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Sample records for optical readout tracking

  1. Feasibility studies for a wireless 60 GHz tracking detector readout

    CERN Document Server

    Dittmeier, Sebastian; Soltveit, Hans Kristian; Wiedner, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The amount of data produced by highly granular silicon tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments poses a major challenge to readout systems. At high collision rates, e.g. at LHC experiments, only a small fraction of data can be read out with currently used technologies. To cope with the requirements of future or upgraded experiments new data transfer techniques are required which offer high data rates at low power and low material budget. Wireless technologies operating in the 60 GHz band or at higher frequencies offer high data rates and are thus a promising upcoming alternative to conventional data transmission via electrical cables or optical fibers. Using wireless technology, the amount of cables and connectors in detectors can be significantly reduced. Tracking detectors profit most from a reduced material budget as fewer secondary particle interactions (multiple Coulomb scattering, energy loss, etc.) improve the tracking performance in general. We present feasibility studies regarding the in...

  2. Prototype readout electronics for the upgraded ALICE Inner Tracking System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielewicz, K. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Bonora, M.; Ferencei, J.; Giubilato, P.; Rossewij, M. J.; Schambach, J.; Vanat, T.

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade to the experimental apparatus. A key element of the upgrade is the construction of a new silicon-based Inner Tracking System containing 12 Gpixels in an area of 10 m2. Its readout system consists of 192 readout units that control the pixel sensors and the power units, and deliver the sensor data to the counting room. A prototype readout board has been designed to test: the interface between the sensor modules and the readout electronics, the signal integrity and reliability of data transfer, the interface to the ALICE DAQ and trigger, and the susceptibility of the system to the expected radiation level.

  3. Parallel Readout of Optical Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    27, 2987-2992 (1988). 11. T. Yatagai, J. G. Camacho-Basilio, and H. Onda , "Recording of Computer-Generated Holograms on an Optical Disk Master...Multivariate Observations," Proceedings of the Fifth Berkeley Symposium on Math. Stat. and Prob I., L. M. LeCam and J. Neyman, eds. (University of...California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles California, 1967), pp. 281-297. [9] R. Duda and P Hart, "Pattern Classification and Scene Analysis," (John

  4. Enhanced optomechanical readout using optical coalescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genes, Claudiu; Xuereb, André; Pupillo, Guido;

    2013-01-01

    We present a scheme to strongly enhance the readout sensitivity of the squared displacement of a mobile scatterer placed in a Fabry-Pérot cavity. We investigate the largely unexplored regime of cavity electrodynamics in which a highly reflective element positioned between the end mirrors of a sym...... in this generic “optical coalescence” phenomenon gives rise to an enhanced frequency shift of the peaks of the cavity transmission that can be exploited in optomechanics....

  5. Feasibility studies for a wireless 60 GHz tracking detector readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmeier, S.; Schöning, A.; Soltveit, H. K.; Wiedner, D.

    2016-09-01

    The amount of data produced by highly granular silicon tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments poses a major challenge to readout systems. At high collision rates, e.g. at LHC experiments, only a small fraction of data can be read out with currently used technologies. To cope with the requirements of future or upgraded experiments new data transfer techniques are required which offer high data rates at low power and low material budget. Wireless technologies operating in the 60 GHz band or at higher frequencies offer high data rates and are thus a promising upcoming alternative to conventional data transmission via electrical cables or optical fibers. Using wireless technology, the amount of cables and connectors in detectors can be significantly reduced. Tracking detectors profit most from a reduced material budget as fewer secondary particle interactions (multiple Coulomb scattering, energy loss, etc.) improve the tracking performance in general. We present feasibility studies regarding the integration of the wireless technology at 60 GHz into a silicon tracking detector. We use spare silicon strip modules of the ATLAS experiment as test samples which are measured to be opaque in the 60 GHz range. The reduction of cross talk between links and the attenuation of reflections is studied. An estimate of the maximum achievable link density is given. It is shown that wireless links can be placed as close as 2 cm next to each other for a layer distance of 10 cm by exploiting one or several of the following measures: highly directive antennas, absorbers like graphite foam, linear polarization and frequency channeling. Combining these measures, a data rate area density of up to 11 Tb/(s·m2) seems feasible. In addition, two types of silicon sensors are tested under mm-wave irradiation in order to determine the influence of 60 GHz data transmission on the detector performance: an ATLAS silicon strip sensor module and an HV-MAPS prototype for the Mu3e

  6. Feasibility studies for a wireless 60 GHz tracking detector readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittmeier, S., E-mail: dittmeier@physi.uni-heidelberg.de; Schöning, A.; Soltveit, H.K.; Wiedner, D.

    2016-09-11

    The amount of data produced by highly granular silicon tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments poses a major challenge to readout systems. At high collision rates, e.g. at LHC experiments, only a small fraction of data can be read out with currently used technologies. To cope with the requirements of future or upgraded experiments new data transfer techniques are required which offer high data rates at low power and low material budget. Wireless technologies operating in the 60 GHz band or at higher frequencies offer high data rates and are thus a promising upcoming alternative to conventional data transmission via electrical cables or optical fibers. Using wireless technology, the amount of cables and connectors in detectors can be significantly reduced. Tracking detectors profit most from a reduced material budget as fewer secondary particle interactions (multiple Coulomb scattering, energy loss, etc.) improve the tracking performance in general. We present feasibility studies regarding the integration of the wireless technology at 60 GHz into a silicon tracking detector. We use spare silicon strip modules of the ATLAS experiment as test samples which are measured to be opaque in the 60 GHz range. The reduction of cross talk between links and the attenuation of reflections is studied. An estimate of the maximum achievable link density is given. It is shown that wireless links can be placed as close as 2 cm next to each other for a layer distance of 10 cm by exploiting one or several of the following measures: highly directive antennas, absorbers like graphite foam, linear polarization and frequency channeling. Combining these measures, a data rate area density of up to 11 Tb/(s·m{sup 2}) seems feasible. In addition, two types of silicon sensors are tested under mm-wave irradiation in order to determine the influence of 60 GHz data transmission on the detector performance: an ATLAS silicon strip sensor module and an HV-MAPS prototype for the Mu3e

  7. Readout of TPC Tracking Chambers with GEMs and Pixel Chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadyk, John; Kim, T.; Freytsis, M.; Button-Shafer, J.; Kadyk, J.; Vahsen, S.E.; Wenzel, W.A.

    2007-12-21

    Two layers of GEMs and the ATLAS Pixel Chip, FEI3, have been combined and tested as a prototype for Time Projection Chamber (TPC) readout at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The double-layer GEM system amplifies charge with gain sufficient to detect all track ionization. The suitability of three gas mixtures for this application was investigated, and gain measurements are presented. A large sample of cosmic ray tracks was reconstructed in 3D by using the simultaneous timing and 2D spatial information from the pixel chip. The chip provides pixel charge measurement as well as timing. These results demonstrate that a double GEM and pixel combination, with a suitably modified pixel ASIC, could meet the stringent readout requirements of the ILC.

  8. Fast optical readout for Mu3e experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qinhua [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: Mu3e-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Charged lepton flavour violation is highly suppressed in the Standard Model, which results in a prediction for the branching ratio of μ{sup +}→e{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -} below O(10{sup -54}). The Mu3e experiment will search for this rare decay with a sensitivity of 10{sup -16}. An observation would be a clear sign for new physics. A high muon stopping rate of 2.10{sup 9} Hz is required so that sufficient statistics can be accumulated in about one year of data taking. The high event rate and the requirement of a full online track reconstruction demand a fast readout system which should provide a bandwidth above 1 Tbit/s. Reconfigurable devices, namely FPGAs, can easily parallelise the data processing, so it becomes possible to sort, merge, pack and route the data with low latency at high throughput. Optical fibres are the only option for the interconnection between different FPGA-based boards. The fibres also reduce the crosstalk and signal attenuation, especially over long distance links. As part of the readout system prototyping, firmware for synchronous merging of different data streams is being developed. In addition, the optical links have been tested and show a bit error rate below O(10{sup -16}) at 6.4 Gbit/s for a single fibre.

  9. The GBT based readout concept for the silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Joerg [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the CBM experiment at FAIR is designed to handle interaction rates up to 10 MHz with hundreds of tracks in fixed target heavy ion collisions of up to 35 AGeV. STS data will be read out from 14000 ASICs on 1800 frontend boards (FEBs) with a total of 1.8 million channels operating at rates from below 15 up to 1000 kHz and located in the STS detector box inside the CBM magnet with challenging conditions in terms of available space, radiation, magnetic field and temperature. ASICs from 1, 2 or 5 FEBs operated at varying sensor potential will be connected via AC-coupled 320 MHz LVDS links to a readout board (ROB) employing radiation hard GBTX and Versatile Link components developed at CERN for data aggregation and optical readout. The approximately 1000 ROBs will be located inside the STS detector box, 4000 optical links will be routed from there to the subsequent FPGA based CBM data processing board (DPB). The concept of the GBT based readout including connection scheme and custom protocol is presented, and an outlook on the ROB prototype is given.

  10. Optical readout of liquid argon ionisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, N. J. C.; Lightfoot, P. K.; Barker, G. J.; Ramachers, Y. A.; Mavrokoridis, K.

    2011-07-01

    Reading out the charge from a very large liquid argon detector, such as proposed for next generation proton decay and long baseline neutrino detectors, represents a significant challenge. Current proposals suggest using wires in the liquid or a two-phase approach that can provide some gain via amplification in the gas phase. We present here work on an alternative new approach in which the charge is read out by optical means following generation of electroluminescence, such as in a THGEM (Thick Gas Electron Multiplier) mounted within the liquid. This has the potential for significant advantages by providing both simpler readout electronics and significant charge gain, without the need for the complexities of dual phase operation. Tests with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) mounted above a THGEM, all submerged in liquid argon, have allowed first demonstration of the technique. Sensitivity to 5.9 keV 55Fe gamma events was observed with an estimated gain of 150 photoelectrons per drifted electron. We review the concepts and results.

  11. On the optical readout of gas avalanche chambers and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.; Breskin, A.; Charpak, G.; Daubie, E.; Dominik, W.; Fabre, J.P.; Gaudean, J.; Sauli, F.; Sauvage, D.; Strock, P.; Zeludziewicz, T.

    1986-09-25

    Gaseous avalanche counters with mixtures containing the vapour of triethylamine, are coupled to an optical readout system. Different configurations are studied in order to visualize ionization tracks produced by high-energy particles or images caused by vacuum ultraviolet light. This instrument has potential applications in the study of rare or complex events - such as the search for double-beta and proton decay - or in Cherenkov ring imaging.

  12. On the optical readout of gas avalanche chambers and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.; Charpak, G.; Fabre, J.P.; Gaudean, J.; Sauli, F.; Sauvage, D.; Strock, P.; Zeludziewicz, T.; Breskin, A.; Daubie, E.

    1988-01-01

    Gaseous avalanche counters with mixtures containing the vapour of triethylamine, are coupled to an optical readout system. Different configurations are studied in order to visualize ionization tracks produced by high-energy particles or images caused by vacuum ultraviolet light. This instrument has potential applications in the study of rare or complex events - such as the search for double-beta and proton decay - or in Cherenkov ring imaging.

  13. Development of the readout system for waveguide multilayer optical card

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Min-fen; LIANG Zhong-cheng; WANG Ren-zhou; DONG Xiang-mei; ZHANG Pei-ming; CHEN Jia-bi

    2008-01-01

    Waveguide multilayer optical card(WMOC)is a novel storage device of three-dimensional optical information.An ad-vancod readout system fitting for the WMOC is introduced in this paper.The hardware mainly consists of the light source for reading,WMOC,motorized stages addressing unit,microscope imaging unit,CCD detecting unit and PC controlling & processing unit.The movement of the precision motorized stage is controlled by the computer through Visual Basic(VB) language in software.A control panel is also designed to get the layer address and the page address through which the position of the motorized stages call be changed.The WMOC readout system is easy to manage and the readout result is directly displayed on computer monitor.

  14. Towards multi-hit readout of TPCs for exotic beam tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, Timothy; Enders, Joachim; Hucka, Jan-Paul; Schlemme, Steffen [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Nociforo, Chiara; Pietri, Stephane; Prochazka, Andrej [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Super-FRS beam diagnostics system supports the set up and adjustment of the separator and provides tracking and event-by-event particle identification. A TPC-type detector with GEM amplification and with multi-hit single-strip readout is proposed to be used as a tracking detector. The main challenges for such a detector are position resolution below 1 mm, high dynamic range (1000) and high-efficiency tracking up to 10 MHz ion rate. One of the planned improvements towards a high-rate capability of single-ion tracking is the multi-hit readout of the TPC detectors. Present TPC detectors with delay-line readout were tested with multihit electronics at the GSI fragment separator FRS with Au beam at 1 GeV/nucl. up to 150 kHz. Results are presented in comparison to single-hit readout.

  15. Optical readout and control systems for the CMS tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Troska, Jan K; Faccio, F; Gill, K; Grabit, R; Jareno, R M; Sandvik, A M; Vasey, F

    2003-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment will be installed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2007. The readout system for the CMS Tracker consists of 10000000 individual detector channels that are time-multiplexed onto 40000 unidirectional analogue (40 MSample /s) optical links for transmission between the detector and the 65 m distant counting room. The corresponding control system consists of 2500 bi-directional digital (40 Mb/s) optical links based as far as possible upon the same components. The on-detector elements (lasers and photodiodes) of both readout and control links will be distributed throughout the detector volume in close proximity to the silicon detector elements. For this reason, strict requirements are placed on minimal package size, mass, power dissipation, immunity to magnetic field, and radiation hardness. It has been possible to meet the requirements with the extensive use of commercially available components with a minimum of customization. The project has now entered its vol...

  16. ALICE inner tracking system readout electronics prototype testing with the CERN ``Giga Bit Transceiver''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schambach, J.; Rossewij, M. J.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Bonora, M.; Ferencei, J.; Giubilato, P.; Vanat, T.

    2016-12-01

    The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major detector upgrade for the LHC Run 3, which includes the construction of a new silicon pixel based Inner Tracking System (ITS). The ITS readout system consists of 192 readout boards to control the sensors and their power system, receive triggers, and deliver sensor data to the DAQ. To prototype various aspects of this readout system, an FPGA based carrier board and an associated FMC daughter card containing the CERN Gigabit Transceiver (GBT) chipset have been developed. This contribution describes laboratory and radiation testing results with this prototype board set.

  17. A TPC-like readout method for high precision muon-tracking using GEM-detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flierl, Bernhard; Biebel, Otmar; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Hertenberger, Ralf; Klitzner, Felix; Loesel, Philipp; Mueller, Ralph [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Zibell, Andre [Julius-Maximilians-Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors are well suited for tracking of charged particles. Three dimensional tracking in a single layer can be achieved by application of a time-projection-chamber like readout mode (μTPC), if the drift time of the electrons is measured and the position dependence of the arrival time is used to calculate the inclination angle of the track. To optimize the tracking capabilities for ion tracks drift gas mixtures with low drift velocity have been investigated by measuring tracks of cosmic muons in a compact setup of four GEM-detectors of 100 x 100 x 6 mm{sup 3} active volume each and an angular acceptance of -25 to 25 . The setup consists of three detectors with two-dimensional strip readout layers of 0.4 mm pitch and one detector with a single strip readout layer of 0.25 mm pitch. All strips are readout by APV25 frontend boards and the amplification stage in the detectors consists of three GEM-foils. Tracks are reconstructed by the μTPC-method in one of the detectors and are then compared to the prediction from the other three detectors defined by the center of charge in every detector. We report our study of Argon and Helium based noble gas mixtures with carbon-dioxide as quencher.

  18. A readout system for the wavelength-shifting optical module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foesig, Carl-Christian; Boeser, Sebastian [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The success of IceCube and the plans for an IceCube-Gen2 stimulate the development of new photo sensors. The approach of the Wavelength-shifting Optical Module is to provide a device which has a low dark noise rate combined with a high detection efficiency. A small PMT is used to detect red shifted photons guided in a coated PMMA tube, originally emitted by a wavelength shifting coating that absorbs photons in the UV Region. We have studied several PMTs for their usability with the IceCube-Gen2 readout system. Relevant parameters are the pulse widths in relation to the bandwidth of the IceCube-Gen2 readout electronics and the dark noise rates.

  19. Fibre Optic Readout of Microcantilever Arrays for Fast Microorganism Growth Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Maloney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a fibre-optic-based device for the automated readout of microcantilever arrays for fast microorganism growth detection. We determined the ability of our device to track shifts in resonance frequency due to an increase in mass on the cantilever surface or changes in mechanical stiffness. The resonance frequency response of 7 μm thick agarose-functionalised cantilevers was tracked as humidity levels were varied revealing a mass responsivity of ~51±1 pg/Hz. The resonance response of microcantilevers coated with Aspergillus niger (A. niger spores was monitored for >48 h revealing a growth detection time of >4 h. The growth of mycelium along the cantilevers surface is seen to result in an increase in resonance frequency due to the reinforcement of the cantilever structure. The use of our fibre optic detection technique allows data to be recorded continuously and faster than previously reported.

  20. Radiopurity assessment of the tracking readout for the NEXT double beta decay experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Álvarez, V; Barrado, A I; Bettini, A; Borges, F I G M; Camargo, M; Cárcel, S; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Conde, E; Dafni, T; Díaz, J; Esteve, R; Fernandes, L M P; Fernández, M; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Liubarsky, I; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Martínez, A; Martínez-Lema, G; Miller, T; Monrabal, F; Monserrate, M; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; Nebot-Guinot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; de Solórzano, A Ortiz; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Segui, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R C; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2014-01-01

    The 'Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon Time-Projection Chamber' (NEXT) is intended to investigate the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe, which requires a severe suppression of potential backgrounds; therefore, an extensive screening and selection process is underway to control the radiopurity levels of the materials to be used in the experimental set-up of NEXT. The detector design combines the measurement of the topological signature of the event for background discrimination with the energy resolution optimization. Separate energy and tracking readout planes are based on different sensors: photomultiplier tubes for calorimetry and silicon multi-pixel photon counters for tracking. The design of a radiopure tracking plane, in direct contact with the gas detector medium, was a challenge since the needed components have typically activities too large for experiments requiring ultra-low background conditions. Here, the radiopurity assessment of tracking readout components based on gamma-ray spectroscopy usi...

  1. A Triple-GEM Detector with Pixel Readout for High-Rate Beam Tracking in COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Nagel, T; Haas, F; Ketzer, B; Konorov, I; Krämer, M; Mann, A; Paul, S

    2008-01-01

    For its physics program with a high-intensity hadron beam of $2 · 10^{7}$ particles/s, the COMPASS experiment at CERN requires tracking of charged particles scattered by very small angles with respect to the incident beam direction. While good resolution in time and space is mandatory, the challenge is imposed by the high beam intensity, requiring radiation-hard detectors which add very little material to the beam path in order to minimise secondary interactions. To this end, a set of triple-GEM detectors with pixel readout in the beam region and 2-D strip readout in the periphery is currently being built. The pixel size has been chosen to be 1×1 mm2, which constitutes a compromise between the spatial resolution achievable and the number of readout channels. Surrounding the pixel area, a 2-D strip readout with a pitch of 400 μm has been realised on the same printed circuit foil. In total an active area of 10 × 10 cm2 is covered using 2048 readout channels. Analogue readout by the APV25 ASIC has been chose...

  2. Optical readout of a triple-GEM detector by means of a CMOS sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marafini, M. [INFN Sezione di Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); Patera, V. [INFN Sezione di Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Pinci, D., E-mail: davide.pinci@roma1.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Roma (Italy); Sarti, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma (Italy); Sciubba, A. [INFN Sezione di Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma (Italy); Spiriti, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    In last years, the development of optical sensors has produced objects able to provide very interesting performance. Large granularity is offered along with a very high sensitivity. CMOS sensors with millions of pixels able to detect as few as two or three photons per pixel are commercially available and can be used to read-out the optical signals provided by tracking particle detectors. In this work the results obtained by optically reading-out a triple-GEM detector by a commercial CMOS sensor will be presented. A standard detector was assembled with a transparent window below the third GEM allowing the light to get out. The detector is supplied with an Ar/CF{sub 4} based gas mixture producing 650 nm wavelength photons matching the maximum quantum efficiency of the sensor.

  3. High-Resolution Mammography Detector Employing Optical Switching Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisawa, Kaku; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Yamane, Katsutoshi; Sendai, Tomonari; Hosoi, Yuichi

    Conceiving a new detector structure, FUJIFILM Corporation has successfully put its invention of an X-ray detector employing "Optical Switching" into practical use. Since Optical Switching Technology allows an electrode structure to be easily designed, both high resolution of pixel pitch and low electrical noise readout have been achieved, which have consequently realized the world's smallest pixel size of 50×50 μm2 from a Direct-conversion FPD system as well as high DQE. The digital mammography system equipped with this detector enables to acquire high definition images while maintaining granularity. Its outstanding feature is to be able to acquire high-precision images of microcalcifications which is an important index in breast examination.

  4. Fast regional readout CMOS Image Sensor for dynamic MLC tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, H.; Harris, E.; Osmond, J.; Evans, P.

    2014-03-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) require verification of the complex beam delivery including tracking of multileaf collimators (MLC) and monitoring the dose rate. This work explores the feasibility of a prototype Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor Image Sensor (CIS) for tracking these complex treatments by utilising fast, region of interest (ROI) read out functionality. An automatic edge tracking algorithm was used to locate the MLC leaves edges moving at various speeds (from a moving triangle field shape) and imaged with various sensor frame rates. The CIS demonstrates successful edge detection of the dynamic MLC motion within accuracy of 1.0 mm. This demonstrates the feasibility of the sensor to verify treatment delivery involving dynamic MLC up to ~400 frames per second (equivalent to the linac pulse rate), which is superior to any current techniques such as using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). CIS provides the basis to an essential real-time verification tool, useful in accessing accurate delivery of complex high energy radiation to the tumour and ultimately to achieve better cure rates for cancer patients.

  5. Optical Readout in a Multi-Module System Test for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Flick, T; Gerlach, P; Kersten, S; Mättig, P; Kirichu, S N; Reeves, K; Richter, J; Schultes, J; Flick, Tobias; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Gerlach, Peter; Kersten, Susanne; Maettig, Peter; Kirichu, Simon Nderitu; Reeves, Kendall; Richter, Jennifer; Schultes, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The innermost part of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, CERN, will be a pixel detector. The command messages and the readout data of the detector are transmitted over an optical data path. The readout chain consists of many components which are produced at several locations around the world, and must work together in the pixel detector. To verify that these parts are working together as expected a system test has been built up. In this paper the system test setup and the operation of the readout chain is described. Also, some results of tests using the final pixel detector readout chain are given.

  6. Optical sensitivity non-uniformity analysis and optimization of a tilt optical readout focal plane array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianyu; Shang, Haiping; Shi, Haitao; Li, Zhigang; Ou, Yi; Chen, Dapeng; Zhang, Qingchuan

    2016-02-01

    An optical readout focal plane array (FPA) usually has a differently tilted reflector/absorber at the initial state due to the micromachining technique. The angular deviation of the reflector/absorber has a strong impact on the optical sensitivity non-uniformity, which is a key factor which affects the imaging uniformity. In this study, a theoretical analysis has been developed, and it is found that the stress matching in SiO2-Aluminum (Al) bilayer leg could make a contribution towards reducing the optical sensitivity non-uniformity. Ion implantation of phosphorus (P) has been utilized to control the stress in SiO2 film. By controlling the implantation energy and dose, the stress and stress stability are modified. The optical readout FPA has been successfully fabricated with the stress-control technique based on P+ implantation. It is demonstrated that the gray response non-uniformity of optical readout FPA has decreased from 25.69% to 10.7%.

  7. The optimal optical readout for the x-ray light valve—Document scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Oakham, P.; MacDougall, Robert D.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    The x-ray light valve (XLV) is a novel, potentially low-cost, x-ray detector that converts an x-ray exposure into an optical image stored in a liquid crystal cell. This optical image is then transferred from the liquid crystal cell to a computer through an optical-to-digital imaging readout system. Previously, CCD-based cameras were used for the optical readout, but recently it was proposed that an inexpensive optical scanner, such as an office document scanner, is a better match to the optic...

  8. Integrated optical readout for miniaturization of cantilever-based sensor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Maria; Zauner, Dan; Calleja, Montserrat

    2007-01-01

    The authors present the fabrication and characterization of an integrated optical readout scheme based on single-mode waveguides for cantilever-based sensors. The cantilever bending is read out by monitoring changes in the optical intensity of light transmitted through the cantilever that also acts...

  9. Recent Developments on the Silicon Drift Detector readout scheme for the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    CERN Document Server

    Mazza, G; Bonazzola, G C; Bonvicini, V; Cavagnino, D; Cerello, P G; De Remigis, P; Falchieri, D; Gabrielli, A; Gandolfi, E; Giubellino, P; Hernández, R; Masetti, M; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nouais, D; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F

    1999-01-01

    Proposal of abstract for LEB99, Snowmass, Colorado, 20-24 September 1999Recent developments of the Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) readout system for the ALICE Experiment are presented. The foreseen readout system is based on 2 main units. The first unit consists of a low noise preamplifier, an analog memory which continuously samples the amplifier output, an A/D converter and a digital memory. When the trigger signal validates the analog data, the ADCs convert the samples into a digital form and store them into the digital memory. The second unit performs the zero suppression/data compression operations. In this paper the status of the design is presented, together with the test results of the A/D converter, the multi-event buffer and the compression unit prototype.Summary:In the Inner Tracker System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment the third and the fourth layer of the detectors are SDDs. These detectors provide the measurement of both the energy deposition and the bi-dimensional position of the track. In terms o...

  10. Readout electronics for the SiPM tracking plane in the NEXT-1 prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero, V. [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular I3M (Centro mixto CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia-CIEMAT), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Toledo, J., E-mail: jtoledo@eln.upv.es [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular I3M (Centro mixto CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia-CIEMAT), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Catala, J.M.; Esteve, R. [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular I3M (Centro mixto CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia-CIEMAT), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Gil, A.; Lorca, D. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universidad de Valencia), 46980 Valencia (Spain); Monzo, J.M.; Sanchis, F. [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular I3M (Centro mixto CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia-CIEMAT), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Verdugo, A. [CIEMAT-Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-12-11

    NEXT is a new experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay using a 100 kg radio-pure high-pressure gaseous xenon TPC with electroluminescence readout. A large-scale prototype with a SiPM tracking plane has been built. The primary electron paths can be reconstructed from time-resolved measurements of the light that arrives to the SiPM plane. Our approach is to measure how many photons have reached each SiPM sensor each microsecond with a gated integrator. We have designed and tested a 16-channel front-end board that includes the analog paths and a digital section. Each analog path consists of three different stages: a transimpedance amplifier, a gated integrator and an offset and gain control stage. Measurements show good linearity and the ability to detect single photoelectrons.

  11. Double remote electrochemical addressing and optical readout of electrochemiluminescence at the tip of an optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haidong; Garrigue, Patrick; Bouffier, Laurent; Arbault, Stéphane; Kuhn, Alexander; Sojic, Neso

    2016-07-21

    In this work, we report an original strategy for the wireless electrochemical generation of light at the tip of an optical fiber bundle, coupled with a simultaneous remote readout. An optical fiber bundle coated with a nanometer-thin gold film acts as a dual platform, on the one hand to locally generate electrochemiluminescence (ECL) in a wireless manner by bipolar electrochemistry, and on the other hand to guide the resulting ECL signal. The light emission is triggered and collected at one end, transmitted by the waveguide and remotely detected at the opposite end. Integration of both functionalities at the level of the same miniaturized object leads to an unprecedented bipolar opto-electrode, allowing one to quantify the ECL intensity as a function of different parameters in a double remote approach with interesting potential applications, ranging from high-throughput catalyst screening to massive parallel biochemical analysis.

  12. Track Initiation for Electro-Optical Tracking of Space Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z. W.; Wang, X.

    2016-03-01

    Aimed at the track initiation for the electro-optical tracking of space objects, and based on modified Hough transformation, a track initiation algorithm without prior information is proposed to realize the fully robotic identification and tracking of moving objects. The method is valid for the tracking of multi-target as well as with a non-continuous sequence. Simulation shows that the method is effective and applicable for operational usage, and is especially good for the search and discovery of new objects.

  13. Cantilever-based sensor with integrated optical read-out using single mode waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Maria; Zauner, Dan; Calleja, Montserrat;

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the design, fabrication and mechanical characterisation of an integrated optical read-out scheme for cantilever-based biosensors. A cantilever can be used as a biosensor by monitoring its bending caused by the surface stress generated due to chemical reactions occurring on its ...

  14. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Mok, E-mail: jmkim@kriss.re.kr; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong [Brain Cognition Measurement Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  15. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2013-12-01

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  16. The "optical lever" intracavity readout scheme for gravitational-wave antennae

    OpenAIRE

    Khalili, F. Ya

    2002-01-01

    An improved version of the ``optical bar'' intracavity readout scheme for gravitational-wave antennae is considered. We propose to call this scheme ``optical lever'' because it can provide significant gain in the signal displacement of the local mirror similar to the gain which can be obtained using ordinary mechanical lever with unequal arms. In this scheme displacement of the local mirror can be close to the signal displacement of the end mirrors of hypothetical gravitational-wave antenna w...

  17. Optical readout of coupling between a nanomembrane and an LC circuit at room temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagci, T.; Simonsen, A.; Zeuthen, E.

    2013-01-01

    via a mechanical interface is of potential interest, as it would allow for low noise optical detection and laser cooling of weak electrical excitations. In a recent paper [4], a scheme was proposed for room temperature applications where a membrane converts rf electrical excitations in an LC circuit...... is within reach. Furthermore the electromechanical part can be placed in an optical cavity for simultaneous readout and laser cooling of electrical excitations in an LC circuit....

  18. Silicon retina for optical tracking systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohbehn, K.; Jenkins, R. E.; Sun, X.; Andreou, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    There are a host of position sensors, such as quadcells and CCD's, which are candidates for detecting optical position errors and providing error signals for a mirror positioning loop. We are developing a novel, very high bandwidth, biologically inspired position sensor for optical position tracking systems. We present recent test results and design issues for the use of biologically inspired silicon retinas for spaceborne optical position tracking systems.

  19. MEMS acceleration sensor with remote optical readout for continuous power generator monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tormen Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Miniaturized accelerometers with remote optical readout are required devices for the continuous monitoring of vibrations inside power generators. In turbo and hydro generators, end-winding vibrations are present during operation causing in the long term undesirable out-of-service repairs. Continuous monitoring of these vibrations is therefore mandatory. The high electromagnetic fields in the generators impose the use of devices immune to electromagnetic interferences. In this paper a MEMS based accelerometer with remote optical readout is presented. Advantages of the proposed device are the use of a differential optical signal to reject the common mode signal and noise, the reduced number of steps for the MEMS chip fabrication and for the system assembly, and the reduced package volume.

  20. Mechanically amplified MEMS optical accelerometer with FPI readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Edward; George, David S.; Holmes, Andrew S.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a silicon MEMS optical accelerometer in which the motion of the proof mass is mechanically amplified using a V-beam mechanism prior to transduction. The output motion of the V-beam is detected using a Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) which is interrogated in reflection mode via a single-mode optical fibre. Mechanical amplification allows the sensitivity of the accelerometer to be increased without compromising the resonant frequency or measurement bandwidth. We have also devised an all-optical method for calibrating the return signal from the FPI, based on photothermal actuation of the V-beam structure using fibre-delivered light of a different wavelength. A finite-element model has been used to predict the relationship between the incident optical power and the cavity length at steady state, as well as the step response which determines the minimum time for calibration. Prototype devices have been fabricated with resonant frequencies above 10 kHz and approximately linear response for accelerations in the range 0.01 to 15 g.

  1. Detection of human κ-opioid antibody using microresonators with integrated optical readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timurdogan, Erman; Ozber, Natali; Nargul, Sezin; Yavuz, Serhat; Kilic, M Salih; Kavakli, I Halil; Urey, Hakan; Alaca, B Erdem

    2010-09-15

    Label-free detection of the interaction between hexahistidine-tagged human κ-opioid receptor membrane protein and anti-His antibody is demonstrated in liquid by an optical microelectromechanical system utilizing electromagnetically actuated microresonators. Shift in resonance frequency due to accretion of mass on the sensitive surface of microresonators is monitored via an integrated optical readout. A frequency resolution of 2Hz is obtained. Together with a sensitivity of 7 ppm/(ng/ml) this leads to a minimum detectable antibody concentration of 5.7 ng/ml for a 50-kHz device. The measurement principle is shown to impart immunity to environmental noise, facilitate operation in liquid media and bring about the prospect for further miniaturization of actuator and readout leading to a portable biochemical sensor. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Feasibility for Testing the Equivalence Principle with Optical Readout in Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Fen; ZHOU Ze-Bing; LUO Jun

    2011-01-01

    @@ A concept of testing the equivalence principle with optical readout in space(TEPO)has been proposed[J.Jpn.Soc.Microgravity Appl.25(2008)423].We further discuss the feasibility of TEPO using LISA(laser interferometer space antenna)Pathfinder technologies,such as a heterodyne interferometer,an inertial sensor,drag-free control and discharge technique,and determine that the equivalence principle could be tested at 8×10(-17)with one day integration.

  3. Fault injection as a test method for an FPGA in charge of data readout for a large tracking detector

    CERN Document Server

    Roed, K; Richter, M; Fehlker, D; Helstrup, H; Alme, J; Ullaland, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes how fault injection has been implemented as a test method for an FPGA in an existing hardware configuration setup. As this FPGA is in charge of data readout for a large tracking detector, the reliability of this FPGA is of high importance. Due to the complexity of the readout electronics, irradiation testing is technically difficult at this stage of the system commissioning. The work presented in this paper is therefore motivated by introducing fault injection as an alternative method to characterize failures caused by SEUs. It is a method to study the effect that a configuration upset may have on the operation of the FPGA. The target platform consists of two independent modules for data acquisition and detector control functionality. Fault injection to test the response of the data acquisition module is made possible by implementing the solution as part of the detector control functionality. Correct implementation is validated by a simple shift register design. Our results demonstrate th...

  4. A high-speed readout scheme for fast optical correlation-based pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Gregor J.; Lewis, Meirion F.; Wilson, Rebecca

    2004-12-01

    We describe recent developments to a novel form of hybrid electronic/photonic correlator, which exploits component innovations in both electronics and photonics to provide fast, compact and rugged target recognition, applicable to a wide range of security applications. The system benefits from a low power, low volume, optical processing core which has the potential to realise man portable pattern recognition for a wide range of security based imagery and target databases. In the seminal Vander Lugt correlator the input image is Fourier transformed optically and multiplied optically with the conjugate Fourier transform of a reference pattern; the required correlation function is completed by taking the inverse Fourier transform of the product optically. The correlator described here is similar in principle, but performs the initial Fourier transforms and multiplication electronically, with only the final most computationally demanding output Fourier transform being performed optically. In this scheme the Fourier transforms of both the input scene and reference pattern are reduced to a binary phase-only format, where the multiplication process simplifies to a simple Boolean logic XOR function. The output of this XOR gate is displayed on a state-of-the-art Fast Bit Plane Spatial Light Modulator (FBPSLM). A novel readout scheme has been developed which overcomes the previous system output bottleneck and for the first time allows correlation frame readout rates capable of matching the inherently fast nature of the SLM. Readout rates of up to ~1 MHz are now possible, exceeding current SLM capabilities and meeting potential medium term SLM developments promised by SLMs based on novel materials and architectures.

  5. Photocurrent switching method based on photoisomerization of diarylethene layer for nondestructive readout of photochromic optical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi; Onishi, Itaru; Natsume, Daisuke

    2010-07-10

    We report on photocurrent switching based on photoisomerization for the nondestructive readout of photochromic optical memory. The photoisomerization of a diarylethene (DAE) memory layer switched the photocurrent generated in a light-absorbing phthalocyanine layer upon irradiation of a laser light. This switching is based on the ionization potential change of the DAE molecules. Switching characteristics of the photocurrent were investigated for the laser light with a wavelength of 410 nm, 630 nm, or 780 nm. Excellent on-off ratios of the photocurrent were achieved by irradiation at 630 nm and 780 nm. When the pulsed laser light with a wavelength of 780 nm was repeatedly irradiated to the colored and uncolored memory devices, no change of the photocurrent signal levels was observed, even after 8 x 10(5) cycles, indicating a successful demonstration of the nondestructive readout.

  6. Integrated optical read-out for polymeric cantilever-based sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenje, Maria

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents a novel read-out method developed for cantilever-based sensors. Cantilevers are thin beams clamped at one end and during the last 10 years they have emerged as an interesting new type of bio/chemical sensor. The specific recognition of a chemical manifests itself as a bending...... Young’s modulus instead of the conventional materials Si and Si3N4. Here, a novel read-out method is presented where optical waveguides are used to integrate the light into the cantilever. It is an all-polymer device where both the cantilever and the waveguides are fabricated in the negative resist SU-8....... Waveguides are structured on either side of the cantilever that is free-hanging in a microfluidic channel. Light is guided into the system and is either transmitted through the cantilever or reflected off the cantilever front-end, depending on the mode of operation. This work shows that waveguides, only...

  7. Gas proportional detectors with interpolating cathode pad readout for high track multiplicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Bo

    1991-12-01

    New techniques for position encoding in very high rate particle and photon detectors will be required in experiments planned for future particle accelerators such as the Superconducting Super Collider and new, high intensity, synchrotron sources. Studies of two interpolating cathode ``pad`` readout systems are described in this thesis. They are well suited for high multiplicity, two dimensional unambiguous position sensitive detection of minimum ionizing particles and heavy ions as well as detection of x-rays at high counting rates. One of the readout systems uses subdivided rows of pads interconnected by resistive strips as the cathode of a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC). A position resolution of less than 100 {mu}m rms, for 5.4 keV x-rays, and differential non-linearity of 12% have been achieved. Low mass ({approximately}0.6% of a radiation length) detector construction techniques have been developed. The second readout system uses rows of chevron shaped cathode pads to perform geometrical charge division. Position resolution (FWHM) of about 1% of the readout spacing and differential non-linearity of 10% for 5.4 keV x-rays have been achieved. A review of other interpolating methods is included. Low mass cathode construction techniques are described. In conclusion, applications and future developments are discussed. 54 refs.

  8. Gas proportional detectors with interpolating cathode pad readout for high track multiplicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Bo.

    1991-12-01

    New techniques for position encoding in very high rate particle and photon detectors will be required in experiments planned for future particle accelerators such as the Superconducting Super Collider and new, high intensity, synchrotron sources. Studies of two interpolating cathode pad'' readout systems are described in this thesis. They are well suited for high multiplicity, two dimensional unambiguous position sensitive detection of minimum ionizing particles and heavy ions as well as detection of x-rays at high counting rates. One of the readout systems uses subdivided rows of pads interconnected by resistive strips as the cathode of a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC). A position resolution of less than 100 {mu}m rms, for 5.4 keV x-rays, and differential non-linearity of 12% have been achieved. Low mass ({approximately}0.6% of a radiation length) detector construction techniques have been developed. The second readout system uses rows of chevron shaped cathode pads to perform geometrical charge division. Position resolution (FWHM) of about 1% of the readout spacing and differential non-linearity of 10% for 5.4 keV x-rays have been achieved. A review of other interpolating methods is included. Low mass cathode construction techniques are described. In conclusion, applications and future developments are discussed. 54 refs.

  9. Optical readout uncooled infrared imaging detector using knife-edge filter operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Q; MIAO Z; GUO Z; DONG F; XIONG Z; WU X; CHEN D; LI C; JIAO B

    2007-01-01

    An optical readout uncooled infrared (IR) imaging detector of bimaterial cantilever array using knife-edge filter operation(KEFO) is demonstrated. The angle change of each cantilever in a focal plane array (FPA) can be simultaneously detected with a resolution of 10-5 degree. A deformation magnifying substrate-free micro-cantilever unit with multi-fold interval metallized legs is specially designed and modeled. A FPA with 160× 160 pixels is fabricated and thermal images with noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 400 mK are obtained by this imaging detector.

