WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical turbulence simulations

  1. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence for optical systems with extended sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Majid; Hranilovic, Steve

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the method of random wave vectors for simulation of atmospheric turbulence is extended to 2D×2D space to provide spatial degrees of freedom at both input and output planes. The modified technique can thus simultaneously simulate the turbulence-induced log-amplitude and phase distortions for optical systems with extended sources either implemented as a single large aperture or multiple apertures. The reliability of our simulation technique is validated in different conditions and its application is briefly investigated in a multibeam free-space optical communication scenario.

  2. Mesoscale Optical Turbulence simulations at Dome C

    CERN Document Server

    Lascaux, F; Hagelin, S; Stoesz, J

    2009-01-01

    These last years ground-based astronomy has been looking towards Antarctica, especially its summits and the internal continental plateau where the optical turbulence (OT) appears to be confined in a shallow layer close to the surface. Preliminary measurements have so far indicated pretty good value for the seeing above 30-35 m: 0.36" (Agabi et al. 2006), 0.27" (Lawrence et al. 2004) and 0.3" (Trinquet et al. 2008) at Dome C. Site testing campaigns are however extremely expensive, instruments provide only local measurements and atmospheric modeling might represent a step ahead towards the search and selection of astronomical sites thanks to the possibility to reconstruct 3D Cn2 maps over a surface of several kilometers. The Antarctic Plateau represents therefore an important benchmark test to evaluate the possibility to discriminate sites on the same plateau. Our group (Hagelin et al. 2008) has proven that the analyses from the ECMWF global model do not describe with the required accuracy the antarctic boundar...

  3. Laboratory simulation of atmospheric turbulence-induced optical wavefront distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Travis S.; Gregory, Don A.

    2002-11-01

    Real-time liquid crystal television-based technique for simulating optical wavefront distortion due to atmospheric turbulence is presented and demonstrated. A liquid crystal television (LCTV) operating in the "phase mostly" mode was used as an array of spatially correlated phase delays. A movie of the arrays in motion was then generated and displayed on the LCTV. The turbulence simulation system was verified by passing a collimated and doubled diode pumped Nd:YVO 4 laser beam (532 nm) through the transparent LCTV screen. The beam was then passed through a lens and the power spectra of the turbulence information carrying beam was detected as a measure of the far-field distribution. The same collimated laser beam, without the LCTV, was also transmitted down an open-air range and the power spectra detected as a measure of a real far-field distribution. Accepted turbulence parameters were measured for both arrangements and then compared.

  4. Mesoscale optical turbulence simulations at Dome C: refinements

    CERN Document Server

    Lascaux, Franck; Hagelin, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper the authors presented an extended study aiming at simulating the classical meteorological parameters and the optical turbulence at Dome C during the winter with the atmospherical mesoscale model Meso-NH. A statistical analysis has been presented and the conclusions of that paper have been very promising. Wind speed and temperature fields revealed to be very well reconstructed by the Meso-NH model with better performances than what has been achieved with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) global model, especially near the surface. All results revealed to be resolution-dependent and it has been proved that a grid-nesting configuration (3 domains) with a high horizontal resolution (1km) for the innermost domain is necessary to reconstruct all the optical turbulence features with a good correlation to measurements. High resolution simulations provided an averaged surface layer thickness just ~14 m higher than what is estimated by measurements, the seeing in the free at...

  5. Wave optics approach for incoherent imaging simulation through distributed turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Thomas A.; Voelz, David G.

    2013-09-01

    An approach is presented for numerically simulating incoherent imaging using coherent wave optics propagation methods. The approach employs averaging of irradiance from uncorrelated coherent waves to produce incoherent results. Novel aspects of the method include 1) the exploitation of a spatial windowing feature in the wave optics numerical propagator to limit the angular spread of the light and 2) a simple propagation scaling concept to avoid aliased field components after the focusing element. Classical linear systems theory is commonly used to simulate incoherent imaging when it is possible to incorporate aberrations and/or propagation medium characteristics into an optical transfer function (OTF). However, the technique presented here is useful for investigating situations such as "instantaneous" short-exposure imaging through distributed turbulence and phenomena like anisoplanatism that are not easily modeled with the typical linear systems theory. The relationships between simulation variables such as spatial sampling, source and aperture support, and intermediate focal plane are discussed and the requirement or benefits of choosing these in certain ways are demonstrated.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Optical Turbulence Using an Advanced Atmospheric Prediction Model: Implications for Adaptive Optics Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliss, R.

    2014-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical telescopes and reducing the data quality of optical imaging and communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so numerical simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using a multi-node linux cluster using the Intel chip architecture. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution and centered on the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) of the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. The Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) TKE scheme has been modified to diagnose the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of the Richardson number, following observations by Kondo and others. This modification

  7. Current status and challenges in optical turbulence simulations in various layers of the Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Nunalee, Christopher G.; Basu, Sukanta; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we present a brief review on the existing approaches for optical turbulence estimation in various layers of the Earth's atmosphere. The advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are also discussed. An alternative approach, based on mesoscale modeling with parameterized turbulence, is proposed and tested for the simulation of refractive index structure parameter (C2n ) in the atmospheric boundary layer. The impacts of a few atmospheric flow phenomena (e.g., low-level jets, island wake vortices, gravity waves) on optical turbulence are discussed. Consideration of diverse geographic settings (e.g., flat terrain, coastal region, ocean islands) makes this study distinct.

  8. Validation of Optical Turbulence Simulations from a Numerical Weather Prediction Model in Support of Adaptive Optics Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from large astronomical telescopes and possibly reducing data quality of air to air laser communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using the Maui High Performance Computing Centers Jaws cluster. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution over a domain covering the islands of Maui and the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. We are interested in the variations in Cn2 and the Fried Coherence Length (ro) between the summits of Haleakala and Mauna Loa. Over six months of simulations have been performed over this area. Simulations indicate that

  9. Simulation of turbulences and fog effects on the free space optical link inside of experimental box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latal, Jan; Vitasek, Jan; Hajek, Lukas; Vanderka, Ales; Koudelka, Petr; Kepak, Stanislav; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with problematic of Free Space Optical (FSO) Links. The theoretical part describes the effects of atmospheric transmission environment on these FSO connections. The practical part is focused on the creation of an appropriate experimental workplace for turbulences simulation (mechanical and thermal turbulences), fog effects and subsequent measurement of these effects. For definition how big impact these effects on the FSO system have is used the statistical analysis and simulation software Optiwave. Overall there were tested three optical light sources operating at wavelengths of 632.8 nm, 850 nm and 1550 nm respectively. Influences of simulated atmospheric effects on the signal attenuation were observed. Within the frame of simulation in Optiwave software there were studied influences of attenuation on given wavelengths in form of FSO link transmission parameters degradation. Also for the purposes of real measurements it was necessary to fabricate an experimental box. This box was constructed with sizes of 2.5 and 5 meters and was used for simulation of atmospheric environment.

  10. On the simulation and mitigation of anisoplanatic optical turbulence for long range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Russell C.; LeMaster, Daniel A.

    2017-05-01

    We describe a numerical wave propagation method for simulating long range imaging of an extended scene under anisoplanatic conditions. Our approach computes an array of point spread functions (PSFs) for a 2D grid on the object plane. The PSFs are then used in a spatially varying weighted sum operation, with an ideal image, to produce a simulated image with realistic optical turbulence degradation. To validate the simulation we compare simulated outputs with the theoretical anisoplanatic tilt correlation and differential tilt variance. This is in addition to comparing the long- and short-exposure PSFs, and isoplanatic angle. Our validation analysis shows an excellent match between the simulation statistics and the theoretical predictions. The simulation tool is also used here to quantitatively evaluate a recently proposed block- matching and Wiener filtering (BMWF) method for turbulence mitigation. In this method block-matching registration algorithm is used to provide geometric correction for each of the individual input frames. The registered frames are then averaged and processed with a Wiener filter for restoration. A novel aspect of the proposed BMWF method is that the PSF model used for restoration takes into account the level of geometric correction achieved during image registration. This way, the Wiener filter is able fully exploit the reduced blurring achieved by registration. The BMWF method is relatively simple computationally, and yet, has excellent performance in comparison to state-of-the-art benchmark methods.

  11. Mesoscale optical turbulence simulations above Dome C, Dome A and South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Lascaux, Franck; Hagelin, Susanna; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.17709.x

    2010-01-01

    In two recent papers the mesoscale model Meso-NH, joint with the Astro-Meso-NH package, has been validated at Dome C, Antarctica, for the characterization of the optical turbulence. It has been shown that the meteorological parameters (temperature and wind speed, from which the optical turbulence depends on) as well as the Cn2 profiles above Dome C were correctly statistically reproduced. The three most important derived parameters that characterize the optical turbulence above the internal antarctic plateau: the surface layer thickness, the seeing in the free-atmosphere and in the total atmosphere showed to be in a very good agreement with observations. Validation of Cn2 has been performed using all the measurements of the optical turbulence vertical distribution obtained in winter so far. In this paper, in order to investigate the ability of the model to discriminate between different turbulence conditions for site testing, we extend the study to two other potential astronomical sites in Antarctica: Dome A ...

  12. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  13. Multilevel turbulence simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tziperman, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors propose a novel method for the simulation of turbulent flows, that is motivated by and based on the Multigrid (MG) formalism. The method, called Multilevel Turbulence Simulations (MTS), is potentially more efficient and more accurate than LES. In many physical problems one is interested in the effects of the small scales on the larger ones, or in a typical realization of the flow, and not in the detailed time history of each small scale feature. MTS takes advantage of the fact that the detailed simulation of small scales is not needed at all times, in order to make the calculation significantly more efficient, while accurately accounting for the effects of the small scales on the larger scale of interest. In MTS, models of several resolutions are used to represent the turbulent flow. The model equations in each coarse level incorporate a closure term roughly corresponding to the tau correction in the MG formalism that accounts for the effects of the unresolvable scales on that grid. The finer resolution grids are used only a small portion of the simulation time in order to evaluate the closure terms for the coarser grids, while the coarse resolution grids are then used to accurately and efficiently calculate the evolution of the larger scales. The methods efficiency relative to direct simulations is of the order of the ratio of required integration time to the smallest eddies turnover time, potentially resulting in orders of magnitude improvement for a large class of turbulence problems.

  14. Collisions and turbulence in optical rogue wave formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genty, G.; de Sterke, C.M.; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    We discuss optical rogue wave generation in terms of collisions and turbulence processes. Simulations of picosecond pulse propagation in optical fibres show rogue soliton generation from either third-order dispersion or Raman scattering independently. Simulations of rogue soliton emergence...

  15. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence layers with phase screens by JAVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Chen, Wenqin; Yu, Xin; Yan, Jixiang

    2008-03-01

    In multiconjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO), the phase screens are used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers to study the optimal turbulence delamination and the determination of layer boundary position. In this paper, the method of power spectrum inversion and sub-harmonic compensation were used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers and results can be shown by grey map. The simulation results showed that, with the increase of turbulence layers, the RMS of adaptive system decreased, but the amplitude diminished. So the atmospheric turbulence can be split into 2-3 layers and be modeled by phase screens. Otherwise, a small simulation atmospheric turbulence delamination system was realized by JAVA.

  16. The world's largest turbulence simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Iapichino, Luigi; Hammer, Nicolay J

    2016-01-01

    Understanding turbulence is critical for a wide range of terrestrial and astrophysical applications. Here we present first results of the world's highest-resolution simulation of turbulence ever done. The current simulation has a grid resolution of 10048^3 points and was performed on 65536 compute cores on SuperMUC at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ). We present a scaling test of our modified version of the FLASH code, which updates the hydrodynamical equations in less than 3 micro seconds per cell per time step. A first look at the column density structure of the 10048^3 simulation is presented and a detailed analysis is provided in a forthcoming paper.

  17. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance, a co....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence.......A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance......, a correct spectral shape, and non-Gaussian statistics, is selected in order to evaluate the model turbulence. An actual turbulence record is analyzed in detail providing both a standard for comparison and input statistics for the generalized spectral analysis, which in turn produces a set of orthonormal...

  18. Optical Rogue Waves in Vortex Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Christopher J; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present a spatio-temporal mechanism for producing 2D optical rogue waves in the presence of a turbulent state with creation, interaction and annihilation of optical vortices. Spatially periodic structures with bound phase lose stability to phase unbound turbulent states in complex Ginzburg- Landau and Swift-Hohenberg models with external driving. When the pumping is high and the external driving is low, synchronized oscillations are unstable and lead to spatio-temporal turbulence with high excursions in amplitude. Nonlinear amplification leads to rogue waves close to turbulent optical vortices, where the amplitude tends to zero, and to probability distribution functions with long tails typical of extreme optical events.

  19. Modified-Dewan Optical Turbulence Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    for infomation Ortln end Repaot 1070-1uS). 1215 JeffereonDevie Htgiway. Stdte 1204. Anilngton, VA 22202-4302. Reepondenteshoridbe awae that...suggestions and discussions concerning the challenges of working with optical turbulence data and developing parameterizations to improve optical...2 used as the baseline for expressing the optical turbulence design criteria for optical systems . The CLEAR1 parameterization is composed of three

  20. Nonstationary multiscale turbulence simulation based on local PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghi, Alessandro; Cenedese, Angelo; Masiero, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Turbulence simulation methods are of fundamental importance for evaluating the performance of control strategies for Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. In order to obtain a reliable evaluation of the performance a statistically accurate turbulence simulation method has to be used. This work generalizes a previously proposed method for turbulence simulation based on the use of a multiscale stochastic model. The main contributions of this work are: first, a multiresolution local PCA representation is considered. In typical operating conditions, the computational load for turbulence simulation is reduced approximately by a factor of 4, with respect to the previously proposed method, by means of this PCA representation. Second, thanks to a different low resolution method, based on a moving average model, the wind velocity can be in any direction (not necessarily that of the spatial axes). Finally, this paper extends the simulation procedure to generate, if needed, turbulence samples by using a more general model than that of the frozen flow hypothesis.

  1. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H; Bondur, Valery G; Leung, Pak T; Prandke, H; Vithanage, D

    2007-01-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed ~100 m spectral anomalies in km^2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2x10^4 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence ma...

  2. Global simulations of magnetorotational turbulence II: turbulent energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetorotational turbulence draws its energy from gravity and ultimately releases it via dissipation. However, the quantitative details of this energy flow have not been assessed for global disk models. In this work we examine the energetics of a well-resolved, three-dimensional, global magnetohydrodynamic accretion disk simulation by evaluating statistically-averaged mean-field equations for magnetic, kinetic, and internal energy using simulation data. The results reveal that turbulent magnetic (kinetic) energy is primarily injected by the correlation between Maxwell (Reynolds) stresses and shear in the (almost Keplerian) mean flow, and removed by dissipation. This finding differs from previous work using local (shearing-box) models, which indicated that turbulent kinetic energy was primarily sourced from the magnetic energy reservoir. Lorentz forces provide the bridge between the magnetic and kinetic energy reservoirs, converting ~ 1/5 of the total turbulent magnetic power input into turbulent kinetic ener...

  3. Simulation and modeling of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B; Lumley, John L

    1996-01-01

    This book provides students and researchers in fluid engineering with an up-to-date overview of turbulent flow research in the areas of simulation and modeling. A key element of the book is the systematic, rational development of turbulence closure models and related aspects of modern turbulent flow theory and prediction. Starting with a review of the spectral dynamics of homogenous and inhomogeneous turbulent flows, succeeding chapters deal with numerical simulation techniques, renormalization group methods and turbulent closure modeling. Each chapter is authored by recognized leaders in their respective fields, and each provides a thorough and cohesive treatment of the subject.

  4. Turbulent Transitions in Optical Wave Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierangeli, D; Di Mei, F; Di Domenico, G; Agranat, A J; Conti, C; DelRe, E

    2016-10-28

    We report the direct observation of the onset of turbulence in propagating one-dimensional optical waves. The transition occurs as the disordered hosting material passes from being linear to one with extreme nonlinearity. As the response grows, increased wave interaction causes a modulational unstable quasihomogeneous flow to be superseded by a chaotic and spatially incoherent one. Statistical analysis of high-resolution wave behavior in the turbulent regime unveils the emergence of concomitant rogue waves. The transition, observed in a photorefractive ferroelectric crystal, introduces a new and rich experimental setting for the study of optical wave turbulence and information transport in conditions dominated by large fluctuations and extreme nonlinearity.

  5. Gyrokinetic simulations of ETG Turbulence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevins, William

    2005-10-01

    Recent gyrokinetic simulations of electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence [1,2] produced different results despite similar plasma parameters. Ref.[1] differs from Ref.[2] in that [1] eliminates magnetically trapped particles ( r/R=0 ), while [2] retains magnetically trapped particles ( r/R 0.18 ). Differences between [1] and [2] have been attributed to insufficient phase-space resolution and novel physics associated with toroidicity and/or global simulations[2]. We have reproduced the results reported in [2] using a flux-tube, particle-in-cell (PIC) code, PG3EQ[3], thereby eliminating global effects as the cause of the discrepancy. We observe late-time decay of ETG turbulence and the steady-state heat transport in agreement with [2], and show this results from discrete particle noise. Discrete particle noise is a numerical artifact, so both the PG3EQ simulations reported here and those reported in Ref.[2] have little to say about steady-state ETG turbulence and the associated anomalous electron heat transport. Our attempts to benchmark PIC and continuum[4] codes at the plasma parameters used in Ref.[2] produced very large, intermittent transport. We will present an alternate benchmark point for ETG turbulence, where several codes reproduce the same transport levels. Parameter scans about this new benchmark point will be used to investigate the parameter dependence of ETG transport and to elucidate saturation mechanisms proposed in Refs.[1,2] and elsewhere[5-7].*In collaboration with A. Dimits (LLNL), J. Candy, C. Estrada-Mila (GA), W. Dorland (U of MD), F. Jenko, T. Dannert (Max-Planck Institut), and G. Hammett (PPPL). Work at LLNL performed for US DOE under Contract W7405-ENG-48.[1] F. Jenko and W. Dorland, PRL 89, 225001 (2002).[2] Z. Lin et al, 2004 Sherwood Mtg.; 2004 TTF Mtg.; Fusion Energy 2004 (IAEA, Vienna, 2005); Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. (November, 2004); 2005 TTF Mtg.; 2005 Sherwood Mtg.; Z. Lin, et al, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056125 (2005). [3] A.M. Dimits

  6. Optical Turbulence above the Internal Antarctic Plateau

    CERN Document Server

    Masciadri, E; Hagelin, S; Moigne, P Le; Noilhan, J

    2010-01-01

    The internal antarctic plateau revealed in the last years to be a site with interesting potentialities for the astronomical applications due to the extreme dryness and low temperatures, the typical high altitude of the plateau, the weak level of turbulence in the free atmosphere down to a just few tens of meters from the ground and the thin optical turbulence layer developed at the ground. The main goal of a site testing assessment above the internal antarctic plateau is to characterize the site (optical turbulence and classical meteorological parameters) and to quantify which is the gain we might obtain with respect to equivalent astronomical observations done above mid-latitude sites to support plans for future astronomical facilities. Our group is involved, since a few years, in studies related to the assessment of this site for astronomical applications that include the characterization of the meteorological parameters and optical turbulence provided by general circulation models as well as mesoscale atmo...

  7. Imposing resolved turbulence in CFD simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, L.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    In large‐eddy simulations, the inflow velocity field should contain resolved turbulence. This paper describes and analyzes two methods for imposing resolved turbulence in the interior of the domain in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations. The intended application of the methods is to impose...... resolved turbulence immediately upstream of the region or structure of interest. Comparing to the alternative of imposing the turbulence at the inlet, there is a large potential to reduce the computational cost of the simulation by reducing the total number of cells. The reduction comes from a lower demand...... of modifying the source terms. None of the two methods can impose synthetic turbulence with good results, but it is shown that by running the turbulence field through a short precursor simulation, very good results are obtained. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  8. A computer-based simulator of the atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyaev, Petr A.

    2015-11-01

    Computer software for modeling the atmospheric turbulence is developed on the basis of a time-varying random medium simulation algorithm and a split-step Fourier transform method for solving a wave propagation equation. A judicious choice of the simulator parameters, like the velocity of the evolution and motion of the medium, turbulence spectrum and scales, enables different effects of a random medium on the optical wavefront to be simulated. The implementation of the simulation software is shown to be simple and efficient due to parallel programming functions from the MKL Intel ® Parallel Studio libraries.

  9. A computationally efficient autoregressive method for generating phase screens with frozen flow and turbulence in optical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Srinath, Sriakr; Rudy, Alexander R; Ammons, S Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present a sample-based, autoregressive (AR) method for the generation and time evolution of atmospheric phase screens that is computationally efficient and uses a single parameter per Fourier mode to vary the power contained in the frozen flow and stochastic components. We address limitations of Fourier-based methods such as screen periodicity and low spatial frequency power content. Comparisons of adaptive optics (AO) simulator performance when fed AR phase screens and translating phase screens reveal significantly elevated residual closed-loop temporal power for small increases in added stochastic content at each time step, thus displaying the importance of properly modeling atmospheric "boiling". We present preliminary evidence that our model fits to AO telemetry are better reflections of real conditions than the pure frozen flow assumption.

  10. Optical rogue waves and soliton turbulence in nonlinear fibre optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genty, G.; Dudley, J. M.; de Sterke, C. M.

    2009-01-01

    We examine optical rogue wave generation in nonlinear fibre propagation in terms of soliton turbulence. We show that higher-order dispersion is sufficient to generate localized rogue soliton structures, and Raman scattering effects are not required.......We examine optical rogue wave generation in nonlinear fibre propagation in terms of soliton turbulence. We show that higher-order dispersion is sufficient to generate localized rogue soliton structures, and Raman scattering effects are not required....

  11. Simulating Supersonic Turbulence in Galaxy Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Scannapieco, Evan

    2010-01-01

    We present three-dimensional, adaptive mesh simulations of dwarf galaxy out- flows driven by supersonic turbulence. Here we develop a subgrid model to track not only the thermal and bulk velocities of the gas, but also its turbulent velocities and length scales. This allows us to deposit energy from supernovae directly into supersonic turbulence, which acts on scales much larger than a particle mean free path, but much smaller than resolved large-scale flows. Unlike previous approaches, we are able to simulate a starbursting galaxy modeled after NGC 1569, with realistic radiative cooling throughout the simulation. Pockets of hot, diffuse gas around individual OB associations sweep up thick shells of material that persist for long times due to the cooling instability. The overlapping of high-pressure, rarefied regions leads to a collective central outflow that escapes the galaxy by eating away at the exterior gas through turbulent mixing, rather than gathering it into a thin, unstable shell. Supersonic, turbul...

  12. Large-eddy simulations of contrails in a turbulent atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Picot

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the evolution of contrails in the vortex and dissipation regimes is studied by means of fully three-dimensional large-eddy simulation (LES coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking method to treat the ice phase. This is the first paper where fine-scale atmospheric turbulence is generated and sustained by means of a stochastic forcing that mimics the properties of stably stratified turbulent flows as those occurring in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere. The initial flow-field is composed by the turbulent background flow and a wake flow obtained from separate LES of the jet regime. Atmospheric turbulence is the main driver of the wake instability and the structure of the resulting wake is sensitive to the intensity of the perturbations, primarily in the vertical direction. A stronger turbulence accelerates the onset of the instability, which results in shorter contrail decent and more effective mixing in the interior of the plume. However, the self-induced turbulence that is produced in the wake after the vortex break-up dominates over background turbulence at the end of the vortex regime and dominates the mixing with ambient air. This results in global microphysical characteristics such as ice mass and optical depth that are be slightly affected by the intensity of atmospheric turbulence. On the other hand, the background humidity and temperature have a first order effect on the survival of ice crystals and particle size distribution, which is in line with recent and ongoing studies in the literature.

  13. Laser beam shaping limitations for laboratory simulation of turbulence using a phase-only spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent approaches to demonstrating adaptive optics and atmospheric turbulence have made use of spatial light modulators (SLMs) as the active phase element. However, there are limitations in using SLMs as an accurate method of simulating turbulence...

  14. Large eddy simulation of stably stratified turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Stable stratification turbulence, as a common phenomenon in atmospheric and oceanic flows, is an important mechanism for numerical prediction of such flows. In this paper the large eddy simulation is utilized for investigating stable stratification turbulence numerically. The paper is expected to provide correct statistical results in agreement with those measured in the atmosphere or ocean. The fully developed turbulence is obtained in the stable stratification fluid by large eddy simulation with different initial velocity field and characteristic parameters, i.e. Reynolds number Re and Froude number Fr. The evolution of turbulent kinetic energy, characteristic length scales and parameters is analyzed for investigating the development of turbulence in stable stratification fluid. The three-dimensional energy spectra, horizontal and vertical energy spectrum, are compared between numerical simulation and real observation in the atmosphere and ocean in order to test the reliability of the numerical simulation. The results of numerical cases show that the large eddy simulation is capable of predicting the properties of stable stratification turbulence in consistence with real measurements at less computational cost. It has been found in this paper that the turbulence can be developed under different initial velocity conditions and the internal wave energy is dominant in the developed stable stratification turbulence. It is also found that the characteristic parameters must satisfy certain conditions in order to have correct statistical property of stable stratification turbulence in the atmosphere and ocean. The Reynolds number and Froude number are unnecessarily equal to those in atmosphere or ocean, but the Reynolds number must be large enough, say, greater than 10 2 , and Froude number must be less than 0.1. The most important parameter is ReFr 2 which must be greater than 10.

  15. General optical scintillation in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruizhong Rao

    2008-01-01

    A general expression of the scintillation index is proposed for optical wave propagating in turbulent atmosphere under arbitrary fluctuation conditions. The expression depends on extreme behaviors of the scintillation indices under both weak and strong fluctuations. The maximum scintillation index in the onset region and the corresponding Rytov index can be evaluated from the general expression. Plane and spherical waves in the cases of zero and non-zero turbulence inner scale are given as examples for illustration of the general behaviors of scintillation indices.

  16. Direct numerical simulation of compressible isotropic turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Xinliang(李新亮); FU; Dexun(傅德薰); MAYanwen(马延文)

    2002-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of decaying compressible isotropic turbulence at tur-bulence Mach numbers of Mt = 0.2-0.7 and Taylor Reynolds numbers of 72 and 153 is per-formed by using the 7th order upwind-biased difference and 8th order center difference schemes.Results show that proper upwind-biased difference schemes can release the limit of "start-up"problem to Mach numbers.Compressibility effects on the statistics of turbulent flow as well as the mechanics of shockletsin compressible turbulence are also studied, and the conclusion is drawn that high Mach numberleads to more dissipation. Scaling laws in compressible turbulence are also analyzed. Evidence isobtained that scaling laws and extended self similarity (ESS) hold in the compressible turbulentflow in spite of the presence of shocklets, and compressibility has little effect on scaling exponents.

  17. Optical Intensity Interferometry through Atmospheric Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Peng Kian; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrowband spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photon detectors (APDs), the Solar $g^{(2)}(\\tau)$ signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of $g^{(2)}(\\tau) = 1.693 \\pm 0.003$ from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement scheme...

  18. Optical intensity interferometry through atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, P. K.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrow-band spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photodiodes, the Solar g(2)(τ) signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of g(2)(τ) = 1.693 ± 0.003 from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  20. Vortex Simulation of Turbulent Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-19

    TURBULENT COMBUSTION (AFOSR Grant No. 89-0491) Principal Investigator: Ahmed F. Ghoniem Department of Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of...Heavy Industries, Nagoya, Japan.(talk and discussion). 17. 1990, Mazda Motor Co., Yokohama, Japan, (talk and discussion). 18. 1990, American Math Society...VORTICITY LAYERS UNDER NON-SYMMETRIC CONDITIONS Omar M. Kniot and Ahmed F. Ghoniem Department of Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of

  1. Simulation and optimisation of turbulence in stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xanthopoulos, Pavlos; Helander, Per; Turkin, Yuriy; Plunk, Gabriel G.; Bird, Thomas; Proll, Josefine H.E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Mynick, Harry [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Jenko, Frank; Goerler, Tobias; Told, Daniel [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    In tokamaks and stellarators - two leading types of devices used in fusion research - magnetic field lines trace out toroidal surfaces on which the plasma density and temperature are constant, but turbulent fluctuations carry energy across these surfaces to the wall, thus degrading the plasma confinement. Using petaflop-scale simulations, we calculate for the first time the pattern of turbulent structures forming on stellarator magnetic surfaces, and find striking differences relative to tokamaks. The observed sensitivity of the turbulence to the magnetic geometry suggests that there is room for further confinement improvement, in addition to measures already taken to minimise the laminar transport. With an eye towards fully optimised stellarators, we present a proof-of-principle configuration with substantially reduced turbulence compared to an existing design.

  2. Optical Turbulence Characterization at LAMOST Site: Observations and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, L -Y; Yao, Y -Q; Vernin, J; Chadid, M; Wang, H -S; Yin, J; Wang, Y -P

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence seriously limits the performance of high angular resolution instruments. An 8-night campaign of measurements was carried out at the LAMOST site in 2011, to characterize the optical turbulence. Two instruments were set up during the campaign: a Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) used to measure the total atmospheric seeing, and a Single Star Scidar (SSS) to measure the vertical profiles of the turbulence C_n^2(h) and the horizontal wind velocity V(h). The optical turbulence parameters are also calculated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the Trinquet-Vernin model, which describes optical effects of atmospheric turbulence by using the local meteorological parameters. This paper presents assessment of the optical parameters involved in high angular resolution astronomy. Its includes seeing, isoplanatic angle, coherence time, coherence etendue, vertical profiles of optical turbulence intensity _n^2(h)$ and horizontal wind speed V(h). The median...

  3. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  4. Discontinuous Galerkin Methods for Turbulence Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, S. Scott

    2002-01-01

    A discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is formulated, implemented, and tested for simulation of compressible turbulent flows. The method is applied to turbulent channel flow at low Reynolds number, where it is found to successfully predict low-order statistics with fewer degrees of freedom than traditional numerical methods. This reduction is achieved by utilizing local hp-refinement such that the computational grid is refined simultaneously in all three spatial coordinates with decreasing distance from the wall. Another advantage of DG is that Dirichlet boundary conditions can be enforced weakly through integrals of the numerical fluxes. Both for a model advection-diffusion problem and for turbulent channel flow, weak enforcement of wall boundaries is found to improve results at low resolution. Such weak boundary conditions may play a pivotal role in wall modeling for large-eddy simulation.

  5. Numerical simulation of turbulent slurry flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghgoo, Mohammad Reza; Spiteri, Reymond J.; Bergstrom, Donlad J.

    2016-11-01

    Slurry flows, i.e., the flow of an agglomeration of liquid and particles, are widely employed in many industrial applications, such as hydro-transport systems, pharmaceutical batch crystallizers, and wastewater disposal. Although there are numerous studies available in the literature on turbulent gas-particle flows, the hydrodynamics of turbulent liquid-particle flows has received much less attention. In particular, the fluid-phase turbulence modulation due to the particle fluctuating motion is not yet well understood and remains challenging to model. This study reports the results of a numerical simulation of a vertically oriented slurry pipe flow using a two-fluid model based on the kinetic theory of granular flows. The particle stress model also includes the effects of frictional contact. Different turbulence modulation models are considered, and their capability to capture the characteristic features of the turbulent flow is assessed. The model predictions are validated against published experimental data and demonstrate the significant effect of the particles on the fluid-phase turbulence.

  6. Setting up a liquid crystal phase screen to simulate atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Michael K.; Seward, Anthony J.; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Rha, Jungtae; Jimenez, Ray

    2000-11-01

    Phase screens are often used to simulate atmospheric turbulence in systems designed to test adaptive optics techniques. This paper presents the design and implementation of a dynamic phase screen using a simple and inexpensive twisted nematic liquid crystal display taken from a video projector and placed in a pupil plane. The details of the optical system layout, the system alignment procedure, and the operating parameters of the liquid crystal display are discussed. Examples of turbulence (having strength and statistics similar to measured values of atmospheric turbulence in a variety of scenarios) are written to the phase screen, and the effects of the turbulence on image quality are measured and presented.

  7. Velocity fields and optical turbulence near the boundary in a strongly convective laboratory flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Hellman, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Boundary layers around moving underwater vehicles or other platforms can be a limiting factor for optical communication. Turbulence in the boundary layer of a body moving through a stratified medium can lead to small variations in the index of refraction, which impede optical signals. As a first step towards investigating this boundary layer effect on underwater optics, we study the flow near the boundary in the Rayleigh-Bénard laboratory tank at the Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center. The tank is set up to generate temperature-driven, i.e., convective turbulence, and allows control of the turbulence intensity. This controlled turbulence environment is complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations to visualize and quantify multi-scale flow patterns. The boundary layer dynamics in the laboratory tank are quantified using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to examine the boundary layer velocities and turbulence parameters. The velocity fields and flow dynamics from the PIV are compared to the numerical model and show the model to accurately reproduce the velocity range and flow dynamics. The temperature variations and thus optical turbulence effects can then be inferred from the model temperature data. Optical turbulence is also visible in the raw data from the PIV system. The newly collected data are consistent with previously reported measurements from high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers (Nortek Vectrino), as well as fast thermistor probes and novel next-generation fiber-optics temperature sensors. This multi-level approach to studying optical turbulence near a boundary, combining in-situ measurements, optical techniques, and numerical simulations, can provide new insight and aid in mitigating turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission.

  8. CUDA Simulation of Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John V.; Shum, Victor; Fu, Terry

    2011-01-01

    We discuss very fast Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) simulations of ideal homogeneous incompressible turbulence based on Fourier models. These models have associated statistical theories that predict that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. Prior numerical simulations have shown that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We review the theoretical basis of this "broken ergodicity" as applied to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence. Our new simulations examine the phenomenon of broken ergodicity through very long time and large grid size runs performed on a state-of-the-art CUDA platform. Results comparing various CUDA hardware configurations and grid sizes are discussed. NS and MHD results are compared.

  9. Improved Climatological Characterization of Optical Turbulence for Space Optical Imaging and Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    2010-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical or other telescopes. In addition, the quality of service of a free space optical communications link may also be impacted. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, particularly for OCONUS locations, so simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using the Maui High Performance Computing Centers (MHPCC) Mana cluster. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution over a domain covering several hundreds of kilometers. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. We are interested in the variations in Cn2 and the Fried Coherence Length (ro). Nearly two years of simulations have been performed over various regions

  10. Large Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Wind turbines operate in the turbulent boundary layer of the atmosphere and due to the rotational sampling effect the blades experience a high level of turbulence [1]. In this project the effect of turbulence is investigated by large eddy simulations of the turbulent flow past a NACA 0015 airfoil...

  11. Flamelet Regime Diagram for Turbulent Combustion Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai Lee; Ihme, Matthias; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    The flamelet model has been widely used in numerical combustion investigations, particularly for the closure of large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent reacting flows. In most cases, the simulation results demonstrated good agreements with their experimental counterparts. However, a systematic analysis of the flamelet model's applicability, as well as its potential limitations, is seldom conducted, and the model performance is usually based only on a-posteriori comparisons. The objective of this work is to derive a metric that can formally quantify the suitability of the flamelet model in different flame configurations. For this purpose, a flamelet regime diagram has been developed and studied in the context of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a turbulent lifted jet flame. The implementation of the regime diagram in LES has been investigated through explicit filtering of the DNS results.

  12. On Challenges for Hypersonic Turbulent Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, H C; Sjogreen, B

    2009-01-14

    This short note discusses some of the challenges for design of suitable spatial numerical schemes for hypersonic turbulent flows, including combustion, and thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows. Often, hypersonic turbulent flows in re-entry space vehicles and space physics involve mixed steady strong shocks and turbulence with unsteady shocklets. Material mixing in combustion poses additional computational challenges. Proper control of numerical dissipation in numerical methods beyond the standard shock-capturing dissipation at discontinuities is an essential element for accurate and stable simulations of the subject physics. On one hand, the physics of strong steady shocks and unsteady turbulence/shocklet interactions under the nonequilibrium environment is not well understood. On the other hand, standard and newly developed high order accurate (fourth-order or higher) schemes were developed for homogeneous hyperbolic conservation laws and mixed hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs) (without source terms). The majority of finite rate chemistry and thermal nonequilibrium simulations employ methods for homogeneous time-dependent PDEs with a pointwise evaluation of the source terms. The pointwise evaluation of the source term might not be the best choice for stability, accuracy and minimization of spurious numerics for the overall scheme.

  13. The influence of underwater turbulence on optical phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Brandon; Davis, Allen; Kirkendall, Clay; Dandridge, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Emerging underwater optical imaging and sensing applications rely on phase-sensitive detection to provide added functionality and improved sensitivity. However, underwater turbulence introduces spatio-temporal variations in the refractive index of water which can degrade the performance of these systems. Although the influence of turbulence on traditional, non-interferometric imaging has been investigated, its influence on the optical phase remains poorly understood. Nonetheless, a thorough understanding of the spatio-temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through underwater turbulence are crucial to the design of phase-sensitive imaging and sensing systems. To address this concern, we combined underwater imaging with high speed holography to provide a calibrated characterization of the effects of turbulence on the optical phase. By measuring the modulation transfer function of an underwater imaging system, we were able to calibrate varying levels of optical turbulence intensity using the Simple Underwater Imaging Model (SUIM). We then used high speed holography to measure the temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through varying levels of turbulence. Using this method, we measured the variance in the amplitude and phase of the beam, the temporal correlation of the optical phase, and recorded the turbulence induced phase noise as a function of frequency. By bench marking the effects of varying levels of turbulence on the optical phase, this work provides a basis to evaluate the real-world potential of emerging underwater interferometric sensing modalities.

  14. Coherent optical array receiver for PPM signals under atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Fernandez, Michela

    The performance of a coherent free-space optical communications system operating in the presence of turbulence is investigated. Maximum Likelihood Detection techniques are employed to optimally detect Pulse Position Modulated signals with a focal-plane detector array and to reconstruct the turbulence-degraded signals. Laboratory equipment and experimental setup used to carry out these experiments at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are described. The key components include two lasers operating at 1064 nm wavelength for use with coherent detection, a 16 element (4 X 4) InGaAs focal-plane detector array, and a data-acquisition and signal-processing assembly needed to sample and collect the data and analyze the results. The detected signals are combined using the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm. In the first part of the experimental results we show convergence of the algorithm for experimentally obtained signal tones in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. The second part of the experimental results shows adaptive combining of experimentally obtained heterodyned pulse position modulated (PPM) signals with pulse-to-pulse coherence in the presence of simulated spatial distortions resembling atmospheric turbulence. The adaptively combined PPM signals are phased up via an LMS algorithm suitably optimized to operate with PPM in the presence of additive shot noise. A convergence analysis of the algorithm is presented, and results with both computer-simulated and experimentally obtained PPM signals are analyzed. The third part of the experimental results, in which the main goal of this thesis is achieved, includes an investigation of the performance of the Coherent Optical Receiver Experiment (CORE) at JPL. Bit Error Rate (BER) results are presented for single and multichannel optical receivers where quasi shot noise-limited performance is achieved under simulated turbulence conditions using noncoherent postdetection processing techniques. Theoretical BER expressions are

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of reconnection in turbulent astrophysical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmer, Fabien

    2016-07-19

    Turbulence is ubiquitous at large-Reynolds-number astrophysical plasmas like in the Solar corona. In such environments, the turbulence is thought to enhance the energy conversion rate by magnetic reconnection above the classical model predictions. Since turbulence cannot be simulated together with the large scale behaviour of the plasma, magnetic reconnection is studied through the average properties of turbulence. A Reynolds-averaged turbulence model is explored in which turbulence is self-sustained and -generated by the large scales (mean-) field inhomogeneities. Employing that model, the influence of turbulence is investigated by large-scale MHD numerical simulations solving evolution equations of the energy and cross-helicity of the turbulence together with the MHD equations. Magnetic reconnection is found to be either rapidly enhanced or suppressed by turbulence depending on the turbulence timescale. If the turbulence timescale is self-consistently calculated, reconnection is always strongly enhanced. Since the solar corona bears strong guide magnetic fields perpendicular to the reconnecting magnetic fields, the influences of a strong guide field on turbulent reconnection is separately investigated. A slow down of reconnection, obtained in the presence of a finite guide field, can be understood by a finite residual helicity working against the enhancement of reconnection by the turbulence. The influence of turbulence on magnetic reconnection is further studied by means of high resolution simulations of plasmoid-unstable current sheets. These simulations revealed the importance of turbulence for reaching fast reconnection.

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-15

    Application to an HCCI Engine . Proceedings of the 4th Joint Meeting of the U.S. Sections of the Combustion Institute, 2005. [34] K. Fieweger...LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF TURBULENT COMBUSTION Principle Investigator: Heinz Pitsch Flow Physics and Computation Department of Mechanical Engineering ...burners and engines found in modern, industrially relevant equipment. In the course of this transition of LES from a scientifically interesting method

  17. Large Eddy Simulation of SGS Turbulent Kinetic Energy and SGS Turbulent Dissipation in a Backward-Facing Step Turbulent Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兵; 张会强; 王希麟

    2004-01-01

    The instantaneous and time-averaged statistic characteristics of the sub-grid scale (SGS) turbulent kinetic energy and SGS dissipation in a backward-facing step turbulent flow have been studied bylarge eddy simulation. The SGS turbulent kinetic energy and SGS turbulent dissipation vary in different flow regions and decrease with the flow developing spatially. The fluid molecular dissipation shares about 14% to 28% of the whole dissipation.

  18. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  19. Direct numerical simulation of axisymmetric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Bo; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Naso, Aurore

    2017-09-01

    The dynamics of decaying, strictly axisymmetric, incompressible turbulence is investigated using direct numerical simulations. It is found that the angular momentum is a robust invariant of the system. It is further shown that long-lived coherent structures are generated by the flow. These structures can be associated with stationary solutions of the Euler equations. The structures obey relations in agreement with predictions from selective decay principles, compatible with the decay laws of the system. Two different types of decay scenarios are highlighted. The first case results in a quasi-two-dimensional flow with a dynamical behavior in the poloidal plane similar to freely decaying two-dimensional turbulence. In a second regime, the long-time dynamics is dominated by a single three-dimensional mode.

  20. Efficient Turbulence Modeling for CFD Wake Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul

    , that can accurately and efficiently simulate wind turbine wakes. The linear k-ε eddy viscosity model (EVM) is a popular turbulence model in RANS; however, it underpredicts the velocity wake deficit and cannot predict the anisotropic Reynolds-stresses in the wake. In the current work, nonlinear eddy...... viscosity models (NLEVM) are applied to wind turbine wakes. NLEVMs can model anisotropic turbulence through a nonlinear stress-strain relation, and they can improve the velocity deficit by the use of a variable eddy viscosity coefficient, that delays the wake recovery. Unfortunately, all tested NLEVMs show...... numerically unstable behavior for fine grids, which inhibits a grid dependency study for numerical verification. Therefore, a simpler EVM is proposed, labeled as the k-ε - fp EVM, that has a linear stress-strain relation, but still has a variable eddy viscosity coefficient. The k-ε - fp EVM is numerically...

  1. Hermes: Global plasma edge fluid turbulence simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dudson, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The transport of heat and particles in the relatively collisional edge regions of magnetically confined plasmas is a scientifically challenging and technologically important problem. Understanding and predicting this transport requires the self-consistent evolution of plasma fluctuations, global profiles and flows, but the numerical tools capable of doing this in realistic (diverted) geometry are only now being developed. Here a 5-field reduced 2-fluid plasma model for the study of instabilities and turbulence in magnetised plasmas is presented, built on the BOUT++ framework. This cold ion model allows the evolution of global profiles, electric fields and flows on transport timescales, with flux-driven cross-field transport determined self-consistently by electromagnetic turbulence. Developments in the model formulation and numerical implementation are described, and simulations are performed in poloidally limited and diverted tokamak configurations.

  2. Adaptive LES Methodology for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleg V. Vasilyev

    2008-06-12

    Although turbulent flows are common in the world around us, a solution to the fundamental equations that govern turbulence still eludes the scientific community. Turbulence has often been called one of the last unsolved problem in classical physics, yet it is clear that the need to accurately predict the effect of turbulent flows impacts virtually every field of science and engineering. As an example, a critical step in making modern computational tools useful in designing aircraft is to be able to accurately predict the lift, drag, and other aerodynamic characteristics in numerical simulations in a reasonable amount of time. Simulations that take months to years to complete are much less useful to the design cycle. Much work has been done toward this goal (Lee-Rausch et al. 2003, Jameson 2003) and as cost effective accurate tools for simulating turbulent flows evolve, we will all benefit from new scientific and engineering breakthroughs. The problem of simulating high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows of engineering and scientific interest would have been solved with the advent of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) techniques if unlimited computing power, memory, and time could be applied to each particular problem. Yet, given the current and near future computational resources that exist and a reasonable limit on the amount of time an engineer or scientist can wait for a result, the DNS technique will not be useful for more than 'unit' problems for the foreseeable future (Moin & Kim 1997, Jimenez & Moin 1991). The high computational cost for the DNS of three dimensional turbulent flows results from the fact that they have eddies of significant energy in a range of scales from the characteristic length scale of the flow all the way down to the Kolmogorov length scale. The actual cost of doing a three dimensional DNS scales as Re{sup 9/4} due to the large disparity in scales that need to be fully resolved. State-of-the-art DNS calculations of isotropic

  3. Localization of angular momentum in optical waves propagating through turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-12-01

    This is the first in a series of papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. The scope of this first paper is much narrower. Here, we demonstrate that atmospheric turbulence can impart non-trivial angular momentum to beams and that this non-trivial angular momentum is highly localized. Furthermore, creation of this angular momentum is a normal part of propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

  4. Detached Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels; Davidson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The effect of resolving inflow turbulence in detached eddy simulations of airfoil flows is studied. Synthetic turbulence is used for inflow boundary condition. The generated turbulence fields are shown to decay according to experimental data as they are convected through the domain with the free ...

  5. Testing turbulent closure models with convection simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Snellman, J E; Mantere, M J; Rheinhardt, M; Dintrans, B

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To compare simple analytical closure models of turbulent Boussinesq convection for stellar applications with direct three-dimensional simulations both in homogeneous and inhomogeneous (bounded) setups. Methods: We use simple analytical closure models to compute the fluxes of angular momentum and heat as a function of rotation rate measured by the Taylor number. We also investigate cases with varying angles between the angular velocity and gravity vectors, corresponding to locating the computational domain at different latitudes ranging from the pole to the equator of the star. We perform three-dimensional numerical simulations in the same parameter regimes for comparison. The free parameters appearing in the closure models are calibrated by two fit methods using simulation data. Unique determination of the closure parameters is possible only in the non-rotating case and when the system is placed at the pole. In the other cases the fit procedures yield somewhat differing results. The quality of the closu...

  6. Aero-optic analysis of anisotropic turbulent boundary layer by direct integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S.; Price, J.; Chen, C. P.; Pond, John E.; Sutton, G. W.

    2013-09-01

    Aero-optic aberrations that effect optical sensor performance and laser beam propagation, can be caused by changes in the index-of-refraction field as the optical wave traverses a compressible non-uniform, turbulent flowfield. Mean flowfield non-uniformities cause bore sight error and blurring and, if the mean flowfield is unsteady, jitter. Turbulence causes blurring and high frequency jitter. Blurring also causes the signal-to-noise ratio to decrease and image distortion, and adversely affects centroid location for precision tracking. The objective of this study is to develop an unified approach for whole-field aero-optics prediction using hybrid LES/RANS (Large Eddy Simulation/Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes) turbulence modeling in combination with a newly formulated optical Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). The whole field turbulence includes the near-vehicle boundary layer mean and turbulence, as well as far-field atmospheric turbulence. A flat plate compressible boundary layer case is used to demonstrate the methodology. the abstract two lines below author names and addresses.

  7. Fade statistics of M-turbulent optical links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado-Navas, Antonio; Maria Garrido-Balsells, Jose; Castillo-Vazquez, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    A new and generalized statistical model, called Malaga or simply M distribution, has been derived recently to characterize the irradiance fluctuations of an unbounded optical wavefront propagating through a turbulent medium under all irradiance fluctuation conditions. The aforementioned model ext...

  8. Turbulence profiling for adaptive optics tomographic reconstructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Douglas J.; Osborn, James; Wilson, Richard W.; Morris, Timothy J.; Butterley, Timothy; Reeves, Andrew P.; Townson, Matthew J.; Gendron, Éric; Vidal, Fabrice; Morel, Carine

    2016-07-01

    To approach optimal performance advanced Adaptive Optics (AO) systems deployed on ground-based telescopes must have accurate knowledge of atmospheric turbulence as a function of altitude. Stereo-SCIDAR is a high-resolution stereoscopic instrument dedicated to this measure. Here, its profiles are directly compared to internal AO telemetry atmospheric profiling techniques for CANARY (Vidal et al. 20141), a Multi-Object AO (MOAO) pathfinder on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), La Palma. In total twenty datasets are analysed across July and October of 2014. Levenberg-Marquardt fitting algorithms dubbed Direct Fitting and Learn 2 Step (L2S; Martin 20142) are used in the recovery of profile information via covariance matrices - respectively attaining average Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients with stereo-SCIDAR of 0.2 and 0.74. By excluding the measure of covariance between orthogonal Wavefront Sensor (WFS) slopes these results have revised values of 0.65 and 0.2. A data analysis technique that combines L2S and SLODAR is subsequently introduced that achieves a correlation coefficient of 0.76.

  9. 4. Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Channel Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuaki, DOI; Tsukasa, KIMURA; Hiroshima University; Mitsubishi Precision

    1989-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow is studied numerically by using Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). Finite difference method is employed in the LES. The simulation is stably executed by using the 3rd order upwind difference scheme which dissipate numerical errors. Several pilot tests are performed in order to investigate the effect of numerical dissipation and the wall damping function on the calculated results. Time dependent feature and turbulent flow structures in a turbulent channel flow are numerically ...

  10. An analogy between optical turbulence and activator-inhibitor dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Spineanu, F

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of laser beams through madia with cubic nonlinear polarization is part of a wide range of practical applications. The processes that are involved are at the limit of extreme (cuasi-singular) concentration of intensity and the transversal modulational instability, the saturation and defocusing effect of the plasma generated through avalanche and multi-photon (MPI) ionization are competing leading to a complicated pattern of intensity in the transversal plane. This regime has been named \\textquotedblleft optical turbulence\\textquotedblright and it has been studied in experiments and numerical simulations. Led by the similarity of the portraits we have investigated the possibility that the mechanism that underlies the creation of the complex pattern of the intensity field is the manifestation of the dynamics \\textit{activator-inhibitor}. In a previous work we have considered a unique connection, the \\textit{complex Landau-Ginzburg equation}, a common ground for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation ...

  11. Axisymmetric Vortex Simulations with Various Turbulence Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Howard Fiedler

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The CFD code FLUENTTM has been applied to a vortex within an updraft above a frictional lower boundary. The sensitivity of vortex intensity and structure to the choice of turbulent model is explored. A high Reynolds number of 108 is employed to make the investigation relevant to the atmospheric vortex known as a tornado. The simulations are axisymmetric and are integrated forward in time to equilibrium.  In a variety of turbulence models tested, the Reynolds Stress Model allows for the greatest intensification of the vortex, with the azimuthal wind speed near the surface being 2.4 times the speed of the updraft, consistent with the destructive nature of tornadoes.  The Standard k-e Model, which is simpler than the Reynolds Stress Model but still more detailed than what is commonly available in numerical weather prediction models, produces an azimuthal wind speed near the surface of at most 0.6 times the updraft speed.        

  12. Large Eddy Simulations of Severe Convection Induced Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nash'at; Proctor, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Convective storms can pose a serious risk to aviation operations since they are often accompanied by turbulence, heavy rain, hail, icing, lightning, strong winds, and poor visibility. They can cause major delays in air traffic due to the re-routing of flights, and by disrupting operations at the airports in the vicinity of the storm system. In this study, the Terminal Area Simulation System is used to simulate five different convective events ranging from a mesoscale convective complex to isolated storms. The occurrence of convection induced turbulence is analyzed from these simulations. The validation of model results with the radar data and other observations is reported and an aircraft-centric turbulence hazard metric calculated for each case is discussed. The turbulence analysis showed that large pockets of significant turbulence hazard can be found in regions of low radar reflectivity. Moderate and severe turbulence was often found in building cumulus turrets and overshooting tops.

  13. Study of the Temperature Turbulences Effect upon Optical Beam in Atmospheric Optical Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dvorak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the study of the effect of temperature turbulences upon the optical beam. The polarization parameters of optical radiation sources and different optical beam states of polarization have been investigated. The obtained polarization parameters are projected on the Poincare sphere by means of Stokes vectors. The optical power distribution curves of optical beams are processed into diagrams. The horizontal and vertical components of linearly and circularly polarized optical beams have been studied. The turbulence flux has vertical direction and the optical beam is propagating through an atmosphere environment with three different states of turbulence. The evaluation of the obtained data was done by means of variance and correlation functions computing. Different rates of effect of temperature turbulences upon horizontal and vertical components were found. To reduce the rate of effect the advantage of an optical beam with circular polarization has been proposed.

  14. Optical Turbulence Characterization by WRF model above Ali, Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongshuai; Yao, Yongqiang; Liu, Liyong; Qian, Xuan; Yin, Jia

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence modeling and forecast for astronomy is a relatively recent discipline, but has played important roles in site survey, optimization of large telescope observing tables, and in the applications of adaptive optics technique. The numerical approach, by using of meteorological parameters and parameterization of optical turbulence, can provide all the optical turbulence parameters related, such as C2n profile, coherent length, wavefront coherent time, seeing, isoplanatic angle, and so on. This is particularly interesting for searching new sites without the long and expensive site testing campaigns with instruments. Earlier site survey results by the site survey team of National Astronomical Observatories of China imply that the south-west Tibet, Ali, is one of the world best IR and sub-mm site. For searching the best site in Ali area, numerical approach by Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model had been used to evaluate the climatology of the optical turbulence. The WRF model is configured over a domain 200km×200km with 1km horizontal resolution and 65 vertical levels from ground to the model top(10millibars) in 2010. The initial and boundary conditions for the model are provided by the 1° × 1° Global Final Analysis data from NCEP. The distribution and seasonal variation of optical turbulence parameters over this area are presented.

  15. Optical turbulence forecast: toward a new era of ground-based astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Masciadri, E

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of the optical turbulence (OT) for astronomical applications obtained with non-hydrostatic atmospherical models at meso-scale presents, with respect to measurements, some advantages. The future of the ground-based astronomy relies upon the potentialities and feasibility of the ELTs. Our ability in knowing, controlling and 'managing' the effects of the turbulence on such a new generation telescopes and facilities are determinant to assure their competitiveness with respect to the space astronomy. In the past several studies have been carried out proving the feasibility of the simulation of realistic Cn2 profiles above astronomical sites. The European Community (FP6 Program) decided recently to fund a Project aiming, from one side, to prove the feasibility of the OT forecasts and the ability of meso-scale models in discriminating astronomical sites from optical turbulence point of view and, from the other side, to boost the development of this discipline at the borderline between the astrophysics...

  16. Simulations and Transport Models for Imbalanced Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chung-Sang; Dennis, T.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a series of three-dimensional simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence based on reduced MHD equations. Alfven waves are launched from both ends of a long tube along the background uniform magnetic field so that turbulence develops due to collision between counter propagating Alfven waves in the interior region. Waves are launched randomly with specified correlation time Tc such that the length of the tube, L, is greater than (but of the same order of) VA *Tc such that turbulence can fill most of the tube. While waves at both ends are launched with equal power, turbulence generated is imbalanced in general, with normalized cross-helicity gets close to -1 at one end and 1 at the other end. This simulation setup allows easier comparison of turbulence properties with one-dimensional turbulence transport models, which have been applied rather successfully in modeling solar wind turbulence. However, direct comparison of such models with full simulations of solar wind turbulence is difficult due to much higher level of complexity involved. We will present our latest simulations at different resolutions with decreasing dissipation (resistivity and viscosity) levels and compare with model outputs from turbulence transport models. This work is supported by a NASA Grant NNX15AU61G.