  10. Optically readout write once read many memory with single active organic layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Viet Cuong; Lee, Pooi See, E-mail: pslee@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-01-18

    An optically readable write once read many memory (WORM) in Ag/Poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH PPV)/ITO is demonstrated in this work. Utilising characteristics of the organic light emitting diode structure of Ag/MEH PPV/ITO and electrochemical metallization of Ag, a WORM with light emitting capability can be realised. The simple fabrication process and multifunction capability of the device can be useful for future wearable optoelectronics and photomemory applications, where fast and parallel readout can be achieved by photons.

  11. Electro-Optical Data Acquisition and Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electro-Optical Data Acquisition and Tracking System (EDATS) dynamically tracks and measures target signatures. It consists of an instrumentation van integrated...

  12. All-optical initialization, readout, and coherent preparation of single silicon-vacancy spins in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Lachlan J; Jahnke, Kay D; Metsch, Mathias H; Sipahigil, Alp; Binder, Jan M; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi; Lukin, Mikhail D; Hemmer, Philip; Jelezko, Fedor

    2014-12-31

    The silicon-vacancy (SiV-) color center in diamond has attracted attention because of its unique optical properties. It exhibits spectral stability and indistinguishability that facilitate efficient generation of photons capable of demonstrating quantum interference. Here we show optical initialization and readout of electronic spin in a single SiV- center with a spin relaxation time of T1=2.4±0.2  ms. Coherent population trapping (CPT) is used to demonstrate coherent preparation of dark superposition states with a spin coherence time of T2⋆=35±3  ns. This is fundamentally limited by orbital relaxation, and an understanding of this process opens the way to extend coherence by engineering interactions with phonons. Hyperfine structure is observed in CPT measurements with the 29Si isotope which allows access to nuclear spin. These results establish the SiV- center as a solid-state spin-photon interface.

  13. SALT, a dedicated readout chip for high precision tracking silicon strip detectors at the LHCb Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugiel, Sz.; Dasgupta, R.; Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kuczynska, M.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.; Szumlak, T.

    2016-02-01

    The Upstream Tracker (UT) silicon strip detector, one of the central parts of the tracker system of the modernised LHCb experiment, will use a new 128-channel readout ASIC called SALT. It will extract and digitise analogue signals from the UT sensors, perform digital signal processing and transmit a serial output data. The SALT is being designed in CMOS 130 nm process and uses a novel architecture comprising of analog front-end and fast (40 MSps) ultra-low power (designed, fabricated and tested. A prototype of an 8-channel version of the SALT chip, comprising all important functionalities was also designed and fabricated. The architecture and design of the SALT, together with the selected preliminary tests results, are presented.

  14. Wafer-level vacuum packaging for an optical readout bi-material cantilever infrared FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyu; Zhou, Xiaoxiong; Yu, Xiaomei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the design and fabrication of an uncooled infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) on quartz substrate and the wafer-level vacuum packaging for the IR FPA in view of an optical readout method. This FPA is composed of bi-material cantilever array which fabricated by the Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, and the wafer-level packaging of the IR FPA is realized based on AuSn solder bonding technique. The interface of soldering is observed by scan electron microscope (SEM), which indicates that bonding interface is smooth and with no bubbles. The air leakage rate of packaged FPA is measured to be 1.3×10-9 atm·cc/s.

  15. Optical lock-in particle tracking in optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Michael A; Bowen, Warwick P

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a lock-in particle tracking scheme in optical tweezers based on stroboscopic modulation of an illuminating optical field. This scheme is found to evade low frequency noise sources while otherwise producing an equivalent position measurement to continuous measurement. This was demonstrated, and found to yield on average 20dB of noise suppression in the frequency range 10-5000 Hz, where low frequency laser noise and electronic noise was significant, and 35 dB of noise suppression in the range 550-710 kHz where laser relaxation oscillations introduced laser noise. The setup is simple, and compatible with any trapping optics.

  16. Multibeam optical apparatus and method for tracking control for an optical disk having a set of tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reno, Charles W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A multitrack optical disk has two or more circular or spiral tracks, which are recorded or played back in simultaneous sets for high data rates. Tracking is accomplished by sets of first and second tracking pads, which lie partially on and partially off the track paths. The amount of inter-track space required to accommodate the track pads is reduced by placing the overlap of the tracking pads in the same inter-track space, and by tracking any additional simultaneous tracks in excess of two by mechanical coupling with the first two.

  17. Automated Mulitple Object Optical Tracking and Recognition System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OPTRA proposes to develop an optical tracking system that is capable of recognizing and tracking up to 50 different objects within an approximately 2 degree x 3...

  18. Robust Optical User Motion Tracking Using a Kalman Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Dorfmüller-Ulhaas, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Optical tracking has a great future in applications of virtual and augmented reality. It will assist to enhance the acceptance of virtual reality user interfaces, since optical tracking allows wireless interaction and precise tracking. Existing commercial motion capture systems are neither working reliably in real-time. Additionally, only few optical trackers can smooth and predict motion and include a motion estimator supplying similar results to the presented approach. A Kalman filter formu...

  19. Study on the MWIR imaging ability of optical readout bimaterial microcantilever FPA uncooled infrared imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bingbing; Feng, Yun; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan; Liu, Ming; Chu, Xuhong; Yu, Xiaomei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze and experimentally demonstrate the medium-wave infrared (MWIR) imaging ability based on optical readout bimaterial microcantilever focal plane array (FPA) uncooled infrared imaging system. Multiband infrared imaging technology has been a hotspot in the field of infrared imaging. In the infrared band, medium-wave infrared (3 5 μm) has minimal attenuation of atmospheric infrared window, and it also covers many atomic and molecular absorption peak. Imaging study on MWIR radiation source also appears particularly important. First of all, we introduce the bimaterial microcantilever IR sensing principle and the fabrication of the bimaterial microcantilever FPA. Secondly, the paper introduces the theory of the optical-thermal-mechnical reading based on FPA. Finally, the experimental platform was constructed to conduct the MWIR imaging experiment. The medium-wave infrared radiation source consists of a continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator (OPO) that is pumped by a polarization-maintained, single-mode fiber amplifier. The length of the 50mm periodically polarized LiNbO3 crystal (5%MgO) is used as the nonlinear crystal. The stable cavity of the ring is designed, and the output of the 3 4 μm band is realized by the design of the nonlinear crystal polarization period. And the FPA employed in our experiment contains 256×256 pixels fabricated on a glass substrate, whose working bandwidth is covering the three IR atmospheric windows. The experimental results show that the bimaterial microcantilever FPA has a good imaging ability to the MWIR sources.

  20. A 130 nm CMOS mixed mode front end readout chip for silicon strip tracking at the future linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, T.H., E-mail: pham@lpnhe.in2p3.f [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Charpy, A.; Ciobanu, C. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Comerma, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Dept E.C.M/Dept. Electronica/ICC-Diagonal 647, planta 6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); David, J.; Dhellot, M. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Dieguez, A.; Gascon, D. [Universitat de Barcelona, Dept E.C.M/Dept. Electronica/ICC-Diagonal 647, planta 6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Genat, J.F.; Savoy Navarro, A.; Sefri, R. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2010-11-01

    A 130 nm mixed (analog and digital) CMOS chip intended to read silicon strip detectors for future linear collider experiments was developed. Currently under testing, this chip has been optimized for a silicon micro-strip tracking device. It includes 88 channels of a full analog signal processing chain with the corresponding digital control and readout. Every analog channel includes (i) a low noise charge amplifier and integration with long pulse shaping, (ii) an eight by eight positions analog sampler for both storing successive events and reconstructing the full pulse shape, and (iii) a sparsifier performing analog sum of three adjacent inputs to decide whether there is signal or not. The whole system is controlled by the digital part, which allows configuring all the reference currents and voltages, drives the control signals to the analog memories, records the timing and channel information and subsequently performs the conversion to digital values of samples. The total surface of the circuit is 10x5 mm{sup 2}, with each analog channel occupying an area of 105x3500 {mu}m{sup 2}, and the remaining space of about 9000x700 {mu}m{sup 2} being filled by the analog channels on the silicon.

  1. The ALICE TPC, a large 3-dimensional tracking device with fast readout for ultra-high multiplicity events

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00249819; Appelshauser, H.; Bablok, S.; Bialas, N.; Bolgen, R.; Bonnes, U.; Bramm, R.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Campagnolo, R.; Christiansen, P.; Dobrin, A.; Engster, C.; Fehlker, D.; Foka, Y.; Frankenfeld, U.; Gaardhoje, J.J.; Garabatos, C.; Glassel, P.; Gonzalez Gutierrez, C.; Gros, P.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Helstrup, H.; Hoch, M.; Ivanov, M.; Janik, R.; Junique, A.; Kalweit, A.; Keidel, R.; Kniege, S.; Kowalski, M.; Larsen, D.T.; Lesenechal, Y.; Lenoir, P.; Lindegaard, N.; Lippmann, C.; Mager, M.; Mast, M.; Matyja, A.; Munkejord, M.; Musa, L.; Nielsen, B.S.; Nikolic, V.; Oeschler, H.; Olsen, E.K.; Oskarsson, A.; Osterman, L.; Pikna, M.; Rehman, A.; Renault, G.; Renfordt, R.; Rossegger, S.; Rohrich, D.; Roed, K.; Richter, M.; Rueshmann, G.; Rybicki, A.; Sann, H.; Schmidt, H.R.; Siska, M.; Sitar, B.; Soegaard, C.; Soltveit, H.K.; Soyk, D.; Stachel, J.; Stelzer, H.; Stenlund, E.; Stock, R.; Strmen, P.; Szarka, I.; Ullaland, K.; Vranic, D.; Veenhof, R.; Westergaard, J.; Wiechula, J.; Windelband, B.

    2010-01-01

    The design, construction, and commissioning of the ALICE Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) is described. It is the main device for pattern recognition, tracking, and identification of charged particles in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. The TPC is cylindrical in shape with a volume close to 90 m^3 and is operated in a 0.5 T solenoidal magnetic field parallel to its axis. In this paper we describe in detail the design considerations for this detector for operation in the extreme multiplicity environment of central Pb--Pb collisions at LHC energy. The implementation of the resulting requirements into hardware (field cage, read-out chambers, electronics), infrastructure (gas and cooling system, laser-calibration system), and software led to many technical innovations which are described along with a presentation of all the major components of the detector, as currently realized. We also report on the performance achieved after completion of the first round of stand-alone calibration runs and demonstrate result...

  2. Field weighting model for tracking-integrated optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelwright, Brian; Angel, Roger; Coughenour, Blake; Hammer, Kimberly; Geary, Andrew; Stalcup, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The emergent field of tracking-integrated optics enables a potentially low cost concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) implementation, where single-axis module tracking is complemented by an additional degree of freedom within the module [1,2,3,4,5]. Gross module tracking can take on multiple configurations, the most common being rotation about a polar or horizontal North-South oriented axis. Polar-axis tracking achieves >95% sunlight collection compared to dual-axis tracking[6], leaving the tracking-integrated optics to compensate for +/-23.5° seasonal variations. The collection efficiency of N-S horizontal axis tracking is latitude-dependent, with ˜90% collection relative to dual-axis tracking at 32.2° latitude. Horizontal tracking at higher latitudes shifts an increasing burden to the tracking-integrated optics, which must operate between two incidence angle extremes: summer solstice sunrise/sunset to winter solstice noon. An important aspect of tracking-integrated lens design is choosing a suitable field weighting to appropriately account for annual DNI received at each angle of incidence. We present a field weighting model, generalized for polar or horizontal module tracking at any latitude, which shows excellent agreement with measured insolation data. This model is particularly helpful for the design of tracking-integrated optics for horizontally-tracked modules, where the correct field weighting is asymmetric and significantly biased away from the normal incidence.

  3. Quantitative read-out of Al2O3:C,Mg-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors using a commercial confocal microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Greilich, Steffen; Niklas, Martin; Lauer, Florian; Bestvater, Felix; Jäkel, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTD) show great potential for applications in ion-beam therapy research, such as dosimetry, advanced beam characterization, in-vivo use or as radiobiological assay. A essential feature of FNTDs is their ability to assess the energy loss of single ions yielding for example LET estimations. This article describes the basic characterisations of FNTDs and our read-out system (a Zeiss LSM710 confocal laser scanning microscope) to enable quantative measurements of energy loss.

  4. A GEM-based dose imaging detector with optical readout for proton radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klyachko, A.V., E-mail: aklyachk@indiana.edu [Indiana University Cyclotron Operations, Indiana University Integrated Science and Accelerator Technology Hall, 2401 Milo. B. Sampson Ln., Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Moskvin, V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Nichiporov, D.F.; Solberg, K.A. [Indiana University Cyclotron Operations, Indiana University Integrated Science and Accelerator Technology Hall, 2401 Milo. B. Sampson Ln., Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    New techniques in proton radiation therapy and advances in beam delivery systems design such as beam scanning require accurate 2D dosimetry systems to verify the delivered dose distribution. Dose imaging detectors based on gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are capable of providing high sensitivity, improved dose measurement linearity, position resolution, fast response and accurate characterization of depth-dose distributions. In this work, we report on the development of a GEM-based dose imaging detector with optical readout using a CCD camera. A 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} detector has been tested in a 205 MeV proton beam in single- and double-GEM configurations. The detector demonstrates linearity in dose rate up to 100 Gy/min and position resolution ({sigma}) of 0.42 mm. Transverse non-uniformity of the detector response is {<=}10% before correction and the stability of the detector output throughout the day is within {+-}1%, with day-to-day reproducibility of about 10%. The depth-dose response of the detector is close to that of a wide-aperture air-filled ionization chamber and is in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Development of a new laser-line and CCD based optical-CT scanner for the readout of 3D radiation dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, A E; Maris, T G; Zacharakis, G; Ripoll, J; Varveris, C; Damilakis, J, E-mail: apapadak@edu.med.uoc.g

    2010-11-01

    We present initial results on the comparison of the dose readout from a three dimensional polymer gel dosimeter using two different optical-CT systems; i) a common wide field and a wide area detector optical-CT system and ii) a new 'laser-line' and wide area detector based optical-CT system. The findings presented herein highlight the advantage of the laser based over the wide field optical-CT concept for the readout of scattering 3D dosimeters. Moreover, the new 'laser-line' based optical-CT system overcomes the disadvantage of the long acquisition times required by the existing laser-based instruments.

  6. Compact Frontend-Electronics and Bidirectional 3.3 Gbps Optical Datalink for Fast Proportional Chamber Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Lüders, S

    2001-01-01

    The 9600 channels of the multi-wire proportional chamber of the H1 experiment at HERA have to be read out within 96 ns and made available to the trigger system. The tight spatial conditions at the rear end flange require a compact bidirectional readout electronics with minimal power consumption and dead material. A solution using 40 identical optical link modules, each transferring the trigger information with a physical rate of 4 x 832 Mbps via optical fibers, has been developed and commisioned. The analog pulses from the chamber can be monitored and the synchronization to the global HERA clock signal is ensured.

  7. Accuracy of optical navigation systems for automatic head surgery: optical tracking versus optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Díaz, Jesús; Riva, Mauro H.; Majdani, Omid; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    The choice of a navigation system highly depends on the medical intervention and its accuracy demands. The most commonly used systems for image guided surgery (IGS) are based on optical and magnetic tracking systems. This paper compares two optical systems in terms of accuracy: state of the art triangulation-based optical tracking (OT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). We use an experimental setup with a combined OCT and cutting laser, and an external OT. We simulate a robotic assisted surgical intervention, including planning, navigation, and processing, and compare the accuracies reached at a specific target with each navigation system.

  8. Proteolytic assays on quantum-dot-modified paper substrates using simple optical readout platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryayeva, Eleonora; Algar, W Russ

    2013-09-17

    Paper-based assays are a promising diagnostic format for point-of-care applications, field deployment, and other low-resource settings. To date, the majority of efforts to integrate nanomaterials with paper-based assays have utilized gold nanoparticles. Here, we show that semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), in combination with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), are also suitable nanomaterials for developing paper-based assays. Paper fibers were chemically modified with thiol ligands to immobilize CdSeS/ZnS QDs, the QDs were self-assembled with dye-labeled peptides to generate efficient FRET, and steady-state and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) were used for characterization. Peptides were selected as substrates for three different proteases and a series of kinetic assays for proteolytic activity was carried out, including multiplexed assays and pro-enzyme activation assays. Quantitative results were obtained within 5-60 min at levels as low as 1-2 nM of protease. These assays were possible using simple optical readout platforms that did not negate the low cost, ease of use, and overall accessibility advantages of paper-based assays. A violet light-emitting diode (LED) excitation source and color imaging with either a digital camera, consumer webcam, or smartphone camera were sufficient for analysis on the basis of a red/green color intensity ratio. At most, a universal serial bus (USB) connection to a computer was required and the instrumentation cost orders of magnitude less than that typically utilized for in vitro bioanalyses with QDs. This work demonstrates that QDs are valuable probes for developing a new generation of paper-based diagnostics.

  9. Computer program TRACK_VISION for simulating optical appearance of etched tracks in CR-39 nuclear track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.

    2008-04-01

    A computer program called TRACK_VISION for determining the optical appearances of tracks in nuclear track materials resulted from light-ion irradiation and subsequent chemical etching was described. A previously published software, TRACK_TEST, was the starting point for the present software TRACK_VISION, which contained TRACK_TEST as its subset. The programming steps were outlined. Descriptions of the program were given, including the built-in V functions for the commonly employed nuclear track material commercially known as CR-39 (polyallyldiglycol carbonate) irradiated by alpha particles. Program summaryProgram title: TRACK_VISION Catalogue identifier: AEAF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4084 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 117 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90 Computer: Pentium PC Operating system: Windows 95+ RAM: 256 MB Classification: 17.5, 18 External routines: The entire code must be linked with the MSFLIB library. MSFLib is a collection of C and C++ modules which provides a general framework for processing IBM's AFP datastream. MSFLIB is specific to Visual Fortran (Digital, Compaq or Intel flavors). Nature of problem: Nuclear track detectors are commonly used for radon measurements through studying the tracks generated by the incident alpha particles. Optical microscopes are often used for this purpose but the process is relatively tedious and time consuming. Several automatic and semi-automatic systems have been developed in order to facilitate determination of track densities. In all these automatic systems, the optical appearance of the tracks is important. However, not much has been done so far to obtaining the

  10. Description of an Advantageous Optical Label-Free Biosensing Interferometric Read-Out Method to Measure Biological Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Holgado

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we report a new, simple, and reliable optical read-out detection method able to assess Rotavirus present in human sera as well as in the viral pollution sources. It is based on the interference of two interferometers used as biophotonic transducers. The method significantly improves the optical label-free biosensing response measuring both, the concentration of the AgR and its corresponding size. Two different immunoassays were carried out: Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA, and the recognition by its antibody (anti-BSA; and Rotavirus (AgR and the recognition by its antibody (anti-AgR. In the cases studied, and using as model interferometer a simple Fabry-Perot transducer, we demonstrate a biosensing enhancement of two orders of magnitude in the Limit of Detection (LoD. In fact, this read-out optical method may have significant implications to enhance other optical label-free photonic transducers reported in the scientific literature.

  11. Optical tracking of nanoscale particles in microscale environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, P. P.; Liddle, J. A.; Stavis, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    The trajectories of nanoscale particles through microscale environments record useful information about both the particles and the environments. Optical microscopes provide efficient access to this information through measurements of light in the far field from nanoparticles. Such measurements necessarily involve trade-offs in tracking capabilities. This article presents a measurement framework, based on information theory, that facilitates a more systematic understanding of such trade-offs to rationally design tracking systems for diverse applications. This framework includes the degrees of freedom of optical microscopes, which determine the limitations of tracking measurements in theory. In the laboratory, tracking systems are assemblies of sources and sensors, optics and stages, and nanoparticle emitters. The combined characteristics of such systems determine the limitations of tracking measurements in practice. This article reviews this tracking hardware with a focus on the essential functions of nanoparticles as optical emitters and microenvironmental probes. Within these theoretical and practical limitations, experimentalists have implemented a variety of tracking systems with different capabilities. This article reviews a selection of apparatuses and techniques for tracking multiple and single particles by tuning illumination and detection, and by using feedback and confinement to improve the measurements. Prior information is also useful in many tracking systems and measurements, which apply across a broad spectrum of science and technology. In the context of the framework and review of apparatuses and techniques, this article reviews a selection of applications, with particle diffusion serving as a prelude to tracking measurements in biological, fluid, and material systems, fabrication and assembly processes, and engineered devices. In so doing, this review identifies trends and gaps in particle tracking that might influence future research. PMID:27213022

  12. Two-Photon-Absorption Scheme for Optical Beam Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Gerardo G.; Farr, William H.

    2011-01-01

    A new optical beam tracking approach for free-space optical communication links using two-photon absorption (TPA) in a high-bandgap detector material was demonstrated. This tracking scheme is part of the canonical architecture described in the preceding article. TPA is used to track a long-wavelength transmit laser while direct absorption on the same sensor simultaneously tracks a shorter-wavelength beacon. The TPA responsivity was measured for silicon using a PIN photodiode at a laser beacon wavelength of 1,550 nm. As expected, the responsivity shows a linear dependence with incident power level. The responsivity slope is 4.5 x 10(exp -7) A/W2. Also, optical beam spots from the 1,550-nm laser beacon were characterized on commercial charge coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imagers with as little as 13.7 microWatts of optical power (see figure). This new tracker technology offers an innovative solution to reduce system complexity, improve transmit/receive isolation, improve optical efficiency, improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and reduce cost for free-space optical communications transceivers.

  13. Optical Alignment System for the PHENIX Muon Tracking Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Murata, J; Armendariz, R L; Brooks, M L; Horaguchi, T; Kamihara, N; Kobayashi, H; Lee, D M; Shibata, T A; Sondheim, W E

    2003-01-01

    A micron-precision optical alignment system (OASys) for the PHENIX muon tracking chambers is developed. To ensure the required mass resolution of vector meson detection, the relative alignment between three tracking station chambers must be monitored with a precision of 25$\\mu$m. The OASys is a straightness monitoring system comprised of a light source, lens and CCD camera, used for determining the initial placement as well as for monitoring the time dependent movement of the chambers on a micron scale.

  14. Readout strategy of an electro-optical coupled PET detector for time-of-flight PET/MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, M. F.; Olcott, P. D.; Levin, C. S.

    2013-10-01

    Combining PET with MRI in a single system provides clinicians with complementary molecular and anatomical information. However, existing integrated PET/MRI systems do not have time-of-flight (ToF) PET capabilities. This work describes an MRI-compatible front-end electronic system with ToF capabilities. The approach employs a fast arrival-time pickoff comparator to digitize the timing information, and a laser diode to drive a 10 m fiber-optic cable to optically transmit asynchronous timing information to a photodiode receiver readout system. The FWHM jitter of the comparator and this electo-optical link is 11.5 ps in response to a fast digital pulse. When configured with LYSO scintillation crystals and Hamamatsu MPPC silicon photo-multipliers the comparator and electro-optical link achieved a 511 keV coincidence time resolution of 254.7 ps +/- 8.0 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 crystals and 166.5 +/- 2.5 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 crystals.

  15. First demonstration of THGEM/GAPD-matrix optical readout in two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector in Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Bondar, A; Dolgov, A; Grebenuk, A; Shemyakina, E; Sokolov, A; Breskin, A; Thers, D

    2013-01-01

    The multi-channel optical readout of a THGEM multiplier coupled to a matrix of 3x3 Geiger-mode APDs (GAPDs) was demonstrated in a two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) in Ar. The GAPDs recorded THGEM-hole avalanches in the Near Infrared (NIR). At an avalanche charge gain of 160, the yield of the combined THGEM/GAPD-matrix multiplier amounted at ~80 photoelectrons per 20 keV X-ray absorbed in the liquid phase. A spatial resolution of 2.5 mm (FWHM) has been measured for the impinging X-rays. This technique has potential applications in coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and dark matter search experiments.

  16. First demonstration of THGEM/GAPD-matrix optical readout in a two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector in Ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov Street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Buzulutskov, A., E-mail: a.f.buzulutskov@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov Street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Dolgov, A. [Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov Street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Grebenuk, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Shemyakina, E.; Sokolov, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov Street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Breskin, A. [Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Thers, D. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Université de Nantes, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2013-12-21

    The multi-channel optical readout of a THGEM multiplier coupled to a matrix of 3×3 Geiger-mode APDs (GAPDs) was demonstrated in a two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) in Ar. The GAPDs recorded THGEM-hole avalanches in the Near Infrared (NIR) spectral range. At an avalanche charge gain of 160, the yield of the combined THGEM/GAPD-matrix multiplier amounted to ∼80 photoelectrons per 20 keV X-ray absorbed in the liquid phase. A spatial resolution of 2.5 mm (FWHM) has been measured for the impinging X-rays. This technique has potential applications in coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and in dark matter search experiments.

  17. Image quality improvement by the structured light illumination method in an optical readout cantilever array infrared imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yun; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Yu, Xiaomei; Kong, Lingqin; Ma, Wei; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    The structured light illumination method is applied in an optical readout uncooled infrared imaging system to improve the IR image quality. The unavoidable nonuniform distribution of the initial bending angles of the bimaterial cantilever pixels in the focal plane array (FPA) can be well compensated by this method. An ordinary projector is used to generate structured lights of different intensity distribution. The projected light is divided into patches of rectangular regions, and the brightness of each region can be set automatically according to the deflection angles of the FPA and the light intensity focused on the imaging plane. By this method, the FPA image on the CCD plane can be much more uniform and the image quality of the IR target improved significantly. A comparative experiment is designed to verify the effectiveness. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed structured light illumination method outperforms the conventional one, especially when it is difficult to perfect the FPA fabrication.

  18. An optical readout TPC (O-TPC) for studies in nuclear astrophysics with gamma-ray beams at HI{gamma}S{sup 1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, M; Zimmerman, W R; Kading, T J; Seo, P-N; Young, A H [LNS at Avery Point, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT 06340-6097 (United States); Ahmed, M W; Stave, S C; Henshaw, S S; Martel, P P; Weller, H R [TUNL, Dept. of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Breskin, A; Chechik, R [Dept. of Particle Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Bromberger, B; Dangendorf, V; Tittelmeier, K [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Delbar, Th [Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); III, R H France [Georgia College and State University, CBX 82, Milledgeville, GA 31061 (United States); McDonald, J E R, E-mail: moshe.gai@yale.edu [Dept. of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8124 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We report on the construction, tests, calibrations and commissioning of an Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber (O-TPC) detector operating with a CO{sub 2}(80%) + N{sub 2}(20%) gas mixture at 100 and 150 Torr. It was designed to measure the cross sections of several key nuclear reactions involved in stellar evolution. In particular, a study of the rate of formation of oxygen and carbon during the process of helium burning will be performed by exposing the chamber gas to intense nearly mono-energetic gamma-ray beams at the High Intensity Gamma Source (HI{gamma}S) facility. The O-TPC has a sensitive target-drift volume of 30x30x21 cm{sup 3}. Ionization electrons drift towards a double parallel-grid avalanche multiplier, yielding charge multiplication and light emission. Avalanche-induced photons from N{sub 2} emission are collected, intensified and recorded with a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera, providing two-dimensional track images. The event's time projection (third coordinate) and the deposited energy are recorded by photomultipliers and by the TPC charge-signal, respectively. A dedicated VME-based data acquisition system and associated data analysis tools were developed to record and analyze these data. The O-TPC has been tested and calibrated with 3.183 MeV alpha-particles emitted by a {sup 148}Gd source placed within its volume with a measured energy resolution of 3.0%. Tracks of alpha and {sup 12}C particles from the dissociation of {sup 16}O and of three alpha-particles from the dissociation of {sup 12}C have been measured during initial in-beam test experiments performed at the HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University. The full detection system and its performance are described and the results of the preliminary in-beam test experiments are reported.

  19. An optical processor for object recognition and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, J.; Udomkesmalee, S.

    1987-01-01

    The design and development of a miniaturized optical processor that performs real time image correlation are described. The optical correlator utilizes the Vander Lugt matched spatial filter technique. The correlation output, a focused beam of light, is imaged onto a CMOS photodetector array. In addition to performing target recognition, the device also tracks the target. The hardware, composed of optical and electro-optical components, occupies only 590 cu cm of volume. A complete correlator system would also include an input imaging lens. This optical processing system is compact, rugged, requires only 3.5 watts of operating power, and weighs less than 3 kg. It represents a major achievement in miniaturizing optical processors. When considered as a special-purpose processing unit, it is an attractive alternative to conventional digital image recognition processing. It is conceivable that the combined technology of both optical and ditital processing could result in a very advanced robot vision system.

  20. Vol. 30 - A Novel Data Acquisition System Based on Fast Optical Links and Universal Readout Boards

    CERN Document Server

    Korcyl, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Various scale measurement systems are composed of the sensors providing data through the data acquisition system to the archiving facility. The scale of such systems is determined by the number of sensors that require processing and can vary from few up to hundreds of thousands. The number and the type of sensors impose several requirements on the data acquisition system like readout frequency, measurement precision and online analysis algorithms. The most challenging application s are the large scale experiments in nuclear and particle physics . This thesis presents a concept , construction and tests of a modular and scalable, tree - structured architecture of a data acquisition system. The system is composed out of two logical elemen ts: endpoints which are the modules providing data and hubs that concentrate the data streams from the endpoints and provide connectivity with the rest of the system. Those two logica...

  1. Optical CT scanner for in-air readout of gels for external radiation beam 3D dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Daniel; Rutten, Thomas P; Shepherd, Justin; Bezak, Eva

    2012-06-21

    Optical CT scanners for a 3D readout of externally irradiated radiosensitive hydrogels currently require the use of a refractive index (RI) matching liquid bath to obtain suitable optical ray paths through the gel sample to the detector. The requirement for a RI matching liquid bath has been negated by the design of a plastic cylindrical gel container that provides parallel beam geometry through the gel sample for the majority of the projection. The design method can be used for various hydrogels. Preliminary test results for the prototype laser beam scanner with ferrous xylenol-orange gel show geometric distortion of 0.2 mm maximum, spatial resolution limited to beam spot size of about 0.4 mm and 0.8% noise (1 SD) for a uniform irradiation. Reconstruction of a star pattern irradiated through the cylinder walls demonstrates the suitability for external beam applications. The extremely simple and cost-effective construction of this optical CT scanner, together with the simplicity of scanning gel samples without RI matching fluid increases the feasibility of using 3D gel dosimetry for clinical external beam dose verifications.

  2. Tracking nanoparticles in an optical microscope using caustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Eann A [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Whelan, Maurice P [Nanotechnology and Molecular Imaging Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, European Commission DG Joint Research Center, 21021 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy)

    2008-03-12

    An elegant method is proposed and demonstrated for tracking the location and movement of nanoparticles in an optical microscope using the optical phenomenon of caustics. A simple and reversible adjustment to the microscope generates caustics several orders of magnitude larger than the particles. The method offers a simple and relatively inexpensive method for visualizing such phenomena as the formation of self-assembled monolayers and the interaction of nanoparticles with chemically functionalized surfaces.

  3. Coupling of an enzymatic biofuel cell to an electrochemical cell for self-powered glucose sensing with optical readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyou, Piyanut; Conzuelo, Felipe; Sliozberg, Kirill; Vivekananthan, Jeevanthi; Contin, Andrea; Pöller, Sascha; Plumeré, Nicolas; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    A miniaturized biofuel cell (BFC) is powering an electrolyser invoking a glucose concentration dependent formation of a dye which can be determined spectrophotometrically. This strategy enables instrument free analyte detection using the analyte-dependent BFC current for triggering an optical read-out system. A screen-printed electrode (SPE) was used for the immobilization of the enzymes glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and bilirubin oxidase (BOD) for the biocatalytic oxidation of glucose and reduction of molecular oxygen, respectively. The miniaturized BFC was switched-on using small sample volumes (ca. 60 μL) leading to an open-circuit voltage of 567 mV and a maximal power density of (6.8±0.6) μW cm(-2). The BFC power was proportional to the glucose concentration in a range from 0.1 to 1.0 mM (R(2)=0.991). In order to verify the potential instrument-free analyte detection the BFC was directly connected to an electrochemical cell comprised of an optically-transparent SPE modified with methylene green (MG). The reduction of the electrochromic reporter compound invoked by the voltage and current flow applied by the BFC let to MG discoloration, thus allowing the detection of glucose.

  4. Comparative accuracy of radiostereometric and optical tracking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedgley, Angela E; Birmingham, Trevor; Jenkyn, Thomas R

    2009-06-19

    This study aims to quantify and compare the accuracy of traditional radiostereometric analysis (RSA), fluoroscopic RSA (fRSA), and optical tracking systems. Three phantoms were constructed, each having three stainless steel spheres and three reflective markers. One phantom was mounted to the base of a precision cross-slide table, one to the base of a precision rotation table, and the third was mounted to each moveable tabletop. Two dial-gauges, rigidly mounted to the cross-slide table and rotation table, quantified translations and rotations. Two fluoroscopy units placed orthogonally tracked the steel spheres while a four-camera optical motion capture system tracked the reflective markers in three-dimensional space. RSA was performed with both digital radiography and fluoroscopy. Three axes of translation were tested: parallel to one fluoroscopy image, parallel to the other fluoroscopy image, and at approximately 45 degrees to each image. One axis of rotation was tested. Intraclass correlation coefficients indicated excellent agreement between the actual (dial-gauge) and measured translations for all modalities (ICCs>0.99) and excellent agreement between actual and measured rotations for RSA and fRSA (ICCs>0.99). Standard errors of measurement ranged from 0.032 mm and 0.121 degrees for RSA, to 0.040 mm and 0.229 degrees for fRSA, and to 0.109 mm and 0.613 degrees for optical tracking. Differences between actual and measured translations along the 45 degrees axis were significantly smaller than the two parallel axes. These findings suggest that under ideal conditions, accuracy of fRSA is comparable to traditional RSA, and superior to optical tracking. Accuracy is highest when measured at 45 degrees to the fluoroscopy units.

  5. Development of emulsion track expansion techniques for optical-microscopy-observation of low-velocity ion tracks with ranges beyond optical resolution limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naka, T. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Natsume, M. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)], E-mail: natsume@flab.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Niwa, K.; Hoshino, K.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Sato, O. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2007-11-01

    We succeeded to observe tracks of low-velocity Kr ions, having originally ranges below optical resolution, in a fine grain nuclear emulsion with an optical microscope after expanding the emulsion along the incident direction. This opens up the possibility of tracking low-velocity nuclear recoils from massive dark matter particles using optical microscope scanning systems.

  6. Novel Readout Method for Molecular Diagnostic Assays Based on Optical Measurements of Magnetic Nanobead Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Antunes, Paula Soares Martins; Bejhed, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate detection of DNA coils formed from a Vibrio cholerae DNA target at picomolar concentrations using a novel optomagnetic approach exploiting the dynamic behavior and optical anisotropy of magnetic nanobead (MNB) assemblies. We establish that the complex second harmonic optical...... transmission spectra of MNB suspensions measured upon application of a weak uniaxial AC magnetic field correlate well with the rotation dynamics of the individual MNBs. Adding a target analyte to the solution leads to the formation of permanent MNB clusters, namely, to the suppression of the dynamic MNB...... behavior. We prove that the optical transmission spectra are highly sensitive to the formation of permanent MNB clusters and, thereby to the target analyte concentration. As a specific clinically relevant diagnostic case, we detect DNA coils formed via padlock probe recognition and isothermal rolling...

  7. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe (San Francisco, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  8. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.

    1997-11-25

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its ``sensor end`` biological ``binding partners`` (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor. 9 figs.

  9. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe (San Francisco, CA); Albertson, Donna G. (Lafayette, CA)

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  10. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe (San Francisco, CA); Albertson, Donna G. (Lafayette, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  11. Optical fiber sensor for tracking line-focus solar collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiczer, J J

    1982-08-01

    Currently there is a need to provide an alignment monitor feedback signal to the tracking mechanism of line-focus trough-type concentrating solar collectors. We report here on the novel use of an optical fiber as a distributed integrating sensor to generate such a signal. Experiments have shown that 3.0 m of optical fiber exposed to concentrated sunlight equal to ~40 suns in intensity will generate 1 microA of signal current in a silicon photodiode. These data were measured in an experimental line-focus solar collector using solar flux conditions common to this type of collector.

  12. Lab-on-a-disc agglutination assay for protein detection by optomagnetic readout and optical imaging using nano- and micro-sized magnetic beads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Rokon; Burger, Robert; Donolato, Marco;

    2016-01-01

    We present a biosensing platform for the detection of proteins based on agglutination of aptamer coated magnetic nano- or microbeads. The assay, from sample to answer, is integrated on an automated, low-cost microfluidic disc platform. This ensures fast and reliable results due to a minimum...... of manual steps involved. The detection of the target protein was achieved in two ways: (1) optomagnetic readout using magnetic nanobeads (MNBs); (2) optical imaging using magnetic microbeads (MMBs). The optomagnetic readout of agglutination is based on optical measurement of the dynamics of MNB aggregates...... whereas the imaging method is based on direct visualization and quantification of the average size of MMB aggregates. By enhancing magnetic particle agglutination via application of strong magnetic field pulses, we obtained identical limits of detection of 25 pM with the same sample-to-answer time (15 min...

  13. Radiation hardness and lifetime studies of LEDs and VCSELs for the optical readout of the ATLAS SCT

    CERN Document Server

    Beringer, J; Mommsen, R K; Nickerson, R B; Weidberg, A R; Monnier, E; Hou, H Q; Lear, K L

    1999-01-01

    We study the radiation hardness and the lifetime of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser diodes (VCSELs) in the context of the development of the optical readout for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) at LHC. About 170 LEDs from two different manufacturers and about 130 VCSELs were irradiated with neutron and proton fluences equivalent to (and in some cases more than twice as high as) the combined neutral and charged particle fluence of about 5x10 sup 1 sup 4 n (1 MeV eq. in GaAs)/cm sup 2 expected in the ATLAS inner detector. We report on the radiation damage and the conditions required for its partial annealing under forward bias, we calculate radiation damage constants, and we present post-irradiation failure rates for LEDs and VCSELs. The lifetime after irradiation was investigated by operating the diodes at an elevated temperature of 50 degree sign C for several months, resulting in operating times corresponding to up to 70 years of operation in the ATLAS SCT. From o...

  14. Pairwise entanglement and readout of atomic-ensemble and optical wave-packet modes in traveling-wave Raman interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wasilewski, W; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    We analyze quantum entanglement of Stokes light and atomic electronic polarization excited during single-pass, linear-regime, stimulated Raman scattering in terms of optical wave-packet modes and atomic-ensemble spatial modes. The output of this process is confirmed to be decomposable into multiple discrete, bosonic mode pairs, each pair undergoing independent evolution into a two-mode squeezed state. For this we extend the Bloch-Messiah reduction theorem, previously known for discrete linear systems (S. L. Braunstein, Phys. Rev. A, vol. 71, 055801 (2005)). We present typical mode functions in the case of one-dimensional scattering in an atomic vapor. We find that in the absence of dispersion, one mode pair dominates the process, leading to a simple interpretation of entanglement in this continuous-variable system. However, many mode pairs are excited in the presence of dispersion-induced temporal walkoff of the Stokes, as witnessed by the photon-count statistics. We also consider the readout of the stored at...

  15. Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber (O-TPC) for a Study of Oxygen Formation In Stellar Helium Burning

    CERN Document Server

    Gai, M; Chechik, R; Dangendorf, V; Weller, H R; Gai, Moshe; Breskin, Amos; Chechik, Rachel; Dangendorf, Volker; Weller, Henry R.

    2005-01-01

    We are developing an Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber (O-TPC) detector for the study of the 12C(a,g)16O reaction that determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen in helium burning. This ratio is crucial for understanding the final fate of a progenitor star and the nucleosynthesis of elements prior to a Type II supernova; an oxygen rich star is predicted to collapse to a black hole, and a carbon rich star to a neutron star. Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) are used as standard candles for measuring cosmological distances with the use of an empirical light curve-luminosity stretching factor. It is essential to understand helium burning that yields the carbon/oxygen white dwarf and thus the initial stage of SNeIa. The O-TPC is intended for use with high intensity photon beams extracted from the HIgS/TUNL facility at Duke University to study the 16O(g,a)12C reaction, and thus the direct reaction at energies as low as 0.7 MeV. We are conducting a systematical study of the best oxygen containing gas with light emitti...

  16. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-02-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics.

  17. Analog electro-optical readout of SiPMs achieves fast timing required for time-of-flight PET/MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, M F; Levin, C S

    2015-05-07

    The design of combined positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) systems presents a number of challenges to engineers, as it forces the PET system to acquire data in a space constrained environment that is sensitive to electro-magnetic interference and contains high static, radio frequency and gradient fields. In this work we validate fast timing performance of a PET scintillation detector using a potentially very compact, very low power, and MR compatible readout method in which analog silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) signals are transmitted optically away from the MR bore with little or even no additional readout electronics. This analog 'electro-optial' method could reduce the entire PET readout in the MR bore to two compact, low power components (SiPMs and lasers). Our experiments show fast timing performance from analog electro-optical readout with and without pre-amplification. With 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals and Excelitas SiPMs the best two-sided fwhm coincident timing resolution achieved was 220 +/- 3 ps in electrical mode, 230 +/- 2 ps in electro-optical with preamp mode, and 253 +/- 2 ps in electro-optical without preamp mode. Timing measurements were also performed with Hamamatsu SiPMs and 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm crystals. In the future the timing degradation seen can be further reduced with lower laser noise or improvements SiPM rise time or gain.

  18. Integration of an optical CMOS sensor with a microfluidic channel allows a sensitive readout for biological assays in point-of-care tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dorst, Bieke; Brivio, Monica; Van Der Sar, Elfried; Blom, Marko; Reuvekamp, Simon; Tanzi, Simone; Groenhuis, Roelf; Adojutelegan, Adewole; Lous, Erik-Jan; Frederix, Filip; Stuyver, Lieven J

    2016-04-15

    In this manuscript, a microfluidic detection module, which allows a sensitive readout of biological assays in point-of-care (POC) tests, is presented. The proposed detection module consists of a microfluidic flow cell with an integrated Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS)-based single photon counting optical sensor. Due to the integrated sensor-based readout, the detection module could be implemented as the core technology in stand-alone POC tests, for use in mobile or rural settings. The performance of the detection module was demonstrated in three assays: a peptide, a protein and an antibody detection assay. The antibody detection assay with readout in the detection module proved to be 7-fold more sensitive that the traditional colorimetric plate-based ELISA. The protein and peptide assay showed a lower limit of detection (LLOD) of 200 fM and 460 fM respectively. Results demonstrate that the sensitivity of the immunoassays is comparable with lab-based immunoassays and at least equal or better than current mainstream POC devices. This sensitive readout holds the potential to develop POC tests, which are able to detect low concentrations of biomarkers. This will broaden the diagnostic capabilities at the clinician's office and at patient's home, where currently only the less sensitive lateral flow and dipstick POC tests are implemented.

  19. Geant4 simulation of optical photon transport in scintillator tile with direct readout by silicon photomultiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpachev, S.; Chadeeva, M.

    2017-01-01

    The direct coupling of silicon photomultiplier to the scintillator tile is considered to be the main option for active elements of the highly granular hadron calorimeter developed for future linear collider experiments. In this study, the response of the scintillator-SiPM system to minimum ionising particles was simulated using the optical photon transport functionality available in the Geant4 package. The uniformity of response for both flat tile and tile with dimple was estimated from the simulations and compared to the experimental results obtained in the previous studies.

  20. Detection of Target ssDNA Using a Microfabricated Hall Magnetometer with Correlated Optical Readout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Hira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensing biological agents at the genomic level, while enhancing the response time for biodetection over commonly used, optics-based techniques such as nucleic acid microarrays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs, is an important criterion for new biosensors. Here, we describe the successful detection of a 35-base, single-strand nucleic acid target by Hall-based magnetic transduction as a mimic for pathogenic DNA target detection. The detection platform has low background, large signal amplification following target binding and can discriminate a single, 350 nm superparamagnetic bead labeled with DNA. Detection of the target sequence was demonstrated at 364 pM (<2 target DNA strands per bead target DNA in the presence of 36 μM nontarget (noncomplementary DNA (<10 ppm target DNA using optical microscopy detection on a GaAs Hall mimic. The use of Hall magnetometers as magnetic transduction biosensors holds promise for multiplexing applications that can greatly improve point-of-care (POC diagnostics and subsequent medical care.

  1. A Prototype Combination TPC Cherenkov Detector with GEM Readout for Tracking and Particle Identification and its Potential Use at an Electron Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Woody, Craig; Majka, Richard; Phipps, Michael; Purschke, Martin; Smirnov, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    A prototype detector is being developed which combines the functions of a Time Projection Chamber for charged particle tracking and a Cherenkov detector for particle identification. The TPC consists of a 10x10x10 cm3 drift volume where the charge is drifted to a 10x10 cm2 triple GEM detector. The charge is measured on a readout plane consisting of 2x10 mm2 chevron pads which provide a spatial resolution ~ 100 microns per point in the chevron direction along with dE/dx information. The Cherenkov portion of the detector consists of a second 10x10 cm2 triple GEM with a photosensitive CsI photocathode on the top layer. This detector measures Cherenkov light produced in the drift gas of the TPC by high velocity particles which are above threshold. CF4 or CF4 mixtures will be used as the drift gas which are highly transparent to UV light and can provide excellent efficiency for detecting Cherenkov photons. The drift gas is also used as the operating gas for both GEM detectors. The prototype detector has been constr...

  2. Optical readout of the quantum collective motion of an array of atomic ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botter, Thierry; Brooks, Daniel W C; Schreppler, Sydney; Brahms, Nathan; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2013-04-12

    We create an ultracold-atom-based cavity optomechanical system in which the center-of-mass modes of motion of as many as six distinguishable atomic ensembles are prepared and optically detected near their ground states. We demonstrate that the collective motional state of one atomic ensemble can be selectively addressed while preserving neighboring ensembles near their ground states to better than 95% per excitation quantum. We also show that our system offers nanometer-scale spatial resolution of each atomic ensemble via optomechanical imaging. This technique enables the in situ parallel sensing of potential landscapes, a capability relevant to active research areas of atomic physics and force-field detection in optomechanics.

  3. An optical readout system for the drag free control of the LISA spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosa, R.; di Fiore, L.; Garufi, F.; Grado, A.; La Rana, A.; Milano, L.

    2011-01-01

    LISA is an ESA-NASA joint project for the realization of a space interferometric gravitational wave (GW) antenna. LISA is designed for the measurement of GWs in a very low frequency band (0.1-100 mHz). The antenna is composed by three spacecraft (SC) in suitable heliocentric orbits placed at the corners of a huge equilateral triangle, each side being 5 million km long. The SCs are linked by lasers, forming a sort of optical transponder. By means of phase locking techniques, any round-trip phase delay change gives a measurement of a change in the SC distance (measured as light transit time), due to incoming GWs. An essential requirement is that the SCs are set as close as possible to pure geodetic motion, in the measurement frequency band. This is hardly fulfilled because the SCs are disturbed by several external forces, like solar radiation pressure, cosmic rays etc. In each SC there are two free falling proof masses (PM) that are as much isolated as possible by all external force but gravity. The relative position between each PM and the SC is measured, in six degrees of freedom, by the so-called inertial sensor (IS). The IS signal is then used for drag-free servo-loops that force the SC to follow the geodetic motion of the PMs. The current solution for the IS is the adoption of capacitive sensing. This gives a reliable device but poses several limitations due to back action and cross couplings. In this work, we present an optical lever sensor as an alternative solution. In particular we analyze the potential sensitivity and discuss the advantages in terms of relaxed specifications for the drag free control loops. We also report on bench-top measurements that confirm the performance in the required frequency band.

  4. Precision targeting with a tracking adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Bigelow, Chad E.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Ustun, Teoman E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Hodnett, Harvey M.; Imholte, Michelle L.; Kumru, Semih S.; McCall, Michelle N.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2006-02-01

    Precise targeting of retinal structures including retinal pigment epithelial cells, feeder vessels, ganglion cells, photoreceptors, and other cells important for light transduction may enable earlier disease intervention with laser therapies and advanced methods for vision studies. A novel imaging system based upon scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) with adaptive optics (AO) and active image stabilization was designed, developed, and tested in humans and animals. An additional port allows delivery of aberration-corrected therapeutic/stimulus laser sources. The system design includes simultaneous presentation of non-AO, wide-field (~40 deg) and AO, high-magnification (1-2 deg) retinal scans easily positioned anywhere on the retina in a drag-and-drop manner. The AO optical design achieves an error of third generation retinal tracking system achieves a bandwidth of greater than 1 kHz allowing acquisition of stabilized AO images with an accuracy of ~10 μm. Normal adult human volunteers and animals with previously-placed lesions (cynomolgus monkeys) were tested to optimize the tracking instrumentation and to characterize AO imaging performance. Ultrafast laser pulses were delivered to monkeys to characterize the ability to precisely place lesions and stimulus beams. Other advanced features such as real-time image averaging, automatic highresolution mosaic generation, and automatic blink detection and tracking re-lock were also tested. The system has the potential to become an important tool to clinicians and researchers for early detection and treatment of retinal diseases.

  5. Automatic respiration tracking for radiotherapy using optical 3D camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason; Li, Shidong

    2013-03-01

    Rapid optical three-dimensional (O3D) imaging systems provide accurate digitized 3D surface data in real-time, with no patient contact nor radiation. The accurate 3D surface images offer crucial information in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) treatments for accurate patient repositioning and respiration management. However, applications of O3D imaging techniques to image-guided radiotherapy have been clinically challenged by body deformation, pathological and anatomical variations among individual patients, extremely high dimensionality of the 3D surface data, and irregular respiration motion. In existing clinical radiation therapy (RT) procedures target displacements are caused by (1) inter-fractional anatomy changes due to weight, swell, food/water intake; (2) intra-fractional variations from anatomy changes within any treatment session due to voluntary/involuntary physiologic processes (e.g. respiration, muscle relaxation); (3) patient setup misalignment in daily reposition due to user errors; and (4) changes of marker or positioning device, etc. Presently, viable solution is lacking for in-vivo tracking of target motion and anatomy changes during the beam-on time without exposing patient with additional ionized radiation or high magnet field. Current O3D-guided radiotherapy systems relay on selected points or areas in the 3D surface to track surface motion. The configuration of the marks or areas may change with time that makes it inconsistent in quantifying and interpreting the respiration patterns. To meet the challenge of performing real-time respiration tracking using O3D imaging technology in IGRT, we propose a new approach to automatic respiration motion analysis based on linear dimensionality reduction technique based on PCA (principle component analysis). Optical 3D image sequence is decomposed with principle component analysis into a limited number of independent (orthogonal) motion patterns (a low dimension eigen-space span by eigen-vectors). New

  6. Optical microscope for nuclear emulsion readout: system design and results in application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Kerstin; Koerner, Lienhard; Gussek, Peter; Balogh, Istvan; Breitfelder, Stefan; Schlichting, Johannes; Dupraz, Jean-Pierre; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Panman, Jaap; Papadopoulos, Ioannis M.; Zucchelli, Piero; van de Vyver, Bart

    1999-10-01

    Experiments such as CHORUS at CERN require the inspection of a large amount of nuclear emulsion plates exposed to particle beams. Rare events need to be found, measured and analyzed. Their features are stored as grains in microscopic dimensions in a 3D stack of plates. A new, fully automatic immersion microscope system was developed for this purpose. It features high resolution, small depth of focus, large working distance, large field of view and synchronization of illumination and detector. An additional requirement is given by variations in the refraction index and in the relative thickness of immersion oil and emulsion. The approach used here is an imaging system based on a various objective lens with extreme numerical aperture, large working distance and wide field, combined with a matched high-aperture Koehler illuminator. The light source is a mercury arc lamp, combined with a filter package for the g- line. It includes liquid crystal elements for synchronized shuttering and variable attenuation. The theoretical resolution is less than 1 micron in x, y, z within a volume of 0.5mm diameter times 1 mm scanning depth in all situations within a predefined index range. Three identical pieces of the system have been built. The identical pieces of the system have been built. The experimentally measured resolution confirms the expectations and is better than 1 micron in all three dimensions. This is the result of a complex process of system design and manufacturing, unifying optical, opto-mechanical and opto-electronical contributions. This process spans from the early stages of feasibility and manufacturing up to the test and adjustment procedures. The three prototypes are operational since the fall of 1998 in the frame of the CHORUS project. Practical experience and application results are presented.

  7. Effects of static and dynamic higher-order optical modes in balanced homodyne readout for future gravitational waves detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Danilishin, Stefan L.; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Barr, Bryan W.; Bell, Angus S.; Dupej, Peter; Gräf, Christian; Hennig, Jan-Simon; Houston, E. Alasdair; Huttner, Sabina H.; Leavey, Sean S.; Pascucci, Daniela; Sorazu, Borja; Spencer, Andrew; Wright, Jennifer; Strain, Kenneth A.; Hild, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    With the recent detection of gravitational waves (GWs), marking the start of the new field of GW astronomy, the push for building more sensitive laser-interferometric gravitational wave detectors (GWDs) has never been stronger. Balanced homodyne detection (BHD) allows for a quantum-noise (QN) limited readout of arbitrary light field quadratures, and has therefore been suggested as a vital building block for upgrades to Advanced LIGO and third-generation observatories. In terms of the practical implementation of BHD, we develop a full framework for analyzing the static optical high-order modes (HOMs) occurring in the BHD paths related to the misalignment or mode matching at the input and output ports of the laser interferometer. We find the effects of HOMs on the quantum-noise limited sensitivity is independent of the actual interferometer configuration; e.g. Michelson and Sagnac interferometers are affected in the same way. We show that misalignment of the output ports of the interferometer (output misalignment) only affects the high-frequency part of the quantum-noise limited sensitivity (detection noise). However, at low frequencies, HOMs reduce the interferometer response and the radiation pressure noise (back-action noise) by the same amount and hence the quantum-noise limited sensitivity is not negatively affected in that frequency range. We show that the misalignment of the laser into the interferometer (input misalignment) produces the same effect as output misalignment and additionally decreases the power inside the interferometer. We also analyze dynamic HOM effects, such as beam jitter created by the suspended mirrors of the BHD. Our analyses can be directly applied to any BHD implementation in a future GWD. Moreover, we apply our analytical techniques to the example of the speed meter proof-of-concept experiment under construction in Glasgow. We find that for our experimental parameters, the performance of our seismic isolation system in the BHD paths is

  8. Automatic Optical Crack Tracking for Double Cantilever Beam Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    and Member, R.G., ‘‘Path Planning For Machine Vision Assisted , Teleoperated Pavement Crack Sealer,’’ Journal of Transportation Engineering 124:137...TECHN ICAL ART IC LE Automatic Optical Crack Tracking for Double Cantilever Beam Specimens B. Krull1,2, J. Patrick2,3, K. Hart2,4, S. White2,4, and N...Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 3 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of

  9. Micro-optics for high-efficiency optical performance and simplified tracking for concentrated photovoltaics (CPV).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Filatov, Anton; Lentine, Anthony L.; Sweatt, William C.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2010-02-01

    Micro-optical 5mm lenses in 50mm sub-arrays illuminate arrays of photovoltaic cells with 49X concentration. Fine tracking over {+-}10{sup o} FOV in sub-array allows coarse tracking by meter-sized solar panels. Plastic prototype demonstrated for 400nm < {lambda} < 1600 nm. We have designed a solar collector that will be composed of 50-mm-diameter sub-arrays, each containing {approx}100 5-mm plastic micro-lenses. Each micro-lens illuminates a stack of about four 0.7mm PV cells that collect sunlight from 400nm to 1600 nm with a theoretical efficiency approaching 50%. Each sub-array has internal solar tracking and alignment over a {+-}10{sup o} field, so a large array of sub-arrays only needs to coarsely track the sun. The refractive lenses in the design are thin so the optical transmission can be >90% and the optics will weigh very little. There are other optical properties incorporated in this design that help the photovoltaic cells to operate very efficiently. We are building a pre-prototype system now, and will describe our progress at the conference.

  10. Test Of The CMS Microstrip Silicon Tracker Readout And Control

    CERN Document Server

    Zghiche, A; Civinini, C; Coughlan, J; Drouhin, F; Figueiredo, P; Fiore, L; Furtjes, A; Giassi, A; Gutleber, J; Ljuslin, C; Loreti, M; Maazouzi, C; Marchioro, A; Marinelli, N; Mattig, P M; Parthipan, T; Paillard, C; Siegrist, P; Silvestris, L; Tsirou, A; Verdini, P G; Walsham, P; Wittmer, B

    2000-01-01

    The Microstrip Silicon tracker of the CMS detector is designed to provide robust particle tracking and vertex reconstruction within a strong magnetic field in the high luminosity environment of the LHC. The Tracker readout system employs Front End Driver cards to digitize and buffer the analogue data arriving via optical links from on detector pipeline chips. The control Chain of the front-end electronic is built to operate via optical fibers in order to shield the communications from the outside noise. Components close to the final design have been assembled to be tested in the X5 beam area at CERN where a dedicated 25ns temporal structrure beam has been made available by the SPS. This paper describes the hardware and the software developed for readout and control of data acquired by the front-end electronics operating at 40 MHz. Some preliminary results of the tests performed in the 25ns beam are also given.

  11. Timing and Readout Contorl in the LHCb Upgraded Readout System

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, Federico

    2016-01-01

    In 2019, the LHCb experiment at CERN will undergo a major upgrade where its detectors electronics and entire readout system will be changed to read-out events at the full LHC rate of 40 MHz. In this paper, the new timing, trigger and readout control system for such upgrade is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the distribution of the clock, timing and synchronization information across the entire readout system using generic FTTH technology like Passive Optical Networks. Moreover the system will be responsible to generically control the Front-End electronics by transmitting configuration data and receiving monitoring data, offloading the software control system from the heavy task of manipulating complex protocols of thousands of Front-End electronics devices. The way in which this was implemented is here reviewed with a description of results from first implementations of the system, including usages in test-benches, implementation of techniques for timing distribution and latency control."

  12. Ultra-Short Pulse Tracking by Using Wavelength Dispersion for a Short-Time Optical Buffer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsuyoshi; Konishi; Hideaki; Furukawa; Kousuke; Asano; Kazuyoshi; Itoh

    2003-01-01

    To synchronize a control signal with a packet signal in response to changing timing jitter, we investigate ultra-short pulse tracking by using wavelength dispersion for a short-time optical buffer in an optical router.

  13. Architectural modeling of pixel readout chips Velopix and Timepix3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poikela, T.; Plosila, J.; Westerlund, T.; Buytaert, J.; Campbell, M.; Llopart, X.; Plackett, R.; Wyllie, K.; van Beuzekom, M.; Gromov, V.; Kluit, R.; Zappon, F.; Zivkovic, V.; Brezina, C.; Desch, K.; Fang, X.; Kruth, A.

    2012-01-01

    We examine two digital architectures for front end pixel readout chips, Velopix and Timepix3. These readout chips are developed for tracking detectors in future high energy physics experiments. They must incorporate local intelligence in pixels for time-over-threshold measurement and sparse readout.

  14. Lab-on-a-disc agglutination assay for protein detection by optomagnetic readout and optical imaging using nano- and micro-sized magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Rokon; Burger, Robert; Donolato, Marco; Fock, Jeppe; Creagh, Michael; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Boisen, Anja

    2016-11-15

    We present a biosensing platform for the detection of proteins based on agglutination of aptamer coated magnetic nano- or microbeads. The assay, from sample to answer, is integrated on an automated, low-cost microfluidic disc platform. This ensures fast and reliable results due to a minimum of manual steps involved. The detection of the target protein was achieved in two ways: (1) optomagnetic readout using magnetic nanobeads (MNBs); (2) optical imaging using magnetic microbeads (MMBs). The optomagnetic readout of agglutination is based on optical measurement of the dynamics of MNB aggregates whereas the imaging method is based on direct visualization and quantification of the average size of MMB aggregates. By enhancing magnetic particle agglutination via application of strong magnetic field pulses, we obtained identical limits of detection of 25pM with the same sample-to-answer time (15min 30s) using the two differently sized beads for the two detection methods. In both cases a sample volume of only 10µl is required. The demonstrated automation, low sample-to-answer time and portability of both detection instruments as well as integration of the assay on a low-cost disc are important steps for the implementation of these as portable tools in an out-of-lab setting.

  15. The use and calibration of read-out streaks to increase the dynamic range of the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Page, M J; Breeveld, A A; Hancock, B; Holland, S T; Marshall, F E; Oates, S; Roming, P W A; Siegel, M H; Smith, P J; Carter, M; De Pasquale, M; Symeonidis, M; Yershov, V; Beardmore, A P

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic range of photon counting micro-channel-plate (MCP) intensified charged-coupled device (CCD) instruments such as the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) is limited at the bright end by coincidence loss, the superposition of multiple photons in the individual frames recorded by the CCD. Photons which arrive during the brief period in which the image frame is transferred for read out of the CCD are displaced in the transfer direction in the recorded images. For sufficiently bright sources, these displaced counts form read-out streaks. Using UVOT observations of Tycho-2 stars, we investigate the use of these read-out streaks to obtain photometry for sources which are too bright (and hence have too much coincidence loss) for normal aperture photometry to be reliable. For read-out-streak photometry, the bright-source limiting factor is coincidence loss within the MCPs rather than the CCD. We find that photometric measurements can be obtained for stars u...

  16. Optical fibers and photonics applications: topical tracks at Wilga conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a research survey of WILGA Symposium work, 2010-2012 Editions, concerned with Optical Fibers, Optoelectronic Devices, Sensors, Communication and Photonics Applications. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the three recent Wilga Symposia on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposia embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, photonic equipment for JET tokamak and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium is an annual summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP students to meet together in a large group spanning the whole country with guests from this part of Europe. A digest of Wilga references is presented [1-274]. Wilga Symposia play a role of an universal integrator of young science in photonics and related areas in this country and also in this part of Europe. More than 5000 young scientists participated in scientific Wilga meetings and discussions during the last nearly two decades. Over 2500 papers were published, including over 1000 in Proc. SPIE.

  17. The Readout Control Unit of the ALICE TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Lien, J A; Musa, L

    2004-01-01

    The ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector of the central barrel of the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider) Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), being constructed at CERN, Geneva. It is a 88 m$^{3}$ cylinder filled with gas and divided into two drift regions by the central electrode located at its axial center. The readout chambers of the TPC are multi-wire proportional chambers with cathode pad readout. About 570 000 pads are read-out by an electronics chain of amplification, digitalization and pre-processing. One of the challenges in designing the TPC for ALICE is the design of Front End Electronics (FEE) to cope with the data rates and the channel occupancy. The Readout Control Unit (RCU), which is presented in this work, is designed to control and monitor the Front End Electronics, and to collect and ship data to the High Level Trigger and the Data Acquisition System, via the Detector Data Link (DDL - optical fibre). The RCU must be capable of reading out up to 200 Mbytes/s f...

  18. Multichannel decision feedback equalizer for high track density in optical recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswamy, Srinivasan; Kumar, B. V. K.

    1996-08-01

    A possible approach to high track density in optical recording is to reduce the track widths and eliminate the spacing between consecutive tracks. Parallel readback of several tracks and combined equalization of the multitrack readback signals is a viable approach toward reducing the deteriorating effects of interference in such a high-track- density system. Multichannel readback using laser diode arrays has been reported in optical recording. An additional advantage of multitrack readback is a high data rate. A novel multichannel decision feedback equalizer to reduce interference both within and across the tracks using 2D feedback is presented. Simulation results shows good improvement in error-rate performance by using multichannel decision feedback equalization. By this readback method, tracks can be brought closer, thus increasing the areal density.

  19. Automation system for optical counting of nuclear tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Boulyga, S F; Lomonosova, E M; Zhuk, I V

    1999-01-01

    An automation system consisting of the microscope, video camera and Pentium PC with frame recorder was created. The system provides counting of nuclear tracks on the SSNTD surface with a resolution of 752 x 582 points, determination of the surface area and main axis of the track. The pattern recognition program was developed for operation in Windows 3.1 (or higher) ensuring a convenient interface with the user. In a comparison of the results on automatic track counting with the more accurate hand mode it was shown that the program enables the tracks to be detected even on images with a rather high noise level. It ensures a high accuracy of track counting being comparable with the accuracy of manual counting for densities of tracks in the range of up to 2 centre dot 10 sup 5 tracks/cm sup 2. The automatic system was applied in the experimental investigation of uranium and transuranium elements.

  20. Automation system for optical counting of nuclear tracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F.; Boulyga, E.G.; Lomonosova, E.M.; Zhuk, I.V

    1999-06-01

    An automation system consisting of the microscope, video camera and Pentium PC with frame recorder was created. The system provides counting of nuclear tracks on the SSNTD surface with a resolution of 752 x 582 points, determination of the surface area and main axis of the track. The pattern recognition program was developed for operation in Windows 3.1 (or higher) ensuring a convenient interface with the user. In a comparison of the results on automatic track counting with the more accurate hand mode it was shown that the program enables the tracks to be detected even on images with a rather high noise level. It ensures a high accuracy of track counting being comparable with the accuracy of manual counting for densities of tracks in the range of up to 2{center_dot}10{sup 5} tracks/cm{sup 2}. The automatic system was applied in the experimental investigation of uranium and transuranium elements.

  1. Internal model control of a fast steering mirror for electro-optical fine tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yun-xia; Bao, Qi-liang; Wu, Qiong-yan

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this research is to develop advanced control methods to improve the bandwidth and tracking precision of the electro-optical fine tracking system using a fast steering mirror (FSM). FSM is the most important part in this control system. The model of FSM is established at the beginning of this paper. Compared with the electro-optical fine tracking system with ground based platform, the electro-optical fine tracking system with movement based platform must be a wide bandwidth and a robustness system. An advanced control method based on internal model control law is developed for electro-optical fine tracking system. The IMC is an advanced algorithm. Theoretically, it can eliminate disturbance completely and make sure output equals to input even there is model error. Moreover, it separates process to the system dynamic characteristic and the object perturbation. Compared with the PID controller, the controller is simpler and the parameter regulation is more convenient and the system is more robust. In addition, we design an improved structure based on classic IMC. The tracking error of the two-port control system is much better than which of the classic IMC. The simulation results indicate that the electro-optical control system based on the internal model control algorithm is very effective. It shows a better performance at the tracing precision and the disturbance suppresses. Thus a new method is provided for the high-performance electro-optical fine tracking system.

  2. Photostimulated near-infrared persistent luminescence as a new optical read-out from Cr3+-doped LiGa5O8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Yan, Wuzhao; Chuang, Yen-Jun; Zhen, Zipeng; Xie, Jin; Pan, Zhengwei

    2013-01-01

    In conventional photostimulable storage phosphors, the optical information written by x-ray or ultraviolet irradiation is usually read out as a visible photostimulated luminescence (PSL) signal under the stimulation of a low-energy light with appropriate wavelength. Unlike the transient PSL, here we report a new optical read-out form, photostimulated persistent luminescence (PSPL) in the near-infrared (NIR), from a Cr3+-doped LiGa5O8 NIR persistent phosphor exhibiting a super-long NIR persistent luminescence of more than 1,000 h. An intense PSPL signal peaking at 716 nm can be repeatedly obtained in a period of more than 1,000 h when an ultraviolet-light (250–360 nm) pre-irradiated LiGa5O8:Cr3+ phosphor is repeatedly stimulated with a visible light or a NIR light. The LiGa5O8:Cr3+ phosphor has promising applications in optical information storage, night-vision surveillance, and in vivo bio-imaging. PMID:23532003

  3. Data readout system utilizing photonic integrated circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopiński, S., E-mail: S.Stopinski@tue.nl [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology (Poland); Malinowski, M.; Piramidowicz, R. [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology (Poland); Smit, M.K.; Leijtens, X.J.M. [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2013-10-11

    We describe a novel optical solution for data readout systems. The core of the system is an Indium-Phosphide photonic integrated circuit performing as a front-end readout unit. It functions as an optical serializer in which the serialization of the input signal is provided by means of on-chip optical delay lines. The circuit employs electro-optic phase shifters to build amplitude modulators, power splitters for signal distribution, semiconductor optical amplifiers for signal amplification as well as on-chip reflectors. We present the concept of the system, the design and first characterization results of the devices that were fabricated in a multi-project wafer run.

  4. Liquid crystal TV-based white light optical tracking novelty filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Kostrzewski, A; Kim, D H; Eichmann, G

    1989-11-15

    A compact white light optical tracking novelty filter is demonstrated. Based on the use of two inexpensive liquid crystal televisions, a filtered and collimated white light source, digital delay, and video recorder, this portable white light device performs two major image comparison operations, a real time image subtraction and novelty tracking operations. Some preliminary experimental results are presented.

  5. Comparison Study of Two Different Sun-Tracking Methods in Optical Efficiency of Heliostat Field

    OpenAIRE

    K.-K. Chong; Tan, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    There are two sun-tracking methods widely used for the heliostat, which are conventional Azimuth-Elevation and revolutionary Spinning-Elevation methods. Following the previous study to compare the range of motion, a comparison study in optical efficiency of heliostat field for the two methods is further explored in this paper. A special algorithm using ray-tracing technique has also been developed to simulate the optical efficiency of heliostat field for both sun-tracking methods in different...

  6. Virtual rigid body: a new optical tracking paradigm in image-guided interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Alexis; Lee, David S.; Deshmukh, Nishikant; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Tracking technology is often necessary for image-guided surgical interventions. Optical tracking is one the options, but it suffers from line of sight and workspace limitations. Optical tracking is accomplished by attaching a rigid body marker, having a pattern for pose detection, onto a tool or device. A larger rigid body results in more accurate tracking, but at the same time large size limits its usage in a crowded surgical workspace. This work presents a prototype of a novel optical tracking method using a virtual rigid body (VRB). We define the VRB as a 3D rigid body marker in the form of pattern on a surface generated from a light source. Its pose can be recovered by observing the projected pattern with a stereo-camera system. The rigid body's size is no longer physically limited as we can manufacture small size light sources. Conventional optical tracking also requires line of sight to the rigid body. VRB overcomes these limitations by detecting a pattern projected onto the surface. We can project the pattern onto a region of interest, allowing the pattern to always be in the view of the optical tracker. This helps to decrease the occurrence of occlusions. This manuscript describes the method and results compared with conventional optical tracking in an experiment setup using known motions. The experiments are done using an optical tracker and a linear-stage, resulting in targeting errors of 0.38mm+/-0.28mm with our method compared to 0.23mm+/-0.22mm with conventional optical markers. Another experiment that replaced the linear stage with a robot arm resulted in rotational errors of 0.50+/-0.31° and 2.68+/-2.20° and the translation errors of 0.18+/-0.10 mm and 0.03+/-0.02 mm respectively.

  7. Compact Optical Inertial Tracking for Launch Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a method for developing a miniature all-optical Inertial Navigation System. In an optical INS, the rotation sensitivity depends on the area enclosed by a...

  8. Research on target tracking in coal mine based on optical flow method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hongye; Xiao, Qingwei

    2015-03-01

    To recognize, track and count the bolting machine in coal mine video images, a real-time target tracking method based on the Lucas-Kanade sparse optical flow is proposed in this paper. In the method, we judge whether the moving target deviate from its trajectory, predicate and correct the position of the moving target. The method solves the problem of failure to track the target or lose the target because of the weak light, uneven illumination and blocking. Using the VC++ platform and Opencv lib we complete the recognition and tracking. The validity of the method is verified by the result of the experiment.

  9. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone. PMID:26203370

  10. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, Christy K; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone.

  11. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  12. Readout Strategy of an Electro-optical Coupled PET Detector for Time-of-Flight PET/MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Bieniosek, M F; Olcott, P D; Levin, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Combining PET with MRI in a single system provides clinicians with complementary molecular and anatomical information. However, existing integrated PET/MRI systems do not have time-of-flight PET capabilities. This work describes an MRI-compatible front-end electronic system with ToF capabilities. The approach employs a fast arrival-time pickoff comparator to digitize the timing information, and a laser diode to drive a 10m fiber-optic cable to optically transmit asynchronous timing informatio...

  13. Improved optics for automatic stored-seam tracking on an electron-beam welder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitzke, K.A.

    1978-11-24

    A commercial 7.5-kW electron-beam welder has been optically upgraded. The viewing system has been replaced by high-resolution optics (36 line pairs per millimeter (36l/mm) with video option. A high-intensity arc lamp provides illumination of the weld region. The upgraded optical system provides the capability for making accurate and repeatable welds with computer-automated seam tracking.

  14. INNER TRACKING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sharp

    The CMS Inner Tracking Detector continues to make good progress. The successful commissioning of ~ 25% of the Silicon Strip Tracker was completed in the Tracker Integration Facility (TIF) at CERN in July 2007 and the Tracker has since been prepared for moving and installation into CMS at P5. The Tracker was ready to move on schedule in September 2007. The Installation of the Tracker cooling pipes and LV cables between Patch Panel 1 (PP1) on the inside the CMS magnet cryostat, and the cooling plants and power system racks on the balconies has been completed. The optical fibres from PP1 to the readout FEDs in the USC have been installed, together with the Tracker cable channels, in parallel with the installation of the EB/HB services. All of the Tracker Safety, Power, DCS and the VME Readout Systems have been installed at P5 and are being tested and commissioned with CMS. It is planned to install the Tracker into CMS before Christmas. The Tracker will then be connected to the pre-installed services on Y...

  15. Design of tracking and detecting lens system by diffractive optical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiang; Qi, Bo; Ren, Ge; Zhou, Jianwei

    2016-10-01

    Many target-tracking applications require an optical system to acquire the target for tracking and identification. This paper describes a new detecting optical system that can provide automatic flying object detecting, tracking and measuring in visible band. The main feature of the detecting lens system is the combination of diffractive optics with traditional lens design by a technique was invented by Schupmann. Diffractive lens has great potential for developing the larger aperture and lightweight lens. First, the optical system scheme was described. Then the Schupmann achromatic principle with diffractive lens and corrective optics is introduced. According to the technical features and requirements of the optical imaging system for detecting and tracking, we designed a lens system with flat surface Fresnel lens and cancels the optical system chromatic aberration by another flat surface Fresnel lens with effective focal length of 1980mm, an F-Number of F/9.9 and a field of view of 2ωω = 14.2', spatial resolution of 46 lp/mm and a working wavelength range of 0.6 0.85um. At last, the system is compact and easy to fabricate and assembly, the diffuse spot size and MTF function and other analysis provide good performance.

  16. Readout of the UFFO Slewing Mirror Telescope to detect UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, J. E.; Lim, H.; Nam, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    The Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) was proposed for rapid response to prompt UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). The SMT is a key component of the Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO)-pathfinder, which will be launched aboard the Lomonosov spacecraft at the end of 2013. The SMT utilizes...... plane detector of Intensified Charge-Coupled Device (ICCD). The ICCD is sensitive to UV/optical photons of 200–650 nm in wavelength by using a UV-enhanced S20 photocathode and amplifies photoelectrons at a gain of 104–106 in double Micro-Channel Plates. These photons are read out by a Kodak KAI-0340...

  17. New method for fast detection of railway track smoothness by fiber optic gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixin; Liang, Lei; Hu, Wenbin

    2000-05-01

    In this article, the conducting schemes for fiber optic gyro (FOG) used int he fast detecting of the smoothness of rail track has been proposed from the practical use point of view. The relevant approximate method of calculating has been given. The experiments in lab have been carried out, and the factors to influence the detecting precision of the smoothness of rail track such as the precision of FOG have been analyzed.

  18. Comparison Study of Two Different Sun-Tracking Methods in Optical Efficiency of Heliostat Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-K. Chong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two sun-tracking methods widely used for the heliostat, which are conventional Azimuth-Elevation and revolutionary Spinning-Elevation methods. Following the previous study to compare the range of motion, a comparison study in optical efficiency of heliostat field for the two methods is further explored in this paper. A special algorithm using ray-tracing technique has also been developed to simulate the optical efficiency of heliostat field for both sun-tracking methods in different latitudes. With the new algorithm, comprehensive analysis to compare the optical efficiency of individual heliostat and the overall heliostat field for the two sun-tracking methods has been carried out.

  19. Optical read-out of the quantum motion of an array of atoms-based mechanical oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Botter, Thierry; Schreppler, Sydney; Brahms, Nathan; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2012-01-01

    We create an ultracold-atoms-based cavity optomechanical system in which as many as six distinguishable mechanical oscillators are prepared, and optically detected, near their ground states of motion. We demonstrate that the motional state of one oscillator can be selectively addressed while preserving neighboring oscillators near their ground states to better than 95% per excitation quantum. We also show that our system offers nanometer-scale spatial resolution of each mechanical element via optomechanical imaging. This technique enables in-situ, parallel sensing of potential landscapes, a capability relevant to active research areas of atomic physics and force-field detection in optomechanics.

  20. Optically stimulated luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz due to repeated use in single aliquot readout: Experiments and computer simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKeever, S.W.S.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Agersnap Larsen, N.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a study to examine sensitivity changes in single aliquot techniques using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) a series of experiments has been conducted with single aliquots of natural quartz, and the data compared with the results of computer simulations of the type of processes...... believed to be occurring. The computer model used includes both shallow and deep ('hard-to-bleach') traps, OSL ('easy-to-bleach') traps, and radiative and non-radiative recombination centres. The model has previously been used successfully to account for sensitivity changes in quartz due to thermal...... trap and deep trap effects....

  1. A robust optical/inertial data fusion system for motion tracking of the robot manipulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie CHEN; Can-jun YANG; Jens HOFSCHULTE; Wan-li JIANG; Cha ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    We present an optical/inertial data fusion system for motion tracking of the robot manipulator, which is proved to be more robust and accurate than a normal optical tracking system (OTS). By data fusion with an inertial measurement unit (IMU), both robustness and accuracy of OTS are improved. The Kalman filter is used in data fusion. The error distribution of OTS pro-vides an important reference on the estimation of measurement noise using the Kalman filter. With a proper setup of the system and an effective method of coordinate frame synchronization, the results of experiments show a significant improvement in terms of robustness and position accuracy.

  2. Optical non-contact floating object tracking using an open-source library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an optical non-contact low budget method for tracking the position of multi-object is presented for marine/off-shore laboratory applications. Particular focus is given at the wave energy field and the analysis of floating wave energy converters dynamics. The measurement of the posi......In this paper, an optical non-contact low budget method for tracking the position of multi-object is presented for marine/off-shore laboratory applications. Particular focus is given at the wave energy field and the analysis of floating wave energy converters dynamics. The measurement...

  3. LHCb: Fast Readout Control for the upgraded readout architecture of the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Alessio, F

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN has proposed an upgrade towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times its initial design luminosity with an upgraded LHCb detector. As a consequence, the various LHCb sub-systems in the readout architecture will be upgraded to cope with higher sub-detector occupancies, higher rate, and higher readout load. The new architecture, new functionalities, and the first hardware implementation of a new LHCb Readout Control system (commonly referred to as S-TFC) for the upgraded LHCb experiment is here presented. Our attention is focused in describing solutions for the distribution of clock and timing information to control the entire upgraded readout architecture by profiting of a bidirectional optical network and powerful FPGAs, including a real-time mechanism to synchronize the entire system. Solutions and implementations are presented, together with first results on the simulation and the validation of the system.