  17. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  18. Adaptive Optics Simulations for Siding Spring

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwin, Michael; Lambert, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Using an observational derived model optical turbulence profile (model-OTP) we have investigated the performance of Adaptive Optics (AO) at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO), Australia. The simulations cover the performance for AO techniques of single conjugate adaptive optics (SCAO), multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) and ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO). The simulation results presented in this paper predict the performance of these AO techniques as applied to the Australian National University (ANU) 2.3 m and Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) 3.9 m telescopes for astronomical wavelength bands J, H and K. The results indicate that AO performance is best for the longer wavelengths (K-band) and in the best seeing conditions (sub 1-arcsecond). The most promising results are found for GLAO simulations (field of view of 180 arcsecs), with the field RMS for encircled energy 50% diameter (EE50d) being uniform and minimally affected by the free-atmosphere turbulence. The GLAO performance is reasonably good over...

  19. A Novel Statistical Channel Model for Turbulence-Induced Fading in Free-Space Optical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Aminikashani, Mohammadreza; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new probability distribution function which accurately describes turbulence-induced fading under a wide range of turbulence conditions. The proposed model, termed Double Generalized Gamma (Double GG), is based on a doubly stochastic theory of scintillation and developed via the product of two Generalized Gamma (GG) distributions. The proposed Double GG distribution generalizes many existing turbulence channel models and provides an excellent fit to the published plane and spherical waves simulation data. Using this new statistical channel model, we derive closed form expressions for the outage probability and the average bit error as well as corresponding asymptotic expressions of free-space optical communication systems over turbulence channels. We demonstrate that our derived expressions cover many existing results in the literature earlier reported for Gamma-Gamma, Double-Weibull and K channels as special cases.

  20. Scintillation index of optical wave propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rao Rui-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    A concise expression of the scintillation index is proposed for a plane optical wave and a spherical optical wave both propagating in a turbulent atmosphere with a zero inner scale and a finite inner scale under an arbitrary fluc- tuation condition. The expression is based on both the results in the Rytov approximation under a weak fluctuation condition and the numerical results in a strong fluctuation regime. The maximum value of the scintillation index and its corresponding Rytov index axe evaluated. These quantities are affected by the ratio of the turbulence inner scale to the Frcsnel size.

  1. Nonlinear random optical waves: Integrable turbulence, rogue waves and intermittency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randoux, Stéphane; Walczak, Pierre; Onorato, Miguel; Suret, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    We examine the general question of statistical changes experienced by ensembles of nonlinear random waves propagating in systems ruled by integrable equations. In our study that enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, we specifically focus on optical fiber systems accurately described by the integrable one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We consider random complex fields having a Gaussian statistics and an infinite extension at initial stage. We use numerical simulations with periodic boundary conditions and optical fiber experiments to investigate spectral and statistical changes experienced by nonlinear waves in focusing and in defocusing propagation regimes. As a result of nonlinear propagation, the power spectrum of the random wave broadens and takes exponential wings both in focusing and in defocusing regimes. Heavy-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics are observed in focusing regime while low-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics are observed in defocusing regime. After some transient evolution, the wave system is found to exhibit a statistically stationary state in which neither the probability density function of the wave field nor the spectrum changes with the evolution variable. Separating fluctuations of small scale from fluctuations of large scale both in focusing and defocusing regimes, we reveal the phenomenon of intermittency; i.e., small scales are characterized by large heavy-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics, while the large ones are almost Gaussian.

  2. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF PULSATING TURBULENT OPEN CHANNEL FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Li-yong; LIU Nan-sheng; LU Xi-yun

    2004-01-01

    Pulsating turbulent open channel flow has been investigated by the use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique coupled with dynamic Sub-Grid-Scale (SGS) model for turbulent SGS stress to closure the governing equations. Three-dimensional filtered Navier-Stokes equations are numerically solved by a fractional-step method. The objective of this study is to deal with the behavior of the pulsating turbulent open channel flow and to examine the reliability of the LES approach for predicting the pulsating turbulent flow. In this study, the Reynolds number (Reτ ) is chosen as 180 based on the friction velocity and the channel depth. The frequency of the driving pressure gradient for the pulsating turbulent flow ranges low, medium and high value. Statistical turbulence quantities as well as the flow structures are analyzed.

  3. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Global Turbulent Transport Properties in Tokamak Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.X.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.; Ethier, S.; Lewandowski, J.L.V.; Rewoldt, G.; Hahm, T.S.; Manickam, J.

    2006-01-01

    A general geometry gyro-kinetic model for particle simulation of plasma turbulence in tokamak experiments is described. It incorporates the comprehensive influence of noncircular cross section, realistic plasma profiles, plasma rotation, neoclassical (equilibrium) electric fields, and Coulomb collisions. An interesting result of global turbulence development in a shaped tokamak plasma is presented with regard to nonlinear turbulence spreading into the linearly stable region. The mutual interaction between turbulence and zonal flows in collisionless plasmas is studied with a focus on identifying possible nonlinear saturation mechanisms for zonal flows. A bursting temporal behavior with a period longer than the geodesic acoustic oscillation period is observed even in a collisionless system. Our simulation results suggest that the zonal flows can drive turbulence. However, this process is too weak to be an effective zonal flow saturation mechanism.

  4. Optical phase distortion due to turbulent-fluid density fields - Quantification using the small-aperture beam technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumper, E. J.; Hugo, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    This paper discusses the small-aperture beam technique, a relatively new way of experimentally quantifying optically-active, turbulent-fluid-flow-induced optical degradation. The paper lays out the theoretical basis for the technique, and the relationship of the measured jitter of the beam to optical path difference. A numerical simulation of a two-dimensional heated jet is used to explore the validity of beam jitter to obtain optical path difference in a flow region where eddy production constitutes the major character of the 'turbulent' flow field.

  5. Experimental demonstration of single-mode fiber coupling over relatively strong turbulence with adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Liu, Chao; Xian, Hao

    2015-10-10

    High-speed free-space optical communication systems using fiber-optic components can greatly improve the stability of the system and simplify the structure. However, propagation through atmospheric turbulence degrades the spatial coherence of the signal beam and limits the single-mode fiber (SMF) coupling efficiency. In this paper, we analyze the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the SMF coupling efficiency over various turbulences. The results show that the SMF coupling efficiency drops from 81% without phase distortion to 10% when phase root mean square value equals 0.3λ. The simulations of SMF coupling with adaptive optics (AO) indicate that it is inevitable to compensate the high-order aberrations for SMF coupling over relatively strong turbulence. The SMF coupling efficiency experiments, using an AO system with a 137-element deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor, obtain average coupling efficiency increasing from 1.3% in open loop to 46.1% in closed loop under a relatively strong turbulence, D/r0=15.1.

  6. Optical diagnostics for turbulent and multiphase flows: Particle image velocimetry and photorefractive optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Shagam, R.N.; Blanchat, T.K.; Chu, T.Y.; Tassin-Leger, A.L.; Henderson, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project ``Optical Diagnostics for Turbulent and Multiphase Flows.`` Advanced optical diagnostics have been investigated and developed for flow field measurements, including capabilities for measurement in turbulent, multiphase, and heated flows. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) includes several techniques for measurement of instantaneous flow field velocities and associated turbulence quantities. Nonlinear photorefractive optical materials have been investigated for the possibility of measuring turbulence quantities (turbulent spectrum) more directly. The two-dimensional PIV techniques developed under this LDRD were shown to work well, and were compared with more traditional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Three-dimensional PIV techniques were developed and tested, but due to several experimental difficulties were not as successful. The photorefractive techniques were tested, and both potential capabilities and possible problem areas were elucidated.

  7. Parallel Simulation of 3-D Turbulent Flow Through Hydraulic Machinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宇; 吴玉林

    2003-01-01

    Parallel calculational methods were used to analyze incompressible turbulent flow through hydraulic machinery. Two parallel methods were used to simulate the complex flow field. The space decomposition method divides the computational domain into several sub-ranges. Parallel discrete event simulation divides the whole task into several parts according to their functions. The simulation results were compared with the serial simulation results and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental results. The results give the distribution and configuration of the complex vortices and illustrate the effectiveness of the parallel algorithms for numerical simulation of turbulent flows.

  8. Numerical simulation of wall-bounded turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, P.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in three dimensional, time dependent numerical simulation of turbulent flows bounded by a wall are reviewed. Both direct and large eddy simulation techniques are considered within the same computational framework. The computational spatial grid requirements as dictated by the known structure of turbulent boundary layers are presented. The numerical methods currently in use are reviewed and some of the features of these algorithms, including spatial differencing and accuracy, time advancement, and data management are discussed. A selection of the results of the recent calculations of turbulent channel flow, including the effects of system rotation and transpiration on the flow are included.

  9. SQUID and magneto-optic investigations of flux turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblischka, M.R.; Johansen, T.H.; Baziljevich, M.

    2000-01-01

    Instabilities of the critical state ("turbulence") are observed in various high-T-c, single crystals by means of magneto-optic (MO) imaging. Using the same samples as in the MO investigations, we observe for the first time characteristic steps in the magnetic moment measured by means of a SQUID s...

  10. Optimal threshold detection for Málaga turbulent optical links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado-Navas, Antonio; Garrido-Balsellss, José María; del Castillo Vázquez, Miguel;

    2016-01-01

    A new and generalized statistical model, called Málaga distribution (M distribution), has been derived recently to characterize the irradiance fluctuations of an unbounded optical wave front propagating through a turbulent medium under all irradiance fluctuation conditions. As great advantages as...

  11. Coherent Structures in Numerically Simulated Plasma Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed-Hansen, O.; Pécseli, H.L.; Trulsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Low level electrostatic ion acoustic turbulence generated by the ion-ion beam instability was investigated numerically. The fluctuations in potential were investigated by a conditional statistical analysis revealing propagating coherent structures having the form of negative potential wells which...

  12. Characterisation of the Optical Turbulence at Siding Spring

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwin, Michael; Lambert, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the optical turbulence profile above Siding Spring Observatory were conducted during 2005 and 2006. This effort was largely motivated by the need to predict the statistical performance of adaptive optics at Siding Spring. The data were collected using a purpose-built instrument based on the slope-detection and ranging method (SLODAR) where observations of a bright double star are imaged by Shack-Hartmann taken with the Australian National University 24 inch and 40 inch telescopes. The analysis of the data yielded a model consisting of a handful of statistically prominent thin layers that are statistically separated into the ground layer (37.5, 250m) and the free atmosphere (1, 3, 6, 9, 13.5 km) for good (25%), typical (50%) and bad (25%) observing conditions. We found that ground-layer turbulence dominates the turbulence profile with up to 80% of the integrated turbulence below 500 m. The turbulence tends to be non-Kolmogorov, especially for the ground-layer with a power law index of $\\beta \\s...

  13. Measurements of optical underwater turbulence under controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaev, A. V.; Gladysz, S.; Almeida de Sá Barros, R.; Matt, S.; Nootz, G. A.; Josset, D. B.; Hou, W.

    2016-05-01

    Laser beam propagation underwater is becoming an important research topic because of high demand for its potential applications. Namely, ability to image underwater at long distances is highly desired for scientific and military purposes, including submarine awareness, diver visibility, and mine detection. Optical communication in the ocean can provide covert data transmission with much higher rates than that available with acoustic techniques, and it is now desired for certain military and scientific applications that involve sending large quantities of data. Unfortunately underwater environment presents serious challenges for propagation of laser beams. Even in clean ocean water, the extinction due to absorption and scattering theoretically limit the useful range to few attenuation lengths. However, extending the laser light propagation range to the theoretical limit leads to significant beam distortions due to optical underwater turbulence. Experiments show that the magnitude of the distortions that are caused by water temperature and salinity fluctuations can significantly exceed the magnitude of the beam distortions due to atmospheric turbulence even for relatively short propagation distances. We are presenting direct measurements of optical underwater turbulence in controlled conditions of laboratory water tank using two separate techniques involving wavefront sensor and LED array. These independent approaches will enable development of underwater turbulence power spectrum model based directly on the spatial domain measurements and will lead to accurate predictions of underwater beam propagation.

  14. DNSLab: A gateway to turbulent flow simulation in Matlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, V.; Keskinen, K.

    2016-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research is increasingly much focused towards computationally intensive, eddy resolving simulation techniques of turbulent flows such as large-eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS). Here, we present a compact educational software package called DNSLab, tailored for learning partial differential equations of turbulence from the perspective of DNS in Matlab environment. Based on educational experiences and course feedback from tens of engineering post-graduate students and industrial engineers, DNSLab can offer a major gateway to turbulence simulation with minimal prerequisites. Matlab implementation of two common fractional step projection methods is considered: the 2d Fourier pseudo-spectral method, and the 3d finite difference method with 2nd order spatial accuracy. Both methods are based on vectorization in Matlab and the slow for-loops are thus avoided. DNSLab is tested on two basic problems which we have noted to be of high educational value: 2d periodic array of decaying vortices, and 3d turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 180. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is possibly the first to investigate efficiency of a 3d turbulent, wall bounded flow in Matlab. The accuracy and efficiency of DNSLab is compared with a customized OpenFOAM solver called rk4projectionFoam. Based on our experiences and course feedback, the main contribution of DNSLab consists of the following features. (i) The very compact Matlab implementation of present Navier-Stokes solvers provides a gateway to efficient learning of both, physics of turbulent flows, and simulation of turbulence. (ii) Only relatively minor prerequisites on fluid dynamics and numerical methods are required for using DNSLab. (iii) In 2d, interactive results for turbulent flow cases can be obtained. Even for a 3d channel flow, the solver is fast enough for nearly interactive educational use. (iv) DNSLab is made openly available and thus contributing to

  15. Determining astronomical seeing conditions at Matjiesfontein by optical and turbulence methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickola, M [Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) Space Geodesy Programme, PO Box 443, Krugersdorp 1740 (South Africa); Esau, I [G.C. Rieber Climate Institute of the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC), Thoermohlensgate 47, N-5006 Bergen (Norway); Djolov, G [University of Pretoria, Department of Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2010-08-15

    Matjiesfontein in the Karoo has been proposed as a suitable location for a new fundamental space geodetic observatory. On-site geodetic equipment will include a Lunar Laser Ranger (LLR). LLR requires sub-arcsecond optical seeing conditions for delivery of high quality and quantity data. Seeing conditions at the Matjiesfontein site will be evaluated by making use of an automated seeing monitor and by modelling atmospheric turbulence with Large Eddy Simulation Nansen Center Improved Code (LESNIC).

  16. Numerical simulation of multi-fluid shock-turbulence interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yifeng; Jaberi, Farhad; Livescu, Daniel; Li, Zhaorui

    2017-01-01

    Accurate numerical simulation of multi-fluid Shock-Turbulence Interaction (STI) is conducted by a hybrid monotonicity preserving-compact finite difference scheme for a detailed study of STI in variable density flows. Theoretical and numerical assessments of data confirm that all turbulence scales as well as the STI are well captured by the computational method. Comparison of multi-fluid and single-fluid data indicates that the turbulent kinetic energy is amplified more and the scalar mixing is enhanced more by the shock in flows involving two different fluids/densities when compared with those observed in single-fluid flows.

  17. Computational Methods for Predictive Simulation of Stochastic Turbulence Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-05

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0363 Computational Methods for Predictive Simulation of Stochastic Turbulence Systems Catalin Trenchea UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH...STOCHASTIC TURBULENCE SYSTEMS AFOSR GRANT FA 9550-12-1-0191 William Layton and Catalin Trenchea Department of Mathematics University of Pittsburgh...During Duration of Grant Nan Jian Graduate student, Univ . of Pittsburgh (currently Postdoc at FSU) Sarah Khankan Graduate student, Univ . of Pittsburgh

  18. On numerical turbulence generation for test-particle simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Tautz, R. C.; Dosch, A.

    2013-01-01

    A modified method is presented to generate artificial magnetic turbulence that is used for test-particle simulations. Such turbulent fields are obtained from the superposition of a set of wave modes with random polarizations and random directions of propagation. First, it is shown that the new method simultaneously fulfils requirements of isotropy, equal mean amplitude and variance for all field components, and vanishing divergence. Second, the number of wave modes required for a stochastic p...

  19. Numerical models and experiment of air flow in a simulation box for optical wireless communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latal Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors focused on real measurements of mechanical turbulence generated by ventilators in the simulation box for Optical Wireless Communications. The mechanical turbulences disturb the optical beam that propagates along the central axis of the simulation box. The aim of authors is to show the effect of mechanical turbulence on optical beams at different heights in the simulation box. In the Ansys Fluent, we created numerical models which were then compared with real measurements. Authors compared the real and numerical models according to statistical methods.

  20. Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of Protostellar Jets and Turbulent Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Tricco, Terrence S; Federrath, Christoph; Bate, Matthew R

    2013-01-01

    We presents results from Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics simulations of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and dynamo amplification of the magnetic field in the presence of Mach 10 magnetised turbulence. Our star formation simulations have produced, for the first time ever, highly collimated magnetised protostellar jets from the first hydrostatic core phase. Up to 40% of the initial core mass may be ejected through this outflow. The primary difficulty in performing these simulations is maintaining the divergence free constraint of the magnetic field, and to address this issue, we have developed a new divergence cleaning method which has allowed us to stably follow the evolution of these protostellar jets for long periods. The simulations performed of supersonic MHD turbulence are able to exponentially amplify magnetic energy by up to 10 orders of magnitude via turbulent dynamo. To reduce numerical dissipation, a new shock detection algorithm is utilised which is able to track magnetic shocks throughout ...

  1. Observations and Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    2006-12-01

    Alfvénic fluctuations are a ubiquitous component of the solar wind. Evidence from many spacecraft indicates that the fluctuations are convected out of the solar corona with relatively flat power spectra and constitute a source of free energy for a turbulent cascade of magnetic and kinetic energy to high wave numbers. Observations and simulations support the conclusion that the cascade evolves most rapidly in the vicinity of velocity shears and current sheets. Numerical solutions of the magnetohydrodynamic equations have elucidated the role of expansion on the evolution of the turbulence. Such studies are clarifying not only how a turbulent cascade develops, but also the nature of the symmetries of the turbulence. Of particular interest is the origin of the two-component correlation function of magnetic fluctuations that was deduced from ISEE-3 data. A central issue to be resolved is whether the correlation function indicates the existence of a quasi-two- dimensional component of the turbulence, or reflects another origin, such as pressure-balanced structures or small velocity shears. In our efforts to simulate solar wind turbulence we have included a tilted rotating current heliospheric sheet as well as variety of waves (e.g., Alfvénic, quasi-two-dimensional, pressure balance structures) and microstreams. These simulations have replicated many of the observations, but challenges remain.

  2. Turbulence dissipation challenge: particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y.; Germaschewski, K.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss application of three particle in cell (PIC) codes to the problems relevant to turbulence dissipation challenge. VPIC is a fully kinetic code extensively used to study a variety of diverse problems ranging from laboratory plasmas to astrophysics. PSC is a flexible fully kinetic code offering a variety of algorithms that can be advantageous to turbulence simulations, including high order particle shapes, dynamic load balancing, and ability to efficiently run on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Finally, HYPERS is a novel hybrid (kinetic ions+fluid electrons) code, which utilizes asynchronous time advance and a number of other advanced algorithms. We present examples drawn both from large-scale turbulence simulations and from the test problems outlined by the turbulence dissipation challenge. Special attention is paid to such issues as the small-scale intermittency of inertial range turbulence, mode content of the sub-proton range of scales, the formation of electron-scale current sheets and the role of magnetic reconnection, as well as numerical challenges of applying PIC codes to simulations of astrophysical turbulence.

  3. Quantification of Modelling Uncertainties in Turbulent Flow Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edeling, W.N.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to make predictive simulations with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, i.e. simulations with a systematic treatment of model and data uncertainties and their propagation through a computational model to produce predictions of quantities of interest w

  4. Quantification of Modelling Uncertainties in Turbulent Flow Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edeling, W.N.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to make predictive simulations with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, i.e. simulations with a systematic treatment of model and data uncertainties and their propagation through a computational model to produce predictions of quantities of interest

  5. Modelling and prediction of non-stationary optical turbulence behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doelman, Niek; Osborn, James

    2016-07-01

    There is a strong need to model the temporal fluctuations in turbulence parameters, for instance for scheduling, simulation and prediction purposes. This paper aims at modelling the dynamic behaviour of the turbulence coherence length r0, utilising measurement data from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument installed at the Isaac Newton Telescope at La Palma. Based on an estimate of the power spectral density function, a low order stochastic model to capture the temporal variability of r0 is proposed. The impact of this type of stochastic model on the prediction of the coherence length behaviour is shown.

  6. Orbital angular momentum in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-11-21

    This is the second of two papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. In the companion paper, it is shown that propagation through atmospheric turbulence can create non-trivial angular momentum. Here, we extend the result and demonstrate that this momentum is, at least in part, orbital angular momentum. Specifically, we demonstrate that branch points (in the language of the adaptive optic community) indicate the presence of photons with non-zero OAM. Furthermore, the conditions required to create photons with non-zero orbital angular momentum are ubiquitous. The repercussions of this statement are wide ranging and these are cursorily enumerated.

  7. EO Signal Propagation in a Simulated Underwater Turbulence Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    scattering I. INTRODUCTION Recent research on underwater vision and optical, as well as acoustical signal propagation suggests better understanding is...most astronomy , as well as reconnaissance imaging needs. However, this is not the case for the most oceanic turbulence study, unless vertical

  8. Optical tomography system for laboratory turbulence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMackin, Lenore J.; Pierson, Robert E.; Hugo, Ronald J.; Truman, C. Randall

    1998-10-01

    We describe the design and operation of a high speed optical tomography system for measuring 2D images of a dynamic phase object at a rate of 5 kHz. Data from a set of eight Hartmann wavefront sensors is back-projected to produce phase images showing the details of the inner structure of a heated air flow. Series of reconstructions at different downstream locations illustrate the development of flow structure and the effect of acoustic flow forcing.

  9. Numerical simulation of the characteristics of turbulent Taylor vortex flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiantao; PAN Jiazhen; CHEN Liqing; SHI Yan; CHEN Wenmei; CHU Liangyin

    2007-01-01

    Turbulent Taylor vortex flow,which is contained between a rotating inner cylinder and a coaxial fixed outer cylinder with fixed ends,is simulated by applying the development in Reynolds stress equations mold (RSM) of the micro-perturbation.This resulted from the truncation error between the numerical solution and exact solution of the Reynolds stress equations.Based on the numerical simulation results of the turbulent Taylor vortex flow,its characteristics such as the fluctuation of the flow field,the precipitous drop of azimuthal velocity,the jet flow of radial velocity,the periodicity of axial velocity,the wave periodicity of pressure distribution,the polarization of shear stress on the walls,and the turbulence intensity in the jet region,are discussed.Comparing the pilot results measured by previous methods,the relative error of the characteristics predicted by simulation is less than 30%.

  10. SIMULATION OF NOx FORMATION IN TURBULENT SWIRLING COMBUSTION USING A USM TURBULENCE-CHEMISTRY MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周力行; 乔丽; 张健

    2003-01-01

    A unified second-order moment (USM) turbulence-chemistry model for simulating NOx formation in turbulent combustion is proposed.All of correlations,including the correlation of the reaction-rate coefficient fluctuation with the concentration fluctuation,are closed by the transport equations in the same form.This model discards the approximation of series expansion of the exponential function or the approximation of using the product of several 1-D PDF's instead of a joint PDF.It is much simpler than other refined models,such as the PDF transport equation model and the conditional moment closure model.The proposed model is used to simulate methane-air swirling turbulent combustion and NOx formation.The prediction results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Compressible Jets

    OpenAIRE

    Semlitsch, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic noise pollution is an environmental aggressor in everyday life. Aero- dynamically generated noise annoys and was linked with health issues. It may be caused by high-speed turbulent free flows (e.g. aircraft jet exhausts), by airflow interacting with solid surfaces (e.g. fan noise, wind turbine noise), or it may arise within a confined flow environment (e.g. air ventilation systems, refrigeration systems). Hence, reducing the acoustic noise levels would result in a better life quality...

  12. Numerical Simulations of Driven Supersonic Relativistic MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zrake, Jonathan; 10.1063/1.3621748

    2011-01-01

    Models for GRB outflows invoke turbulence in relativistically hot magnetized fluids. In order to investigate these conditions we have performed high-resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations of relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical (RMHD) turbulence. We find that magnetic energy is amplified to several percent of the total energy density by turbulent twisting and folding of magnetic field lines. Values of epsilon_B near 1% are thus naturally expected. We study the dependence of saturated magnetic field energy fraction as a function of Mach number and relativistic temperature. We then present power spectra of the turbulent kinetic and magnetic energies. We also present solenoidal (curl-like) and dilatational (divergence-like) power spectra of kinetic energy. We propose that relativistic effects introduce novel couplings between these spectral components. The case we explore in most detail is for equal amounts of thermal and rest mass energy, corresponding to conditions after collisions of shells with re...

  13. Direct simulation of a turbulent oscillating boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalart, Philippe R.; Baldwin, Barrett S.

    1987-01-01

    The turbulent boundary layer driven by a freestream velocity that varies sinusoidally in time around a zero mean is considered. The flow has a rich behavior including strong pressure gradients, inflection points, and reversal. A theory for the velocity and stress profiles at high Reynolds number is formulated. Well-resolved direct Navier-Stokes simulations are conducted over a narrow range of Reynolds numbers, and the results are compared with the theoretical predictions. The flow is also computed over a wide range of Reynolds numbers using a new algebraic turbulence model; the results are compared with the direct simulations and the theory.

  14. Research on diversity receive technology for wireless optical communication using PPM in weak turbulence atmosphere channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Guo-an

    2014-09-01

    In order to mitigate atmospheric turbulence, the free space optical (FSO) system model with spatial diversity is analyzed based on intensity detection pulse position modulation (PPM) in the weak turbulence atmosphere. The slot error rate (SER) calculating formula of the system without diversity is derived under pulse position modulation firstly. Then as a benchmark, independent of identical distribution, the average slot error rates of the three linear combining technologies, which are the maximal ratio combining (MRC), equal gain combining (EGC) and selection combining (SelC), are compared. Simulation results show that the performance of system is the best improved by MRC, followed by EGC, and is poor by SelC, but SelC is simpler and more convenient. Spatial diversity is efficient to improve the performance and has strong ability on resistance to atmospheric channel decline. The above scheme is more suitable for optical wireless communication systems.

  15. Towards Precision LSST Weak-Lensing Measurement - I: Impacts of Atmospheric Turbulence and Optical Aberration

    CERN Document Server

    Tyson, M James Jee And J Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The weak-lensing science of the LSST project drives the need to carefully model and separate the instrumental artifacts from the intrinsic lensing signal. The dominant source of the systematics for all ground based telescopes is the spatial correlation of the PSF modulated by both atmospheric turbulence and optical aberrations. In this paper, we present a full FOV simulation of the LSST images by modeling both the atmosphere and the telescope optics with the most current data for the telescope specifications and the environment. To simulate the effects of atmospheric turbulence, we generated six-layer phase screens with the parameters estimated from the on-site measurements. For the optics, we combined the ray-tracing tool ZEMAX and our simulated focal plane data to introduce realistic aberrations and focal plane height fluctuations. Although this expected flatness deviation for LSST is small compared with that of other existing cameras, the fast f-ratio of the LSST optics makes this focal plane flatness vari...

  16. A new method for simulating atmospheric turbulence for rotorcraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, J. V. R.; Schrage, D. P.; Gaonkar, G. H.; Riaz, J.

    1991-01-01

    Simulation of atmospheric turbulence as seen by a rotating blade element involves treatment of cyclostationary processes. Conventional filtering techniques do not lend themselves well to the generation of such turbulence sample functions as are required in rotorcraft flight dynamics simulation codes. A method to generate sample functions containing second-order statistics of mean and covariance is presented. Compared to ensemble averaging involving excessive computer time, the novelty is to exploit cycloergodicity and thereby, replace ensemble averaging by averaging over a single-path sample function of long duration. The method is validated by comparing its covariance results with the analytical and ensemble-averaged results for a widely used one-dimensional turbulence approximation.

  17. Gyrokinetic simulations of turbulent transport: size scaling and chaotic behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villard, L.; Bottino, A.; Brunner, S.; Casati, A.; Chowdhury, J.; Dannert, T.; Ganesh, R.; Garbet, X.; Görler, T.; Grandgirard, V.; Hatzky, R.; Idomura, Y.; Jenko, F.; Jolliet, S.; Khosh Aghdam, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Latu, G.; McMillan, B. F.; Merz, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Tran, T. M.; Vernay, T.

    2010-12-01

    Important steps towards the understanding of turbulent transport have been made with the development of the gyrokinetic framework for describing turbulence and with the emergence of numerical codes able to solve the set of gyrokinetic equations. This paper presents some of the main recent advances in gyrokinetic theory and computing of turbulence. Solving 5D gyrokinetic equations for each species requires state-of-the-art high performance computing techniques involving massively parallel computers and parallel scalable algorithms. The various numerical schemes that have been explored until now, Lagrangian, Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian, each have their advantages and drawbacks. A past controversy regarding the finite size effect (finite ρ*) in ITG turbulence has now been resolved. It has triggered an intensive benchmarking effort and careful examination of the convergence properties of the different numerical approaches. Now, both Eulerian and Lagrangian global codes are shown to agree and to converge to the flux-tube result in the ρ* → 0 limit. It is found, however, that an appropriate treatment of geometrical terms is necessary: inconsistent approximations that are sometimes used can lead to important discrepancies. Turbulent processes are characterized by a chaotic behaviour, often accompanied by bursts and avalanches. Performing ensemble averages of statistically independent simulations, starting from different initial conditions, is presented as a way to assess the intrinsic variability of turbulent fluxes and obtain reliable estimates of the standard deviation. Further developments concerning non-adiabatic electron dynamics around mode-rational surfaces and electromagnetic effects are discussed.

  18. Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2016-07-15

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties of hydrocarbon fuels, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. The article attempts to provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art DNS of turbulent premixed flames at high Re/Ka conditions, with an emphasis on homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow configurations. Some important qualitative findings from numerical studies are summarized, new analytical approaches to investigate intensely turbulent premixed flame dynamics are discussed, and topics for future research are suggested. © 2016 Taylor & Francis.

  19. Progressive Prediction of Turbulence Using Wave-Front Sensor Data in Adaptive Optics Using Data Mining

    CERN Document Server

    Vyas, Akondi; Prasad, B Raghavendra

    2009-01-01

    Nullifying the servo bandwidth errors improves the strehl ratio by a substantial quantity in adaptive optics systems. An effective method for predicting atmospheric turbulence to reduce servo bandwidth errors in real time closed loop correction systems is presented using data mining. Temporally evolving phase screens are simulated using Kolmogorov statistics and used for data analysis. A data cube is formed out of the simulated time series. Partial data is used to predict the subsequent phase screens using the progressive prediction method. The evolution of the phase amplitude at individual pixels is segmented by implementing the segmentation algorithms and prediction was made using linear as well as non linear regression. In this method, the data cube is augmented with the incoming wave-front sensor data and the newly formed data cube is used for further prediction. The statistics of the prediction method is studied under different experimental parameters like segment size, decorrelation timescales of turbul...

  20. Gaussian beam propagation in anisotropic turbulence along horizontal links: theory, simulation, and laboratory implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xifeng; Voelz, David G; Toselli, Italo; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-05-20

    Experimental and theoretical work has shown that atmospheric turbulence can exhibit "non-Kolmogorov" behavior including anisotropy and modifications of the classically accepted spatial power spectral slope, -11/3. In typical horizontal scenarios, atmospheric anisotropy implies that the variations in the refractive index are more spatially correlated in both horizontal directions than in the vertical. In this work, we extend Gaussian beam theory for propagation through Kolmogorov turbulence to the case of anisotropic turbulence along the horizontal direction. We also study the effects of different spatial power spectral slopes on the beam propagation. A description is developed for the average beam intensity profile, and the results for a range of scenarios are demonstrated for the first time with a wave optics simulation and a spatial light modulator-based laboratory benchtop counterpart. The theoretical, simulation, and benchtop intensity profiles show good agreement and illustrate that an elliptically shaped beam profile can develop upon propagation. For stronger turbulent fluctuation regimes and larger anisotropies, the theory predicts a slightly more elliptical form of the beam than is generated by the simulation or benchtop setup. The theory also predicts that without an outer scale limit, the beam width becomes unbounded as the power spectral slope index α approaches a maximum value of 4. This behavior is not seen in the simulation or benchtop results because the numerical phase screens used for these studies do not model the unbounded wavefront tilt component implied in the analytic theory.

  1. Silicon Optical Modulator Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Thor LIM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We developed a way of predicting and analyzing high speed optical modulator. Our research adopted a bottom-up approach to consider high-speed optical links using an eye diagram. Our method leverages on modular mapping of electrical characteristics to optical characteristics, while attaining the required accuracy necessary for device footprint approaching sub-micron scales where electrical data distribution varies drastically. We calculate for the bias dependent phase shift (2pi/mm and loss (dB/mm for the optical modulator based on the real and imaginary part of complex effective indices. Subsequently, combine effectively both the electrical and optical profiles to construct the optical eye diagram which is the essential gist of signal integrity of such devices.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of particles in a turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ankit; Kumaran, Vishwanathan

    2016-11-01

    Goswami and Kumaran(2009a,b,2011a) studied the effect of fluid turbulence on particle phase in DNS.However,their studies were restricted to one way coupling where the effect of particles on fluid turbulence was not incorporated. We have extended their work by formulating a reverse force treatment through multipole expansion for the particle disturbance to the fluid turbulence.Here,the fluid velocity, strain rate and rotation rate at the particle position are used,as a far field,to calculate the disturbance caused by the particle and relaxing the point particle approximation.The simulations are done at high Stokes number where the fluid velocity fluctuations are uncorrelated over time scales of the particle dynamics.The results indicate that the particle mean velocity and stress are reduced when reverse force is incorporated.Level of reduction increases with mass loading and Stokes number.The variance of particle distribution function is reduced due to reduction in the fluid turbulent intensities.The particle velocity,angular velocity distribution function and stresses are compared for simulations where only the reverse force is incorporated, and where the dipoles are also incorporated, to examine the effect of force dipoles on the fluid turbulence and the particle distributions.

  3. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2012-12-13

    In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

  4. Simulating tidal turbines with mesh optimisation and RANS turbulence models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abolghasemi, A.; Piggott, M.D.; Spinneken, J.; Vire, A.; Cotter, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile numerical model for the simulation of flow past horizontal axis tidal turbines has been developed. Currently most large-scale marine models employed to study marine energy use the shallow water equations and therefore can fail to account for important turbulent physics. The model present

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flows in Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak

    This research is devoted to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), and to lesser extent, wind tunnel measurements of turbulent flows in wind energy. It starts with an introduction to the LES technique associated with the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, discretized using a finite...... Reynolds numbers, and thereafter, the fully-developed infinite wind farm boundary later simulations are performed. Sources of inaccuracy in the simulations are investigated and it is found that high Reynolds number flows are more sensitive to the choice of the SGS model than their low Reynolds number...... of attack. Laminar-turbulent transition, generation of laminar boundary layer separation, and formation of stall cells are investigated. The simulated airfoil characteristics are validated against measurements. It is concluded that the LES computations and wind tunnel measurements are in good agreement...

  6. Lyapunov Exponents and Covariant Vectors for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonigan, Patrick; Murman, Scott; Fernandez, Pablo; Wang, Qiqi

    2016-11-01

    As computational power increases, engineers are beginning to use scale-resolving turbulent flow simulations for applications in which jets, wakes, and separation dominate. However, the chaotic dynamics exhibited by scale-resolving simulations poses problems for the conventional sensitivity analysis and stability analysis approaches that are vital for design and control. Lyapunov analysis is used to study the chaotic behavior of dynamical systems, including flow simulations. Lyapunov exponents are the growth or a decay rate of specific flow field perturbations called the Lyapunov covariant vectors. Recently, the authors have used Lyapunov analysis to study the breakdown in conventional sensitivity analysis and the cost of new shadowing-based sensitivity analysis. The current work reviews Lyapunov analysis and presents new results for a DNS of turbulent channel flow, wall-modeled channel flow, and a DNS of a low pressure turbine blade. Additionally, the implications of these Lyapunov analyses for computing sensitivities of these flow simulations will be discussed.

  7. Nonlinear instability in simulations of Large Plasma Device turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, B; Umansky, M V; Schaffner, D; Joseph, I

    2013-01-01

    Several simulations of turbulence in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Inst. 62, 2875 (1991)] are energetically analyzed and compared with each other and with the experiment. The simulations use the same model, but different axial boundary conditions. They employ either periodic, zero-value, zero-derivative, or sheath axial boundaries. The linear stability physics is different between the scenarios because the various boundary conditions allow the drift wave instability to access different axial structures, and the sheath boundary simulation contains a conducting wall mode instability which is just as unstable as the drift waves. Nevertheless, the turbulence in all the simulations is relatively similar because it is primarily driven by a robust nonlinear instability that is the same for all cases. The nonlinear instability preferentially drives $k_\\parallel = 0$ potential energy fluctuations, which then three-wave couple to $k_\\parallel \

  8. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR THE STEPPED SPILLWAY OVERFLOW WITH TURBULENCE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Stepped spillways have increasingly become a very important measure for flood discharge and energy dissipation. Therefore, the velocity, pressure and other characteristics of the flow on the stepped spillway should be known clearly. But so far the study for the stepped spillway overflow is only based on the model test. In this paper, the stepped spillway overflow was simulated by the Reynolds stress turbulence model. The simulation results were analyzed and compared with measured data, which shows they are satisfactory.

  9. Simulation of shear and turbulence impact on wind turbine performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Courtney, Michael; Larsen, Torben J.;

    Aerodynamic simulations (HAWC2Aero) were used to investigate the influence of the speed shear, the direction shear and the turbulence intensity on the power output of a multi-megawatt turbine. First simulation cases with laminar flow and power law wind speed profiles were compared to the case of ...... may get from a LIDAR mounted on the nacelle of the turbine (measuring upwind) and we investigated different ways of deriving an equivalent wind speed from such measurements....

  10. An atmospheric turbulence generator for dynamic tests with LINC-NIRVANA's adaptive optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschke, D.; Bizenberger, P.; Gaessler, W.; Zhang, X.; Mohr, L.; Baumeister, H.; Diolaiti, E.

    2010-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA[1] (LN) is an instrument for the Large Binocular Telescope[2] (LBT). Its purpose is to combine the light coming from the two primary mirrors in a Fizeau-type interferometer. In order to compensate turbulence-induced dynamic aberrations, the layer oriented adaptive optics system of LN[3] consists of two major subsystems for each side: the Ground-Layer-Wavefront sensor (GLWS) and the Mid- and High-Layer Wavefront sensor (MHLWS). The MHLWS is currently set up in a laboratory at the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg. To test the multi-conjugate AO with multiple simulated stars in the laboratory and to develop the necessary control software, a dedicated light source is needed. For this reason, we designed an optical system, operating in visible as well as in infrared light, which imitates the telescope's optical train (f-ratio, pupil position and size, field curvature). By inserting rotating surface etched glass phase screens, artificial aberrations corresponding to the atmospheric turbulence are introduced. In addition, different turbulence altitudes can be simulated depending on the position of these screens along the optical axis. In this way, it is possible to comprehensively test the complete system, including electronics and software, in the laboratory before integration into the final LINC-NIRVANA setup. Combined with an atmospheric piston simulator, also this effect can be taken into account. Since we are building two identical sets, it is possible to feed the complete instrument with light for the interferometric combination during the assembly phase in the integration laboratory.

  11. Resolving high Reynolds numbers in SPH simulations of subsonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    Accounting for the Reynolds number is critical in numerical simulations of turbulence, particularly for subsonic flow. For Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) with constant artificial viscosity coefficient alpha, it is shown that the effective Reynolds number in the absence of explicit physical viscosity terms scales linearly with the Mach number - compared to mesh schemes, where the effective Reynolds number is largely independent of the flow velocity. As a result, SPH simulations with alpha=1 will have low Reynolds numbers in the subsonic regime compared to mesh codes, which may be insufficient to resolve turbulent flow. This explains the failure of Bauer and Springel (2011, arXiv:1109.4413v1) to find agreement between the moving-mesh code AREPO and the GADGET SPH code on simulations of driven, subsonic (v ~ 0.3 c_s) turbulence appropriate to the intergalactic/intracluster medium, where it was alleged that SPH is somehow fundamentally incapable of producing a Kolmogorov-like turbulent cascade. We show tha...

  12. Direct simulation of the stably stratified turbulent Ekman layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, G. N.; Ferziger, J. H.; Spalart, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations and the Boussinesq approximation were used to compute a 3D time-dependent turbulent flow in the stably stratified Ekman layer over a smooth surface. The simulation data are found to be in very good agreement with atmospheric measurements when nondimensionalized according to Nieuwstadt's local scaling scheme. Results suggest that, when Reynolds number effects are taken into account, the 'constant Froud number' stable layer model (Brost and Wyngaard, 1978) and the 'shearing length' stable layer model (Hunt, 1985) for the dissipitation rate of turbulent kinetic energy are both valid. It is concluded that there is good agreement between the direct numerical simulation results and large-eddy simulation results obtained by Mason and Derbyshire (1990).

  13. Optical Receiver for Coherently Detected Pulse-Position Modulated Signals in the Presence of Atmospheric Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Fernandez, M.; Vilnrotter, V. A.

    2005-05-01

    Performance analysis and experimental verification of a coherent free-space optical communications receiver in the presence of simulated atmospheric turbulence is presented. Bit-error rate (BER) performance of ideal coherent detection is analyzed in Section II, and the laboratory equipment and experimental setup used to carry out these experiments are described. The key components include two lasers operating at a 1064-nm wavelength for use with coherent detection, a 16-element (4 x 4) focal-plane detector array, and a data acquisition and signal processing assembly needed to sample and collect the data and analyze the results. The detected signals are combined using the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm. In Section III, convergence of the algorithm for experimentally obtained signal tones in the presence of atmospheric turbulence is demonstrated. In Section IV, adaptive combining of experimentally obtained heterodyned pulse-position modulated (PPM) signals with pulse-to-pulse coherence, in the presence of simulated spatial distortions resembling atmospheric turbulence, is demonstrated. The adaptively combined PPM signals are phased up via an LMS algorithm suitably optimized to operate with PPM in the presence of additive shot noise. A convergence analysis of the algorithm is presented, and results with both computer-simulated and experimentally obtained PPM signals are analyzed.

  14. Turbulent phase noise on asymmetric two-way ground-satellite coherent optical links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Wolf, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Bidirectional ground-satellite laser links suffer from turbulence-induced scintillation and phase distortion. We study how turbulence impacts on coherent detection capacity and on the associated phase noise that restricts clock transfer precision. We evaluate the capacity to obtain a two-way cancellation of atmospheric effects despite the asymmetry between up and down link that limits the link reciprocity. For ground-satellite links, the asymmetry is induced by point-ahead angle and possibly the use, for the ground terminal, of different transceiver diameters, in reception and emission. The quantitative analysis is obtained thanks to refined end-to-end simulations under realistic turbulence and wind conditions as well as satellite cinematic. Simulations make use of the reciprocity principle to estimate both down and up link performance from wave-optics propagation of descending plane waves. These temporally resolved simulations allow characterising the coherent detection in terms of time series of heterodyne efficiency for different system parameters. We show Tip/Tilt correction on ground is mandatory at reception for the down link and as a pre-compensation of the up link. Good correlation between up and down phase noise is obtained even with asymmetric apertures of the ground transceiver and in spite of pointing ahead angle. The reduction to less than 1 rad2 of the two-way differential phase noise is very promising for clock transfer.

  15. The Local Variational Multiscale Method for Turbulence Simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Ramakrishnan, Srinivas

    2005-05-01

    Accurate and efficient turbulence simulation in complex geometries is a formidable chal-lenge. Traditional methods are often limited by low accuracy and/or restrictions to simplegeometries. We explore the merger of Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) spatial discretizationswith Variational Multi-Scale (VMS) modeling, termed Local VMS (LVMS), to overcomethese limitations. DG spatial discretizations support arbitrarily high-order accuracy on un-structured grids amenable for complex geometries. Furthermore, high-order, hierarchicalrepresentation within DG provides a natural framework fora prioriscale separation crucialfor VMS implementation. We show that the combined benefits of DG and VMS within theLVMS method leads to promising new approach to LES for use in complex geometries.The efficacy of LVMS for turbulence simulation is assessed by application to fully-developed turbulent channelflow. First, a detailed spatial resolution study is undertakento record the effects of the DG discretization on turbulence statistics. Here, the localhp[?]refinement capabilites of DG are exploited to obtain reliable low-order statistics effi-ciently. Likewise, resolution guidelines for simulating wall-bounded turbulence using DGare established. We also explore the influence of enforcing Dirichlet boundary conditionsindirectly through numericalfluxes in DG which allows the solution to jump (slip) at thechannel walls. These jumps are effective in simulating the influence of the wall commen-surate with the local resolution and this feature of DG is effective in mitigating near-wallresolution requirements. In particular, we show that by locally modifying the numericalviscousflux used at the wall, we are able to regulate the near-wall slip through a penaltythat leads to improved shear-stress predictions. This work, demonstrates the potential ofthe numerical viscousflux to act as a numerically consistent wall-model and this successwarrents future research.As in any high-order numerical method some

  16. Sub-Alfvenic Non-Ideal MHD Turbulence Simulations with Ambipolar Diffusion: I. Turbulence Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R I; Li, P S; McKee, C F; Fisher, R

    2008-04-10

    Most numerical investigations on the role of magnetic fields in turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) are based on ideal magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD). However, MCs are weakly ionized, so that the time scale required for the magnetic field to diffuse through the neutral component of the plasma by ambipolar diffusion (AD) can be comparable to the dynamical time scale. We have performed a series of 256{sup 3} and 512{sup 3} simulations on supersonic but sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems with AD using the Heavy-Ion Approximation developed in Li et al. (2006). Our calculations are based on the assumption that the number of ions is conserved, but we show that these results approximately apply to the case of time-dependent ionization in molecular clouds as well. Convergence studies allow us to determine the optimal value of the ionization mass fraction when using the heavy-ion approximation for low Mach number, sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems. We find that ambipolar diffusion steepens the velocity and magnetic power spectra compared to the ideal MHD case. Changes in the density PDF, total magnetic energy, and ionization fraction are determined as a function of the AD Reynolds number. The power spectra for the neutral gas properties of a strongly magnetized medium with a low AD Reynolds number are similar to those for a weakly magnetized medium; in particular, the power spectrum of the neutral velocity is close to that for Burgers turbulence.

  17. SIMULATION OF TURBULENT FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER OVER A BACKWARD -FACING STEP WITH RIBS TURBULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khudheyer S Mushatet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation is presented for a backward facing step flow and heat transfer inside a channel with ribs turbulators. The problem was investigated for Reynolds numbers up to 32000. The effect of a step height, the number of ribs and the rib thickness on the flow and thermal field were investigated. The computed results are presented as streamlines counters, velocity vectors and graphs of Nusselt number and turbulent kinetic energy variation. A control volume method employing a staggered grid techniques was imposed to discretize the governing continuity, full Navier Stockes and energy equations. A computer program using a SIMPLE algorithm was developed to handle the considered problem. The effect of turbulence was modeled by using a k-є model with its wall function formulas. The obtained results show that the strength and size of the re-circulation zones behind the step are increased with the increase of contraction ratio(i.e. with the increase of a step height. The size of recirculation regions and the reattachment length after the ribs are decreased with increasing of the contraction ratio. Also the results show that the Reynolds number and contraction ratio have a significant effect on the variation of turbulent kinetic energy and Nusselt number

  18. Advanced Unsteady Turbulent Combustion Simulation Capability for Space Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed here is a high performance, high fidelity simulation capability to enable accurate, fast and robust simulation of unsteady turbulent,...

  19. Error Probability Analysis of Free-Space Optical Links with Different Channel Model under Turbulent Condition

    CERN Document Server

    Barua, Bobby; Islam, Md Rezwan

    2012-01-01

    Free space optics (FSO) is a promising solution for the need to very high data rate point-to point communication. FSO communication technology became popular due to its large bandwidth potential, unlicensed spectrum, excellent security and quick and inexpensive setup. Unfortunately, atmospheric turbulence-induced fading is one of the main impairments affecting FSO communications. To design a high performance communication link for the atmospheric FSO channel, it is of great importance to characterize the channel with proper model. In this paper, the modulation format is Q-ary PPM across lasers, with intensity modulation and ideal photodetectors are assumed to investigate the most efficient PDF models for FSO communication under turbulent condition. The performance results are evaluated in terms of symbol error probability (SEP) for different type of channel model and the simulation results confirm the analytical findings.

  20. From synchronisation to persistent optical turbulence in laser arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackbeard, Nicholas; Wieczorek, Sebastian; Erzgräber, Hartmut; Dutta, Partha Sharathi

    2014-10-01

    We define and study synchronisation in a linear array of nearest-neighbour coupled lasers. Our focus is on possible synchronisation types and the stability of their corresponding synchronisation manifolds with dependence on the coupling strength, the laser frequency detuning, the amount of shear (amplitude-phase coupling) in a single laser, and the array size. We classify, and give analytical conditions for the existence of complete synchronisation solutions, where all the lasers emit light with the same intensity and frequency. Furthermore, we derive stability criteria for two special cases where all the lasers oscillate (i) in-phase with each other and (ii) in anti-phase with their nearest neighbour(s). We then explain transitions from complete synchronisation, to partial synchronisation (where only a subset of the lasers synchronises), to persistent optical turbulence (where no lasers synchronise and each laser is chaotic) in terms of bifurcations including blowouts of chaotic attractors. Finally, we quantify properties of optical turbulence using Lyapunov spectrum and dimension, which highlights differences in chaos generated by nearest-neighbour and globally coupled oscillators.

  1. Selection of unstable patterns and control of optical turbulence by Fourier plane filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamaev, A.V.; Saffman, M.

    1998-01-01

    We report on selection and stabilization of transverse optical patterns in a feedback mirror experiment. Amplitude filtering in the Fourier plane is used to select otherwise unstable spatial patterns. Optical turbulence observed for nonlinearities far above the pattern formation threshold...

  2. A lower bound on adiabatic heating of compressed turbulence for simulation and model validation

    CERN Document Server

    Davidovits, Seth

    2016-01-01

    The energy in turbulent flow can be amplified by compression, when the compression occurs on a timescale shorter than the turbulent dissipation time. This mechanism may play a part in sustaining turbulence in various astrophysical systems, including molecular clouds. The amount of turbulent amplification depends on the net effect of the compressive forcing and turbulent dissipation. By giving an argument for a bound on this dissipation, we give a lower bound for the scaling of the turbulent velocity with compression ratio in compressed turbulence. That is, turbulence undergoing compression will be enhanced at least as much as the bound given here, subject to a set of caveats that will be outlined. Used as a validation check, this lower bound suggests that some simulations and models of compressing astrophysical turbulence are too dissipative. The technique used highlights the relationship between compressed turbulence and decaying turbulence.

  3. Comparative measurements of the level of turbulence atmosphere by optical and acoustic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botugina, N. N.; Gladkih, V. A.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.; Odintsov, S. L.; Torgaev, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    The complex measurements of level of atmospheric turbulence are conducted by the differential measurement device of turbulence (DMT), wave-front sensor (WFS), and also by ultrasonic weather-stations. Daytime measurements of structure parameters of refractive index of atmospheric turbulence carried out on horizontal optical paths on the Base Experimental Complex (BEC) of V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS (IOA). A comparative analysis over of the got results is brought.

  4. Computer Simulation of Turbulent Reactive Gas Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn H. Hjertager

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available A simulation procedure capable of handling transient compressible flows involving combustion is presented. The method uses the velocity components and pressure as primary flow variables. The differential equations governing the flow are discretized by integration over control volumes. The integration is performed by application of up-wind differencing in a staggered grid system. The solution procedure is an extension of the SIMPLE-algorithm accounting for compressibility effects.

  5. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent circular jet flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S. C. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sotiropoulos, F. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sale, M. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2002-07-01

    This report presents a numerical method for carrying out large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent free shear flows and an application of a method to simulate the flow generated by a nozzle discharging into a stagnant reservoir. The objective of the study was to elucidate the complex features of the instantaneous flow field to help interpret the results of recent biological experiments in which live fish were exposed to the jet shear zone. The fish-jet experiments were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems program. The experiments were designed to establish critical thresholds of shear and turbulence-induced loads to guide the development of innovative, fish-friendly hydropower turbine designs.

  6. Using random walk models to simulate the vertical distribution of particles in a turbulent water column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre

    1997-01-01

    Random walk simulation has the potential to be an extremely powerful tool in the investigation of turbulence in environmental processes. However, care must be taken in applying such simulations to the motion of particles in turbulent marine systems where turbulent diffusivity is commonly spatially...

  7. CFD simulation of vented explosion and turbulent flame propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulach Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Very rapid physical and chemical processes during the explosion require both quality and quantity of detection devices. CFD numerical simulations are suitable instruments for more detailed determination of explosion parameters. The paper deals with mathematical modelling of vented explosion and turbulent flame spread with use of ANSYS Fluent software. The paper is focused on verification of preciseness of calculations comparing calculated data with the results obtained in realised experiments in the explosion chamber.

  8. Applications of weakly compressible model to turbulent flow problem towards adaptive turbulence simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takuya; Yokomine, Takehiko; Shimizu, Akihiko

    2002-11-01

    We have been engaged in the development of multi-scale adaptive simulation technique for incompressible turbulent flow. This is designed as that important scale components in the flow field are detected automatically by lifting wavelet and solved selectively. In conventional incompressible scheme, it is very common to solve Poisson equation of pressure to meet the divergence free constraints of incompressible flow. It may be not impossible to solve the Poisson eq. in the adaptive way, but this is very troublesome because it requires generation of control volume at each time step. We gave an eye on weakly compressible model proposed by Bao(2001). This model was derived from zero Mach limit asymptotic analysis of compressible Navier-Stokes eq. and does not need to solve the Poisson eq. at all. But it is relatively new and it requires demonstration study before the combination with the adaptation by wavelet. In present study, 2-D and 3-D Backstep flow were selected as test problems and applicability to turbulent flow is verified in detail. Besides, combination of adaptation by wavelet with weakly compressible model towards the adaptive turbulence simulation is discussed.

  9. Stochastic Simulation of Lagrangian Particle Transport in Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangyuan

    This dissertation presents the development and validation of the One Dimensional Turbulence (ODT) multiphase model in the Lagrangian reference frame. ODT is a stochastic model that captures the full range of length and time scales and provides statistical information on fine-scale turbulent-particle mixing and transport at low computational cost. The flow evolution is governed by a deterministic solution of the viscous processes and a stochastic representation of advection through stochastic domain mapping processes. The three algorithms for Lagrangian particle transport are presented within the context of the ODT approach. The Type-I and -C models consider the particle-eddy interaction as instantaneous and continuous change of the particle position and velocity, respectively. The Type-IC model combines the features of the Type-I and -C models. The models are applied to the multi-phase flows in the homogeneous decaying turbulence and turbulent round jet. Particle dispersion, dispersion coefficients, and velocity statistics are predicted and compared with experimental data. The models accurately reproduces the experimental data sets and capture particle inertial effects and trajectory crossing effect. A new adjustable particle parameter is introduced into the ODT model, and sensitivity analysis is performed to facilitate parameter estimation and selection. A novel algorithm of the two-way momentum coupling between the particle and carrier phases is developed in the ODT multiphase model. Momentum exchange between the phases is accounted for through particle source terms in the viscous diffusion. The source term is implemented in eddy events through a new kernel transformation and an iterative procedure is required for eddy selection. This model is applied to a particle-laden turbulent jet flow, and simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. The effect of particle addition on the velocities of the gas phase is investigated. The development of

  10. Large-eddy simulation of contrail evolution in the vortex phase and its interaction with atmospheric turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Picot

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the evolution of contrails in the vortex and dissipation regimes is studied by means of fully three-dimensional large-eddy simulation (LES coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking method to treat the ice phase. In this paper, fine-scale atmospheric turbulence is generated and sustained by means of a stochastic forcing that mimics the properties of stably stratified turbulent flows as those occurring in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The initial flow field is composed of the turbulent background flow and a wake flow obtained from separate LES of the jet regime. Atmospheric turbulence is the main driver of the wake instability and the structure of the resulting wake is sensitive to the intensity of the perturbations, primarily in the vertical direction. A stronger turbulence accelerates the onset of the instability, which results in shorter contrail descent and more effective mixing in the interior of the plume. However, the self-induced turbulence that is produced in the wake after the vortex breakup dominates over background turbulence until the end of the vortex regime and controls the mixing with ambient air. This results in mean microphysical characteristics such as ice mass and optical depth that are slightly affected by the intensity of atmospheric turbulence. However, the background humidity and temperature have a first-order effect on the survival of ice crystals and particle size distribution, which is in line with recent studies.

  11. A new framework for simulating forced homogeneous buoyant turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Phares L.; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2015-06-01

    This work proposes a new simulation methodology to study variable density turbulent buoyant flows. The mathematical framework, referred to as homogeneous buoyant turbulence, relies on a triply periodic domain and incorporates numerical forcing methods commonly used in simulation studies of homogeneous, isotropic flows. In order to separate the effects due to buoyancy from those due to large-scale gradients, the linear scalar forcing technique is used to maintain the scalar variance at a constant value. Two sources of kinetic energy production are considered in the momentum equation, namely shear via an isotropic forcing term and buoyancy via the gravity term. The simulation framework is designed such that the four dimensionless parameters of importance in buoyant mixing, namely the Reynolds, Richardson, Atwood, and Schmidt numbers, can be independently varied and controlled. The framework is used to interrogate fully non-buoyant, fully buoyant, and partially buoyant turbulent flows. The results show that the statistics of the scalar fields (mixture fraction and density) are not influenced by the energy production mechanism (shear vs. buoyancy). On the other hand, the velocity field exhibits anisotropy, namely a larger variance in the direction of gravity which is associated with a statistical dependence of the velocity component on the local fluid density.

  12. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A PREMIXED TURBULENT V-SHAPED FLAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M I El Khazen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we simulate a turbulent premixed V-shape flame stabilized on a hot wire. The device used is composed of a vertical combustion chamber where the methane-air mixture is convected upwards with a mean velocity of 4ms-1. The flow was simulated running Fluent 6.3, which numerically solved the stationary Favre-averaged mass balance; Navier-Stokes equations; combustion progress variable, and k-ε equations on a two-dimensional numerical mesh. We model gaseous mixture, ignoring Soret and Dufour effects and radiation heat transfer. The progress variable balance equation was closed using Eddy Break Up model. The results of our simulations allow us to analyze the influence of equivalence ratio and the turbulent intensity on the properties of the flame (velocity, fluctuation, progress variable and Thickness of flame.This work gives us an idea on the part which turbulence can play to decrease the risks of extinction and instabilities caused by the lean premixed combustion.

  13. Turbulence statistics applied to calculate expected turbulence-induced scintillation effects on electro-optical systems in different climatic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Wrana, Karin R.

    2005-08-01

    The refractive-index structure parameter Cn2 is the parameter most commonly used to describe the optically active turbulence. In the past, FGAN-FOM carried out long-term experiments in moderate climate (Central Europe, Germany), arid (summer), and semiarid (winter) climate (Middle East, Israel). Since Cn2 usually changes as a function of time of day and of season its influence on electro-optical systems should be expressed in a statistical way. We composed a statistical data base of Cn2 values. The cumulative frequency of occurrence was calculated for a time interval of two hours around noon (time of strongest turbulence), at night, and around sunrise (time of weakest turbulence) for an arbitrarily selected period of one month in summer and in winter. In October 2004 we extended our long-term turbulence experiments to subarctic climate (North Europe, Norway). First results of our turbulence measurement over snow-covered terrain indicate Cn2 values which are similar or even higher than measured values in Central European winter. The statistical data base was used to calculate the expected turbulence-induced aperture-averaged scintillation index for free-space optical systems (FSO system) in different climates. The calculations were performed for commercially available FSO systems with wavelength of 785 nm and 1.55 µm respectively and with aperture diameters of the receiver of 60 mm and 150 mm for horizontal path at two heights, 2.3 m and 10 m above ground.

  14. Numerical simulations of turbulent jet ignition and combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Irannejad, Abolfazl; Jaberi, Farhad

    2013-11-01

    The ignition and combustion of a homogeneous lean hydrogen-air mixture by a turbulent jet flow of hot combustion products injected into a colder gas mixture are studied by a high fidelity numerical model. Turbulent jet ignition can be considered as an efficient method for starting and controlling the reaction in homogeneously charged combustion systems used in advanced internal combustion and gas turbine engines. In this work, we study in details the physics of turbulent jet ignition in a fundamental flow configuration. The flow and combustion are modeled with the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) approach, in which the filtered form the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity and the FMDF transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar (temperature and species mass fractions) field. The hydrogen oxidation is described by a detailed reaction mechanism with 37 elementary reactions and 9 species.

  15. RANS Simulation of Turbulent Diffusive Combustion using Open Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Gutiérrez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schemes to write the flow equations in discreet form, solution solvers, pre and post data processing utilitiesprovidedbyOpenFoamlibraries, areusedtobuildafinitevolumeexecutableforsimulatinga low speed, turbulent and rate controlled diffusive CH4-Air combustion. Unsteady Favre’s averaged turbulent conservation equations (total mass, momentum, energy and species mass fractions, are used to describe the combustion gas dynamics, and to handle turbulence a modified k- ε model is applied. Several global kinetic mechanisms, one step, two and four steps have been considered to describe the oxidation process of CH4 in a free jet type flame. The interaction between chemistry and turbulence, is modeled according to the partially stirred reactor (PaSR concept. To improve convergence and accuracy in solving low speed fluid dynamic equations, a pressure implicit with splitting of operators (PISO technique extended to cover high temperature flows, is utilized. The exponential dependence of the chemical kinetics from temperature, makes stiffs the ODE’s needed to determine source average values with which the species conservation equations are solved. To deal with the stiffness issue, OpenFoam provides numerical schemes that guaranties the stability of the computation. Comparisons between results of numerical simulations and experimental data obtained with the benchmark known as flame “D”, are presented.

  16. Gyrokinetic δ particle simulation of trapped electron mode driven turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jianying

    2007-11-01

    Turbulent transport driven by collisionless trapped electron modes (CTEM) is systematically studied using gyrokinetic delta-f particle-in-cell simulation. Scaling with local plasma parameters, including density gradient, electron temperature gradient, magnetic shear, temperature ratio and aspect ratio, is investigated. Simulation results are compared with previous simulations and theoretical predictions. Nonlinearly the transport level increases with increasing magnetic shear. We explain the nonlinear magnetic shear scaling by differences in the radial correlation lengths caused by toroidal coupling. The turbulence is more radially elongated at higher magnetic shear compared with low magnetic shear. We show that the suppression effect of zonal flow on CTEM transport depends on both the electron temperature gradient and the electron to ion temperature ratio. This helps explain the previous contradictory conclusions on the importance of zonal flows in different parameter regimes.ootnotetextT. Dannert, F. Jenko, Phys. Plasmas 12, 072309 (2005); D. Ernst, et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2637 (2004). Zonal flow suppression is consistent with the rate of EXB shearing from the ambient turbulence as well as the radial broadening of the spectra. Strong geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) are generated along with zonal flows and the frequency of the GAMs agrees well with kinetic theory.ootnotetextT. Watari, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 062504 (2006). We further explore the nonlinear saturation mechanism when the zonal flows are not important. We find that when only a single toroidal mode (and its conjugate) is kept, reasonable nonlinear saturation is obtained. Investigating a range of n, modes with larger mode number n saturate at a higher level relative to lower n modes, indicating a turbulent inverse cascade process.

  17. Turbulent Flow Simulations in Complex Multilouvered Fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Danesh

    2000-11-01

    Air-side resistance makes up roughly 80resistance in compact heat exchangers. Multilouvered fins find widespread use in the automotive and HVAC industry for heat transfer augmentation. We will describe the computational methodology for simulating the complex three-dimensional geometry and present results at a Reynolds number of 1100 based on louver pitch and the average flow velocity. The three-dimensionality in the louver geometry occurs along the height of the fin, where the angled louver transitions to the flat landing and joins with the tube surface. The transition region is characterized by a swept leading edge and decreasing flow area between louvers. Results show the formation of spanwise vortices at the leading edge of the angled portion of the louver which convect downstream in the vicinity of the louver surface. Further there is evidence of a separate louver wake instability which interacts with the vortices shed from the leading edge. In the transition region, a high energy streamwise vortex jet is formed. The jet forms in the vicinity of the louver junction with the flat landing and is drawn under the louver in the transition region. The passage of the jet in the vicinity of the louver surface produces a high pressure stagnant zone directly under the jet with a net effect of reducing heat transfer. On the other hand, the top surface of the louver in the transition region experiences high velocities in the vicinity of the surface and exhibits much higher heat transfer coefficients than the bottom surface.

  18. Simulation of the inherent turbulence and wake interaction inside an infinitely long row of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Juhl; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2013-01-01

    The turbulence in the interior of awind farmis simulated using large eddy simulation and the actuator line technique implemented in the Navier–Stokes equations. The simulations are carried out for an infinitely long row of turbines simulated by applying cyclic boundary conditions at the inlet...... and outlet. The simulations investigate the turbulence inherent to the wind turbines as no ambient turbulence or shear is added to this idealised case. The simulated data give insight into the performance of thewind turbines operating in thewake of others aswell as details on key turbulent quantities. One...

  19. The dependence of optical turbulence on thermal and mechanical forces over the sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk, Alexander M. J.; Sprung, Detlev; Sucher, Erik; Eisele, Christian; Seiffer, Dirk; Stein, Karin

    2016-09-01

    Optical turbulence for over-water conditions was investigated in a long-term experiment over False Bay near Cape Town, South Africa. A sonic anemometer and two boundary-layer scintillometers were deployed to access in-situ turbulence as well as the integrated turbulence over two 1.8 and 8.7 km paths. Statistical analysis reveals spatial temporal variations of the turbulence conditions over False Bay, which might be related to differences in the atmospheric conditions and/or the surface (water) temperatures. An analysis in terms of mechanical and thermal forcing reveals that the latter factor is more dominant in determining the turbulence strength.

  20. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow in corrugated pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Henrique S. de; Morales, Rigoberto E.M.; Franco, Admilson T.; Junqueira, Silvio L.M.; Erthal, Raul H. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. Academico de Mecanica (DAMEC)]. E-mails: rique.stel@gmail.com; rmorales@utfpr.edu.br; admilson@utfpr.edu.br; silvio@utfpr.edu.br; rherthal@utfpr.edu.br; Goncalves, Marcelo de Albuquerque Lima [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)]. E-mail: marcelog@petrobras.com.br

    2008-07-01

    Corrugated pipes are used in various engineering applications such heat exchangers and oil transport. In most cases these pipes consist of periodically distributed grooves at the duct inner wall. Numerical and experimental works reported the influence of grooves height and length in the turbulent flow by inspection of several turbulent properties such as velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress. The present article aims to investigate the influence of grooves height and length in the global friction factor of turbulent flow through periodically corrugated pipes. Mass and momentum conservation equations are revised and specific boundary conditions are set to characterize a periodic fully developed regime in a single axisymmetric bidimensional module which represents the periodically corrugated duct geometry. The set of algebraic equations is discretized through the Finite Volume Method, with the Hybrid interpolation scheme applied to the convective terms, and solved using the commercial software PHOENICS CFD. The simulation of turbulent, incompressible, isothermal and single-phase flow is considered. The algebraic turbulence model LVEL is used. Four geometric configurations are assumed, including grooves height and length variations, in order to compare their influence on the friction factor. The obtained numerical friction factors show good agreement with previous experimental results, specially for Reynolds numbers over 20000. Numerical results for corrugated pipes compared to the Blasius smooth pipe correlation shows that the friction factor increases compared to smooth pipes, and such increase is more significant for higher Reynolds numbers and for larger grooves as well. These trends appear to be related to an enhancement of the momentum transport over the corrugated wall due to the recirculating pattern inside the grooves, in accordance with previous experimental works (author)

  1. Turbulent Simulations of Divertor Detachment Based On BOUT + + Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Xu, Xueqiao; Xia, Tianyang; Ye, Minyou

    2015-11-01

    China Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor is under conceptual design, acting as a bridge between ITER and DEMO. The detached divertor operation offers great promise for a reduction of heat flux onto divertor target plates for acceptable erosion. Therefore, a density scan is performed via an increase of D2 gas puffing rates in the range of 0 . 0 ~ 5 . 0 ×1023s-1 by using the B2-Eirene/SOLPS 5.0 code package to study the heat flux control and impurity screening property. As the density increases, it shows a gradually change of the divertor operation status, from low-recycling regime to high-recycling regime and finally to detachment. Significant radiation loss inside the confined plasma in the divertor region during detachment leads to strong parallel density and temperature gradients. Based on the SOLPS simulations, BOUT + + simulations will be presented to investigate the stability and turbulent transport under divertor plasma detachment, particularly the strong parallel gradient driven instabilities and enhanced plasma turbulence to spread heat flux over larger surface areas. The correlation between outer mid-plane and divertor turbulence and the related transport will be analyzed. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675075.

  2. Sub-Alfvenic Non-Ideal MHD Turbulence Simulations with Ambipolar Diffusion: I. Turbulence Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I; Fisher, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    Most numerical investigations on the role of magnetic fields in turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) are based on ideal magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD). However, MCs are weakly ionized, so that the time scale required for the magnetic field to diffuse through the neutral component of the plasma by ambipolar diffusion (AD) can be comparable to the dynamical time scale. We have performed a series of 256^3 and 512^3 simulations on supersonic but sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems with AD using the Heavy-Ion Approximation developed in Li, McKee, & Klein (2006). Our calculations are based on the assumption that the number of ions is conserved, but we show that these results approximately apply to the case of time-dependent ionization in molecular clouds as well. Convergence studies allow us to determine the optimal value of the ionization mass fraction when using the heavy-ion approximation for low Mach number, sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems. We find that ambipolar diffusion steepens the velocity and magnetic power spectr...

  3. Large Eddy Simulations of turbulent flows at supercritical pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunik, C.; Otic, I.; Schulenberg, T., E-mail: claus.kunik@kit.edu, E-mail: ivan.otic@kit.edu, E-mail: thomas.schulenberg@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Inst. of Tech. (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method is used to investigate turbulent heat transfer to CO{sub 2} at supercritical pressure for upward flows. At those pressure conditions the fluid undergoes strong variations of fluid properties in a certain temperature range, which can lead to a deterioration of heat transfer (DHT). In this analysis, the LES method is applied on turbulent forced convection conditions to investigate the influence of several subgrid scale models (SGS-model). At first, only velocity profiles of the so-called inflow generator are considered, whereas in the second part temperature profiles of the heated section are investigated in detail. The results are statistically analyzed and compared with DNS data from the literature. (author)

  4. Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Autoigniting Hydrogen Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaithambi, Rajapandiyan

    Autoignition is an important phenomenon and a tool in the design of combustion engines. To study autoignition in a canonical form a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent autoigniting hydrogen jet in vitiated coflow conditions at a jet Reynolds number of 10,000 is performed. A detailed chemical mechanism for hydrogen-air combustion and non-unity Lewis numbers for species transport is used. Realistic inlet conditions are prescribed by obtaining the velocity eld from a fully developed turbulent pipe flow simulation. To perform this simulation a scalable modular density based method for direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible reacting flows is developed. The algorithm performs explicit time advancement of transport variables on structured grids. An iterative semi-implicit time advancement is developed for the chemical source terms to alleviate the chemical stiffness of detailed mechanisms. The algorithm is also extended from a Cartesian grid to a cylindrical coordinate system which introduces a singularity at the pole r = 0 where terms with a factor 1/r can be ill-defined. There are several approaches to eliminate this pole singularity and finite volume methods can bypass this issue by not storing or computing data at the pole. All methods however face a very restrictive time step when using a explicit time advancement scheme in the azimuthal direction (theta) where the cell sizes are of the order DelrDeltheta. We use a conservative finite volume based approach to remove the severe time step restriction imposed by the CFL condition by merging cells in the azimuthal direction. In addition, fluxes in the radial direction are computed with an implicit scheme to allow cells to be clustered along the jet's shear layer. This method is validated and used to perform the large scale turbulent reacting simulation. The resulting flame structure is found to be similar to a turbulent diusion flame but stabilized by autoignition at the

  5. Optical wave turbulence: Towards a unified nonequilibrium thermodynamic formulation of statistical nonlinear optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picozzi, A., E-mail: Antonio.Picozzi@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, Université de Bourgogne, CNRS-UMR 5027, Dijon (France); Garnier, J. [Laboratoire de Probabilités et Modèles Aléatoires and Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, Université Paris VII, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Hansson, T. [Department of Information Engineering, Università di Brescia, Brescia 25123 (Italy); Suret, P.; Randoux, S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, CNRS, Université de Lille (France); Millot, G. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, Université de Bourgogne, CNRS-UMR 5027, Dijon (France); Christodoulides, D.N. [College of Optics/CREOL, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The nonlinear propagation of coherent optical fields has been extensively explored in the framework of nonlinear optics, while the linear propagation of incoherent fields has been widely studied in the framework of statistical optics. However, these two fundamental fields of optics have been mostly developed independently of each other, so that a satisfactory understanding of statistical nonlinear optics is still lacking. This article is aimed at reviewing a unified theoretical formulation of statistical nonlinear optics on the basis of the wave turbulence theory, which provides a nonequilibrium thermodynamic description of the system of incoherent nonlinear waves. We consider the nonlinear Schrödinger equation as a representative model accounting either for a nonlocal or a noninstantaneous nonlinearity, as well as higher-order dispersion effects. Depending on the amount of nonlocal (noninstantaneous) nonlinear interaction and the amount of inhomogeneous (nonstationary) statistics of the incoherent wave, different types of kinetic equations are derived and discussed. In the spatial domain, when the incoherent wave exhibits inhomogeneous statistical fluctuations, different forms of the (Hamiltonian) Vlasov equation are obtained depending on the amount of nonlocality. This Vlasov approach describes the processes of incoherent modulational instability and localized incoherent soliton structures. In the temporal domain, the causality property inherent to the response function leads to a kinetic formulation analogous to the weak Langmuir turbulence equation, which describes nonlocalized spectral incoherent solitons. In the presence of a highly noninstantaneous response, this formulation reduces to a family of singular integro-differential kinetic equations (e.g., Benjamin–Ono equation), which describe incoherent dispersive shock waves. Conversely, a non-stationary statistics leads to a (non-Hamiltonian) long-range Vlasov formulation, whose self-consistent potential

  6. Multi-particle Lagrangian statistics of turbulent dispersion from simulations of isotropic turbulence at Rλ 1100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, J. F.; Yeung, P. K.; Sawford, B. L.

    2009-11-01

    Numerical simulations at up to (4096^3) grid resolution have been conducted on machines with very large processor counts to obtain the statistics of Lagrangian particle pairs and tetrads in turbulent relative dispersion. Richardson-Obukhov scaling for mean-square pair separation adjusted for initial conditions is observed for intermediate initial separations, in support of prior estimates of about 0.6 for Richardson's constant. Simulations at (Rλ 650) have also been conducted for sufficient duration to obtain fully converged exit time statistics for independently moving particles at very large scales. The fact that all particle pairs reach such large scales of separation means the inertial subrange of exit times is also captured accurately. The results show Kolmogorov scaling for positive moments of exit time, but a strong dependence on initial separations for inverse moments. Inertial-range estimates of tetrad shape factors are reinforced by simulations at Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers up to about 1100. Tetrad shape parameters conditioned on cluster size are also examined in order to understand geometric features of turbulent dispersion in more detail.

  7. LSPV+7, a branch-point-tolerant reconstructor for strong turbulence adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbock, Michael J; Hyde, Milo W; Schmidt, Jason D

    2014-06-20

    Optical wave propagation through long paths of extended turbulence presents unique challenges to adaptive optics (AO) systems. As scintillation and branch points develop in the beacon phase, challenges arise in accurately unwrapping the received wavefront and optimizing the reconstructed phase with respect to branch cut placement on a continuous facesheet deformable mirror. Several applications are currently restricted by these capability limits: laser communication, laser weapons, remote sensing, and ground-based astronomy. This paper presents a set of temporally evolving AO simulations comparing traditional least-squares reconstruction techniques to a complex-exponential reconstructor and several other reconstructors derived from the postprocessing congruence operation. The reconstructors' behavior in closed-loop operation is compared and discussed, providing several insights into the fundamental strengths and limitations of each reconstructor type. This research utilizes a self-referencing interferometer (SRI) as the high-order wavefront sensor, driving a traditional linear control law in conjunction with a cooperative point source beacon. The SRI model includes practical optical considerations and frame-by-frame fiber coupling effects to allow for realistic noise modeling. The "LSPV+7" reconstructor is shown to offer the best performance in terms of Strehl ratio and correction stability-outperforming the traditional least-squares reconstructed system by an average of 120% in the studied scenarios. Utilizing a continuous facesheet deformable mirror, these reconstructors offer significant AO performance improvements in strong turbulence applications without the need for segmented deformable mirrors.

  8. Performance analysis of satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications with spatial diversity over Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kangning; Ma, Jing; Belmonte, Aniceto; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan

    2015-12-01

    The performances of satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications over Gamma-Gamma distributed turbulence are studied for a multiple-aperture receiver system. Equal gain-combining (EGC) and selection-combining (SC) techniques are considered as practical schemes to mitigate the atmospheric turbulence under thermal-noise-limited conditions. Bit-error rate (BER) performances for on-off keying-modulated direct detection and outage probabilities are analyzed and compared for SC diversity receptions using analytical results and for EGC diversity receptions through an approximation method. To show the net diversity gain of a multiple-aperture receiver system, BER performances and outage probabilities of EGC and SC receiver systems are compared with a single monolithic-aperture receiver system with the same total aperture area (same average total incident optical power) for satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications. All the numerical results are also verified by Monte-Carlo simulations.

  9. Simulation of inertial fibre orientation in turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njobuenwu, Derrick O.; Fairweather, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The spatial and orientational behaviour of fibres within a suspension influences the rheological and mechanical properties of that suspension. An Eulerian-Lagrangian framework to simulate the behaviour of fibres in turbulent flows is presented. The framework is intended for use in simulations of non-spherical particles with high Reynolds numbers, beyond the Stokesian regime, and is a computationally efficient alternative to existing Stokesian models for fibre suspensions in turbulent flow. It is based on modifying available empirical drag correlations for the translation of non-spherical particles to be orientation dependent, accounting for the departure in shape from a sphere. The orientational dynamics of a particle is based on the framework of quaternions, while its rotational dynamics is obtained from the solution of the Euler equation of rotation subject to external torques on the particle. The fluid velocity and turbulence quantities are obtained using a very high-resolution large eddy simulation with dynamic calibration of the sub-grid scale energy containing fluid motions. The simulation matrix consists of four different fibre Stokes numbers (St = 1, 5, 25, and 125) and five different fibre aspect ratios (λ = 1.001, 3, 10, 30, and 50), with results considered at four distances from a channel wall (in the viscous sub-layer, buffer, and fully turbulent regions), which are taken as a measure of the flow velocity gradient, all at a constant fibre to fluid density ratio (ρp/ρ = 760) and shear Reynolds number Reτ = 150. The simulated fibre orientation, concentration, and streakiness confirm previous experimentally observed characteristics of fibre behaviour in turbulence, and that of direct numerical simulations of fibres in Stokesian, or creeping flow, regimes. The fibres exhibit translational motion similar to spheres, where they tend to accumulate in the near-wall (viscous sub-layer and buffer) region and preferentially concentrate in regions of low

  10. Final Report: "Large-Eddy Simulation of Anisotropic MHD Turbulence"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2008-06-23

    To acquire better understanding of turbulence in flows of liquid metals and other electrically conducting fluids in the presence of steady magnetic fields and to develop an accurate and physically adequate LES (large-eddy simulation) model for such flows. The scientific objectives formulated in the project proposal have been fully completed. Several new directions were initiated and advanced in the course of work. Particular achievements include a detailed study of transformation of turbulence caused by the imposed magnetic field, development of an LES model that accurately reproduces this transformation, and solution of several fundamental questions of the interaction between the magnetic field and fluid flows. Eight papers have been published in respected peer-reviewed journals, with two more papers currently undergoing review, and one in preparation for submission. A post-doctoral researcher and a graduate student have been trained in the areas of MHD, turbulence research, and computational methods. Close collaboration ties have been established with the MHD research centers in Germany and Belgium.

  11. Spectral large-eddy simulations and vortex dynamics in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lesieur, M

    1999-01-01

    We present a point of view of large-eddy simulations (LES) in Fourier space, where the eddy coefficients are expressed thanks to a two- point spectral closure of isotropic turbulence, the EDQNM theory. Returning to real space, this leads to models of the structure- function family (plain, selective or filtered). These models are applied with success to predict the statistical distributions and coherent-vortex dynamics for a wide variety of turbulent flows. In three-dimensional decaying isotropic turbulence, we confirm the existence of a k/sup 4/ infrared backscatter in the kinetic-energy spectrum, and predict a new k/sup 2/ law for the pressure spectrum in this range. In the mixing layer (temporal or spatial), we show how to manipulate the topology of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices, from quasi two- dimensionality to helical pairing. The latter vortex organization is found in a backward-facing step just behind the step, and yields big staggered Lambda -vortices which are carried away downstream. In a developed turb...

  12. Simulation of turbulent magnetic reconnection in the smallscale solar wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏奉思; 胡强; R.Schwen; 冯学尚

    2000-01-01

    Some observational examples for the possible occurrence of the turbulent magnetic reconnection in the solar wind are found by analysing Helios spacecraft’s high resolution data. The phenom-ena of turbulent magnetic reconnections in small scale solar wind are simulated by introducing a third order accuracy upwind compact difference scheme to the compressible two-dimensional MHD flow. Numerical results verify that the turbulent magnetic reconnection process could occur in small scale in-terplanetary solar wind, which is a basic feature characterizing the magnetic reconnection in high-mag-netie Peynolds number ( RM = 2 000-10 000) solar wind. The configurations of the magnetic reconnection could evolve from a single X-line to a multiple X-line reconnection, exhibiting a complex picture of the formation, merging and evolution of magnetic islands, and finally the magnetic reconnection would evolve into a low-energy state. Its life-span of evolution is about one hour order of magnitude. Various magnetic and f

  13. Direct numerical simulation of turbulence in a bent pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Philipp; Noorani, Azad

    2013-11-01

    A series of direct numerical simulations of turbulent flow in a bent pipe is presented. The setup employs periodic (cyclic) boundary conditions in the axial direction, leading to a nominally infinitely long pipe. The discretisation is based on the high-order spectral element method, using the code Nek5000. Four different curvatures, defined as the ratio between pipe radius and coil radius, are considered: κ = 0 (straight), 0.01 (mild curvature), 0.1 and 0.3 (strong curvature), at bulk Reynolds numbers of up to 11700 (corresponding to Reτ = 360 in the straight pipe case). The result show the turbulence-reducing effect of the curvature (similar to rotation), leading close to relaminarisation in the inner side; the outer side, however, remains fully turbulent. Prpoer orthogonal decomposition (POD) is used to extract the dominant modes, in an effort to explain low-frequency switching of sides inside the pipe. A number of additional interesting features are explored, which include sub-straight and sub-laminar drag for specific choices of curvature and Reynolds number: In particular the case with sub-laminar drag is investigated further, and our analysis shows the existence of a spanwise wave in the bent pipe, which in fact leads to lower overall pressure drop.

  14. Large eddy simulation of vertical turbulent jets under JONSWAP waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Lu; Ling-Ling Wang; Hong-Wu Tang; Hui-Chao Dai

    2011-01-01

    The effect of random waves on vertical plane turbulent jets is studied numerically and the mechanism behind the interaction of the jet and waves is analyzed. The large eddy simulation method is used and the σ-coordinate system is adopted. Turbulence is modeled by a dynamic coherent eddy model. The σ-coordinate transformation is introduced to map the irregular physical domain with a wavy free surface and an uneven bottom onto a regular computational domain. The fractional step method is used to solve the filtered Navier-Stokes equations. Results presented include the distribution of velocity, the decay law of the mean velocity along the jet axis, self-similar characteristics and volume flux per unit width. In particular, the role of coherent structures on the momentum transfer along the jet centerline and the jet instantaneous characteristics in JONSWAP waves are a special focus of this research. The numerical results obtained are of great theoretical importance in understanding the behavior of turbulent jets in random wave environments.

  15. SIMULATION OF TURBULENT FLOW THROUGH TARBELA DAM TUNNEL 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abid

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Tarbela dam is one of the largest earth filled dam in the world. The sediments inflow in the Tarbela reservoir has resulted in reduction in water storage capacity. During the recent years, a reasonable increase of sediment particles in the tunnel is observed. This is damaging tunnels, power generating units and is a severe threat to the plant equipment. To the authors knowledge, to-date no comprehensive simulation studies are performed for flooding in the reservoir or turbulent flows in the tunnels. In this paper, turbulent flow using Reynolds Stress Model in Tunnel 3 of the Tarbela Dam is analyzed with and without considering the effect of sediments particle. Results are presented for three different water heads in the reservoir i.e. considering summer, winter and average seasons and for one-way and two-way/full coupling for sediments particle tracking/deposition. The effect of cavitation erosion and damage to the tunnels due to erosion is investigated and results are compared with the experimental erosion results for similar geometries and are found in good agreement. Sediments particulate analysis is also performed for the validation of the samples collected from WAPDA. Moreover, pressure, velocity and erosion rate results are discussed to get complete behavior of the turbulent flow of water in the tunnel.

  16. Numerical simulations of compressively driven interstellar turbulence: I. Isothermal gas

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Wolfram; Hupp, Markus; Kern, Sebastian; Niemeyer, Jens C

    2008-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of supersonic isothermal turbulence driven by mostly compressive large-scale forcing, using both a static grid and adaptive mesh refinement with an effective resolution N=768^3. After a transient phase dominated by shocks, turbulence evolves into a steady state with an RMS Mach number about 2.5, in which cloud-like structures of over-dense gas are surrounded by highly rarefied gas. The index of the turbulence energy spectrum function beta = 2.0 in the shock-dominated phase. As the flow approaches statistical equilibrium, the spectrum flattens, with beta = 1.9. For the scaling exponent of the root mean square velocity fluctuation, we obtain gamma = 0.43 from the velocity structure functions of second order. These results are well within the range of observed scaling properties for the velocity dispersion in molecular clouds. Calculating structure functions of order p=1,...,5, we find for all scaling exponents significant deviations from the Kolmogorov-Burgers model proposed b...

  17. Large Eddy Simulations of Turbulent Flow Over a Wavy Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Shivshankar; Avva, Ram

    1997-11-01

    Turbulent, separated flow over a wavy wall was simulated using CFD-ACE, a general purpose Navier-Stokes code. The code employs finite-volume formulation and body-fitted curvilinear (BFC) grids. The flow channel consists of a flat upper wall at a mean distance, H, from a sinusoidally varying lower wall (amplitude of 0.05H and a wavelength of 1H). The Reynolds number in terms of bulk velocity and H was 6760. Computations used both a coarse grid (40x40x20;4waves) and a fine grid (60x40x40;2 waves). The spanwise extent was 2H. Periodic boundary conditions were enforced in the streamwise and spanwise directions. Both Smagorinsky (with van Driest damping) and Dynamic models were employed. The Dynamic model yielded better overall results. Present separation and reattachment lengths of 0.13 and 0.64 are in excellent agreement with prior DNS and experiment. Pressure, friction velocity over the wavy wall and mean cross-channel profiles were indistinguishable from prior data. A turbulent mixing layer and a growing boundary layer downstream of reattachment were identified using peaks in turbulence intensities. The level and location of these peaks were in good agreement with DNS.

  18. LOLAS-2 : redesign of an optical turbulence profiler

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, R; Tapia-Rodriguez, J J; Sanchez, L J; Cruz-Gonzalez, I; Aviles, J L; Valdes-Hernandez, O; Carrasco, E

    2016-01-01

    We present the development, tests and first results of the second generation Low Layer Scidar (LOLAS-2). This instrument constitutes a strongly improved version of the prototype Low Layer Scidar, which is aimed at the measurement of optical turbulence profiles close to the ground, with high altitude-resolution. The method is based on the Generalised Scidar principle which consists in taking double-star scintillation images on a defocused pupil plane and calculating in real time the autocovariance of the scintillation. The main components are an open-truss 40-cm Ritchey-Chr\\'etien telescope, a german-type equatorial mount, an Electron Multiplying CCD camera and a dedicated acquisition and real-time data processing software. The new optical design of LOLAS-2 is significantly simplified compared with the prototype. The experiments carried out to test the permanence of the image within the useful zone of the detector and the stability of the telescope focus show that LOLAS-2 can function without the use of the au...

  19. On integrating large eddy simulation and laboratory turbulent flow experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Fernando F

    2009-07-28

    Critical issues involved in large eddy simulation (LES) experiments relate to the treatment of unresolved subgrid scale flow features and required initial and boundary condition supergrid scale modelling. The inherently intrusive nature of both LES and laboratory experiments is noted in this context. Flow characterization issues becomes very challenging ones in validation and computational laboratory studies, where potential sources of discrepancies between predictions and measurements need to be clearly evaluated and controlled. A special focus of the discussion is devoted to turbulent initial condition issues.

  20. Incoherent shock waves in long-range optical turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Garnier, J.; Faccio, D.; Trillo, S.; Picozzi, A.

    2016-10-01

    Considering the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation as a representative model, we report a unified presentation of different forms of incoherent shock waves that emerge in the long-range interaction regime of a turbulent optical wave system. These incoherent singularities can develop either in the temporal domain through a highly noninstantaneous nonlinear response, or in the spatial domain through a highly nonlocal nonlinearity. In the temporal domain, genuine dispersive shock waves (DSW) develop in the spectral dynamics of the random waves, despite the fact that the causality condition inherent to the response function breaks the Hamiltonian structure of the NLS equation. Such spectral incoherent DSWs are described in detail by a family of singular integro-differential kinetic equations, e.g. Benjamin-Ono equation, which are derived from a nonequilibrium kinetic formulation based on the weak Langmuir turbulence equation. In the spatial domain, the system is shown to exhibit a large scale global collective behavior, so that it is the fluctuating field as a whole that develops a singularity, which is inherently an incoherent object made of random waves. Despite the Hamiltonian structure of the NLS equation, the regularization of such a collective incoherent shock does not require the formation of a DSW - the regularization is shown to occur by means of a different process of coherence degradation at the shock point. We show that the collective incoherent shock is responsible for an original mechanism of spontaneous nucleation of a phase-space hole in the spectrogram dynamics. The robustness of such a phase-space hole is interpreted in the light of incoherent dark soliton states, whose different exact solutions are derived in the framework of the long-range Vlasov formalism.

  1. Detection of the phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion in numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Haugen, N E L; Rogachevskii, I; Brandenburg, A

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion causing a non-diffusive turbulent flux of particles in the direction of the turbulent heat flux, is found using direct numerical simulations (DNS) in temperature-stratified turbulence. In simulations with and without gravity, a peak in the particle number density is found around the minimum of the mean fluid temperature for small Stokes numbers due to the phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion. This implies that this phenomenon causes formation of large-scale inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of particles. For Stokes numbers larger than unity, this effect decreases with increasing Stokes number.

  2. Aeroelastic large eddy simulations using vortex methods: unfrozen turbulent and sheared inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre; Papadakis, G.; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    Vortex particles methods are applied to the aeroelastic simulation of a wind turbine in sheared and turbulent inflow. The possibility to perform large-eddy simulations of turbulence with the effect of the shear vorticity is demonstrated for the first time in vortex methods simulations. Most vorte...

  3. Turbulent jumps and shock-structure in shock-turbulence interactions using shock-resolving direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Hsin; Donzis, Diego

    2016-11-01

    Substantial efforts have been made to understand the canonical interaction between isotropic turbulence and a normal shock. Evidence from theories, experiments and simulations, however, has shown that the interaction is complex and that the outcome is determined not only by mean flow behavior, as suggested by early theories, but also by characteristics of turbulence fluctuations typically quantified by parameters such as the Reynolds (Rλ) and the turbulent Mach number (Mt). An important, yet unresolved, issue is the accurate determination of departures from Rankine-Hugoniot relations due to turbulent fluctuations upstream of the shock. We present an analytic study, based on the quasi-equilibrium assumption, that yield turbulent jumps that depend not only on the mean flow but also on turbulence characteristics. In particular, the focus will be on thermodynamic jumps. Our analytical results agree well with new shock-resolving simulations at a range of Reynolds and Mach numbers. In the context of these results we also present a comparison of previous theory on the dilatation at the shock with the new DNS data. This is further discussed in the context of the transition from wrinkled to broken regimes and the difficulties associated with identifying a shock for very vigorous turbulence. Support from AFOSR is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Quantum speed-up for turbulent mixing simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guanglei; Daley, Andrew; Givi, Peyman; Somma, Rolando

    2016-11-01

    Quantum computing techniques have the potential in the future to generate revolutionary advances in many types of computation. The necessary hardware is under rapid development, making it an opportune time to identify possible specific applications across a range of fields, and properly identify the potential of this new paradigm of computing. Turbulent mixing simulation is important in a variety of fields, and is typically accomplished by Monte Carlo methods. To reach high precision in estimating parameters often requires vast computational resources. We have developed a quantum algorithm for turbulent mixing simulation that provides a quadratic speed-up over Monte Carlo methods in terms of number of repetitions needed to achieve designated accuracy. Taking the example of binary scalar mixing process described by a coaslescence/dispersion model, we demonstrate the advantages of our quantum algorithm by illustrating comparisons of statistical error scaling to repetition number between Monte Carlo method and quantum algorithm. This is an important starting point to further understand how quantum algorithms can be directly applied in fluid dynamics, and to estimate the timescales on which quantum hardware will have useful applications in this area of science. This work was supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-12-1-0057.

  5. CFD simulation of bubbly turbulent Tayor-Couette flow☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Gao; Bo Kong; R. Dennis Vigil

    2016-01-01

    Bubbly gas–liquid Taylor–Couette vortex flow has been the subject of several recent investigations both because of interest in bubble-induced drag reduction and because such devices have potential applications to a variety of chemical and biochemical processing problems. In order to quantitatively describe the hydrodynamics of highly turbulent two phase Taylor–Couette flow, a rigorous two-fluid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed and compared with previously published experimental data. This model includes a comprehensive description of the constitutive closure for inter-phase forces and turbulence was simulated using both the k–εand k–ωmodels. In addition, the mechanism by which the dispersed fluid attains a non-uniform radial and axial distribution is analyzed and the relative importance of various interphase forces is discussed. Lastly the model was validated by comparison of simulation predictions with experimental data, and it is shown that the CFD model correctly predicts phase velocity, velocity fluctuation, and gas distribution, and may provide guidance for reactor design and scale-up.

  6. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Ralph W.; Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Jou, Wen-Huei; Riley, James J.; Givi, Peyman

    1988-01-01

    The results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers are presented. This is an extension of earlier work to a more detailed study of previous three dimensional simulations of cold reacting flows plus the development, validation, and use of codes to simulate chemically reacting shear layers with heat release. Additional analysis of earlier simulations showed good agreement with self similarity theory and laboratory data. Simulations with a two dimensional code including the effects of heat release showed that the rate of chemical product formation, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release. Subsequent three dimensional simulations showed similar behavior, in agreement with laboratory observations. Baroclinic torques and thermal expansion in the mixing layer were found to produce changes in the flame vortex structure that act to diffuse the pairing vortices, resulting in a net reduction in vorticity. Previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layers were shown to result from vorticity generation by baroclinic torques.

  7. Optically simulated universal quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, D.; Ledesma, S.

    2008-04-01

    Recently, classical optics based systems to emulate quantum information processing have been proposed. The analogy is based on the possibility of encoding a quantum state of a system with a 2N-dimensional Hilbert space as an image in the input of an optical system. The probability amplitude of each state of a certain basis is associated with the complex amplitude of the electromagnetic field in a given slice of the laser wavefront. Temporal evolution is represented as the change of the complex amplitude of the field when the wavefront pass through a certain optical arrangement. Different modules that represent universal gates for quantum computation have been implemented. For instance, unitary operations acting on the qbits space (or U(2) gates) are represented by means of two phase plates, two spherical lenses and a phase grating in a typical image processing set up. In this work, we present CNOT gates which are emulated by means of a cube prism that splits a pair of adjacent rays incoming from the input image. As an example of application, we present an optical module that can be used to simulate the quantum teleportation process. We also show experimental results that illustrate the validity of the analogy. Although the experimental results obtained are promising and show the capability of the system for simulate the real quantum process, we must take into account that any classical simulation of quantum phenomena, has as fundamental limitation the impossibility of representing non local entanglement. In this classical context, quantum teleportation has only an illustrative interpretation.

  8. Multifractal characteristics of optical turbulence measured through a single beam holographic process

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Dario G; Morille, Yohann; Zielinska, Sonia; Ortyl, Ewelina

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that azopolymer thin films exposed to coherent light that has travelled through a turbulent medium produces a surface relief grating containing information about the intensity of the turbulence; for instance, a relation between the refractive index structure constant C2 as a function of the surface parameters was obtained. In this work, we show that these films capture much more information about the turbulence dynamics. Multifractal detrended fluctuation and fractal dimension analysis from images of the surface roughness produced by the light on the azopolymer reveals scaling properties related to those of the optical turbulence.

  9. Generalized Local Induction Equation, Elliptic Asymptotics, and Simulating Superfluid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Strong, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    We prove the generalized induction equation and the generalized local induction equation (GLIE), which replaces the commonly used local induction approximation (LIA) to simulate the dynamics of vortex lines and thus superfluid turbulence. We show that the LIA is, without in fact any approximation at all, a general feature of the velocity field induced by any length of a curved vortex filament. Specifically, the LIA states that the velocity field induced by a curved vortex filament is asymmetric in the binormal direction. Up to a potential term, the induced incompressible field is given by the Biot-Savart integral, where we recall that there is a direct analogy between hydrodynamics and magnetostatics. Series approximations to the Biot-Savart integrand indicate a logarithmic divergence of the local field in the binormal direction. While this is qualitatively correct, LIA lacks metrics quantifying its small parameters. Regardless, LIA is used in vortex filament methods simulating the self-induced motion of quan...

  10. Flocculation, Optics and Turbulence in the Community Sediment Transport Model System: Application of Oasis Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Flocculation , Optics and Turbulence in the Community...www.phys.ocean.dal.ca/~phill LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of this research is to develop greater understanding of how the flocculation of fine-grained sediment...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Flocculation , Optics and Turbulence in the Community Sediment Transport Model System: Application of Oasis

  11. Flocculation, Optics and Turbulence in the Community Sediment Transport Model System: Applications of Oasis Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Flocculation , Optics and Turbulence in the Community...www.phys.ocean.dal.ca/~phill LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of this research is to develop greater understanding of how the flocculation of fine-grained...DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Flocculation , Optics and Turbulence in the Community Sediment Transport Model System

  12. Average capacity for optical wireless communication systems over exponentiated Weibull distribution non-Kolmogorov turbulent channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mingjian; Zhang, Yixin; Gao, Jie; Wang, Fei; Zhao, Fengsheng

    2014-06-20

    We model the average channel capacity of optical wireless communication systems for cases of weak to strong turbulence channels, using the exponentiation Weibull distribution model. The joint effects of the beam wander and spread, pointing errors, atmospheric attenuation, and the spectral index of non-Kolmogorov turbulence on system performance are included. Our results show that the average capacity decreases steeply as the propagation length L changes from 0 to 200 m and decreases slowly down or tends to a stable value as the propagation length L is greater than 200 m. In the weak turbulence region, by increasing the detection aperture, we can improve the average channel capacity and the atmospheric visibility as an important issue affecting the average channel capacity. In the strong turbulence region, the increase of the radius of the detection aperture cannot reduce the effects of the atmospheric turbulence on the average channel capacity, and the effect of atmospheric visibility on the channel information capacity can be ignored. The effect of the spectral power exponent on the average channel capacity in the strong turbulence region is higher than weak turbulence region. Irrespective of the details determining the turbulent channel, we can say that pointing errors have a significant effect on the average channel capacity of optical wireless communication systems in turbulence channels.

  13. Simulation of inhomogeneous, non-stationary and non-Gaussian turbulent winds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2007-01-01

    Turbulence time series are needed for wind turbine load simulation. The multivariate Fourier simulation method often used for this purpose is extended for inhomogeneous and non-stationary processes of general probability distribution. This includes optional conditional simulation matching simulated...... series to field measurements at selected points. A probability model for the application of turbine wind loads is discussed, and finally the technique for non-stationary processes is illustrated by turbulence simulation during a front passage....

  14. Reducing Wind Turbine Load Simulation Uncertainties by Means of a Constrained Gaussian Turbulence Field

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for incorporating wind measurements from multiple-point scanning lidars into the turbulence fields serving as input to wind turbine load simulations. The measurement values are included in the analysis by applying constraints to randomly generated turbulence fields. A numerical study shows the application of the constrained turbulence method to load simulations on a 10MW wind turbine model, using two example lidar patterns – a 5-point pattern forming a square with a ce...

  15. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Wang, W.; Horton, W.; Klasky, S.; Decyk, V.; Ma, K.-L.; Chames, J.; Adams, M.

    2011-09-21

    The three-year project GPS-TTBP resulted in over 152 publications and 135 presentations. This summary focuses on the scientific progress made by the project team. A major focus of the project was on the physics intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Progress included the first ever flux driven study of net intrinsic spin-up, mediated by boundary effects (in collaboration with CPES), detailed studies of the microphysics origins of the Rice scaling, comparative studies of symmetry breaking mechanisms, a pioneering study of intrinsic torque driven by trapped electron modes, and studies of intrinsic rotation generation as a thermodynamic engine. Validation studies were performed with C-Mod, DIII-D and CSDX. This work resulted in very successful completion of the FY2010 Theory Milestone Activity for OFES, and several prominent papers of the 2008 and 2010 IAEA Conferences. A second major focus was on the relation between zonal flow formation and transport non-locality. This culminated in the discovery of the ExB staircase - a conceptually new phenomenon. This also makes useful interdisciplinary contact with the physics of the PV staircase, well-known in oceans and atmospheres. A third topic where progress was made was in the simulation and theory of turbulence spreading. This work, now well cited, is important for understanding the dynamics of non-locality in turbulent transport. Progress was made in studies of conjectured non-diffusive transport in trapped electron turbulence. Pioneering studies of ITB formation, coupling to intrinsic rotation and hysteresis were completed. These results may be especially significant for future ITER operation. All told, the physics per dollar performance of this project was quite good. The intense focus was beneficial and SciDAC resources were essential to its success.

  16. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent plane Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon Joo

    1991-01-01

    Turbulent plane Couette flow was numerically simulated at a Reynolds number (U(sub w)h/nu) of 6000, where U(sub w) is the relative wall speed and h is half the channel-height. Unlike in Poiseuille flow, where the mean shear rate changes its sign at the centerline, the sign of mean shear rate in plane Couette flow remains the same across the whole channel. This difference is expected to yield several differences between the two flows, especially in the core region. The most significant and dramatic difference observed was the existence of large-scale structures in the core region of the plane Couette flow. The large eddies are extremely long in the flow direction and fill the entire channel (i.e., their vertical extent is 2h). The large-scale structures have the largest contribution from the wavenumber (k(sub x)h,k(sub z)h) = (0, plus or minus 1.5), corresponding to a wavelength lambda(sub z)/h is approximately equal to 4. The secondary motion associated with the k(sub x)h = 0 mode consists of the large-scale vortices. The large eddies contribute about 30 percent of turbulent kinetic energy.

  17. Mathematics of large eddy simulation of turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berselli, L.C. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Applied Mathematics ' ' U. Dini' ' ; Iliescu, T. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Layton, W.J. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

    2006-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is a method of scientific computation seeking to predict the dynamics of organized structures in turbulent flows by approximating local, spatial averages of the flow. Since its birth in 1970, LES has undergone an explosive development and has matured into a highly-developed computational technology. It uses the tools of turbulence theory and the experience gained from practical computation. This book focuses on the mathematical foundations of LES and its models and provides a connection between the powerful tools of applied mathematics, partial differential equations and LES. Thus, it is concerned with fundamental aspects not treated so deeply in the other books in the field, aspects such as well-posedness of the models, their energy balance and the connection to the Leray theory of weak solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. The authors give a mathematically informed and detailed treatment of an interesting selection of models, focusing on issues connected with understanding and expanding the correctness and universality of LES. This volume offers a useful entry point into the field for PhD students in applied mathematics, computational mathematics and partial differential equations. Non-mathematicians will appreciate it as a reference that introduces them to current tools and advances in the mathematical theory of LES. (orig.)

  18. Quantification of optical turbulence in the ocean and its effects on beam propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nootz, Gero; Jarosz, Ewa; Dalgleish, Fraser R; Hou, Weilin

    2016-11-01

    The influence of optically active turbulence on the propagation of laser beams is investigated in clear ocean water over a path length of 8.75 m. The measurement apparatus is described and the effects of optical turbulence on the laser beam are presented. The index of refraction structure constant is extracted from the beam deflection and the results are compared to independently made measures of the turbulence strength (Cn2) by a vertical microstructure profiler. Here we present values of Cn2 taken from aboard the R/V Walton Smith during the Bahamas optical turbulence exercise (BOTEX) in the Tongue of the Ocean between June 30 and July 12, 2011, spanning a range from 10-14 to 10-10  m-2/3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such measurements are reported for the ocean.

  19. 3D two-fluid simulations of turbulence in LAPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin M.

    The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) is modeled using a modified version of the 3D Global Braginskii Solver code (GBS) for a nominal Helium plasma. The unbiased low-flow regime is explored in simulations where there is an intrinsic E x B rotation of the plasma. In the simulations this rotation is caused primarily by sheath effects with the Reynolds stress and J x B torque due to a cross-field Pederson conductivity having little effect. Explicit biasing simulations are also explored for the first time where the intrinsic rotation of the plasma is modified through boundary conditions that mimic the biasable limiter used in LAPD. Comparisons to experimental measurements in the unbiased case show strong qualitative agreement with the data, particularly the radial dependence of the density fluctuations, cross-correlation lengths, radial flux dependence outside of the cathode edge, and camera imagery. Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) turbulence at relatively large scales is the dominant driver of cross-field transport in these simulations with smaller-scale drift waves and sheath modes playing a secondary role. Plasma holes and blobs arising from KH vortices are consistent with the scale sizes and overall appearance of those in LAPD camera images. The addition of ion-neutral collisions in the unbiased simulations at previously theorized values reduces the radial particle flux due to a modest stabilizing contribution of the collisions on the KH-modes driving the turbulent transport. In the biased runs the ion-neutral collisions have a much smaller effect due to the modification of the potential from sheath terms. In biasing the plasma to increase the intrinsic rotation, simulations show the emergence of a nonlinearly saturated coherent mode of order m = 6. In addition, the plasma inside of the cathode edge becomes quiescent due to the strong influence of the wall bias in setting up the equilibrium plasma potential. Biasing in the direction opposite to the intrinsic flow reduces the

  20. Optical turbulence in a spinning pipe gas lens

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mafusire, C

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The researchers have managed to do quantitative analysis of ‘controlled’ turbulence. The researchers could control the degree of turbulence by controlling the rotation speed and wall temperature of the spinning pipe gas lens. The researchers also...

  1. Verification of Gyrokinetic Particle of Turbulent Simulation of Device Size Scaling Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhihong; S. ETHIER; T. S. HAHM; W. M. TANG

    2012-01-01

    Verification and historical perspective are presented on the gyrokinetic particle simulations that discovered the device size scaling of turbulent transport and indentified the geometry model as the source of the long-standing disagreement between gyrokinetic particle and continuum simulations.

  2. Principal Component Analysis studies of turbulence in optically thick gas

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, Caio; Burkhart, Blakesley; Pogosyan, Dmitri; De Medeiros, José Renan

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) sensitivity to the velocity power spectrum in high opacity regimes of the interstellar medium (ISM). For our analysis we use synthetic Position-Position-Velocity (PPV) cubes of fractional Brownian motion (fBm) and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations, post processed to include radiative transfer effects from CO. We find that PCA analysis is very different from the tools based on the traditional power spectrum of PPV data cubes. Our major finding is that PCA is also sensitive to the phase information of PPV cubes and this allows PCA to detect the changes of the underlying velocity and density spectra at high opacities, where the spectral analysis of the maps provides the universal -3 spectrum in accordance with the predictions of Lazarian \\& Pogosyan (2004) theory. This makes PCA potentially a valuable tool for studies of turbulence at high opacities provided that the proper gauging of the PCA index is made. The later, however, we found t...

  3. PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS STUDIES OF TURBULENCE IN OPTICALLY THICK GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, C.; Medeiros, J. R. De [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal (Brazil); Lazarian, A. [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 N. Charter St., WI 53711 (United States); Burkhart, B. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, MS-20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pogosyan, D., E-mail: caioftc@dfte.ufrn.br [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-02-20

    In this work we investigate the sensitivity of principal component analysis (PCA) to the velocity power spectrum in high-opacity regimes of the interstellar medium (ISM). For our analysis we use synthetic position–position–velocity (PPV) cubes of fractional Brownian motion and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations, post-processed to include radiative transfer effects from CO. We find that PCA analysis is very different from the tools based on the traditional power spectrum of PPV data cubes. Our major finding is that PCA is also sensitive to the phase information of PPV cubes and this allows PCA to detect the changes of the underlying velocity and density spectra at high opacities, where the spectral analysis of the maps provides the universal −3 spectrum in accordance with the predictions of the Lazarian and Pogosyan theory. This makes PCA a potentially valuable tool for studies of turbulence at high opacities, provided that proper gauging of the PCA index is made. However, we found the latter to not be easy, as the PCA results change in an irregular way for data with high sonic Mach numbers. This is in contrast to synthetic Brownian noise data used for velocity and density fields that show monotonic PCA behavior. We attribute this difference to the PCA's sensitivity to Fourier phase information.

  4. Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Lin; R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ Turbulent transport driven by plasma pressure gradients [Tangl978] is one of the most important scientific challenges in burning plasma experiments since the balance between turbulent transport and the self-heating by the fusion products (a-particles) determines the performance of a fusion reactor like ITER.

  5. Simulating radially outward winds within a turbulent gas clump

    CERN Document Server

    Arreaga-Garcia, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    By using the particle-based code Gadget2, we follow the evolution of a gas clump, in which a gravitational collapse is initially induced. The particles representing the gas clump have initially a velocity according to a turbulent spectrum built in a Fourier space of 64$^3$ grid elements. In a very early stage of evolution of the clump, a set of gas particles representing the wind, suddenly move outwards from the clump's center. We consider only two kinds of winds, namely: one with spherical symmetry and a second one being a bipolar collimated jet. In order to assess the dynamical change in the clump due to interaction with the winds, we show iso-velocity and iso-density plots for all our simulations.

  6. Simulating Turbulence Using the Astrophysical Discontinuous Galerkin Code TENET

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Andreas; Springel, Volker; Chandrashekar, Praveen; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Klingenberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In astrophysics, the two main methods traditionally in use for solving the Euler equations of ideal fluid dynamics are smoothed particle hydrodynamics and finite volume discretization on a stationary mesh. However, the goal to efficiently make use of future exascale machines with their ever higher degree of parallel concurrency motivates the search for more efficient and more accurate techniques for computing hydrodynamics. Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods represent a promising class of methods in this regard, as they can be straightforwardly extended to arbitrarily high order while requiring only small stencils. Especially for applications involving comparatively smooth problems, higher-order approaches promise significant gains in computational speed for reaching a desired target accuracy. Here, we introduce our new astrophysical DG code TENET designed for applications in cosmology, and discuss our first results for 3D simulations of subsonic turbulence. We show that our new DG implementation provides ac...