  4. Optical fiber reach extended FMCW radar for remote respiratory tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    2017-01-01

    Wireless monitoring of human vital signs such as breathing rate is a nonintrusive alternative to contemporary solutions relying on physical contact. To ease the installment, fiber optical transmission is used to extend the reach from the transmitter and receiver circuitry to the antenna subsystem....... In this paper, a frequency modulated carrier wave radar, operating at 25.7–26.6 GHz and utilizing optical fiber extension, was experimentally demonstrated to accurately recover the breathing rate of a human placed 1 m away from the radar antennas....

  5. A novel optical investigation technique for railroad track inspection and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabato, Alessandro; Beale, Christopher H.; Niezrecki, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Track failures due to cross tie degradation or loss in ballast support may result in a number of problems ranging from simple service interruptions to derailments. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of railway track is important for safety reasons and to reduce downtime and maintenance costs. For this reason, novel and cost-effective track inspection technologies for assessing tracks' health are currently insufficient and needed. Advancements achieved in recent years in cameras technology, optical sensors, and image-processing algorithms have made machine vision, Structure from Motion (SfM), and three-dimensional (3D) Digital Image Correlation (DIC) systems extremely appealing techniques for extracting structural deformations and geometry profiles. Therefore, optically based, non-contact measurement techniques may be used for assessing surface defects, rail and tie deflection profiles, and ballast condition. In this study, the design of two camera-based measurement systems is proposed for crossties-ballast condition assessment and track examination purposes. The first one consists of four pairs of cameras installed on the underside of a rail car to detect the induced deformation and displacement on the whole length of the track's cross tie using 3D DIC measurement techniques. The second consists of another set of cameras using SfM techniques for obtaining a 3D rendering of the infrastructure from a series of two-dimensional (2D) images to evaluate the state of the track qualitatively. The feasibility of the proposed optical systems is evaluated through extensive laboratory tests, demonstrating their ability to measure parameters of interest (e.g. crosstie's full-field displacement, vertical deflection, shape, etc.) for assessment and SHM of railroad track.

  6. Tracking the eye non-invasively: Simultaneous comparison of the scleral search coil and optical tracking techniques in themacaque monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Kimmel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available From human perception to primate neurophysiology, monitoring eye position is critical to the study of vision, attention, oculomotor control, and behavior. Two principal techniques for the precise measurement of eye position—the long-standing sclera-embedded search coil and more recent optical tracking techniques—are in use in various laboratories, but no published study compares the performance of the two methods simultaneously in the same primates. Here we compare two popular systems—a sclera-embedded search coil from C-N-C Engineering and the EyeLink 1000 optical system from SR Research—by recording simultaneously from the same eye in the macaque monkey while the animal performed a simple oculomotor task. We found broad agreement between the two systems, particularly in positional accuracy during fixation, measurement of saccade amplitude, detection of fixational saccades, and sensitivity to subtle changes in eye position from trial to trial. Nonetheless, certain discrepancies persist, particularly elevated saccade peak velocities, post-saccadic ringing, influence of luminance change on reported position, and greater sample-to-sample variation in the optical system. Our study shows that optical performance now rivals that of the search coil, rendering optical systems appropriate for many if not most applications. This finding is consequential, especially for animal subjects, because the optical systems do not require invasive surgery for implantation and repair of search coils around the eye. Our data also allow laboratories using the optical system in human subjects to assess the strengths and limitations of the technique for their own applications.

  7. A custom readout electronics for the BESIII CGEM detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha Rolo, M.; Alexeev, M.; Amoroso, A.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bianchi, F.; Bugalho, R.; Calcaterra, A.; Canale, N.; Capodiferro, M.; Carassiti, V.; Cerioni, S.; Chai, J. Y.; Chiozzi, S.; Cibinetto, G.; Cossio, F.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Di Francesco, A.; Dong, J.; Evangelisti, F.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Felici, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Gatta, M.; Greco, M.; Lavezzi, L.; Leng, C. Y.; Li, H.; Maggiora, M.; Malaguti, R.; Marcello, S.; Marciniewski, P.; Melchiorri, M.; Mezzadri, G.; Mignone, M.; Morello, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pellegrino, J.; Pelosi, A.; Rivetti, A.; Savrié, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Soldani, E.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Tskhadadze, E.; Varela, J.; Verma, S.; Wheadon, R.; Yan, L.

    2017-07-01

    For the upgrade of the inner tracker of the BESIII spectrometer, planned for 2018, a lightweight tracker based on an innovative Cylindrical Gas Electron Multiplier (CGEM) detector is now under development. The analogue readout of the CGEM enables the use of a charge centroid algorithm to improve the spatial resolution to better than 130 μm while loosening the pitch strip to 650 μm, which allows to reduce the total number of channels to about 10 000. The channels are readout by 160 dedicated integrated 64-channel front-end ASICs, providing a time and charge measurement and featuring a fully-digital output. The energy measurement is extracted either from the time-over-threshold (ToT) or the 10-bit digitisation of the peak amplitude of the signal. The time of the event is generated by quad-buffered low-power TDCs, allowing for rates in excess of 60 kHz per channel. The TDCs are based on analogue interpolation techniques and produce a time stamp (or two, if working in ToT mode) of the event with a time resolution better than 50 ps. The front-end noise, based on a CSA and a two-stage complex conjugated pole shapers, dominate the channel intrinsic time jitter, which is less than 5 ns r.m.s. The time information of the hit can be used to reconstruct the track path, operating the detector as a small TPC and hence improving the position resolution when the distribution of the cloud, due to large incident angle or magnetic field, is very broad. Event data is collected by an off-detector motherboard, where each GEM-ROC readout card handles 4 ASIC carrier FEBs (512 channels). Configuration upload and data readout between the off-detector electronics and the VME-based data collector cards are managed by bi-directional fibre optical links. This paper covers the design of a custom front-end electronics for the readout of the new inner tracker of the BESIII experiment, addressing the relevant design aspects of the detector electronics and the front-end ASIC for the CGEM readout

  8. Evaluation of optical flow algorithms for tracking endocardial surfaces on three-dimensional ultrasound data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qi; Angelini, Elsa D.; Herz, Susan L.; Ingrassia, Christopher M.; Gerard, Olivier; Costa, Kevin D.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.; Laine, Andrew F.

    2005-04-01

    With relatively high frame rates and the ability to acquire volume data sets with a stationary transducer, 3D ultrasound systems, based on matrix phased array transducers, provide valuable three-dimensional information, from which quantitative measures of cardiac function can be extracted. Such analyses require segmentation and visual tracking of the left ventricular endocardial border. Due to the large size of the volumetric data sets, manual tracing of the endocardial border is tedious and impractical for clinical applications. Therefore the development of automatic methods for tracking three-dimensional endocardial motion is essential. In this study, we evaluate a four-dimensional optical flow motion tracking algorithm to determine its capability to follow the endocardial border in three dimensional ultrasound data through time. The four-dimensional optical flow method was implemented using three-dimensional correlation. We tested the algorithm on an experimental open-chest dog data set and a clinical data set acquired with a Philips' iE33 three-dimensional ultrasound machine. Initialized with left ventricular endocardial data points obtained from manual tracing at end-diastole, the algorithm automatically tracked these points frame by frame through the whole cardiac cycle. A finite element surface was fitted through the data points obtained by both optical flow tracking and manual tracing by an experienced observer for quantitative comparison of the results. Parameterization of the finite element surfaces was performed and maps displaying relative differences between the manual and semi-automatic methods were compared. The results showed good consistency between manual tracing and optical flow estimation on 73% of the entire surface with fewer than 10% difference. In addition, the optical flow motion tracking algorithm greatly reduced processing time (about 94% reduction compared to human involvement per cardiac cycle) for analyzing cardiac function in three

  9. Design of active disturbance rejection controller for space optical communication coarse tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jian; Ai, Yong

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve the dynamic tracking performance of coarse tracking system in space optical communication, a new control method based on active disturbance rejection controller (ADRC) is proposed. Firstly, based on the structure analysis of coarse tracking system, the simplified system model was obtained, and then the extended state observer was designed to calculate state variables and spot disturbance from the input and output signals. Finally, the ADRC controller of coarse tracking system is realized with the combination of nonlinear PID controller. The simulation experimental results show that compared with the PID method, this method can significantly reduce the step response overshoot and settling time. When the target angular velocity is120mrad/s, tracking error with ADRC method is 30μrad, which decreases 85% compared with the PID method. Meanwhile the disturbance rejection bandwidth is increased by 3 times with ADRC. This method can effectively improve the dynamic tracking performance of coarse tracking and disturbance rejection degree, with no need of hardware upgrade, and is of certain reference value to the wide range and high dynamic precision photoelectric tracking system.

  10. Active disturbance rejection controller of fine tracking system for free space optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ning; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xinglin; Wang, Yan

    2013-08-01

    Free space optical communication is one of the best approaches in future communications. Laser beam's acquisition, pointing and tracking are crucial technologies of free space optical communication. Fine tracking system is important component of APT (acquisition, pointing and tracking) system. It cooperates with the coarse pointing system in executing the APT mission. Satellite platform vibration and disturbance, which reduce received optical power, increase bit error rate and affect seriously the natural performance of laser communication. For the characteristic of satellite platform, an active disturbance rejection controller was designed to reduce the vibration and disturbance. There are three major contributions in the paper. Firstly, the effects of vibration on the inter satellite optical communications were analyzed, and the reasons and characters of vibration of the satellite platform were summarized. The amplitude-frequency response of a filter was designed according to the power spectral density of platform vibration of SILEX (Semiconductor Inter-satellite Laser Experiment), and then the signals of platform vibration were generated by filtering white Gaussian noise using the filter. Secondly, the fast steering mirror is a key component of the fine tracking system for optical communication. The mechanical design and model analysis was made to the tip/tilt mirror driven by the piezoelectric actuator and transmitted by the flexure hinge. The transfer function of the fast steering mirror, camera, D/A data acquisition card was established, and the theory model of transfer function of this system was further obtained. Finally, an active disturbance rejection control method is developed, multiple parallel extended state observers were designed for estimation of unknown dynamics and external disturbance, and the estimated states were used for nonlinear feedback control and compensation to improve system performance. The simulation results show that the designed

  11. Lateral translation micro-tracking of planar micro-optic solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallas, Justin M.; Karp, Jason H.; Tremblay, Eric J.; Ford, Joseph E.

    2010-08-01

    High-concentration photo-voltaic systems focus incident sunlight by hundreds of times by combining focusing lenses with accurate, dual-axis solar tracking. Conventional systems mount large optical arrays on expensive tracking pedestals to maintain normal incidence throughout the day. A recently proposed micro-optic solar concentrator utilizes a twodimensional lens array focusing into a planar slab waveguide. Localized mirrors fabricated on the waveguide surface reflect focused sunlight into guided modes which propagate towards an edge-mounted photovoltaic cell. This geometry enables a new method of solar tracking by laterally translating the waveguide with respect to the lens array to capture off-axis illumination. Using short focal length lenses, translations on the order of millimeters can efficiently collect 70° full-angle incident fields. This allows for either one or two-axis tracking systems where the small physical motion is contained within the physical footprint of a fixed solar panel. Here, we experimentally demonstrate lateral micro tracking for off-axis light collection using table-mounted components. We also present a novel tracking frame based on de-centered cams and describe a lens configuration optimized for off-axis coupling.

  12. New readout and data-acquisition system in an electron-tracking Compton camera for MeV gamma-ray astronomy (SMILE-II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizumoto, T., E-mail: mizumoto@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Matsuoka, Y. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Mizumura, Y. [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Tanimori, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Iwaki, S.; Sawano, T.; Nakamura, K.; Komura, S.; Nakamura, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Oda, M.; Miyamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Parker, J.D.; Tomono, D.; Sonoda, S. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Miuchi, K. [Department of Physics, Kobe University, 658-8501 Kobe (Japan); Kurosawa, S. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 980-8577 Sendai (Japan)

    2015-11-11

    For MeV gamma-ray astronomy, we have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a MeV gamma-ray telescope capable of rejecting the radiation background and attaining the high sensitivity of near 1 mCrab in space. Our ETCC comprises a gaseous time-projection chamber (TPC) with a micro pattern gas detector for tracking recoil electrons and a position-sensitive scintillation camera for detecting scattered gamma rays. After the success of a first balloon experiment in 2006 with a small ETCC (using a 10×10×15 cm{sup 3} TPC) for measuring diffuse cosmic and atmospheric sub-MeV gamma rays (Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I; SMILE-I), a (30 cm){sup 3} medium-sized ETCC was developed to measure MeV gamma-ray spectra from celestial sources, such as the Crab Nebula, with single-day balloon flights (SMILE-II). To achieve this goal, a 100-times-larger detection area compared with that of SMILE-I is required without changing the weight or power consumption of the detector system. In addition, the event rate is also expected to dramatically increase during observation. Here, we describe both the concept and the performance of the new data-acquisition system with this (30 cm){sup 3} ETCC to manage 100 times more data while satisfying the severe restrictions regarding the weight and power consumption imposed by a balloon-borne observation. In particular, to improve the detection efficiency of the fine tracks in the TPC from ~10% to ~100%, we introduce a new data-handling algorithm in the TPC. Therefore, for efficient management of such large amounts of data, we developed a data-acquisition system with parallel data flow.

  13. Optically lightweight tracking of objects around a corner

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Jonathan; Martín, Jaime; Laurenzis, Martin; Hullin, Matthias B

    2016-01-01

    The observation of objects located in inaccessible regions is a recurring challenge in a wide variety of important applications. Recent work has shown that indirect diffuse light reflections can be used to reconstruct objects and two-dimensional (2D) patterns around a corner. However, these prior methods always require some specialized setup involving either ultrafast detectors or narrowband light sources. Here we show that occluded objects can be tracked in real time using a standard 2D camera and a laser pointer. Unlike previous methods based on the backprojection approach, we formulate the problem in an analysis-by-synthesis sense. By repeatedly simulating light transport through the scene, we determine the set of object parameters that most closely fits the measured intensity distribution. We experimentally demonstrate that this approach is capable of following the translation of unknown objects, and translation and orientation of a known object, in real time.

  14. Survey of energy efficient tracking and localization techniques in buildings using optical and wireless communication media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruintjes, Tom M.; Kokkeler, André B.J.; Karagiannis, Georgios; Smit, Gerard J.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of beamforming, beamsteering and mobile tracking techniques. The survey was made in the context of the SOWICI project. The aim of this project is to reduce power consumption of data exchanging devices within houses. An optical fiber network is used for data transport to

  15. 6DOF optical tracking system using afocal optics for image guided surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae You Seong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Image guided surgery using medical robots is becoming popular these days. For image guided surgery, a tracking system is required to provide 6DOF information of patient coordinate, surgical instruments and medical robots used in surgery. To provide 6DOF information, a marker has to be attached to the target. However, it is hard to use many markers all together because the markers will take too much space in the surgical area. The tracking system proposed in this study utilizes down sized markers compared to traditional markers by using micro-engraved data-coded pattern with a lens instead of using geometrically specified marker spheres as a tracking target. A tracking system is developed that has a measurement area of 1m to 2.5m from the tracking system. Experiment has been done for surgical navigation using the proposed tracking system and a medical robot.

  16. Studies of pointing, acquisition, and tracking of agile optical wireless transceivers for free-space optical communication networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tzung-Hsien; Trisno, Sugianto; Smolyaninov, Igor I.; Milner, Stuart D.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2004-02-01

    Free space, dynamic, optical wireless communications will require topology control for optimization of network performance. Such networks may need to be configured for bi- or multiple-connectedness, reliability and quality-of-service. Topology control involves the introduction of new links and/or nodes into the network to achieve such performance objectives through autonomous reconfiguration as well as precise pointing, acquisition, tracking, and steering of laser beams. Reconfiguration may be required because of link degradation resulting from obscuration or node loss. As a result, the optical transceivers may need to be re-directed to new or existing nodes within the network and tracked on moving nodes. The redirection of transceivers may require operation over a whole sphere, so that small-angle beam steering techniques cannot be applied. In this context, we are studying the performance of optical wireless links using lightweight, bi-static transceivers mounted on high-performance stepping motor driven stages. These motors provide an angular resolution of 0.00072 degree at up to 80,000 steps per second. This paper focuses on the performance characteristics of these agile transceivers for pointing, acquisition, and tracking (PAT), including the influence of acceleration/deceleration time, motor angular speed, and angular re-adjustment, on latency and packet loss in small free space optical (FSO) wireless test networks.

  17. New readout and data-acquisition system in an Electron-Tracking Compton Camera for MeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy (SMILE-II)

    CERN Document Server

    Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Tanimori, Toru; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Takada, Atsushi; Iwaki, Satoru; Sawano, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Kiseki; Komura, Shotaro; Nakamura, Shogo; Kishimoto, Tetsuro; Oda, Makoto; Miyamoto, Shohei; Takemura, Taito; Parker, Joseph D; Tomono, Dai; Sonoda, Shinya; Miuchi, Kentaro; Kurosawa, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    For MeV gamma-ray astronomy, we have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a MeV gamma-ray telescope capable of rejecting the radiation background and attaining the high sensitivity of near 1 mCrab in space. Our ETCC comprises a gaseous time-projection chamber (TPC) with a micro pattern gas detector for tracking recoil electrons and a position-sensitive scintillation camera for detecting scattered gamma rays. After the success of a first balloon experiment in 2006 with a small ETCC (using a 10$\\times$10$\\times$15 cm$^3$ TPC) for measuring diffuse cosmic and atmospheric sub-MeV gamma rays (Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I; SMILE-I), a (30 cm)$^{3}$ medium-sized ETCC was developed to measure MeV gamma-ray spectra from celestial sources, such as the Crab Nebula, with single-day balloon flights (SMILE-II). To achieve this goal, a 100-times-larger detection area compared with that of SMILE-I is required without changing the weight or power consumption of the detector syste...

  18. Robust Face Location and Tracking Using Optical Flow and Genetic Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yanjiang; YUAN Baozong

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new and robustapproach to the detection, localization and tracking ofa human face in image sequences. First, a fast algo-rithm based on the neighbor-point-reliability is pro-posed to calculate the optical flow, which is used toextract the motion region. Then the hair and thehead knowledges are used to locate the face area. Forface tracking, a new genetic algorithms-based dynamictemplate-matching method is applied to search thenew position of the face in each new video frame. Ex-perimental results show that the proposed face track-ing method is fast and robust to illumination, faceposes, facial expressions and image distractors suchas facial occlusion by hands.

  19. Real-time optical multiple-object recognition and tracking demonstration: A friendly challenge to the digital field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1980-01-01

    Researchers demonstrated the first optical multiple object tracking system. The system is capable of simultaneous tracking of multiple objects, each with independent movements in real-time, limited only to the TV frame rate (30 msec). In order to perform a similar tracking operation, a large computer system and very complex software would be needed. Although researchers have demonstrated the tracking of only 3 objects, the system capacity can easily be expanded by 2 orders of magnitude.

  20. Study of the mechanical behavior of the optical fiber by a mark-tracking method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangleboeuf J-C.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The mark-tracking method was used in the uniaxial tensile test to determine the elastic properties of optical fibers. The mark-tracking method is based on the followup of two markers on the specimen with the help of an image processing technique. It allows us to determine the true strain with respect to the small strains assumption (e 1% or the finite strains (e>1% without any impact of the rigid solid movement neither pulley fiber sliding on the measured strain. Optical fibers used in this study are commercial Verrillon single mode silica fibers, 125 µm in diameter with a two layers 62.5 µm thick epoxy-acrylate polymer coating. Both as-received optical fiber and stripped fiber were subjected to the uniaxial tensile test and the cantilever beam bending test. The stripped fiber Young’s modulus results under both tests were found to be very similar. Thus, the mark-tracking method is adaptable to the tensile test of optical fibers and the elastic behavior of both as-received optical fiber and stripped fiber is found to be linear. Their Young’s modulus are 22GPa and 83GPa, respectively. These results revealed that those coatings are playing a mechanical role in the fiber elongation.

  1. Effective star tracking method based on optical flow analysis for star trackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ting; Xing, Fei; Wang, Xiaochu; Li, Jin; Wei, Minsong; You, Zheng

    2016-12-20

    Benefiting from rapid development of imaging sensor technology, modern optical technology, and a high-speed computing chip, the star tracker's accuracy, dynamic performance, and update rate have been greatly improved with low power consumption and miniature size. The star tracker is currently one of the most competitive attitude measurement sensors. However, due to restrictions of the optical imaging system, difficulties still exist in moving star spot detection and star tracking when in special motion conditions. An effective star tracking method based on optical flow analysis for star trackers is proposed in this paper. Spot-based optical flow, based on a gray gradient between two adjacent star images, is analyzed to distinguish the star spot region and obtain an accurate star spot position so that the star tracking can keep continuous under high dynamic conditions. The obtained star vectors and extended Kalman filter (EKF) are then combined to conduct an angular velocity estimation to ensure region prediction of the star spot; this can be combined with the optical flow analysis result. Experiment results show that the method proposed in this paper has advantages in conditions of large angular velocity and large angular acceleration, despite the presence of noise. Higher functional density and better performance can be achieved; thus, the star tracker can be more widely applied in small satellites, remote sensing, and other complex space missions.

  2. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRitchie, Jennifer; McPherson, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterization of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction.

  3. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMacRitchie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterisation of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction.

  4. Automatic Data Normalization and Parameterization for Optical Motion Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Kobbelt

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Methods for optical motion capture often require time-consuming manual processing before the data can be used for subsequent tasks such as retargeting or character animation. These processing steps restrict the applicability of motion capturing especially for dynamic VR-environments with real time requirements. To solve these problems, we present two additional, fast and automatic processing stages based on our motion capture pipeline presented in [ HSK05 ]. A normalization step aligns the recorded coordinate systems with the skeleton structure to yield a common and intuitive data basis across different recording sessions. A second step computes a parameterization based on automatically extracted main movement axes to generate a compact motion description. Our method does not restrict the placement of marker bodies nor the recording setup, and only requires a short calibration phase.

  5. Observation of single artificial atom optical bi-stability and its application to single-shot readout in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyan; Ginossar, Eran; Guy, Mikhael; Reed, Matthew; Paik, Hanhee; Bishop, Lev S.; Sears, Adam; Petrenko, Andrei; Brecht, Teresa; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven; Schoelkopf, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The high power transient behavior of superconducting qubit-cavity systems has recently been used to perform high fidelity readout of transmon qubits [1]. We show that in the steady state, the system exhibits a bi-stable behavior that can be observed on the single-shot level, with the cavity state switching stochastically between dim and bright states. The switching times are shown to be long compared to the cavity and qubit lifetimes. Some features of the bi-stability can be explained by mean field theory, while its switching dynamics is studied with large scale simulations. Understanding these dynamics will be crucial for studying the transient response, an essential aspect of the qubit readout. We will discuss progress on optimizing readout by shaping the measurement pulse. [4pt] [1] M. D. Reed, L. DiCarlo, B. R. Johnson, L. Sun, D. I. Schuster, L. Frunzio, and R. J. Schoelkopf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 173601 (2010)

  6. Vibration-displacement measurement employing phase tracking technique with an optical fiber Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sen; Li, Zhaoying; Xie, Fang

    2011-11-01

    A vibration-displacement measurement system by tracking the phase variation of an optical fiber Michelson interferometer with an electronic feedback loop is presented. The measurement system includes an electronic feedback loop which is used to track the phase variation induced by the measured vibration-displacement and provides a sense of direction of the displacement simultaneously. The measurement system is designed to be capable of measuring vibration-displacement with frequencies up to 200Hz and the measurement resolution can reach 13nm.

  7. Sun-tracking optical element realized using thermally activated transparency-switching material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostoleris, Harry; Stefancich, Marco; Lilliu, Samuele; Chiesa, Matteo

    2015-07-27

    We present a proof of concept demonstration of a novel optical element: a light-responsive aperture that can track a moving light beam. The element is created using a thermally-activated transparency-switching material composed of paraffin wax and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Illumination of the material with a focused beam causes the formation of a localized transparency at the focal spot location, due to local heating caused by absorption of a portion of the incident light. An application is proposed in a new design for a self-tracking solar collector.

  8. Pupil Tracking for Real-Time Motion Corrected Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M.; Nankivil, Derek; Viehland, Christian; Keller, Brenton; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Volumetric acquisition with anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT) is necessary to obtain accurate representations of the tissue structure and to account for asymmetries of the anterior eye anatomy. Additionally, recent interest in imaging of anterior segment vasculature and aqueous humor flow resulted in application of OCT angiography techniques to generate en face and 3D micro-vasculature maps of the anterior segment. Unfortunately, ASOCT structural and vasculature imaging systems do not capture volumes instantaneously and are subject to motion artifacts due to involuntary eye motion that may hinder their accuracy and repeatability. Several groups have demonstrated real-time tracking for motion-compensated in vivo OCT retinal imaging, but these techniques are not applicable in the anterior segment. In this work, we demonstrate a simple and low-cost pupil tracking system integrated into a custom swept-source OCT system for real-time motion-compensated anterior segment volumetric imaging. Pupil oculography hardware coaxial with the swept-source OCT system enabled fast detection and tracking of the pupil centroid. The pupil tracking ASOCT system with a field of view of 15 x 15 mm achieved diffraction-limited imaging over a lateral tracking range of +/- 2.5 mm and was able to correct eye motion at up to 22 Hz. Pupil tracking ASOCT offers a novel real-time motion compensation approach that may facilitate accurate and reproducible anterior segment imaging. PMID:27574800

  9. Optical Tracking With Two Markers for Robust Prospective Motion Correction for Brain Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya; Zahneisen, Benjamin; Keating, Brian; Herbst, Michael; Chang, Linda; Zaitsev, Maxim; Ernst, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Object Prospective motion correction (PMC) during brain imaging using camera-based tracking of a skin-attached marker may suffer from problems including loss of marker visibility due to the coil and false correction due to non-rigid-body facial motion, such as frowning or squinting. A modified PMC system is introduced to mitigate these problems and increase the robustness of motion correction. Materials and Methods The method relies on simultaneously tracking two markers, each providing six degrees of freedom, that are placed on the forehead. This allows us to track head motion when one marker is obscured, and detect skin movements to prevent false corrections. Experiments were performed to compare the performance of the two-marker motion correction technique to the previous single-marker approach. Results Experiments validate the theory developed for adaptive marker tracking and skin movement detection, and demonstrate improved image quality during obstruction of the line-of-sight of one marker, when subjects squint, or when subjects squint and move simultaneously. Conclusion The proposed methods eliminate two common failure modes of PMC and substantially improve the robustness of PMC and can be applied to other optical tracking systems capable of tracking multiple markers. The methods presented can be adapted to the use of more than two markers. PMID:26121941

  10. Readout Architecture for Hybrid Pixel Readout Chips

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)694170; Westerlund, Tomi; Wyllie, Ken

    The original contribution of this thesis to knowledge are novel digital readout architectures for hybrid pixel readout chips. The thesis presents asynchronous bus-based architecture, a data-node based column architecture and a network-based pixel matrix architecture for data transportation. It is shown that the data-node architecture achieves readout efficiency 99 % with half the output rate as a bus-based system. The network-based solution avoids ``broken'' columns due to some manufacturing errors, and it distributes internal data traffic more evenly across the pixel matrix than column-based architectures. An improvement of $>$ 10 % to the efficiency is achieved with uniform and non-uniform hit occupancies. Architectural design has been done using transaction level modeling ($TLM$) and sequential high-level design techniques for reducing the design and simulation time. It has been possible to simulate tens of column and full chip architectures using the high-level techniques. A decrease of $>$ 10 in run-time...

  11. Real-time surface tracking system using common-path spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keo-Sik; Park, Hyoung-Jun; Kang, Hyun Seo; Kang, Jin U.; Song, Chul-Gyu

    2012-11-01

    An enhanced surface tracking system based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) modality has been developed and tested for use in a surgical guidance system. A surface detection algorithm based on a Savitzky-Golay filter of A-scan data and thresholding was applied to real-time depth tracking. The algorithm output controlled a motorized stage to adjust the probe position according to the sample's topological variance in real-time. As a result, the root mean square error (RMSE: 4.2 μm) of our algorithm was relatively lower than the conventional method (RMSE: 16.6 μm). Also, OCT images obtained using the algorithm showed a significantly extended imaging range and active surface tracking in real time. Consequently, the devised method demonstrated potential for use in systems for guiding surgical robots and endoscopic OCT.

  12. Theory and design of line-to-point focus solar concentrators with tracking secondary optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Thomas; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Pedretti, Andrea; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2013-12-10

    The two-stage line-to-point focus solar concentrator with tracking secondary optics is introduced. Its design aims to reduce the cost per m(2) of collecting aperture by maintaining a one-axis tracking trough as the primary concentrator, while allowing the thermodynamic limit of concentration in 2D of 215× to be significantly surpassed by the implementation of a tracking secondary stage. The limits of overall geometric concentration are found to exceed 4000× when hollow secondary concentrators are used, and 6000× when the receiver is immersed in a dielectric material of refractive index n=1.5. Three exemplary collectors, with geometric concentrations in the range of 500-1500× are explored and their geometric performance is ascertained by Monte Carlo ray-tracing. The proposed solar concentrator design is well-suited for large-scale applications with discrete, flat receivers requiring concentration ratios in the range 500-2000×.

  13. Tracking lung tumour motion using a dynamically weighted optical flow algorithm and electronic portal imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, P. T.; Crow, R.; Van Nest, S.; Sasaki, D.; Pistorius, S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility and accuracy of using a computer vision algorithm and electronic portal images to track the motion of a tumour-like target from a breathing phantom. A multi-resolution optical flow algorithm that incorporates weighting based on the differences between frames was used to obtain a set of vectors corresponding to the motion between two frames. A global value representing the average motion was obtained by computing the average weighted mean from the set of vectors. The tracking accuracy of the optical flow algorithm as a function of the breathing rate and target visibility was investigated. Synthetic images with different contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were created, and motions were tracked. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm was compared against potentiometer measurements giving average position errors of 0.6 ± 0.2 mm, 0.2 ± 0.2 mm and 0.1 ± 0.1 mm with average velocity errors of 0.2 ± 0.2 mm s-1, 0.4 ± 0.3 mm s-1 and 0.6 ± 0.5 mm s-1 for 6, 12 and 16 breaths min-1 motions, respectively. The cumulative average position error reduces more rapidly with the greater number of breathing cycles present in higher breathing rates. As the CNR increases from 4.27 to 5.6, the average relative error approaches zero and the errors are less dependent on the velocity. When tracking a tumour on a patient's digitally reconstructed radiograph images, a high correlation was obtained between the dynamically weighted optical flow algorithm, a manual delineation process and a centroid tracking algorithm. While the accuracy of our approach is similar to that of other methods, the benefits are that it does not require manual delineation of the target and can therefore provide accurate real-time motion estimation during treatment.

  14. Real-time optical tracking for motion compensated irradiation with scanned particle beams at CNAO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattori, G., E-mail: giovanni.fattori@psi.ch [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Seregni, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Pella, A. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Riboldi, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Capasso, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Donetti, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Ciocca, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Giordanengo, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Pullia, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Marchetto, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Baroni, G. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2016-08-11

    Purpose: We describe the interface developed at the National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy in Pavia to provide the dose delivery systems with real time respiratory motion information captured with an optical tracking system. An experimental study is presented to assess the technical feasibility of the implemented organ motion compensation framework, by analyzing the film response when irradiated with proton beams. Methods: The motion monitoring solution is based on a commercial hardware for motion capture running in-house developed software for respiratory signal processing. As part of the integration, the latency of data transmission to the dose delivery system was experimentally quantified and accounted for by signal time prediction. A respiratory breathing phantom is presented and used to test tumor tracking based either on the optical measurement of the target position or internal-external correlation models and beam gating, as driven by external surrogates. Beam tracking was tested considering the full target motion excursion (25×18 mm), whereas it is limited to 6×2 mm in the gating window. The different motion mitigation strategies were evaluated by comparing the experimental film responses with respect to static irradiation conditions. Dose inhomogeneity (IC) and conformity (CI) are provided as main indexes for dose quality assessment considering the irradiation in static condition as reference. Results: We measured 20.6 ms overall latency for motion signal processing. Dose measurements showed that beam tracking largely preserved dose homogeneity and conformity, showing maximal IC and CI variations limited to +0.10 and −0.01 with respect to the static reference. Gating resulted in slightly larger discrepancies (ΔIC=+0.20, ΔCI=−0.13) due to uncompensated residual motion in the gating window. Conclusions: The preliminary beam tracking and gating results verified the functionality of the prototypal solution for organ motion compensation based on

  15. FISST Based Method for Multi-Target Tracking in the Image Plane of Optical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Xu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A finite set statistics (FISST-based method is proposed for multi-target tracking in the image plane of optical sensors. The method involves using signal amplitude information in probability hypothesis density (PHD filter which is derived from FISST to improve multi-target tracking performance. The amplitude of signals generated by the optical sensor is modeled first, from which the amplitude likelihood ratio between target and clutter is derived. An alternative approach is adopted for the situations where the signal noise ratio (SNR of target is unknown. Then the PHD recursion equations incorporated with signal information are derived and the Gaussian mixture (GM implementation of this filter is given. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves significantly better performance than the generic PHD filter. Moreover, our method has much lower computational complexity in the scenario with high SNR and dense clutter.

  16. Tissue motion tracking at the edges of a radiation treatment field using local optical flow analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, P. T.; Pistorius, S.

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility and accuracy of tracking the motion of an intruding organ-at-risk (OAR) at the edges of a treatment field using a local optical flow analysis of electronic portal images. An intruding OAR was simulated by modifying the portal images obtained by irradiating a programmable phantom's lung tumour. A rectangular treatment aperture was assumed and the edges of the beam's eye view (BEV) were partitioned into clusters/grids according to the width of the multi-leaf collimators (MLC). The optical flow velocities were calculated and the motion accuracy in these clusters was analysed. A velocity error of 0.4 ± 1.4 mm/s with a linearity of 1.04 for tracking an object intruding at 10mm/s (max) was obtained.

  17. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepankiewicz, A.

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb-Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  18. A magneto-optical isolator based on series-coupled race-track resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Jin, Yichang; Yu, Hui; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel kind of magneto-optical (MO) isolators based on series-coupled race-track resonators. The perturbation theory is used to calculate the non-reciprocal phase shift (NRPS) induced by the MO effect. The numerical result indicates that the isolation is greatly enhanced by the box-like spectra of series-coupled resonators. Optical isolation ratio for the first, second, and third order devices are 7.8, 21, and 36.2 dB, respectively.

  19. Three-Dimensional High-Resolution Optical/X-Ray Stereoscopic Tracking Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Soyoung S.; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of three-dimensional (3-D) three-component velocity fields is of great importance in a variety of research and industrial applications for understanding materials processing, fluid physics, and strain/displacement measurements. The 3-D experiments in these fields most likely inhibit the use of conventional techniques, which are based only on planar and optically-transparent-field observation. Here, we briefly review the current status of 3-D diagnostics for motion/velocity detection, for both optical and x-ray systems. As an initial step for providing 3-D capabilities, we nave developed stereoscopic tracking velocimetry (STV) to measure 3-D flow/deformation through optical observation. The STV is advantageous in system simplicity, for continually observing 3- D phenomena in near real-time. In an effort to enhance the data processing through automation and to avoid the confusion in tracking numerous markers or particles, artificial neural networks are employed to incorporate human intelligence. Our initial optical investigations have proven the STV to be a very viable candidate for reliably measuring 3-D flow motions. With previous activities are focused on improving the processing efficiency, overall accuracy, and automation based on the optical system, the current efforts is directed to the concurrent expansion to the x-ray system for broader experimental applications.

  20. Slip detection and grip adjustment using optical tracking in prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Luke; Singhal, Girish; Kaliki, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a closed loop control system that adjusts the grasping force of a prosthetic hand based on the amount of object slip detected by an optical tracking sensor. The system was designed for the i-Limb (a multi-fingered prosthetic hand from Touch Bionics Inc.) and is comprised of an optical sensor embedded inside a silicone prosthetic glove and a control algorithm. In a proof of concept study to demonstrate the effectiveness of optical tracking in slip sensing, we record slip rate while increasing the weight held in the grasp of the hand and compare two cases: grip adjustment on and grip adjustment off. The average slip rate was found to be 0.314 slips/(s · oz) without grip adjustment and 0.0411 slips/(s · oz) with grip adjustment. This paper discusses the advantages of the optical approach in slip detection and presents the experiment and results utilizing the optical sensor and grip control algorithm.

  1. High-precision, three-dimensional tracking of mouse whisker movements with optical motion capture technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snigdha eRoy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The mystacial vibrissae or whiskers in rodents are sensitive tactile hairs emerging from both sides of the face. Rats and mice actively move these whiskers during exploration. The neuronal mechanisms controlling whisker movements and the sensory representation of whisker tactile information are widely studied as a model for sensorimotor processing in mammals. Studies of the natural whisker movement patterns during exploration and tactile examination are still in their early stages. Tracking the movements of whiskers is technically challenging as they move relatively fast and are very thin, particularly in mice. Existing systems detect light-beam interruptions by the whiskers or use high-speed video to track whisker movements in one or two dimensions. Here we describe a method for tracking the movements of mouse whiskers in 3 dimensions (3D using using optical motion capture technology. Optical motion capture technology tracks the movements of small retro-reflective markers attached to whiskers of a head-fixed mouse with a spatial resolution of <0.5mm in all three dimensions and a temporal resolution of 5msec (200 fps. The system stores the 3D coordinates of the marker’s trajectories onto hard disk allowing a detailed analysis of movement trajectories bilateral coordination.

  2. Optical retrodirective tracking system approach using an array of phase conjugators for communication and power transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Christian A; Matoba, Osamu; Kaya, Nobuyuki

    2007-07-20

    A new concept for a retrodirective tracking system applicable for communication and power transmission is proposed. In the proposed concept, the power transmitter utilizes a receiver's pilot signal to obtain information about its direction by conjugating the signal's phase inside a nonlinear medium. Power is therefore transmitted back to the receiver by the phase-conjugated signal beam. The power can be concentrated by an array of phase conjugators, which provides a large aperture so that the intensity can be increased on the receiver's photovoltaic panels compared to a single element. Controlling the phase and the direction of the readout beams in the four-wave-mixing process provides control over the interference pattern, its position, and its size. A numerical analysis is given for the phase and spot size control, and measurements with two Co-doped Sr(x)Ba(1-x)Nb(2)O(6) (Co:SBN) crystals confirm the occurrence of interference that is achieved for the case of two beams.

  3. Two-dimensional cell tracking by FPGA-optical correlation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, Iraís; Torres-Cisneros, M.; Aviña-Cervantes, J. G.; Ibarra-Manzano, O. G.; Debeir, O.; Ledesma-Orozco, S.; Pérez-Careta, E.; Sanchez-Mondragón, J. J.

    2009-06-01

    Our work uses 1080 images sequence obtained from "in vitro" samples taken every 4 min from a microscope under phase contrast technique. These images are in JPEG format and are 500×700 pixels size with a compression rate of 3:1. We developed an algorithm and characterize it over several image operations against the tracking effectiveness and its robustness respect mitosis and cell shape change. Image equalization, dilation and erosion were the image processing procedures founded to provide best tracking results. Equalization procedure, for example, required a time delay of 5 sec for a size target of 60×90 pixels and 9 sec for size target of 89×100 pixels. This algorithm was implemented into a FPGA which controlled our optical correlator in order to performance all Fourier operations by optical method. Our results showed that the use of the optical correlator can reduce the time consuming in the image process until for 90% which able us to track cells in vascular structure.