  7. Direct numerical simulation of turbulence using GPU accelerated supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeh-Saeed, Ali; Blair Perot, J.

    2013-02-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulence are optimized for up to 192 graphics processors. The results from two large GPU clusters are compared to the performance of corresponding CPU clusters. A number of important algorithm changes are necessary to access the full computational power of graphics processors and these adaptations are discussed. It is shown that the handling of subdomain communication becomes even more critical when using GPU based supercomputers. The potential for overlap of MPI communication with GPU computation is analyzed and then optimized. Detailed timings reveal that the internal calculations are now so efficient that the operations related to MPI communication are the primary scaling bottleneck at all but the very largest problem sizes that can fit on the hardware. This work gives a glimpse of the CFD performance issues will dominate many hardware platform in the near future.

  8. Cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in imbalanced MHD turbulence simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Weidl, Martin S; Teaca, Bogdan; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pitch-angle scattering rates for cosmic-ray particles in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with imbalanced turbulence are calculated for fully evolving electromagnetic turbulence. We compare with theoretical predictions derived from the quasilinear theory of cosmic-ray diffusion for an idealized slab spectrum and demonstrate how cross helicity affects the shape of the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient. Additional simulations in evolving magnetic fields or static field configurations provide evidence that the scattering anisotropy in imbalanced turbulence is not primarily due to coherence with propagating Alfven waves, but an effect of the spatial structure of electric fields in cross-helical MHD turbulence.

  9. Optical turbulence forecast: ready for an operational application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciadri, E.; Lascaux, F.; Turchi, A.; Fini, L.

    2017-04-01

    One of the main goals of the feasibility study MOSE (MOdelling ESO Sites) is to evaluate the performances of a method conceived to forecast the optical turbulence (OT) above the European Southern Observatory (ESO) sites of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) in Chile. The method implied the use of a dedicated code conceived for the OT called ASTRO-MESO-NH. In this paper, we present results we obtained at conclusion of this project concerning the performances of this method in forecasting the most relevant parameters related to the OT (CN^2, seeing ε, isoplanatic angle θ0 and wavefront coherence time τ0). Numerical predictions related to a very rich statistical sample of nights uniformly distributed along a solar year and belonging to different years have been compared to observations, and different statistical operators have been analysed such as the classical bias, root-mean-squared error, σ and more sophisticated statistical operators derived by the contingency tables that are able to quantify the score of success of a predictive method such as the percentage of correct detection (PC) and the probability to detect a parameter within a specific range of values (POD). The main conclusions of the study tell us that the ASTRO-MESO-NH model provides performances that are already very good to definitely guarantee a not negligible positive impact on the service mode of top-class telescopes and ELTs. A demonstrator for an automatic and operational version of the ASTRO-MESO-NH model will be soon implemented on the sites of VLT and E-ELT.

  10. Simulations of sooting turbulent jet flames using a hybrid flamelet/stochastic Eulerian field method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consalvi, Jean-Louis; Nmira, Fatiha; Burot, Daria

    2016-03-01

    The stochastic Eulerian field method is applied to simulate 12 turbulent C1-C3 hydrocarbon jet diffusion flames covering a wide range of Reynolds numbers and fuel sooting propensities. The joint scalar probability density function (PDF) is a function of the mixture fraction, enthalpy defect, scalar dissipation rate and representative soot properties. Soot production is modelled by a semi-empirical acetylene/benzene-based soot model. Spectral gas and soot radiation is modelled using a wide-band correlated-k model. Emission turbulent radiation interactions (TRIs) are taken into account by means of the PDF method, whereas absorption TRIs are modelled using the optically thin fluctuation approximation. Model predictions are found to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data in terms of flame structure, soot quantities and radiative loss. Mean soot volume fractions are predicted within a factor of two of the experiments whereas radiant fractions and peaks of wall radiative fluxes are within 20%. The study also aims to assess approximate radiative models, namely the optically thin approximation (OTA) and grey medium approximation. These approximations affect significantly the radiative loss and should be avoided if accurate predictions of the radiative flux are desired. At atmospheric pressure, the relative errors that they produced on the peaks of temperature and soot volume fraction are within both experimental and model uncertainties. However, these discrepancies are found to increase with pressure, suggesting that spectral models describing properly the self-absorption should be considered at over-atmospheric pressure.

  11. Turbulence Resolving Flow Simulations of a Francis Turbine in Part Load using Highly Parallel CFD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krappel, Timo; Riedelbauch, Stefan; Jester-Zuerker, Roland; Jung, Alexander; Flurl, Benedikt; Unger, Friedeman; Galpin, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The operation of Francis turbines in part load conditions causes high fluctuations and dynamic loads in the turbine and especially in the draft tube. At the hub of the runner outlet a rotating vortex rope within a low pressure zone arises and propagates into the draft tube cone. The investigated part load operating point is at about 72% discharge of best efficiency. To reduce the possible influence of boundary conditions on the solution, a flow simulation of a complete Francis turbine is conducted consisting of spiral case, stay and guide vanes, runner and draft tube. As the flow has a strong swirling component for the chosen operating point, it is very challenging to accurately predict the flow and in particular the flow losses in the diffusor. The goal of this study is to reach significantly better numerical prediction of this flow type. This is achieved by an improved resolution of small turbulent structures. Therefore, the Scale Adaptive Simulation SAS-SST turbulence model - a scale resolving turbulence model - is applied and compared to the widely used RANS-SST turbulence model. The largest mesh contains 300 million elements, which achieves LES-like resolution throughout much of the computational domain. The simulations are evaluated in terms of the hydraulic losses in the machine, evaluation of the velocity field, pressure oscillations in the draft tube and visual comparisons of turbulent flow structures. A pre-release version of ANSYS CFX 17.0 is used in this paper, as this CFD solver has a parallel performance up to several thousands of cores for this application which includes a transient rotor-stator interface to support the relative motion between the runner and the stationary portions of the water turbine.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer with Spanwise Wall Oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidan Ni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulations (DNS of Mach = 2.9 supersonic turbulent boundary layers with spanwise wall oscillation (SWO are conducted to investigate the turbulent heat transport mechanism and its relation with the turbulent momentum transport. The turbulent coherent structures are suppressed by SWO and the drag is reduced. Although the velocity and temperature statistics are disturbed by SWO differently, the turbulence transports of momentum and heat are simultaneously suppressed. The Reynolds analogy and the strong Reynolds analogy are also preserved in all the controlled flows, proving the consistent mechanisms of momentum transport and heat transport in the turbulent boundary layer with SWO. Despite the extra dissipation and heat induced by SWO, a net wall heat flux reduction can be achieved with the proper selected SWO parameters. The consistent mechanism of momentum and heat transports supports the application of turbulent drag reduction technologies to wall heat flux controls in high-speed vehicles.

  13. Numerical simulation of the vertical migration of Microcystis (cyanobacteria colonies based on turbulence drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongru Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The vertical migration and accumulation of Microcystis is an important process in water blooms, and colony migration is influenced by colony size and wind-wave disturbance. The vertical migration of Microcystis colonies in turbulence can be simulated in a numerical model. In this study, we model such migration by coupling the colony size and hydrodynamics, including the gravity, colony buoyancy, and the viscous drag force of turbulence. The turbulence intensity was represented by the turbulent kinetic energy (KZ; the larger the KZ, the stronger the wind-wave disturbance. The simulated vertical distribution of Microcystis well agreed with the measured values in a laboratory experiment indicating that our model can simulate the vertical distribution of Microcystis under different hydrodynamic conditions. We also found a size-dependent critical turbulent kinetic energy (TKZ, such that if the turbulent kinetic energy of water exceeds the critical value (i.e., KZ > TKZ, the colonies sink under the drag forces of turbulence; conversely, if KZ < TKZ, the colonies can overcome the turbulent mixing and float. The TKZ of each colony was linearly related to colony diameter. The model is crucial for prediction and prevention of water blooms. The simulated threshold turbulent kinetic energy, at which water blooms disappear in Lake Taihu (a large freshwater lake in the Yangtze Delta, Jiangsu Province, China, was 55.5 cm2 s−2. 

  14. Direct numerical simulation of stationary lean premixed methane-air flames under intense turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, Ramanan [ORNL; Hawkes, Evatt R [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Yoo, Chun S [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Chen, Jacqueline H [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Lu, Tianfeng [Princeton University; Law, Chung K [Princeton University

    2007-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a three-dimensional spatially- developing turbulent Bunsen flame has been performed at three different turbulence intensities. The simulations are performed using a reduced methane-air chemical mechanism which is specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration is used in which turbulent preheated methane-air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issues through a central jet and is surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow are selected such that combustion occurs in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity the conditions fall on the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime. At the highest turbulence intensity the conditions correspond to the boundary between the TRZ regime and the broken reaction zones regime. The data from the three simulations is analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Statistical analysis of the data shows that the thermal preheat layer of the flame is thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone is not significantly affected.

  15. Missile Electro-Optical Countermeasures Simulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory comprises several hardware-in-the-loop missile flight simulations designed specifically to evaluate the effectiveness of electro-optical air defense...

  16. Optical diagnostics of turbulent mixing in explosively-driven shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James; Hargather, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Explosively-driven shock tube experiments were performed to investigate the turbulent mixing of explosive product gases and ambient air. A small detonator initiated Al / I2O5 thermite, which produced a shock wave and expanding product gases. Schlieren and imaging spectroscopy were applied simultaneously along a common optical path to identify correlations between turbulent structures and spatially-resolved absorbance. The schlieren imaging identifies flow features including shock waves and turbulent structures while the imaging spectroscopy identifies regions of iodine gas presence in the product gases. Pressure transducers located before and after the optical diagnostic section measure time-resolved pressure. Shock speed is measured from tracking the leading edge of the shockwave in the schlieren images and from the pressure transducers. The turbulent mixing characteristics were determined using digital image processing. Results show changes in shock speed, product gas propagation, and species concentrations for varied explosive charge mass. Funded by DTRA Grant HDTRA1-14-1-0070.

  17. Influence of turbulence on the wake of a marine current turbine simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, T; Batten, W M J; Bahaj, A S

    2014-10-08

    Marine current turbine commercial prototypes have now been deployed and arrays of multiple turbines under design. The tidal flows in which they operate are highly turbulent, but the characteristics of the inflow turbulence have not being considered in present design methods. This work considers the effects of inflow turbulence on the wake behind an actuator disc representation of a marine current turbine. Different turbulence intensities and integral length scales were generated in a large eddy simulation using a gridInlet, which produces turbulence from a grid pattern on the inlet boundary. The results highlight the significance of turbulence on the wake profile, with a different flow regime occurring for the zero turbulence case. Increasing the turbulence intensity reduced the velocity deficit and shifted the maximum deficit closer to the turbine. Increasing the integral length scale increased the velocity deficit close to the turbine due to an increased production of turbulent energy. However, the wake recovery was increased due to the higher rate of turbulent mixing causing the wake to expand. The implication of this work is that marine current turbine arrays could be further optimized, increasing the energy yield of the array when the site-specific turbulence characteristics are considered.

  18. A Gas-Kinetic Scheme For The Simulation Of Compressible Turbulent Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Righi, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    A gas-kinetic scheme for the continuum regime is applied to the simulation of turbu- lent compressible flow, by replacing the molecular relaxation time with a turbulent relaxation time in the BGK model. The turbulence dynamics is modelled on the basis of a standard, linear two-equation turbulence model. The hydrodynamic limit of the resulting turbulence model is linear in smooth flow and non-linear in the presence of stronger flow gradients. The non-linear correction terms in the numerical flux are weighed as a function of "rarefaction" - referred to turbulence dynamics and not to molecular dynamics, i.e. measured by the ratio of turbulence to mean flow scales of motion. Even though no assumptions on the nature of the turbulence have been made and a linear two-equation turbulence model is used, the turbulence gas-kinetic scheme seems able to correct the turbulent stress tensor in an effective way; on the basis of a number of turbulence modelling benchmark flow cases, characterized by strong shock - boundary l...

  19. Phase space structures in gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghendrih, Philippe; Norscini, Claudia; Cartier-Michaud, Thomas; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Abiteboul, Jérémie; Dong, Yue; Garbet, Xavier; Gürcan, Ozgür; Hennequin, Pascale; Grandgirard, Virginie; Latu, Guillaume; Morel, Pierre; Sarazin, Yanick; Storelli, Alexandre; Vermare, Laure

    2014-10-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasmas give extensive information in 5D on turbulence and transport. This paper highlights a few of these challenging physics in global, flux driven simulations using experimental inputs from Tore Supra shot TS45511. The electrostatic gyrokinetic code GYSELA is used for these simulations. The 3D structure of avalanches indicates that these structures propagate radially at localised toroidal angles and then expand along the field line at sound speed to form the filaments. Analysing the poloidal mode structure of the potential fluctuations (at a given toroidal location), one finds that the low modes m = 0 and m = 1 exhibit a global structure; the magnitude of the m = 0 mode is much larger than that of the m = 1 mode. The shear layers of the corrugation structures are thus found to be dominated by the m = 0 contribution, that are comparable to that of the zonal flows. This global mode seems to localise the m = 2 mode but has little effect on the localisation of the higher mode numbers. However when analysing the pulsation of the latter modes one finds that all modes exhibit a similar phase velocity, comparable to the local zonal flow velocity. The consequent dispersion like relation between the modes pulsation and the mode numbers provides a means to measure the zonal flow. Temperature fluctuations and the turbulent heat flux are localised between the corrugation structures. Temperature fluctuations are found to exhibit two scales, small fluctuations that are localised by the corrugation shear layers, and appear to bounce back and forth radially, and large fluctuations, also readily observed on the flux, which are associated to the disruption of the corrugations. The radial ballistic velocity of both avalanche events if of the order of 0.5ρ∗c0 where ρ∗ = ρ0/a, a being the tokamak minor radius and ρ0 being the characteristic Larmor radius, ρ0 = c0/Ω0. c0 is the reference ion thermal velocity and Ω0 = qiB0/mi the reference

  20. Simulation of spatially evolving turbulence and the applicability of Taylor's hypothesis in compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangsan; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1992-01-01

    For the numerical simulation of inhomogeneous turbulent flows, a method is developed for generating stochastic inflow boundary conditions with a prescribed power spectrum. Turbulence statistics from spatial simulations using this method with a low fluctuation Mach number are in excellent agreement with the experimental data, which validates the procedure. Turbulence statistics from spatial simulations are also compared to those from temporal simulations using Taylor's hypothesis. Statistics such as turbulence intensity, vorticity, and velocity derivative skewness compare favorably with the temporal simulation. However, the statistics of dilatation show a significant departure from those obtained in the temporal simulation. To directly check the applicability of Taylor's hypothesis, space-time correlations of fluctuations in velocity, vorticity, and dilatation are investigated. Convection velocities based on vorticity and velocity fluctuations are computed as functions of the spatial and temporal separations. The profile of the space-time correlation of dilatation fluctuations is explained via a wave propagation model.

  1. Numerical simulation of flow around square cylinder using different low-Reynolds number turbulence models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling; ZHOU Jun-li; CHEN Xiao-chun; LAN Li; ZHANG Nan

    2008-01-01

    ABE-KONDOH-NAGANO, ABID, YANG-SHIH and LAUNDER-SHARMA low-Reynolds number turbulence models were applied to simulating unsteady turbulence flow around a square cylinder in different phases flow field and time-averaged unsteady flow field. Meanwhile, drag and lift coefficients of the four different low-Reynolds number turbulence models were analyzed. The simulated results of YANG-SHIH model are close to the large eddy simulation results and experimental results, and they are significantly better than those of ABE-KONDOH-NAGANO, ABID and LAUNDER-SHARMR models. The modification of the generation of turbulence kinetic energy is the key factor to a successful simulation for YANG-SHIH model, while the correction of the turbulence near the wall has minor influence on the simulation results. For ABE-KONDOH-NAGANO, ABID and LAUNDER-SHARMA models satisfactory simulation results cannot be obtained due to lack of the modification of the generation of turbulence kinetic energy. With the joint force of wall function and the turbulence models with the adoption of corrected swirl stream,flow around a square cylinder can be fully simulated with less grids by the near-wall.

  2. Introducing the concept of anisotropy at different scales for modeling optical turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toselli, Italo

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the concept of anisotropy at different atmospheric turbulence scales is introduced. A power spectrum and its associated structure function with inner and outer scale effects and anisotropy are also shown. The power spectrum includes an effective anisotropic parameter ζ(eff) to describe anisotropy, which is useful for modeling optical turbulence when a non-Kolmogorov power law and anisotropy along the direction of propagation are present.

  3. Test-particle simulations in increasingly strong turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontius, D. H., Jr.; Gray, P. C.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1995-01-01

    Quasi-linear theory supposes that the energy in resonant fluctuations is small compared to that in the mean magnetic field. This is evident in the fact that the zeroth-order particle trajectories are helices about a mean field B(sub o) that is spatially uniform over many correlation lengths. However, in the solar wind it is often the case that the fluctuating part of the field is comparable in magnitude to the mean part. It is generally expected that quasi-linear theory remains viable for particles that are in resonance with a region of the fluctuation spectrum having only small energy density, but even so, care must be taken when comparing simulations to theoretical predictions. We have performed a series of test-particle simulations to explore the evolution of ion distributions in turbulent situations with varying levels of magnetic fluctuations. As delta-B/B(sub o) is increased the distinctions among absolute pitch angle (defined relative to B(sub o)), local pitch angle (defined relative to B(x)), and magnetic moment become important, some of them exhibiting periodic sloshing unrelated to the nonadiabatic processes of interest. Comparing and contrasting the various runs illustrates the phenomena that must be considered when the premise underlying quasi-linear theory are relaxed.

  4. Simulation of plasma turbulence in scrape-off layer conditions: the GBS code, simulation results and code validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, P.; Halpern, F. D.; Jolliet, S.; Loizu, J.; Mosetto, A.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Theiler, C.

    2012-12-01

    Based on the drift-reduced Braginskii equations, the Global Braginskii Solver, GBS, is able to model the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma turbulence in terms of the interplay between the plasma outflow from the tokamak core, the turbulent transport, and the losses at the vessel. Model equations, the GBS numerical algorithm, and GBS simulation results are described. GBS has been first developed to model turbulence in basic plasma physics devices, such as linear and simple magnetized toroidal devices, which contain some of the main elements of SOL turbulence in a simplified setting. In this paper we summarize the findings obtained from the simulation carried out in these configurations and we report the first simulations of SOL turbulence. We also discuss the validation project that has been carried out together with the GBS development.

  5. High Resolution Simulation of Turbulent Flow in a Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-25

    chosen to maintain the original Poiseuille flow . The introduction of highly unstable disturbances causes transition to turbulence so that the wall...for Turbulent Channel Flow ," Phys. Rev. Lett, Vol. 47, 832-835 (1981). 2. S.A. Orszag and L.C. Kells, "Transition to turbulence in plane Poiseuille and...plane Couette Flow ," J. Fluid Mech., Vol. 96, pp. 159-205. 3. Kreplin, H.-P. and Eckelmann, H., "Behavior of the Three Fluctucting Velocity

  6. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow in helically coiled open-channels with compound cross-sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO; Xuejun; WANG; Hong; CHEN; Zhi

    2004-01-01

    Turbulence structure in a helically coiled open channel flow is numerically simulated using three different turbulence models--the Launder and Ying model, the Naot and Rodi model, and the nonlinear k-ε Model (SY model). Simulation results were compared with observation of (i) turbulent flows in alternating point-bar type channel bends with rectangular sections, and (ii) straight open channel flows with compound cross-sections. Based on calculations of the impact of various channel curvatures on turbulence characteristics, accuracy of the three turbulence models was analyzed with observed data as a qualitative reference. It has been found out that the Launder and Ying model and the nonlinear k-ε Model are able to predict the same general trend as measured data, and the simulation of the effect of the centrifugal force on the formation of secondary currents produces a correct pattern.

  7. Reducing Wind Turbine Load Simulation Uncertainties by Means of a Constrained Gaussian Turbulence Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for incorporating wind measurements from multiple-point scanning lidars into the turbulence fields serving as input to wind turbine load simulations. The measurement values are included in the analysis by applying constraints to randomly generated turbulence fields...

  8. Simulation of Helical Flow Hydrodynamics in Meanders and Advection-Turbulent Diffusion Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusti, T. P.; Hertanti, D. R.; Bahsan, E.; Soeryantono, H.

    2013-12-01

    Particle-based numerical methods, such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), may be able to simulate some hydrodynamic and morphodynamic behaviors better than grid-based numerical methods. This study simulates hydrodynamics in meanders and advection and turbulent diffusion in straight river channels using Microsoft Excel and Visual Basic. The simulators generate three-dimensional data for hydrodynamics and one-dimensional data for advection-turbulent diffusion. Fluid at rest, sloshing, and helical flow are simulated in the river meanders. Spill loading and step loading are done to simulate concentration patterns associated with advection-turbulent diffusion. Results indicate that helical flow is formed due to disturbance in morphology and particle velocity in the stream and the number of particles does not have a significant effect on the pattern of advection-turbulent diffusion concentration.

  9. Comparison of two turbulent models in simulating evaporating liquid film in a wiped molecular distillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Aishuang; XU Songlin

    2005-01-01

    Velocity field of evaporating liquid film in a wiped molecular distillator was simulated with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and two turbulent models treating near-wall flow were compared. Differences between wiped and other molecular distillations were introduced to explain why turbulent model should be used in this simulation. Three assumptions were made in order to simplify simulating processes. In rotating coordinate system, fixed other settings, the above two turbulent models were used, and the volume of fluid (VOF) multiphase model was also applied to tracking the liquid-gas surface. Both of the simulating results are basically identical with real situation and were compared in several aspects. It was concluded that both of the turbulent models are suitable in this simulation.

  10. Measurements of indoor/outdoor atmospheric turbulence through optical triangulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Gúbio; Silva, Vinicius N. H.; Barbero, Andrés P. L.; Ribeiro, Ricardo M.; Coelho, Thiago V. N.; Bessa dos Santos, A.

    2017-05-01

    Atmospheric turbulence degrades the performance of wireless optical communication links. This phenomenon distorts the light wave-front, and changes the spatial optical power distribution, spread and wander of the beam on the receiver plane. In this paper we present measurements of indoor and outdoor atmospheric turbulence taken using a simple and low-cost device based on an optical triangulation method. The device tracks a Gaussian beam due to the beam wander effect and measures the effective Gaussian width due to beam spread in order to calculate the refractive index structure constant in real time. Thus, the device operation principle, the outdoor/indoor turbulence profile during the day, the hotspot dispersion and the beam width variation are shown.

  11. Employing circle polarization shift keying in free space optical communication with gamma-gamma atmospheric turbulence channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Du, Fan; Ma, Jing; Tan, Liying

    2014-12-01

    A novel theoretical model of a circular polarization shift keying (CPolSK) system for free space optical links through an atmospheric turbulence channel, is proposed. Intensity scintillation and phase fluctuation induced in atmospheric turbulence, from weak to strong levels, are specifically researched with respect to circular polarization control error caused by the system design. We derive closed form expressions of the bit error rate (BER) and outage probability for evaluating the BER performance and communication interruption in the Gamma-Gamma distributed channel model. Simulation results show that atmospheric turbulence and circular polarization control error have significant effects on the BER performance and interruption of communication in the CPolSK system. The deterioration in BER performance, caused by intensity scintillation and phase fluctuation, is augmented by the power penalty conditioned by the circular polarization control error. This consequently adds to the demand for emissive power from the CPolSK system. Furthermore, we demonstrate that controlling the circular polarization control error below 8° as well as the normalized threshold within 8 dB, 9 dB and 10 dB in turbulent scenarios from weak to strong levels can significantly reduce the probability of communication interruption occurring. This study provides reference material for further design of the CPolSK system.

  12. Hybrid pulse position modulation and binary phase shift keying subcarrier intensity modulation for free space optics in a weak and saturated turbulence channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridzadeh, Monire; Gholami, Asghar; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Rajbhandari, Sujan

    2012-08-01

    In this paper a hybrid modulation scheme based on pulse position modulation (PPM) and binary phase shift keying subcarrier intensity modulation (BPSK-SIM) schemes for free-space optical communications is proposed. The analytical bit error rate (BER) performance is investigated in weak and saturated turbulence channels and results are verified with the simulation data. Results show that performance of PPM-BPSK-SIM is superior to BPSK-SIM in all turbulence regimes; however, it outperforms 2-PPM for the turbulence variance σ(1)(2)>0.2. PPM-BPSK-SIM offers a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain of 50 dB in the saturation regime compared to BPSK at a BER of 10(-6). The SNR gain in comparison to PPM improves as the strength of the turbulence level increases.

  13. Anisotropic Characteristics of Turbulence Dissipation in Swirling Flow: A Direct Numerical Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the anisotropic characteristics of turbulent energy dissipation rate in a rotating jet flow via direct numerical simulation. The turbulent energy dissipation tensor, including its eigenvalues in the swirling flows with different rotating velocities, is analyzed to investigate the anisotropic characteristics of turbulence and dissipation. In addition, the probability density function of the eigenvalues of turbulence dissipation tensor is presented. The isotropic subrange of PDF always exists in swirling flows relevant to small-scale vortex structure. Thus, with remarkable large-scale vortex breakdown, the isotropic subrange of PDF is reduced in strongly swirling flows, and anisotropic energy dissipation is proven to exist in the core region of the vortex breakdown. More specifically, strong anisotropic turbulence dissipation occurs concentratively in the vortex breakdown region, whereas nearly isotropic turbulence dissipation occurs dispersively in the peripheral region of the strong swirling flows.

  14. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Nonlinear Anisotropic Dynamical Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Heusen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate test-particle diffusion in dynamical turbulence based on a numerical approach presented before. For the turbulence we employ the nonlinear anisotropic dynamical turbulence model which takes into account wave propagation effects as well as damping effects. We compute numerically diffusion coefficients of energetic particles along and across the mean magnetic field. We focus on turbulence and particle parameters which should be relevant for the solar system and compare our findings with different interplanetary observations. We vary different parameters such as the dissipation range spectral index, the ratio of the turbulence bendover scales, and the magnetic field strength in order to explore the relevance of the different parameters. We show that the bendover scales as well as the magnetic field ratio have a strong influence on diffusion coefficients whereas the influence of the dissipation range spectral index is weak. The best agreement with solar wind observations can be found for equal bend...

  15. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow over porous walls

    CERN Document Server

    Rosti, Marco E; Cortelezzi, Luca

    2014-01-01

    We perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a turbulent channel flow over porous walls. In the fluid region the flow is governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, while in the porous layers the Volume-Averaged Navier-Stokes (VANS) equations are used, which are obtained by volume-averaging the microscopic flow field over a small volume that is larger than the typical dimensions of the pores. In this way the porous medium has a continuum description, and can be specified via global properties like permeability and porosity, without the need of a detailed knowledge of the pore microstructure. At the interface between the porous material and the fluid region, following literature momentum-transfer conditions are applied, in which an available coefficient related to the unknown structure of the interface can be used as an error estimate. To formulate the numerical problem, the velocity-vorticity formulation of the coupled Navier--Stokes and VANS equations is derived and implement into a pseudo-sp...

  16. Numerical simulation of the turbulent convective buoyant flow of sodium over a backward- facing step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumm, T.; Frohnapfel, B.; Marocco, L.

    2016-09-01

    A forced convective and a buoyancy-aided turbulent liquid sodium flow over a backward-facing step with a constant heat flux applied on the indented wall is simulated. Linear eddy viscosity models are used for the Reynolds stresses. Turbulent heat fluxes are modelled with a single gradient diffusion hypotheses with two different approaches to evaluate the turbulent Prandtl number. Moreover, the influence of turbulence on heat transfer to sodium is also assessed through simulations with zero turbulent thermal diffusivity. The results are compared with DNS data from literature. The velocity and turbulent kinetic energy profiles predicted by all models are in good agreement with the DNS data. The local Nusselt number trend is qualitatively well captured, however, its magnitude is underestimated by all models for the mixed convection case. For forced convection, the heat transfer is overestimated by all heat flux models. The simulation with neglected turbulent heat transfer shows the best overall agreement for the forced convection case. For the mixed convection best agreement is obtained using a correlation to locally evaluate the turbulent thermal diffusivity.

  17. Direct numerical simulation and statistical analysis of turbulent convection in lead-bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otic, I.; Grotzbach, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institut fuer Kern-und Energietechnik (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Improved turbulent heat flux models are required to develop and analyze the reactor concept of an lead-bismuth cooled Accelerator-Driven-System. Because of specific properties of many liquid metals we have still no sensors for accurate measurements of the high frequency velocity fluctuations. So, the development of the turbulent heat transfer models which are required in our CFD (computational fluid dynamics) tools needs also data from direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows. We use new simulation results for the model problem of Rayleigh-Benard convection to show some peculiarities of the turbulent natural convection in lead-bismuth (Pr = 0.025). Simulations for this flow at sufficiently large turbulence levels became only recently feasible because this flow requires the resolution of very small velocity scales with the need for recording long-wave structures for the slow changes in the convective temperature field. The results are analyzed regarding the principle convection and heat transfer features. They are also used to perform statistical analysis to show that the currently available modeling is indeed not adequate for these fluids. Basing on the knowledge of the details of the statistical features of turbulence in this convection type and using the two-point correlation technique, a proposal for an improved statistical turbulence model is developed which is expected to account better for the peculiarities of the heat transfer in the turbulent convection in low Prandtl number fluids. (authors)

  18. Numerical simulation of incompressible turbulent flows in presence of laminar to turbulent transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, G.; Vashista, G. A.; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2017-04-01

    Most of the widely used popular mathematical models of turbulence use a judicious combination of intuition, empiricism and the governing equations of instantaneous and mean motion-valid strictly for fully developed turbulence without any laminar region. In reality however, any wall bounded or free shear flow may consist of some laminar flow patches which eventually undergo transition over a finite length to grow into fully turbulent flows. Most of the turbulence models used in commercial CFD codes, are unable to predict the dynamics of turbulent flows with laminar patches. However, accurate prediction of transitional flows is often essential to estimate the pressure losses and/or heat transfer in industrial applications. The present paper implements two different transition models in an existing finite volume URANS-based code RANS3D, developed in house and validated against reliable measurement data for flow past flat plates with different free stream turbulence levels and flow past SD7003 aerofoil at a chord-based Reynolds number of 60,000.

  19. Mt. Graham: Optical turbulence vertical distribution at standard and high vertical resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Masciadri, E; Hagelin, S; S.,; Lascaux, F; di Arcetri, INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico; 10.1117/12.856904

    2010-01-01

    A characterization of the optical turbulence vertical distribution and all the main integrated astroclimatic parameters derived from the CN2 and the wind speed profiles above Mt. Graham is presented. The statistic includes measurements related to 43 nights done with a Generalized Scidar (GS) used in standard configuration with a vertical resolution of ~1 km on the whole 20-22 km and with the new technique (HVR-GS) in the first kilometer. The latter achieves a resolution of ~ 20-30 m in this region of the atmosphere. Measurements done in different periods of the year permit us to provide a seasonal variation analysis of the CN2. A discretized distribution of the typical CN2 profiles useful for the Ground Layer Adaptive Optics (GLAO) simulations is provided and a specific analysis for the LBT Laser Guide Star system ARGOS case is done including the calculation of the 'gray zones' for J, H and K bands. Mt. Graham confirms to be an excellent site with median values of the seeing without dome contribution equal to...

  20. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF FREE SURFACE TURBULENT CHANNEL FLOW WITH HEAT TRANSFER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) was used to study the free-surface turbulent channel flow with passive heat transfer. The three-dimensional filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and energy equation were numerically solved with dynamic Subgrid Scale (SGS) models for modeling turbulent stresses and heat flux. To compare the turbulent behavior of the free-surface and two-walled channel flows, the LES of two-walled turbulent channel flow was performed. The statistical quantities and flow structures of the free-surface turbulence with heat transfer in the vicinity of the free-surface were investigated. The results are also in good agreement with theoretical analysis and available results by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS).

  1. Binocular adaptive optics visual simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Enrique J; Prieto, Pedro M; Artal, Pablo

    2009-09-01

    A binocular adaptive optics visual simulator is presented. The instrument allows for measuring and manipulating ocular aberrations of the two eyes simultaneously, while the subject performs visual testing under binocular vision. An important feature of the apparatus consists on the use of a single correcting device and wavefront sensor. Aberrations are controlled by means of a liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulator, where the two pupils of the subject are projected. Aberrations from the two eyes are measured with a single Hartmann-Shack sensor. As an example of the potential of the apparatus for the study of the impact of the eye's aberrations on binocular vision, results of contrast sensitivity after addition of spherical aberration are presented for one subject. Different binocular combinations of spherical aberration were explored. Results suggest complex binocular interactions in the presence of monochromatic aberrations. The technique and the instrument might contribute to the better understanding of binocular vision and to the search for optimized ophthalmic corrections.

  2. Outcomes from the DOE Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulation at the Exascale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprague, Michael; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Chang, Choong-Seock; Fischer, Paul F.; Grout, Ray; Gustafson, William I.; Hittinger, Jeffrey A.; Merzari, Elia; Moser, Robert

    2016-06-17

    This paper summarizes the outcomes from the Turbulent Flow Simulation at the Exascale: Opportunities and Challenges Workshop, which was held 4-5 August 2015, and was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research. The workshop objective was to define and describe the challenges and opportunities that computing at the exascale will bring to turbulent-flow simulations in applied science and technology. The need for accurate simulation of turbulent flows is evident across the U.S. Department of Energy applied-science and engineering portfolios, including combustion, plasma physics, nuclear-reactor physics, wind energy, and atmospheric science. The workshop brought together experts in turbulent-flow simulation, computational mathematics, and high-performance computing. Building upon previous ASCR workshops on exascale computing, participants defined a research agenda and path forward that will enable scientists and engineers to continually leverage, engage, and direct advances in computational systems on the path to exascale computing.

  3. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Timescale Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Kuron, Mike; Ren, Zhuyin; Lu, Tianfeng; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-11-01

    Transported probability density function (TPDF) method features the generality for all combustion regimes, which is attractive for turbulent combustion simulations. However, the modeling of micromixing due to molecular diffusion is still considered to be a primary challenge for TPDF method, especially in turbulent premixed flames. Recently, a hybrid mixing rate model for TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed flames has been proposed, which recovers the correct mixing rates in the limits of flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime while at the same time aims to properly account for the transition in between. In this work, this model is employed in TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed methane-air slot burner flames. The model performance is assessed by comparing the results from both direct numerical simulation (DNS) and conventional constant mechanical-to-scalar mixing rate model. This work is Granted by NSFC 51476087 and 91441202.

  4. Turbulent geodynamo simulations: a leap towards Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, N.; Jault, D.; Nataf, H.-C.; Fournier, A.

    2017-10-01

    We present an attempt to reach realistic turbulent regime in direct numerical simulations of the geodynamo. We rely on a sequence of three convection-driven simulations in a rapidly rotating spherical shell. The most extreme case reaches towards the Earth's core regime by lowering viscosity (magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 0.1) while maintaining vigorous convection (magnetic Reynolds number Rm > 500) and rapid rotation (Ekman number E = 10-7) at the limit of what is feasible on today's supercomputers. A detailed and comprehensive analysis highlights several key features matching geomagnetic observations or dynamo theory predictions—all present together in the same simulation—but it also unveils interesting insights relevant for Earth's core dynamics. In this strong-field, dipole-dominated dynamo simulation, the magnetic energy is one order of magnitude larger than the kinetic energy. The spatial distribution of magnetic intensity is highly heterogeneous, and a stark dynamical contrast exists between the interior and the exterior of the tangent cylinder (the cylinder parallel to the axis of rotation that circumscribes the inner core). In the interior, the magnetic field is strongest, and is associated with a vigorous twisted polar vortex, whose dynamics may occasionally lead to the formation of a reverse polar flux patch at the surface of the shell. Furthermore, the strong magnetic field also allows accumulation of light material within the tangent cylinder, leading to stable stratification there. Torsional Alfvén waves are frequently triggered in the vicinity of the tangent cylinder and propagate towards the equator. Outside the tangent cylinder, the magnetic field inhibits the growth of zonal winds and the kinetic energy is mostly non-zonal. Spatio-temporal analysis indicates that the low-frequency, non-zonal flow is quite geostrophic (columnar) and predominantly large-scale: an m = 1 eddy spontaneously emerges in our most extreme simulations, without any

  5. Development of a two zone turbulence model and its application to the cycle-simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjerić Momir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a two zone k-ε turbulence model for the cycle-simulation software is presented. The in-cylinder turbulent flow field of internal combustion engines plays the most important role in the combustion process. Turbulence has a strong influence on the combustion process because the convective deformation of the flame front as well as the additional transfer of the momentum, heat and mass can occur. The development and use of numerical simulation models are prompted by the high experimental costs, lack of measurement equipment and increase in computer power. In the cycle-simulation codes, multi zone models are often used for rapid and robust evaluation of key engine parameters. The extension of the single zone turbulence model to the two zone model is presented and described. Turbulence analysis was focused only on the high pressure cycle according to the assumption of the homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow field. Specific modifications of differential equation derivatives were made in both cases (single and two zone. Validation was performed on two engine geometries for different engine speeds and loads. Results of the cyclesimulation model for the turbulent kinetic energy and the combustion progress variable are compared with the results of 3D-CFD simulations. Very good agreement between the turbulent kinetic energy during the high pressure cycle and the combustion progress variable was obtained. The two zone k-ε turbulence model showed a further progress in terms of prediction of the combustion process by using only the turbulent quantities of the unburned zone.

  6. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Hong G [University of Michigan; Trouve, Arnaud [University of Maryland; Rutland, Christopher J [University of Wisconsin; Chen, Jacqueline H [Sandia National Laboratories

    2012-08-13

    The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

  7. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION (LES) OF TURBULENT FLOW BY FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KWAG Seung Hyun; DOI Yasuaki; PARK Jong Chun

    2004-01-01

    A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique was applied to solve the turbulent channel flow for Reτ=150. Three types of turbulence models are employed, such as the Smagorinsky model, the Dynamic Sub-Grid Scale(SGS) model and the Generalized Normal Stress (GNS) model. The simulated data in time series for the LES were averaged in both time and space to carry out the statistical analysis. Results of LES were compared with that of a DNS. As an application, a LES technique was used for 2D body in order to check the validation by investigating the turbulent vortical motion around the afterbody with a slant angle.

  8. Synthetic atmospheric turbulence and wind shear in large eddy simulations of wind turbine wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Troldborg, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    , superimposed on top of a mean deterministic shear layer consistent with that used in the IEC standard for wind turbine load calculations. First, the method is evaluated by running a series of large-eddy simulations in an empty domain, where the imposed turbulence and wind shear is allowed to reach a fully...... as input for simulations with a wind turbine, represented by an actuator line model, to evaluate the development of turbulence in a wind turbine wake. The resulting turbulence intensity and spectral distribution, as well as the meandering of the wake, are compared to field data. Overall, the performance...

  9. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR INCOMPRESSIBLE TURBULENT FLOW IN THE IMPELLER OF SEWAGE PUMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Minguan; Guo Xiaomei; Wang Chunlin; Jia Weidong; Yuan Chunyuan

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D turbulent flow in the impeller of sewage pump is simulated.The time-averaged N-S equations and the k-ε turbulent model is modified.The calculation is carried out in body-fitted coordinated grid by applying SIMPLE-C algorithm.The calculated velocity, pressure distributions of the turbulent flow in the sewage pump are obtained for the first time, which will be helpful for the optimal design and performance prediction of sewage pumps on the basis of flow field simulation.

  10. Compressibility Corrections to Closure Approximations for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L D

    2003-02-01

    We summarize some modifications to the usual closure approximations for statistical models of turbulence that are necessary for use with compressible fluids at all Mach numbers. We concentrate here on the gradient-flu approximation for the turbulent heat flux, on the buoyancy production of turbulence kinetic energy, and on a modification of the Smagorinsky model to include buoyancy. In all cases, there are pressure gradient terms that do not appear in the incompressible models and are usually omitted in compressible-flow models. Omission of these terms allows unphysical rates of entropy change.

  11. Computational Enhancements for Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Mukhadiyev, Nurzhan

    2017-05-01

    Combustion at extreme conditions, such as a turbulent flame at high Karlovitz and Reynolds numbers, is still a vast and an uncertain field for researchers. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent flame is a superior tool to unravel detailed information that is not accessible to most sophisticated state-of-the-art experiments. However, the computational cost of such simulations remains a challenge even for modern supercomputers, as the physical size, the level of turbulence intensity, and chemical complexities of the problems continue to increase. As a result, there is a strong demand for computational cost reduction methods as well as in acceleration of existing methods. The main scope of this work was the development of computational and numerical tools for high-fidelity direct numerical simulations of premixed planar flames interacting with turbulence. The first part of this work was KAUST Adaptive Reacting Flow Solver (KARFS) development. KARFS is a high order compressible reacting flow solver using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism; it is capable to run on various types of heterogeneous computational architectures. In this work, it was shown that KARFS is capable of running efficiently on both CPU and GPU. The second part of this work was numerical tools for direct numerical simulations of planar premixed flames: such as linear turbulence forcing and dynamic inlet control. DNS of premixed turbulent flames conducted previously injected velocity fluctuations at an inlet. Turbulence injected at the inlet decayed significantly while reaching the flame, which created a necessity to inject higher than needed fluctuations. A solution for this issue was to maintain turbulence strength on the way to the flame using turbulence forcing. Therefore, a linear turbulence forcing was implemented into KARFS to enhance turbulence intensity. Linear turbulence forcing developed previously by other groups was corrected with net added momentum removal mechanism to prevent mean

  12. Integrated Approach to Free Space Optical Communications in Strong Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    24 EDFA erbium-doped fiber amplifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 APD...either optically or electrically. An erbium-doped fiber amplifier ( EDFA ), which optically enhances the signal but is susceptible to increased noise due to

  13. Contributions of numerical simulation data bases to the physics, modeling and measurement of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Parviz; Spalart, Philippe R.

    1987-01-01

    The use of simulation data bases for the examination of turbulent flows is an effective research tool. Studies of the structure of turbulence have been hampered by the limited number of probes and the impossibility of measuring all desired quantities. Also, flow visualization is confined to the observation of passive markers with limited field of view and contamination caused by time-history effects. Computer flow fields are a new resource for turbulence research, providing all the instantaneous flow variables in three-dimensional space. Simulation data bases also provide much-needed information for phenomenological turbulence modeling. Three dimensional velocity and pressure fields from direct simulations can be used to compute all the terms in the transport equations for the Reynolds stresses and the dissipation rate. However, only a few, geometrically simple flows have been computed by direct numerical simulation, and the inventory of simulation does not fully address the current modeling needs in complex turbulent flows. The availability of three-dimensional flow fields also poses challenges in developing new techniques for their analysis, techniques based on experimental methods, some of which are used here for the analysis of direct-simulation data bases in studies of the mechanics of turbulent flows.

  14. Eulerian-Lagranigan simulation of aerosol evolution in turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2016-09-23

    The formation and evolution of aerosol in turbulent flows are ubiquitous in both industrial processes and nature. The intricate interaction of turbulent mixing and aerosol evolution in a canonical turbulent mixing layer was investigated by a direct numerical simulation (DNS) in a recent study (Zhou, K., Attili, A., Alshaarawi, A., and Bisetti, F. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer. Physics of Fluids, 26, 065106 (2014)). In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of aerosol evolution is carried out along Lagrangian trajectories obtained in the previous simulation, in order to quantify the error of the moment method used in the previous simulation. Moreover, the particle size distribution (PSD), not available in the previous works, is also investigated. Along a fluid parcel moving through the turbulent flow, temperature and vapor concentration exhibit complex fluctuations, triggering complicate aerosol processes and rendering complex PSD. However, the mean PSD is found to be bi-modal in most of the mixing layer except that a tri-modal distribution is found in the turbulent transition region. The simulated PSDs agree with the experiment observations available in the literature. A different explanation on the formation of such PSDs is provided.

  15. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow using the finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R.C.

    1995-02-15

    The equations of motion describing turbulent flows (in both the low and high Reynolds-number regimes) are well established. However, present day computers cannot meet the enormous computational requirement for numerically solving the governing equations for common engineering flows in the high Reynolds number turbulent regime. The characteristics that make turbulent, high Reynolds number flows difficult to simulate is the extreme range of time and space scales of motion. Most current engineering calculations are performed using semi-empirical equations, developed in terms of the flow mean (average) properties. These turbulence{open_quote} models{close_quote} (semi-empirical/analytical approximations) do not explicitly account for the eddy structures and thus, the temporal and spatial flow fluctuations are not resolved. In these averaging approaches, it is necessary to approximate all the turbulent structures using semi-empirical relations, and as a result, the turbulence models must be tailored for specific flow conditions and geometries with parameters obtained (usually) from physical experiments. The motivation for this research is the development of a finite element turbulence modeling approach which will ultimately be used to predict the wind flow around buildings. Accurate turbulence models of building flow are needed to predict the dispersion of airborne pollutants. The building flow turbulence models used today are not capable of predicting the three-dimensional separating and reattaching flows without the manipulation of many empirical parameters. These empirical parameters must be set by experimental data and they may vary unpredictably with building geometry, building orientation, and upstream flow conditions.

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices in a Homogeneous Atmospheric Turbulence: Vortex Decay and Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ambient turbulence on decay and descent of aircraft wake vortices are studied using a validated, three-dimensional: large-eddy simulation model. Numerical simulations are performed in order to isolate the effect of ambient turbulence on the wake vortex decay rate within a neutrally-stratified atmosphere. Simulations are conducted for a range of turbulence intensities, by injecting wake vortex pairs into an approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulence field. The decay rate of the vortex circulation increases clearly with increasing ambient turbulence level, which is consistent with field observations. Based on the results from the numerical simulations, simple decay models are proposed as functions of dimensionless ambient turbulence intensity (eta) and dimensionless time (T) for the circulation averaged over a range of radial distances. With good agreement with the numerical results, a Gaussian type of vortex decay model is proposed for weak turbulence: while an exponential type of Tortex decay model can be applied for strong turbulence. A relationship for the vortex descent based on above vortex decay model is also proposed. Although the proposed models are based on simulations assuming neutral stratification, the model predictions are compared to Lidar vortex measurements observed during stable, neutral, and unstable atmospheric conditions. In the neutral and unstable atmosphere, the model predictions appear to be in reasonable agreement with the observational data, while in the stably-stratified atmosphere, they largely underestimate the observed circulation decay with consistent overestimation of the observed vortex descent. The underestimation of vortex decay during stably-stratified conditions suggests that stratification has an important influence on vortex decay when ambient levels of turbulence are weak.

  17. From quantum turbulence to statistical atom optics: new perspectives in speckle matter wave

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, P E S; Telles, G D; Impens, F; Kaiser, R; Bagnato, V S

    2016-01-01

    Quantum Turbulence, the chaotic configuration of tangled quantized vortex lines, can be analyzed from the matter wave perspective in instead of the traditional fluid perspective. We report the observation of a remarkable similarity in between the dynamics of a freely expanding turbulent Bose-Einstein condensate and the propagation of an optical speckle pattern. Both follow very similar basic propagation characteristics. The second-order correlation is calculated and the typical correlation length of the two phenomena is used to substantiate the observations. The analogy between an expanding turbulent atomic condensate and a traveling optical speckle creates exciting prospects to investigate disordered quantum matter including the possibilities of a 3D speckle matter field.

  18. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-12

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  19. Direct observation of Rogue Waves in optical turbulence using Time Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Suret, Pierre; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clement; Randoux, Stephane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The formation of coherent structures in noise driven phenomena and in Turbulence is a complex and fundamental question. A particulary important structure is the so-called Rogue Wave (RW) that arises as the sudden appearance of a localized and giant peak. First studied in Oceanography, RWs have been extensively investigated in Optics since 2007, in particular in optical fibers experiments on supercontinua and optical turbulence. However the typical time scales underlying the random dynamics in those experiments prevented --up to now-- the direct observation of isolated RWs. Here we report on the direct observation of RWs, using an ultrafast acquisition system equivalent to microscope in the time domain. The RWs are generated by nonlinear propagation of random waves inside an optical fiber, and recorded with $\\sim 250$~fs resolution. Our experiments demonstrate the central role played by "breathers-like" solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (1D-NLSE) in the formation of RWs

  20. Long-range transport of terrain-induced turbulence from high-resolution numerical simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Katurji

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Over complex terrain, an important question is how various topographic features may generate or alter wind turbulence and how far the influence can be extended downstream. Current measurement technology limits the capability in providing a long-range snapshot of turbulence as atmospheric eddies travel over terrain, interact with each other, change their productive and dissipative properties, and are then observed tens of kilometers downstream of their source. In this study, we investigate through high-resolution numerical simulations the atmospheric transport of terrain-generated turbulence in an atmosphere that is neutrally stratified. The simulations are two-dimensional with an isotropic spatial resolution of 15 m and run to a quasi-steady state. They are designed in such a way to allow an examination of the effects of a bell-shaped experimental hill with varying height and aspect ratio on turbulence properties generated by another hill 20 km upstream. Averaged fields of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE imply that terrain could have a large influence on velocity perturbations at least 30H (H is the terrain height upstream and downstream of the terrain, with the largest effect happening in the area of the largest pressure perturbations. The results also show that downstream of the terrain the TKE fields are sensitive to the terrain's aspect ratio with larger enhancement in turbulence by higher aspect ratio, while upstream there is a suppression of turbulence that does not appear to be sensitive to the terrain aspect ratio. Instantaneous vorticity fields shows very detailed flow structures that resemble a multitude of eddy scales dynamically interacting while shearing oppositely paired vortices. The knowledge of the turbulence production and modifications by topography from these high-resolution simulations can be helpful in understanding long-range terrain-induced turbulence and improving turbulence parameterizations used in

  1. Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Molecular Clouds Regulated by Radiation Feedback Forces. I. Star Formation Rate and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskutti, Sudhir; Ostriker, Eve C.; Skinner, M. Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Radiation feedback from stellar clusters is expected to play a key role in setting the rate and efficiency of star formation in giant molecular clouds. To investigate how radiation forces influence realistic turbulent systems, we have conducted a series of numerical simulations employing the Hyperion radiation hydrodynamics solver, considering the regime that is optically thick to ultraviolet and optically thin to infrared radiation. Our model clouds cover initial surface densities between Σ cl,0∼ 10--300 M⊙ pc-2, with varying initial turbulence. We follow them through turbulent, self-gravitating collapse, star cluster formation, and cloud dispersal by stellar radiation. All our models display a log-normal distribution of gas surface density Σ for an initial virial parameter αvir,0=2, the log-normal standard deviation is σln Σ =1-1.5 and the star formation rate coefficient ɛff,ρ=0.3-0.5, both of which are sensitive to turbulence but not radiation feedback. The net star formation efficiency (SFE) ɛfinal increases with Σcl,0 and decreases with α vir,0. We interpret these results via a simple conceptual framework, whereby steady star formation increases the radiation force, such that local gas patches at successively higher Σ become unbound. Based on this formalism (with fixed σln Σ), we provide an analytic upper bound on ɛfinal, which is in good agreement with our numerical results. The final SFE depends on the distribution of Eddington ratios in the cloud and is strongly increased by the turbulent compression of gas.

  2. Cost Reduction of Large Eddy Simulation of Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels; Rethore, Pierre-Elouan

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses simulations of airfoil flows by use of computational fluid dynamics. In recent work large eddy simulations (LES) of airfoil flows have proved superior to detached eddy simulations (DES); by resolving the inflow turbulence the agreement with experiments is improved. The scope...

  3. SIMULATION OF STRONG TURBULENCE FLOW WITH FREE SURFACE INCLUDING THE EFFECTS OF STREAMLINE CURVATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hui-chao; LIU Yu-ling; WEI Wen-li

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a mathematical model for two-dimensional strong turbulence flow with free surface including the effects of streamline curvature in orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system, with which the characteristics of the turbulence flow field on the ogee spillway was numerical simulated. In the numerical simulation, the flow control equations in orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system were discretized by the finite volume method, the physical parameters( P, U,V,K,ε,γt,etc.) were arranged on a staggered grid, the discretized equations were solved with the SIMPLEC method, and the complex free surface was dealt with VOF method. The computed results show that the velocity fields, pressure field, shear stress distribution and kinetic energy of turbulent flow on the ogee spillway are in agreement with experimental data. This confirms that the model can be used for numerical simulation of the turbulence flow on ogee spillway.

  4. Simulation model of SAR remote sensing of turbulent wake of semi-elliptical submerged body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In terms of the 2-dimensional hydrodynamic simplified model of a semi-elliptical submerged body moving horizontally at high speed,by using the full-spectrum model of SAR(synthetic aperture radar) remote sensing and taking the effect of oceanic interior turbulence on surface gravity capillary waves into account, applying the k-ε model of turbulence with internal wave mixing, and adopting the Nasmyth spectrum of oceanic turbulence, the 2-dimensional simulation model of SAR remote sensing of this semi-elliptical submerged body is built up. Simulation by using this model at X band and C band is made in the northeastern South China Sea (21°00'N,119°00'E). Satisfactory results of the delay time and delay distance of turbulent surface wake of this semi-elliptical submerged body, as well as the minimum submerged depth at which this submerged body which cannot be discovered by SAR, are obtained through simulation.

  5. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Li, Shan; Wang, Hu; Ren, Zhuyin

    2015-11-01

    Predictive simulations of turbulent premixed flames over a wide range of Damköhler numbers in the framework of Probability Density Function (PDF) method still remain challenging due to the deficiency in current micro-mixing models. In this work, a hybrid micro-mixing model, valid in both the flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime, is proposed. A priori testing of this model is first performed by examining the conditional scalar dissipation rate and conditional scalar diffusion in a 3-D direct numerical simulation dataset of a temporally evolving turbulent slot jet flame of lean premixed H2-air in the thin reaction zone regime. Then, this new model is applied to PDF simulations of the Piloted Premixed Jet Burner (PPJB) flames, which are a set of highly shear turbulent premixed flames and feature strong turbulence-chemistry interaction at high Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers. Supported by NSFC 51476087 and NSFC 91441202.

  6. Employing Taylor and Heisenberg subfilter viscosities to simulate turbulent statistics in LES models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrazia, G. A.; Rizza, U.; Puhales, F. S.; Welter, G. S.; Acevedo, O. C.; Maldaner, S.

    2012-02-01

    A turbulent subfilter viscosity for Large Eddy Simulation (LES) based on the Taylor statistical diffusion theory is proposed. This viscosity is described in terms of a velocity variance and a time scale, both associated to the inertial subrange. This new subfilter viscosity contains a cutoff wavenumber kc, presenting an identical form (differing by a constant) to the Heisenberg subfilter viscosity. Therefore, both subfilter viscosities are described in terms of a sharp division between large and small wavenumbers of a turbulent flow and, henceforth, Taylor and Heisenberg subfilter viscosities are in agreement with the sharp Fourier filtering operation, frequently employed in LES models. Turbulent statistics of different orders, generated from atmospheric boundary layer simulations employing both Taylor and Heisenberg subfilter viscosities have been compared with observations and results provided by other simulations. The comparison shows that the LES model utilizing the approaches of Taylor and Heisenberg reproduces these turbulent statistics correctly in different vertical regions of a planetary convective boundary layer (CBL).

  7. Simultaneous measurement of aero-optical distortion and turbulent structure in a heated boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley; Smith, Adam; Gordeyev, Stanislav

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between turbulent structures and the aero-optical distortion of a laser beam passing through a turbulent boundary layer. Previous studies by Smith et al. (AIAA, 2014--2491) have found a bulk convection velocity of 0 . 8U∞ for aero-optical distortion in turbulent boundary layers, motivating a comparison of the distortion with the outer boundary layer. In this study, a turbulent boundary layer is developed over a flat plate with a moderately-heated section of length 25 δ . Density variation in the thermal boundary layer leads to aero-optical distortion, which is measured with a Malley probe (Smith et al., AIAA, 2013--3133). Simultaneously, 2D PIV measurements are recorded in a wall-normal, streamwise plane centered on the Malley probe location. Experiments are run at Reθ = 2100 and at a Mach number of 0.03, with the heated wall 10 to 20°C above the free stream temperature. Correlations and conditional averages are carried out between Malley probe distortion angles and flow features in the PIV vector fields. Aero-optical distortion in this study will be compared to distortion in higher Mach number flows studied by Gordeyev et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014), with the aim of extending conclusions into compressible flows. This research is made possible by the Department of Defense through the National Defense & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant # FA9550-12-1-0060.

  8. Wave turbulence in integrable systems: nonlinear propagation of incoherent optical waves in single-mode fibers

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    International audience; We study theoretically, numerically and experimentally the nonlinear propagation of partially incoherent optical waves in single mode optical fibers. We revisit the traditional treatment of the wave turbulence theory to provide a statistical kinetic description of the integrable scalar NLS equation. In spite of the formal reversibility and of the integrability of the NLS equation, the weakly nonlinear dynamics reveals the existence of an irreversible evolution toward a...

  9. Digital simulation of 3D turbulence wind field of Sutong Bridge based on measured wind spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao WANG; Zhou-hong ZONG; Ai-qun LI; Teng TONG; Jie NIU; Wen-ping DENG

    2012-01-01

    Time domain analysis is an essential implement to study the buffeting behavior of long-span bridges for it can consider the non-linear effect which is significant in long-span bridges.The prerequisite of time domain analysis is the accurate description of 3D turbulence winds.In this paper,some hypotheses for simplifying the 3D turbulence simulation of long-span cable-stayed bridges are conducted,considering the structural characteristics.The turbulence wind which is a 3D multivariate stochastic vector process is converted into four independent ID univariate stochastic processes.Based on recorded wind data from structural health monitoring system (SHMS) of the Sutong Bridge,China,the measured spectra expressions are then presented using the nonlinear least-squares fitting method.Turbulence winds at the Sutong Bridge site are simulated based on the spectral representation method and the Fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique,and the relevant results derived from target spectra including measured spectra and recommended spectra are compared.The reliability and accuracy of the presented turbulence simulation method are validated through comparisons between simulated and target spectra (measured and recommended spectra).The obtained turbulence simulations can not only serve further analysis of the buffeting behavior of the Sutong Bridge,but references for structural anti-wind design in adjacent regions.

  10. Investigation of Particles Statistics in large Eddy Simulated Turbulent Channel Flow using Generalized lattice Boltzmann Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Samari Kermani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of spherical solid particles with turbulent eddies in a 3-D turbulent channel flow with friction Reynolds number was studied. A generalized lattice Boltzmann equation (GLBE was used for computation of instantaneous turbulent flow field for which large eddy simulation (LES was employed. The sub-grid-scale (SGS turbulence effects were simulated through a shear-improved Smagorinsky model (SISM, which can predict turbulent near wall region without any wall function. Statistical properties of particles behavior such as root mean square (RMS velocities were studied as a function of dimensionless particle relaxation time ( by using a Lagrangian approach. Combination of SISM in GLBE with particle tracking analysis in turbulent channel flow is novelty of the present work. Both GLBE and SISM solve the flow field equations locally. This is an advantage of this method and makes it easy implementing. Comparison of the present results with previous available data indicated that SISM in GLBE is a reliable method for simulation of turbulent flows which is a key point to predict particles behavior correctly.

  11. Turbulence radiation interaction modeling in hydrocarbon pool fire simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURNS,SHAWN P.

    1999-12-01

    The importance of turbulent fluctuations in temperature and species concentration in thermal radiation transport modeling for combustion applications is well accepted by the radiation transport and combustion communities. A number of experimental and theoretical studies over the last twenty years have shown that fluctuations in the temperature and species concentrations may increase the effective emittance of a turbulent flame by as much as 50% to 300% over the value that would be expected from the mean temperatures and concentrations. With the possibility of such a large effect on the principal mode of heat transfer from a fire, it is extremely important for fire modeling efforts that turbulence radiation interaction be well characterized and possible modeling approaches understood. Toward this end, this report seeks to accomplish three goals. First, the principal turbulence radiation interaction closure terms are defined. Second, an order of magnitude analysis is performed to understand the relative importance of the various closure terms. Finally, the state of the art in turbulence radiation interaction closure modeling is reviewed. Hydrocarbon pool fire applications are of particular interest in this report and this is the perspective from which this review proceeds. Experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that, for this type of heavily sooting flame, the turbulent radiation interaction effect is dominated by the nonlinear dependence of the Planck function on the temperature. Additional effects due to the correlation between turbulent fluctuations in the absorptivity and temperature may be small relative to the Planck function effect for heavily sooting flames. This observation is drawn from a number of experimental and theoretical discussions. Nevertheless, additional analysis and data is needed to validate this observation for heavily sooting buoyancy dominated plumes.

  12. Implicit Large-Eddy Simulations of Zero-Pressure Gradient, Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Susheel; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2015-01-01

    A set of direct simulations of zero-pressure gradient, turbulent boundary layer flows are conducted using various span widths (62-630 wall units), to document their influence on the generated turbulence. The FDL3DI code that solves compressible Navier-Stokes equations using high-order compact-difference scheme and filter, with the standard recycling/rescaling method of turbulence generation, is used. Results are analyzed at two different Re values (500 and 1,400), and compared with spectral DNS data. They show that a minimum span width is required for the mere initiation of numerical turbulence. Narrower domains ((is) less than 100 w.u.) result in relaminarization. Wider spans ((is) greater than 600 w.u.) are required for the turbulent statistics to match reference DNS. The upper-wall boundary condition for this setup spawns marginal deviations in the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles, particularly in the buffer region.

  13. Large eddy simulation of compressible turbulent channel flow with spanwise wall oscillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jian; LU LiPeng; SHAO Liang

    2009-01-01

    The influences of the modification of turbulent coherent structures on temperature field and heat transfer in turbulent channel flow are studied using large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible tur-bulent channel flows with spanwise wall oscillation (SWO). The reliability of the LES on such problems is proved by the comparisons of the drag reduction data with those of other researches. The high con-sistency of coherent velocity structures and temperature structures is found based on the analyses of the turbulent flow field. When the coherent velocity structures are suppressed, the transportations of momentum and heat are reduced simultaneously, demonstrating the same trend. This shows that the turbulent coherent structures have the same effects on the transportations of momentum and heat. The averaged wall heat flux can be reduced with appropriate oscillating parameters.

  14. Large eddy simulation of compressible turbulent channel flow with spanwise wall oscillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The influences of the modification of turbulent coherent structures on temperature field and heat transfer in turbulent channel flow are studied using large eddy simulation(LES) of compressible turbulent channel flows with spanwise wall oscillation(SWO).The reliability of the LES on such problems is proved by the comparisons of the drag reduction data with those of other researches.The high consistency of coherent velocity structures and temperature structures is found based on the analyses of the turbulent flow field.When the coherent velocity structures are suppressed,the transportations of momentum and heat are reduced simultaneously,demonstrating the same trend.This shows that the turbulent coherent structures have the same effects on the transportations of momentum and heat.The averaged wall heat flux can be reduced with appropriate oscillating parameters.

  15. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Turbulent Couette Minimal Flow Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward

    2016-11-01

    What happens to turbulent motions below the Kolmogorov length scale? In order to explore this question, a 300 million molecule Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation is presented for the minimal Couette channel in which turbulence can be sustained. The regeneration cycle and turbulent statistics show excellent agreement to continuum based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) at Re=400. As MD requires only Newton's laws and a form of inter-molecular potential, it captures a much greater range of phenomena without requiring the assumptions of Newton's law of viscosity, thermodynamic equilibrium, fluid isotropy or the limitation of grid resolution. The fundamental nature of MD means it is uniquely placed to explore the nature of turbulent transport. A number of unique insights from MD are presented, including energy budgets, sub-grid turbulent energy spectra, probability density functions, Lagrangian statistics and fluid wall interactions. EPSRC Post Doctoral Prize Fellowship.

  16. Optical eye simulator for laser dazzle events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, João M P; Freitas, José; Williamson, Craig A

    2016-03-20

    An optical simulator of the human eye and its application to laser dazzle events are presented. The simulator combines optical design software (ZEMAX) with a scientific programming language (MATLAB) and allows the user to implement and analyze a dazzle scenario using practical, real-world parameters. Contrary to conventional analytical glare analysis, this work uses ray tracing and the scattering model and parameters for each optical element of the eye. The theoretical background of each such element is presented in relation to the model. The overall simulator's calibration, validation, and performance analysis are achieved by comparison with a simpler model based uponCIE disability glare data. Results demonstrate that this kind of advanced optical eye simulation can be used to represent laser dazzle and has the potential to extend the range of applicability of analytical models.

  17. Miniature dissolved oxygen and turbulence optical sensor for river and coastal environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapezza, Edward M.; Lombardi, Gabrial; Butman, Jerry; Babb, Ivar

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes an innovative miniature optical sensor for predicting dissolved oxygen concentrations and measuring turbulence in river and littoral water columns. The dissolved oxygen and turbulence sensor consists of a single-frequency laser transmitter and a photodetector on which the scattered light from the turbulent water at the base of a dam or spillway is coherently mixed with a sample of the transmitted beam. This miniature sensor could be used both upstream and downsteam of dams and weirs to predict the amount of dissolved oxygen and turbulence in these waters. It could also be used on mobile platforms, such as unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV's), to monitor the edges of biological or chemical plumes or for wake follow platforms, schools of fish or marine mammals or on stationary unattended underwater sensors to monitor natural aeration and turbulence in littoral and riverine waters. Arrays of fixed unattended sensors could be used to detect the wake of transiting submerged vehicles, scuba divers, marine mammals or large schools of fish. A mobile platform equipped with a miniature sensor could to be cued to the general location and depth of an underwater target and then the platform could use this small aperture sensor to acquire and follow the wake. This dissolved oxygen and turbulence sensor system could be miniaturized and packaged into a very small volume; approximately the size of a wristwatch.

  18. Long-range transport of terrain-induced turbulence from high-resolution numerical simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Katurji

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Over complex terrain, an important question is how various topographic features may generate or alter wind turbulence and how far the influence can be extended downstream. Current measurement technology limits the capability in providing a long-range snapshot of turbulence as atmospheric eddies travel over terrain, interact with each other, change their productive and dissipative properties, and are then observed tens of kilometers downstream of their source.In this study, we investigate through high-resolutionnumerical simulations the atmospheric transport of terrain-generated turbulence in an atmosphere that is neutrally stratified. The simulations are two-dimensional with an isotropic spatial resolution of 15 m and run to a quasi-steady state. They are designed in such a way to allow an examination of the effects of a bell-shaped experimental hill with varying height and aspect ratio on turbulence properties generated by another hill 20 km upstream. Averaged fields of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE implythat terrain could have a large influence on velocity perturbations at least 30 H (H is the terrain height upstream and downstream of the terrain, with the largest effect happening in the area of the largest pressure perturbations. The results also show that downstream of the terrain the TKE fields are sensitive to the terrain's aspect ratio with larger enhancement in turbulence by higher aspect ratio, while upstream there is a suppression of turbulence that does not appear to be sensitive to the terrain aspect ratio. Instantaneous vorticity fields shows very detailed flow structures that resemble a multitude of eddy scales dynamically interacting while shearing oppositely paired vortices. The knowledge of the turbulence production and modifications by topography from these high-resolutionsimulationscan be helpful in understanding long-range terrain-induced turbulence and improving turbulence parameterizations used in lower

  19. THREE-DIMENSIONAL TURBULENCE NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A STEPPED SPILLWAY OVERFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qun; DAI Guang-qing; ZHU Fen-qing; YANG Qing

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the k-ε two-equation turbulence model was used to simulate the three-dimensional turbulent flow of the stepped spillway at the Yubeishan reservoir. In order to solve the curved free water surface and to handle the complex boundary conditions, the fractional Volume Of Fluid (VOF) model that is applicable to the solution of the stratified two-phase flow was intorduced to the k-ε turbulence model and the unstructured grid was used for the discretization of the irregular simulation domain. By these methods, the turbulent flow field of the stepped spillway was simulated successfully. The location of the free surface along the spillway, the magnitude and distribution of the velocity, the pressure distribution on the step surface, the turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence dissipation rate were obtained by simulation. The changes and distributions of these characteristics along the width of the spillway were also obtained. The energy dissipation ratio of the stepped spillway was calculated according to the upstream and downstream water depth and velocities.

  20. Numerical Simulations of Turbulent, Molecular Clouds Regulated by Radiation Feedback Forces I: Star Formation Rate and Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Raskutti, Sudhir; Skinner, M Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Radiation feedback from stellar clusters is expected to play a key role in setting the rate and efficiency of star formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs). To investigate how radiation forces influence realistic turbulent systems, we have conducted a series of numerical simulations employing the {\\it Hyperion} radiation hydrodynamics solver, considering the regime that is optically thick to ultraviolet (UV) and optically thin to infrared (IR) radiation. Our model clouds cover initial surface densities between $\\Sigma_{\\rm cl,0} \\sim 10-300~M_{\\odot}~{\\rm pc^{-2}}$, with varying initial turbulence. We follow them through turbulent, self-gravitating collapse, formation of star clusters, and cloud dispersal by stellar radiation. All our models display a lognormal distribution of gas surface density $\\Sigma$; for an initial virial parameter $\\alpha_{\\rm vir,0} = 2$, the lognormal standard deviation is $\\sigma_{\\rm ln \\Sigma} = 1-1.5$ and the star formation rate coefficient $\\varepsilon_{\\rm ff,\\bar\\rho} = 0.3-...

  1. Subproton-scale Cascades in Solar Wind Turbulence: Driven Hybrid-kinetic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, S. S.; Califano, F.; Jenko, F.; Told, D.; Rincon, F.

    2016-05-01

    A long-lasting debate in space plasma physics concerns the nature of subproton-scale fluctuations in solar wind (SW) turbulence. Over the past decade, a series of theoretical and observational studies were presented in favor of either kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) or whistler turbulence. Here, we investigate numerically the nature of the subproton-scale turbulent cascade for typical SW parameters by means of unprecedented high-resolution simulations of forced hybrid-kinetic turbulence in two real-space and three velocity-space dimensions. Our analysis suggests that small-scale turbulence in this model is dominated by KAWs at β ≳ 1 and by magnetosonic/whistler fluctuations at lower β. The spectral properties of the turbulence appear to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions. A tentative interpretation of this result in terms of relative changes in the damping rates of the different waves is also presented. Overall, the results raise interesting new questions about the properties and variability of subproton-scale turbulence in the SW, including its possible dependence on the plasma β, and call for detailed and extensive parametric explorations of driven kinetic turbulence in three dimensions.

  2. Three Dimensional Large Eddy Simulation Model of Turbulence in a Meandering Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahori, R.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2002-12-01

    Recent research has shown that intermittency caused by large-scale turbulence structures in rivers can be critical to accurate prediction of the sediment transport field. These large-scale turbulence structures are inherently three-dimensional. This is especially true in a river meander where strong secondary flows affect not only the three-dimensional, time-averaged flow structure, but also the process of large-scale turbulent eddy generation. It is very difficult to directly measure the turbulence field in a river except at the water surface or a few points in the interior of the flow. Numerical simulation of turbulence is a powerful tool, because it can provide information about the non-averaged flow at each grid point. Many previous researchers have calculated the time-averaged flow in a meandering channel, and obtained useful results. However, simulations of turbulence in meandering channels have been restricted to two dimensions. Therefore, they have a problem in accurately reproducing important features of the flow. We present a 3-dimenstional turbulent model for the numerical calculation of channel flow. The turbulence cannot be resolved at scales smaller than the channel grid, and we therefore parameterize the effects of small scale turbulence using standard Large Eddy Simulation (LES) assumptions. A Body Fitted Coordinate (BFC) system is employed to fit the irregular boundaries of natural channels. To solve the Navier-Stokes equations on the finite difference mesh, we employ the Cubic-Interpolated Propagation (CIP) method. The CIP method precisely solves the convective acceleration terms without numerical diffusion.

  3. Simulations of optical microscope images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germer, Thomas A.; Marx, Egon

    2006-03-01

    The resolution of an optical microscope is limited by the optical wavelengths used. However, there is no fundamental limit to the sensitivity of a microscope to small differences in any of a feature's dimensions. That is, those limits are determined by such things as the sensitivity of the detector array, the quality of the optical system, and the stability of the light source. The potential for using this nearly unbounded sensitivity has sparked interest in extending optical microscopy to the characterization of sub-wavelength structures created by photolithography and using that characterization for process control. In this paper, an analysis of the imaging of a semiconductor grating structure with an optical microscope will be presented. The analysis includes the effects of partial coherence in the illumination system, aberrations of both the illumination and the collection optics, non-uniformities in the illumination, and polarization. It can thus model just about any illumination configuration imaginable, including Koehler illumination, focused (confocal) illumination, or dark-field illumination. By propagating Jones matrices throughout the system, polarization control at the back focal planes of both illumination and collection can be investigated. Given a detailed characterization of the microscope (including aberrations), images can be calculated and compared to real data, allowing details of the grating structure to be determined, in a manner similar to that found in scatterometry.

  4. Incompressible Turbulent Flow Simulation Using the κ-ɛ Model and Upwind Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the computation of turbulent flows via turbulence modeling, the treatment of the convective terms is a key issue. In the present work, we present a numerical technique for simulating two-dimensional incompressible turbulent flows. In particular, the performance of the high Reynolds κ-ɛ model and a new high-order upwind scheme (adaptative QUICKEST by Kaibara et al. (2005 is assessed for 2D confined and free-surface incompressible turbulent flows. The model equations are solved with the fractional-step projection method in primitive variables. Solutions are obtained by using an adaptation of the front tracking GENSMAC (Tomé and McKee (1994 methodology for calculating fluid flows at high Reynolds numbers. The calculations are performed by using the 2D version of the Freeflow simulation system (Castello et al. (2000. A specific way of implementing wall functions is also tested and assessed. The numerical procedure is tested by solving three fluid flow problems, namely, turbulent flow over a backward-facing step, turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate under zero-pressure gradients, and a turbulent free jet impinging onto a flat surface. The numerical method is then applied to solve the flow of a horizontal jet penetrating a quiescent fluid from an entry port beneath the free surface.

  5. Cloud Simulations in Response to Turbulence Parameterizations in the GISS Model E GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mao-Sung; Cheng, Ye

    2013-01-01

    The response of cloud simulations to turbulence parameterizations is studied systematically using the GISS general circulation model (GCM) E2 employed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5).Without the turbulence parameterization, the relative humidity (RH) and the low cloud cover peak unrealistically close to the surface; with the dry convection or with only the local turbulence parameterization, these two quantities improve their vertical structures, but the vertical transport of water vapor is still weak in the planetary boundary layers (PBLs); with both local and nonlocal turbulence parameterizations, the RH and low cloud cover have better vertical structures in all latitudes due to more significant vertical transport of water vapor in the PBL. The study also compares the cloud and radiation climatologies obtained from an experiment using a newer version of turbulence parameterization being developed at GISS with those obtained from the AR5 version. This newer scheme differs from the AR5 version in computing nonlocal transports, turbulent length scale, and PBL height and shows significant improvements in cloud and radiation simulations, especially over the subtropical eastern oceans and the southern oceans. The diagnosed PBL heights appear to correlate well with the low cloud distribution over oceans. This suggests that a cloud-producing scheme needs to be constructed in a framework that also takes the turbulence into consideration.

  6. Subcarrier MPSK/MDPSK modulated optical wireless communications in lognormal turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Xuegui

    2015-03-01

    Bit-error rate (BER) performance of subcarrier Mary phase-shift keying (MPSK) and M-ary differential phase-shift keying (MDPSK) is analyzed for optical wireless communications over the lognormal turbulence channels. Both exact BER and approximate BER expressions are presented. We demonstrate that the approximate BER, which is obtained by dividing the symbol error rate by the number of bits per symbol, can be used to estimate the BER performance with acceptable accuracy. Through our asymptotic analysis, we derive closed-form asymptotic BER performance loss expression for MDPSK with respect to MPSK in the lognormal turbulence channels. © 2015 IEEE.

  7. A high-resolution code for large eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent boundary layer flows

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan

    2014-03-01

    We describe a framework for large eddy simulation (LES) of incompressible turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate. This framework uses a fractional-step method with fourth-order finite difference on a staggered mesh. We present several laminar examples to establish the fourth-order accuracy and energy conservation property of the code. Furthermore, we implement a recycling method to generate turbulent inflow. We use the stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and virtual wall model to simulate the turbulent boundary layer flow. We find that the case with Reθ ≈ 2.5 × 105 agrees well with available experimental measurements of wall friction, streamwise velocity profiles and turbulent intensities. We demonstrate that for cases with extremely large Reynolds numbers (Reθ = 1012), the present LES can reasonably predict the flow with a coarse mesh. The parallel implementation of the LES code demonstrates reasonable scaling on O(103) cores. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Numerical simulation on turbulent flow field in convergent-divergent nozzle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yi-yu; LIO Yong; LI Xiao-hong; FANG Yong; ZHAO Jian-xin

    2009-01-01

    Because of the complication of turbulence's mechanism and law as well as the jet pressure in nozzle is difficult to test by experiment, five turbulent models were applied to numerically simulate the turbulent flow field in convergent-divergent nozzle. Theory analysis and experiment results of mass flow rates conclude that the RNG κ-ε model is the most suitable model. The pressure distribution in the convergent-divergent nozzle was revealed by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulating on the turbulent flow field under different pressure conditions. The growing conditions of cavitation bubbles were shown; meanwhile, the phenomena in the experiment could be explained. The differential pressure between the upstream and downstream in nozzle throat section can improve the cavitating effect of cavitation water jet.

  9. Angular momentum transport and large eddy simulations in magnetorotational turbulence: the small Pm limit

    CERN Document Server

    Meheut, H; Lesur, G; Joos, M; Longaretti, P -Y

    2015-01-01

    Angular momentum transport in accretion discs is often believed to be due to magnetohydrodynamic turbulence mediated by the magnetorotational instability. Despite an abundant literature on the MRI, the parameters governing the saturation amplitude of the turbulence are poorly understood and the existence of an asymptotic behavior in the Ohmic diffusion regime is not clearly established. We investigate the properties of the turbulent state in the small magnetic Prandtl number limit. Since this is extremely computationally expensive, we also study the relevance and range of applicability of the most common subgrid scale models for this problem. Unstratified shearing boxes simulations are performed both in the compressible and incompressible limits, with a resolution up to 800 cells per disc scale height. The latter constitutes the largest resolution ever attained for a simulation of MRI turbulence. In the presence of a mean magnetic field threading the domain, angular momentum transport converges to a finite va...

  10. Stereo-SCIDAR: Optical turbulence profiling with high sensitivity using a modified SCIDAR instrument

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, H W; Wilson, R W; Butterley, T; Avila, R; Dhillon, V S; Morris, T J

    2013-01-01

    The next generation of adaptive optics (AO) systems will require tomographic reconstruction techniques to map the optical refractive index fluctuations, generated by the atmospheric turbulence, along the line of sight to the astronomical target. These systems can be enhanced with data from an external atmospheric profiler. This is important for Extremely Large Telescope scale tomography. Here we propose a new instrument which utilises the generalised SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (SCIDAR) technique to allow high sensitivity vertical profiles of the atmospheric optical turbulence and wind velocity profile above astronomical observatories. The new approach, which we refer to as 'Stereo-SCIDAR', uses a stereoscopic system with the scintillation pattern from each star of a double-star target incident on a separate detector. Separating the pupil images for each star has several advantages including: increased magnitude difference tolerance for the target stars; negating the need for re-calibration due to the...

  11. Towards predictive simulations of soot formation: from surrogate to turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanquart, Guillaume [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-03-28

    The combustion of transportation fuels leads to the formation of several kinds of pollutants, among which are soot particles. These particles, also formed during coal combustion and in fires, are the source of several health problems and environmental issues. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena leading to the formation of soot particles remains incomplete, and as a result, the predictive capability of our numerical tools is lacking. The objective of the work was to reduce the gap in the present understanding and modeling of soot formation both in laminar and turbulent flames. The effort spanned several length scales from the molecular level to large scale turbulent transport.

  12. Direct numerical simulations of statistically steady, homogeneous, isotropic fluid turbulence with polymer additives

    CERN Document Server

    Perlekar, Prasad; Pandit, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    We carry out a direct numerical simulation (DNS) study that reveals the effects of polymers on statistically steady, forced, homogeneous, isotropic fluid turbulence. We find clear manifestations of dissipation-reduction phenomena: On the addition of polymers to the turbulent fluid, we obtain a reduction in the energy dissipation rate, a significant modification of the fluid energy spectrum, especially in the deep-dissipation range, a suppression of small-scale intermittency, and a decrease in small-scale vorticity filaments. We also compare our results with recent experiments and earlier DNS studies of decaying fluid turbulence with polymer additives.

  13. SLM-based laboratory simulations of Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov anisotropic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toselli, Italo; Korotkova, Olga; Xiao, Xifeng; Voelz, David G

    2015-05-20

    In this paper, we present a laboratory setup to simulate anisotropic, non-Kolmogorov turbulence. A sequence of numerical phase screens that incorporate the turbulence characteristics were applied to a spatial light modulator placed in the path of a laser beam with a Gaussian intensity profile and the resulting far-field intensity patterns were recorded by a CCD camera. The values of scintillation at the position of the maximum intensity were extracted from the images and compared with theoretical values. Our experimental results show a trend that is in agreement with known theoretical expressions; however, the turbulence rescaling due to anisotropy shows some discrepancy with theory and requires more investigation.

  14. The Direct Numerical Simulation of A Turbulent Channel Flow with Analyses of the Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChunxiaoXU; ZhaoshunZHANG

    1996-01-01

    The database of fully developed turbulent channel flow at low Reynolds number is set up through direct numerical simulations.The budget of dissipation-rate of turbulent kinetic energy is calculated and some existing models for the transport equation of the dissipation rate are evaluated.A new model for the turbulent production and viscous destruction terms is given.It makes a considerable improvement in the near-wall behavior,A new flow structure contributing much to high kurtosis levels in transverse velocity fluctuation in viscous sublayer is found.The common characters they possessed are described.

  15. Large-Eddy Simulation on turbulent flow and plume dispersion over a 2-dimensional hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, H.; Nagai, H.

    2010-05-01

    The dispersion analysis of airborne contaminants including radioactive substances from industrial or nuclear facilities is an important issue for air quality maintenance and safety assessment. In Japan, many nuclear power plants are located at complex coastal terrains. In these cases, terrain effects on the turbulent flow and plume dispersion should be investigated. In this study, we perform Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulent flow and plume dispersion over a 2-dimensional hill flow and investigate the characteristics of mean and fluctuating concentrations.

  16. Subgrid-scale heat flux modeling for large eddy simulation of turbulent mixed convection

    OpenAIRE

    Morar, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, new subgrid-scale (SGS) heat flux model for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent mixed convection is developed. The new model explicitly includes the buoyancy production term. It is based on the algebraic equations and dynamic procedure is applied to calculate model coefficients. An experiment on turbulent mixed convection to water in a vertical duct is used for validation of the model.

  17. Simulation and analysis of the soot particle size distribution in a turbulent nonpremixed flame

    KAUST Repository

    Lucchesi, Marco

    2017-02-05

    A modeling framework based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is employed to simulate the evolution of the soot particle size distribution in turbulent sooting flames. The stochastic reactor describes the evolution of soot in fluid parcels following Lagrangian trajectories in a turbulent flow field. The trajectories are sampled from a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a n-heptane turbulent nonpremixed flame. The DSMC method is validated against experimentally measured size distributions in laminar premixed flames and found to reproduce quantitatively the experimental results, including the appearance of the second mode at large aggregate sizes and the presence of a trough at mobility diameters in the range 3–8 nm. The model is then applied to the simulation of soot formation and growth in simplified configurations featuring a constant concentration of soot precursors and the evolution of the size distribution in time is found to depend on the intensity of the nucleation rate. Higher nucleation rates lead to a higher peak in number density and to the size distribution attaining its second mode sooner. The ensemble-averaged PSDF in the turbulent flame is computed from individual samples of the PSDF from large sets of Lagrangian trajectories. This statistical measure is equivalent to time-averaged, scanning mobility particle size (SMPS) measurements in turbulent flames. Although individual trajectories display strong bimodality as in laminar flames, the ensemble-average PSDF possesses only one mode and a long, broad tail, which implies significant polydispersity induced by turbulence. Our results agree very well with SMPS measurements available in the literature. Conditioning on key features of the trajectory, such as mixture fraction or radial locations does not reduce the scatter in the size distributions and the ensemble-averaged PSDF remains broad. The results highlight and explain the important role of turbulence in broadening the size distribution of

  18. The gyro-radius scaling of ion thermal transport from global numerical simulations of ITG turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottaviani, M. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Manfredi, G. [Dublin Inst. for Advanced Studies (Ireland). School of CosmicPhysics

    1998-12-01

    A three-dimensional, fluid code is used to study the scaling of ion thermal transport caused by Ion-Temperature-Gradient-Driven (ITG) turbulence. The code includes toroidal effects and is capable of simulating the whole torus. It is found that both close to the ITG threshold and well above threshold, the thermal transport and the turbulence structures exhibit a gyro-Bohm scaling, at least for plasmas with moderate poloidal flow. (author) 19 refs.

  19. Advances in Turbulent Combustion Dynamics Simulations in Bluff-Body Stabilized Flames-Body Stabilized Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON V. Sankaran a. REPORT...and temporal scales is called direct numerical simulation ( DNS ). In a DNS there is no need for a turbulence or turbulent combustion model [3]. All...therefore computationally very expensive. DNS also requires small time steps that adds additional expense. As a result of this required fine resolution

  20. Actuator Line Simulation of Wake of Wind Turbine Operating in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2007-01-01

    The wake of a wind turbine operating in an atmospheric turbulent inflow without mean shear is simulated using a numerical method, which combines large eddy simulations with an actuator line technique. A turbulent inflow with the same spectral characteristics as the atmosphere is produced....... Furthermore, the results are used to verify the validity of some of the basic assumptions employed in simpler engineering models and to study their bounds of application. The large amount of data from the wake simulation can easily be used in simple engineering methods to model a wind turbine operating...... by introducing time varying body forces in a plane upstream the rotor. The results of the simulation are compared to those obtained on a wind turbine in uniform inflow at the same mean wind speed and from this comparison a number of features of the influence of inflow turbulence on wake dynamics are deduced...

  1. Numerical simulation of three-dimensional turbulent flow in multistage axial compressor blade row

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian JIANG; Bo LIU; Yangang WANG; Xiangyi NAN

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation of three-dimensional turbulent flow in a multistage axial compressor blade row is conducted. A high resolution, third-order ENN scheme is adopted to catch the shockwave and simulate the turbulent flow correctly, while an LU-SGS implicit method is chosen to improve computation rate. A detailed and highly efficient numerical simulation system is thus constructed. The investigation is focused on the grid con-necting methods between the rotor and the stator and the corresponding treatment of rotor-stator interactional sur-face. The final results of a three-stage axial compressor with inlet guide vanes conform well to the experimental data.

  2. Numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; McLaughlin, J.B.; Kontomaris, K.; Portela, L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents results for the behavior of particle-laden gases in a small Reynolds number vertical channel down flow. Results will be presented for the effects of particle feedback on the gas-phase turbulence and for the concentration profile of the particles. The effects of density ratio,

  3. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flow in Concentric Annuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, B.J.; Breugem, W.-P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider a fully developed turbulent flow in a round pipe with a small inner annulus. The diameter of the inner annulus is less than 10% of the diameter of the outer pipe. As a consequence, the surface area of the inner pipe compared to the outer pipe is small. The friction exerted

  4. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flow in Concentric Annuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, B.J.; Breugem, W.-P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider a fully developed turbulent flow in a round pipe with a small inner annulus. The diameter of the inner annulus is less than 10% of the diameter of the outer pipe. As a consequence, the surface area of the inner pipe compared to the outer pipe is small. The friction exerted

  5. Underwater optical communication performance for laser beam propagation through weak oceanic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiang; Li, Zan; Liu, Zengji

    2015-02-20

    In clean ocean water, the performance of a underwater optical communication system is limited mainly by oceanic turbulence, which is defined as the fluctuations in the index of refraction resulting from temperature and salinity fluctuations. In this paper, using the refractive index spectrum of oceanic turbulence under weak turbulence conditions, we carry out, for a horizontally propagating plane wave and spherical wave, analysis of the aperture-averaged scintillation index, the associated probability of fade, mean signal-to-noise ratio, and mean bit error rate. Our theoretical results show that for various values of the rate of dissipation of mean squared temperature and the temperature-salinity balance parameter, the large-aperture receiver leads to a remarkable decrease of scintillation and consequently a significant improvement on the system performance. Such an effect is more noticeable in the plane wave case than in the spherical wave case.

  6. Using Social Simulations to Assess and Train Potential Leaders to Make Effective Decisions in Turbulent Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, L. Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe two social simulations created to assess leadership potential and train leaders to make effective decisions in turbulent environments. One is set in the novel environment of a lunar moon colony and the other is a military combat command. The research generated from these simulations for assessing…

  7. Simulation of a ground-layer adaptive optics system for the Kunlun Dark Universe Survey Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Jia; Sijiong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Ground Layer Adaptive Optics (GLAO) is a recently developed technique extensively applied to ground-based telescopes,which mainly compensates for the wavefront errors induced by ground-layer turbulence to get an appropriate point spread function in a wide field of view.The compensation results mainly depend on the turbulence distribution.The atmospheric turbulence at Dome A in the Antarctic is mainly distributed below 15 meters,which is an ideal site for applications of GLAO.The GLAO system has been simulated for the Kunlun Dark Universe Survey Telescope,which will be set up at Dome A,and uses a rotating mirror to generate several laser guide stars and a wavefront sensor with a wide field of view to sequentially measure the wavefronts from different laser guide stars.The system is simulated on a computer and parameters of the system are given,which provide detailed information about the design of a practical GLAO system.

  8. Effect of optical turbulence along a downward slant path on probability of laser hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, K. Ove S.

    2016-10-01

    The importance of the optical turbulence effect along a slant path downward on probability of exceeding the maximum permissible exposure level (MPE) from a laser is discussed. The optical turbulence is generated by fluctuations (variations) in refractive index of the atmosphere. These fluctuations are caused in turn by changes in atmospheric temperature and humidity. The structure function of refractive index, Cn2, is the single most important parameter in the description of turbulence effects on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation. In the boundary layer, the lowest part of the atmosphere where the ground directly influence the atmosphere, is the variation of Cn2 in Sweden between about 10-17 and 10-12 m-2/3, see Bergström et al. [5]. Along a horizontal path is the Cn 2 often assumed to be constant. The variation of the Cn2 along a slant path is described by the Tatarski model as function of height to the power of -4/3 or -2/3, depending on day or night conditions. The hazard of laser damage of eye is calculated for a long slant path downward. The probability of exceeding the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) level is given as a function of distance in comparison with nominal ocular hazard distance (NOHD) for adopted levels of turbulence. Furthermore, calculations are carried out for a laser pointer or a designator laser from a high altitude and long distance down to a ground target. The used example shows that there is an 10% risk of exceeding the MPE at a distance 2 km beyond the NOHD, in this example 48 km, due to turbulence level of 5·10-15 m-2/3 at ground height. The turbulence influence on a laser beam along horizontal path on NOHD have been shown before by Zilberman et al. [4].

  9. Mixing model with multi-particle interactions for Lagrangian simulations of turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the numerical study of the mixing volume model (MVM) for molecular diffusion in Lagrangian simulations of turbulent mixing problems. The MVM is based on the multi-particle interaction in a finite volume (mixing volume). A priori test of the MVM, based on the direct numerical simulations of planar jets, is conducted in the turbulent region and the interfacial layer between the turbulent and non-turbulent fluids. The results show that the MVM predicts well the mean effects of the molecular diffusion under various numerical and flow parameters. The number of the mixing particles should be large for predicting a value of the molecular diffusion term positively correlated to the exact value. The size of the mixing volume relative to the Kolmogorov scale η is important in the performance of the MVM. The scalar transfer across the turbulent/non-turbulent interface is well captured by the MVM especially with the small mixing volume. Furthermore, the MVM with multiple mixing particles is tested in the hybrid implicit large-eddy-simulation/Lagrangian-particle-simulation (LES-LPS) of the planar jet with the characteristic length of the mixing volume of O(100η). Despite the large mixing volume, the MVM works well and decays the scalar variance in a rate close to the reference LES. The statistics in the LPS are very robust to the number of the particles used in the simulations and the computational grid size of the LES. Both in the turbulent core region and the intermittent region, the LPS predicts a scalar field well correlated to the LES.

  10. Influence of wind speed on free space optical communication performance for Gaussian beam propagation through non Kolmogorov strong turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Peng; Yuan Xiuhua; Zeng Yanan; Zhao Ming; Luo Hanjun, E-mail: yuanxh@mail.hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2011-02-01

    In free-space optical communication links, atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in both the intensity and the phase of the received signal, affecting link performance. Most theoretical treatments have been described by Kolmogorov's power spectral density model through weak turbulence with constant wind speed. However, several experiments showed that Kolmogorov theory is sometimes incomplete to describe atmospheric turbulence properly, especially through the strong turbulence with variable wind speed, which is known to contribute significantly to the turbulence in the atmosphere. We present an optical turbulence model that incorporates into variable wind speed instead of constant value, a non-Kolmogorov power spectrum that uses a generalized exponent instead of constant standard exponent value 11/3, and a generalized amplitude factor instead of constant value 0.033. The free space optical communication performance for a Gaussian beam wave of scintillation index, mean signal-to-noise ratio, and mean bit error rate , have been derived by extended Rytov theory in non-Kolmogorov strong turbulence. And then the influence of wind speed variations on free space optical communication performance has been analyzed under different atmospheric turbulence intensities. The results suggest that the effects of wind speed variation through non-Kolmogorov turbulence on communication performance are more severe in many situations and need to be taken into account in free space optical communication. It is anticipated that this work is helpful to the investigations of free space optical communication performance considering wind speed under severe weather condition in the strong atmospheric turbulence.

  11. LARGE EDDY SIMULATIONS OF THE TURBULENT FLOW IN A STIRRED TANK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Wang, Yundong; Fei, Weiyang

    2005-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the fluid flow in a baffled, stirred tank with a single Rushton turbine are performed. The simulations are carried out on the “Shengcao-21C” supercomputer via commercial CFD software CFX5, using k-ε and large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence model...... respectively. Results show that CFD simulations using k-ε and LES model agree well with DPIV measurements. From the LES simulation, the velocity fluctuation is shown to occur with the development of vortices and eddies. This shows that LES simulation is better than k-ε simulation, although it demands a lot...

  12. LARGE EDDY SIMULATIONS OF THE TURBULENT FLOW IN A STIRRED TANK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Wang, Yundong; Fei, Weiyang

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the fluid flow in a baffled, stirred tank with a single Rushton turbine are performed. The simulations are carried out on the “Shengcao-21C” supercomputer via commercial CFD software CFX5, using k-ε and large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence model...... respectively. Results show that CFD simulations using k-ε and LES model agree well with DPIV measurements. From the LES simulation, the velocity fluctuation is shown to occur with the development of vortices and eddies. This shows that LES simulation is better than k-ε simulation, although it demands a lot...

  13. Modeling of power spectral density of modified von Karman atmospheric phase turbulence and acousto-optic chaos using scattered intensity profiles over discrete time intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Monish R.; Mohamed, Fathi H. A.

    2014-10-01

    In recent research, propagation of plane electromagnetic (EM) waves through a turbulent medium with modified von Karman phase characteristics was modeled and numerically simulated using transverse planar apertures representing narrow phase turbulence along the propagation path. The case for extended turbulence was also studied by repeating the planar phase screens multiple times over the propagation path and incorporating diffractive effects via a split-step algorithm. The goal of the research reported here is to examine two random phenomena: (a) atmospheric turbulence due to von Karman-type phase fluctuations, and (b) chaos generated in an acousto-optic (A-O) Bragg cell under hybrid feedback. The latter problem has been thoroughly examined for its nonlinear dynamics and applications in secure communications. However, the statistical characteristics (such as the power spectral density (PSD)) of the chaos have not been estimated in recent work. To that end, treating the chaos phenomena as a random process, the time waveforms of the chaos intensity and their spectra are numerically evaluated over a (large) number of time iterations. These spectra are then averaged to derive the equivalent PSD of the A-O chaos. For the turbulence problem, an optical beam passing through an input pinhole is propagated through a random phase screen (placed at different locations) to a desired distance (typically near-field) under different levels of turbulence strength. The resulting spatial intensity profile is then averaged and the process repeated over a (large) number of pre-specified time intervals. From this data, once again, the turbulence PSD is calculated via the Fourier spectra of the average intensity snapshots. The results for the two systems are compared.

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL TURBULENCE NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A STEPPED SPILLWAY OVERFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the k-ε turbulence model is usedto simulate the three-dimensional turbulence flow over thestepped spillway at the Yubeishan reservoir. In order to solvethe curved free water surface and to handle the complexboundary conditions, the fractional Volume Of Fluid (VOF)model that is applicable to the solution of the stratified two-phase flow is introduced along with k-ε turbulence model and the unstructured grid is used for the discretization of the irreg-ular simulation domain. By these methods, the turbulenceflow field of the stepped spillway is simulated successfully.The location of the free surface along the spillway, the magni-tude and distribution of the velocity, the pressure on the stepsurface, the turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence dissipa-tion rate are obtained by simulation. The changes and distri-butions of these characteristics along the width of the spillwayare also obtained. The energy dissipation ratio of the steppedspillway is calculated according to the upstream and down-stream water depth and velocities.

  15. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent non-premixed methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, J. M.; Chen, J. H.; Day, M.; Mahalingam, S.

    1994-01-01

    Turbulent non-premixed stoichiometric methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics have been studied using the direct numerical simulation approach. The simulations include realistic chemical kinetics, and the molecular transport is modeled with constant Lewis numbers for individual species. The effect of turbulence on the internal flame structure and extinction characteristics of methane-air flames is evaluated. Consistent with earlier DNS with simple one-step chemistry, the flame is wrinkled and in some regions extinguished by the turbulence, while the turbulence is weakened in the vicinity of the flame due to a combination of dilatation and an increase in kinematic viscosity. Unlike previous results, reignition is observed in the present simulations. Lewis number effects are important in determining the local stoichiometry of the flame. The results presented in this work are preliminary but demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating reduced kinetics for the oxidation of methane with direct numerical simulations of homogeneous turbulence to evaluate the limitations of various levels of reduction in the kinetics and to address the formation of thermal and prompt NO(x).

  16. Large-eddy simulation of suspended sediment transport in turbulent channel flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hai; WANG Ling-ling; TANG Hong-wu

    2013-01-01

    The numerical simulation of the non-cohesive sediment transport in a turbulent channel flow with a high concentration is a challenging but practical task.A modified coherent dynamic eddy model of the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with a pick-up function is used in the present study to simulate the sediment erosion and the deposition in a turbulent channel flow.The rough wall model is used instead of the LES with the near-wall resolution to obtain the reasonable turbulent flow characteristics while avoiding the high costs in the computation.Good results are obtained,and are used to analyze the sediment transport properties.The results show that the streamwise vortices play an important role in the riverbed erosion and the sediment pick-up,which may serve as guidelines for the sediment management and the water environment protection engineering.

  17. Sustained Magnetorotational Turbulence in Local Simulations of Stratified Disks with Zero Net Magnetic Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, S W; Pessah, M E

    2009-01-01

    We examine the effects of density stratification on magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability in local simulations that adopt the shearing box approximation. Our primary result is that, even in the absence of explicit dissipation, the addition of vertical gravity leads to convergence in the turbulent energy densities and stresses as the resolution increases, contrary to results for zero net flux, unstratified boxes. The ratio of total stress to midplane pressure has a mean of ~0.01, although there can be significant fluctuations on long (>~50 orbit) timescales. We find that the time averaged stresses are largely insensitive to both the radial or vertical aspect ratio of our simulation domain. For simulations with explicit dissipation, we find that stratification extends the range of Reynolds and magnetic Prandtl numbers for which turbulence is sustained. Confirming the results of previous studies, we find oscillations in the large scale toroidal field with periods of ~10 orbit...

  18. Equilibrium disks, MRI mode excitation, and steady state turbulence in global accretion disk simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2012-01-01

    Global three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of turbulent accretion disks are presented which start from fully equilibrium initial conditions in which the magnetic forces are accounted for and the induction equation is satisfied. The local linear theory of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is used as a predictor of the growth of magnetic field perturbations in the global simulations. The linear growth estimates and global simulations diverge when non-linear motions - perhaps triggered by the onset of turbulence - upset the velocity perturbations used to excite the MRI. The saturated state is found to be independent of the initially excited MRI mode, showing that once the disk has expelled the initially net flux field and settled into quasi-periodic oscillations in the toroidal magnetic flux, the dynamo cycle regulates the global saturation stress level. Furthermore, time-averaged measures of converged turbulence, such as the ratio of magnetic energies, are found to be in agreement with...

  19. Structure and Turbulence in Simulated Galaxy Clusters and the Implications for the Formation of Radio Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Hallman, Eric J

    2011-01-01

    We track the histories of massive clusters of galaxies formed within a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. Specifically, we track the time evolution of the energy in random bulk motions of the intracluster medium and X-ray measures of cluster structure and their relationship to cluster mergers. We aim to assess the viability of the turbulent re-acceleration model for the generation of giant radio halos by comparing the level of turbulent kinetic energy in simulated clusters with the observed properties of radio halo clusters, giving particular attention to the association of radio halos to clusters with disturbedX-ray structures. The evolution of X-ray cluster structure and turbulence kinetic energy, k, in simulations can then inform us about the expected lifetime of radio halos and the fraction of clusters as a function of redshift expected to host them. We find strong statistical correlation of disturbed structure measures and the presence of enhancements in k. Specifically, quantitatively "disturbed", ra...

  20. Turbulent Kinetic Energy Spectra of Solar Convection from NST Observations and Realistic MHD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, I N; Goode, P R; Kosovichev, A G; Lele, S K; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A; Yurchyshyn, V B

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent properties of the quiet Sun represent the basic state of surface conditions, and a background for various processes of solar activity. Therefore understanding of properties and dynamics of this `basic' state is important for investigation of more complex phenomena, formation and development of observed phenomena in the photosphere and atmosphere. For characterization of the turbulent properties we compare kinetic energy spectra on granular and sub-granular scales obtained from infrared TiO observations with the New Solar Telescope (Big Bear Solar Observatory) and from 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations ('SolarBox' code). We find that the numerical simulations require a high spatial resolution with 10 - 25 km grid-step in order to reproduce the inertial (Kolmogorov) turbulence range. The observational data require an averaging procedure to remove noise and potential instrumental artifacts. The resulting kinetic energy spectra show a good agreement between the simulations and observations, opening...

  1. SIMULATION OF SHIP GENERATED TURBULENT AND VORTICAL WAKE IMAGING BY SAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Aiming; Zhu Minhui

    2004-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging of ocean surface features is studied. The simulation of the turbulent and vortical features generated by a moving ship and SAR imaging of these wakes is carried out. The turbulent wake damping the ocean surface capillary waves may be partially responsible for the suppression of surface waves near the ship track. The vortex pair generating a change in the lateral flow field behind the ship may be partially responsible for an enhancement of the waves near the edges of the smooth area. These hydrodynamic phenomena as well as the changes of radar backscatter generated by turbulence and vortex are simulated.An SAR imaging model is then used on such ocean surface features to provide SAR images.Comparison of two ships' simulated SAR images shows that the wake features are different for various ship parameters.

  2. Numerical flow simulation and efficiency prediction for axial turbines by advanced turbulence models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jošt, D.; Škerlavaj, A.; Lipej, A.

    2012-11-01

    Numerical prediction of an efficiency of a 6-blade Kaplan turbine is presented. At first, the results of steady state analysis performed by different turbulence models for different operating regimes are compared to the measurements. For small and optimal angles of runner blades the efficiency was quite accurately predicted, but for maximal blade angle the discrepancy between calculated and measured values was quite large. By transient analysis, especially when the Scale Adaptive Simulation Shear Stress Transport (SAS SST) model with zonal Large Eddy Simulation (ZLES) in the draft tube was used, the efficiency was significantly improved. The improvement was at all operating points, but it was the largest for maximal discharge. The reason was better flow simulation in the draft tube. Details about turbulent structure in the draft tube obtained by SST, SAS SST and SAS SST with ZLES are illustrated in order to explain the reasons for differences in flow energy losses obtained by different turbulence models.

  3. Analysis of the coherent and turbulent stresses of a numerically simulated rough wall pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, L.; MacDonald, M.; Chung, D.; Hutchins, N.; Ooi, A.

    2017-04-01

    A turbulent rough wall flow in a pipe is simulated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) where the roughness elements consist of explicitly gridded three-dimensional sinusoids. Two groups of simulations were conducted where the roughness semi-amplitude h+ and the roughness wavelength λ+ are systematically varied. The triple decomposition is applied to the velocity to separate the coherent and turbulent components. The coherent or dispersive component arises due to the roughness and depends on the topological features of the surface. The turbulent stress on the other hand, scales with the friction Reynolds number. For the case with the largest roughness wavelength, large secondary flows are observed which are similar to that of duct flows. The occurrence of these large secondary flows is due to the spanwise heterogeneity of the roughness which has a spacing approximately equal to the boundary layer thickness δ.

  4. Global full-f gyrokinetic simulations of plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandgirard, V [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sarazin, Y [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Angelino, P [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bottino, A [Max Plank Institut fr Plasmaphysik, IPP-EURATOM AssociationGarching (Germany); Crouseilles, N [IRMA, Universite Louis Pasteur, 7, rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Darmet, G [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dif-Pradalier, G [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Garbet, X [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ghendrih, Ph [CEA/DSM/DRFC, Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Jolliet, S [CRPP, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Latu, G [LaBRI, 341 Cours Liberation, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Sonnendruecker, E [IRMA, Universite Louis Pasteur, 7, rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Villard, L [CRPP, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-12-15

    Critical physical issues can be specifically tackled with the global full-f gyrokinetic code GYSELA. Three main results are presented. First, the self-consistent treatment of equilibrium and fluctuations highlights the competition between two compensation mechanisms for the curvature driven vertical charge separation, namely, parallel flow and polarization. The impact of the latter on the turbulent transport is discussed. In the non-linear regime, the benchmark with the Particle-In-Cell code ORB5 looks satisfactory. Second, the transport scaling with {rho}{sub *} is found to depend both on {rho}{sub *} itself and on the distance to the linear threshold. Finally, a statistical steady-state turbulent regime is achieved in a reduced version of GYSELA by prescribing a constant heat source.

  5. Global full-f gyrokinetic simulations of plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Angelino, P.; Bottino, A.; Crouseilles, N.; Darmet, G.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph; Jolliet, S.; Latu, G.; Sonnendrücker, E.; Villard, L.

    2007-12-01

    Critical physical issues can be specifically tackled with the global full-f gyrokinetic code GYSELA. Three main results are presented. First, the self-consistent treatment of equilibrium and fluctuations highlights the competition between two compensation mechanisms for the curvature driven vertical charge separation, namely, parallel flow and polarization. The impact of the latter on the turbulent transport is discussed. In the non-linear regime, the benchmark with the Particle-In-Cell code ORB5 looks satisfactory. Second, the transport scaling with ρ* is found to depend both on ρ* itself and on the distance to the linear threshold. Finally, a statistical steady-state turbulent regime is achieved in a reduced version of GYSELA by prescribing a constant heat source.

  6. MOSE: A Demonstrator for an Automatic Operational System for the Optical Turbulence Forecast for ESO Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciadri, Elena; Lascaux, F.; Turchi, A.; Fini, L.

    2017-09-01

    "Most of the observations performed with new-generation ground-based telescopes are employing the Service Mode. To optimize the flexible-scheduling of scientific programs and instruments, the optical turbulence (OT) forecast is a must, particularly when observations are supported by adaptive optics (AO) and Interferometry. Reliable OT forecast are crucial to optimize the usage of AO and interferometric facilities which is not possible when using only optical measurements. Numerical techniques are the best placed to achieve such a goal. The MOSE project (MOdeling ESO Sites), co-funded by ESO, aimed at proving the feasibility of the forecast of (1) all the classical atmospheric parameters (such as temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity) and (2) the optical turbulence i.e. the CN 2 profiles and all the main integrated astro-climatic parameters derived from the CN 2 (the seeing, the isoplanatic angle, the wavefront coherence time) above the two ESO sites of Cerro Paranal and Cerro Armazones. The proposed technique is based on the use of a non-hydrostatic atmospheric meso-scale model and a dedicated code for the optical turbulence. The final goal of the project aimed at implementing an automatic system for the operational forecasts of the aforementioned parameters to support the astronomical observations above the two sites. MOSE Phase A and B have been completed and a set of dedicated papers have been published on the topic. Model performances have been extensively quantified with several dedicated figures of merit and we proved that our tool is able to provide reliable forecasts of optical turbulence and atmospheric parameters with very satisfactory score of success. This should guarantee us to make a step ahead in the framework of the Service Mode of new generation telescopes. A conceptual design as well as an operational plan of the automatic system has been submitted to ESO as integral part of the feasibility study. We completed a negotiation with

  7. SIMULATIONS OF THE KELVIN–HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE TURBULENT CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Daniel O.; DeLuca, Edward E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mininni, Pablo D. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and Instituto de Física de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-02-20

    Recent high-resolution Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory images show evidence of the development of the Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) instability, as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) expand in the ambient corona. A large-scale magnetic field mostly tangential to the interface is inferred, both on the CME and on the background sides. However, the magnetic field component along the shear flow is not strong enough to quench the instability. There is also observational evidence that the ambient corona is in a turbulent regime, and therefore the criteria for the development of the instability are a priori expected to differ from the laminar case. To study the evolution of the KH instability with a turbulent background, we perform three-dimensional simulations of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations. The instability is driven by a velocity profile tangential to the CME–corona interface, which we simulate through a hyperbolic tangent profile. The turbulent background is generated by the application of a stationary stirring force. We compute the instability growth rate for different values of the turbulence intensity, and find that the role of turbulence is to attenuate the growth. The fact that KH instability is observed sets an upper limit on the correlation length of the coronal background turbulence.

  8. Alignment of Velocity and Magnetic Fluctuations in Simulations of Anisotropic MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2007-11-01

    There has been recent theoretical interest in the effect of the alignment of velocity and magnetic fluctuations in three-dimensional (3D) MHD turbulence with a large-scale magnetic field [Boldyrev 2005, 2006]. This theory predicts that the angle θ between the velocity and magnetic fluctuation vectors has a scaling of θ&1/4circ;, where λ is the spatial scale of the fluctuations. There have also been simulations on 3D forced MHD turbulence that supports this prediction [Mason et al. 2006, 2007]. The scaling has also been tested against observations of solar wind turbulence [Podesta et al. 2007]. We report here simulation results based on decaying 2D turbulence. The scaling of θ&1/4circ; and Iroshnikov-Kraichnan scaling has also been observed within a range of time interval and spatial scales, despite the fact that Boldyrev's theory was developed for fully 3D turbulence in the presence of a strong external field. As the external field is reduced in magnitude and becomes comparable to the magnitude of magnetic fluctuations or lower, the scale-dependent alignment is weakened. Implications for observations of solar wind turbulence will be discussed.