  4. Instrumentation by distributed optical fiber sensors of a new ballastless track structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapeleau, Xavier; Cottineau, Louis-Marie; Sedran, Thierry; Gueguen, Ivan; Cailliau, Joël

    2013-04-01

    While relatively expensive to build, ballastless track structures are presently seen as an attractive alternative to conventional ballast. With its service life of at least 60 years, they require little maintenance and hence they offer great availability. Other reasons for using ballastless tracks instead of ballasted tracks are the lack of suitable ballast material and the need of less noise and vibration for high-speed, in particularly. A new ballastless track structure has been designed to be circulated up to 300km/h, with a target life of 100 years. It is an interoperable way on concrete slabs that are cast-in-place and slip formed. This structure has been built and tested at the scale one in our laboratory. Indeed, ten millions cyclic loads were applied at 2.5Hz to evaluate the fatigue behaviour under selected mechanical and thermal conditions. To monitor the thermo-mechanical behavior of this new structure and to verify the numerical simulations used for its design, a lot of sensors have been embedded. In particularly, we have tested an optical fiber as distributed sensors to measure strain distribution in the railway model. This sensor can also be used to detect, localize and monitor cracks in concrete slabs. The optical fiber sensing technique ("Rayleigh technique") used in this experimentation has a centimetric spatial resolution which allows to measure complex strain profiles unlike electrical strain gauges which only give local information. Firstly, optical cables used as sensors have been successfully embedded and attached to the reinforcing steel bars in the structure. We have noted that they are resistant enough to resist concrete pouring and working activities. Secondly, strains measured by conventional strain gauges has confirmed the quality of the strain profiles measurements obtained by optical fiber sensors. Moreover, we have found a good agreement between experimental profiles measurements and those obtained by numerical simulations. Early

  5. The optical measurement of large cluster tracks in a gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Dong; Han, Jifeng; Bai, Lixin

    2016-08-01

    We propose an optical method based on Rayleigh scattering for the direct measurement of cluster tracks produced by a high-pressure gas jet. The tracks of the argon and methane clusters are acquired by a high-speed camera. It is found that the cluster sizes of these tracks are within the range of 7E + 03~1E + 07 for argon and 2E + 06~4E + 08 for methane. Most argon tracks are continuous and their intensity changes gradually, while the majority of the methane tracks are separated into discrete fractions and their intensity alters periodically along the flight path, which may indicate the methane clusters are more unstable and easily to break up. Special methane clusters which may fly at an axial velocity of less than 2.5m/s are also found. This method is very sensitive to large gas cluster and has broad application prospects in cluster physics.

  6. Development and Validation of a Near-Infrared Optical System for Tracking Surgical Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qinyong; Cai, Ken; Yang, Rongqian; Chen, Huazhou; Wang, Zhigang; Zhou, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Surgical navigation systems can help doctors maximize the accuracy of surgeries, minimize operation durations, avoid mistakes, and improve the survival chances of patients. The tracking of device is an important component in surgical navigation systems. However, commercial surgical tracking devices are expensive, thus hindering the development of surgical navigation systems, particularly in developing countries. Therefore, an accurate and low-cost near-infrared optical tracking system is presented in this study for the real-time tracking of surgical tools and for measuring and displaying the positions of these tools relative to lesions and other targets inside a patient's body. A relative algorithm for the registration of surgical tools is also proposed in this paper to yield easy, safe, and precise tracking. Experiments are conducted to test the performance of the system. Results show that the mean square errors of the distances between the light-emitting points on the surgical tools are less than 0.3 mm, with the mean square error of distance between the tip and light-emitting points is less than 0.025 mm and that between two adjacent corner points is 0.2714 mm.

  7. Targeted illumination and tracking using optical fiber probe for optogenetics application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep M.; Matham, Murukeshan V.

    2016-03-01

    There was a renewed interest, during the recent years, in the imaging and tracking of targeted cells or organelles for a variety of biomedical and lab-on a chip applications that include particles movement. However, nonspecific illumination during tracking can have adverse effects such as heating, reduced image contrast and photo bleaching. In fact, current available tracking and imaging systems are unable to selectively illuminate the particle being tracked. To fill this void, we have developed a fiber optics based probe system incorporating a spatial light modulator (SLM) and an imaging fiber bundle for selective illumination on the targeted particle. A GRIN lens is attached at the distal endface of the image fiber bundle for optimised illumination and collection. A tracking algorithm is developed in order to enable controlled illumination through SLM to target the illumination point or location in accordance with the particle movement and size variation. Further with this probe, particles can be illuminated with light pulses of controllable duty cycle and frequency. The proposed methodology and developed probe have good significance and expected to find potential applications areas such as optogenetics, cell signalling studies, and lab-on a chip systems.

  8. System Design and Implementation of the Virginia Tech Optical Satellite Tracking Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, D.; Black, J.

    2016-09-01

    The Virginia Tech Optical Satellite Tracking Telescope (VTOST) aims to test the feasibility of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) designed tracking system for Space Situational Awareness (SSA) data contribution. A novel approach is considered, combining two COTS systems, a high-powered telescope, built for astronomy purposes, and a larger field of view (FOV) camera. Using only publicly available two-line element sets (TLEs), orbital propagation accuracy degrades quickly with time from epoch and is often not accurate enough to task a high-powered, small FOV telescope. Under this experimental approach, the larger FOV camera is used to acquire and track the resident space object (RSO) and provide a real-time pointing update to allow the high-powered telescope to track the RSO and provide possible resolved imagery. VTOST is designed as a remotely taskable sensor, based on current network architecture, capable of serving as a platform for further SSA studies, including unresolved and resolved imagery analysis, network tasking, and orbit determination. Initial design considerations are based on the latest Raven class and other COTS based telescope research, including research by the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL), ExoAnalytic Solutions, and other university level telescope projects. A holistic system design, including astronomy, image processing, and tracking methods, in a low-budget environment is considered. Method comparisons and results of the system design process are presented.

  9. Wave-guided Optical Waveguides tracked and coupled using dynamic diffractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael

    With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro-actuation requ......With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro......-actuation requires the optimization of optical forces and optical torques that, in turn, requires the optimization of the underlying light-matter interaction [1]. We have previously proposed and demonstrated micro-targeted light-delivery and the opto-mechanical capabilities of so-called wave-guided optical...

  10. RFID-over-Fiber system for agricultural exploitations - Wireless track and trace with range extension using optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter; Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Cavalcante, Lucas Costa Pereira

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes and demonstrates an RFIDover-Fiber wireless track and trace system using active RFID tags and operating over distances up to 30 km of optical fiber and 35 meters of wireless readability......This paper proposes and demonstrates an RFIDover-Fiber wireless track and trace system using active RFID tags and operating over distances up to 30 km of optical fiber and 35 meters of wireless readability...

  11. Proposed SLR Optical Bench Required to Track Debris Using 1550 nm Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coyle, D. B.; McGarry, J. F.; Bufton, J.; Cheek, J. W.; Clarke, G.; Hull, S. M.; Skillman, D. R.; Stysley, P. R.; Sun, X.; Young, R. P.; Zagwodzki, T.

    2015-01-01

    A previous study has indicated that by using approx.1550 nm wavelengths a laser ranging system can track debris objects in an "eye safe" manner, while increasing the expected return rate by a factor of approx. 2/unit area of the telescope. In this presentation we develop the optical bench required to use approx.1550nm lasers, and integration with a 532nm system. We will use the optical bench configuration for NGSLR as the baseline, and indicate a possible injection point for the 1550 nm laser. The presentation will include what elements may need to be changed for transmitting the required power on the approx.1550nm wavelength, supporting the alignment of the laser to the telescope, and possible concerns for the telescope optics.

  12. A reconfigurable image tube using an external electronic image readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapington, J. S.; Howorth, J. R.; Milnes, J. S.

    2005-08-01

    We have designed and built a sealed tube microchannel plate (MCP) intensifier for optical/NUV photon counting applications suitable for 18, 25 and 40 mm diameter formats. The intensifier uses an electronic image readout to provide direct conversion of event position into electronic signals, without the drawbacks associated with phosphor screens and subsequent optical detection. The Image Charge technique is used to remove the readout from the intensifier vacuum enclosure, obviating the requirement for additional electrical vacuum feedthroughs and for the readout pattern to be UHV compatible. The charge signal from an MCP intensifier is capacitively coupled via a thin dielectric vacuum window to the electronic image readout, which is external to the sealed intensifier tube. The readout pattern is a separate item held in proximity to the dielectric window and can be easily detached, making the system easily reconfigurable. Since the readout pattern detects induced charge and is external to the tube, it can be constructed as a multilayer, eliminating the requirement for narrow insulator gaps and allowing it to be constructed using standard PCB manufacturing tolerances. We describe two readout patterns, the tetra wedge anode (TWA), an optimized 4 electrode device similar to the wedge and strip anode (WSA) but with a factor 2 improvement in resolution, and an 8 channel high speed 50 ohm device, both manufactured as multilayer PCBs. We present results of the detector imaging performance, image resolution, linearity and stability, and discuss the development of an integrated readout and electronics device based on these designs.

  13. "DNA Origami Traffic Lights" with a Split Aptamer Sensor for a Bicolor Fluorescence Readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Heidi-Kristin; Bauer, Jens; Steinmeyer, Jeannine; Kuzuya, Akinori; Niemeyer, Christof M; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2017-03-08

    A split aptamer for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was embedded as a recognition unit into two levers of a nanomechanical DNA origami construct by extension and modification of selected staple strands. An additional optical module in the stem of the split aptamer comprised two different cyanine-styryl dyes that underwent an energy transfer from green (donor) to red (acceptor) emission if two ATP molecules were bound as target molecule to the recognition module and thereby brought the dyes in close proximity. As a result, the ATP as a target triggered the DNA origami shape transition and yielded a fluorescence color change from green to red as readout. Conventional atomic force microscopy (AFM) images confirmed the topology change from the open form of the DNA origami in the absence of ATP into the closed form in the presence of the target molecule. The obtained closed/open ratios in the absence and presence of target molecules tracked well with the fluorescence color ratios and thereby validated the bicolor fluorescence readout. The correct positioning of the split aptamer as the functional unit farthest away from the fulcrum of the DNA origami was crucial for the aptasensing by fluorescence readout. The fluorescence color change allowed additionally to follow the topology change of the DNA origami aptasensor in real time in solution. The concepts of fluorescence energy transfer for bicolor readout in a split aptamer in solution, and AFM on surfaces, were successfully combined in a single DNA origami construct to obtain a bimodal readout. These results are important for future custom DNA devices for chemical-biological and bioanalytical purposes because they are not only working as simple aptamers but are also visible by AFM on the single-molecule level.

  14. INNER TRACKING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sharp

    The CMS Inner Tracking Detector continues to make good progress. The successful commissioning of ~ 25% of the Silicon Strip Tracker was completed in the Tracker Integration Facility (TIF) at CERN on 18 July 2007 and the Tracker has since been prepared for moving and installation into CMS at P5. The Tracker will be ready to move on schedule in September 2007. The Installation of the Tracker cooling pipes and LV cables between Patch Panel 1 (PP1) on the inside the CMS magnet cryostat, and the cooling plants and power system racks on the balconies has been completed. The optical fibres from PP1 to the readout FEDs in the USC will be installed in parallel with the installation of the EB/HB services, and will be completed in October. It is planned to install the Tracker into CMS at the end of October, after the completion of the installation of the EB/HB services. The Tracker will then be connected to the pre-installed services on YB0 and commissioned with CMS in December. The FPix and BPix continue to make ...

  15. Vibration-displacement measurements based on the phase tracking of an optical fiber Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang; Chen, Zhimin; Ren, Junyu; Feng, Qibo

    2009-04-01

    A vibration-displacement measurement system based on tracking the phase variation of an optical fiber Michelson interferometer with electronic feedback loops is presented. The measurement system includes two sets of electronic feedback loops. One electronic feedback loop is used to compensate for the low frequency drifts in the phase of the interferometric signal that results from environmental disturbances, while the other one is used to track the phase variation induced by the measured vibration displacement, and thus realize the measurement of the vibration displacement and provide a sense of direction of the displacement simultaneously. The measurement system is designed to be capable of measuring vibration displacement with frequencies ranging from 1.5 to 200 Hz, with measurement resolution reaching 13 nm.

  16. Delay Tracking of Spread-Spectrum Signals for Indoor Optical Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Salido-Monzú

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Delay tracking of spread-spectrum signals is widely used for ranging in radio frequency based navigation. Its use in non-coherent optical ranging, however, has not been extensively studied since optical channels are less subject to narrowband interference situations where these techniques become more useful. In this work, an early-late delay-locked loop adapted to indoor optical ranging is presented and analyzed. The specific constraints of free-space infrared channels in this context substantially differ from those typically considered in radio frequency applications. The tracking stage is part of an infrared differential range measuring system with application to mobile target indoor localization. Spread-spectrum signals are used in this context to provide accurate ranging while reducing the effect of multipath interferences. The performance of the stage regarding noise and dynamic errors is analyzed and validated, providing expressions that allow an adequate selection of the design parameters depending on the expected input signal characteristics. The behavior of the stage in a general multipath scenario is also addressed to estimate the multipath error bounds. The results, evaluated under realistic conditions corresponding to an 870 nm link with 25 MHz chip-rate, built with low-cost up-to-date devices, show that an overall error below 6% of a chip time can be achieved.

  17. Delay tracking of spread-spectrum signals for indoor optical ranging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salido-Monzú, David; Martín-Gorostiza, Ernesto; Lázaro-Galilea, José Luis; Martos-Naya, Eduardo; Wieser, Andreas

    2014-12-05

    Delay tracking of spread-spectrum signals is widely used for ranging in radio frequency based navigation. Its use in non-coherent optical ranging, however, has not been extensively studied since optical channels are less subject to narrowband interference situations where these techniques become more useful. In this work, an early-late delay-locked loop adapted to indoor optical ranging is presented and analyzed. The specific constraints of free-space infrared channels in this context substantially differ from those typically considered in radio frequency applications. The tracking stage is part of an infrared differential range measuring system with application to mobile target indoor localization. Spread-spectrum signals are used in this context to provide accurate ranging while reducing the effect of multipath interferences. The performance of the stage regarding noise and dynamic errors is analyzed and validated, providing expressions that allow an adequate selection of the design parameters depending on the expected input signal characteristics. The behavior of the stage in a general multipath scenario is also addressed to estimate the multipath error bounds. The results, evaluated under realistic conditions corresponding to an 870 nm link with 25 MHz chip-rate, built with low-cost up-to-date devices, show that an overall error below 6% of a chip time can be achieved.

  18. Tracking performance of upgraded "polished panel" optical receiver on NASA's 34 meter research antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilnrotter, V.

    There has been considerable interest in developing and demonstrating a hybrid “ polished panel” optical receiver concept that would replace the microwave panels on the Deep Space Network's (DSN) 34 meter antennas with highly polished aluminum panels, thus enabling simultaneous optical and microwave reception1. A test setup has been installed on the 34 meter research antenna at DSS-13 (Deep Space Station 13) at NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex in California in order to assess the feasibility of this concept. Here we describe the results of a recent effort to dramatically reduce the dimensions of the point-spread function (PSF) generated by a custom polished panel, thus enabling improved optical communications performance. The latest results are compared to the previous configuration in terms of quantifiable PSF improvement. In addition, the performance of acquisition and tracking algorithms designed specifically for the polished panel PSF are evaluated and compared, based on data obtained from real-time tracking of planets and bright stars with the 34 meter research antenna at DSS-13.

  19. Research on the acquisition and tracking simulation system of light beacon in satellite-ground optical communications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Tao; AI Yong; HUANG Hai-bo; SU Gui-bo

    2010-01-01

    @@ The study on the acquisition and tracking simulation system in satellite-ground optical communications is presented here.By applying global positioning system(GPS)coordinate calculation,the time needed in initial acquisition of light beacon can be reduced largely.Smith predictor is applied to compensate the mechanical hysteresis of tracking system and to improve the dynamic performance of the system.Tracking experiments over a i 6 km distance on the ground are conducted to verify the tracking of light beacon in satellite-ground optical communications.The standard deviation of horizontal coordinates is 35.3568 μrad and the maximum offset is 209.3675 μrad in stable tracking.

  20. Fast left ventricle tracking in CMR images using localized anatomical affine optical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirós, Sandro; Vilaça, João. L.; Morais, Pedro; Fonseca, Jaime C.; D'hooge, Jan; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In daily cardiology practice, assessment of left ventricular (LV) global function using non-invasive imaging remains central for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with cardiovascular diseases. Despite the different methodologies currently accessible for LV segmentation in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images, a fast and complete LV delineation is still limitedly available for routine use. In this study, a localized anatomically constrained affine optical flow method is proposed for fast and automatic LV tracking throughout the full cardiac cycle in short-axis CMR images. Starting from an automatically delineated LV in the end-diastolic frame, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries are propagated by estimating the motion between adjacent cardiac phases using optical flow. In order to reduce the computational burden, the motion is only estimated in an anatomical region of interest around the tracked boundaries and subsequently integrated into a local affine motion model. Such localized estimation enables to capture complex motion patterns, while still being spatially consistent. The method was validated on 45 CMR datasets taken from the 2009 MICCAI LV segmentation challenge. The proposed approach proved to be robust and efficient, with an average distance error of 2.1 mm and a correlation with reference ejection fraction of 0.98 (1.9 +/- 4.5%). Moreover, it showed to be fast, taking 5 seconds for the tracking of a full 4D dataset (30 ms per image). Overall, a novel fast, robust and accurate LV tracking methodology was proposed, enabling accurate assessment of relevant global function cardiac indices, such as volumes and ejection fraction

  1. PANDA straw tube detectors and readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzempek, P.; Panda Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    PANDA is a detector under construction dedicated to studies of production and interaction of particles in the charmonium mass range using antiproton beams in the momentum range of 1.5 - 15 GeV/c at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. PANDA consists of two spectrometers: a Target Spectrometer with a superconducting solenoid and a Forward Spectrometer using a large dipole magnet and covering the most forward angles (Θ < 10 °). In both spectrometers, the particle's trajectories in the magnetic field are measured using self-supporting straw tube detectors. The expected high count rates, reaching up to 1 MHz/straw, are one of the main challenges for the detectors and associated readout electronics. The paper presents the readout chain of the tracking system and the results of tests performed with realistic prototype setups. The readout chain consists of a newly developed ASIC chip (PASTTREC 〈 PANDASTTReadoutChip 〉) with amplification, signal shaping, tail cancellation, discriminator stages and Time Readout Boards as digitizer boards.

  2. Atmospheric-Fade-Tolerant Tracking and Pointing in Wireless Optical Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Gerardo; Lee, Shinhak

    2003-01-01

    An acquisition, tracking, and pointing (ATP) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, is intended to enable a terminal in a free-space optical communication system to continue to aim its transmitting laser beam toward a receiver at a remote terminal when the laser beacon signal from the remote terminal temporarily fades or drops out of sight altogether. Such fades and dropouts can be caused by adverse atmospheric conditions (e.g., rain or clouds). They can also occur when intervening objects block the line of sight between terminals as a result of motions of those objects or of either or both terminals

  3. Readout electronic for multichannel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kulibaba, V I; Naumov, S V

    2001-01-01

    Readout electronics based on the 128-channel chip 'Viking' (IDE AS inc., Norway) is considered. The chip 'Viking' integrates 128 low noise charge-sensitive preamplifiers with tunable CR-(RC) sup 2 shapers,analog memory and multiplexed readout to one output. All modules of readout electronics were designed and produced in KIPT taking into account the published recommendations of IDE AS inc.

  4. Optical flow based Kalman filter for body joint prediction and tracking using HOG-LBP matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Binu M.; Kendricks, Kimberley D.; Asari, Vijayan K.; Tuttle, Ronald F.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a real-time novel framework for tracking specific joints in the human body on low resolution imagery using optical flow based Kalman tracker without the need of a depth sensor. Body joint tracking is necessary for a variety of surveillance based applications such as recognizing gait signatures of individuals, identifying the motion patterns associated with a particular action and the corresponding interactions with objects in the scene to classify a certain activity. The proposed framework consists of two stages; the initialization stage and the tracking stage. In the initialization stage, the joints to be tracked are either manually marked or automatically obtained from other joint detection algorithms in the first few frames within a window of interest and appropriate image descriptions of each joint are computed. We employ the use of a well-known image coding scheme known as the Local Binary Patterns (LBP) to represent the joint local region where this image coding removes the variance to non-uniform lighting conditions as well as enhances the underlying edges and corner. The image descriptions of the joint region would then include a histogram computed from the LBP-coded ROI and a HOG (Histogram of Oriented Gradients) descriptor to represent the edge information. Next the tracking stage can be divided into two phases: Optical flow based detection of joints in corresponding frames of the sequence and prediction /correction phases of Kalman tracker with respect to the joint coordinates. Lucas Kanade optical flow is used to locate the individual joints in consecutive frames of the video based on their location in the previous frame. But more often, mismatches can occur due to the rotation of the joint region and the rotation variance of the optical flow matching technique. The mismatch is then determined by comparing the joint region descriptors using Chi-squared metric between a pair of frames and depending on this statistic, either the prediction

  5. Generation of 2.1 m wavelength from degenerate high gray track resistant potassium titanyl phosphate optical parametric oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Verma; C Mishra; V Kumar; M Yadav; K C Bahuguna; N S Vasan; S P Gaba

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of degenerate optical parametric generation using a high gray track resistant potassium titanyl phosphate (HGTR KTP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO). An average output power of 7 W at 10 kHz has been achieved that includes both signal and idler powers near degeneracy using 20Waverage power from a 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 pump source corresponding to an optical conversion efficiency of 35%.

  6. Research on Airborne Electro-Optical Tracking and Sighting System Based on Fuzzy PID and H∞ Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Airborne electro-optical tracking and sighting system is a three-degree-of-freedom angular position servo system which is influenced by multi-disturbance, and its control system consists of stabilizing and tracking components. Stabilizing control is applied to track angular velocity order and control multi-disturbance under airborne condition, and its robustness should be very good; tracking control is applied to compensate tracking error of angular position. A mathematical model is established by taking the control of yaw loop as example. H∞ stabilizing controller is designed by taking the advantage of H∞ control robustness and combining with Kalman filter. A fuzzy control is introduced in general PID control to design a decoupled fuzzy Smith estimating PID controller for tracking control. Simulation research shows that the control effect of airborne electro-optical tracking and sighting system based on fuzzy PID and H∞ control is good, especially when the model parameters change and the multi-disturbance exists, the system capability has little fall, but this system still can effectively track a target.

  7. Tracking Performance of Upgraded "Polished Panel" Optical Receiver on NASA's 34 Meter Research Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilnrotter, Victor

    2013-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in developing and demonstrating a hybrid "polished panel" optical receiver concept that would replace the microwave panels on the Deep Space Network's (DSN) 34 meter antennas with highly polished aluminum panels, thus enabling simultaneous opticaland microwave reception. A test setup has been installed on the 34 meter research antenna at DSS-13 (Deep Space Station 13) at NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex in California in order to assess the feasibility of this concept. Here we describe the results of a recent effort todramatically reduce the dimensions of the point-spread function (PSF) generated by a custom polished panel, thus enabling improved optical communications performance. The latest results are compared to the previous configuration in terms of quantifiable PSF improvement. In addition, the performance of acquisition and tracking algorithms designed specifically for the polished panel PSF are evaluated and compared, based on data obtained from real-time tracking of planets and bright stars with the 34 meter research antenna at DSS-13.

  8. Tracking Performance of Upgraded "Polished Panel" Optical Receiver on NASA's 34 Meter Research Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilnrotter, Victor

    2013-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in developing and demonstrating a hybrid "polished panel" optical receiver concept that would replace the microwave panels on the Deep Space Network's (DSN) 34 meter antennas with highly polished aluminum panels, thus enabling simultaneous opticaland microwave reception. A test setup has been installed on the 34 meter research antenna at DSS-13 (Deep Space Station 13) at NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex in California in order to assess the feasibility of this concept. Here we describe the results of a recent effort todramatically reduce the dimensions of the point-spread function (PSF) generated by a custom polished panel, thus enabling improved optical communications performance. The latest results are compared to the previous configuration in terms of quantifiable PSF improvement. In addition, the performance of acquisition and tracking algorithms designed specifically for the polished panel PSF are evaluated and compared, based on data obtained from real-time tracking of planets and bright stars with the 34 meter research antenna at DSS-13.

  9. Hierarchical fringe tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, Romain G; Boskri, Abdelkarim; Folcher, Jean-Pierre; Lagarde, Stephane; Bresson, Yves; Benkhaldoum, Zouhair; Lazrek, Mohamed; Rakshit, Suvendu

    2014-01-01

    The limiting magnitude is a key issue for optical interferometry. Pairwise fringe trackers based on the integrated optics concepts used for example in GRAVITY seem limited to about K=10.5 with the 8m Unit Telescopes of the VLTI, and there is a general "common sense" statement that the efficiency of fringe tracking, and hence the sensitivity of optical interferometry, must decrease as the number of apertures increases, at least in the near infrared where we are still limited by detector readout noise. Here we present a Hierarchical Fringe Tracking (HFT) concept with sensitivity at least equal to this of a two apertures fringe trackers. HFT is based of the combination of the apertures in pairs, then in pairs of pairs then in pairs of groups. The key HFT module is a device that behaves like a spatial filter for two telescopes (2TSF) and transmits all or most of the flux of a cophased pair in a single mode beam. We give an example of such an achromatic 2TSF, based on very broadband dispersed fringes analyzed by g...

  10. Error analysis and algorithm implementation for an improved optical-electric tracking device based on MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Wu, Qian-zhong

    2013-09-01

    In order to improve the precision of optical-electric tracking device, proposing a kind of improved optical-electric tracking device based on MEMS, in allusion to the tracking error of gyroscope senor and the random drift, According to the principles of time series analysis of random sequence, establish AR model of gyro random error based on Kalman filter algorithm, then the output signals of gyro are multiple filtered with Kalman filter. And use ARM as micro controller servo motor is controlled by fuzzy PID full closed loop control algorithm, and add advanced correction and feed-forward links to improve response lag of angle input, Free-forward can make output perfectly follow input. The function of lead compensation link is to shorten the response of input signals, so as to reduce errors. Use the wireless video monitor module and remote monitoring software (Visual Basic 6.0) to monitor servo motor state in real time, the video monitor module gathers video signals, and the wireless video module will sent these signals to upper computer, so that show the motor running state in the window of Visual Basic 6.0. At the same time, take a detailed analysis to the main error source. Through the quantitative analysis of the errors from bandwidth and gyro sensor, it makes the proportion of each error in the whole error more intuitive, consequently, decrease the error of the system. Through the simulation and experiment results shows the system has good following characteristic, and it is very valuable for engineering application.

  11. Dual-readout Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, N; Cardini, A.; Cascella, M.; Cei, F.; De Pedis, D.; Fracchia, S.; Franchino, S.; Fraternali, M.; Gaudio, G.; Genova, P.; Hauptman, J.; La Rotonda, L.; Lee, S.; Livan, M.; Meoni, E.; Moggi, A.; Pinci, D.; Policicchio, A.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sill, A.; Venturelli, T.; Wigmans, R.

    2013-01-01

    The RD52 Project at CERN is a pure instrumentation experiment whose goal is to un- derstand the fundamental limitations to hadronic energy resolution, and other aspects of energy measurement, in high energy calorimeters. We have found that dual-readout calorimetry provides heretofore unprecedented information event-by-event for energy resolution, linearity of response, ease and robustness of calibration, fidelity of data, and particle identification, including energy lost to binding energy in nuclear break-up. We believe that hadronic energy resolutions of {\\sigma}/E $\\approx$ 1 - 2% are within reach for dual-readout calorimeters, enabling for the first time comparable measurement preci- sions on electrons, photons, muons, and quarks (jets). We briefly describe our current progress and near-term future plans. Complete information on all aspects of our work is available at the RD52 website http://highenergy.phys.ttu.edu/dream/.

  12. Dual-readout Calorimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Akchurin, N.; Bedeschi, F.; Cardini, A.; Cascella, M.; Cei, F.; Pedis, D.; Fracchia, S.; Franchino, S.; Fraternali, M.; Gaudio, G.; P. Genova; Hauptman, J.; La Rotonda, L.; Lee, S.; Livan, M.(INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia, Italy)

    2013-01-01

    The RD52 Project at CERN is a pure instrumentation experiment whose goal is to understand the fundamental limitations to hadronic energy resolution, and other aspects of energy measurement, in high energy calorimeters. We have found that dual-readout calorimetry provides heretofore unprecedented information event-by-event for energy resolution, linearity of response, ease and robustness of calibration, fidelity of data, and particle identification, including energy lost to binding energy in n...

  13. Fluoroscopic bone fragment tracking for surgical navigation in femur fracture reduction by incorporating optical tracking of hip joint rotation center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yoshikazu; Tashiro, Takahito; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Koyama, Tsuyoshi; Maeda, Yuki; Tamura, Yuichi; Saito, Masanobu; Tamura, Shin'ichi; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Sugita, Naohiko; Sakuma, Ichiro; Ochi, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2007-09-01

    A new method for fluoroscopic tracking of a proximal bone fragment in femoral fracture reduction is presented. The proposed method combines 2-D and 3-D image registration from single-view fluoroscopy with tracking of the head center position of the proximal femoral fragment to improve the accuracy of fluoroscopic registration without the need for repeated manual adjustment of the C-arm as required in stereo-view registrations. Kinematic knowledge of the hip joint, which has a positional correspondence with the femoral head center and the pelvis acetabular center, allows the position of the femoral fragment to be determined from pelvis tracking. The stability of the proposed method with respect to fluoroscopic image noise and the desired continuity of the fracture reduction operation is demonstrated, and the accuracy of tracking is shown to be superior to that achievable by single-view image registration, particularly in depth translation.

  14. Self-induced polarization tracking, tunneling effect and modal attraction in optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Guasoni, Massimiliano; Bony, Pierre-Yves; Wabnitz, Stefan; Fatome, Julien

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the observation and exploitation of the capability of light to self-organize its state-of-polarization, upon propagation in optical fibers, by means of a device called Omnipolarizer. The principle of operation of this system consists in a counter-propagating four-wave mixing interaction between an incident signal and its backward replica generated at the fiber output thanks to a reflective fiber loop. We have exploited this self-induced polarization tracking phenomenon for all-optical data processing and successfully demonstrated the spontaneous repolarization of a 40-Gbit/s On-Off keying optical signal without noticeable impairments. Moreover, the strong local coupling between the two counter-propagating waves has also revealed a fascinating aspect of the Omnipolarizer called polarization-based tunneling effect. This intrinsic property enables us to instantaneously let jump a polarization information onto the reflected signal, long before the expected time-of-flight induced by the ro...

  15. Statistical Track-Before-Detect Methods Applied to Faint Optical Observations of Resident Space Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, K.; Yanagisawa, T.; Uetsuhara, M.

    Automated detection and tracking of faint objects in optical, or bearing-only, sensor imagery is a topic of immense interest in space surveillance. Robust methods in this realm will lead to better space situational awareness (SSA) while reducing the cost of sensors and optics. They are especially relevant in the search for high area-to-mass ratio (HAMR) objects, as their apparent brightness can change significantly over time. A track-before-detect (TBD) approach has been shown to be suitable for faint, low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) images of resident space objects (RSOs). TBD does not rely upon the extraction of feature points within the image based on some thresholding criteria, but rather directly takes as input the intensity information from the image file. Not only is all of the available information from the image used, TBD avoids the computational intractability of the conventional feature-based line detection (i.e., "string of pearls") approach to track detection for low SNR data. Implementation of TBD rooted in finite set statistics (FISST) theory has been proposed recently by Vo, et al. Compared to other TBD methods applied so far to SSA, such as the stacking method or multi-pass multi-period denoising, the FISST approach is statistically rigorous and has been shown to be more computationally efficient, thus paving the path toward on-line processing. In this paper, we intend to apply a multi-Bernoulli filter to actual CCD imagery of RSOs. The multi-Bernoulli filter can explicitly account for the birth and death of multiple targets in a measurement arc. TBD is achieved via a sequential Monte Carlo implementation. Preliminary results with simulated single-target data indicate that a Bernoulli filter can successfully track and detect objects with measurement SNR as low as 2.4. Although the advent of fast-cadence scientific CMOS sensors have made the automation of faint object detection a realistic goal, it is nonetheless a difficult goal, as measurements

  16. Optical Tracking Measurement on Vortex Induced Vibration of Flexible Riser with Short-Length Buoyance Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dixia; Du, Honglin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We address experimentally the vortex induced vibrations (VIV) of long flexible cylinders. We employ optical tracking, using an array of high speed cameras. Compared to strain gauges and accelerometers, this non-intrusive approach, allows direct measurement of the flexible cylinder displacement with far denser spatial distribution. The measurements reveal essential features of flexible cylinder VIV, including complex geometries such as cylinders containing short-length buoyancy modules, with module to cylinder diameter ratio of 1:3.2 and module to bare cylinder length ratio of 1:1. The experiments are conducted with aspect ratio of 170 and 3 different coverage ratios, of 100%, 50% and 20%. The measurements demonstrate bi-frequency response due to excitation from both buoyancy module and bare cylinder, at low Strouhal number, down to values of 0.08, and the generation of traveling wave patterns.

  17. Low-Complexity Tracking of Laser and Nonlinear Phase Noise in WDM Optical Fiber Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yankov, Metodi Plamenov; Fehenberger, Tobias; Barletta, Luca

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) fiber optic channel is considered. It is shown that for ideal distributed Raman amplification (IDRA), the Wiener process model is suitable for the non-linear phase noise due to cross phase modulation from neighboring channels. Based...... compared to previous trellis-based approaches, which require numerical integration. Further, the proposed method performs very well in low-to-moderate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), where standard decision directed (DD) methods, especially for high-order modulation, fail. The proposed algorithm does not rely...... on this model, a phase noise tracking algorithm is presented. We approximate the distribution of the phase noise at each time instant by a mixture of Tikhonov distributions, and derive a closed form expression for the posterior probabilities of the input symbols. This reduces the complexity dramatically...

  18. Automated Solar Tracking Spectrophotometer for Remote Sensing of Column Aerosol Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainwater, B.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Karr, D.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere are poorly understood in terms of how they affect weather and climate. In an effort to advance this knowledge, an automated solar tracking spectrophotometer has been constructed to measure direct solar radiation from the ultraviolet to infrared. This instrument facilitates determination of solar irradiance, precipitable water, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and the Ångström turbidity exponent related to aerosol size distribution. Measurements with a CIMEL CE-318 sun photometer (part of the global NASA AERONET network) and a manual solar spectrophotometer are being used to evaluate the accuracy of our instrument. Upon successful evaluation, this instrument will provide a basis for research into spectral information that will supplement CIMEL measurements. Presented is the design of this instrument and measurement comparisons with the aforementioned instruments for the air above Reno, Nevada, USA.

  19. Tracking Performance Analysis and Simulation of the Digital Pointing System for the Optical Communication Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racho, C.; Portillo, A.

    1998-10-01

    Over the past 3 years, JPL has been heavily engaged in designing and developing a reduced-complexity optical communication terminal for high-data-volume applications. The terminal is called the Optical Communication Demonstrator (OCD) and has the ability to point microradian-level beams with a very small number of detectors and steering elements. Using only a single steering mirror and a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector array, the OCD can accomplish the functions of beacon signal acquisition, beacon tracking, transmit and receive beam coalignment, and transmit beam point-ahead offset. At a higher system level, developing an understanding of the OCD performance is an essential part of achieving a better understanding of the end-to-end optical communication system performance in the field. During the latter half of fiscal year 1998, a series of experiments was conducted between Table Mountain and Strawberry Peak using the OCD as a transmitting terminal for terrestrial ground-to- ground optical link demonstrations. The OCD was taken to Strawberry Peak and set up to receive the multibeam laser beacon from the 0.6-meter telescope located at Table Mountain, a distance of approximately 40 kilometers. In the presence of atmospheric effects, the laser beacon will fluctuate both in intensity and position. The ability to determine the performance of the control loop under atmospheric-induced fades and distortion becomes very important in evaluating the results of the field testing. This article describes the design and performance of the OCD digital control loop system, which includes the steering mirror, the CCD detector array tracker, and the associated electronics. The digital control loop performance is a key factor in the ultimate performance of the laser beacon acquisition and tracking algorithm of the OCD. A model of the OCD digital control loop is developed for use in simulations. The analytical results from control loop simulations are compared with measured data

  20. Optical techniques for tracking multiple myeloma engraftment, growth, and response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnels, Judith M.; Carlson, Alicia L.; Pitsillides, Costas; Thompson, Brian; Wu, Juwell; Spencer, Joel A.; Kohler, John M. J.; Azab, Abdelkareem; Moreau, Anne-Sophie; Rodig, Scott J.; Kung, Andrew L.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Ghobrial, Irene M.; Lin, Charles P.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), the second most common hematological malignancy, initiates from a single site and spreads via circulation to multiple sites in the bone marrow (BM). Methods to track MM cells both in the BM and circulation would be useful for developing new therapeutic strategies to target MM cell spread. We describe the use of complementary optical techniques to track human MM cells expressing both bioluminescent and fluorescent reporters in a mouse xenograft model. Long-term tumor growth and response to therapy are monitored using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), while numbers of circulating tumor cells are detected by in-vivo flow cytometry. Intravital microscopy is used to detect early seeding of MM cells to the BM, as well as residual cancer cells that remain in the BM after the bulk of the tumor is eradicated following drug treatment. Thus, intravital microscopy provides a powerful, albeit invasive, means to study cellular processes in vivo at the very early stage of the disease process and at the very late stage of therapeutic intervention when the tumor burden is too small to be detected by other imaging methods.

  1. READOUT ELECTRONICS FOR A HIGH-RATE CSC DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OCONNOR,P.; GRATCHEV,V.; KANDASAMY,A.; POLYCHRONAKOS,V.; TCHERNIATINE,V.; PARSONS,J.; SIPPACH,W.

    1999-09-25

    A readout system for a high-rate muon Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is described. The system, planned for use in the forward region of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, uses two custom CMOS integrated circuits to achieve good position resolution at a flux of up to 2,500 tracks/cm{sup 2}/s.

  2. 2-port internal model control for gyro stabilized platform of electro-optical tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yun-xia; Bao, Qi-liang; Li, Zhi-jun; Wu, Qiong-yan

    2012-06-01

    Line-of-sight stabilized system, which can be used to isolate the vibration of the moving bed and the disturbance of environment, is the most important part of an electro-optical tracking system. The steady precision and robustness are the key issues of recent researches. In this paper, a novel control approach so called 2-Port Internal Model Control (2-PIMC) for line-of-sight stabilized system is proposed. By adding a parallel feedback control loop on the basis of Internal Model Control (IMC), the 2-PIMC method can improve precision while it also has strong robustness as the IMC. The robustness and the static error of 2-PIMC method were subsequently analyzed. Based on this novel method, Simulation and experiment are both carried out for a gyro stabilized platform of electro-optical tracking system. The experiments include a shaking table which can generate disturbance as the moving bed and a gyro stabilized platform which is mounted on the shaking table. The experimental result indicated that the gyro stabilized platform using 2-PIMC method is accurate and effective. Comparing with PI control, the following error and disturbance restraining error were both greatly improved at low-frequency and mid-frequency by the 2-PIMC method proposed. The improvement of precision is more than 10dB at 4Hz. In addition, the 2-PIMC method doesn't need any extra sensors for the platform and it's easy for parameters regulation. It can be concluded that the2-PIMC method is a new approach for the high-performance gyro stabilized platform and might have broad application prospect.

  3. Towards a 1000 tracks digital tape recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutellier, J. M.; Castera, J. P.; Colineau, J.; Lehureau, J. C.; Maurice, F.; Hanna, C.