  9. Inflow conditions for spatial direct numerical simulation of turbulent boundary layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The inflow conditions for spatial direct numerical simulation(SDNS) of turbulent boundary layers should reflect the characteristics of upstream turbulence,which is a puzzle. In this paper a new method is suggested,in which the flow field obtained by using temporal direct numerical simulation(TDNS) for fully developed turbulent flow(only flow field for a single moment is sufficient) can be used as the inflow of SDNS with a proper transformation. The calculation results confirm that this method is feasible and effective. It is also found that,under a proper time-space transformation,all statistics of the fully developed turbulence obtained by both temporal mode and spatial mode DNS are in excellent agreement with each other,not only qualitatively,but also quantitatively. The normal-wise distributions of mean flow profile,turbulent Mach number and the root mean square(RMS) of the fluctuations of various variables,as well as the Reynolds stresses of the fully developed turbulence obtained by using SDNS,bear similarity in nature.

  10. A time and space correlated turbulence synthesis method for Large Eddy Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Hugo G.; Paz, Rodrigo R.

    2013-02-01

    In the present work the problem of generating synthesized turbulence at inflow boundaries of the simulation domain is addressed in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method. To represent adequately certain statistical properties of a turbulent process, we propose a synthesized turbulence method which is based on previous works (Huang et al., 2010; Smirnov et al., 2001) [15,28]. For this purpose, time and space correlations are introduced strictly in the mathematical formulation of the synthetic turbulence inflow data. It is demonstrated that the proposed approach inherits the properties of the methods on which it is based while presents some particular advantages as well. The strategy of imposing conditions on the inlet velocity field through turbulence synthesis is implemented in the parallel multiphysics code called PETSc-FEM (http://www.cimec.org.ar/petscfem) primarily targeted to calculations throughout finite elements on general unstructured 2D and 3D grids. We present several numerical tests in order to validate and evaluate the method describing the dynamic phenomena that take place in “real-life” problems, such as a swirling turbulent flow inside a diffuser and the airflow around a vehicle model inside a wind tunnel at high Reynolds number.

  11. Energy transfer and constrained simulations in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Javier

    1993-01-01

    The defining characteristic of turbulent flows is their ability to dissipate energy, even in the limit of zero viscosity. The Euler equations, if constrained in such a way that the velocity derivatives remain bounded, conserve energy. But when they arise as the limit of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, when the Reynolds number goes to infinity, there is persuasive empirical evidence that the gradients become singular as just the right function of Re for the dissipation to remain non-zero and to approach a well defined limit. It is generally believed that this limiting value of the dissipation is a property of the Euler equations themselves, independent of the particular dissipative mechanism involved, and that it can be normalized with the large scale properties of the turbulent flow (e.g. the kinetic energy per unit volume u'(exp 2)/2, and the integral scale L) without reference to the Reynolds number or to other dissipative quantities. This is usually taken to imply that the low wave number end of the energy spectrum, far from the dissipative range, is also independent of the particular mechanism chosen to dispose of the energy transfer. In the following sections, we present some numerical experiments on the effect of substituting different dissipation models into the truncated Euler equations. We will see that the effect is mainly felt in the 'near dissipation' range of the energy spectrum, but that this range can be quite wide in some cases, contaminating a substantial range of wave numbers. In the process, we will develop a 'practical' approximation to the subgrid energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, and we will gain insight into the structure of the nonlinear interactions among turbulent scales of comparable size, and into the nature of energy backscatter. Some considerations on future research directions are offered at the end.

  12. Study of optimum methods of optical communication. [accounting for the effects of the turbulent atmosphere and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harger, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    Abstracts are reported relating to the techniques used in the research concerning optical transmission of information. Communication through the turbulent atmosphere, quantum mechanics, and quantum communication theory are discussed along with the results.

  13. Tokamak edge Er studies by turbulence and divertor simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Y.; Coster, D.; Scott, B.

    2002-11-01

    Numerical coupling of the divertor code B2(B. J. Braams, Next European Torus Technical Report 68 (1987).) and the turbulence code DALF(B. D. Scott, Phys. Fluids B 4), 2468 (1992). is pursued. Within this model, space and time dependent transport coefficients (D and i) respond to the dynamics of drift wave turbulence. The Braginskii transport model of the B2 code incorporates guiding-center plasma drifts self-consistently and generate Er shear in the presence of steep pressure gradients. This Braginskii type Er can enter the turbulence model as a background E × B shear flow which suppresses the radial flux together with Reynolds stress induced electric fields. As an example of L-H transition, influx at the core boundary is controlled to produce steepening of the edge gradients. ( Y.Hamada et al.), in Proceedings of the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (IAEA-F1-CN-69/PD, 1998) reveals heat pulse induced L-H transitions after sawtooth events.

  14. Transport of cosmic-ray protons in intermittent heliospheric turbulence: model and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Alouani-Bibi, Fathallah

    2014-01-01

    The transport of charged energetic particles in the presence of strong intermittent heliospheric turbulence is computationally analyzed based on known properties of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind plasma at 1 Astronomical Unit (AU). The turbulence is assumed to be static, composite, and quasi-three-dimensional with a varying energy distribution between a one-dimensional Alfv\\'enic (slab) and a structured two-dimensional component. The spatial fluctuations of the turbulent magnetic field are modeled either as homogeneous with a Gaussian probability distribution function (PDF), or as intermittent on large and small scales with a q-Gaussian PDF. Simulations showed that energetic particle diffusion coefficients both parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field are significantly affected by intermittency in the turbulence. This effect is especially strong for parallel transport where for large-scale intermittency results show an extended phase of subdiffusive parallel transport duri...

  15. Intercomparison of optical turbulence observations in a mountain-valley system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Frank D.; Brown, Wilbur P.; Ford, Stephen D.; Miller, Judith E.; Stokes, Sheldon S.; Stone, Victor M.

    2001-09-01

    The Airborne Laser Concepts Testbed is located on White Sands Missile Range, NM and is used to explore and develop new methods for tracking, pointing, and compensation of laser beams. All of these efforts require a knowledge of the optical turbulence along the propagation path. The site utilizes a 52.6 km propagation path over a desert basin between two mountain peaks (North Oscuro Peak (NOP) and Salinas Peak). Characterization of the optical turbulence at ABL ACT is challenging due to the long path length int he atmospheric boundary layer and the complex terrain of the site. A suite of instrumentation is being used to approach the problem; a sodar, fine wire probes, a pupil plane imager, a differential image motion monitor, and a scintillometer. In addition, a weather station senses ambient temperature, humidity, pressure, wind speed and direction, and solar radiation-received both horizontally and parallel to the mountain west-facing slope at NOP.

  16. Simulation of isotropic homogeneous turbulence and Rayleigh-Taylor instability; Simulations de turbulence homogene isotrope et d`instabilite de Rayleigh-Taylor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducros, F.

    1996-06-12

    Here is a study about fluid flows (the hydrodynamic part of codes modeling the plasma dynamics) showing great gradients and unsteady flows (Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov). The numerical resolution of these problems needs codes able to simulate the transition at the turbulence. The code exposed here (NSMP), tries to answer to these demands by the resolution of Navier-Stokes equations. After the resolution of these equations are presented the consequences of the discretization of continuous equations of fluids mechanics and then a modeling of turbulence is introduced. The two last chapters are devoted to the simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. (N.C.). 34 refs., 39 figs., 8 colour plates.

  17. First results on the Experiment FESTER on optical turbulence over False Bay South Africa: dependencies and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprung, Detlev; van Eijk, Alexander M. J.; Sucher, Erik; Eisele, Christian; Seiffer, Dirk; Stein, Karin

    2016-10-01

    The experiment FESTER (First European South African Transmission ExpeRiment) took place in 2015 to investigate the atmospheric influence on electro-optical systems performance across False Bay / South Africa on a long term basis. Several permanent stations for monitoring electro-optical propagation and atmospheric parameters were set up around the Bay. Additional intensive observation periods (IOPs) allowed for boat runs to assess the inhomogeneous atmospheric propagation conditions over water. In this paper we focus on the distribution of optical turbulence over the Bay. The different impact of water masses originating from the Indian Ocean and the Benguela current on the development of optical turbulence is discussed. The seasonal behavior of optical turbulence is presented and its effect on electro-optical system performance examined.

  18. Wavefront sensors for optical diagnostics in fluid mechanics: Application to heated flow, turbulence and droplet evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, D.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Warren, M.E.; Shul, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKechnie, T.S. [POD Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Optical measurement techniques are extremely useful in fluid mechanics because of their non-invasive nature. However, it is often difficult to separate measurement effects due to pressure, temperature and density in real flows. Using a variation of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, we have made density measurements that have extremely large dynamic range coupled with excellent sensitivity at high temporal and spatial resolution. We have examined several classes of flow including volumetrically heated gas, turbulence and droplet evaporation.

  19. Sustained Magnetorotational Turbulence in Local Simulations of Stratified Disks with Zero Net Magnetic Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W. Davis, S.; M. Stone, J.; Pessah, Martin Elias

    2010-01-01

    leads to convergence in the turbulent energy densities and stresses as the resolution increases, contrary to results for zero net flux, unstratified boxes. The ratio of total stress to midplane pressure has a mean of ~0.01, although there can be significant fluctuations on long (>~50 orbit) timescales....... We find that the time averaged stresses are largely insensitive to both the radial or vertical aspect ratio of our simulation domain. For simulations with explicit dissipation, we find that stratification extends the range of Reynolds and magnetic Prandtl numbers for which turbulence is sustained...

  20. Optimization of the Turbulence Model on Numerical Simulations of Flow Field within a Hydrocyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reynolds Stress Model and Large Eddy Simulation are used to respectively perform numerical simulation for the flow field of a hydrocyclone. The three-dimensional hexahedral computational grids were generated. Turbulence intensity, vorticity, and the velocity distribution of different cross sections were gained. The velocity simulation results were compared with the LDV test results, and the results indicated that Large Eddy Simulation was more close to LDV experimental data. Large Eddy Simulation was a relatively appropriate method for simulation of flow field within a hydrocyclone.

  1. Characterization of optical turbulence at the GREGOR solar telescope: temporal and local behavior and its influence on the solar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprung, D.; Sucher, E.; Stein, K.; von der Lühe, O.; Berkefeld, Th.

    2016-10-01

    Local atmospheric turbulence at the telescope level is regarded as a major reason for affecting the performance of the adaptive optics systems using wavelengths in the visible and infrared for solar observations. During the day the air masses around the telescope dome are influenced by flow distortions. Additionally heating of the infrastructure close to telescope causes thermal turbulence. Thereby optical turbulence is produced and leads to quality changes in the local seeing throughout the day. Image degradation will be yielded affecting the performance of adaptive optical systems. The spatial resolution of the solar observations will be reduced. For this study measurements of the optical turbulence, represented by the structure function parameter of the refractive index Cn2 were performed on several locations at the GREGOR telescope at the Teide observatory at Tenerife at the Canary Islands / Spain. Since September 2012 measurements of Cn2 were carried out between the towers of the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) and of GREGOR with a laser-scintillometer. The horizontal distance of the measurement path was about 75 m. Additional from May 2015 up to March 2016 the optical turbulence was determined at three additional locations close to the solar telescope GREGOR. The optical turbulence is derived from sonic anemometer measurements. Time series of the sonic temperature are analyzed and compared to the direct measurements of the laser scintillometer. Meteorological conditions are investigated, especially the influence of the wind direction. Turbulence of upper atmospheric layers is not regarded. The measured local turbulence is compared to the system performance of the GREGOR telescopes. It appears that the mountain ridge effects on turbulence are more relevant than any local causes of seeing close to the telescope. Results of these analyses and comparison of nearly one year of measurements are presented and discussed.

  2. On the Performance Analysis of Free-Space Optical Links under Generalized Turbulence and Misalignment Models

    KAUST Repository

    AlQuwaiee, Hessa

    2016-11-01

    One of the potential solutions to the radio frequency (RF) spectrum scarcity problem is optical wireless communications (OWC), which utilizes the unlicensed optical spectrum. Long-range outdoor OWC are usually referred to in the literature as free-space optical (FSO) communications. Unlike RF systems, FSO is immune to interference and multi-path fading. Also, the deployment of FSO systems is flexible and much faster than optical fibers. These attractive features make FSO applicable for broadband wireless transmission such as optical fiber backup, metropolitan area network, and last mile access. Although FSO communication is a promising technology, it is negatively affected by two physical phenomenon, namely, scintillation due to atmospheric turbulence and pointing errors. These two critical issues have prompted intensive research in the last decade. To quantify the effect of these two factors on FSO system performance, we need effective mathematical models. In this work, we propose and study a generalized pointing error model based on the Beckmann distribution. Then, we aim to generalize the FSO channel model to span all turbulence conditions from weak to strong while taking pointing errors into consideration. Since scintillation in FSO is analogous to the fading phenomena in RF, diversity has been proposed too to overcome the effect of irradiance fluctuations. Thus, several combining techniques of not necessarily independent dual-branch free-space optical links were investigated over both weak and strong turbulence channels in the presence of pointing errors. On another front, improving the performance, enhancing the capacity and reducing the delay of the communication link has been the motivation of any newly developed schemes, especially for backhauling. Recently, there has been a growing interest in practical systems to integrate RF and FSO technologies to solve the last mile bottleneck. As such, we also study in this thesis asymmetric an RF-FSO dual-hop relay

  3. Effect of magnetic islands on profiles, flows, turbulence and transport in nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañón Navarro, A.; Bardóczi, L.; Carter, T. A.; Jenko, F.; Rhodes, T. L.

    2017-03-01

    Neoclassical tearing modes have deleterious effects on plasma confinement and, if they grow large enough, they can lead to discharge termination. Therefore, they impose a major barrier in the development of operating scenarios of present-day tokamaks. Gyrokinetics offers a path toward studying multi-scale interactions with turbulence and the effect on plasma confinement. As a first step toward this goal, we have implemented static magnetic islands in nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations with the GENE code. We investigate the effect of the islands on profiles, flows, turbulence and transport and the scaling of these effects with respect to island size. We find a clear threshold island width, below which the islands have little or no effect while beyond this point the islands significantly perturb flows, increase turbulence and transport. Additionally, we study the effect of radially asymmetric islands on shear flows for the first time. We find that island induced shear flows can regulate turbulent fluctuation levels in the vicinity of the island separatrices. Throughout this work, we focus on experimentally relevant quantities, such as rms levels of density and electron temperature fluctuations, as well as amplitude and phasing of turbulence modulation. These simulations aim to provide guidelines for interpreting experimental results by comparing qualitative trends in the simulations with those obtained in tokamak experiments.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent liquid metal flow entering a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albets-Chico, X., E-mail: xalbets@ucy.ac.cy; Grigoriadis, D.G.E.; Votyakov, E.V.; Kassinos, S.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Analysis of turbulence persistence of fully developed MHD pipe flow at Re{sub b} = 4000. • Turbulence decay of fully developed turbulence flow entering low, moderate and strong magnetic fields. • Analysis of the wall conductivity on the aforementioned phenomena. • Discovering and further analysis of flow instabilities of the flow entering a strong magnetic field. -- Abstract: This paper presents direct numerical simulations (DNS) of fully developed turbulent liquid-metal flow in a circular duct entering a magnetic field. The case of a magnetohydrodynamic flow leaving a strong magnetic field has been extensively studied experimentally and numerically owing to its similarity to typical flow configurations appearing in liquid metal blankets of nuclear fusion reactors. Although also relevant to the design of fusion reactor blankets, the flow entering the fringing field of a magnet remains unexplored because its high intricacy precludes any simplification of the governing equations. Indeed, the complexity of the magnetohydrodynamic–turbulence interaction can only be analysed by direct numerical simulations or experiments. With that purpose, this paper addresses the case of a fully developed turbulent flow (Re{sub τ} ≈ 520) entering low, intermediate and strong magnetic fields under electrically insulating and poorly conducting walls by means of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. Purely hydrodynamic computations (without the effect of the magnetic field) reveal an excellent agreement against previous experimental and numerical results. Current MHD results provide a very detailed information of the turbulence decay and reveal new three-dimensional features related to liquid-metal flow entering strong increasing magnetic fields, such as flow instabilities due to the effect of the Lorentz forces within the fringing region at high Ha numbers.

  5. Turbulence and heat exchange inside the dome room of lidar station. Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosov, V. V.; Lukin, V. P.; Nosov, E. V.; Torgaev, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The structure of air turbulent motion inside the dome room - Primary Mirror (diameter 2.2 m) closed shaft at Siberian Lidar Station of V. E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science has been experimentally and theoretically studied. Research is needed to forecast a laser radiation distortion. Results of experiments performed using the ultrasonic compact portable weather station are presented. The main heat exchange directions of air flows inside the shaft are determined. Theoretical results have been obtained by numerical solving of boundary value problem for Navier-Stokes equations. Solitary large vortices (coherent structures, topological solitons) are observed inside the shaft. Coherent decay of such vortices generates the coherent turbulence. It is determined that inside the primary mirror shaft one may expect the weakening of phase fluctuations of optical radiation, and thus improvement the lidar optical imaging. This increases the efficiency of Lidar Station.

  6. Validation through simulations of a C_n^2 profiler for the ESO/VLT Adaptive Optics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rissmann, A.; Guesalaga, A.; Kolb, J.; Le Louarn, M.; Madec, P.-Y.; Neichel, B.

    2015-04-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) project envisages transforming one of the VLT units into an adaptive telescope and providing its ESO (European Southern Observatory) second generation instruments with turbulence-corrected wavefronts. For MUSE and HAWK-I this correction will be achieved through the GALACSI and GRAAL AO modules working in conjunction with a 1170 actuators deformable secondary mirror (DSM) and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF). Multiple wavefront sensors will enable GLAO (ground layer adaptive optics) and LTAO (laser tomography adaptive optics) capabilities, whose performance can greatly benefit from a knowledge about the stratification of the turbulence in the atmosphere. This work, totally based on end-to-end simulations, describes the validation tests conducted on a C_n^2 profiler adapted for the AOF specifications. Because an absolute profile calibration is strongly dependent on a reliable knowledge of turbulence parameters r0 and L0, the tests presented here refer only to normalized output profiles. Uncertainties in the input parameters inherent to the code are tested as well as the profiler response to different turbulence distributions. It adopts a correction for the unseen turbulence, critical for the GRAAL mode, and highlights the effects of masking out parts of the corrected wavefront on the results. Simulations of data with typical turbulence profiles from Paranal were input to the profiler, showing that it is possible to identify reliably the input features for all the AOF modes.

  7. Detector of Optical Vortices as the Main Element of the System of Data Transfer: Principles of Operation, Numerical Model, and Influence of Noise and Atmospheric Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii Aksenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The method is proposed of optical vortex topological charge detection along with a design of a corresponding detector. The developed technique is based on measurements of light field intensity. Mathematical model simulating performance of the detector is described in the paper, and results of numerical experiments are presented which illustrate recognition of a vortex in a turbulent medium and in the presence of amplitude and phase noise in the registered radiation. Influence of shifts of the system optical axis on precision of registration is also considered in the paper.

  8. Numerical simulation of linear and nonlinear quantum optics as a design tool for free-space quantum communications and quantum imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Ronald E.; Deacon, Keith S.; Rosen, D.

    2002-12-01

    A new quantum optics tool for simulating quantum probability density functions resulting from the linear and nonlinear interaction of photons with atoms and with other photons is developed and presented. It can be used to design and simulate quantum optics experiments used in quantum communications, quantum computing, and quantum imaging. Examples of a photon interacting with linears systems of mirrors and beamsplitters are simulated. Nonlinear simulations of the interaction of three photons resulting in photon momentum entanglement is presented. The wavefunction is expanded in Fock states. Fock states cannot be represented by classical modeling and therefore, the results of our modeling can in general represent phenomena in both the linear and nonlinear cases which cannot be modeled by classical linear optics. The modeling presented here is more general than the classical linear optics. Models of atmospheric turbulence and their simulations are presented and demonstrate the potential for first principles physics quantum optics simulations through turbulence in realistic environments.

  9. Stochastic simulation of acoustic communication in turbulent shallow water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Niese, Christian; Lutzen, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a stochastic model of a turbulent shallow-water acoustic channel. The model utilizes a Monte Carlo realization method to predict signal transmission conditions. The main output from the model are statistical descriptions of the signal-to-multipath ratio (SMR) and signal fading....... Probability density functions of signal envelope are evaluated by Pearsons's Skew-Kurtosis Chart, generally predicting Ricean fading. Dynamic calculations of SMR by the model overcome the main inconveniences of deterministic calculations, providing “smooth” instead of “noisy” curves as a result. Dynamic...... calculations of SMR and fading are concluded to provide more intelligible and realistic results than deterministic calculations...

  10. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flow in Concentric Annuli

    OpenAIRE

    Boersma, B.J.; Breugem, W.-P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider a fully developed turbulent flow in a round pipe with a small inner annulus. The diameter of the inner annulus is less than 10% of the diameter of the outer pipe. As a consequence, the surface area of the inner pipe compared to the outer pipe is small. The friction exerted by the wall on the flow is proportional to the surface area and the wall shear stress. Due to the small surface area of the inner annulus the additional stress on the flow due to the presence of th...

  11. Zonal Detached-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Unsteady Flow over Iced Airfoils

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yue

    2015-07-23

    This paper presentsamultiscale finite-element formulation for the second modeofzonal detached-eddy simulation. The multiscale formulation corrects the lack of stability of the standard Galerkin formulation by incorporating the effect of unresolved scales to the grid (resolved) scales. The stabilization terms arise naturally and are free of userdefined stability parameters. Validation of the method is accomplished via the turbulent flow over tandem cylinders. The boundary-layer separation, free shear-layer rollup, vortex shedding from the upstream cylinder, and interaction with the downstream cylinder are well reproduced. Good agreement with experimental measurements gives credence to the accuracy of zonal detached-eddy simulation in modeling turbulent separated flows. A comprehensive study is then conducted on the performance degradation of ice-contaminated airfoils. NACA 23012 airfoil with a spanwise ice ridge and Gates Learjet Corporation-305 airfoil with a leading-edge horn-shape glaze ice are selected for investigation. Appropriate spanwise domain size and sufficient grid density are determined to enhance the reliability of the simulations. A comparison of lift coefficient and flowfield variables demonstrates the added advantage that the zonal detached-eddy simulation model brings to the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Spectral analysis and instantaneous visualization of turbulent structures are also highlighted via zonal detached-eddy simulation. Copyright © 2015 by the CFD Lab of McGill University. Published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.

  12. Observational Diagnostics for Two-Fluid Turbulence in Molecular Clouds As Suggested by Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Chad D; Burkhart, Blakesely; Lazarian, Alex

    2013-01-01

    We present high resolution simulations of two-fluid (ion-neutral) MHD turbulence with resolutions as large as 512^3. The simulations are supersonic and mildly sub-Alfvenic, in keeping with the conditions present in molecular clouds. Such turbulence is thought to influence star formation processes in molecular clouds because typical cores form on length scales that are comparable to the dissipation scales of this turbulence in the ions. The simulations are motivated by the fact that recent studies of isophotologue lines in molecular clouds have found significant differences in the linewidth-size relationship for neutral and ion species. The goals of this paper are to explain those observations using simulations and analytic theory, present a new set of density-based diagnostics by drawing on similar diagnostics that have been obtained by studying single-fluid turbulence, and show that our two-fluid simulations play a vital role in reconciling alternative models of star formation. The velocity-dependent diagnos...

  13. Scintillation analysis of truncated Bessel beams via numerical turbulence propagation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyyuboğlu, Halil T; Voelz, David; Xiao, Xifeng

    2013-11-20

    Scintillation aspects of truncated Bessel beams propagated through atmospheric turbulence are investigated using a numerical wave optics random phase screen simulation method. On-axis, aperture averaged scintillation and scintillation relative to a classical Gaussian beam of equal source power and scintillation per unit received power are evaluated. It is found that in almost all circumstances studied, the zeroth-order Bessel beam will deliver the lowest scintillation. Low aperture averaged scintillation levels are also observed for the fourth-order Bessel beam truncated by a narrower source window. When assessed relative to the scintillation of a Gaussian beam of equal source power, Bessel beams generally have less scintillation, particularly at small receiver aperture sizes and small beam orders. Upon including in this relative performance measure the criteria of per unit received power, this advantageous position of Bessel beams mostly disappears, but zeroth- and first-order Bessel beams continue to offer some advantage for relatively smaller aperture sizes, larger source powers, larger source plane dimensions, and intermediate propagation lengths.

  14. Burst detection in turbulent channel flows based on large eddy simulation databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Qiang; ZHOU; Jifu; LI; Jiachun

    2005-01-01

    Reliable turbulent channel flow databases at several Reynolds numbers have been established by large eddy simulation (LES), with two of them validated by comparing with typical direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. Furthermore, the statistics, such as velocity profile, turbulent intensities and shear stress, were obtained as well as the temporal and spatial structure of turbulent bursts. Based on the LES databases available, the conditional sampling methods are used to detect the structures of burst events. A method to deterimine the grouping parameter from the probability distribution function (pdf) curve of the time separation between ejection events is proposed to avoid the errors in detected results. And thus, the dependence of average burst period on thresholds is considerably weakened. Meanwhile, the average burst-to- bed area ratios are detected. It is found that the Reynolds number exhibits little effect on the burst period and burst-to-bed area ratio

  15. Synergies between Asteroseismology and Three-dimensional Simulations of Stellar Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, W. David; Moravveji, E.

    2017-02-01

    Turbulent mixing of chemical elements by convection has fundamental effects on the evolution of stars. The standard algorithm at present, mixing-length theory (MLT), is intrinsically local, and must be supplemented by extensions with adjustable parameters. As a step toward reducing this arbitrariness, we compare asteroseismically inferred internal structures of two Kepler slowly pulsating B stars (SPBs; M∼ 3.25{M}ȯ ) to predictions of 321D turbulence theory, based upon well-resolved, truly turbulent three-dimensional simulations that include boundary physics absent from MLT. We find promising agreement between the steepness and shapes of the theoretically predicted composition profile outside the convective region in 3D simulations and in asteroseismically constrained composition profiles in the best 1D models of the two SPBs. The structure and motion of the boundary layer, and the generation of waves, are discussed.

  16. The Heating of Test Particles in Numerical Simulations of Alfvenic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lehe, Remi; Quataert, Eliot

    2009-01-01

    We study the heating of charged test particles in three-dimensional numerical simulations of weakly compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence (``Alfvenic turbulence''); these results are relevant to particle heating and acceleration in the solar wind, solar flares, accretion disks onto black holes, and other astrophysics and heliospheric environments. The physics of particle heating depends on whether the gyrofrequency of a particle is comparable to the frequency of a turbulent fluctuation that is resolved on the computational domain. Particles with these frequencies nearly equal undergo strong perpendicular heating (relative to the local magnetic field) and pitch angle scattering. By contrast, particles with large gyrofrequency undergo strong parallel heating. Simulations with a finite resistivity produce additional parallel heating due to parallel electric fields in small-scale current sheets. Many of our results are consistent with linear theory predictions for the particle heating produced by the ...

  17. Whole-volume integrated gyrokinetic simulation of plasma turbulence in realistic diverted-tokamak geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C S; Ku, S; Greengard, L; Park, G [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NY 10012 (United States); Diamond, P; Dif-Pradalier, G [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Adams, M; Keyes, D [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Barreto, R; D' Azevedo, E; Klasky, S; Podhorszki, N [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Chen, Y; Parker, S [University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Cummings, J [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ethier, S; Hahm, T S [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Hinton, F [Hinton Associates, Escondido, CA 92029 (United States); Lin, Z [University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Lofstead, J, E-mail: cschang@cims.nyu.ed [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Performance prediction for ITER is based upon the ubiquitous experimental observation that the plasma energy confinement in the device core is strongly coupled to the edge confinement for an unknown reason. The coupling time-scale is much shorter than the plasma transport time-scale. In order to understand this critical observation, a multi-scale turbulence-neoclassical simulation of integrated edge-core plasma in a realistic diverted geometry is a necessity, but has been a formidable task. Thanks to the recent development in high performance computing, we have succeeded in the integrated multiscale gyrokinetic simulation of the ion-temperature-gradient driven turbulence in realistic diverted tokamak geometry for the first time. It is found that modification of the self-organized criticality in the core plasma by nonlocal core-edge coupling of ITG turbulence can be responsible for the core-edge confinement coupling.

  18. Three-dimensional finite-element simulation of a turbulent push-pull ventilation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, M R; Ahn, K; Miller, C T

    1995-10-01

    A finite-element formulation with penalty approach to enforce continuity is employed here to simulate the three-dimensional velocity field resulting from a simple push-pull ventilation configuration. An analytic expression for the length scale and a transport equation for turbulent kinetic energy are coupled with the momentum equations. A coaxial square hood and jet are arranged with cross-draught perpendicular to the common centreline. Numerical predictions of the velocity and turbulence kinetic energy fields are evaluated in the plane of symmetry with hot film anemometry, and smoke-wire flow visualizations. The agreement of the simulated jet trajectories with flow visualizations is reasonable, as are velocities. Predictions of turbulence kinetic energy are not as good, particularly near the hood face. Despite the limitations the numerical approach is useful in assessing the impact of cross-draughts on the push-pull arrangement.

  19. Whole-volume integrated gyrokinetc simulation of plasma turbulence in realistic diverted-tokamak geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C S [New York University; Ku, Seung-Hoe [New York University; Diamond, Patrick [Columbia University; Adams, Mark [Columbia University; Tchoua, Roselyne B [ORNL; Chen, Yang [University of Colorado, Boulder; Cummings, Julian [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; D' Azevedo, Eduardo [ORNL; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem [University of California, San Diego; Ethier, Stephane [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Greengard, Leslie [New York University; Hahm, Taik Soo [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hinton, Fred [University of California, San Diego; Keyes, David E [Columbia University; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Lin, Zhihong [University of California, Irvine; Lofstead, J. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Park, G. [New York University; Parker, Scott [University of Colorado, Boulder; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL; Schwan, Karsten [Georgia Institute of Technology; Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Silver, D. [Rutgers University; Weitzner, Harold [New York University; Wolf, M. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Yoon, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Zorin, Denis [New York University

    2009-01-01

    Performance prediction for ITER is based upon the ubiquitous experimental observation that the plasma energy confinement in the device core is strongly coupled to the edge confinement for an unknown reason. The coupling time-scale is much shorter than the plasma transport time-scale. In order to understand this critical observation, a multi-scale turbulence-neoclassical simulation of integrated edge-core plasma in a realistic diverted geometry is a necessity, but has been a formidable task. Thanks to the recent development in high performance computing, we have succeeded in the integrated multiscale gyrokinetic simulation of the ion-temperature-gradient driven turbulence in realistic diverted tokamak geometry for the first time. It is found that modification of the self-organized criticality in the core plasma by nonlocal core-edge coupling of ITG turbulence can be responsible for the core-edge confinement coupling.

  20. Whole-volume integrated gyrokinetic simulation of plasma turbulence in realistic diverted-tokamak geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; Diamond, P.; Adams, M.; Barreto, R.; Chen, Y.; Cummings, J.; D'Azevedo, E.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ethier, S.; Greengard, L.; Hahm, T. S.; Hinton, F.; Keyes, D.; Klasky, S.; Lin, Z.; Lofstead, J.; Park, G.; Parker, S.; Podhorszki, N.; Schwan, K.; Shoshani, A.; Silver, D.; Wolf, M.; Worley, P.; Weitzner, H.; Yoon, E.; Zorin, D.

    2009-07-01

    Performance prediction for ITER is based upon the ubiquitous experimental observation that the plasma energy confinement in the device core is strongly coupled to the edge confinement for an unknown reason. The coupling time-scale is much shorter than the plasma transport time-scale. In order to understand this critical observation, a multi-scale turbulence-neoclassical simulation of integrated edge-core plasma in a realistic diverted geometry is a necessity, but has been a formidable task. Thanks to the recent development in high performance computing, we have succeeded in the integrated multiscale gyrokinetic simulation of the ion-temperature-gradient driven turbulence in realistic diverted tokamak geometry for the first time. It is found that modification of the self-organized criticality in the core plasma by nonlocal core-edge coupling of ITG turbulence can be responsible for the core-edge confinement coupling.

  1. Flux-driven gyrokinetic simulations of ion turbulent transport at low magnetic shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y; Strugarek, A; Dif-Pradalier, G; Abiteboul, J; Allfrey, S; Garbet, X; Ghendrih, Ph; Grandgirard, V; Latu, G, E-mail: yanick.sarazin@cea.fr

    2010-11-01

    Ion Temperature Gradient driven turbulence is investigated with the global full-f gyrokinetic code GYSELA for different magnetic equilibria. Reversed shear and monotonous q profile cases do not exhibit dramatic changes nor in the dynamics nor in the level of turbulence, leading to similar mean profiles. Especially, no transport barrier is observed in the vicinity of s = 0 in the general case, although the radial extent of the gap without resonant modes is larger than the typical turbulence correlation length. Conversely, a transport barrier is found to develop in the gap region if non resonant modes are artificially suppressed from the simulation. Such simulations tend to reconcile previously published contradictory results, while extending the analysis to more realistic flux-driven gyrokinetic regimes.

  2. Whole-volume integrated gyrokinetic simulation of plasma turbulence in realistic diverted-tokamak geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C S [New York University; Ku, Seung-Hoe [New York University; Diamond, P. H. [University of California, San Diego; Adams, Mark [Columbia University; Tchoua, Roselyne B [ORNL; Chen, Yang [University of Colorado, Boulder; Cummings, J. [California Institute of Technology, University of California, Davis; D' Azevedo, Ed F [ORNL; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem [University of California, San Diego; Ethier, Stephane [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Greengard, Leslie [New York University; Hahm, Taik Soo [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hinton, Fred [University of California, San Diego; Keyes, David E [Columbia University; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Lin, Z. [University of California, Irvine; Lofstead, J. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Park, G. [New York University; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL; Schwan, Karsten [Georgia Institute of Technology; Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Silver, D. [Rutgers University; Wolf, M. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Zorin, Denis [New York University

    2009-01-01

    Performance prediction for ITER is based upon the ubiquitous experimental observation that the plasma energy confinement in the device core is strongly coupled to the edge confinement for an unknown reason. The coupling time-scale is much shorter than the plasma transport time-scale. In order to understand this critical observation, a multi-scale turbulence-neoclassical simulation of integrated edge-core plasma in a realistic diverted geometry is a necessity, but has been a formidable task. Thanks to the recent development in high performance computing, we have succeeded in the integrated multiscale gyrokinetic simulation of the ion-temperature-gradient driven turbulence in realistic diverted tokamak geometry for the first time. It is found that modification of the self-organized criticality in the core plasma by nonlocal core-edge coupling of ITG turbulence can be responsible for the core-edge confinement coupling.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of the very large anisotropic scales in a turbulent channel

    CERN Document Server

    del Alamo, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decades the knowledge on the small scales of turbulent wall flows has experienced a significant advance, especially in the near-wall region where the highest production of turbulent energy and the maximum turbulence intensity occur. The development of computers has played an important role in this progress, making direct numerical simulations affordable (Kim, Moin & Moser, 1987), and offering wider observational possibilities than most laboratory experiments. The large scales have received less attention, and it has not been until recently that their significance and their real size have been widely recognized, thanks in part to the experiments by Hites (1997) and Kim & Adrian (1999), and to the compilation of experimental and numerical data by Jimenez (1998). The requirements of both a very large box and a high Reynolds number has made direct numerical simulation of the VLAS unapproachable until today. The purpose of this report is to serve as a preliminary description of a newly compil...

  4. AN INVESTIGATION OF TURBULENT HEAT TRANSFER IN CHANNEL FLOWS BY LARGE EDDY SIMULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of fully developed turbulent channel flow with heat transfer was performed to investigate the effects of the Reynolds number on the turbulence behavior. In the present study, the bottom wall of the channel was cooled and the top wall was heated. The Reynolds numbers, based on the central mean-velocity and the half-width of the channel, were chosen as 4000, 6000, 104 and 2×104, and the Prandtl number as 1.0. To validate our calculations, the present results were compared with available data obtained by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), which proves to be in good agreement with each other. To reveal the effects of the Reynolds number, some typical quantities, including the velocity fluctuations, temperature fluctuation, heat fluxes and turbulent Prandtl number, were studied.

  5. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MOVING SCOUR BOUNDARY AND TURBULENCE FLOW AROUND SUBMARINE PIPELINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-cheng; LU Lin

    2005-01-01

    A two dimensional vertical mathematical model is proposed in this paper for simulating the equilibrium profile of local scour around submarine pipelines. The current model is composed of a new k-ε turbulence model, fitting moving boundary with pre-meshed grid lines and incipient criterion of shear stress for sediments. Employing the proposed model, an instance is carried out numerically and compared with experiments. The calculation results agree well with the experiments. It shows that the improved two-equation turbulence model adopted in this paper is appropriate to simulating the turbulent flow field around submarine pipelines, fitting moving boundary with pre-meshed grid lines method is efficient for moving boundary problems in a multiply-connected domain and the stability evaluation method for seabed with critical shear stress based on log-wall law is a reliable choice.

  6. Controlling the onset of turbulence by streamwise traveling waves. Part 2. Direct numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Lieu, Binh K; Jovanović, Mihailo R

    2010-01-01

    This work builds on and confirms the theoretical findings of Part 1 of this paper, Moarref & Jovanovi\\'c (2010). We use direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations to assess the efficacy of blowing and suction in the form of streamwise traveling waves for controlling the onset of turbulence in a channel flow. We highlight the effects of the modified base flow on the dynamics of velocity fluctuations and net power balance. Our simulations verify the theoretical predictions of Part 1 that the upstream traveling waves promote turbulence even when the uncontrolled flow stays laminar. On the other hand, the downstream traveling waves with parameters selected in Part 1 are capable of reducing the fluctuations' kinetic energy, thereby maintaining the laminar flow. In flows driven by a fixed pressure gradient, a positive net efficiency as large as 25 % relative to the uncontrolled turbulent flow can be achieved with downstream waves. Furthermore, we show that these waves can also relaminarize full...

  7. Direct numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent flow over a flat plate at hypersonic flow speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, I. V.; Novikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    A method for direct numerical simulation of a laminar-turbulent flow around bodies at hypersonic flow speeds is proposed. The simulation is performed by solving the full three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The method of calculation is oriented to application of supercomputers and is based on implicit monotonic approximation schemes and a modified Newton-Raphson method for solving nonlinear difference equations. By this method, the development of three-dimensional perturbations in the boundary layer over a flat plate and in a near-wall flow in a compression corner is studied at the Mach numbers of the free-stream of M = 5.37. In addition to pulsation characteristic, distributions of the mean coefficients of the viscous flow in the transient section of the streamlined surface are obtained, which enables one to determine the beginning of the laminar-turbulent transition and estimate the characteristics of the turbulent flow in the boundary layer.

  8. Comparative analysis of turbulence models for flow simulation around a vertical axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, S.; Saha, U.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Guwahati (India)

    2012-07-01

    An unsteady computational investigation of the static torque characteristics of a drag based vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) has been carried out using the finite volume based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package Fluent 6.3. A comparative study among the various turbulence models was conducted in order to predict the flow over the turbine at static condition and the results are validated with the available experimental results. CFD simulations were carried out at different turbine angular positions between 0 deg.-360 deg. in steps of 15 deg.. Results have shown that due to high static pressure on the returning blade of the turbine, the net static torque is negative at angular positions of 105 deg.-150 deg.. The realizable k-{epsilon} turbulent model has shown a better simulation capability over the other turbulent models for the analysis of static torque characteristics of the drag based VAWT. (Author)

  9. Optical intensity scintillation in the simulated atmospherical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Lukas; Latal, Jan; Vanderka, Ales; Vitasek, Jan; Bojko, Marian; Bednarek, Lukas; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    There are several parameters of the atmospheric environment which have an effect on the optical wireless connection. Effects like fog, snow or rain are ones of the effects which appears tendentiously and which are bound by season, geographic location, etc. One of the effects that appear with various intensity for the whole time is airflow. The airflow changes the local refractive index of the air and areas with lower or higher refractive index form. The light going through these areas refracts and due to the optical intensity scintillates on the detector of the receiver. The airflow forms on the basis of two effects in the atmosphere. The first is wind cut and flowing over barriers. The other is thermal flow when warm air rises to the higher layers of the atmosphere. The heart of this article is creation such an environment that will form airflow and the refractive index will scintillate. For the experiment, we used special laboratory box with high-speed ventilators and heating units to simulate atmospheric turbulence. We monitor the impact of ventilator arrangement and air temperature on the scintillation of the gas laser with wavelength 633 nm/15 mW. In the experiment, there is watched the difference in behavior between real measurement and flow simulation with the same peripheral conditions of the airflow in the area of 500 x 500 cm.

  10. Subproton-scale cascades in solar wind turbulence: driven hybrid-kinetic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cerri, S S; Jenko, F; Told, D; Rincon, F

    2016-01-01

    A long-lasting debate in space plasma physics concerns the nature of subproton-scale fluctuations in solar wind (SW) turbulence. Over the past decade, a series of theoretical and observational studies were presented in favor of either kinetic Alfv\\'en wave (KAW) or whistler turbulence. Here, we investigate numerically the nature of the subproton-scale turbulent cascade for typical SW parameters by means of unprecedented high-resolution simulations of forced hybrid-kinetic turbulence in two real-space and three velocity-space dimensions. Our analysis suggests that small-scale turbulence in this model is dominated by KAWs at $\\beta\\gtrsim1$ and by magnetosonic/whistler fluctuations at lower $\\beta$. The spectral properties of the turbulence appear to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions. A tentative interpretation of this result in terms of relative changes in the damping rates of the different waves is also presented. Overall, the results raise interesting new questions about the properties and va...

  11. Transport of cosmic-ray protons in intermittent heliospheric turbulence: Model and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alouani-Bibi, Fathallah; Le Roux, Jakobus A., E-mail: fb0006@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The transport of charged energetic particles in the presence of strong intermittent heliospheric turbulence is computationally analyzed based on known properties of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind plasma at 1 astronomical unit. The turbulence is assumed to be static, composite, and quasi-three-dimensional with a varying energy distribution between a one-dimensional Alfvénic (slab) and a structured two-dimensional component. The spatial fluctuations of the turbulent magnetic field are modeled either as homogeneous with a Gaussian probability distribution function (PDF), or as intermittent on large and small scales with a q-Gaussian PDF. Simulations showed that energetic particle diffusion coefficients both parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field are significantly affected by intermittency in the turbulence. This effect is especially strong for parallel transport where for large-scale intermittency results show an extended phase of subdiffusive parallel transport during which cross-field transport diffusion dominates. The effects of intermittency are found to depend on particle rigidity and the fraction of slab energy in the turbulence, yielding a perpendicular to parallel mean free path ratio close to 1 for large-scale intermittency. Investigation of higher order transport moments (kurtosis) indicates that non-Gaussian statistical properties of the intermittent turbulent magnetic field are present in the parallel transport, especially for low rigidity particles at all times.

  12. Numerical simulations of turbulent ionized gas flows in the circumsolar protoplanetary disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marov, M. Ya.; Kuksa, M. M.

    2015-09-01

    An axisymmetric protoplanetary disk model that takes into account the interaction of turbulent gas flows with the magnetic field is considered. A closed system of equations of homogeneous compressible magnetohydrodynamics in the regime of developed turbulence in the gravitational and magnetic fields of a star has been constructed. Apart from the traditional probability-theoretical averaging of the MHD equations, the weighted Favre averaging is used. The approach by A.V. Kolesnichenko and M.Ya. Marov to modeling the turbulent transport coefficients in a weakly ionized disk has been implemented. It allows the inverse effects of the generated magnetic field on a turbulent gas flow and the dissipation of turbulence through kinematic and magnetic viscosities to be taken into account. A parallel code for numerically solving the system of averaged MHD equations has been developed. The averaged gas density and velocity distributions as well as the configuration of the disk's intrinsic magnetic field at a distance of 1 AU from the star have been obtained through numerical simulations. The assumption that the vertical (parallel to the disk's rotation axis) magnetic induction component changes much more profoundly in height than in radius and, hence, gives grounds to take into account its gradient in the model of the turbulent kinematic viscosity coefficient has been confirmed.

  13. Simulation of finite size particles in turbulent flows using entropic lattice boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhineet; Clercx, Herman J. H.; Toschi, Federico

    2016-11-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flows occur in variety of industrial applications. While the numerical simulation of such flows has seen significant advances in recent years, it still remains a challenging problem. Many studies investigated the rheology of dense suspensions in laminar flows as well as the dynamics of point-particles in turbulence. Here we will present results on the development of numerical methods, based on the Lattice Boltzmann method, suitable for the study of suspensions of finite-size particles under turbulent flow conditions and with varying geometrical complexity. The turbulent flow is modeled by an entropic lattice Boltzmann method, and the interaction between particles and carrier fluid is modeled using bounce back rule. Direct contact and lubrication force models for particle-particle interactions and particle-wall interaction are taken into account to allow for a full four-way coupled interaction. The accuracy and robustness of the method is discussed by validating velocity profile in turbulent pipe flow, sedimentation velocity of spheres in duct flow and resistance functions of approaching particles. Results show that the velocity profiles and turbulence statistics can be significantly altered by the presence of the dispersed solid phase. The author is supported by Shell-NWO computational sciences for energy research (CSER) Grant (12CSER034).

  14. Evolving magnetic equilibria in anomalous turbulent transport simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungpyo; Cerfon, Antoine; Highcock, Edmund; Barnes, Michael

    2014-10-01

    The evolution of poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes in a tokamak are determined by Faraday's law in which electric field needs to be consistent with 1-D radial transports of density, temperature, and toroidal angular momentum. Consistency is required because the transport of the thermodynamic variables depends on the 2-D magnetic equilibrium that changes depending on the radial pressure profile. For neoclassical transport, consistency is achieved through a proper treatment of the parallel electric field and Ohm's law [Hinton and Hazeltine (1976), Hirshman and Jardin (1979)]. Recently, consistency for the anomalous turbulent transport has been studied analytically using a Lagrangian formulation of gyrokinetics [Sugama et al. (2014)]. In this poster, we propose a simple numerical model to evolve both the magnetic equilibrium and the radial profile of density, temperature, and toroidal angular frequency due to turbulent transport with a fixed q (safety factor) profile. The constraint of fixed q profile makes the evolution self-consistent only if the transport time scale is much smaller than the resistive current diffusion time scale. In this model, we use the transport code TRINITY coupled with the local gyrokinetic code GS2 and the q-solver version of the Grad-Shafranov code ECOM.

  15. Turbulence detection in a stenosed artery bifurcation by numerical simulation of pulsatile blood flow using the low-Reynolds number turbulence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalichi, Farzan; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2003-01-01

    The pulsatile blood flow in a partially blocked artery is significantly altered as the flow regime changes through the cardiac cycle. This paper reports on the application of a low-Reynolds turbulence model for computation of physiological pulsatile flow in a healthy and stenosed carotid artery bifurcation. The human carotid artery was chosen since it has received much attention because atherosclerotic lesions are frequently observed. The Wilcox low-Re k-omega turbulence model was used for the simulation since it has proven to be more accurate in describing transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Using the FIDAP finite element code a validation showed very good agreement between experimental and numerical results for a steady laminar to turbulent flow transition as reported in a previous publication by the same authors. Since no experimental or numerical results were available in the literature for a pulsatile and turbulent flow regime, a comparison between laminar and low-Re turbulent calculations was made to further validate the turbulence model. The results of this study showed a very good agreement for velocity profiles and wall shear stress values for this imposed pulsatile laminar flow regime. To explore further the medical aspect, the calculations showed that even in a healthy or non-stenosed artery, small instabilities could be found at least for a portion of the pulse cycle and in different sections. The 40% and 55% diameter reduction stenoses did not significantly change the turbulence characteristics. Further results showed that the presence of 75% stenoses changed the flow properties from laminar to turbulent flow for a good portion of the cardiac pulse. A full 3D simulation with this low-Re-turbulence model, coupled with Doppler ultrasound, can play a significant role in assessing the degree of stenosis for cardiac patients with mild conditions.

  16. Direct numerical simulations and modeling of a spatially-evolving turbulent wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimbala, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Understanding of turbulent free shear flows (wakes, jets, and mixing layers) is important, not only for scientific interest, but also because of their appearance in numerous practical applications. Turbulent wakes, in particular, have recently received increased attention by researchers at NASA Langley. The turbulent wake generated by a two-dimensional airfoil has been selected as the test-case for detailed high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. This same wake has also been chosen to enhance NASA's turbulence modeling efforts. Over the past year, the author has completed several wake computations, while visiting NASA through the 1993 and 1994 ASEE summer programs, and also while on sabbatical leave during the 1993-94 academic year. These calculations have included two-equation (K-omega and K-epsilon) models, algebraic stress models (ASM), full Reynolds stress closure models, and direct numerical simulations (DNS). Recently, there has been mutually beneficial collaboration of the experimental and computational efforts. In fact, these projects have been chosen for joint presentation at the NASA Turbulence Peer Review, scheduled for September 1994. DNS calculations are presently underway for a turbulent wake at Re(sub theta) = 1000 and at a Mach number of 0.20. (Theta is the momentum thickness, which remains constant in the wake of a two dimensional body.) These calculations utilize a compressible DNS code written by M. M. Rai of NASA Ames, and modified for the wake by J. Cimbala. The code employs fifth-order accurate upwind-biased finite differencing for the convective terms, fourth-order accurate central differencing for the viscous terms, and an iterative-implicit time-integration scheme. The computational domain for these calculations starts at x/theta = 10, and extends to x/theta = 610. Fully developed turbulent wake profiles, obtained from experimental data from several wake generators, are supplied at the computational inlet, along with

  17. Direct numerical simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence in a dense gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giauque, A.; Corre, C.; Menghetti, M.

    2017-03-01

    A study of turbulence in BZT dense gas flows is performed using DNS. It is shown that for a large but realistic intensity, the turbulence in dense gas flows behaves in a highly compressible manner when the average thermodynamic state lies within the inversion region in which the gas fundamental derivative is negative. A close similarity is observed in the evolution of the kinetic energy when the initial turbulent Mach number and the Taylor Reynolds number are matched regardless of the Equation of State (EoS) considered. A large turbulent Mach number is yet more easily attained in dense gas flows lying in the inversion region because of the low speed of sound associated with it. In this case the turbulence shows a highly compressible evolution with periodic exchanges between the internal and kinetic energies. In order to assess the capabilities of currently available Large Eddy Simulation (LES) subgrid-scale models, a-posteriori tests are performed using the dynamic Smagorinsky model. Coherently with the hypothesis it relies on, the model perfectly captures the evolution of the kinetic energy when the turbulent Mach number is low enough. When using the perfect gas EoS at a higher turbulent Mach number the agreement is reasonable. Yet, when the average thermodynamic state lies within the inversion region and when using the thermal and caloric Martin&Hou EoS, the model is not able to capture the correct evolution of the kinetic energy. The results presented in this study call for a specific research effort directed towards the assessment and possibly the development of advanced subgrid-scale models for LES of turbulent dense gas flows.

  18. Numerical simulation of turbidity current using V2-f turbulence model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    a. Mehdizadeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The deposition behavior of fine sediment is an important phenomenon, and yet unclear to engineers concerned about reservoir sedimentation. An elliptic relaxation turbulence model ( 2 n - f model has been used to simulate the motion of turbid density currents laden with fine solid particles. During the last few years, the 2 n - f turbulence model has become increasingly popular due to its ability to account for near-wall damping without use of damping functions. The 2 n - f model has also proved to be superior to other RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes methods in many fluid flows where complex flow features are present. This current becomes turbulent at low Reynolds number (order 1000. The k -e model, which was standardized for high Reynolds number and isotropic turbulence flow, cannot simulate the anisotropy and nonhomogenous behavior near the wall. In this study, the turbidity current with a uniform velocity and concentration enters the channel via a sluice gate into a lighter ambient fluid and moves forward down-slope. The model has been validated by available experimental data sets. Moreover, results have been compared with the standard k -e turbulence model. The deposition of particles and the effects of their fall velocity on concentration distribution, Richardson number, and the deposition rate are also investigated. The results show that the coarse particles settle rapidly and make the deposition rate higher.

  19. Direct numerical simulation study of statistically stationary propagation of a reaction wave in homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rixin; Lipatnikov, Andrei N.

    2017-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulation (DNS) study of the propagation of a reaction wave in forced, constant-density, statistically stationary, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is performed by solving Navier-Stokes and reaction-diffusion equations at various (from 0.5 to 10) ratios of the rms turbulent velocity U' to the laminar wave speed, various (from 2.1 to 12.5) ratios of an integral length scale of the turbulence to the laminar wave thickness, and two Zeldovich numbers Ze=6.0 and 17.1. Accordingly, the Damköhler and Karlovitz numbers are varied from 0.2 to 25.1 and from 0.4 to 36.2, respectively. Contrary to an earlier DNS study of self-propagation of an infinitely thin front in statistically the same turbulence, the bending of dependencies of the mean wave speed on U' is simulated in the case of a nonzero thickness of the local reaction wave. The bending effect is argued to be controlled by inefficiency of the smallest scale turbulent eddies in wrinkling the reaction-zone surface, because such small-scale wrinkles are rapidly smoothed out by molecular transport within the local reaction wave.

  20. Parallel CFD simulations of turbulent flows inside a CANDU fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, F.; Yu, S.D.; Cao, J. [Ryerson Univ., Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: fabbasia@ryerson.ca

    2008-07-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is used to study the turbulent flow inside a 43-rod bundle. The two LES models developed in this paper are of dynamic Smagorinsky type, featuring a satisfactory prediction of anisotropic turbulence intensity and frequency. The first model, by taking advantage of the geometric periodicity, deals with one seventh of a rod bundle; it is developed for studying the axial, lateral turbulence intensities and frequencies in the centers of subchannels and narrow-gap regions. The second model, dealing with the full rod bundle inside a pressure tube with nominal eccentricity, is developed for studying the turbulent fluid forces acting on the bundle. In order to accelerate the solution process for the two large CFD models, the parallelized CFD technique is utilized in connection with 24 processors. The numerical results, obtained for a test case (an eight-rod bundle), are in good agreement with those experimental data available in the literature. Numerical simulations of turbulent flow phenomena within subchannels are advantageous since true flow features are difficult or costly to reveal by experiments. (author)

  1. Zakharov simulations of beam-induced turbulence in the auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, H.; Guio, P.; Hirsch, M. A.; Semeter, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Recent detections of strong incoherent scatter radar echoes from the auroral F region, which have been explained as the signature of naturally produced Langmuir turbulence, have motivated us to revisit the topic of beam-generated Langmuir turbulence via simulation. Results from one-dimensional Zakharov simulations are used to study the interaction of ionospheric electron beams with the background plasma at the F region peak. A broad range of beam parameters extending by more than 2 orders of magnitude in average energy and electron number density is considered. A range of wave interaction processes, from a single parametric decay, to a cascade of parametric decays, to formation of stationary density cavities in the condensate region, and to direct collapse at the initial stages of turbulence, is observed as we increase the input energy to the system. The effect of suprathermal electrons, produced by collisional interactions of auroral electrons with the neutral atmosphere, on the dynamics of Langmuir turbulence is also investigated. It is seen that the enhanced Landau damping introduced by the suprathermal electrons significantly weakens the turbulence and truncates the cascade of parametric decays.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of turbulent shear flow between parallel porous walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐政; 刘难生; 董宇红

    2014-01-01

    The effects of two parallel porous walls are investigated, consisting of the Darcy number and the porosity of a porous medium, on the behavior of turbulent shear flows as well as skin-friction drag. The turbulent channel flow with a porous surface is directly simulated by the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The Darcy-Brinkman-Forcheimer (DBF) acting force term is added in the lattice Boltzmann equation to simu-late the turbulent flow bounded by porous walls. It is found that there are two opposite trends (enhancement or reduction) for the porous medium to modify the intensities of the velocity fluctuations and the Reynolds stresses in the near wall region. The parametric study shows that flow modification depends on the Darcy number and the porosity of the porous medium. The results show that, with respect to the conventional impermeable wall, the degree of turbulence modification does not depend on any simple set of param-eters obviously. Moreover, the drag in porous wall-bounded turbulent flow decreases if the Darcy number is smaller than the order of O(10−4) and the porosity of porous walls is up to 0.4.