    1993-01-01

    As the demand for high data rate (up to 1 Gb/s), high density (down to 1 sq micron/bit) tape recorder increases, the main investigation trend is an improvement of the well known helical scan concept. The drawbacks of this technology are also well known; sophisticated mechanics, head to tape contact, and wear problems. In our fixed head approach, the recorder mechanics is made much more simple, but the complexity is turned towards the integrated magnetic components, which have to record and reproduce hundreds of tracks in parallel. Our multiplexed write inductive head and magneto-optical readout head will be described, and the global system performances evaluated.

  4. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian

  5. Implementation of high precision optical and radiometric LRO tracking data in the orbit determination to supplement the baseline S-band tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, D.; Torrence, M. H.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2016-12-01

    LRO has been in a polar lunar orbit for 7 year since it was launched in June 2009. Seven instruments are onboard LRO to perform a global and detailed geophysical, geological and geochemical mapping of the Moon, some of which have very high spatial resolution. To take full advantage of the high resolution LRO datasets from these instruments, the spacecraft orbit must be reconstructed precisely. The baseline LRO tracking was the NASA's White Sands station in New Mexico and a commercial network, the Universal Space Network (USN), providing up to 20 hours per day of almost continuous S-band radio frequency link to LRO. The USN stations produce S-band range data with a 0.4 m precision and Doppler data with a 0.8 mm/s precision. Using the S-band tracking data together with the high-resolution gravity field model from the GRAIL mission, definitive LRO orbit solutions are obtained with an accuracy of 10 m in total position and 0.5 m radially. Confirmed by the 0.50-m high-resolution NAC images from the LROC team, these orbits well represent the LRO orbit "truth". In addition to the S-band data, one-way Laser Ranging (LR) to LRO provides a unique LRO optical tracking dataset over 5 years, from June 2009 to September 2014. Ten international satellite laser ranging stations contributed over 4000 hours LR data with the 0.05 - 0.10 m normal point precision. Another set of high precision LRO tracking data is provided by the Deep Space Network (DSN), which produces radiometric tracking data more precise than the USN S-band data. In the last two years of the LRO mission, the temporal coverage of the USN data has decreased significantly. We show that LR and DSN data can be a good supplement to the baseline tracking data for the orbit reconstruction.

  6. A comparative study between the imaging system and the optical tracking system in proton therapy at CNAO

    CERN Document Server

    Desplanques, Maxime; Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Riboldi, Marco; Fattori, Giovanni; Donno, Andrea; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The synergy between in-room imaging and optical tracking, in co-operation with highly accurate robotic patient handling represents a concept for patient-set-up which has been implemented at CNAO (Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica). In-room imaging is based on a double oblique X-ray projection system; optical tracking consists of the detection of the position of spherical markers placed directly on the patient’s skin or on the immobilization devices. These markers are used as external fiducials during patient positioning and dose delivery. This study reports the results of a comparative analysis between in-room imaging and optical tracking data for patient positioning within the framework of high-precision particle therapy. Differences between the optical tracking system (OTS) and the imaging system (IS) were on average within the expected localization accuracy. On the first 633 fractions for head and neck (H&N) set-up procedures, the corrections applied by the IS, after patient positioning usin...

  7. Optics of the human cornea influence the accuracy of stereo eye-tracking methods: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsingerhorn, A.D.; Boonstra, F.N.; Goossens, H.H.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Current stereo eye-tracking methods model the cornea as a sphere with one refractive surface. However, the human cornea is slightly aspheric and has two refractive surfaces. Here we used ray-tracing and the Navarro eye-model to study how these optical properties affect the accuracy of different

  8. White Sands Missile Range Non-Track Optics: Streamlining the Process of Conducting Business for Improved Customer Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Launch Area Theodolite Systems LOAL lock-on after launch LOBL lock-on before launch xiv MATS Multimode Automatic Tracking Systems MDAGS modular...optical instrumentation array is complemented with the Distant Object Attitude Measurement System (DOAMS), Launch Area Theodolite Systems (LATS

  9. Optics of the human cornea influence the accuracy of stereo eye-tracking methods: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsingerhorn, A D; Boonstra, F N; Goossens, H H L M

    2017-02-01

    Current stereo eye-tracking methods model the cornea as a sphere with one refractive surface. However, the human cornea is slightly aspheric and has two refractive surfaces. Here we used ray-tracing and the Navarro eye-model to study how these optical properties affect the accuracy of different stereo eye-tracking methods. We found that pupil size, gaze direction and head position all influence the reconstruction of gaze. Resulting errors range between ± 1.0 degrees at best. This shows that stereo eye-tracking may be an option if reliable calibration is not possible, but the applied eye-model should account for the actual optics of the cornea.

  10. Balanced homodyne readout for quantum limited gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschel, Peter; Evans, Matthew; Frolov, Valery

    2014-02-24

    Balanced homodyne detection is typically used to measure quantum-noise-limited optical beams, including squeezed states of light, at audio-band frequencies. Current designs of advanced gravitational wave interferometers use some type of homodyne readout for signal detection, in part because of its compatibility with the use of squeezed light. The readout scheme used in Advanced LIGO, called DC readout, is however not a balanced detection scheme. Instead, the local oscillator field, generated from a dark fringe offset, co-propagates with the signal field at the anti-symmetric output of the beam splitter. This article examines the alternative of a true balanced homodyne detection for the readout of gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO. Several practical advantages of the balanced detection scheme are described.

  11. A readout for large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Sean; Mazin, Benjamin A; Serfass, Bruno; Meeker, Seth; O'Brien, Kieran; Duan, Ran; Raffanti, Rick; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting detectors capable of counting single photons and measuring their energy in the UV, optical, and near-IR. MKIDs feature intrinsic frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) at microwave frequencies, allowing the construction and readout of large arrays. Due to the microwave FDM, MKIDs do not require the complex cryogenic multiplexing electronics used for similar detectors, such as transition edge sensors, but instead transfer this complexity to room temperature electronics where they present a formidable signal processing challenge. In this paper, we describe the first successful effort to build a readout for a photon counting optical/near-IR astronomical instrument, the ARray Camera for Optical to Near-infrared Spectrophotometry. This readout is based on open source hardware developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research. Designed principally for radio telescope backends, it is flexible enough to be used for a variety of signal processing applications.

  12. A readout for large arrays of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    McHugh, Sean; Serfass, Bruno; Meeker, Seth; O'Brien, Kieran; Duan, Ran; Raffanti, Rick; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting detectors capable of counting single photons and measuring their energy in the UV, optical, and near-IR. MKIDs feature intrinsic frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) at microwave frequencies, allowing the construction and readout of large arrays. Due to the microwave FDM, MKIDs do not require the complex cryogenic multiplexing electronics used for similar detectors, such as Transition Edge Sensors (TESs), but instead transfer this complexity to room temperature electronics where they present a formidable signal processing challenge. In this paper we describe the first successful effort to build a readout for a photon counting optical/near-IR astronomical instrument, the ARray Camera for Optical to Near-infrared Spectrophotometry (ARCONS). This readout is based on open source hardware developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER). Designed principally for radio telescope backends, it is flexible...

  13. Orbit Determination with Angle-only Data from the First Korean Optical Satellite Tracking System, OWL-Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Jo, J.

    2016-09-01

    The optical satellite tracking data obtained by the first Korean optical satellite tracking system, Optical Wide-field patrol - Network (OWL-Net), had been examined for precision orbit determination. During the test observation at Israel site, we have successfully observed a satellite with Laser Retro Reflector (LRR) to calibrate the angle-only metric data. The OWL observation system is using a chopper equipment to get dense observation data in one-shot over 100 points for the low Earth orbit objects. After several corrections, orbit determination process was done with validated metric data. The TLE with the same epoch of the end of the first arc was used for the initial orbital parameter. Orbit Determination Tool Kit (ODTK) was used for an analysis of a performance of orbit estimation using the angle-only measurements. We have been developing batch style orbit estimator.

  14. H-infinity mix sensitivity controller design based on GIMC for electro-optical stabilization and tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zi-dong; Bao, Qi-liang; Xia, Yunxia; Liu, Xiang

    2013-08-01

    Electro-optical stabilization and tracking system is critical and difficult issue in satellite laser communication. Moreover, line-of-sight stabilized system is the kernel of implementing electro-optical stabilization and tracking system, which can be used to isolate the vibration of the moving platform of the satellite and the disturbance of the space environment. In this paper, we propose a new method, which using H∞ mix sensitivity based on generalized internal model controller (GIMC), to design the control system of the electro-optical stabilized platform. It is well known that there is an intrinsic conflict between performance and robustness in the standard feedback framework. Generalized internal model controller is a new architecture which can separate the performance and robustness design in controller design. This architecture has two parts: a high performance controller, say K0,which is designed by PI controller in this paper, and then a robustification controller, say Q, which is designed to improve the ability of the anti disturbance by using H-infinity mix sensitivity controller design method. In this paper, we also present the steps of controller design by using this method to make it easier to use. Based on the proposed method, numerical simulation and experiment are both carried out for a gyro stabilized platform of electro-optical tacking system. Both the numerical simulated and the experimental results show that the electro-optical stabilized platform using the H-infinity mix sensitivity controller design method based on GIMC is accurate and effective. Comparing with the same PI controller in standard feedback framework, the proposed method can guarantee the high tracking performance as same as the PI controller and improve the external disturbance restraining ability a lot. In conclusion, H-infinity mix sensitivity controller design method based on GIMC is a new approach for gyro stabilized platform of electro-optical stabilization and tracking

  15. Readout technologies for directional WIMP Dark Matter detection

    CERN Document Server

    Battat, J B R; Aleksandrov, A; Guler, M Ali; Asada, T; Baracchini, E; Billard, J; Bosson, G; Bourrion, O; Bouvier, J; Buonaura, A; Burdge, K; Cebrian, S; Colas, P; Consiglio, L; Dafni, T; D'Ambrosio, N; Deaconu, C; De Lellis, G; Descombes, T; Di Crescenzo, A; Di Marco, N; Druitt, G; Eggleston, R; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Fusayasu, T; Galan, J; Galati, G; Garcia, J A; Garza, J G; Gentile, V; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Giomataris, Y; Guerrero, N; Guillaudin, O; Harton, J; Hashimoto, T; Hedges, M T; Iguaz, F; Ikeda, T; Jaegle, I; Kadyk, J A; Katsuragawa, T; Komura, S; Kubo, H; Kuge, K; Lamblin, J; Lauria, A; Lee, E R; Lewis, P; Leyton, M; Loomba, D; Lopez, J P; Luzon, G; Mayet, F; Mirallas, H; Miuchi, K; Mizumoto, T; Mizumura, Y; Monacelli, P; Monroe, J; Montesi, M C; Naka, T; Nakamura, K; Nishimura, H; Ochi, A; Papevangelou, T; Parker, J D; Phan, N S; Pupilli, F; Richer, J P; Riffard, Q; Rosa, G; Santos, D; Sawano, T; Sekiya, H; Seong, I S; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Sugiyama, A; Taishaku, R; Takada, A; Takeda, A; Tanaka, M; Tanimori, T; Thorpe, T N; Tioukov, V; Tomita, H; Umemoto, A; Vahsen, S E; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshimoto, M; Zayas, E

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils is a compelling but technologically challenging strategy to provide an unambiguous signature of the detection of Galactic dark matter. Most directional detectors aim to reconstruct the dark-matter-induced nuclear recoil tracks, either in gas or solid targets. The main challenge with directional detection is the need for high spatial resolution over large volumes, which puts strong requirements on the readout technologies. In this paper we review the various detector readout technologies used by directional detectors. In particular, we summarize the challenges, advantages and drawbacks of each approach, and discuss future prospects for these technologies.

  16. Readout technologies for directional WIMP Dark Matter detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battat, J. B. R.; Irastorza, I. G.; Aleksandrov, A.; Asada, T.; Baracchini, E.; Billard, J.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, J.; Buonaura, A.; Burdge, K.; Cebrián, S.; Colas, P.; Consiglio, L.; Dafni, T.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Deaconu, C.; De Lellis, G.; Descombes, T.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Druitt, G.; Eggleston, R.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Galán, J.; Galati, G.; García, J. A.; Garza, J. G.; Gentile, V.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Giomataris, Y.; Guerrero, N.; Guillaudin, O.; Guler, A. M.; Harton, J.; Hashimoto, T.; Hedges, M. T.; Iguaz, F. J.; Ikeda, T.; Jaegle, I.; Kadyk, J. A.; Katsuragawa, T.; Komura, S.; Kubo, H.; Kuge, K.; Lamblin, J.; Lauria, A.; Lee, E. R.; Lewis, P.; Leyton, M.; Loomba, D.; Lopez, J. P.; Luzón, G.; Mayet, F.; Mirallas, H.; Miuchi, K.; Mizumoto, T.; Mizumura, Y.; Monacelli, P.; Monroe, J.; Montesi, M. C.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nishimura, H.; Ochi, A.; Papevangelou, T.; Parker, J. D.; Phan, N. S.; Pupilli, F.; Richer, J. P.; Riffard, Q.; Rosa, G.; Santos, D.; Sawano, T.; Sekiya, H.; Seong, I. S.; Snowden-Ifft, D. P.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Sugiyama, A.; Taishaku, R.; Takada, A.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, M.; Tanimori, T.; Thorpe, T. N.; Tioukov, V.; Tomita, H.; Umemoto, A.; Vahsen, S. E.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yoshimoto, M.; Zayas, E.

    2016-11-01

    The measurement of the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils is a compelling but technologically challenging strategy to provide an unambiguous signature of the detection of Galactic dark matter. Most directional detectors aim to reconstruct the dark-matter-induced nuclear recoil tracks, either in gas or solid targets. The main challenge with directional detection is the need for high spatial resolution over large volumes, which puts strong requirements on the readout technologies. In this paper we review the various detector readout technologies used by directional detectors. In particular, we summarize the challenges, advantages and drawbacks of each approach, and discuss future prospects for these technologies.

  17. A Time Projection Chamber with GEM-Based Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Attié, David; Bellerive, Alain; Bezshyyko, Oleg; Bhattacharya, Deb Sankar; Bhattacharya, Purba; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Caiazza, Stefano; Colas, Paul; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dehmelt, Klaus; Desch, Klaus; Diener, Ralf; Dixit, Madhu; Fleck, Ivor; Fujii, Keisuke; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Ganjour, Serguei; Gao, Yuanning; Gros, Philippe; Hayman, Peter; Hedberg, Vincent; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Jönsson, Leif; Kaminski, Jochen; Kato, Yukihiro; Kawada, Shin-ichi; Killenberg, Martin; Kleinwort, Claus; Kobayashi, Makoto; Krylov, Vladyslav; Li, Bo; Li, Yulan; Lundberg, Björn; Lupberger, Michael; Majumdar, Nayana; Matsuda, Takeshi; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mjörnmark, Ulf; Müller, Felix; Münnich, Astrid; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Oskarsson, Anders; Österman, Lennart; Peterson, Daniel; Riallot, Marc; Rosemann, Christoph; Roth, Stefan; Schade, Peter; Schäfer, Oliver; Settles, Ronald Dean; Shirazi, Amir Noori; Smirnova, Oxana; Sugiyama, Akira; Takahashi, Tohru; Tian, Junping; Timmermans, Jan; Titov, Maksym; Tsionou, Dimitra; Vauth, Annika; Wang, Wenxin; Watanabe, Takashi; Werthenbach, Ulrich; Yang, Yifan; Yang, Zhenwei; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenker, Klaus; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    For the International Large Detector concept at the planned International Linear Collider, the use of time projection chambers (TPC) with micro-pattern gas detector readout as the main tracking detector is investigated. In this paper, results from a prototype TPC, placed in a 1 T solenoidal field and read out with three independent GEM-based readout modules, are reported. The TPC was exposed to a 6 GeV electron beam at the DESY II synchrotron. The efficiency for reconstructing hits, the measurement of the drift velocity, the space point resolution and the control of field inhomogeneities are presented.

  18. Optical cell tracking analysis using a straight-forward approach to minimize processing time for high frame rate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeto, Wen Jun; Lipke, Elizabeth Ann

    2016-03-01

    Tracking of rolling cells via in vitro experiment is now commonly performed using customized computer programs. In most cases, two critical challenges continue to limit analysis of cell rolling data: long computation times due to the complexity of tracking algorithms and difficulty in accurately correlating a given cell with itself from one frame to the next, which is typically due to errors caused by cells that either come close in proximity to each other or come in contact with each other. In this paper, we have developed a sophisticated, yet simple and highly effective, rolling cell tracking system to address these two critical problems. This optical cell tracking analysis (OCTA) system first employs ImageJ for cell identification in each frame of a cell rolling video. A custom MATLAB code was written to use the geometric and positional information of all cells as the primary parameters for matching each individual cell with itself between consecutive frames and to avoid errors when tracking cells that come within close proximity to one another. Once the cells are matched, rolling velocity can be obtained for further analysis. The use of ImageJ for cell identification eliminates the need for high level MATLAB image processing knowledge. As a result, only fundamental MATLAB syntax is necessary for cell matching. OCTA has been implemented in the tracking of endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC) rolling under shear. The processing time needed to obtain tracked cell data from a 2 min ECFC rolling video recorded at 70 frames per second with a total of over 8000 frames is less than 6 min using a computer with an Intel® Core™ i7 CPU 2.80 GHz (8 CPUs). This cell tracking system benefits cell rolling analysis by substantially reducing the time required for post-acquisition data processing of high frame rate video recordings and preventing tracking errors when individual cells come in close proximity to one another.

  19. US/MRI fusion with new optical tracking and marker approach for interventional procedures inside the MRI suite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj Yeshaswini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Interventional MRI in closed bore high-field systems is a challenge due to limited space and the need of dedicated MRI compatible equipment and tools. A possible solution could be to perform an ultrasound procedure for guidance of the therapy tools outside the bore, but still on the MRI patient bed. That could track and subsequently combine the superior images of MRI with the real-time features of ultrasound. Conventional optical tracking systems suffer from line of sight issues and electromagnetic tracking does not perform well in the presence of magnetic fields. Hence, to overcome these issues a new optical tracking system called inside-out tracking is used. In this approach, the camera is directly attached to the US probe and the markers are placed onto the patient to achieve the location information of the US slice. The evaluation of our novel system of framed fusion markers can easily be adapted to various imaging modalities without losing image registration. To confirm this evaluation, phantom studies with MRI and US imaging were carried out using a point-registration algorithm along with a similarity measure for fusion. In the inside-out system approach, image registration was found to yield an accuracy of upto 4 mm, depending on the imaging modality and the employed marker arrangement and with that provides an accuracy that cannot be easily achieved by combining pre-operative MRI with live ultrasound.

  20. A near-infrared 64-pixel superconducting nanowire single photon detector array with integrated multiplexed readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allman, M. S., E-mail: shane.allman@boulder.nist.gov; Verma, V. B.; Stevens, M.; Gerrits, T.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R.; Nam, S. W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3328 (United States); Marsili, F.; Beyer, A.; Shaw, M. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Kumor, D. [Purdue University, 610 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  1. A Near-Infrared 64-pixel Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detector Array with Integrated Multiplexed Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Allman, M S; Stevens, M; Gerrits, T; Horansky, R D; Lita, A E; Marsili, F; Beyer, A; Shaw, M D; Kumor, D; Mirin, R; Nam, S W

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array, as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  2. Optical tracking of embryonic vertebrates behavioural responses using automated time-resolved video-microscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpitagama, Milanga; Kaslin, Jan; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2016-12-01

    The fish embryo toxicity (FET) biotest performed on embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) has gained significant popularity as a rapid and inexpensive alternative approach in chemical hazard and risk assessment. The FET was designed to evaluate acute toxicity on embryonic stages of fish exposed to the test chemical. The current standard, similar to most traditional methods for evaluating aquatic toxicity provides, however, little understanding of effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of chemical stressors. We postulate that significant environmental effects such as altered motor functions, physiological alterations reflected in heart rate, effects on development and reproduction can occur at sub-lethal concentrations well below than LC10. Behavioral studies can, therefore, provide a valuable integrative link between physiological and ecological effects. Despite the advantages of behavioral analysis development of behavioral toxicity, biotests is greatly hampered by the lack of dedicated laboratory automation, in particular, user-friendly and automated video microscopy systems. In this work we present a proof-of-concept development of an optical system capable of tracking embryonic vertebrates behavioral responses using automated and vastly miniaturized time-resolved video-microscopy. We have employed miniaturized CMOS cameras to perform high definition video recording and analysis of earliest vertebrate behavioral responses. The main objective was to develop a biocompatible embryo positioning structures that were suitable for high-throughput imaging as well as video capture and video analysis algorithms. This system should support the development of sub-lethal and behavioral markers for accelerated environmental monitoring.

  3. Low cost heads-up virtual reality (HUVR) with optical tracking and haptic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Todd; DeFanti, Thomas A.; Dawe, Greg; Prudhomme, Andrew; Schulze, Jurgen P.; Cutchin, Steve

    2011-03-01

    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have created a new, relatively low-cost augmented reality system that enables users to touch the virtual environment they are immersed in. The Heads-Up Virtual Reality device (HUVR) couples a consumer 3D HD flat screen TV with a half-silvered mirror to project any graphic image onto the user's hands and into the space surrounding them. With his or her head position optically tracked to generate the correct perspective view, the user maneuvers a force-feedback (haptic) device to interact with the 3D image, literally 'touching' the object's angles and contours as if it was a tangible physical object. HUVR can be used for training and education in structural and mechanical engineering, archaeology and medicine as well as other tasks that require hand-eye coordination. One of the most unique characteristics of HUVR is that a user can place their hands inside of the virtual environment without occluding the 3D image. Built using open-source software and consumer level hardware, HUVR offers users a tactile experience in an immersive environment that is functional, affordable and scalable.

  4. Low cost heads-up virtual reality (HUVR) with optical tracking and haptic feedback

    KAUST Repository

    Margolis, Todd

    2011-01-23

    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have created a new, relatively low-cost augmented reality system that enables users to touch the virtual environment they are immersed in. The Heads-Up Virtual Reality device (HUVR) couples a consumer 3D HD flat screen TV with a half-silvered mirror to project any graphic image onto the user\\'s hands and into the space surrounding them. With his or her head position optically tracked to generate the correct perspective view, the user maneuvers a force-feedback (haptic) device to interact with the 3D image, literally \\'touching\\' the object\\'s angles and contours as if it was a tangible physical object. HUVR can be used for training and education in structural and mechanical engineering, archaeology and medicine as well as other tasks that require hand-eye coordination. One of the most unique characteristics of HUVR is that a user can place their hands inside of the virtual environment without occluding the 3D image. Built using open-source software and consumer level hardware, HUVR offers users a tactile experience in an immersive environment that is functional, affordable and scalable.

  5. Two particle tracking and detection in a single Gaussian beam optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, P; Yogesha; Iyengar, Shruthi S; Bhattacharya, Sarbari; Ananthamurthy, Sharath

    2016-01-20

    We have studied in detail the situation wherein two microbeads are trapped axially in a single-beam Gaussian intensity profile optical trap. We find that the corner frequency extracted from a power spectral density analysis of intensity fluctuations recorded on a quadrant photodetector (QPD) is dependent on the detection scheme. Using forward- and backscattering detection schemes with single and two laser wavelengths along with computer simulations, we conclude that fluctuations detected in backscattering bear true position information of the bead encountered first in the beam propagation direction. Forward scattering, on the other hand, carries position information of both beads with substantial contribution from the bead encountered first along the beam propagation direction. Mie scattering analysis further reveals that the interference term from the scattering of the two beads contributes significantly to the signal, precluding the ability to resolve the positions of the individual beads in forward scattering. In QPD-based detection schemes, detection through backscattering, thereby, is imperative to track the true displacements of axially trapped microbeads for possible studies on light-mediated interbead interactions.

  6. Upgrade of the ALICE-TPC read-out electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junique, A; Mager, M; Musa, L; Rehman, A Ur, E-mail: Magnus.Mager@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15

    The ALICE experiment at CERN LHC employs a large volume time projection chamber (TPC) as its main tracking device. Instigated by analyses indicating that the high level trigger is capable of sifting events with rare physics probes, it is endeavoured to read out the TPC an order of magnitude faster then was reckoned during the design of its read-out electronics. Based on an analysis of the read-out performance of the current system, an upgrade of the front-end read-out network is proposed. The performance of the foreseen architecture is simulated with raw data from real 7 TeV pp collisions. Events are superimposed in order to emulate the future ALICE running conditions: high multiplicity events generated either by PbPb collisions or by the superposition (pile-up) of a large number of pp collisions. The first prototype of the main building block has been produced and characterised, demonstrating the feasibility of the approach.

  7. Upgrade of the ALICE-TPC read-out electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Junique, A; Musa , L; Rehman , A U

    2010-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN LHC employs a large volume time projection chamber (TPC) as its main tracking device. Instigated by analyses indicating that the high level trigger is capable of sifting events with rare physics probes, it is endeavoured to read out the TPC an order of magnitude faster then was reckoned during the design of its read-out electronics. Based on an analysis of the read-out performance of the current system, an upgrade of the front-end read-out network is proposed. The performance of the foreseen architecture is simulated with raw data from real 7 TeV pp collisions. Events are superimposed in order to emulate the future ALICE running conditions: high multiplicity events generated either by PbPb collisions or by the superposition (pile-up) of a large number of pp collisions. The first prototype of the main building block has been produced and characterised, demonstrating the feasibility of the approach

  8. Analysis of a photon number resolving detector based on fluorescence readout of an ion Coulomb crystal quantum memory inside an optical cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christoph; Sangouard, N.; Drewsen, M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect single photons with a high efficiency is a crucial requirement for various quantum information applications. By combining the storage process of a quantum memory for photons with fluorescence-based quantum state measurement, it is, in principle, possible to achieve high...... on an ion Coulomb crystal inside a moderately high-finesse optical cavity. The cavity enhancement leads to an effective optical depth of 15 for a finesse of 3000 with only about 1500 ions interacting with the light field. We show that these values allow for essentially noiseless detection with an efficiency......-efficiency photon counting in large ensembles of atoms. The large number of atoms can, however, pose significant problems in terms of noise stemming from imperfect initial state preparation and off-resonant fluorescence. We identify and analyse a concrete implementation of a photon number resolving detector based...

  9. Authenticated communication from quantum readout of PUFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škorić, Boris; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.; Mosk, Allard P.

    2017-08-01

    Quantum readout of physical unclonable functions (PUFs) is a recently introduced method for remote authentication of objects. We present an extension of the protocol to enable the authentication of data: A verifier can check if received classical data were sent by the PUF holder. We call this modification QR-d or, in the case of the optical-PUF implementation, QSA-d. We discuss how QSA-d can be operated in a parallel way. We also present a protocol for authenticating quantum states.

  10. A 40 MHz Trigger-free Readout Architecture for the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Alessio, F; Guzik, Z

    2009-01-01

    LHCb is considering an upgrade towards a full 40 MHz readout. In this paper we investigate possibilities for a new Timing and Fast Control (TFC) system based on completely new technologies, and the consequences for the readout electronics. We define the requirements and propose an architecture allowing partitioning, complete readout control and event management. The backbone is based on bidirectional high-speed optical links using the latest FPGA transceivers. For the Front-End Electronics we advocate exploiting the bidirectional capability of the CERN GigaBit Transceiver to make the Readout Boards the TFC and the Control System interface to the Front-End

  11. Analysis of EMCCD and sCMOS readout noise models for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Basden, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, detectors with sub-electron readout noise have been used very effectively in astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare readout noise models for the two key faint flux level detector technologies that are commonly used: EMCCD and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) detectors. We find that in almost all situations, EMCCD technology is advantageous, and that the commonly used simplified model for EMCCD readout is appropriate. We also find that the commonly used simple models for sCMOS readout noise are optimistic, and recommend that a proper treatment of the sCMOS rms readout noise probability distribution should be considered during instrument performance modelling and development.

  12. Fast, label-free tracking of single viruses and weakly scattering nanoparticles in a nano-fluidic optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Faez, Sanli; Weidlich, Stefan; Garmann, Rees F; Wondraczek, Katrin; Zeisberger, Matthias; Schmidt, Markus A; Orrit, Michel; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-01-01

    High-speed tracking of single particles is a gateway to understanding physical, chemical, and biological processes at the nanoscale. It is also a major experimental challenge, particularly for small, nanometer-scale particles. Although methods such as confocal or fluorescence microscopy offer both high spatial resolution and high signal-to-background ratios, the fluorescence emission lifetime limits the measurement speed, while photobleaching and thermal diffusion limit the duration of measurements. Here we present a tracking method based on elastic light scattering that enables long-duration measurements of nanoparticle dynamics at rates of thousands of frames per second. We contain the particles within a single-mode silica fiber containing a sub-wavelength, nano-fluidic channel and illuminate them using the fiber's strongly confined optical mode. The diffusing particles in this cylinderical geometry are continuously illuminated inside the collection focal plane. We show that the method can track unlabeled d...

  13. The optical designing method and the concentrating performance analysis for a toroidal heliostat with spinning-elevation sun tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Minghuan [Himin Solar Energy Group, Dezhou (China); CAS, Inst. of Electrical Engineering, Beijing (China); Lu, Zhenwu [CAS, Changchun Inst. of Optics Fine Mechanics and Physics, Changchun (China). State Key Lab. of Applied Optics; Wang, Zhifeng [Himin Solar Energy Group, Dezhou (China)

    2008-07-01

    A practical optical designing method for and some optical simulation results of a toroidal surface heliostat with the two axis spinning-elevation sun tracking are presented in this paper, which will be used as a concentrator for a hydrogen generation system. As a prototype, this heliostat has a compound toroidal surface, which is composed of the 16 same toroidal mirror facets of 1 meter width and 1 meter height with the focal length 7.4689 meters, and the design concentration power of the heliostat is 6 kilowatts. The sampling ray-tracing method including the solar disk effect is introduced and used to analyze the optical performance of the heliostat. The optical errors of the heliostat and the attenuation of reflected solar irradiance in the air have not been taken into account yet. (orig.)

  14. On fading probability density functions of fast-tracked and untracked free-space optical communication channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhijun; Liao, Rui

    2011-03-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication systems suffer from average power loss and instantaneous power fading due to the atmospheric turbulence. The channel fading probability density function (pdf) is of critical importance for FSO communication system design and evaluation. The performance and reliability of FSO communication systems can be greatly enhanced if fast-tacking devices are employed at the transmitter in order to compensate laser beam wander at the receiver aperture. The fast-tracking method is especially effective when communication distance is long. This paper studies the fading probability density functions of both fast-tracked and untracked FSO communication channels. Large-scale wave-optics simulations are conducted for both tracked and untracked lasers. In the simulations, the Kolmogorov spectrum is adopted, and it is assumed that the outer scale is infinitely large and the inner scale is negligibly small. The fading pdfs of both fast-tracked and untracked FSO channels are obtained from the simulations. Results show that the fast-tracked channel fading can be accurately modeled as gamma-distributed if receiver aperture size is smaller than the coherence radius. An analytical method is given for calculating the untracked fading pdfs of both point-like and finite-size receiver apertures from the fast-tracked fading pdf. For point-like apertures, the analytical method gives pdfs close to the well-known gamma-gamma pdfs if off-axis effects are omitted in the formulation. When off-axis effects are taken into consideration, the untracked pdfs obtained using the analytical method fit the simulation pdfs better than gamma-gamma distributions for point-like apertures, and closely fit the simulation pdfs for finite-size apertures where gamma-gamma pdfs deviate from those of the simulations significantly.

  15. Thermopile Area Array Readout Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA/JPL thermopile detector linear arrays, wire bonded to Black Forest Engineering (BFE) CMOS readout integrated circuits (ROICs), have been utilized in NASA...

  16. Fabrication of hard-coated optical absorbers with microstructured surfaces using etched ion tracks: Toward broadband ultra-low reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amemiya, Kuniaki, E-mail: k.amemiya@aist.go.jp [National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan); Koshikawa, Hiroshi; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Yasunari [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shitomi, Hiroshi; Numata, Takayuki; Kinoshita, Kenichi; Tanabe, Minoru; Fukuda, Daiji [National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • A hard-coated optical absorber with microstructured surface was fabricated. • Etched ion tracks coated with diamond-like carbon were used. • The reflectance was below 2% for wavelengths in the 400–1400 nm range. • Fabricated optical absorber exhibited temporal durability and mechanical stability. • Further improvement of the design and process will yield reflectance of ∼0.1%. - Abstract: Broadband low reflectance materials have various applications in the field of optical energy management; however, materials with ultra-low reflectance (below 0.1%) have been considered as mechanically delicate. We have developed a novel hard-surface optical absorber with microstructured, diamond-like carbon coated ion tracks on CR-39 plastic substrate. The spectral reflectance of the first prototype was below 2% for wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 1400 nm; moreover, the optical absorber had mechanically hard surface and exhibited temporal durability. Choosing the appropriate design of the surface structure and coating layer is likely to reduce the reflectance to the order of 0.1%. This technique yields easy-to-handle broadband ultra-low reflectance absorbers.

  17. Tracking features in retinal images of adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope using KLT-SIFT algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2010-06-28

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), high-resolution microscopic imaging of living human retina in the single cell level has been achieved. In an adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system, with a small field size (about 1 degree, 280 μm), the motion of the eye severely affects the stabilization of the real-time video images and results in significant distortions of the retina images. In this paper, Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) is used to abstract stable point features from the retina images. Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi(KLT) algorithm is applied to track the features. With the tracked features, the image distortion in each frame is removed by the second-order polynomial transformation, and 10 successive frames are co-added to enhance the image quality. Features of special interest in an image can also be selected manually and tracked by KLT. A point on a cone is selected manually, and the cone is tracked from frame to frame.

  18. Tracking of Single Quantum Dot Labeled EcoRV Sliding along DNA Manipulated by Double Optical Tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Biebricher, Andreas; Wende, Wolfgang; Escudé, Christophe; Pingoud, Alfred; Desbiolles, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy provides a powerful method to directly observe single enzymes moving along a DNA held in an extended conformation. In this work, we present results from single EcoRV enzymes labeled with quantum dots which interact with DNA manipulated by double optical tweezers. The application of quantum dots facilitated accurate enzyme tracking without photobleaching whereas the tweezers allowed us to precisely control the DNA extension. The labeling did not affect the biochemical a...

  19. 一种新型微梁阵列传感器设计及实现%Design and Realization of New Optical Sequential Readout for Micro-cantilever Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛长国; 张广平; 张青川; 伍小平

    2011-01-01

    As an emerging hotspot of MEMS technology and NEMS sensor over past decades, the research of instrument style of micro-cantilever sensor was developed from single cantilever to onedimensional or two-dimensional arrays. A new optical sequential readout for micro-cantilever array is presented in this paper, based on a commercialized micro-cantilever array with 250μm spacing. Using high precision two-dimensional optical displacement table to adjust the laser position and locate two laser beams on the adjacent micro-cantilever array tips as parallel beams on micro-distance, the bend of two micro-cantilevers was detected by PSD. Thus the system sensor function was realized. This optical path is easy put up in experiment verification and two signals from two micro-cantilevers can be better separated. When an antibody was immobilized on the surface of a micro-cantilever, the system can detect the antigen in solution. This method provided a simple way to design micro-cantilever array based on optical lever in the future.%微悬臂梁传感技术是微纳传感技术研究的热点,仪器装置的研究也从单悬臂梁向微梁阵列的方向发展.本文针对间距为250μm的商品化微梁阵列,提出了一种实现对其弯曲变形的读出系统光路.利用高精度位移平台调节激光器空间位置,使光束实现微距离上平行,并分别照射在阵列梁的相邻微梁上.用位置敏感探测器对两个微悬臂梁尖端反射的激光信号进行检测,实现系统传感功能.实验验证该光路设计简单易行,针对这一方案实现了两个微梁的信号分离.在微梁上修饰对应的抗体,系统就可以对其抗原行检测.该方案对微梁多阵列传感器研制开发提出了一个新的思路.

  20. Modeling and simulation of adaptive multimodal optical sensors for target tracking in the visible to near infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presnar, Michael D.

    This work investigates an integrated aerial remote sensor design approach to address moving target detection and tracking problems within highly cluttered, dynamic ground-based scenes. Sophisticated simulation methodologies and scene phenomenology validations have resulted in advancements in artificial multimodal truth video synthesis. Complex modeling of novel micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) devices, optical systems, and detector arrays has resulted in a proof of concept for a state-of-the-art imaging spectropolarimeter sensor model that does not suffer from typical multimodal image registration problems. Test methodology developed for this work provides the ability to quantify performance of a target tracking application with varying ground scenery, flight characteristics, or sensor specifications. The culmination of this research is an end-to-end simulated demonstration of multimodal aerial remote sensing and target tracking. Deeply hidden target recognition is shown to be enhanced through the fusing of panchromatic, hyperspectral, and polarimetric image modalities. The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation model was leveraged to synthesize truth spectropolarimetric sensor-reaching radiance image cubes comprised of coregistered Stokes vector bands in the visible to near-infrared. An intricate synthetic urban scene containing numerous moving vehicular targets was imaged from a virtual sensor aboard an aerial platform encircling a stare point. An adaptive sensor model was designed with a superpixel array of MOEMS devices fabricated atop a division of focal plane detector. Degree of linear polarization (DoLP) imagery is acquired by combining three adjacent micropolarizer outputs within each 2x2 superpixel whose respective transmissions vary with wavelength, relative angle of polarization, and wire-grid spacing. A novel micromirror within each superpixel adaptively relays light between a panchromatic imaging channel and a hyperspectral

  1. Accuracy of image-guided surgical navigation using near infrared (NIR) optical tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Farooq, Hamza; Alarcon, Joseph; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2015-03-01

    Spinal surgery is particularly challenging for surgeons, requiring a high level of expertise and precision without being able to see beyond the surface of the bone. Accurate insertion of pedicle screws is critical considering perforation of the pedicle can result in profound clinical consequences including spinal cord, nerve root, arterial injury, neurological deficits, chronic pain, and/or failed back syndrome. Various navigation systems have been designed to guide pedicle screw fixation. Computed tomography (CT)-based image guided navigation systems increase the accuracy of screw placement allowing for 3- dimensional visualization of the spinal anatomy. Current localization techniques require extensive preparation and introduce spatial deviations. Use of near infrared (NIR) optical tracking allows for realtime navigation of the surgery by utilizing spectral domain multiplexing of light, greatly enhancing the surgeon's situation awareness in the operating room. While the incidence of pedicle screw perforation and complications have been significantly reduced with the introduction of modern navigational technologies, some error exists. Several parameters have been suggested including fiducial localization and registration error, target registration error, and angular deviation. However, many of these techniques quantify error using the pre-operative CT and an intra-operative screenshot without assessing the true screw trajectory. In this study we quantified in-vivo error by comparing the true screw trajectory to the intra-operative trajectory. Pre- and post- operative CT as well as intra-operative screenshots were obtained for a cohort of patients undergoing spinal surgery. We quantified entry point error and angular deviation in the axial and sagittal planes.

  2. Semiconductor detectors with proximity signal readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asztalos, Stephen J. [XIA, LLC, Hayward, CA (United States)

    2014-01-30

    Semiconductor-based radiation detectors are routinely used for the detection, imaging, and spectroscopy of x-rays, gamma rays, and charged particles for applications in the areas of nuclear and medical physics, astrophysics, environmental remediation, nuclear nonproliferation, and homeland security. Detectors used for imaging and particle tracking are more complex in that they typically must also measure the location of the radiation interaction in addition to the deposited energy. In such detectors, the position measurement is often achieved by dividing or segmenting the electrodes into many strips or pixels and then reading out the signals from all of the electrode segments. Fine electrode segmentation is problematic for many of the standard semiconductor detector technologies. Clearly there is a need for a semiconductor-based radiation detector technology that can achieve fine position resolution while maintaining the excellent energy resolution intrinsic to semiconductor detectors, can be fabricated through simple processes, does not require complex electrical interconnections to the detector, and can reduce the number of required channels of readout electronics. Proximity electrode signal readout (PESR), in which the electrodes are not in physical contact with the detector surface, satisfies this need.