  3. Validation Through Simulations of a Cn2 Profiler for the ESO/VLT Adaptive Optics Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Rissmann, A; Kolb, J; Louarn, M Le; Madec, P -Y; Neichel, B

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) project envisages transforming one of the VLT units into an adaptive telescope and providing its ESO (European Southern Observatory) second generation instruments with turbulence corrected wavefronts. For MUSE and HAWK-I this correction will be achieved through the GALACSI and GRAAL AO modules working in conjunction with a 1170 actuators Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF). Multiple wavefront sensors will enable GLAO and LTAO capabilities, whose performance can greatly benefit from a knowledge about the stratification of the turbulence in the atmosphere. This work, totally based on end-to-end simulations, describes the validation tests conducted on a Cn2 profiler adapted for the AOF specifications. Because an absolute profile calibration is strongly dependent on a reliable knowledge of turbulence parameters r0 and L0, the tests presented here refer only to normalized output profiles. Uncertainties in the input parameters inherent t...

  4. Successive inverse polynomial interpolation to optimize Smagorinsky's model for large-eddy simulation of homogeneous turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Meyers, Johan

    2006-01-01

    We propose the successive inverse polynomial interpolation method to optimize model parameters in subgrid parameterization for large-eddy simulation. This approach is illustrated for the Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity model used in homogeneous decaying turbulence. The optimal Smagorinsky parameter is re

  5. Successive inverse polynomial interpolation to optimize Smagorinsky's model for large-eddy simulation of homogeneous turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.; Meyers, Johan

    We propose the successive inverse polynomial interpolation method to optimize model parameters in subgrid parameterization for large-eddy simulation. This approach is illustrated for the Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity model used in homogeneous decaying turbulence. The optimal Smagorinsky parameter is

  6. A direct-numerical-simulation-based second-moment closure for turbulent magnetohydrodynamic flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjereš, S.; Hanjalić, K.; Bal, D.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic field, imposed on turbulent flow of an electrically conductive fluid, is known to cause preferential damping of the velocity and its fluctuations in the direction of Lorentz force, thus leading to an increase in stress anisotropy. Based on direct numerical simulations (DNS), we have devel

  7. Direct Numerical Simulation of structural vacillation in the transition to geostrophic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Randriamampianina, Anthony; Fruh, Wolf-Gerrit; Read, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    The onset of small-scale fluctuations around a steady convection pattern in a rotating baroclinic annulus filled with air is investigated using Direct Numerical Simulation. In previous laboratory experiments of baroclinic waves, such fluctuations have been associated with a flow regime termed Structural Vacillation which is regarded as the first step in the transition to fully-developed geostrophic turbulence.

  8. Computational turbulent stress closure for large-eddy simulation of compressible flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bos, F.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the computation of stress tensors for turbulent compressible flow for purposes of subgrid modeling for LES (large eddy simulation) methods in an effort to provide a model closure. The method uses and compares a variety of filters and special decomposition methods on the velocity

  9. Turbulence spectra and transport barriers in gyrokinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Angelino, P.; Casati, A.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Gürcan, O.; Hennequin, P.; Sabot, R.

    2008-11-01

    The energy spectra of the Ion Temperature Gradient driven fluctuations are investigated with the global full-f gyrokinetic code GYSELA. For monotonous q profile, the poloidal spectrum can equally be fitted with two power laws or with a unique exponential. When prescribing an additional sheared radial electric field in view of triggering a transport barrier, the system is found to promptly polarize and screen this field, likely in a transient evolution towards a canonical equilibrium. For a reversed q profile, the negative shear region exhibits larger fluctuations, possibly due to the slab branch of ITG, characterized by a flatter spectrum. No clear transport barrier signature is observed in the vicinity of s = 0 when the radial extent of the gap without resonant modes is smaller than the turbulence correlation length.

  10. Numerical simulation of high-speed turbulent water jets in air

    CERN Document Server

    Guha, Anirban; Balachandar, Ram

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulation of high-speed turbulent water jets in air and its validation with experimental data has not been reported in the literature. It is therefore aimed to simulate the physics of these high-speed water jets and compare the results with the existing experimental works. High-speed water jets diffuse in the surrounding atmosphere by the processes of mass and momentum transfer. Air is entrained into the jet stream and the entire process contributes to jet spreading and subsequent pressure decay. Hence the physical problem is in the category of multiphase flows, for which mass and momentum transfer is to be determined to simulate the problem. Using the Eulerian multiphase and the k-\\epsilon turbulence models, plus a novel numerical model for mass and momentum transfer, the simulation was achieved. The results reasonably predict the flow physics of high-speed water jets in air.

  11. Turbulence and fire-spotting effects into wild-land fire simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Inderpreet; Bosseur, Frédéric; Filippi, Jean-Baptiste; Pagnini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical approach to model the effects and the role of phenomena with random nature such as turbulence and fire-spotting into the existing wildfire simulators. The formulation proposes that the propagation of the fire-front is the sum of a drifting component (obtained from an existing wildfire simulator without turbulence and fire-spotting) and a random fluctuating component. The modelling of the random effects is embodied in a probability density function accounting for the fluctuations around the fire perimeter given by the drifting component. In past, this formulation has been applied to include these random effects into a wildfire simulator based on an Eulerian moving interface method, namely the Level Set Method (LSM), but in this paper the same formulation is adapted for a wildfire simulator based on a Lagrangian front tracking technique, namely the Discrete Event System Specification (DEVS). Simple idealised numerical experiments are used to compare the performances of the LSM...

  12. Simulations of Turbulent Momentum and Scalar Transport in Non-Reacting Confined Swirling Coaxial Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical simulations of confined three-dimensional coaxial water jets. The objectives are to validate the newly proposed nonlinear turbulence models of momentum and scalar transport, and to evaluate the newly introduced scalar APDF and DWFDF equation along with its Eulerian implementation in the National Combustion Code (NCC). Simulations conducted include the steady RANS, the unsteady RANS (URANS), and the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS); both without and with invoking the APDF or DWFDF equation. When the APDF (ensemble averaged probability density function) or DWFDF (density weighted filtered density function) equation is invoked, the simulations are of a hybrid nature, i.e., the transport equations of energy and species are replaced by the APDF or DWFDF equation. Results of simulations are compared with the available experimental data. Some positive impacts of the nonlinear turbulence models and the Eulerian scalar APDF and DWFDF approach are observed.

  13. Large-eddy simulations of isolated disc galaxies with thermal and turbulent feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Harald; Niemeyer, Jens C; Almgren, Ann S

    2014-01-01

    We present a subgrid-scale model for the Multi-phase Interstellar medium, Star formation, and Turbulence (MIST) and explore its behaviour in high-resolution large-eddy simulations of isolated disc galaxies. MIST follows the evolution of a clumpy cold and a diffuse warm component of the gas within a volume element which exchange mass and energy via various cooling, heating and mixing processes. The star formation rate is dynamically computed from the state of the gas in the cold phase. An important feature of MIST is the treatment of unresolved turbulence in the two phases and its interaction with star formation and feedback by supernovae. This makes MIST a particularly suitable model for the interstellar medium in galaxy simulations. We carried out a suite of simulations varying fundamental parameters of our feedback implementation. Several observational properties of galactic star formation are reproduced in our simulations, such as an average star formation efficiency ~1%, a typical velocity dispersion arou...

  14. A high-order immersed boundary method for high-fidelity turbulent combustion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Yuki; Aoki, Kozo; Osawa, Kosuke; Shi, Tuo; Prodan, Alexandru; Tanahashi, Mamoru

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) have played important roles in the research of turbulent combustion. With the recent advancement in high-performance computing, DNS of slightly complicated configurations such as V-, various jet and swirl flames have been performed, and such DNS will further our understanding on the physics of turbulent combustion. Since these configurations include walls that do not necessarily conform with the preferred mesh coordinates for combustion DNS, most of these simulations use presumed profiles for inflow/near-wall flows as boundary conditions. A high-order immersed boundary method suited for parallel computation is one way to improve these simulations. The present research implements such a boundary technique in a combustion DNS code, and simulations are performed to confirm its accuracy and performance. This work was partly supported by Council for Science, Technology and Innovation, Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP), "Innovative Combustion Technology" (Funding agency: JST).

  15. Joint-constraint model for large-eddy simulation of helical turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changping; Xiao, Zuoli; Shi, Yipeng; Chen, Shiyi

    2014-04-01

    A three-term mixed subgrid-scale (SGS) stress model is proposed for large-eddy simulation (LES) of helical turbulence. The new model includes a Smagorinsky-Lilly term, a velocity gradient term, and a symmetric vorticity gradient term. The model coefficients are determined by minimizing the mean square error between the realistic and modeled Leonard stresses under a joint constraint of kinetic energy and helicity fluxes. The model formulated as such is referred to as joint-constraint dynamic three-term model (JCD3TM). First, the new model is evaluated a priori using the direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of homogeneous isotropic turbulence with helical forcing. It is shown that the SGS dissipation fractions from all three terms in JCD3TM have the properties of length-scale invariance in inertial subrange. JCD3TM can predict the SGS stresses, energy flux, and helicity flux more accurately than the dynamic Smagorinsky model (DSM) and dynamic mixed helical model (DMHM) in both pointwise and statistical senses. Then, the performance of JCD3TM is tested a posteriori in LESs of both forced and freely decaying helical isotropic turbulence. It is found that JCD3TM possesses certain features of superiority over the other two models in predicting the energy spectrum, helicity spectrum, high-order statistics, etc. It is also noteworthy that JCD3TM is capable of simulating the evolutions of both energy and helicity spectra more precisely than other models in decaying helical turbulence. We claim that the present SGS model can capture the main helical features of turbulent motions and may serve as a useful tool for LES of helical turbulent flows.

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of Spatially Developing Turbulent Reacting Shear Layers with the One-Dimensional Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffie, Andreas Frank

    Large eddy simulation (LES) combined with the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is used to simulate spatially developing turbulent reacting shear layers with high heat release and high Reynolds numbers. The LES-ODT results are compared to results from direct numerical simulations (DNS), for model development and validation purposes. The LES-ODT approach is based on LES solutions for momentum and pressure on a coarse grid and solutions for momentum and reactive scalars on a fine, one-dimensional, but three-dimensionally coupled ODT subgrid, which is embedded into the LES computational domain. Although one-dimensional, all three velocity components are transported along the ODT domain. The low-dimensional spatial and temporal resolution of the subgrid scales describe a new modeling paradigm, referred to as autonomous microstructure evolution (AME) models, which resolve the multiscale nature of turbulence down to the Kolmogorv scales. While this new concept aims to mimic the turbulent cascade and to reduce the number of input parameters, AME enables also regime-independent combustion modeling, capable to simulate multiphysics problems simultaneously. The LES as well as the one-dimensional transport equations are solved using an incompressible, low Mach number approximation, however the effects of heat release are accounted for through variable density computed by the ideal gas equation of state, based on temperature variations. The computations are carried out on a three-dimensional structured mesh, which is stretched in the transverse direction. While the LES momentum equation is integrated with a third-order Runge-Kutta time-integration, the time integration at the ODT level is accomplished with an explicit Forward-Euler method. Spatial finite-difference schemes of third (LES) and first (ODT) order are utilized and a fully consistent fractional-step method at the LES level is used. Turbulence closure at the LES level is achieved by utilizing the Smagorinsky

  17. Dynamics of Turbulence-generated E × B Flows: Simulation and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, T. S.

    1998-11-01

    Many magnetic confinement experiments have indicated that E × B shear can suppress turbulence and consequently lead to significant reduction of plasma transport.^1 It has been observed in flux-tube gyrofluid^2,3 and gyrokinetic^4 simulations that small radial scale fluctuating E × B flows driven by turbulence (often called radial modes,^3 or zonal flows) play a dominant role in regulating toroidal ITG (ion temperature gradient) turbulence. Furthermore, the radial modes with similar characteristics and significant impact on transport have been also observed in the recent global gyrokinetic simulations with improved numerical capabilities^5 as well as in edge turbulence simulations with a collisional poloidal flow damping.^6 In this work, we analyze turbulence and flow statistics from gyrofluid and gyrokinetic simulations and compare to various theoretical predictions. The observed radial modes contain significant components with radial scales and frequencies comparable to those of turbulence. While the fast time varying components (including Geodesic Acoustic Modes) contribute the most to the instantaneous E × B shearing rate, they are less influential in suppressing turbulence. The effective E × B shearing rate capturing this important physics is analytically derived and evaluated from the recent nonlinear simulation results. Its magnitude is much smaller than the instantaneous E × B shearing rate, but typically of the order of the decorrelation rate of the ambient turbulence. This is consistent with the reduced, not completely stabilized level of turbulence with broadened kr spectrum observed in simulations. Zonal flows are linearly stable, but can be generated either by incoherent emission of turbulence or by inverse cascade of spectrum yielding negative turbulent viscosity which is related to the Reynolds' stress.^7 Various analytical calculations and proposed mechanisms for zonal flow generation and saturation^7,8 will be tested numerically. Finally, the

  18. Simulations of Turbulent Momentum and Scalar Transport in Confined Swirling Coaxial Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical simulations of confined three-dimensional coaxial water jets. The objectives are to validate the newly proposed nonlinear turbulence models of momentum and scalar transport, and to evaluate the newly introduced scalar APDF and DWFDF equation along with its Eulerian implementation in the National Combustion Code(NCC). Simulations conducted include the steady RANS, the unsteady RANS (URANS), and the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS); both without and with invoking the APDF or DWFDF equation.

  19. Large-eddy simulations of fluid and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using renormalized parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma; Shishir Kumar

    2004-09-01

    In this paper a procedure for large-eddy simulation (LES) has been devised for fluid and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in Fourier space using the renormalized parameters; The parameters calculated using field theory have been taken from recent papers by Verma [1, 2]. We have carried out LES on 643 grid. These results match quite well with direct numerical simulations of 1283. We show that proper choice of parameter is necessary in LES.

  20. Benchmarking and scaling studies of pseudospectral code Tarang for turbulence simulations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma; Anando Chatterjee; K Sandeep Reddy; Rakesh K Yadav; Supriyo Paul; Mani Chandra; Ravi Samtaney

    2013-10-01

    Tarang is a general-purpose pseudospectral parallel code for simulating flows involving fluids, magnetohydrodynamics, and Rayleigh–Bénard convection in turbulence and instability regimes. In this paper we present code validation and benchmarking results of Tarang. We performed our simulations on 10243, 20483, and 40963 grids using the HPC system of IIT Kanpur and Shaheen of KAUST. We observe good `weak' and `strong' scaling for Tarang on these systems.

  1. Numerical simulation of turbulent diffusion flames using flamelet models on unstructured meshes

    OpenAIRE

    Ventosa Molina, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis aims at developing numerical methods and algorithms for the efficient simulation of diffusion flames in the flamelet regime. To tackle turbulent chemically reacting flows a double framework is used in the present thesis. On the one hand, flow description is performed in the context of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) techniques. On the other hand, thermochemistry is modelled by means of flamelet models. The flamelet regime is characterised by the split of the combustion process...

  2. Benchmarking and scaling studies of pseudospectral code Tarang for turbulence simulations

    KAUST Repository

    VERMA, MAHENDRA K

    2013-09-21

    Tarang is a general-purpose pseudospectral parallel code for simulating flows involving fluids, magnetohydrodynamics, and Rayleigh–Bénard convection in turbulence and instability regimes. In this paper we present code validation and benchmarking results of Tarang. We performed our simulations on 10243, 20483, and 40963 grids using the HPC system of IIT Kanpur and Shaheen of KAUST. We observe good ‘weak’ and ‘strong’ scaling for Tarang on these systems.

  3. Performance Analysis of Free-Space Optical Communication Systems With Multiuser Diversity Over Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Liang

    2014-04-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication has become a cost-effective method to provide high data rates. However, the turbulence-induced fading limits its application to short-range applications. To address this, we propose a multiuser diversity (MD) FSO scheme in which the Nth best user is selected and the channel fluctuations can be effectively exploited to produce a selection diversity gain. More specifically, we first present the statistics analysis for the considered system over both weak and strong atmospheric turbulence channels. Based on these statistics, the outage probability, bit-error rate performance, average capacity, diversity order, and coverage are analyzed. Results show that the diversity order for the gamma-gamma fading is N min{α, β}/2, where N is the number of users, and α and β are the channel fading parameters related to the effective atmospheric conditions of the link.

  4. LOLAS: an optical turbulence profiler in the atmospheric boundary layer with extreme altitude-resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, R; Wilson, R W; Chun, M; Butterley, T; Carrasco, E

    2008-01-01

    We report the development and first results of an instrument called Low Layer Scidar (LOLAS) which is aimed at the measurement of optical-turbulence profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer with high altitude-resolution. The method is based on the Generalized Scidar (GS) concept, but unlike the GS instruments which need a 1- m or larger telescope, LOLAS is implemented on a dedicated 40-cm telescope, making it an independent instrument. The system is designed for widely separated double-star targets, which enables the high altitude-resolution. Using a 20000-separation double- star, we have obtained turbulence profiles with unprecedented 12-m resolution. The system incorporates necessary novel algorithms for autoguiding, autofocus and image stabilisation. The results presented here were obtained at Mauna Kea Observatory. They show LOLAS capabilities but cannot be considered as representative of the site. A forthcoming paper will be devoted to the site characterisation. The instrument was built as part of the ...

  5. Slant path average intensity of finite optical beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yixin Zhang; Gaogang Wang

    2006-01-01

    The average intensity of finite laser beam propagating through turbulent atmosphere is calculated from the extended Huygens Fresnel principle. Formulas are presented for the slant path average intensity from an arbitrarily truncated Gaussian beam. The new expressions are derived from the modified von Karman spectrum for refractive-index fluctuations, quadratic approximation of the structure function,and Gaussian approximation for the product of Gaussian function and Bessel function. It is shown that the form of average intensity is not a Gaussian function but a polynomial of the power of the binomial function, Gaussian function, and the incomplete gamma function. The results also show that the mean irradiance of a finite optical beam propagating in slant path turbulent atmosphere not only depends on the effective beam radius at the transmitting aperture plane, propagation distance, and long-term lateral coherence length of spherical wave, but also on the radius of emit aperture.

  6. Instability of the perfect subgrid model in implicit-filtering large eddy simulation of geostrophic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiga, B T; Livescu, D

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate, in the context of implicit-filtering large eddy simulations (LESs) of geostrophic turbulence, that while the attractor of a well-resolved statistically stationary turbulent flow can be reached in a coarsely resolved LES that is forced by the subgrid scale (SGS) terms diagnosed from the well-resolved computation, the attractor is generically unstable: the coarsely resolved LES system forced by the diagnosed SGS eddy terms has multiple attractors. This points to the importance of interpreting the diagnosed SGS forcing terms in a well-resolved computation or experiment from a combined physical-numerical point of view rather than from a purely physical point of view.

  7. LARGE-EDDY SIMULATION OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL TURBULENT FLOW AROUND A CIRCULAR PIER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; Huhe Aode

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the turbulent flow field and the scouring mechanism around a circular pier were numerically investigated using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method for three scouring holes. The effects of the bottom topographies on the flow structure were studied in detail. The results show that at the downstream of the pier, as the scouring depth increases, the bed shear stress decreases and approaches to the undisturbed shear stress, however, the turbulent intensity, the fluctuating pressure, and the vertical pressure gradient increase gradually.

  8. Performance of Renormalization Group Algebraic Turbulence Model on Boundary Layer Transition Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyung H.

    1994-01-01

    The RNG-based algebraic turbulence model, with a new method of solving the cubic equation and applying new length scales, is introduced. An analysis is made of the RNG length scale which was previously reported and the resulting eddy viscosity is compared with those from other algebraic turbulence models. Subsequently, a new length scale is introduced which actually uses the two previous RNG length scales in a systematic way to improve the model performance. The performance of the present RNG model is demonstrated by simulating the boundary layer flow over a flat plate and the flow over an airfoil.

  9. The numerical simulation tool for the MAORY multiconjugate adaptive optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcidiacono, C.; Schreiber, L.; Bregoli, G.; Diolaiti, E.; Foppiani, I.; Agapito, G.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Oberti, S.; Cosentino, G.; Lombini, M.; Butler, R. C.; Ciliegi, P.; Cortecchia, F.; Patti, M.; Esposito, S.; Feautrier, P.

    2016-07-01

    The Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics RelaY (MAORY) is and Adaptive Optics module to be mounted on the ESO European-Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). It is an hybrid Natural and Laser Guide System that will perform the correction of the atmospheric turbulence volume above the telescope feeding the Multi-AO Imaging Camera for Deep Observations Near Infrared spectro-imager (MICADO). We developed an end-to-end Monte- Carlo adaptive optics simulation tool to investigate the performance of a the MAORY and the calibration, acquisition, operation strategies. MAORY will implement Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics combining Laser Guide Stars (LGS) and Natural Guide Stars (NGS) measurements. The simulation tool implement the various aspect of the MAORY in an end to end fashion. The code has been developed using IDL and use libraries in C++ and CUDA for efficiency improvements. Here we recall the code architecture, we describe the modeled instrument components and the control strategies implemented in the code.

  10. The numerical simulation tool for the MAORY multiconjugate adaptive optics system

    CERN Document Server

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bregoli, Giovanni; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Foppiani, Italo; Agapito, Guido; Puglisi, Alfio; Xompero, Marco; Oberti, Sylvain; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Lombini, Matteo; Butler, Chris R; Ciliegi, Paolo; Cortecchia, Fausto; Patti, Mauro; Esposito, Simone; Feautrier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics RelaY (MAORY) is and Adaptive Optics module to be mounted on the ESO European-Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). It is a hybrid Natural and Laser Guide System that will perform the correction of the atmospheric turbulence volume above the telescope feeding the Multi-AO Imaging Camera for Deep Observations Near Infrared spectro-imager (MICADO). We developed an end-to-end Monte- Carlo adaptive optics simulation tool to investigate the performance of a the MAORY and the calibration, acquisition, operation strategies. MAORY will implement Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics combining Laser Guide Stars (LGS) and Natural Guide Stars (NGS) measurements. The simulation tool implements the various aspect of the MAORY in an end to end fashion. The code has been developed using IDL and uses libraries in C++ and CUDA for efficiency improvements. Here we recall the code architecture, we describe the modeled instrument components and the control strategies implemented in the code.

  11. Numerical simulation and analysis of confined turbulent buoyant jet with variable source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EL-AMIN Mohamed F; AL-GHAMDI Abdulmajeed; SALAMA Amgad; SUN Shuyu

    2015-01-01

    In this work, experimental and numerical investigations are undertaken for confined buoyant turbulent jet with varying inlet temperatures. Results of the experimental work and numerical simulations for the problem under consideration are presented. Four cases of different variable inlet temperatures and different flow rates are considered. The realizable k-ε turbulence model is used to model the turbulent flow. Comparisons show good agreements between simulated and measured results. The average devia- tion of the simulated temperature by realizablek-ε turbulent model and the measured temperature is within 2%. The results indicate that temperatures along the vertical axis vary, generally, in nonlinear fashion as opposed to the approximately linear varia- tion that was observed for the constant inlet temperature that was done in a previous work. Furthermore, thermal stratification exits, particularly closer to the entrance region. Further away from the entrance region the variation in temperatures becomes relatively smaller. The stratification is observed since the start of the experiment and continues during the whole course. Numerical experime- nts for constant, monotone increasing and monotone decreasing of inlet temperature are done to show its effect on the buoyancy force in terms of Richardson number.

  12. Large-Eddy Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in Heliophysics and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesch, Mark; Matthaeus, William; Brandenburg, Axel; Petrosyan, Arakel; Pouquet, Annick; Cambon, Claude; Jenko, Frank; Uzdensky, Dmitri; Stone, James; Tobias, Steve; Toomre, Juri; Velli, Marco

    2015-11-01

    We live in an age in which high-performance computing is transforming the way we do science. Previously intractable problems are now becoming accessible by means of increasingly realistic numerical simulations. One of the most enduring and most challenging of these problems is turbulence. Yet, despite these advances, the extreme parameter regimes encountered in space physics and astrophysics (as in atmospheric and oceanic physics) still preclude direct numerical simulation. Numerical models must take a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach, explicitly computing only a fraction of the active dynamical scales. The success of such an approach hinges on how well the model can represent the subgrid-scales (SGS) that are not explicitly resolved. In addition to the parameter regime, heliophysical and astrophysical applications must also face an equally daunting challenge: magnetism. The presence of magnetic fields in a turbulent, electrically conducting fluid flow can dramatically alter the coupling between large and small scales, with potentially profound implications for LES/SGS modeling. In this review article, we summarize the state of the art in LES modeling of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. After discussing the nature of MHD turbulence and the small-scale processes that give rise to energy dissipation, plasma heating, and magnetic reconnection, we consider how these processes may best be captured within an LES/SGS framework. We then consider several specific applications in heliophysics and astrophysics, assessing triumphs, challenges, and future directions.

  13. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow around a forced moving circular cylinder on cut cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Wei

    2013-01-01

    Fixed and forced moving circular cylinders in turbulent flows are studied by using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and two-equation based Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) turbulence models. The Cartesian cut cell approach is adopted to track the body surface across a stationary background grid covering the whole computational domain. A cell-centered finite volume method of second-order accuracy in both time and space is developed to solve the flow field in fluid cells, which is also modified accordingly in cut cells and merged cells. In order to compare different turbulence models, the current flow past a fixed circular cylinder at a mode- rate Reynolds number,Re=3 900, is tested first. The model is also applied to the simulation of a forced oscillating circular cylinder in the turbulent flow, and the influences of different oscillation amplitudes, frequencies and free stream velocities are discussed. The numerical results indicate that the present numerical model based on the Cartesian cut cell approach is capable of solving the turbu- lent flow around a body undergoing motions, which is a foundation for the possible future study on wake induced oscillation and vor- tex induced vibration.

  14. Large scale Direct Numerical Simulation of premixed turbulent jet flames at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Antonio; Luca, Stefano; Lo Schiavo, Ermanno; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Creta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    A set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed jet flames at different Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers is presented. The simulations feature finite rate chemistry with 16 species and 73 reactions and up to 22 Billion grid points. The jet consists of a methane/air mixture with equivalence ratio ϕ = 0 . 7 and temperature varying between 500 and 800 K. The temperature and species concentrations in the coflow correspond to the equilibrium state of the burnt mixture. All the simulations are performed at 4 atm. The flame length, normalized by the jet width, decreases significantly as the Reynolds number increases. This is consistent with an increase of the turbulent flame speed due to the increased integral scale of turbulence. This behavior is typical of flames in the thin-reaction zone regime, which are affected by turbulent transport in the preheat layer. Fractal dimension and topology of the flame surface, statistics of temperature gradients, and flame structure are investigated and the dependence of these quantities on the Reynolds number is assessed.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of a cooling impinging jet to a turbulent crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Michail; Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we report on Large Eddy Simulations of a cooling impinging jet to a turbulent channel flow. The impinging jet enters the turbulent stream in an oblique direction. This type of flow is relevant to the so-called ``Pressurized Thermal Shock'' phenomenon that can occur in pressurized water reactors. First we elaborate on issues related to the set-up of the simulations of the flow of interest such as, imposition of turbulent inflows, choice of subgrid-scale model and others. Also, the issue of the commutator error due to the anisotropy of the spatial cut-off filter induced by non-uniform grids is being discussed. In the second part of the talk we present results of our simulations. In particular, we focus on the high-shear and recirculation zones that are developed and on the characteristics of the temperature field. The budget for the mean kinetic energy of the resolved-scale turbulent velocity fluctuations is also discussed and analyzed. Financial support has been provided by Bel V, a subsidiary of the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control of Belgium.

  16. Numerical simulation and analysis of confined turbulent buoyant jet with variable source

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2016-01-23

    In this work, experimental and numerical investigations are undertaken for confined buoyant turbulent jet with varying inlet temperatures. Results of the experimental work and numerical simulations for the problem under consideration are presented. Four cases of different variable inlet temperatures and different flow rates are considered. The realizable k-ɛ turbulence model is used to model the turbulent flow. Comparisons show good agreements between simulated and measured results. The average deviation of the simulated temperature by realizable k-ɛ turbulent model and the measured temperature is within 2%. The results indicate that temperatures along the vertical axis vary, generally, in nonlinear fashion as opposed to the approximately linear variation that was observed for the constant inlet temperature that was done in a previous work. Furthermore, thermal stratification exits, particularly closer to the entrance region. Further away from the entrance region the variation in temperatures becomes relatively smaller. The stratification is observed since the start of the experiment and continues during the whole course. Numerical experiments for constant, monotone increasing and monotone decreasing of inlet temperature are done to show its effect on the buoyancy force in terms of Richardson number.

  17. Sound Generation by a Turbulent Flow in Musical Instruments - Multiphysics Simulation Approach -

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Taizo; Takahashi, Kin'ya; Mibu, Ryota; Aoyagi, Mutsumi

    2007-01-01

    Total computational costs of scientific simulations are analyzed between direct numerical simulations (DNS) and multiphysics simulations (MPS) for sound generation in musical instruments. In order to produce acoustic sound by a turbulent flow in a simple recorder-like instrument, compressible fluid dynamic calculations with a low Mach number are required around the edges and the resonator of the instrument in DNS, while incompressible fluid dynamic calculations coupled with dynamics of sound propagation based on the Lighthill's acoustic analogy are used in MPS. These strategies are evaluated not only from the viewpoint of computational performances but also from the theoretical points of view as tools for scientific simulations of complicated systems.

  18. Large eddy simulation of turbulent statistical and transport properties in stably stratified flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang QIU; Yong-xiang HUANG; Zhi-ming LU; Yu-lu LIU

    2009-01-01

    Three dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) is performed in the inves-tigation of stably stratified turbulence with a sharp thermal interface. Main results are focused on the turbulent characteristic scale, statistical properties, transport properties,and temporal and spatial evolution of the scalar field. Results show that the buoyancy scale increases first, and then goes to a certain constant value. The stronger the mean shear, the larger the buoyancy scale. The overturning scale increases with the flow, and the mean shear improves the overturning scale. The flatness factor of temperature de-parts from the Ganssian distribution in a fairly large region, and its statistical properties are clearly different from those of the velocity fluctuations in strong stratified cases. Tur-bulent mixing starts from small scale motions, and then extends to large scale motions.

  19. Large-eddy simulations of geophysical turbulent flows with applications to planetary boundary layer research

    CERN Document Server

    Esau, Igor

    2009-01-01

    The present study gives an overview and emphasizes principal moments of the applications of the turbulence-resolving modeling with large-eddy simulation (LES) numerical technique to planetary boundary layer (PBL) research and climate studies. LES proved to be very useful in understanding of the atmospheric and ocean turbulent exchange and ultimately in parameterization improvement in traditional meteorological models. LES have played a key role in recognizing the importance of previously ignored self-organized structures in the geophysical turbulence. LES assisted theoreticians and weather/climate modelers with reliable information about the averaged vertical structure of the PBL in convection and shear regimes as well as with better estimations of key PBL parameters, e.g. an entrainment rate, for model calibrations. At present, LES are an essential, indispensible part of geosciences, while the mainstream of the LES research still deals with idealized case studies with rather simple micro-physics.

  20. Flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion: A direct numerical simulation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacks, Daniel H.; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus; Arias, Paul G.; Im, Hong G.

    2016-12-01

    The distributions of flow topologies within the flames representing the corrugated flamelets, thin reaction zones, and broken reaction zone regimes of premixed turbulent combustion are investigated using direct numerical simulation data of statistically planar turbulent H2-air flames with an equivalence ratio ϕ =0.7 . It was found that the diminishing influence of dilatation rate with increasing Karlovitz number has significant influences on the statistical behaviors of the first, second, and third invariants (i.e., P ,Q , and R ) of the velocity gradient tensor. These differences are reflected in the distributions of the flow topologies within the flames considered in this analysis. This has important consequences for those topologies that make dominant contributions to the scalar-turbulence interaction and vortex-stretching terms in the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport equations, respectively. Detailed physical explanations are provided for the observed regime dependences of the flow topologies and their implications on the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport.

  1. Simulations of ionospheric turbulence produced by HF heating near the upper hybrid layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmi, A.; Eliasson, B.; Shao, X.; Milikh, G. M.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-06-01

    Heating of the ionosphere by high-frequency (HF), ordinary (O) mode electromagnetic waves can excite magnetic field-aligned density striations, associated with upper and lower hybrid turbulence and electron heating. We have used Vlasov simulations in one spatial and two velocity dimensions to study the induced turbulence in the presence of striations when the O-mode pump is mode converted to large-amplitude upper hybrid oscillations trapped in a striation. Parametric processes give rise to upper and lower hybrid turbulence, as well as to large amplitude, short wavelength electron Bernstein waves. The latter excite stochastic electron heating when their amplitudes exceed a threshold for stochasticity, leading to a rapid increase of the electron temperature by several thousands of kelvin. The results have relevance for high-latitude heating experiments.

  2. Numerical simulation research on sodium laser beacon imagings through the atmosphere turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyuan; Qian, Xianmei; Zhang, Suimeng; Zhao, Minfu; Cui, Chaolong; Huang, Honghua

    2016-01-01

    Based on the relative intensity distributions of Sodium Laser Beacon (SLB) and analysis of the on-axis imaging of incoherent light, considering the effects of atmospheric turbulence and the changes of telescope receiving diameter on the short-exposure SLB imagings on the focal plane, imagings of an extended source SLB are simulated under the three atmospheric turbulence models. Results indicate that sharpness and peak strehl ratio of SLB imagings increase but sharpness radius decrease with the decrease of atmosphere turbulence strengths. Moreover, the changes of telescope diameter from 3.0m to 1.5m cause the decrease of sharpness and peak strehl ratio but the increase of sharpness radius.

  3. Simulation of particle diffusion in a spectrum of electrostatic turbulence. Low frequency Bohm or percolation scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuss, J.D.; Misguich, J.H.

    1996-02-01

    An important point for turbulent transport consists in determining the scaling law for the diffusion coefficient D due to electrostatic turbulence. It is well-known that for weak amplitudes or large frequencies, the reduced diffusion coefficient has a quasi-linear like (or gyro-Bohm like) scaling, while for large amplitudes or small frequencies it has been traditionally believed that the scaling is Bohm-like. The aim of this work consists to test this prediction for a given realistic model. This problem is studied by direct simulation of particle trajectories. Guiding centre diffusion in a spectrum of electrostatic turbulence is computed for test particles in a model spectrum, by means of a new parallelized code RADIGUET 2. The results indicate a continuous transition for large amplitudes toward a value which is compatible with the Isichenko percolation prediction. (author). 34 refs.

  4. Numerical Simulation of the Turbulent Flow around an Oval-Sail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouahiba Guerri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents numerical study of an oval-sail, a bluff-body equipped with a grid all along the span. Suction based flow control is applied to this body that is developed for wind assisted ship propulsion. First, a choice of numerical turbulence model is discussed through results of an oval-sail without suction. Three turbulence models are applied: the Ri j SSG, the Ri j EBRSM and the v2 f model. Then, computations are performed for the oval-sail fitted with suction grid. These last simu- lations are carried out with the low-Reynolds-number Ri j EBRSM turbulence model. The influence of the grid geometry on the oval-sail aerodynamic performances is highlighted. All simulations are carried out for the sail set at zero incidence. The Reynolds number based on the free stream velocity and the profile chord is Re = 5105. Results are compared to available experimental data.

  5. Flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion: A direct numerical simulation analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Wacks, Daniel H.

    2016-12-02

    The distributions of flow topologies within the flames representing the corrugated flamelets, thin reaction zones, and broken reaction zone regimes of premixed turbulent combustion are investigated using direct numerical simulation data of statistically planar turbulent H-2-air flames with an equivalence ratio phi = 0.7. It was found that the diminishing influence of dilatation rate with increasing Karlovitz number has significant influences on the statistical behaviors of the first, second, and third invariants (i.e., P, Q, and R) of the velocity gradient tensor. These differences are reflected in the distributions of the flow topologies within the flames considered in this analysis. This has important consequences for those topologies that make dominant contributions to the scalar-turbulence interaction and vortex-stretching terms in the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport equations, respectively. Detailed physical explanations are provided for the observed regime dependences of the flow topologies and their implications on the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport.

  6. Tetrahedral-Mesh Simulation of Turbulent Flows with the Space-Time Conservative Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji; Cheng, Gary C.

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows are predominantly carried out using structured, hexahedral meshes despite decades of development in unstructured mesh methods. Tetrahedral meshes offer ease of mesh generation around complex geometries and the potential of an orientation free grid that would provide un-biased small-scale dissipation and more accurate intermediate scale solutions. However, due to the lack of consistent multi-dimensional numerical formulations in conventional schemes for triangular and tetrahedral meshes at the cell interfaces, numerical issues exist when flow discontinuities or stagnation regions are present. The space-time conservative conservation element solution element (CESE) method - due to its Riemann-solver-free shock capturing capabilities, non-dissipative baseline schemes, and flux conservation in time as well as space - has the potential to more accurately simulate turbulent flows using unstructured tetrahedral meshes. To pave the way towards accurate simulation of shock/turbulent boundary-layer interaction, a series of wave and shock interaction benchmark problems that increase in complexity, are computed in this paper with triangular/tetrahedral meshes. Preliminary computations for the normal shock/turbulence interactions are carried out with a relatively coarse mesh, by direct numerical simulations standards, in order to assess other effects such as boundary conditions and the necessity of a buffer domain. The results indicate that qualitative agreement with previous studies can be obtained for flows where, strong shocks co-exist along with unsteady waves that display a broad range of scales, with a relatively compact computational domain and less stringent requirements for grid clustering near the shock. With the space-time conservation properties, stable solutions without any spurious wave reflections can be obtained without a need for buffer domains near the outflow/farfield boundaries. Computational results for the

  7. Performance limits of high-rate space-to-ground optical communications through the turbulent atmospheric channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, John E.

    1995-04-01

    Atmospheric turbulence corrupts both the amplitude and phase of an optical field propagating from space to an earth-based receiver. While aperture averaging can mitigate amplitude scintillation effects, the performance of single spatial-mode receiver systems such as coherent detection or preamplified direction detection can be significantly degraded by the corrupted phase when the ratio of aperture diameter D to atmospheric coherence length r0 exceeds unity. Although adaptive optics may be employed to correct the wavefront, in practice the correction is imperfect and the residual phase errors induce a communications performance loss. That loss is quantified here by Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Single-mode-receiver fade statistics for imperfect phase correction are calculated in terms of the atmospheric Greenwood frequency fg, the adaptive optic servo loop cutoff frequency fc, and the ratio D/r0. From these statistics, link bit-error rate (BER) performance is calculated. The results reveal that conventional performance measures such as Strehl ratio or mean signal-to- noise ratio loss can significantly underestimate receiver BER losses. Only when the ratio fg/fc is 0.1 or less will communications losses be small (about 0.5 dB) over a wide range of D/r0.

  8. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bodony, Daniel J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Freund, Jonathan B., E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space–time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge–Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that

  9. SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhihong [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-12-18

    During the first year of the SciDAC gyrokinetic particle simulation (GPS) project, the GPS team (Zhihong Lin, Liu Chen, Yasutaro Nishimura, and Igor Holod) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) studied the tokamak electron transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence, and by trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence with kinetic electron effects, extended our studies of ITG turbulence spreading to core-edge coupling. We have developed and optimized an elliptic solver using finite element method (FEM), which enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models (split-weight scheme and hybrid model) in the SciDAC GPS production code GTC. The GTC code has been ported and optimized on both scalar and vector parallel computer architectures, and is being transformed into objected-oriented style to facilitate collaborative code development. During this period, the UCI team members presented 11 invited talks at major national and international conferences, published 22 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 10 papers in conference proceedings. The UCI hosted the annual SciDAC Workshop on Plasma Turbulence sponsored by the GPS Center, 2005-2007. The workshop was attended by about fifties US and foreign researchers and financially sponsored several gradual students from MIT, Princeton University, Germany, Switzerland, and Finland. A new SciDAC postdoc, Igor Holod, has arrived at UCI to initiate global particle simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence driven by energetic particle modes. The PI, Z. Lin, has been promoted to the Associate Professor with tenure at UCI.

  10. Large-Eddy Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in Astrophysics and Space Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Miesch, Mark S; Brandenburg, Axel; Petrosyan, Arakel; Pouquet, Annick; Cambon, Claude; Jenko, Frank; Uzdensky, Dmitri; Stone, James; Tobias, Steve; Toomre, Juri; Velli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We live in an age in which high-performance computing is transforming the way we do science. Previously intractable problems are now becoming accessible by means of increasingly realistic numerical simulations. One of the most enduring and most challenging of these problems is turbulence. Yet, despite these advances, the extreme parameter regimes encountered in astrophysics and space physics (as in atmospheric and oceanic physics) still preclude direct numerical simulation. Numerical models must take a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach, explicitly computing only a fraction of the active dynamical scales. The success of such an approach hinges on how well the model can represent the subgrid-scales (SGS) that are not explicitly resolved. In addition to the parameter regime, astrophysical and heliophysical applications must also face an equally daunting challenge: magnetism. The presence of magnetic fields in a turbulent, electrically conducting fluid flow can dramatically alter the coupling between large and...

  11. GYSELA, a full-f global gyrokinetic Semi-Lagrangian code for ITG turbulence simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Crouseilles, N.; Latu, G.; Sonnendrücker, E.; Besse, N.; Bertrand, P.

    2006-11-01

    This work addresses non-linear global gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence with the GYSELA code. The particularity of GYSELA code is to use a fixed grid with a Semi-Lagrangian (SL) scheme and this for the entire distribution function. The 4D non-linear drift-kinetic version of the code already showns the interest of such a SL method which exhibits good properties of energy conservation in non-linear regime as well as an accurate description of fine spatial scales. The code has been upgrated to run 5D simulations of toroidal ITG turbulence. Linear benchmarks and non-linear first results prove that semi-lagrangian codes can be a credible alternative for gyrokinetic simulations.

  12. Implications of the homogeneous turbulence assumption on the aero-optic linking equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Ronald J.; Jumper, Eric J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper investigates the validity of applying the simplified (under the assumptions of isotropic and homogeneous turbulence) aero-optic linking equation to a flowfield that is known to consist of anisotropic and nonhomogeneous turbulence. The investigation is performed in the near nozzle-region of a heated two-dimensional jet, and the study makes use of a conditional sampling experiment to acquire a spatio-temporal temperature field data base for the heated jet flowfield. After compensating for the bandwidth limitations of constant-current-wire temperature measurements, the temperature field data base is applied to the computation of optical degradation through both direct methods and indirect methods relying on the aero-optic linking equation. The simplified version of the linking equation was found to provide very good agreement with direct calculations provided that the length scale of the density fluctuations was interpreted as being the integral scale, with the limits of the integration being the two first zero crossings of the covariance coefficient function.

  13. Advanced CFD simulations of turbulent flows around appendages in CANDU fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, F.; Hadaller, G.I.; Fortman, R.A., E-mail: fabbasian@sternlab.com [Stern Laboratories Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to simulate the coolant flow in a modified 37-element CANDU fuel bundle, in order to investigate the effects of the appendages on the flow field. First, a subchannel model was created to qualitatively analyze the capabilities of different turbulence models such as k.ε, Reynolds Normalization Group (RNG), Shear Stress Transport (SST) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Then, the turbulence model with the acceptable quality was used to investigate the effects of positioning appendages, normally used in CANDU 37-element Critical Heat Flux (CHF) experiments, on the flow field. It was concluded that the RNG and SST models both show improvements over the k.ε method by predicting cross flow rates closer to those predicted by the LES model. Also the turbulence effects in the k.ε model dissipate quickly downstream of the appendages, while in the RNG and SST models appear at longer distances similar to the LES model. The RNG method simulation time was relatively feasible and as a result was chosen for the bundle model simulations. In the bundle model simulations it was shown that the tunnel spacers and leaf springs, used to position the bundles inside the pressure tubes in the experiments, have no measureable dominant effects on the flow field. The flow disturbances are localized and disappear at relatively short streamwise distances. (author)

  14. Quantifying Turbulent Kinetic Energy in an Aortic Coarctation with Large Eddy Simulation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-11-01

    In this study, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in an aortic coarctation was studied using both a numerical technique (large eddy simulation, LES) and in vivo measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High levels of TKE are undesirable, as kinetic energy is extracted from the mean flow to feed the turbulent fluctuations. The patient underwent surgery to widen the coarctation, and the flow before and after surgery was computed and compared to MRI measurements. The resolution of the MRI was about 7 × 7 voxels in axial cross-section while 50x50 mesh cells with increased resolution near the walls was used in the LES simulation. In general, the numerical simulations and MRI measurements showed that the aortic arch had no or very low levels of TKE, while elevated values were found downstream the coarctation. It was also found that TKE levels after surgery were lowered, indicating that the diameter of the constriction was increased enough to decrease turbulence effects. In conclusion, both the numerical simulation and MRI measurements gave very similar results, thereby validating the simulations and suggesting that MRI measured TKE can be used as an initial estimation in clinical practice, while LES results can be used for detailed quantification and further research of aortic flows.

  15. Telescope simulators for Hubble - An overview of optical designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davilla, Pam; Wood, H. J.; Atcheson, Paul D.; Saunders, Renee; Sullivan, Joe; Vaughan, Arthur H.; Saisse, Michel

    1993-01-01

    This paper briefly describes optical design of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and overviews three optical design simulators for HST which have been proposed for use as verification tools to characterize the performance of second-generation instruments during ground testing. These simulators are: the Refractive Aberrated Simulator developed at Ball Aerospace, the Optical Simulator developed at Laboratoire Astronomie Spatiale, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Stimulus. Relative advantages and disadvantages of each optical configuration are discussed.

  16. Analysis of Winske-Daughton 3D Electromagnetic Particle Simulation of Ion Ring Generated Lower Hybrid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Rudakov, Leonid; Mithaiwala, Manish; Ganguli, Gurudas

    2012-01-01

    Using electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations Winske and Daughton [Phys Plasmas, 19, 072109, 2012] have recently demonstrated that the nonlinear evolution of a wave turbulence initiated by cold ion ring beam is vastly different in three dimensions than in two dimensions. We further analyze the Winske-Daughton three dimensional simulation data and show that the nonlinear induced scattering by thermal plasma particles is crucial for understanding the evolution of lower hybrid/whistler wave turbulence as described in the simulation.

  17. Impact of a hollow density profile on turbulent particle fluxes: Gyrokinetic and fluid simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegnered, D.; Oberparleiter, M.; Strand, P.; Nordman, H.

    2017-07-01

    Hollow density profiles may occur in connection with pellet fuelling and L to H transitions. A positive density gradient could potentially stabilize the turbulence or change the relation between convective and diffusive fluxes, thereby reducing the turbulent transport of particles towards the center, making the pellet fuelling scheme inefficient. In the present work, the particle transport driven by Ion Temperature Gradient/Trapped Electron (ITG/TE) mode turbulence in hollow density profiles is studied by fluid as well as gyrokinetic simulations. The fluid model used, an extended version of the Weiland transport model, Extended Drift Wave Model (EDWM), incorporates an arbitrary number of ion species in a multi-fluid description and an extended wavelength spectrum. The fluid model, which is fast and hence suitable for use in predictive simulations, is compared to gyrokinetic simulations using the code GENE. Typical tokamak parameters are used based on the Cyclone Base Case. Parameter scans in key plasma parameters like plasma β, R/LT, and magnetic shear are investigated. In addition, the effects of a fast species are studied and global ITG simulations in a simplified physics description are performed in order to investigate nonlocal effects. It is found that β in particular, has a stabilizing effect in the negative R/Ln region. Both nonlinear GENE and EDWM simulations show a decrease in inward flux for negative R/Ln and a change in the direction from inward to outward for positive R/Ln. Moreover, the addition of fast particles was shown to decrease the inward main ion particle flux in the positive gradient region further. This might have serious consequences for pellet fuelling of high β plasmas. Additionally, the heat flux in global ITG turbulence simulations indicates that nonlocal effects can play a different role from usual in connection with pellet fuelling.

  18. Characterization of dual-polarization LTE radio over a free-space optical turbulence channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohata, J; Zvanovec, S; Korinek, T; Mansour Abadi, M; Ghassemlooy, Z

    2015-08-10

    A dual polarization (DP) radio over a free-space optical (FSO) communication link using a long-term evolution (LTE) radio signal is proposed and analyzed under different turbulence channel conditions. Radio signal transmission over the DP FSO channel is experimentally verified by means of error vector magnitude (EVM) statistics. We demonstrate that such a system, employing a 64 quadrature amplitude modulation at the frequency bands of 800 MHz and 2.6 GHz, evinces reliability with LTE signal over the FSO channel is a potential solution for last-mile access or backbone networks, when using multiple-input multiple-output based DP signals.

  19. The fractional Brownian motion property of the turbulent refractive within Geometric Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, D G

    2003-01-01

    We introduce fractional Brownian motion processes (fBm) as an alternative model for the turbulent index of refraction. These processes allow to reconstruct most of the refractive index properties, but they are not differentiable. We overcome the apparent impossibility of their use within the Ray Optics approximation introducing a Stochastic Calculus. Afterwards, we successfully provide a solution for the stochastic ray-equation; moreover, its implications in the statistical analysis of experimental data is discussed. In particular, we analyze the dependence of the averaged solution against the characteristic variables of a simple propagation problem.

  20. Experimental verification of the frozen flow atmospheric turbulence assumption with use of astronomical adaptive optics telemetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyneer, Lisa; van Dam, Marcos; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2009-04-01

    We use closed-loop deformable mirror telemetry from Altair and Keck adaptive optics (AO) to determine whether atmospheric turbulence follows the frozen flow hypothesis. Using telemetry from AO systems, our algorithms (based on the predictive Fourier control framework) detect frozen flow >94% of the time. Usually one to three layers are detected. Between 20% and 40% of the total controllable phase power is due to frozen flow. Velocity vector RMS variability is less than 0.5 m/s (per axis) on 10-s intervals, indicating that the atmosphere is stable enough for predictive control to measure and adapt to prevailing atmospheric conditions before they change.

  1. Simple statistical channel model for weak temperature-induced turbulence in underwater wireless optical communication systems

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.

    2017-06-16

    In this Letter, we use laser beam intensity fluctuation measurements to model and describe the statistical properties of weak temperature-induced turbulence in underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC) channels. UWOC channels with temperature gradients are modeled by the generalized gamma distribution (GGD) with an excellent goodness of fit to the measured data under all channel conditions. Meanwhile, thermally uniform channels are perfectly described by the simple gamma distribution which is a special case of GGD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first model that comprehensively describes both thermally uniform and gradient-based UWOC channels.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of heat transfer in a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Luo, Kun; Fan, Jianren

    2016-10-01

    Direct numerical simulation has been performed to investigate heat transfer in a zero-pressure-gradient spatially developing turbulent boundary layer with realistic thermal inflow boundary conditions. The temperature is considered as a passive scalar and the molecular Prandtl number is set to be 0.71. The turbulence statistics for both the velocity and temperature fields show good agreement with previous numerical and experimental data in the literature. The present study provides a valuable database for the spatially developing turbulent thermal boundary layer over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 1100 to 1940. The simulation results indicate that both the peak value and peak location of the streamwise velocity fluctuation grow slightly with increasing Reynolds number, same as those of the temperature fluctuation. The relationship between the streamwise velocity and temperature fluctuations has been examined and a strong correlation is observed in the vicinity of the wall. With increasing distance from the wall, however, the degree of correlation significantly decreases. In addition, the difference between the turbulent velocity and temperature fields is also analysed by investigating the mechanisms of heat and momentum transport in boundary layer flow.

  3. The Generation and Dissipation of Interstellar Turbulence - Results from Large Scale High Resolution Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    de Avillez, Miguel A

    2007-01-01

    We study, by means of adaptive mesh refinement hydro- and magnetohydrodynamical simulations that cover a wide range of scales (from kpc to sub-parsec), the dimension of the most dissipative structures and the injection scale of the turbulent interstellar gas, which we find to be about 75 pc, in agreement with observations. This is however smaller than the average size of superbubbles, but consistent with significant density and pressure changes in the ISM, which leads to the break-up of bubbles locally and hence to injection of turbulence. The scalings of the structure functions are consistent with log-Poisson statistics of supersonic turbulence where energy is dissipated mainly through shocks. Our simulations are different from previous ones by other authors as (i) we do not assume an isothermal gas, but have temperature variations of several orders of magnitude and (ii) we have no artificial forcing of the fluid with some ad hoc Fourier spectrum, but drive turbulence by stellar explosions at the Galactic ra...

  4. Case study of wave breaking with high-resolution turbulence measurements with LITOS and WRF simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Andreas; Söder, Jens; Gerding, Michael; Wagner, Johannes; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    Gravity waves in their final stage produce turbulence and dissipation. In the stratosphere only few studies of this phenomenon exist because the observation is technically challenging. In order to precisely infer energy dissipation rates, the viscous subrange has to be covered, which in the stratosphere lies at scales of centimetres and below. With our balloon-borne instrument LITOS (Leibniz-Institute Turbulence Observations in the Stratosphere), which has a vertical resolution below 1 mm, measurements were performed from Kiruna (68°N, 21°E) as well as from Kühlungsborn (54°N, 12°E). To characterise the atmospheric background conditions, WRF simulations driven by ECMWF reanalysis data were performed for the times of the flights. Averaged dissipation rates observed by LITOS are connected to wave signatures seen in the model. Particularly, larger dissipation rates correlate to larger amplitudes seen in the horizontal divergence or vertical winds in the model and vice versa. For one flight, a very pronounced maximum in dissipation is observed below the tropopause. It is connected to a wind reversal and dynamic instability. In the corresponding WRF simulation, turbulent kinetic energies (TKE) and amplitudes in horizontal divergence are enhanced in this region. For the other flights, no such pronounced maximum in dissipation but also no enhanced values of TKE outside of the boundary layer are observed. That means that low and moderate turbulence is not resolved in WRF, but is observed by LITOS throughout all altitudes.

  5. Large-eddy simulations and vortex structures of turbulent jets in crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using the method of large-eddy simulation, the 3-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow with stream-wise and transverse arrangements of nozzle are simulated, emphasizing on the dynamical process of generation and evolution of vortex structures in these flows. The results show that the basic vortex structures in literatures, such as the counter-rotating vortex pair, leading-edge vortices, lee-side vortices, hanging vortices, kidney vortices and anti-kidney vortices, are not independent physical substances, but local structures of the basic vortex structure of turbulent jets in crossflow-the 3-D stretching vortex rings originating from the orifice of the nozzle, which is discovered in this study. Therefore, the most important large-scale structures of turbulent jets in crossflow are unified to the 3-D vortex rings which stretch and twist in stream-wise and swing in transverse directions. We also found that the shedding frequencies of vortex rings are much lower than the one corresponding to the appearance of leading-edge and lee-side vortices in the turbulent jets.

  6. Large-eddy simulations and vortex structures of turbulent jets in crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hui; WU ChuiJie

    2007-01-01

    Using the method of large-eddy simulation,the 3-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow with stream-wise and transverse arrangements of nozzle are simulated,emphasizing on the dynamical process of generation and evolution of vortex structures in these flows.The results show that the basic vortex structures in literatures,such as the counter-rotating vortex pair,leading-edge vortices,lee-side vortices,hanging vortices,kidney vortices and anti-kidney vortices,are not independent physical substances,but local structures of the basic vortex structure of turbulent jets in crossflow-the 3-D stretching vortex rings originating from the orifice of the nozzle,which is discovered in this study.Therefore,the most important large-scale structures of turbulent jets in crossflow are unified to the 3-D vortex rings which stretch and twist in stream-wise and swing in transverse directions.We also found that the shedding frequencies of vortex rings are much lower than the one corresponding to the appearance of leading-edge and lee-side vortices in the turbulent jets.

  7. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF COMPLEX TURBULENT FLOWS: PHYSICAL ASPECTS AND RESEARCH TRENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家春

    2001-01-01

    In the current paper, we have primarily addressed one powerful simulation tool developed during the last decades Large Eddy Simulation (LES), which is most suitable for unsteady three-dimensional complex turbulent flows in industry and natural environment. The main point in LES is that the large-scale motion is resolved while the small-scale motion is modeled or, in geophysical terminology, pa-rameterized. With a view to devising a subgrid-scale(SGS) model of high quality, we have highlighted analyzing physical aspects in scale interaction and energy transfer such as dissipation, backscatter, local and non-local interaction, anisotropy and resolution requirement. They are the factors responsible for where the advantages and disadvantages in existing SGS models come from. A case study on LES of turbulence in vegetative canopy is presented to illustrate that LES model is more based on physical arguments. Then, varieties of challenging complex turbulent flows in both industry and geophysical fields in the near future are presented. In conclusion, we may say with confidence that new century shall see the flourish in the research of turbulence with the aid of LES combined with other approaches.

  8. Wall-Resolved Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flow Past a NACA0012 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-11-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flow past a NACA0012 airfoil is performed at angle of attack (AoA) 3o and Rec = 2 . 3 ×104 . The filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are spatially discretized using an energy conservative fourth-order scheme developed by Morinishi et al. (J. of Comput. Phys., 1998), and the subgrid-scale (SGS) tensor is modeled by the stretched-vortex SGS model developed by Pullin and co-workers (Phys. of Fluids, 2000, J. of Fluid Mech., 2009). An extension of the original stretched-vortex SGS model is utilized to resolve the streak-like structures in the near-wall flow regions. The mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles on airfoil surface and in wake are validated against experimental data reported in Dong-Ha Kim et al. (AIAA, 2009). To further verify our LES capacity, some high-order turbulence quantities are also compared with the DNS results produced by our in-house DNS code. The effect of grid-refinement on the wall-resolved LES approach is also discussed. Supported by KAUST OCRF funded CRG project on simulation of turbulent flows over bluff bodies and airfoils.

  9. Sunset decay of the convective turbulence with Large-Eddy Simulation under realistic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizza, U.; Miglietta, M. M.; Degrazia, G. A.; Acevedo, O. C.; Marques Filho, E. P.

    2013-10-01

    Large-Eddy Simulation is performed for a single day from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES-99) field program. This study investigates an observed case of evening transition boundary layer over land. Parameters of the ambient atmosphere in the LES-decay studies conducted so far were typically prescribed in an idealized form. To provide suitable data under the wide range of the PBL weather conditions, the LES should be able to adequately reproduce the PBL turbulence dynamics including-if possible-baroclinicity, radiation, large scale advection and not only be related to a decreasing surface heating. In addition LES-decay studies usually assume that the sensible heat flux decreases instantaneously or with a very short time scale. The main purpose of this investigation is to study the decay of boundary-layer average turbulent kinetic energy at sunset with Large-Eddy Simulation that is forced with realistic environment conditions. This allows investigating the Turbulent Kinetic Energy decay over the realistic time scale that is observed in the atmosphere. During the intermediate and last stage of decay of the boundary-layer average Turbulent Kinetic Energy the exponents of the decay power law t go from 2 to 6, as evidenced by experimental results and recent analytical modeling in the surface layer.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial wave generation in turbulent gas-liquid flows in horizontal channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bryce; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming; Subramani, Hariprasad

    2014-11-01

    For gas-liquid flows through pipes and channels, a flow regime (referred to as slug flow) may occur when waves form at the interface of a stratified flow and grow until they bridge the pipe diameter trapping large elongated gas bubbles within the liquid. Slug formation is often accompanied by strong nonlinear wave-wave interactions, wave breaking, and gas entrainment. This work numerically investigates the fully nonlinear interfacial evolution of a two-phase density/viscosity stratified flow through a horizontal channel. A Navier-Stokes flow solver coupled with a conservative volume-of-fluid algorithm is use to carry out high resolution three-dimensional simulations of a turbulent gas flowing over laminar (or turbulent) liquid layers. The analysis of such flows over a range of gas and liquid Reynolds numbers permits the characterization of the interfacial stresses and turbulent flow statistics allowing for the development of physics-based models that approximate the coupled interfacial-turbulent interactions and supplement the heuristic models built into existing industrial slug simulators.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent combustion: fundamental insights towards predictive models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Evatt R.; Sankaran, Ramanan; Sutherland, James C.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2005-01-01

    The advancement of our basic understanding of turbulent combustion processes and the development of physics-based predictive tools for design and optimization of the next generation of combustion devices are strategic areas of research for the development of a secure, environmentally sound energy infrastructure. In direct numerical simulation (DNS) approaches, all scales of the reacting flow problem are resolved. However, because of the magnitude of this task, DNS of practical high Reynolds number turbulent hydrocarbon flames is out of reach of even terascale computing. For the foreseeable future, the approach to this complex multi-scale problem is to employ distinct but synergistic approaches to tackle smaller sub-ranges of the complete problem, which then require models for the small scale interactions. With full access to the spatially and temporally resolved fields, DNS can play a major role in the development of these models and in the development of fundamental understanding of the micro-physics of turbulence-chemistry interactions. Two examples, from simulations performed at terascale Office of Science computing facilities, are presented to illustrate the role of DNS in delivering new insights to advance the predictive capability of models. Results are presented from new three-dimensional DNS with detailed chemistry of turbulent non-premixed jet flames, revealing the differences between mixing of passive and reacting scalars, and determining an optimal lower dimensional representation of the full thermochemical state space.

  12. Turbulent Flow Simulation at the Exascale: Opportunities and Challenges Workshop: August 4-5, 2015, Washington, D.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprague, Michael A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Boldyrev, Stanislav [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fischer, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Grout, Ray [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gustafson, Jr., William I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moser, Robert [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This report details the impact exascale will bring to turbulent-flow simulations in applied science and technology. The need for accurate simulation of turbulent flows is evident across the DOE applied-science and engineering portfolios, including combustion, plasma physics, nuclear-reactor physics, wind energy, and atmospheric science. The workshop brought together experts in turbulent-flow simulation, computational mathematics, and high-performance computing. Building upon previous ASCR workshops on exascale computing, participants defined a research agenda and path forward that will enable scientists and engineers to continually leverage, engage, and direct advances in computational systems on the path to exascale computing.

  13. Error analysis of large-eddy simulation of the turbulent non-premixed sydney bluff-body flame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempf, A.M.; Geurts, B.J.; Oefelein, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    A computational error analysis is applied to the large-eddy simulation of the turbulent non-premixed Sydney bluff-body flame, where the error is defined with respect to experimental data. The errorlandscape approach is extended to heterogeneous compressible turbulence, which is coupled to combustion

  14. Propagation of a cosh-Gaussian beam through an optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiuxiang

    2007-12-24

    The propagation of a cosh-Gaussian beam through an arbitrary ABCD optical system in turbulent atmosphere has been investigated. The analytical expressions for the average intensity at any receiver plane are obtained. As an elementary example, the average intensity and its radius at the image plane of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a thin lens are studied. To show the effects of a lens on the average intensity and the intensity radius of the laser beam in turbulent atmosphere, the properties of a collimated cosh-Gaussian beam and a focused cosh-Gaussian beam for direct propagation in turbulent atmosphere are studied and numerically calculated. The average intensity profiles of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a lens can have a shape similar to that of the initial beam for a longer propagation distance than that of a collimated cosh-Gaussian beam for direct propagation. With the increment in the propagation distance, the average intensity radius at the image plane of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a thin lens will be smaller than that at the focal plane of a focused cosh-Gaussian beam for direct propagation. Meanwhile, the intensity distributions at the image plane of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a lens with different w(0) and Omega(0) are also studied.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation and Experimental Validation of Hypersonic Turbulence Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Hong

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation and experimental validation of a hypersonic flat plate and isothermal turning wall flow were conducted in the current study. The investigation was based on three kinds of grids (Grid1, Grid2 and Grid3 with laminar flow and three types of turbulence models (BL, SA and SST. Under the same initiation and different turbulence models, the convergence process of the friction drag coefficient CP and the Stanton number st of a hypersonic flat plate flow revealed four results. First, the flow turbulence effect in the BL model simulation was responsive to CP and st. Second, the SA and SST model simulations both reflected the development process of flow turbulence. Third, the flow turbulence effect in the SST model simulation did not gradually emerge until the laminar flow simulation was sufficient. Moreover, the SA model simulation did not exist on such obvious hysteresis. Fourth, by comparing CP and st of a hypersonic flat-plate laminar simulation under the three grids, the errors of the calculation results of Grid2 and Grid3 were small. In contrast, the error on Grid1 was large. By comparing CP and st of the BL model for the three grids, we found that the result of Grid3 was slightly better than the result of Grid2. The deviation between them basically remained within 10%. However, the result of Grid1 had a large deviation with oscillation. CP and st of the SA model for the three grids were then compared. A large difference was found only on the transition zone location between the result of Grid2 and Grid3. Nevertheless, the error and calculation of reference between them was maintained within 10%. Grid1 not only had a large deviation, but also had certain oscillation on the laminar flow area. Finally, CP and st of the SST model for the three grids were compared. There was a large difference only on the transition zone location between the result of Grid2 and Grid3, but the error between them was maintained within 10%. Grid1 had a

  16. Wave optics simulation of spatially partially coherent beams: Applications to free space laser communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xifeng

    One of the main drawbacks that prevent the extensive application of free space laser communications is the atmospheric turbulence through which the beam must propagate. For the past four decades, much attention has been devoted to finding different methods to overcome this difficulty. A partially coherent beam (PCB) has been recognized as an effective approach to improve the performance of an atmospheric link. It has been examined carefully with most analyses considering the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam. However, practical PCBs may not follow GSM theory and are better examined through some numerical simulation approach such as a wave optics simulation. Consequently, an approach for modeling the spatially PCB in wave optics simulation is presented here. The approach involves the application of a sequence of random phase screens to an initial beam field and the summation of the intensity results after propagation. The relationship between the screen parameters and the spatial coherence function for the beam is developed and the approach is verified by comparing results with analytic formulations for a Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam. A variety of simulation studies were performed for this dissertation. The propagation through turbulence of a coherent beam and a particular version of a PCB, a pseudo-partially coherent beam (PPCB), is analyzed. The beam is created with a sequence of several Gaussian random phase screens for each atmospheric realization. The average intensity profiles, the scintillation index and aperture averaging factor for a horizontal propagation scenario are examined. Comparisons between these results and their corresponding analytic results for the well-known GSM beam are also made. Cumulative probability density functions for the received irradiance are initially investigated. Following the general simulation investigations, a performance metric is proposed as a general measure for optimizing the transverse coherence length of a partial

  17. Analysis and simulation of aperture-sizing strategies with partial adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Robert K.

    1994-05-01

    The central core intensity of a stellar image observed by a ground-based telescope can be maximized by a judicious balancing of the adaptive optics system and the size of the telescope entrance aperture. For a given aperture, increasing the number of degrees of adaptive optics turbulence compensation will maximize the brightness of the central core. However, for an observatory using an adaptive optics system with a fixed number of degrees-of-freedom, the largest aperture available will not necessarily result in a maximized image central core. The negative effects of atmospheric turbulence, roughly proportional to e(superscript -(D/r(subscript o))(superscript 5/3)), cannot always be compensated by the increased light gathering ability of a larger aperture (proportional to D(superscript 2)). It is shown and verified through simulation that the optimum aperture diameter is a function of N(superscript p) r(subscript o) where N is the number of adaptive optics degrees of freedom and r(subscript o) is the seeing cell size. The simulations show that the exponent p is related to the control algorithm or, more precisely, the figure-of-merit used to drive the deformable mirror actuators. Optimizing the useful aperture of the telescope/adaptive optics system is a strategy that can make use of the variation in site seeing conditions and benefit the astronomer by increasing the available number of observable science objects or reducing the observing time.

  18. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjiva Lele

    2012-10-01

    The target of this SciDAC Science Application was to develop a new capability based on high-order and high-resolution schemes to simulate shock-turbulence interactions and multi-material mixing in planar and spherical geometries, and to study Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing. These fundamental problems have direct application in high-speed engineering flows, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions and scramjet combustion, and also in the natural occurrence of supernovae explosions. Another component of this project was the development of subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulations of flows involving shock-turbulence interaction and multi-material mixing, that were to be validated with the DNS databases generated during the program. The numerical codes developed are designed for massively-parallel computer architectures, ensuring good scaling performance. Their algorithms were validated by means of a sequence of benchmark problems. The original multi-stage plan for this five-year project included the following milestones: 1) refinement of numerical algorithms for application to the shock-turbulence interaction problem and multi-material mixing (years 1-2); 2) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of canonical shock-turbulence interaction (years 2-3), targeted at improving our understanding of the physics behind the combined two phenomena and also at guiding the development of SGS models; 3) large-eddy simulations (LES) of shock-turbulence interaction (years 3-5), improving SGS models based on the DNS obtained in the previous phase; 4) DNS of planar/spherical RM multi-material mixing (years 3-5), also with the two-fold objective of gaining insight into the relevant physics of this instability and aiding in devising new modeling strategies for multi-material mixing; 5) LES of planar/spherical RM mixing (years 4-5), integrating the improved SGS and multi-material models developed in stages 3 and 5. This final report is

  19. Evaluation of turbulent transport and flame surface dissipation using direct numerical simulation of turbulent combustion; Evaluation des termes de transport et de dissipation de surface de flamme par simulation numerique directe de la combustion turbulente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughanem, H.

    1998-03-24

    The assumption of gradient transport for the mean reaction progress variable has a limited domain of validity in premixed turbulent combustion. The existence of two turbulent transport regimes, gradient and counter-gradient, is demonstrated in the present work using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of plane flame configurations. The DNS data base describes the influence of the heat release factor, of the turbulence-to-flame velocity ratio, and of an external pressure gradient. The simulations reveal a strong correlation between the regime of turbulent transport and the turbulent flame speed and turbulent flame thickness. These effects re not well described by current turbulent combustion models. A conditional approach `fresh gases / burnt gases` is proposed to overcome these difficulties. Furthermore, he development of flame instabilities in turbulent configurations is also observed in the simulations. A criterion is derived that determines the domain of occurrence of these instabilities (Darrieus- Landau instabilities, Rayleigh- Taylor instabilities, thermo-diffusive instabilities). This criterion suggests that the domain of occurrence of flame instabilities is not limited to small Reynolds numbers. (author) 98 refs.

  20. Compressible Turbulent Flow Numerical Simulations of Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khatami, F.; Weide, van der E.T.A.; Hoeijmakers, H.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    For an elliptic Arndt’s hydrofoil numerical simulations of vortex cavitation are presented. An equilibrium cavitation model is employed. This single-fluid model assumes local thermodynamic and mechanical equilibrium in the mixture region of the flow, is employed. Furthermore, for characterizing the

  1. Modelling of airflow in a closed simulation box with regard to atmospheric optical link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajek Lukas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Article is dealing with defining of mathematical turbulent air flow numerical model in the laboratory box with help of ANSYS Fluent software application. The paper describes real measurement of parameters of mechanical turbulences created by high-speed ventilator mounted on the simulation box. The real measurement took place in two planes perpendicular to each other, input and output slot. Subsequently the simulation of mechanical air flow was performed by the help of k-ε and k-ω turbulent models. The results of individual simulations were evaluated by statistical model in the same points, planes respectively, in which the real measurement was made. Other simulation was dealing with effect of heaters inside of closed laboratory box with regards to optical beam degradation. During real measurement was performed temperature point measurement by probe placed inside of the box. The probe was recording air temperature every one second during seven minutes long measurement. The results comparison of simulated and measured data was made in the end. The maximal temperature reached approximately 50 °C in both cases. Also the air flow character in dependence on the number of hot-air extraction ventilators was monitored.

  2. Numerical simulation of quasi-streamwise hairpin-like vortex generation in turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nan; LU Li-peng; DUAN Zhen-zhen; YUAN Xiang-jiang

    2008-01-01

    A mechanism for generation of near wall quasi-streamwise hairpin-like vortex (QHV) and secondary quasi-streamwise vortices (SQV) is presented. The conceptual model of resonant triad in the theory of hydrodynamic instability and direct numerical simulation of a turbulent boundary layer were applied to reveal the formation of QHV and SQV. The generation procedures and the characteristics of the vortex structures are obtained, which share some similarities with previous numerical simulations. The research using resonant triad conceptual model and numerical simulation provides a possibility for investigating and controling the vortex structures, which play a dominant role in the evolution of coherent structures in the near-wall region.

  3. Algebraic Stress Model with RNG ε-Equation for Simulating Confined Strongly Swirling Turbulent Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jiangrong; Yao Qiang; Cao Xingyu; Cen Kefa

    2001-01-01

    Strongly swirl flow simulation are still under developing. In this paper, ε equation based on the Renormalization Group theory is used into algebraic stress model. Standard k-ε model, algebraic stress model by Jiang Zhang[5]and present model (RNG-ASM) are applied simultaneously to simulating the confined strongly swirling flow.The Simulating results by RNG-ASM model are compared to the results by other two model, it is shown that the predictions by this model display reasonable agreement with experimental data, and lead to greater improvement than Zhang's ASM turbulence model[5].

  4. Large scale simulation numerical study of transition to turbulence in jets; Etude numerique par simulation des grandes echelles de la transition a la turbulence dans les jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbin, Gerald [Institut National Polytechnique, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1998-02-02

    This study highlights the potentialities of the numerical technique of large scale simulation in describing and understanding the turbulent flows in a complex geometry. Particularly, it is focussed on flows of free jet, confined jets and multiple jets of high solidity grid. Spatial simulations of the circular zone close to a free jet, of high Reynolds number were performed. In spite of an evident sensitivity to upstream conditions good agreement between our statistical predictions and different experimental measurements was obtained. The multiple coherent vortical structures implied in the transition to turbulence of the jet were found. At the same time, helical or annular axisymmetric vortices were observed. Also, an original vortical arrangement was evidenced, resulting from the alternating inclination and local pairing of these rings. It could been forced through an ad-hoc excitation which modifies subsequently drastically the jet development. When an axisymmetric excitation is imposed after formation of annular structures, pairs of counter-rotative longitudinal vortices occur and generate lateral jets. Their nature and presence in case of a helical excitation are discussed. An efficient method for controlling their number is developed. Then, one is studied the very low frequency periodic phenomenon of backward-facing transition to turbulence which develops in the confined jet and grid multiple jets (a phenomenon generic in numerous flows). It was found to depend not only on the characteristic of the re-circulation (pre-transition) zones but also on the upstream flow (zone of post-transition stagnation, pressure effect). Large scale transversal motions of the fluid have been found beginning from the grid. An interpretation of this phenomenon is suggested 193 refs., 109 figs.

  5. Scrape-Off Layer Turbulence in Tokamaks Simulated with a Continuum Gyrokinetic Code

    CERN Document Server

    Hakim, A; Abel, I G; Hammett, G W; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T

    2016-01-01

    We are developing a new continuum gyrokinetic code, Gkeyll, for use in edge plasma simulations, and here present initial simulations of turbulence on open field lines with model sheath boundary conditions. The code implements an energy conserving discontinuous Galerkin scheme, applicable to a general class of Hamiltonian equations. Several applications to test problems have been done, including a calculation of the parallel heat-flux on divertor plates resulting from an ELM crash in JET, for a 1x/1v SOL scenario explored previously, where the ELM is modeled as a time-dependent intense upstream source. Here we present initial simulations of turbulence on open field lines in the LAPD linear plasma device. We have also done simulations in a helical open-field-line geometry. While various simplifications have been made at present, this still includes some of the key physics of SOL turbulence, such as bad-curvature drive for instabilities and rapid parallel losses with sheath boundary conditions. This is useful fo...

  6. Simulation of shear and turbulence impact on wind turbine power performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.; Courtney, M.S.; Larsen, T.J.; Paulsen, U.S.

    2010-01-15

    Aerodynamic simulations (HAWC2Aero) were used to investigate the influence of the speed shear, the direction shear and the turbulence intensity on the power output of a multi-megawatt turbine. First simulation cases with laminar flow and power law wind speed profiles were compared to the case of a uniform inflow. Secondly, a similar analysis was done for cases with direction shear. In each case, we derived a standard power curve (function of the wind speed at hub height) and power curves obtained with various definitions of equivalent wind speed in order to reduce the scatter due to shear. Thirdly, the variations of the power output and the power curve were analysed for various turbulence intensities. Furthermore, the equivalent speed method was successfully tested on a power curve resulting from simulations cases combining shear and turbulence. Finally, we roughly simulated the wind speed measurements we may get from a LIDAR mounted on the nacelle of the turbine (measuring upwind) and we investigated different ways of deriving an equivalent wind speed from such measurements. (author)

  7. High-fidelity numerical simulations of compressible turbulence and mixing generated by hydrodynamic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahed, Pooya

    High-speed flows are prone to hydrodynamic interfacial instabilities that evolve to turbulence, thereby intensely mixing different fluids and dissipating energy. The lack of knowledge of these phenomena has impeded progress in a variety of disciplines. In science, a full understanding of mixing between heavy and light elements after the collapse of a supernova and between adjacent layers of different density in geophysical (atmospheric and oceanic) flows remains lacking. In engineering, the inability to achieve ignition in inertial fusion and efficient combustion constitute further examples of this lack of basic understanding of turbulent mixing. In this work, my goal is to develop accurate and efficient numerical schemes and employ them to study compressible turbulence and mixing generated by interactions between shocked (Richtmyer-Meshkov) and accelerated (Rayleigh-Taylor) interfaces, which play important roles in high-energy-density physics environments. To accomplish my goal, a hybrid high-order central/discontinuity-capturing finite difference scheme is first presented. The underlying principle is that, to accurately and efficiently represent both broadband motions and discontinuities, non-dissipative methods are used where the solution is smooth, while the more expensive and dissipative capturing schemes are applied near discontinuous regions. Thus, an accurate numerical sensor is developed to discriminate between smooth regions, shocks and material discontinuities, which all require a different treatment. The interface capturing approach is extended to central differences, such that smooth distributions of varying specific heats ratio can be simulated without generating spurious pressure oscillations. I verified and validated this approach against a stringent suite of problems including shocks, interfaces, turbulence and two-dimensional single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability simulations. The three-dimensional code is shown to scale well up to 4000 cores

  8. Molecular-Based Optical Measurement Techniques for Transition and Turbulence in High-Speed Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    photogrammetry (for model attitude and deformation measurement) are excluded to limit the scope of this report. Other physical probes such as heat flux gauges, total temperature probes are also excluded. We further exclude measurement techniques that require particle seeding though particle based methods may still be useful in many high speed flow applications. This manuscript details some of the more widely used molecular-based measurement techniques for studying transition and turbulence: laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), Rayleigh and Raman Scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). These techniques are emphasized, in part, because of the prior experience of the authors. Additional molecular based techniques are described, albeit in less detail. Where possible, an effort is made to compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of the various measurement techniques, although these comparisons can be subjective views of the authors. Finally, the manuscript concludes by evaluating the different measurement techniques in view of the precision requirements described in this chapter. Additional requirements and considerations are discussed to assist with choosing an optical measurement technique for a given application.

  9. Performance evaluation of RANS-based turbulence models in simulating a honeycomb heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasi, Abdussamet; Ozsipahi, Mustafa; Sahin, Bayram; Gunes, Hasan

    2017-07-01

    As well-known, there is not a universal turbulence model that can be used to model all engineering problems. There are specific applications for each turbulence model that make it appropriate to use, and it is vital to select an appropriate model and wall function combination that matches the physics of the problem considered. Therefore, in this study, performance of six well-known Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes ( RANS) based turbulence models which are the Standard k {{-}} ɛ, the Renormalized Group k- ɛ, the Realizable k- ɛ, the Reynolds Stress Model, the k- ω and the Shear Stress Transport k- ω and accompanying wall functions which are the standard, the non-equilibrium and the enhanced are evaluated via 3D simulation of a honeycomb heat sink. The CutCell method is used to generate grid for the part including heat sink called test section while a hexahedral mesh is employed to discretize to inlet and outlet sections. A grid convergence study is conducted for verification process while experimental data and well-known correlations are used to validate the numerical results. Prediction of pressure drop along the test section, mean base plate temperature of the heat sink and temperature at the test section outlet are regarded as a measure of the performance of employed models and wall functions. The results indicate that selection of turbulence models and wall functions has a great influence on the results and, therefore, need to be selected carefully. Hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the honeycomb heat sink can be determined in a reasonable accuracy using RANS- based turbulence models provided that a suitable turbulence model and wall function combination is selected.

  10. Performance evaluation of RANS-based turbulence models in simulating a honeycomb heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasi, Abdussamet; Ozsipahi, Mustafa; Sahin, Bayram; Gunes, Hasan

    2017-02-01

    As well-known, there is not a universal turbulence model that can be used to model all engineering problems. There are specific applications for each turbulence model that make it appropriate to use, and it is vital to select an appropriate model and wall function combination that matches the physics of the problem considered. Therefore, in this study, performance of six well-known Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) based turbulence models which are the Standard k - ɛ, the Renormalized Group k - ɛ, the Realizable k - ɛ, the Reynolds Stress Model, the k - ω and the Shear Stress Transport k - ω and accompanying wall functions which are the standard, the non-equilibrium and the enhanced are evaluated via 3D simulation of a honeycomb heat sink. The CutCell method is used to generate grid for the part including heat sink called test section while a hexahedral mesh is employed to discretize to inlet and outlet sections. A grid convergence study is conducted for verification process while experimental data and well-known correlations are used to validate the numerical results. Prediction of pressure drop along the test section, mean base plate temperature of the heat sink and temperature at the test section outlet are regarded as a measure of the performance of employed models and wall functions. The results indicate that selection of turbulence models and wall functions has a great influence on the results and, therefore, need to be selected carefully. Hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the honeycomb heat sink can be determined in a reasonable accuracy using RANS-based turbulence models provided that a suitable turbulence model and wall function combination is selected.

  11. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-09-21

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  12. Simulating the formation of molecular clouds. II. Rapid formation from turbulent initial conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, S C O

    2006-01-01

    (Abridged). In this paper, we present results from a large set of numerical simulations that demonstrate that H2 formation occurs rapidly in turbulent gas. Starting with purely atomic hydrogen, large quantities of molecular hydrogen can be produced on timescales of 1 -- 2 Myr, given turbulent velocity dispersions and magnetic field strengths consistent with observations. Moreover, as our simulations underestimate the effectiveness of H2 self-shielding and dust absorption, we can be confident that the molecular fractions that we compute are strong lower limits on the true values. The formation of large quantities of H2 on the timescale required by rapid cloud formation models therefore appears to be entirely plausible. We also investigate the density and temperature distributions of gas in our model clouds. We show that the density probability distribution function is approximately log-normal, with a dispersion that agrees well with the prediction of Padoan, Nordlund & Jones (1997). The temperature distrib...

  13. Reconnection-Driven Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in a Simulated Coronal-Hole Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Uritsky, Vadim M; DeVore, C Richard; Karpen, Judith T

    2016-01-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet and X-ray jets occur frequently in magnetically open coronal holes on the Sun, especially at high solar latitudes. Some of these jets are observed by white-light coronagraphs as they propagate through the outer corona toward the inner heliosphere, and it has been proposed that they give rise to microstreams and torsional Alfv\\'{e}n waves detected in situ in the solar wind. To predict and understand the signatures of coronal-hole jets, we have performed a detailed statistical analysis of such a jet simulated with an adaptively refined magnetohydrodynamics model. The results confirm the generation and persistence of three-dimensional, reconnectiondriven magnetic turbulence in the simulation. We calculate the spatial correlations of magnetic fluctuations within the jet and find that they agree best with the M\\"{u}ller - Biskamp scaling model including intermittent current sheets of various sizes coupled via hydrodynamic turbulent cascade. The anisotropy of the magnetic fluctuations and the sp...

  14. Large eddy simulation of a shocked gas cylinder instability induced turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations for compressible fluid are solved with the operator splitting technique and LES (large eddy simulation) with the Smagorinsky model. A computational code MVFT (multi-viscosity-fluid and turbulence) is developed to study hydrodynamic instability and the induced turbulent mixing for multi compressible fluid. In order to validate the code MVFT,the LANL’s shock tube experiment of shocked SF6 gas cylinder is simulated with the initial state of SF6 gas cylinder described by dissipative ITL (interface transition layer). It is shown that the width and height of gas cylinder calculated with MVFT are closer to the experimental results than RAGE,and that the velocities of upstream edge,downstream edge and vortex edge agree with the experimental results,and are appreciably smaller than the RAGE results. The code MVFT has been pre-liminarily validated.

  15. A 3D MHD simulation of SN 1006: a polarized emission study for the turbulent case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, P. F.; Schneiter, E. M.; Reynoso, E. M.; Esquivel, A.; De Colle, F.; Toledo-Roy, J. C.; Gómez, D. O.; Sieyra, M. V.; Moranchel-Basurto, A.

    2017-01-01

    Three dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations were carried out in order to perform a new polarization study of the radio emission of the supernova remnant SN 1006. These simulations consider that the remnant expands into a turbulent interstellar medium (including both magnetic field and figuredensity perturbations). Based on the referenced-polar angle technique, a statistical study was done on observational and numerical magnetic field position-angle distributions. Our results show that a turbulent medium with an adiabatic index of 1.3 can reproduce the polarization properties of the SN 1006 remnant. This statistical study reveals itself as a useful tool for obtaining the orientation of the ambient magnetic field, previous to be swept up by the main supernova remnant shock.

  16. SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE FROM MHD TO SUB-ION SCALES: HIGH-RESOLUTION HYBRID SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franci, Luca; Verdini, Andrea; Landi, Simone [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Matteini, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hellinger, Petr [Astronomical Institute, AS CR, Bocni II/1401, CZ-14100 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-10

    We present results from a high-resolution and large-scale hybrid (fluid electrons and particle-in-cell protons) two-dimensional numerical simulation of decaying turbulence. Two distinct spectral regions (separated by a smooth break at proton scales) develop with clear power-law scaling, each one occupying about a decade in wavenumbers. The simulation results simultaneously exhibit several properties of the observed solar wind fluctuations: spectral indices of the magnetic, kinetic, and residual energy spectra in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) inertial range along with a flattening of the electric field spectrum, an increase in magnetic compressibility, and a strong coupling of the cascade with the density and the parallel component of the magnetic fluctuations at sub-proton scales. Our findings support the interpretation that in the solar wind, large-scale MHD fluctuations naturally evolve beyond proton scales into a turbulent regime that is governed by the generalized Ohm’s law.

  17. Turbulent mixing and layer formation in double-diffusive convection: 3D numerical simulations and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenblum, Erica; Traxler, Adrienne; Stellmach, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Double-diffusive convection, often referred to as semi-convection in astrophysics, occurs in thermally and compositionally stratified systems which are stable according to the Ledoux-criterion but unstable according to the Schwarzchild criterion. This process has been given relatively little attention so far, and its properties remain poorly constrained. In this paper, we present and analyze a set of three-dimensional simulations of this phenomenon in a Cartesian domain under the Boussinesq approximation. We find that in some cases the double-diffusive convection saturates into a state of homogeneous turbulence, but with turbulent fluxes several orders of magnitude smaller than those expected from direct overturning convection. In other cases the system rapidly and spontaneously develops closely-packed thermo-compositional layers, which later successively merge until a single layer is left. We compare the output of our simulations with an existing theory of layer formation in the oceanographic context, and fi...

  18. An hybrid RANS/LES model for simulation of complex turbulent flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏群; 陈红勋; 马峥

    2016-01-01

    A non-linear eddy viscosity model (NLEVM) and a scalable hybrid Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes/ large eddy simula- tion (RANS/LES) strategy are developed to improve the capability of the eddy viscosity model (EVM) to simulate complex flows featuring separations and unsteady motions. To study the performance of the NLEVM, numerical simulations around S809 airfoil are carried out and the results show that the NLEVM performs much better when a large separation occurs. Calculated results of the flow around a triangular cylinder show that the NLEVM can improve the precision of the flow fields to some extents, but the error is still considerable, and the small turbulence structures can not be clearly captured as the EVM. Whereas the scalable hybrid RANS/LES model based on the NLEVM is fairly effective on resolving the turbulent structures and can give more satisfactory predictions of the flow fields.

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TURBULENT JETS WITH LATERAL INJECTION INTO A CROSSFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ting-ting; LI Shao-hua; XU Zhong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, Numerical simulations of mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy fields are presented for three-dimensional lateral jet in crossflow, at the injection angles of -60° and -30°. The RNG k-ε turbulence model, with the two-layer wall function method, is adopted to simulate the characteristics of this flow at the jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios, 1, 2 and 4. The results show that the injection angle and jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio can change the flow fields, and the range upstream affected by jet injected laterally increase and the curvature of jet trajectories varies along the flow direction. Furthermore, the separation events in the lee of the jet exit and behind the jet bending-segment have been found, and the mechanisms of two vortex systems are analyzed.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flow Over of Semi-Cylindrical Profile at Zero Angle of Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shebelev Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of unsteady two-dimensional numerical simulations for the turbulent flow over the semi-cylindrical profile at Reynolds number 45000 are presented. Three different turbulence RANS eddy viscosity models are used for the simulation. The calculations show the formation of alternating large-scale vortices shed in the wake of the body. The calculated averaged pressure distribution on the contour demonstrate a good agreement with the experimental data. A series of calculations have been performed for the estimation of influence of mesh resolution in the wake of streamlined body on the unsteady solution accuracy. It was found that a mesh size ~0.04 of chord length is sufficient to resolve the vortex street.

  1. Simulations of Magnetorotational Turbulence with a Higher-Order Godunov Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Jacob B; Beckwith, Kris

    2008-01-01

    (abridged) We apply a second-order Godunov code, Athena, to studies of the magnetorotational instability using the local shearing box formalism. We present a set of ideal magnetohydrodynamic, unstratified shearing box simulations using two initial magnetic field configurations: a net uniform vertical field, and a sinusoidally varying zero-net vertical field. We find that our simulations agree well with previously published results. We next carry out analyses to study the flow of energy from differential rotation to turbulent fluctuations to thermalization. The first analysis is based on a direct measurement of the time-evolution of volume-averaged quantities. We find that the timescale over which energy is injected into turbulent fluctuations and then dissipated is on the order of \\Omega^{-1}, where \\Omega is the orbital frequency of the local domain. Magnetic dissipation dominates over kinetic dissipation, although not by as great a factor as the ratio of magnetic to kinetic energy. The second analysis exami...

  2. Large eddy simulation of turbulent mixing by using 3D decomposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issakhov, Alibek, E-mail: aliisahov@mail.ru [al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2011-12-22

    Parallel implementation of algorithm of numerical solution of Navier-Stokes equations for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulence is presented in this research. The dynamic Smagorinsky model is applied for sub-grid simulation of turbulence. The numerical algorithm was worked out using a scheme of splitting on physical parameters. At the first stage it is supposed that carrying over of movement amount takes place only due to convection and diffusion. Intermediate field of velocity is determined by method of fractional steps by using Thomas algorithm (tridiagonal matrix algorithm). At the second stage the determined intermediate field of velocity is used for determination of the field of pressure. Three dimensional Poisson equation for the field of pressure is solved using over relaxation method.

  3. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Turbulent Couette Minimal Flow Unit

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, E R

    2015-01-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of planar Couette flow is presented for the minimal channel in which turbulence structures can be sustained. Evolution over a single breakdown and regeneration cycle is compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Qualitative similar structures are observed and turbulent statistics show excellent quantitative agreement. The molecular scale law of the wall is presented in which stick-slip molecular wall-fluid interactions replace the no-slip conditions. The impact of grid resolution is explored and the observed structures are seen to be dependant on averaging time and length scales. The kinetic energy spectra show a range of scales are present in the molecular system and that spectral content is dependent on the grid resolution employed. The subgrid velocity of the molecules is compared to spatial averaged velocity using joint probability density functions. Molecular trajectories, diffusions and Lagrangian statistics are presented. The importance of sub-grid ...

  4. Electro-optic testbed utilizing a dynamic range gated Rayleigh beacon for atmospheric turbulence profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuraski, Steven M.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Beecher, Elizabeth A.; Figlewski, Nathan M.; Schmidt, Jason D.; McCrae, Jack E.

    2016-10-01

    The Photometry Analysis and Optical Tracking and Evaluation System (PANOPTES) Quad Axis Telescope is a unique four axis mount Ritchey-Chretien 24 inch telescope capable of tracking objects through the zenith without axes rotation delay (no Dead Zone). This paper describes enhancement components added to the quad axis mount telescope that will enable measurements supporting novel research and field testing focused on `three-dimensional' characterization of turbulent atmospheres, mitigation techniques, and new sensing modalities. These all support research and operational techniques relating to astronomical imaging and electro-optical propagation though the atmosphere, relative to sub-meter class telescopes in humid, continental environments. This effort will use custom designed and commercial off the shelf hardware; sub-system components discussed will include a wavefront sensor system, a co-aligned beam launch system, and a fiber coupled research laser. The wavefront sensing system has the ability to take measurements from a dynamic altitude adjustable laser beacon scattering spot, a key concept that enables rapid turbulence structure parameter measurements over an altitude varied integrated atmospheric volume. The sub-components are integrated with the overall goal of measuring a height-resolved volumetric profile for the atmospheric turbulence structure parameter at the site, and developing mobile techniques for such measurements. The design concept, part selection optimization, baseline component lab testing, and initial field measurements, will be discussed in the main sections of this paper. This project is a collaborative effort between the Air Force Research Labs Sensors Directorate and the Air Force Institute of Technology Center for Directed Energy.

  5. Turbulence-resolved Numerical Simulation for Hydrogen Safety in a NPP Containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongtae; Hong, Seong-Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, a new measure to distinguish numerical analysis methods is proposed, which is based on how to resolve turbulent characteristics in nuclear thermal hydraulics. Even though 3-dimensional thermal hydraulic equations are used, it belongs to turbulence-unresolved approach if turbulence effect is lumped into correlations. The current numerical approach for the severe accident analysis strongly relies on models and correlations which are developed by analytical and experimental works. Traditionally, the numerical method is split into a lumped-parameter (LP) method and a multi-dimensional method. In the frame of multi-sale approach proposed by Yadigaroglu, LP method is thought to be useful for system scale (macro scale) analysis. On the contrary, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is applicable to component (meso scale) or detail (micro scale) analysis. Recently the boundary of the two LP and CFD methods becomes more and more obscure. LP codes such as Melcor and Relap have been continuously improved in their capabilities. Melcor has been added convection terms in two-phase momentum equations. Relap-3D, a 3-dimensional version of the Relap code, has a multi-dimensional nodalization module similar to a CFD code. One of long-standing containment analysis codes GOTHIC was developed as a LP code originating Cobra-TF. Now, it can simulate a containment three-dimensionally using a Cartesian or cylindrical coordinate-based nodalization. So, it is believed that the LP codes can now resolve 3-D behavior of flows in a component such as a reactor or containment. GASFLOW is a famous containment analysis code based on 3-D nodalization. It has some lumped models for PAR (passive auto-catalytic recombiner) and sink and source of mass and energy to reduce the number of nodes and efficiently simulate their thermal hydraulic phenomena. Nowadays the turbulence-resolved approach becomes more important, and it is expected that the traditional LP method is supported by the

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Turbulent Reactive Plume on a Parallel Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Andrew W.; Riley, James J.

    1996-12-01

    A computational algorithm is described for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a reactive plume in spatially evolving grid turbulence. The algorithm uses sixth-order compact differencing in conjunction with a fifth-order compact boundary scheme which has been developed and found to be stable. A compact filtering method is discussed as a means of stabilizing calculations where the viscous/diffusive terms are differenced in their conservative form. This approach serves as an alternative to nonconservative differencing, previously advocated as a means of damping the 2δ waves. In numerically solving the low Mach number equations the time derivative of the density field in the pressure Poisson equation was found to be the most destabilizing part of the calculation. Even-ordered finite difference approximations to this derivative were found to be more stable (allow for larger density gradients) than odd-ordered approximations. Turbulence at the inlet boundary is generated by scanning through an existing three-dimensional field of fully developed turbulence. In scanning through the inlet field, it was found that a high order interpolation, e.g., cubic-spline interpolation, is necessary in order to provide continuous velocity derivatives. Regarding pressure, a Neumann inlet condition combined with a Dirichlet outlet condition was found to work well. The chemistry follows the single-step, irreversible, global reaction: Fuel + ( r) Oxidizer → (1 + r)Product + Heat, with parameters chosen to match experimental data as far as allowed by resolution constraints. Simulation results are presented for four different cases in order to examine the effects of heat release, Damköhler number, and Arrhenius kinetics on the flow physics. Statistical data from the DNS are compared to theory and wind tunnel data and found in reasonable agreement with regard to growth of turbulent length scales, decay of turbulent kinetic energy, decay of centerline scalar concentration, decrease in

  7. Physical consistency of subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvis, Maurits H.; Remmerswaal, Ronald A.; Verstappen, Roel

    2017-01-01

    We study the construction of subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent flows. In particular, we aim to consolidate a systematic approach of constructing subgrid-scale models, based on the idea that it is desirable that subgrid-scale models are consistent with the mathematical and physical properties of the Navier-Stokes equations and the turbulent stresses. To that end, we first discuss in detail the symmetries of the Navier-Stokes equations, and the near-wall scaling behavior, realizability and dissipation properties of the turbulent stresses. We furthermore summarize the requirements that subgrid-scale models have to satisfy in order to preserve these important mathematical and physical properties. In this fashion, a framework of model constraints arises that we apply to analyze the behavior of a number of existing subgrid-scale models that are based on the local velocity gradient. We show that these subgrid-scale models do not satisfy all the desired properties, after which we explain that this is partly due to incompatibilities between model constraints and limitations of velocity-gradient-based subgrid-scale models. However, we also reason that the current framework shows that there is room for improvement in the properties and, hence, the behavior of existing subgrid-scale models. We furthermore show how compatible model constraints can be combined to construct new subgrid-scale models that have desirable properties built into them. We provide a few examples of such new models, of which a new model of eddy viscosity type, that is based on the vortex stretching magnitude, is successfully tested in large-eddy simulations of decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence and turbulent plane-channel flow.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of turbulent heat transfer in a rotating square duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhaohui; Pletcher, Richard

    2004-11-01

    Turbulent heat transfer in a rotating square duct is an important topic with numerous applications such as turbine blade cooling and automobile brake cooling. Without rotation, Prandtl's secondary flow of the second kind is known to have a significant impact on the transport of heat and momentum in turbulent duct flows. With rotation, Coriolis force and centrifugal buoyancy force cause more complicated secondary flow pattern and, as a consequence, modify heat transfer coefficients. The objective of this study is to expand the capability of the current LES code to correctly predict complex turbulent flow phenomena and to gain a better understanding of the physics of turbulent flow in rotating passages. A finite volume LU-SGS scheme is used to simulate compressible three-dimensional turbulent flow at low Mach numbers. Time derivative preconditioning is employed to deal with the low Mach number situation. A localized dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model is used to evaluate the unresolved stresses. The calculation domain is divided into two parts. In the first part periodic boundary conditions are applied and this provides the fully developed inlet flow for the second part in which the heat transfer conditions are imposed. Characteristic out-flow conditions are used in the second part. This allows the flow to develop further as it responds to the heating condition. The code is parallelized using MPI (Message Passing Interface). To verify the code, we calculated isothermal rotating duct cases and compared our results with DNS and experimental results. Then heated duct flow cases were simulated and the results were compared to available data. Good agreement has been obtained.

  9. Optical Spatial Filter to Suppress Beam Wander and Spatial Noise Induced by Atmospheric Turbulence in Free-Space Optical Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ucuk Darusalam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an optical spatial filter (OSF method to suppress beam wander and spatial noise effects. Signal from random displacements of the focus spot around the optical axis within the constricted area is collected. This method advantageously suppresses fluctuations in signal intensity. The OSF consists of a pinhole and cone reflector. The pinhole produces Fresnel diffraction on the focus spot. The cone reflector provides directed reflectance onto the pinhole for random focus spot displacements due to beam wander. The calculations of signal power are based on fluctuations of signal intensity that are minimized by the circular aperture function of the pinhole and the cosine of the reflectance angle from the cone reflector. The method is applied to free-space optical communications at a wavelength of 1.55 μm with an atmospheric chamber to provide optical propagation media. Based on calculations, the beam wander angles that can be received by the OSF are from 14.0° to 28.0°. Moreover, based on experiment, the OSF with a pinhole diameter of 20.0 μm and cone reflector diameter of 1.5 mm produces signal power of −15.3 dBm. Both calculations and experiment show that the OSF enhances the received signal power in the presence of turbulence.

  10. Parametric Study of Decay of Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Rubinstein, Robert; Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Zang, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence are performed with both low-order and high-order spatial discretization schemes. The turbulent Mach and Reynolds numbers for the simulations are 0.2 and 250, respectively. For the low-order schemes we use either second-order central or third-order upwind biased differencing. For higher order approximations we apply weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes, both with linear and nonlinear weights. There are two objectives in this preliminary effort to investigate possible schemes for large eddy simulation (LES). One is to explore the capability of a widely used low-order computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to perform LES computations. The other is to determine the effect of higher order accuracy (fifth, seventh, and ninth order) achieved with high-order upwind biased WENO-based schemes. Turbulence statistics, such as kinetic energy, dissipation, and skewness, along with the energy spectra from simulations of the decaying turbulence problem are used to assess and compare the various numerical schemes. In addition, results from the best performing schemes are compared with those from a spectral scheme. The effects of grid density, ranging from 32 cubed to 192 cubed, on the computations are also examined. The fifth-order WENO-based scheme is found to be too dissipative, especially on the coarser grids. However, with the seventh-order and ninth-order WENO-based schemes we observe a significant improvement in accuracy relative to the lower order LES schemes, as revealed by the computed peak in the energy dissipation and by the energy spectrum.

  11. Numerical simulations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence in stratified fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Scagliarini, A; Sbragaglia, M; Sugiyama, K; Toschi, F

    2010-01-01

    We present results from numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence, performed using a recently proposed lattice Boltzmann method able to describe consistently a thermal compressible flow subject to an external forcing. The method allowed us to study the system both in the nearly-Boussinesq and strongly compressible regimes. Moreover, we show that when the stratification is important, the presence of the adiabatic gradient causes the arrest of the mixing process.

  12. Optical Soliton Simulation in Optical Fibers by OptiSystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaik Tay, Kim; Huong Kah Ching, Audrey; Loi, Wei Sen; Tiong Ong, Chee

    2017-08-01

    Fiber optic communication is often known to offer higher frequency transmission of signals with greater bit rate and larger data carrying capacity over a long distance with lower loss and interference as compared to copper wire electrical communication. However, several factors that would affect the performance of an optical fiber transmission are such as group velocity dispersion (GVD), fiber loss and also self-phase modulation (SPM). In this paper, the effects of GVD, SPM, optical soliton formation and fiber loss are simulated using OptiSystem 14. It is found that GVD broaden pulse in temporal domain without modifying its spectrum. Meanwhile, SPM creates chirp in spectrum with its temporal profile maintained. This work concluded that a balance between the GVD and SPM is essential to form solitonthat is able to travel for a long distance without being distorted. It is also found that the decrease in the amplitude of the soliton is dependent on the fiber loss and this decay in the signal increases with the propagation distance.

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of Insoluble Surfactant Effect on Turbulent Channel Bubbly Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiacai; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2016-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) have been successfully used to obtain detailed data for turbulent channel bubbly flows. However, most of DNS that have been done so far remain problematic in comparing to most experiments. One of the major reasons is that real bubbly flows contain surfactants. The surfactants adhere to the interface, and produce an uneven distribution of the surfactant concentration due to the moving of bubbles and result in uneven surface tension over bubble surfaces. In this project, the effect of surfactants on the flow of many bubbles in an upward turbulent channel flow is studied by using of Direct Numerical Simulation with 3D Front-tracking method. The surfactant mass and the interfacial area are directly tracked in the method, and the surfactant mass remains conserved during the evolution. By using of different elasticity numbers in the non-linear equation of state which relates the surface tension to the surfactant concentration, the simulations show that the evolution of the turbulent channel bubbly flow are much different among the cases with contaminated bubbles and clean bubbles. Profiles of many parameters, such as streamwise velocity, shear stress and etc., are also compared at the statistically steady state for these cases. Research supported by DOE (CASL).

  14. Mechanism of local scour around submarine pipelines based on numerical simulation of turbulence model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Lin; LI Yucheng; CHEN Bing

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism of local scour around submarine pipelines is studied numerically based on a renormalized group (RNG) turbulence model. To validate the numerical model, the equilibrium profiles of local scour for two cases are simulated and compared with the experimental data. It shows that the RNG turbulence model can give an appropriate prediction for the configuration of equilibrium scour hole, and it is applicable to this situation. The local scour mechanism around submarine pipelines including the flow structure, shear stress distribution and pressure field is then analyzed and compared with experiments. For further comparison and validation, especially for the flow structure, a numerical calculation employing the large eddy simulation (LES) is also conducted. The numerical results of RNG demonstrate that the critical factor governing the equilibrium profile is the seabed shear stress distribution in the case of bed load sediment transport, and the two-equation RNG turbulence model coupled with the law of wall is capable of giving a satisfying estimation for the bed shear stress. Moreover, the piping phenomena due to the great difference of pressure between the upstream and downstream parts of pipelines and the vortex structure around submarine pipelines are also simulated successfully, which are believed to be the important factor that lead to the onset of local scour.

  15. Dissipation in PIC simulations of moderate to low \\b{eta} plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Makwana, Kirit; Guo, Fan; Li, Xiaocan

    2016-01-01

    We simulate decaying turbulence in electron-positron pair plasmas using a fully- kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code. We run two simulations with moderate-to-low plasma beta. The energy decay rate is found to be similar in both the cases. The perpendicular wave-number spectrum of magnetic energy shows a slope of k^-1.3 in both the cases. The particle energy distribution function shows the formation of a non-thermal feature in the case of lower plasma beta, with a slope close to E^-1. The role of thin turbulent current sheets in this process is investigated. The heating by E_{\\parallel}.J_{\\parallel} term dominates the E_{\\perp}.J_{\\perp} term. Regions of strong E_{\\parallel}.J_{\\parallel} are spatially well-correlated with regions of intense current sheets, which also appear correlated with regions of strong E_{\\parallel} in the low beta simulation, suggesting an important role of magnetic reconnection in the dissipation of low beta plasma turbulence.

  16. Effect of deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium on the Goldberg-Unno method. [turbulence effects on optical density in the solar photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyan, V. I.

    1974-01-01

    The dependence of turbulent velocity on optical depth was studied by use of the Goldberg-Unno method, with allowance made for the influence of deviation from the local thermodynamic equilibrium. It was found that allowance for deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium displaces the curve of dependence of turbulent velocity on optical depth along two axes.

  17. Terascale direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion using S3D.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Mellor-Crummy, J.; DeVries, M.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Ma, K. L.; Podhorski, N.; Liao, W. K.; Klasky, S.; de Supinski, B.; Choudhary, A.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Shende, Sameer

    2008-08-01

    Computational science is paramount to the understanding of underlying processes in internal combustion engines of the future that will utilize non-petroleum-based alternative fuels, including carbon-neutral biofuels, and burn in new combustion regimes that will attain high efficiency while minimizing emissions of particulates and nitrogen oxides. Next-generation engines will likely operate at higher pressures, with greater amounts of dilution and utilize alternative fuels that exhibit a wide range of chemical and physical properties. Therefore, there is a significant role for high-fidelity simulations, direct numerical simulations (DNS), specifically designed to capture key turbulence-chemistry interactions in these relatively uncharted combustion regimes, and in particular, that can discriminate the effects of differences in fuel properties. In DNS, all of the relevant turbulence and flame scales are resolved numerically using high-order accurate numerical algorithms. As a consequence terascale DNS are computationally intensive, require massive amounts of computing power and generate tens of terabytes of data. Recent results from terascale DNS of turbulent flames are presented here, illustrating its role in elucidating flame stabilization mechanisms in a lifted turbulent hydrogen/air jet flame in a hot air co-flow, and the flame structure of a fuel-lean turbulent premixed jet flame. Computing at this scale requires close collaborations between computer and combustion scientists to provide optimized scaleable algorithms and software for terascale simulations, efficient collective parallel I/O, tools for volume visualization of multiscale, multivariate data and automating the combustion workflow. The enabling computer science, applied to combustion science, is also required in many other terascale physics and engineering simulations. In particular, performance monitoring is used to identify the performance of key kernels in the DNS code, S3D and especially memory

  18. Terascale direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion using S3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Choudhary, A.; de Supinski, B.; DeVries, M.; Hawkes, E. R.; Klasky, S.; Liao, W. K.; Ma, K. L.; Mellor-Crummey, J.; Podhorszki, N.; Sankaran, R.; Shende, S.; Yoo, C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Computational science is paramount to the understanding of underlying processes in internal combustion engines of the future that will utilize non-petroleum-based alternative fuels, including carbon-neutral biofuels, and burn in new combustion regimes that will attain high efficiency while minimizing emissions of particulates and nitrogen oxides. Next-generation engines will likely operate at higher pressures, with greater amounts of dilution and utilize alternative fuels that exhibit a wide range of chemical and physical properties. Therefore, there is a significant role for high-fidelity simulations, direct numerical simulations (DNS), specifically designed to capture key turbulence-chemistry interactions in these relatively uncharted combustion regimes, and in particular, that can discriminate the effects of differences in fuel properties. In DNS, all of the relevant turbulence and flame scales are resolved numerically using high-order accurate numerical algorithms. As a consequence terascale DNS are computationally intensive, require massive amounts of computing power and generate tens of terabytes of data. Recent results from terascale DNS of turbulent flames are presented here, illustrating its role in elucidating flame stabilization mechanisms in a lifted turbulent hydrogen/air jet flame in a hot air coflow, and the flame structure of a fuel-lean turbulent premixed jet flame. Computing at this scale requires close collaborations between computer and combustion scientists to provide optimized scaleable algorithms and software for terascale simulations, efficient collective parallel I/O, tools for volume visualization of multiscale, multivariate data and automating the combustion workflow. The enabling computer science, applied to combustion science, is also required in many other terascale physics and engineering simulations. In particular, performance monitoring is used to identify the performance of key kernels in the DNS code, S3D and especially memory

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of turbulent flow in a porous, face centered cubic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoliang; Apte, Sourabh; Wood, Brian

    2014-11-01

    DNS of flow through a 3D, periodic, face centered cubic (FCC) unit cell geometry at Re = 300 , 550, and 950 based on diameter is performed. This low porosity arrangement of spheres is characterized by rapid flow expansions and contractions, and thus features an early onset to turbulence. The simulations are performed using a fictitious domain approach [Apte et al., J. Comp. Physics 2009], which uses non-body conforming Cartesian grids, with resolution up to D / Δ = 250 (3543 cells total). The results are used to investigate the structure of turbulence in the Eulerian and Lagrangian frames, the distribution and budget of turbulent kinetic energy, and the characteristics of the energy spectrum in complex packed beds and porous media. The porescale flow physics, which are important to properties such as bulk mixing performance and permeability, are investigated. Specifically, the data generated is being used to understand the important turbulence characteristics in low porosity packed beds of relevance for heat tranfer applications in chemical/nuclear reactors. Funding: NSF Project Number 1336983.

  20. Simulation of turbulent magnetic reconnection in the small-scale solar wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Some observational examples for the possible occurrence of the turbulent magnetic reconnection in the solar wind are found by analysing Helios spacecraft's high resolution data. The phenomena of turbulent magnetic reconnections in small scale solar wind are simulated by introducing a third order accuracy upwind compact difference scheme to the compressible two_dimensional MHD flow. Numerical results verify that the turbulent magnetic reconnection process could occur in small scale interplanetary solar wind, which is a basic feature characterizing the magnetic reconnection in high_magnetic Reynolds number (RM=2 000-10 000) solar wind. The configurations of the magnetic reconnection could evolve from a single X_line to a multiple X-line reconnection, exhibiting a complex picture of the formation, merging and evolution of magnetic islands, and finally the magnetic reconnection would evolve into a low_energy state. Its life_span of evolution is about one hour order of magnitude. Various magnetic and flow signatures are recorded in the numerical test for different evolution stages and along different crossing paths, which could in principle explain and confirm the observational samples from the Helios spacecraft. These results are helpful for revealing the basic physical processes in the solar wind turbulence.