  3. A New Readout Electronics for the LHCb Muon Detector Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Cadeddu, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    The 2018/2019 upgrade of LHCb Muon System foresees a 40 MHz readout scheme and requires the development of a new Off Detector Electronics (nODE) board that will be based on the nSYNC, a radiation tolerant custom ASIC developed in UMC 130 nm technology. Each nODE board has 192 input channels processed by 4 nSYNCs. The nSYNC is equipped with fully digital TDCs and it implements all the required functionalities for the readout: bunch crossing alignment, data zero suppression, time measurements. Optical interfaces, based on GBT and Versatile link components, are used to communicate with DAQ, TFC and ECS systems.

  4. A Readout System for the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedner, D; Apeldorn , G; Bachmann, S; Bagaturi , I; Bauer, T; Berkien, A; Blouw, J; Bos, E; Deisenroth, M; Dubitzki, R; Eisele, F; Guz , Y; Haas, T; Hommels, B; Ketel, T; Knopf , J; Merk , M; Nardulli , J; Nedos, M; Pellegrino, A; Rausch, A; Rusnyak, R; Schwemmer, R; Simoni, E; Sluijk , T; Spaan, B; Spelt , J; Stange, U; van Tilburg, J; Trunk , U; Tuning , N; Uwer, U; Vankow , P; Warda, K

    2006-01-01

    The LHCb Outer Tracker is composed of 55 000 straw drift tubes. The requirements for the OT electronics are the precise (1 ns) drift time measurement at 6 % occupancy and 1 MHz readout. Charge signals from the straw detector are amplified, shaped and discriminated by ATLAS ASDBLR chips. Drift-times are determined and stored in the OTIS TDC and put out to a GOL serializer at L0 accept. Optical fibres carry the data 90 m to the TELL1 acquisition board. The full readout chain performed well in an e- test beam.

  5. Markerless PET motion correction: tracking in narrow gantries through optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Benjaminsen, Claus;

    2015-01-01

    In a time with increasing resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of medical 3D brain scanners, there is also an increased need for tracking and motion correction of patient movements during acquisition time. To successfully implement a system for motion tracking in the clinic, the system should be ...

  6. Ultra-Wideband Radar for Breath Tracking with Optical Fiber for Remote Reach Extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of an UWB radar with fiber extension for remote breath tracking through 10 cm of concrete. The radar is based on telecom class equipment.......We report on the experimental demonstration of an UWB radar with fiber extension for remote breath tracking through 10 cm of concrete. The radar is based on telecom class equipment....

  7. Ghost marker detection and elimination in marker-based optical tracking systems for real-time tracking in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Guanghua, E-mail: yan@ufl.edu; Li, Jonathan; Huang, Yin; Mittauer, Kathryn; Lu, Bo; Liu, Chihray [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To propose a simple model to explain the origin of ghost markers in marker-based optical tracking systems (OTS) and to develop retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. Methods: In marker-based OTS, ghost markers are virtual markers created due to the cross-talk between the two camera sensors, which can lead to system execution failure or inaccuracy in patient tracking. As a result, the users have to limit the number of markers and avoid certain marker configurations to reduce the chances of ghost markers. In this work, the authors propose retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. The two camera sensors were treated as mathematical points in space. The authors identified the coplanar within limit (CWL) condition as the necessary condition for ghost marker occurrence. A simple ghost marker detection method was proposed based on the model. Ghost marker elimination was achieved through pattern matching: a ghost marker-free reference set was matched with the optical marker set observed by the OTS; unmatched optical markers were eliminated as either ghost markers or misplaced markers. The pattern matching problem was formulated as a constraint satisfaction problem (using pairwise distances as constraints) and solved with an iterative backtracking algorithm. Wildcard markers were introduced to address missing or misplaced markers. An experiment was designed to measure the sensor positions and the limit for the CWL condition. The ghost marker detection and elimination algorithms were verified with samples collected from a five-marker jig and a nine-marker anthropomorphic phantom, rotated with the treatment couch from −60° to +60°. The accuracy of the pattern matching algorithm was further validated with marker patterns from 40 patients who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). For this purpose, a synthetic optical marker pattern was created for each patient by introducing ghost markers, marker position

  8. In-plane ultrasonic needle tracking using a fiber-optic hydrophone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Wenfeng, E-mail: wenfeng.xia@ucl.ac.uk; Desjardins, Adrien E. [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Mari, Jean Martial [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and GePaSud, University of French Polynesia, Faa’a 98702, French Polynesia (France); West, Simeon J. [Department of Anaesthesia, University College Hospital, Main Theatres, Maple Bridge Link Corridor, Podium 3, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Ginsberg, Yuval; David, Anna L. [Institute for Women’s Health, University College London, 86-96 Chenies Mews, London WC1E 6HX (United Kingdom); Ourselin, Sebastien [Center for Medical Imaging Computing, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate and efficient guidance of needles to procedural targets is critically important during percutaneous interventional procedures. Ultrasound imaging is widely used for real-time image guidance in a variety of clinical contexts, but with this modality, uncertainties about the location of the needle tip within the image plane lead to significant complications. Whilst several methods have been proposed to improve the visibility of the needle, achieving accuracy and compatibility with current clinical practice is an ongoing challenge. In this paper, the authors present a method for directly visualizing the needle tip using an integrated fiber-optic ultrasound receiver in conjunction with the imaging probe used to acquire B-mode ultrasound images. Methods: Needle visualization and ultrasound imaging were performed with a clinical ultrasound imaging system. A miniature fiber-optic ultrasound hydrophone was integrated into a 20 gauge injection needle tip to receive transmissions from individual transducer elements of the ultrasound imaging probe. The received signals were reconstructed to create an image of the needle tip. Ultrasound B-mode imaging was interleaved with needle tip imaging. A first set of measurements was acquired in water and tissue ex vivo with a wide range of insertion angles (15°–68°) to study the accuracy and sensitivity of the tracking method. A second set was acquired in an in vivo swine model, with needle insertions to the brachial plexus. A third set was acquired in an in vivo ovine model for fetal interventions, with insertions to different locations within the uterine cavity. Two linear ultrasound imaging probes were used: a 14–5 MHz probe for the first and second sets, and a 9–4 MHz probe for the third. Results: During insertions in tissue ex vivo and in vivo, the imaged needle tip had submillimeter axial and lateral dimensions. The signal-to-noise (SNR) of the needle tip was found to depend on the insertion angle. With

  9. 3D, Flash, Induced Current Readout for Silicon Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Sherwood I. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-06-07

    A new method for silicon microstrip and pixel detector readout using (1) 65 nm-technology current amplifers which can, for the first time with silicon microstrop and pixel detectors, have response times far shorter than the charge collection time (2) 3D trench electrodes large enough to subtend a reasonable solid angle at most track locations and so have adequate sensitivity over a substantial volume of pixel, (3) induced signals in addition to, or in place of, collected charge

  10. Integrated Circuit Readout for the Silicon Sensor Test Station

    CERN Document Server

    Atkin, E; Silaev, A; Fedenko, A; Karmanov, D; Merkin, M; Voronin, A

    2009-01-01

    Various chips for the silicon sensors measurements are described. These chips are based on 0.35 um and 0.18um CMOS technology. Several analog chips together with self-trigger /derandomizer one allow to measure silicon sensors designed for different purposes. Tracking systems, calorimeters, particle charge measurement system and other application sensors can be investigated by the integrated circuit readout with laser or radioactive sources. Also electrical parameters of silicon sensors can be studied by such test setup.

  11. A Triggerless readout system for the bar PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemens, M.; PANDA Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    One of the physics goals of the future bar PANDA experiment at FAIR is to research newly discovered exotic states. Because the detector response created by these particles is very similar to the background channels, a new type of data readout had to be developed, called "triggerless" readout. In this concept, each detector subsystem preprocesses the signal, so that in a later stage, high-level phyiscs constraints can be applied to select events of interest. A dedicated clock source using a protocol called SODANET over optical fibers ensures proper synchronisation between the components. For this new type of readout, a new way of simulating the detector response also needed to be developed, taking into account the effects of pile-up caused by the 20 MHz interaction rate.

  12. Fast, Label-Free Tracking of Single Viruses and Weakly Scattering Nanoparticles in a Nanofluidic Optical Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faez, Sanli; Lahini, Yoav; Weidlich, Stefan; Garmann, Rees F; Wondraczek, Katrin; Zeisberger, Matthias; Schmidt, Markus A; Orrit, Michel; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-12-22

    High-speed tracking of single particles is a gateway to understanding physical, chemical, and biological processes at the nanoscale. It is also a major experimental challenge, particularly for small, nanometer-scale particles. Although methods such as confocal or fluorescence microscopy offer both high spatial resolution and high signal-to-background ratios, the fluorescence emission lifetime limits the measurement speed, while photobleaching and thermal diffusion limit the duration of measurements. Here we present a tracking method based on elastic light scattering that enables long-duration measurements of nanoparticle dynamics at rates of thousands of frames per second. We contain the particles within a single-mode silica fiber having a subwavelength, nanofluidic channel and illuminate them using the fiber's strongly confined optical mode. The diffusing particles in this cylindrical geometry are continuously illuminated inside the collection focal plane. We show that the method can track unlabeled dielectric particles as small as 20 nm as well as individual cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) virions-26 nm in size and 4.6 megadaltons in mass-at rates of over 3 kHz for durations of tens of seconds. Our setup is easily incorporated into common optical microscopes and extends their detection range to nanometer-scale particles and macromolecules. The ease-of-use and performance of this technique support its potential for widespread applications in medical diagnostics and micro total analysis systems.

  13. Signal Characteristics of a Resistive-Strip Micromegas Detector with an Integrated Two-Dimensional Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Tai-Hua; Schott, Matthias; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Wehner, Laura; Westenberger, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, micropattern gaseous detectors, which comprise a two-dimensional readout structure within one PCB layer, received significant attention in the development of precision and cost-effective tracking detectors in medium and high energy physics experiments. In this article, we present for the first time a systematic performance study of the signal characteristics of a resistive strip micromegas detector with a two-dimensional readout, based on test-beam and X-ray measurements. In particular, comparisons of the response of the two independent readout-layers regarding their signal shapes and signal reconstruction efficiencies are discussed.

  14. Long-Term Tracking of a Specific Vehicle Using Airborne Optical Camera Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, F.; Rosenbaum, D.; Runge, H.; Cerra, D.; Mattyus, G.; Reinartz, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present two low cost, airborne sensor systems capable of long-term vehicle tracking. Based on the properties of the sensors, a method for automatic real-time, long-term tracking of individual vehicles is presented. This combines the detection and tracking of the vehicle in low frame rate image sequences and applies the lagged Cell Transmission Model (CTM) to handle longer tracking outages occurring in complex traffic situations, e.g. tunnels. The CTM model uses the traffic conditions in the proximities of the target vehicle and estimates its motion to predict the position where it reappears. The method is validated on an airborne image sequence acquired from a helicopter. Several reference vehicles are tracked within a range of 500m in a complex urban traffic situation. An artificial tracking outage of 240m is simulated, which is handled by the CTM. For this, all the vehicles in the close proximity are automatically detected and tracked to estimate the basic density-flow relations of the CTM model. Finally, the real and simulated trajectories of the reference vehicles in the outage are compared showing good correspondence also in congested traffic situations.

  15. Deformation-induced speckle-pattern evolution and feasibility of correlational speckle tracking in optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.; Matveyev, Alexandr L.; Matveev, Lev A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Vitkin, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Feasibility of speckle tracking in optical coherence tomography (OCT) based on digital image correlation (DIC) is discussed in the context of elastography problems. Specifics of applying DIC methods to OCT, compared to processing of photographic images in mechanical engineering applications, are emphasized and main complications are pointed out. Analytical arguments are augmented by accurate numerical simulations of OCT speckle patterns. In contrast to DIC processing for displacement and strain estimation in photographic images, the accuracy of correlational speckle tracking in deformed OCT images is strongly affected by the coherent nature of speckles, for which strain-induced complications of speckle "blinking" and "boiling" are typical. The tracking accuracy is further compromised by the usually more pronounced pixelated structure of OCT scans compared with digital photographic images in classical DIC applications. Processing of complex-valued OCT data (comprising both amplitude and phase) compared to intensity-only scans mitigates these deleterious effects to some degree. Criteria of the attainable speckle tracking accuracy and its dependence on the key OCT system parameters are established.

  16. Evaluation of artifact reduction in optical coherence tomography angiography with real-time tracking and motion correction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camino, Acner; Zhang, Miao; Gao, Simon S; Hwang, Thomas S; Sharma, Utkarsh; Wilson, David J; Huang, David; Jia, Yali

    2016-10-01

    Artifacts introduced by eye motion in optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) affect the interpretation of images and the quantification of parameters with clinical value. Eradication of such artifacts in OCTA remains a technical challenge. We developed an algorithm that recognizes five different types of motion artifacts and used it to evaluate the performance of three motion removal technologies. On en face maximum projection of flow images, the summed flow signal in each row and column and the correlation between neighboring rows and columns were calculated. Bright line artifacts were recognized by large summed flow signal. Drifts, distorted lines, and stretch artifacts exhibited abnormal correlation values. Residual lines were simultaneously a local maximum of summed flow and a local minimum of correlation. Tracking-assisted scanning integrated with motion correction technology (MCT) demonstrated higher performance than tracking or MCT alone in healthy and diabetic eyes.

  17. Ultraviolet radiation-induced modifications of the optical and registration properties of a CR-39 nuclear track detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, A.F., E-mail: abdallahsaad56@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Benghazi, Benghazi (Libya); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig (Egypt); Al-Faitory, N.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Benghazi, Benghazi (Libya); Hussein, M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig (Egypt); Mohamed, R.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Benghazi, Benghazi (Libya)

    2015-09-15

    The UV–VIS (ultraviolet–visible) spectra and etching characteristics of poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC, a form of the CR-39 polymer) detector films after exposure to UV radiation for various times have been studied. Etching experiments were carried out on the UV-exposed CR-39 detectors after alpha particle and fission-fragment irradiation using a {sup 252}Cf source. The bulk and track etch rates were measured using the alpha and fission-fragment track diameters, and the sensitivity and the detection efficiency were also determined. The optical band gap for both indirect and direct transitions was calculated based on the absorption edge of the UV spectra of the pristine and variously UV-exposed detectors. The optical band gap evidently indicates a gradual change in the optical properties of the CR-39 detector that is induced by the UV radiation. This study shows that the UV-exposed CR-39 detectors were demonstrated to be highly sensitive to alpha particles, but proved to be somewhat less sensitive to the fission fragments.

  18. Thermopile detector radiation hard readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaalema, Stephen; Van Duyne, Stephen; Gates, James L.; Foote, Marc C.

    2010-08-01

    The NASA Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) conceptual payload contains a thermal instrument with six different spectral bands ranging from 8μm to 100μm. The thermal instrument is based on multiple linear arrays of thermopile detectors that are intrinsically radiation hard; however, the thermopile CMOS readout needs to be hardened to tolerate the radiation sources of the JEO mission. Black Forest Engineering is developing a thermopile readout to tolerate the JEO mission radiation sources. The thermal instrument and ROIC process/design techniques are described to meet the JEO mission requirements.

  19. Determination of optical damage cross-sections and volumes surrounding ion bombardment tracks in GaAs using coherent acoustic phonon spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigerwald, A.; Hmelo, A. B.; Varga, K.; Feldman, L. C.; Tolk, N.

    2012-07-01

    We report the results of coherent acoustic phonon spectroscopy analysis of band-edge optical modification of GaAs irradiated with 400 keV Ne++ for doses between 1011-1013 cm-2. We relate this optical modification to the structural damage density as predicted by simulation and verified by ion channeling analysis. Crystal damage is observed to cause optical modification that reduces the amplitude of the optoacoustic signal. The depth-dependent nature of the optoacoustic measurement allows us to determine optical damage cross-sections along the ion track, which are found to vary as a function of position along the track. Unexpectedly, we find that this optical modification is primarily dependent on the structural damage density and insensitive to the specific defect configuration along the ion track, suggesting that a simple model of defect density along the track is sufficient to characterize the observed optical changes. The extent of optical modification is strongly probe frequency-dependent as the frequency is detuned from the GaAs band edge. As determined from the experimental measurements, the spatial extent of optical modification exceeds the spatial extent of the structural disorder by an order of magnitude.

  20. Optical signal processing and tracking of whispering gallery modes in real-time for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amir R.; Afifi, Amr N.; Taha, Hazem

    2017-05-01

    A novel approach for tracking of whispering gallery modes (WGM) in real-time for dielectric cavities used in sensing application is presented in this paper. Real-time tracking for the shifts of the WGM can be used to measure the physical quantity of interest precisely, under high repetition rates. The tracking algorithm is based on cross-correlation signal processing technique which has been proved to be accurate in WGM shifts detection. In order to achieve portability, the aforementioned real-time algorithm is implemented using a single-board re-configurable input-output hardware. The hardware platform used combines a real-time processor and a field programmable gate array (FPGA), it also allows for data exchange between them. The tracking algorithm's accuracy and real-time behavior is verified by preforming simulations based on experiments conducted on the dielectric cavity, where the cavity is used as a force sensor measuring mechanical compression. The light from a laser diode is tuned with rates up to 10 kHz and then tangentially coupled into the cavity to excite the WGM. Results show that shifts of the WGM are tracked by the algorithm providing real-time force readings.

  1. Tracking and imaging of dynamic objects in scattering media by time-reversed adapted-perturbation (TRAP) optical focusing

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Cheng; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lihong V

    2014-01-01

    The ability to steer light propagation inside scattering media has long been sought-after due to its potential widespread applications. To form optical foci inside scattering media, the only feasible strategy is to guide photons by using either implanted or virtual guide stars. However, all of these guide stars must be introduced extrinsically, either invasively or by physical contact, limiting the scope of their application. Here, we focus light inside scattering media by employing intrinsic dynamics as guide stars. By time-reversing the perturbed component of the scattered light adaptively, we concentrate light to the origin of the perturbation, where the permittivity varied spontaneously. We demonstrate dynamic light focusing onto moving targets and imaging of a time-variant object obscured by highly scattering media, without invasiveness and physical contact. Anticipated applications include all-weather optical communication with airplanes or satellites, tracking vehicles in thick fogs, and imaging and ph...

  2. Optical-electronic system controlling the position of a railway track with the help of reference marks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavrygina, Margarita A.; Konyakhin, Igor A.; Timofeev, Aleksandr N.; Verezhinskaia, Ekaterina A.

    2016-04-01

    Rail transport is the largest rail network worldwide. If you compare the number of passengers and of goods transported by different modes of transport, it appears that the share of rail transport represents a very tangible part of them. Ensuring a high level of rail safety is currently one of the primary tasks of States and organizations involved in rail. In order to contain a railway and to provide its performance, you must ensure a high quality of the Railway, so the establishment of systems to control the position of the path is relevant, especially in the field of optical-electronic instrument making. The purpose of work is development and research of optical-electronic system for controlling the position of a railway track with the help of reference marks.

  3. The “Wear and Measure” Approach: Linking Joint Stability Measurements from a Smart Clothing System to Optical Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen H. M. Bergmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint stability is essential for maintaining normal everyday function. However, assessment of stability often still relies on subjective or obtrusive methods. An unobtrusive approach would be to have our clothes assess our joint stability. Methods. A new application consisting of an attachable clothing sensing system (ACSS, constructed from a flexible carbon black and polyurethane composite film, was tested against an optical tracking system to assess if the ACSS placed across the knee could provide stability results that correlate with the optical tracking outcomes. Stability was challenged by reducing the base of support and by removing vision generating different experimental conditions. Results. Bland and Altman plots indicated a general proportional error between the measurement systems within each stability condition. However, across all conditions a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.81 (p<0.001 was found between the displacement values and ACSS, showing a good association between stability measurements. Electromyography (EMG also indicated that joint stability was challenged between the different conditions. The ACSS was experienced by users as comfortable and hardly noticeable. Conclusions. This study indicates that smart clothing can measure important physiological parameters in an unobtrusive manner. This “wear and measure” approach might change how we gather relevant clinical data in the future.

  4. Foveated Wide Field-of-View Imaging for Missile Warning/Tracking using Adaptive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-30

    Topical Meeting On Optics of Liquid Crystals, OLC 2007, Puebla , Mexico (October 2007) 13. A. Parish, S. Gauza, S.T. Wu, J. Dziaduszek, and R. Dabrowski...New fluorinated terphenyl isothiocyanate liquid crystals” 12th International Topical Meeting On Optics of Liquid Crystals, OLC 2007, Puebla , Mexico

  5. Digital column readout architectures for hybrid pixel detector readout chips

    CERN Document Server

    Poikela, T; Westerlund, T; Buytaert, J; Campbell, M; De Gaspari, M; Llopart, X; Wyllie, K; Gromov, V; Kluit, R; van Beuzekom, M; Zappon, F; Zivkovic, V; Brezina, C; Desch, K; Fu, Y; Kruth, A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, two digital column architectures suitable for sparse readout of data from a pixel matrix in trigger-less applications are presented. Each architecture reads out a pixel matrix of 256 x 256 pixels with a pixel pitch of 55 µm. The first architecture has been implemented in the Timepix3 chip, and this is presented together with initial measurements. Simulation results and measured data are compared. The second architecture has been designed for Velopix, a readout chip planned for the LHCb VELO upgrade. Unlike Timepix3, this has to be tolerant to radiation-induced single-event effects. Results from post-layout simulations are shown with the circuit architectures.

  6. Simple High-Bandwidth Sideband Locking with Heterodyne Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhardt, Christoph; Sankey, Jack C

    2016-01-01

    We present a robust sideband laser locking technique that is ideally suited for applications requiring low probe power and heterodyne readout. By feeding back to a high-bandwidth voltage controlled oscillator, we lock a first-order phase-modulation sideband to a table-top high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, achieving a feedback bandwidth of 3.5 MHz with a single integrator, limited fundamentally by the signal delay. The directly measured transfer function of the closed feedback loop agrees with a model assuming ideal system components, and from this we suggest a modified design that should realistically achieve a bandwidth exceeding 6 MHz with a near-causally limited feedback gain of $4\\times 10^7$ at 1 kHz. The off-resonance optical carrier is used for alignment-free heterodyne readout, alleviating the need for a second laser or additional optical modulators.

  7. Meta-instrument: high speed positioning and tracking platform for near-field optical imaging microscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Bijster, R J F; Spierdijk, J P F; Dekker, A; Klop, W A; Kramer, G F IJ; Cheng, L K; Hagen, R A J; Sadeghian, H

    2016-01-01

    High resolution and high throughput imaging are typically mutually exclusive. The meta-instrument pairs high resolution optical concepts such as nano-antennas, superoscillatory lenses and hyperlenses with a miniaturized opto-mechatronic platform for precise and high speed positioning of the optical elements at lens-to-sample separations that are measured in tens of nanometers. Such platform is a necessary development for bringing near-field optical imaging techniques to their industrial application. Towards this purpose, we present two designs and proof-of-principle instruments that are aimed at realizing sub-nanometer positional precision with a 100 kHz bandwidth.

  8. Towards a new generation of pixel detector readout chips

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, M; Ballabriga, R.; Frojdh, E.; Heijne, E.; Llopart, X.; Poikela, T.; Tlustos, L.; Valerio, P.; Wong, W.

    2016-01-01

    The Medipix3 Collaboration has broken new ground in spectroscopic X-ray imaging and in single particle detection and tracking. This paper will review briefly the performance and limitations of the present generation of pixel detector readout chips developed by the Collaboration. Through Silicon Via technology has the potential to provide a significant improvement in the tile- ability and more flexibility in the choice of readout architecture. This has been explored in the context of 3 projects with CEA-LETI using Medipix3 and Timepix3 wafers. The next generation of chips will aim to provide improved spectroscopic imaging performance at rates compatible with human CT. It will also aim to provide full spectroscopic images with unprecedented energy and spatial resolution. Some of the opportunities and challenges posed by moving to a more dense CMOS process will be discussed.

  9. TID-dependent current measurements of IBL readout chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dette, Karola [TU Dortmund, Experimentelle Physik IV (Germany); CERN (Switzerland); Collaboration: ATLAS Pixel-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS detector consists of several subsystems with a hybrid pixel detector as the innermost component of the tracking system. The pixel detector has been composed of three layers of silicon sensor assemblies during the first data taking run of the LHC and has been upgraded with a new 4th layer, the so-called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), in summer 2014. Each silicon sensor of the IBL is connected to a Front End readout chip (FE-I4) via bump bonds. During the first year of data taking an increase of the LV current produced by the readout chips was observed. This increase could be traced back to radiation damage inside the silicon. The dependence of the current on the Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and temperature has been tested with X-ray irradiations and will be presented in this talk.

  10. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 09: Accuracy of Liver Cancer Treatment on Cyberknife® with Synchrony™ Optical Tracking Throughout the Respiratory Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, J.; Chow, T [Juravinski Cancer Center, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Wong, R.

    2014-08-15

    The Cyberknife® robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy system is well-suited for treating liver lesions over the respiratory cycle as it includes room-mounted orthogonal x-ray tracking of internal fiducial markers and optical tracking of external markers. The Synchrony™ software generates a model of internal target positions during patient respiration and correlates it to the external optical tracking system for real-time optical-based position corrections of the linear accelerator during beam delivery. Although clinical studies have provided preliminary outcomes for liver lesions treated with the Cyberknife system, to date, there is little data demonstrating the ability of the Synchrony software to track targets in the liver, which deforms throughout the respiratory cycle. In this study, we investigated the respiratory motion model performance for predicting tumour motion. We conducted a retrospective analysis of fifteen liver cancer patients treated on the Cyberknife using the Synchrony optical tracking system. We analyzed Cyberknife tracking information stored in the log files to extract the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) correlation errors between the model-predicted position and the internal fiducial centroid position determined by x-ray imaging. Only translational tracking and corrections were applied during treatment. Overall, the correlation errors were greatest in the SI direction. We calculated radial correlation errors, and determined that the 95{sup th}, 98{sup th} and 99{sup th} percentile errors were 3.4 mm, 4.4 mm and 5.1 mm, respectively. Based on translational correlation tracking errors we expect the clinical target volume will be within 3.4 mm of the planning target volume for 95 % of beam delivery time.

  11. The Trigger Readout Electronics for the Phase-I Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Hao; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    For the Phase-I luminosity upgrade of the LHC a higher granularity trigger readout of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters is foreseen to enhance the trigger feature extraction and background rejection. The new readout system digitizes the detector signals, grouped into 34000 so-called Super Cells, with 12bit precision at 40MHz and transfers the data on optical links to the digital processing system, which computes the Super Cell transverse energies. In this paper, development and test results of the new readout system are presented.

  12. The trigger readout electronics for the Phase-I upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao

    2017-03-01

    For the Phase-I luminosity upgrade of the LHC a higher granularity trigger readout of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters is foreseen to enhance the trigger feature extraction and background rejection. The new readout system digitizes the detector signals, grouped into 34000 so-called Super Cells, with 12-bit precision at 40 MHz and transfers the data on optical links to the digital processing system, which computes the Super Cell transverse energies. In this paper, development and test results of the new readout system are presented.

  13. High-Power Amplifier Compatible Internally Sensed Optical Phased Array for Space Debris Tracking and Maneuvering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, L.; Francis, S.; Sibley, P.; Ward, R.; Smith, C.; McClelland, D.; Shaddock, D.

    2016-09-01

    Optical phased arrays (OPAs) provide a way to scale optical power beyond the capabilities of conventional CW lasers via coherent beam combination. By stabilising the relative output phase of multiple spatially separate lasers, OPAs form a coherent optical wavefront in the far field. Since the phase of each laser can be controlled independently, OPAs also have the ability to manipulate the distribution of optical power in the far field, and therefore may provide the capability to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. Combined with their inherent scalability and high power handling capabilities, OPAs are a promising technology for CW space debris ranging and manoeuvring. The OPA presented here is unique in its ability to sense the phase of each laser internally, without requiring any external sampling optics between it and the telescope. This allows the internally sensed OPA to be constructed entirely within fibre, utilising high-power fiber amplifiers to scale optical power beyond the limits of any conventional single lasers. The total power that can be delivered by each emitter in the OPA is limited only by the onset of stimulated Brillouin scattering, a non-linear effect that clamps the amount of power that can be delivered through a fiber waveguide. A three element internally sensed OPA developed at the Australian National University has been demonstrated to coherently combine three commercial 15 Watt fiber amplifiers with an output phase stability of one 200th of a wavelength. We have also demonstrated the ability to dynamically manipulate the distribution of optical power in the far-field at a bandwidth of up to 10 kHz. Since the OPA's control system is implemented using field-programmable gate-array technology, the system may be scaled beyond 100 emitters, potentially reaching the kilowatt level optical powers required to perturb the orbit of space debris.

  14. High-Speed Microscale Optical Tracking Using Digital Frequency-Domain Multiplexing

    OpenAIRE

    MacLachlan, Robert A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2009-01-01

    Position-sensitive detectors (PSDs), or lateral-effect photodiodes, are commonly used for high-speed, high-resolution optical position measurement. This paper describes the instrument design for multidimensional position and orientation measurement based on the simultaneous position measurement of multiple modulated sources using frequency-domain-multiplexed (FDM) PSDs. The important advantages of this optical configuration in comparison with laser/mirror combinations are that it has a large ...

  15. High-Speed Microscale Optical Tracking Using Digital Frequency-Domain Multiplexing

    OpenAIRE

    MacLachlan, Robert A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2009-01-01

    Position-sensitive detectors (PSDs), or lateral-effect photodiodes, are commonly used for high-speed, high-resolution optical position measurement. This paper describes the instrument design for multidimensional position and orientation measurement based on the simultaneous position measurement of multiple modulated sources using frequency-domain-multiplexed (FDM) PSDs. The important advantages of this optical configuration in comparison with laser/mirror combinations are that it has a large ...

  16. A Comparison of Detection and Tracking Methods as Applied to OPIR Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    LCM is superior to PCA. However, the best results are obtained by combining the two. Kalman and alpha-beta filters handle single targets with a...common detection and tracking strategies. Simulation results show that the LCM is superior to PCA. However, the best results are obtained by combining...foreground” that shows only those moving objects. The PCA model relies mostly on simple matrix algebra . An m x n matrix A is constructed where m is the

  17. Solid State Imaging Device Parameter Study for Use in Electro-Optic Tracking Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-01

    DRAWER DE NUCLEAR ENGINEERING MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY ELDRED W. HOUGH, PH.D. MISSISSIPPI STATE, MISSISSIPPI 39762 PETROLEUM ENGINEERING TELEPHONE...are available for investigation. Both utilize the same tracking algorithm, but have different detector arrays. Tracker Number 1 uses a Reticon 50 x 50 A...encoding the outputs of linear reticon arrays. lTese I encoded dataare available then for instant recall. Up to 30 to 1 reductions of such information

  18. Status of Telescope Fabra ROA at Montsec: Optical Observations for Space Surveillance & Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Fors, O; Nunez, J; Muinos, J L; Boloix, J; Baena, R; Morcillo, R; Merino, M

    2011-01-01

    The telescope Fabra ROA at Montsec (TFRM) is a 0.5m f/1 refurbished Baker-Nunn Camera (BNC) operated by a collaboration between the Fabra Observatory - Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences of Barcelona and the Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA), and installed at Montsec Astronomical Observatory (Spain). Among other capabilities, its CCD FoV (4.4{\\deg}x4.4{\\deg}), the telescope tracking at arbitrary RA and DEC rates, and the CCD shutter commanding at will during the exposure are specially remarkable for Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) observational programs. On Feb 2011, the TFRM participated, in the CO-VI third run satellite tracking campaign of the ESA SST/Space Surveillance Awareness Preparatory Program (SST/SSA-PP). During this multi-asset 7-day campaign the TFRM conducted systematic observations of artificial satellites which yielded to the determination of 1137 accurate position measurements. Since Feb 2011, the TFRM is observing in remote and fully unattended robotic modes under commissioning status. A ...

  19. Retinal optical coherence tomography at 1 μm with dynamic focus control and axial motion tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cua, Michelle; Lee, Sujin; Miao, Dongkai; Ju, Myeong Jin; Mackenzie, Paul J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-02-01

    High-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal imaging is important to noninvasively visualize the various retinal structures to aid in better understanding of the pathogenesis of vision-robbing diseases. However, conventional OCT systems have a trade-off between lateral resolution and depth-of-focus. In this report, we present the development of a focus-stacking OCT system with automatic focus optimization for high-resolution, extended-focal-range clinical retinal imaging by incorporating a variable-focus liquid lens into the sample arm optics. Retinal layer tracking and selection was performed using a graphics processing unit accelerated processing platform for focus optimization, providing real-time layer-specific en face visualization. After optimization, multiple volumes focused at different depths were acquired, registered, and stitched together to yield a single, high-resolution focus-stacked dataset. Using this system, we show high-resolution images of the retina and optic nerve head, from which we extracted clinically relevant parameters such as the nerve fiber layer thickness and lamina cribrosa microarchitecture.

  20. LHC Optics Measurement with Proton Tracks Detected by the Roman Pots of the TOTEM Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00062364; Aspell, P; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bottigli, U; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C; Csanád, M; Csörgö, T; Deile, M; Doubek, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Georgiev, V; Giani, S; Grzanka, L; Hammerbauer, J; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Karev, A; Kašpar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lippmaa, J; Lokajíček, M V; Losurdo, L; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodríguez, F; Macrí, M; Mäki, T; Mercadante, A; Minafra, N; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Palazzi, P; Peroutka, Z; Procházka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Scribano, A; Smajek, J; Snoeys, W; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Welti, J; Whitmore, J; Wyszkowski, P; Zielinski, K

    2014-10-28

    Precise knowledge of the beam optics at the LHC is crucial to fulfil the physics goals of the TOTEM experiment, where the kinematics of the scattered protons is reconstructed with the near-beam telescopes -- so-called Roman Pots (RP). Before being detected, the protons' trajectories are influenced by the magnetic fields of the accelerator lattice. Thus precise understanding of the proton transport is of key importance for the experiment. A novel method of optics evaluation is proposed which exploits kinematical distributions of elastically scattered protons observed in the RPs. Theoretical predictions, as well as Monte Carlo studies, show that the residual uncertainty of this optics estimation method is smaller than 0.25 percent.

  1. Effect of thermal annealing on optical properties of CR-39 polymeric track detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhi; Gupta, Renu; Sharma, Tanu; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Kumar, S.

    2009-07-01

    The samples of CR-39 polymer (TASTRAK, Bristol, England) were annealled thermally at various temperatures ranging from 100°C to 180°C for 1 hour, in air. FTIR spectroscopy reveals the structural degradation of CR-39 polymer due to thermal annealing above its glass transition temperature. Optical band gap of pristine and thermally annealed samples has been determined using UV-Visible absorption spectra. It has been observed that the optical band gap decreases continuously as a result of annealing.

  2. Optical eye tracking system for real-time noninvasive tumor localization in external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Riccardo; Fassi, Aurora; Fattori, Giovanni; Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Tagaste, Barbara; Riboldi, Marco; Ciocca, Mario; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido

    2015-05-01

    External beam radiotherapy currently represents an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraocular tumors. Accurate target localization and efficient compensation of involuntary eye movements are crucial to avoid deviations in dose distribution with respect to the treatment plan. This paper describes an eye tracking system (ETS) based on noninvasive infrared video imaging. The system was designed for capturing the tridimensional (3D) ocular motion and provides an on-line estimation of intraocular lesions position based on a priori knowledge coming from volumetric imaging. Eye tracking is performed by localizing cornea and pupil centers on stereo images captured by two calibrated video cameras, exploiting eye reflections produced by infrared illumination. Additionally, torsional eye movements are detected by template matching in the iris region of eye images. This information allows estimating the 3D position and orientation of the eye by means of an eye local reference system. By combining ETS measurements with volumetric imaging for treatment planning [computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], one is able to map the position of the lesion to be treated in local eye coordinates, thus enabling real-time tumor referencing during treatment setup and irradiation. Experimental tests on an eye phantom and seven healthy subjects were performed to assess ETS tracking accuracy. Measurements on phantom showed an overall median accuracy within 0.16 mm and 0.40° for translations and rotations, respectively. Torsional movements were affected by 0.28° median uncertainty. On healthy subjects, the gaze direction error ranged between 0.19° and 0.82° at a median working distance of 29 cm. The median processing time of the eye tracking algorithm was 18.60 ms, thus allowing eye monitoring up to 50 Hz. A noninvasive ETS prototype was designed to perform real-time target localization and eye movement monitoring during ocular radiotherapy treatments. The

  3. Optical eye tracking system for real-time noninvasive tumor localization in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Via, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.via@polimi.it; Fassi, Aurora; Fattori, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133 (Italy); Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Tagaste, Barbara; Ciocca, Mario [CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133, Italy and CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100, Italy and European Institute of Oncology, Milano 20141 (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy currently represents an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraocular tumors. Accurate target localization and efficient compensation of involuntary eye movements are crucial to avoid deviations in dose distribution with respect to the treatment plan. This paper describes an eye tracking system (ETS) based on noninvasive infrared video imaging. The system was designed for capturing the tridimensional (3D) ocular motion and provides an on-line estimation of intraocular lesions position based on a priori knowledge coming from volumetric imaging. Methods: Eye tracking is performed by localizing cornea and pupil centers on stereo images captured by two calibrated video cameras, exploiting eye reflections produced by infrared illumination. Additionally, torsional eye movements are detected by template matching in the iris region of eye images. This information allows estimating the 3D position and orientation of the eye by means of an eye local reference system. By combining ETS measurements with volumetric imaging for treatment planning [computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], one is able to map the position of the lesion to be treated in local eye coordinates, thus enabling real-time tumor referencing during treatment setup and irradiation. Experimental tests on an eye phantom and seven healthy subjects were performed to assess ETS tracking accuracy. Results: Measurements on phantom showed an overall median accuracy within 0.16 mm and 0.40° for translations and rotations, respectively. Torsional movements were affected by 0.28° median uncertainty. On healthy subjects, the gaze direction error ranged between 0.19° and 0.82° at a median working distance of 29 cm. The median processing time of the eye tracking algorithm was 18.60 ms, thus allowing eye monitoring up to 50 Hz. Conclusions: A noninvasive ETS prototype was designed to perform real-time target localization and eye movement monitoring

  4. "Peak tracking chip" for label-free optical detection of bio-molecular interaction and bulk sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougot-Robin, Kristelle; Li, Shunbo; Zhang, Yinghua; Hsing, I-Ming; Benisty, Henri; Wen, Weijia

    2012-10-21

    A novel imaging method for bulk refractive index sensing or label-free bio-molecular interaction sensing is presented. This method is based on specially designed "Peak tracking chip" (PTC) involving "tracks" of adjacent resonant waveguide gratings (RWG) "micropads" with slowly evolving resonance position. Using a simple camera the spatial information robustly retrieves the diffraction efficiency, which in turn transduces either the refractive index of the liquids on the tracks or the effective thickness of an immobilized biological layer. Our intrinsically multiplex chip combines tunability and versatility advantages of dielectric guided wave biochips without the need of costly hyperspectral instrumentation. The current success of surface plasmon imaging techniques suggests that our chip proposal could leverage an untapped potential to routinely extend such techniques in a convenient and sturdy optical configuration toward, for instance for large analytes detection. PTC design and fabrication are discussed with challenging process to control micropads properties by varying their period (step of 2 nm) or their duty cycle through the groove width (steps of 4 nm). Through monochromatic imaging of our PTC, we present experimental demonstration of bulk index sensing on the range [1.33-1.47] and of surface biomolecule detection of molecular weight 30 kDa in aqueous solution using different surface densities. A sensitivity of the order of 10(-5) RIU for bulk detection and a sensitivity of the order of ∼10 pg mm(-2) for label-free surface detection are expected, therefore opening a large range of application of our chip based imaging technique. Exploiting and chip design, we expect as well our chip to open new direction for multispectral studies through imaging.

  5. Thermal-Plume fibre Optic Tracking (T-POT test for flow velocity measurement in groundwater boreholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Read

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We develop an approach for measuring in-well fluid velocities using point electrical heating combined with spatially and temporally continuous temperature monitoring using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS. The method uses a point heater to warm a discrete volume of water. The rate of advection of this plume, once the heating is stopped, equates to the average flow velocity in the well. We conducted Thermal-Plume fibre Optic Tracking (T-POT tests in a borehole in a fractured rock aquifer with the heater at the same depth and multiple pumping rates. Tracking of the thermal plume peak allowed the spatially varying velocity to be estimated up to 50 m downstream from the heating point, depending on the pumping rate. The T-POT technique can be used to estimate the velocity throughout long intervals provided that thermal dilution due to inflows, dispersion, or cooling by conduction do not render the thermal pulse unresolvable with DTS. A complete flow log may be obtained by deploying the heater at multiple depths, or with multiple point heaters.

  6. In vivo application of an optical segment tracking approach for bone loading regimes recording in humans: a reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng-Fei; Sanno, Maximilian; Ganse, Bergita; Koy, Timmo; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Müller, Lars Peter; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-08-01

    This paper demonstrates an optical segment tracking (OST) approach for assessing the in vivo bone loading regimes in humans. The relative movement between retro-reflective marker clusters affixed to the tibia cortex by bone screws was tracked and expressed as tibia loading regimes in terms of segment deformation. Stable in vivo fixation of bone screws was tested by assessing the resonance frequency of the screw-marker structure and the relative marker position changes after hopping and jumping. Tibia deformation was recorded during squatting exercises to demonstrate the reliability of the OST approach. Results indicated that the resonance frequencies remain unchanged prior to and after all exercises. The changes of Cardan angle between marker clusters induced by the exercises were rather minor, maximally 0.06°. The reproducibility of the deformation angles during squatting remained small (0.04°/m-0.65°/m). Most importantly, all surgical and testing procedures were well tolerated. The OST method promises to bring more insights of the mechanical loading acting on bone than in the past.

  7. Diffractive beam shaping, tracking and coupling for wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). The full strength of this structure-mediated paradigm can be harnessed by addressing multiple WOWs and manipulating them to work in tandem. We propose the use of diffractive...

  8. Low-Complexity Tracking of Laser and Nonlinear Phase Noise in WDM Optical Fiber Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yankov, Metodi Plamenov; Fehenberger, Tobias; Barletta, Luca;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) fiber optic channel is considered. It is shown that for ideal distributed Raman amplification (IDRA), the Wiener process model is suitable for the non-linear phase noise due to cross phase modulation from neighboring channels. Based...

  9. Simultaneous dual wavelength eye-tracked ultrahigh resolution retinal and choroidal optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unterhuber, A.; Povaay, B.; Müller, André;

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an optical coherence tomography device that simultaneously combines different novel ultrabroad bandwidth light sources centered in the 800 and 1060 nm regions, operating at 66 kHz depth scan rate, and a confocal laser scanning ophthalmoscope-based eye tracker to permit motion-artif...

  10. Far-field correlation of bidirectional tracking beams due to wave-front deformation in inter-satellites optical communication links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Siyuan; Ma, Zhongtian; Ma, Jing; Wu, Feng; Tan, Liying

    2015-03-23

    In some applications of optical communication systems, such as inter-satellites optical communication, the correlation of the bidirectional tracking beams changes in far-field as a result of wave-front deformation. Far-field correlation model with wave-front deformation on tracking stability is established. Far-field correlation function and factor have been obtained. Combining with parameters of typical laser communication systems, the model is corrected. It shows that deformation pointing-tracking errors θ(A) and θ(B), far-field correlation factor δ depend on RMS of deformation error rms, which decline with a increasing rms including Tilt and Coma. The principle of adjusting far-field correlation factor with wave-front deformation to compensate deformation pointing-tracking errors has been given, through which the deformation pointing-tracking error is reduced to 18.12″ (Azimuth) and 17.65″ (Elevation). Work above possesses significant reference value on optimization design in inter-satellites optical communication.

  11. Readout scheme of the upgraded ALICE TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Appelshaeuser, Harald; Ivanov, Marian; Lippmann, Christian; Wiechula, Jens

    2016-01-01

    In this document, we present the updated readout scheme for the ALICE TPC Upgrade. Two major design changes are implemented with respect to the concept that was presented in the TPC Upgrade Technical Design Report: – The SAMPA front-end ASIC will be used in direct readout mode. – The ADC sampling frequency will be reduced from 10 to 5 MHz. The main results from simulations and a description of the new readout scheme is outlined.

  12. Performance of multi-step avalanche chambers equipped with two-dimensional electronic readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlén, L.; El Chenawi, K.; Enosawa, K; Garpman, S; Gustafsson, H.A.; Kurata, M; Löhner, H.; Martin, M; Miake, Y; Miyamoto, Y; Naef, H; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nystrand, J; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I.; Perrin, E; Rosselet, L; Rubio, JM; Sato, S; Soderstrom, K; Solomey, N; Stenlund, E; Svensson, T; Voros, S; Yagi, K; Yokota, Y

    1998-01-01

    We have developed large area multi-step avalanche chambers with electronic readout for tracking in a very high multiplicity environment in the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS. The operational characteristics of the detection system is reported. The reconstruction efficiency of the chambers varies wi

  13. Developments in Readout for Silicon Microstrip Sensors at a Linear Collider Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Carman, Jerome; Crosby, Sean; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Schumm, Bruce A; Spencer, Ned

    2010-01-01

    We report recent results on the use of charge division to obtain a longitudinal coordinate from silicon strip detectors, and on sources of electronic readout noise for long, thin strips. These results hold promise for the design of Linear Collider charged particle tracking system composed of silicon microstrip sensors.

  14. The Belle II SVD data readout system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmeier, R.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Bulla, L.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Cervenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doleźal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyś, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnićka, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Lueck, T.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2017-02-01

    The Belle II Experiment at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Tsukuba, Japan, will explore the asymmetry between matter and antimatter and search for new physics beyond the standard model. 172 double-sided silicon strip detectors are arranged cylindrically in four layers around the collision point to be part of a system which measures the tracks of the collision products of electrons and positrons. A total of 1748 radiation-hard APV25 chips read out 128 silicon strips each and send the analog signals by time-division multiplexing out of the radiation zone to 48 Flash Analog Digital Converter Modules (FADC). Each of them applies processing to the data; for example, it uses a digital finite impulse response filter to compensate line signal distortions, and it extracts the peak timing and amplitude from a set of several data points for each hit, using a neural network. We present an overview of the SVD data readout system, along with front-end electronics, cabling, power supplies and data processing.

  15. Nanosecond monolithic CMOS readout cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchkov, Vitali V.

    2004-08-24

    A pulse shaper is implemented in monolithic CMOS with a delay unit formed of a unity gain buffer. The shaper is formed of a difference amplifier having one input connected directly to an input signal and a second input connected to a delayed input signal through the buffer. An elementary cell is based on the pulse shaper and a timing circuit which gates the output of an integrator connected to the pulse shaper output. A detector readout system is formed of a plurality of elementary cells, each connected to a pixel of a pixel array, or to a microstrip of a plurality of microstrips, or to a detector segment.

  16. Railway track component condition monitoring using optical fibre Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buggy, S. J.; James, S. W.; Staines, S.; Carroll, R.; Kitson, P.; Farrington, D.; Drewett, L.; Jaiswal, J.; Tatam, R. P.

    2016-05-01

    The use of optical fibre Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensors to monitor the condition of safety critical rail components is investigated. Fishplates, switchblades and stretcher bars on the Stagecoach Supertram tramway in Sheffield in the UK have been instrumented with arrays of FBG sensors. The dynamic strain signatures induced by the passage of a tram over the instrumented components have been analysed to identify features indicative of changes in the condition of the components.

  17. A data readout approach for physics experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xi-Ru; CAO Ping; GAO Li-Wei; ZHENG Jia-Jun

    2015-01-01

    With increasing physical event rates and the number of electronic channels,traditional readout schemes meet the challenge of improving readout speed caused by the limited bandwidth of the crate backplane.In this paper,a high-speed data readout method based on the Ethernet is presented to make each readout module capable of transmitting data to the DAQ.Features of exPlicitly parallel data transmitting and distributed network architecture give the readout system the advantage of adapting varying requirements of particle physics experiments.Furthermore,to guarantee the readout performance and flexibility,a standalone embedded CPU system is utilized for network protocol stack processing.To receive the customized data format and protocol from front-end electronics,a field programmable gate array (FPGA) is used for logic reconfiguration.To optimize the interface and to improve the data throughput between CPU and FPGA,a sophisticated method based on SRAM is presented in this paper.For the purpose of evaluating this high-speed readout method,a simplified readout module is designed and implemented.Test results show that this module can support up to 70 Mbps data throughput from the readout module to DAQ.

  18. 三同心球光学系统跟瞄误差分析%Analyse of pointing and tracking error with three concentric spheres optical system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安岩; 李欣航; 赵义武; 董科研; 楚玉刚; 谢岩

    2016-01-01

    According to unique tracking mode,the specific tracking program of three concentric spherical opti-cal system which used in laser communication is discussed.By analyzing field of view and precision in the communication tracking optical path and the communication receiving optical path,the main relating parame-ters are given on the basis of theoretical calculation of tracking trajectory with Matlab.Using the software of Tracepro,the optical simulation of spot centroid and spot size of image plane in communication tracking optical path and the communication receiving optical path are performed after the introduction of relevant error.The simulation results show that centroid deviation of communication reception and communication tracking are in the ranges of ±4 μm and ±50 μm,respectively.Spot diameter deviation of communication reception and communication tracking are less than 80 μm and 400 μm respectively,which do not affect the relating function on tracking and communicating.%针对独有的跟踪方式,具体讨论了激光通信三同心球光学系统的跟瞄方案,并进行了具体规划。通过对通信跟踪光路和通信接收光路的视场和精度分析,给出了二者的相关参数,作为 Matlab 理论计算跟踪像面轨道的依据。利用 Tra-cepro 软件模拟了引入相关误差量后的通信跟踪和通信接收像面光斑质心偏移和光斑大小变化情况。仿真结果显示:随着角度的旋转,通信接收的质心偏差在±4μm 范围内,通信跟踪的质心偏差在±50μm 范围内;通信接收像面光斑直径小于80μm,通信跟踪像面光斑直径均在400μm 以内。系统所引入的误差在允许范围之内,不影响相关跟踪通信功能。

  19. Real-time optical imaging and tracking of micron-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Song, Qi; Tien, En-kuang; Kalyoncu, Salih K.; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2009-12-01

    We report real-time imaging and dynamics monitoring of micrometer predefined and random sized particles by time-space-wavelength mapping technology using a single-detector. Experimentally, we demonstrate real-time line imaging of a 5 μm polystyrene microsphere, glass powder particles and patterns such as fingerprints with up to 5 μm resolution at 1 line/50 ns capture rate. By using the same setup, real-time displacement tracking of micrometer-size glass particles with 50 ns temporal resolution and up to 5 μm spatial resolution is achieved. We also show that existing correlation spectroscopy algorithms can be adopted to extract dynamic information in a complex environment.

  20. A first-generation multi-functional cytokine for simultaneous optical tracking and tumor therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn Hingtgen

    Full Text Available Creating new molecules that simultaneously enhance tumor cell killing and permit diagnostic tracking is vital to overcoming the limitations rendering current therapeutic regimens for terminal cancers ineffective. Accordingly, we investigated the efficacy of an innovative new multi-functional targeted anti-cancer molecule, SM7L, using models of the lethal brain tumor Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Designed using predictive computer modeling, SM7L incorporates the therapeutic activity of the promising anti-tumor cytokine MDA-7/IL-24, an enhanced secretory domain, and diagnostic domain for non-invasive tracking. In vitro assays revealed the diagnostic domain of SM7L produced robust photon emission, while the therapeutic domain showed marked anti-tumor efficacy and significant modulation of p38MAPK and ERK pathways. In vivo, the unique multi-functional nature of SM7L allowed simultaneous real-time monitoring of both SM7L delivery and anti-tumor efficacy. Utilizing engineered stem cells as novel delivery vehicles for SM7L therapy (SC-SM7L, we demonstrate that SC-SM7L significantly improved pharmacokinetics and attenuated progression of established peripheral and intracranial human GBM xenografts. Furthermore, SC-SM7L anti-tumor efficacy was augmented in vitro and in vivo by concurrent activation of caspase-mediated apoptosis induced by adjuvant SC-mediated S-TRAIL delivery. Collectively, these studies define a promising new approach to treating highly aggressive cancers, including GBM, using the optimized therapeutic molecule SM7L.

  1. Noninvasive Optical Tracking of Red Fluorescent Protein-Expressing Cancer Cells in a Model of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Winnard, Jr.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We have evaluated the use of the Xenogen IVIS 200 imaging system for real-time fluorescence protein- based optical imaging of metastatic progression in live animals. We found that green fluorescent protein- expressing cells (100 × 106 were not detectable in a mouse cadaver phantom experiment. However, a 10-fold lower number of tdTomato-expressing cells were easily detected. Mammary fat pad xenografts of stable MDA-MB-231-tdTomato cells were generated for the imaging of metastatic progression. At 2 weeks postinjection, barely palpable tumor burdens were easily detected at the sites of injection. At 8 weeks, a small contralateral mammary fat pad metastasis was imaged and, by 13 weeks, metastases to lymph nodes were detectable. Metastases with nodular composition were detectable within the rib cage region at 15 weeks. 3-D image reconstructions indicated that the detection of fluorescence extended to approximately 1 cm below the surface. A combination of intense tdTomato fluorescence, imaging at ≥ 620 nm (where autofluorescence is minimized, the sensitivity of the Xenogen imager made this possible. This study demonstrates the utility of the noninvasive optical tracking of cancer cells during metastatic progression with endogenously expressed fluorescence protein reporters using detection wavelengths of ≥ 620 nm.

  2. Real-Time Discrete SPAD Array Readout Architecture for Time of Flight PET

    CERN Document Server

    Tétrault, M -A; Boisvert, A; Thibaudeau, C; Dubois, F; Fontaine, R; Pratte, J -F

    2014-01-01

    Single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays have proven themselves as serious candidates for time of flight positron emission tomography (PET). Discrete readout schemes mitigate the low-noise requirements of analog schemes and offer very fine control over threshold levels and timing pickup strategies. A high optical fill factor is paramount to timing performance in such detectors, and consequently space is limited for closely integrated electronics. Nonetheless, a production, daily used PET scanner must minimize bandwidth usage, data volume, data analysis time and power consumption and therefore requires a real-time readout and data processing architecture as close to the detector as possible. We propose a fully digital, embedded real-time readout architecture for SPAD-based detector. The readout circuit is located directly under the SPAD array instead of within or beside it to remove the fill factor versus circuit capabilities tradeoff. The overall real-time engine reduces transmitted data by a factor of 8 i...

  3. Analyzing the movement of the Nauplius 'Artemia salina' by optical tracking of plasmonic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Silke R; Fedoruk, Michael; Lohmüller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2014-07-15

    We demonstrate how optical tweezers may provide a sensitive tool to analyze the fluidic vibrations generated by the movement of small aquatic organisms. A single gold nanoparticle held by an optical tweezer is used as a sensor to quantify the rhythmic motion of a Nauplius larva (Artemia salina) in a water sample. This is achieved by monitoring the time dependent displacement of the trapped nanoparticle as a consequence of the Nauplius activity. A Fourier analysis of the nanoparticle's position then yields a frequency spectrum that is characteristic to the motion of the observed species. This experiment demonstrates the capability of this method to measure and characterize the activity of small aquatic larvae without the requirement to observe them directly and to gain information about the position of the larvae with respect to the trapped particle. Overall, this approach could give an insight on the vitality of certain species found in an aquatic ecosystem and could expand the range of conventional methods for analyzing water samples.

  4. High-Speed Microscale Optical Tracking Using Digital Frequency-Domain Multiplexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclachlan, Robert A; Riviere, Cameron N

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive detectors (PSDs), or lateral-effect photodiodes, are commonly used for high-speed, high-resolution optical position measurement. This paper describes the instrument design for multidimensional position and orientation measurement based on the simultaneous position measurement of multiple modulated sources using frequency-domain-multiplexed (FDM) PSDs. The important advantages of this optical configuration in comparison with laser/mirror combinations are that it has a large angular measurement range and allows the use of a probe that is small in comparison with the measurement volume. We review PSD characteristics and quantitative resolution limits, consider the lock-in amplifier measurement system as a communication link, discuss the application of FDM to PSDs, and make comparisons with time-domain techniques. We consider the phase-sensitive detector as a multirate DSP problem, explore parallels with Fourier spectral estimation and filter banks, discuss how to choose the modulation frequencies and sample rates that maximize channel isolation under design constraints, and describe efficient digital implementation. We also discuss hardware design considerations, sensor calibration, probe construction and calibration, and 3-D measurement by triangulation using two sensors. As an example, we characterize the resolution, speed, and accuracy of an instrument that measures the position and orientation of a 10 mm × 5 mm probe in 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 30-mm cube with 4-μm peak-to-peak resolution at 1-kHz sampling.

  5. Usefulness of an optical tracking system in laparoscopic surgery for motor skills assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Margallo, Juan A; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M; Pagador Carrasco, José B; Oropesa García, Ignacio; Gómez Aguilera, Enrique J; Moreno del Pozo, José

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the usefulness of an evaluation system of surgical skills based on motion analysis of laparoscopic instruments. This system consists of a physical laparoscopic simulator and a tracking and assessment system of technical skills in laparoscopy. Six surgeons with intermediate experience (between 1 and 50 laparoscopic surgeries) and 5 experienced surgeons (more than 50 laparoscopic surgeries) took part in this study. All participants were right-handed. The subjects performed 3 repetitions of a cutting task on synthetic tissue with the right hand, dissection of a gastric serous layer, and a suturing task in the dissection previously done. Objective metrics such as time, path length, speed of movements, acceleration and motion smoothness were analyzed for the instruments of each hand. In the cutting task, experienced surgeons show less acceleration (P=.014) and a smoother motion (P=.023) using the scissors. Regarding the dissection activity, experienced surgeons need less time (P=.006) and less length with both instruments (P=.006 for dissector and P=.01 for scissors). In the suturing task, experienced surgeons require less time (P=.037) and distance travelled (P=.041) by the dissector. This study shows the usefulness of the evaluation system for the cutting, dissecting, and suturing tasks. It represents a significant step in the development of advanced systems for training and assessment of surgical skills in laparoscopic surgery. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring and tracking the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols using multi-satellite aerosol optical depth composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeger, Aaron R.; Gupta, Pawan; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; McGrath, Kevin M.

    2016-06-01

    The primary goal of this study was to generate a near-real time (NRT) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product capable of providing a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol spatial distribution over the Pacific Ocean, in order to better monitor and track the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols. Therefore, we developed a NRT product that takes advantage of observations from both low-earth orbiting and geostationary satellites. In particular, we utilize AOD products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellites. Then, we combine these AOD products with our own retrieval algorithms developed for the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2) to generate a NRT daily AOD composite product. We present examples of the daily AOD composite product for a case study of trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution and dust aerosols in mid-March 2014. Overall, the new product successfully tracks this aerosol plume during its trans-Pacific transport to the west coast of North America as the frequent geostationary observations lead to a greater coverage of cloud-free AOD retrievals equatorward of about 35° N, while the polar-orbiting satellites provide a greater coverage of AOD poleward of 35° N. However, we note several areas across the domain of interest from Asia to North America where the GOES-15 and MTSAT-2 retrieval algorithms can introduce significant uncertainties into the new product.

  7. Monitoring and tracking the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols using multi-satellite aerosol optical depth retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Naeger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this study was to generate a near-real time (NRT aerosol optical depth (AOD product capable of providing a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol spatial distribution over the Pacific Ocean in order to better monitor and track the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols. Therefore, we developed a NRT product that takes advantage of observations from both low-earth orbiting and geostationary satellites. In particular, we utilize AOD products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS satellites. Then, we combine these AOD products with our own retrieval algorithms developed for the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15 and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2 to generate a NRT daily AOD composite product. We present examples of the daily AOD composite product for a case study of trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution and dust aerosols in mid-March 2014. Overall, the new product successfully tracks this aerosol plume during its trans-Pacific transport to the west coast of North America. However, we identify several areas across the domain of interest from Asia to North America where the new product can encounter significant uncertainties due to the inclusion of the geostationary AOD retrievals. The uncertainties associated with geostationary AOD retrievals are expected to be minimized after the successful launch of the next-generation advanced NOAA GOES-R and recently launched JMA Himawari satellites. Observations from these advanced satellites will ultimately provide an enhanced understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols over the Pacific.

  8. Semi-automated sorting using holographic optical tweezers remotely controlled by eye/hand tracking camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomori, Zoltan; Keša, Peter; Nikorovič, Matej; Kaůka, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-12-01

    We proposed the improved control software for the holographic optical tweezers (HOT) proper for simple semi-automated sorting. The controller receives data from both the human interface sensors and the HOT microscope camera and processes them. As a result, the new positions of active laser traps are calculated, packed into the network format and sent to the remote HOT. Using the photo-polymerization technique, we created a sorting container consisting of two parallel horizontal walls where one wall contains "gates" representing a place where the trapped particle enters into the container. The positions of particles and gates are obtained by image analysis technique which can be exploited to achieve the higher level of automation. Sorting is documented on computer game simulation and the real experiment.

  9. High Resolution Tracking Devices Based on Capillaries Filled with Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Multimedia

    Bonekamper, D; Vassiltchenko, V; Wolff, T

    2002-01-01

    %RD46 %title\\\\ \\\\The aim of the project is to develop high resolution tracking devices based on thin glass capillary arrays filled with liquid scintillator. This technique provides high hit densities and a position resolution better than 20 $\\mu$m. Further, their radiation hardness makes them superior to other types of tracking devices with comparable performance. Therefore, the technique is attractive for inner tracking in collider experiments, microvertex devices, or active targets for short-lived particle detection. High integration levels in the read-out based on the use of multi-pixel photon detectors and the possibility of optical multiplexing allow to reduce considerably the number of output channels, and, thus, the cost for the detector.\\\\ \\\\New optoelectronic devices have been developed and tested: the megapixel Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD), a high resolution image-detector having an outstanding capability of single photo-electron detection; the Vacuum Image Pipeline (VIP), a high-speed gateable pi...

  10. Common Readout System in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Jubin, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is going for a major physics upgrade in 2018. This upgrade is necessary for getting high statistics and high precision measurement for probing into rare physics channels needed to understand the dynamics of the condensed phase of QCD. The high interaction rate and the large event size in the upgraded detectors will result in an experimental data flow traffic of about 1 TB/s from the detectors to the on-line computing system. A dedicated Common Readout Unit (CRU) is proposed for data concentration, multiplexing, and trigger distribution. CRU, as common interface unit, handles timing, data and control signals between on-detector systems and online-offline computing system. An overview of the CRU architecture is presented in this manuscript.

  11. Design and performance testing of the read-out boards for the CMS-DT chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01

    Read-out boards (ROB) are one of the key elements of readout system for CMS barrel muon drift chambers. To insure proper and reliable operation under all detector environmental conditions an exhaustive set of tests have been developed and performed on the 30 pre-series ROB's before production starts. These tests include operation under CMS radiation conditions to detect and estimate SEU rates, validation with real chamber signals and trigger rates, studies of time resolution and linearity, crosstalk analysis, track pattern generation for calibration and on-line tests, and temperature cycling to uncover marginal conditions. We present the status of the ROB and tests results. (5 refs).

  12. Readout electronics for LGAD sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, O.; Franch, N.; Canals, J.; Palacio, F.; López, M.; Vilà, A.; Diéguez, A.; Carulla, M.; Flores, D.; Hidalgo, S.; Merlos, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an ASIC fabricated in 180 nm CMOS technology from AMS with the very front-end electronics used to readout LGAD sensors is presented as well as its experimental results. The front-end has the typical architecture for Si-strip readout, i.e., preamplification stage with a Charge Sensitive Amplifier (CSA) followed by a CR-RC shaper. Both amplifiers are based on a folded cascode structure with a PMOS input transistor and the shaper only uses passive elements for the feedback stage. The CSA has programmable gain and a configurable input stage in order to adapt to the different input capacitance of the LGAD sensors (pixelated, short and long strips) and to the different input signal (depending on the gain of the LGAD). The fabricated prototype has an area of 0.865 mm × 0.965 mm and includes the biasing circuit for the CSA and the shaper, 4 analog channels (CSA+shaper) and programmable charge injection circuits included for testing purposes. Noise and power analysis performed during simulation fixed the size of the input transistor to W/L = 860 μm/0.2 μm. The shaping time is fixed by design at 1 us and, in this ASIC version, the feedback elements of the shaper are passive, which means that the area of the shaper can be reduced using active elements in future versions. Finally, the different gains of the CSA have been selected to maintain an ENC below 400 electrons for a detector capacitor of 20 pF, with a power consumption of 150 μ W per channel.

  13. Optical derotator alignment using image-processing algorithm for tracking laser vibrometer measurements of rotating objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Hossam; Kim, Dongkyu; Jo, Youngjoon; Park, Kyihwan

    2017-06-01

    An optical component called a Dove prism is used to rotate the laser beam of a laser-scanning vibrometer (LSV). This is called a derotator and is used for measuring the vibration of rotating objects. The main advantage of a derotator is that it works independently from an LSV. However, this device requires very specific alignment, in which the axis of the Dove prism must coincide with the rotational axis of the object. If the derotator is misaligned with the rotating object, the results of the vibration measurement are imprecise, owing to the alteration of the laser beam on the surface of the rotating object. In this study, a method is proposed for aligning a derotator with a rotating object through an image-processing algorithm that obtains the trajectory of a landmark attached to the object. After the trajectory of the landmark is mathematically modeled, the amount of derotator misalignment with respect to the object is calculated. The accuracy of the proposed method for aligning the derotator with the rotating object is experimentally tested.

  14. A versatile photogrammetric camera automatic calibration suite for multispectral fusion and optical helmet tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers, Jason; Jermy, Robert; Nicolls, Fred

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a system to determine the photogrammetric parameters of a camera. The lens distortion, focal length and camera six degree of freedom (DOF) position are calculated. The system caters for cameras of different sensitivity spectra and fields of view without any mechanical modifications. The distortion characterization, a variant of Brown's classic plumb line method, allows many radial and tangential distortion coefficients and finds the optimal principal point. Typical values are 5 radial and 3 tangential coefficients. These parameters are determined stably and demonstrably produce superior results to low order models despite popular and prevalent misconceptions to the contrary. The system produces coefficients to model both the distorted to undistorted pixel coordinate transformation (e.g. for target designation) and the inverse transformation (e.g. for image stitching and fusion) allowing deterministic rates far exceeding real time. The focal length is determined to minimise the error in absolute photogrammetric positional measurement for both multi camera systems or monocular (e.g. helmet tracker) systems. The system determines the 6 DOF position of the camera in a chosen coordinate system. It can also determine the 6 DOF offset of the camera relative to its mechanical mount. This allows faulty cameras to be replaced without requiring a recalibration of the entire system (such as an aircraft cockpit). Results from two simple applications of the calibration results are presented: stitching and fusion of the images from a dual-band visual/ LWIR camera array, and a simple laboratory optical helmet tracker.

  15. Tunable mechanical monolithic sensor with interferometric readout for low frequency seismic noise measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acernese, F.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Barone, F.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric-discharge-machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation make it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low-frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2007), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a laser optical lever and a new laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve both for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, evaluated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result, for example, is that the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument is 70 mHz with a Q = 140 in air without thermal stabilization, demonstrating the feasibility of a monolithic FP sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of mHz with a more refined mechanical tuning. Results on the readout system based on polarimetric homodyne Michelson interferometer is discussed.

  16. Sub-electron read noise and millisecond full-frame readout with the near infrared eAPD array SAPHIRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Gert; Baker, Ian; Alvarez, Domingo; Dupuy, Christophe; Ives, Derek; Meyer, Manfred; Mehrgan, Leander; Stegmeier, Jörg; Weller, Harald J.

    2016-07-01

    In 2007 ESO started a program at SELEX (now LEONARDO) to develop noiseless near infrared HgCdTe electron avalanche photodiode arrays (eAPD)[1][2][3]. This eAPD technology is only way to overcome the limiting CMOS noise barrier of near infrared sensors used for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking. After several development cycles of solid state engineering techniques which can be easily applied to the chosen growth technology of metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), the eAPD arrays have matured and resulted in the SAPHIRA arrays. They have a format of 320x256 pixels with a pitch of 24 μm. They now offer an unmatched combination of sub-electron read noise at millisecond frame readout rates. The first generation of SAPHIRA arrays were only sensitive in H and K-band. With the removal of a wide bandgap buffer layer the arrays are now sensitive from λ=0.8 μm to 2.5 μm with high quantum efficiency over the entire wavelength range. The high temperature anneal applied during the growth process produces material with superb cosmetic quality at an APD gain of over 600. The design of the SAPHIRA ROIC has also been revised and the new ME1000 ROIC has an optimized analogue chain and more flexible readout modes. The clock for the vertical shift register is now under external control. The advantage of this is that correlated-double-sampling and uncorrelated readout in the rolling shutter mode now have a duty cycle of 100% at the maximum frame rate. Furthermore, to reduce the readout noise rows can be read several times before and after row reset. Since the APD gain is sufficiently high that one photon produces many more electrons than the square root of kTC which is the charge uncertainty after reset, signals of one photon per exposure can be easily detected without the need for double correlated sampling. First results obtained with the fringe tracker in GRAVITY and the four SAPHIRA wavefront sensors installed in the CIAO adaptive optics systems of the four 8 meter

  17. CCD Readout Electronics for the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Hope, Stephen C; Loomis, Craig P; Fitzgerald, Roger E; Peacock, Grant O

    2014-01-01

    We present details of the design for the CCD readout electronics for the Subaru Telescope Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS). The spectrograph is comprised of four identical spectrograph modules, each collecting roughly 600 spectra. The spectrograph modules provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over the entire band from 380 nm to 1260 nm through the use of three separate optical channels: blue, red, and near infrared (NIR). A camera in each channel images the multi-object spectra onto a 4k x 4k, 15 um pixel, detector format. The two visible cameras use a pair of Hamamatsu 2k x 4k CCDs with readout provided by custom electronics, while the NIR camera uses a single Teledyne HgCdTe 4k x 4k detector and ASIC Sidecar to read the device. The CCD readout system is a custom design comprised of three electrical subsystems: the Back End Electronics (BEE), the Front End Electronics (FEE), and a Pre-amplifier. The BEE is an off-the-shelf PC104 computer, with an auxiliary Xilinx FPGA module. The computer serves as the main...

  18. Electronic readout for THGEM detectors based on FPGA TDCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Tobias; Buechele, Maximilian; Fischer, Horst; Gorzellik, Matthias; Grussenmeyer, Tobias; Herrmann, Florian; Joerg, Philipp; Koenigsmann, Kay; Kremser, Paul; Kunz, Tobias; Michalski, Christoph; Schopferer, Sebastian; Szameitat, Tobias [Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg Univ. (Germany); Collaboration: COMPASS-II RICH upgrade Group

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the RD51 programme the characteristics of a new detector design, called THGEM, which is based on multi-layer arrangements of printed circuit board material, is investigated. The THGEMs combine the advantages for covering gains up to 10{sup 6} in electron multiplication at large detector areas and low material budget. Studies are performed by extending the design to a hybrid gas detector by adding a Micromega layer, which significantly improves the ion back flow ratio of the chamber. With the upgrade of the COMPASS experiment at CERN a MWPC plane of the RICH-1 detector will be replaced by installing THGEM chambers. This summarizes to 40k channels of electronic readout, including amplification, discrimination and time-to-digital conversion of the anode signals. Due to the expected hit rate of the detector we design a cost-efficient TDC, based on Artix7 FPGA technology, with time resolution below 100 ps and sufficient hit buffer depth. To cover the large readout area the data is transferred via optical fibres to a central readout system which is part of the GANDALF framework.

  19. Ultra-Stable Beacon Source for Laboratory Testing of Optical Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yoichi; Marka, Szabolcs; Kovalik, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The ultra-stable beacon source (USBS) provides a laser-beam output with a very low angular jitter and can be used as an absolute angular reference to simulate a beacon in the laboratory. The laser is mounted on the top of a very short (approximately equal to 1 m) inverted pendulum (IP) with its optical axis parallel to the carbon fiber pendulum leg. The 85-cm, carbon fiber rods making up the leg are very lightweight and rigid, and are supported by a flex-joint at the bottom (see figure). The gimbal-mounted laser is a weight-adjustable load of about 1.5 kg with its center of rotation co-located with the center of percussion of the inverted pendulum. This reduces the coupling of transverse motion at the base of the pendulum to angular motion of the laser at the top. The inverted pendulum is mounted on a gimbal with its center of rotation coinciding with the pivot position of the inverted pendulum flexure joint. This reduces coupling of ground tilt at the inverted pendulum base to motion of the laser mounted at the top. The mass of the top gimbal is adjusted to give the pendulum a very low resonant frequency (approximately equal to 10 mHz) that filters transverse seismic disturbances from the ground where the base is attached. The motion of the IP is monitored by an optical-lever sensor. The laser light is reflected by the mirror on the IP, and then is detected by a quadrant photo-detector (QPD). The position of the beam spot on the QPD corresponds to the tilt of the IP. Damping of this motion is provided by two coil and magnet pairs. The bottom gimbal mount consists of two plates. The IP is mounted on the second plate. The first plate is supported by two posts through needles and can be rotated about the axis connecting the tips of the needles. The second plate hangs from the first plate and can be rotated about the axis perpendicular to the first plate. As a result, the second plate acts as a two-axis rotation stage. Its center of rotation is located at the

  20. Description of an evaluation system for knee kinematics in ligament lesions, by means of optical tracking and 3D tomography,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Lazzaretti Fernandes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To describe and demonstrate the viability of a method for evaluating knee kine matics, by means of a continuous passive motion (CPM machine, before and after anterio cruciate ligament (ACL injury.Methods:This study was conducted on a knee from a cadaver, in a mechanical pivot-shif simulator, with evaluations using optical tracking, and also using computed tomography.Results:This study demonstrated the viability of a protocol for measuring the rotation an translation of the knee, using reproducible and objective tools (error<0.2mm. The mech anized provocation system of the pivot-shift test was independent of the examiner an always allowed the same angular velocity and traction of 20 N throughout the movement.Conclusion:The clinical relevance of this method lies in making inferences about the in viv behavior of a knee with an ACL injury and providing greater methodological quality in futur studies for measuring surgical techniques with grafts in relatively close positions.

  1. High Momentum Resolution tracking In a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ljunggren, M; Oskarsson, A

    2011-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been made within the LCTPC-collaboration, an international collaboration for studying the technical aspects af a possible tracking detector at a linear collider. The collaboration has built a prototype Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for testing the properties of dierent readout structures. A TPC is a tracking detector consisting of a gas lled drift volume placed in a solenoidal magnetic eld where the readout is made using a segmented plane of so called pads. When a char...

  2. Research on the standards of indicators associated with maintain time in bidirectional beam tracking in inter-satellites optical communication links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Siyuan; Wu, Feng; Tan, Liying; Guo, Pengzhen; Ma, Jing

    2015-10-19

    We report on a novel technology for high-speed inter-satellites optical communication by bidirectional beam tracking. By establishing the relation between the compensation effect and the parameters of response time and overshoot situation, the stability can be well compensated simply by the control system. Thus the relation between compensation effect and maintain time can be predicted from ground tests, and the certain evaluation standard could be established to meet the requirements of system. The other critical factors, such as signal-to-noise ratio and pointing angle error, have also been considered to improve the stability. The general approach can provide us a powerful path to overcome the performance limitation of bidirectional beam tracking, which can be expected to be widely applied in Free Space optics communications in future.

  3. Test of CMS tracker silicon detector modules with the ARC readout system

    CERN Document Server

    Axer, M; Flügge, G; Franke, T; Hegner, B; Hermanns, T; Kasselmann, S T; Mnich, J; Nowack, A; Pooth, O; Pottgens, M

    2004-01-01

    The CMS tracker will be equipped with 16,000 silicon microstrip detector modules covering a surface of approximately 220 m**2. For quality control, a compact and inexpensive DAQ system is needed to monitor the mass production in industry and in the CMS production centres. To meet these requirements a set-up called APV Readout Controller (ARC) system was developed and distributed among all collaborating institutes to perform full readout tests of hybrids and modules at each production step. The system consists of all necessary hardware components, C++ based readout software using LabVIEW **1 Lab VIEW is a product of National Instruments, Austin, USA. as graphical user interface and provides full database connection to track every single module component during the production phase. Two preseries of Tracker End Cap (TEC) silicon detector modules have been produced by the TEC community and tested with the ARC system at Aachen. The results of the second series are presented.

  4. 3D-FBK pixel sensors with CMS readout: First test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obertino, M., E-mail: margherita.obertino@cern.ch [Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, and INFN, Torino (Italy); Solano, A. [Università di Torino and INFN, Torino (Italy); Vilela Pereira, A. [INFN, Torino (Italy); Alagoz, E. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Andresen, J. [Colorado University, Colorado (United States); Arndt, K.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Boscardin, M. [Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Povo di Trento (Italy); Brosius, R. [SUNY, Buffalo (United States); Bubna, M. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [INFN Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) and Università di Trento, Povo di Trento (Italy); Jensen, F. [Colorado University, Colorado (United States); Krzywda, A. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kumar, A. [SUNY, Buffalo (United States); Kwan, S. [Università di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Milano (Italy); Lei, C.M. [Colorado University, Colorado (United States); Menasce, D.; Moroni, L. [INFN Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Ngadiuba, J. [Università di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Milano (Italy); and others

    2013-08-01

    Silicon 3D detectors consist of an array of columnar electrodes of both doping types which penetrate entirely in the detector bulk, perpendicularly to the surface. They are emerging as one of the most promising technologies for innermost layers of tracking devices for the foreseen upgrades of the LHC. Until recently, properties of 3D sensors have been investigated mostly with ATLAS readout electronics. 3D pixel sensors compatible with the CMS readout were first fabricated at SINTEF (Oslo, Norway), and more recently at FBK (Trento, Italy) and CNM (Barcelona, Spain). Several sensors with different electrode configurations, bump-bonded with the CMS pixel PSI46 readout chip, were characterized in laboratory and tested at Fermilab with a proton beam of 120 GeV/c. Preliminary results of the data analysis are presented.

  5. Readout electronics and test bench for the CMS Phase I pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Del Burgo, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The present CMS pixel detector will be replaced with an upgraded pixel system during the LHC extended technical stop in winter 2016/2017. The CMS Phase 1 pixel upgrade combines a new pixel readout chip, which minimizes detection inefficiencies, with several other design improvements to maintain the excellent tracking performance of CMS at the higher luminosity conditions foreseen for the coming years. The upgraded detector features new readout electronics which require detailed evaluation. For this purpose a test stand has been setup, including a slice of the CMS pixel DAQ system, all components of the upgraded readout chain together with a number of detector modules. The test stand allows for detailed evaluation and verification of all detector components, and is also crucial to develop tests and procedures to be used during the detector assembly and the commissioning and calibration of the detector. In this talk the system test and its functionalities will be described with a focus on the tests performed fo...

  6. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noll, Daniel [Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany); Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  7. BESIII ETOF upgrade readout electronics commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Zhuang; Dai, Hong-Liang; Wu, Zhi; Heng, Yue-Kun; Zhang, Jie; Cao, Ping; Ji, Xiao-Lu; Li, Cheng; Sun, Wei-Jia; Wang, Si-Yu; Wang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    It is proposed to upgrade the endcap time-of-flight (ETOF) of the Beijing Spectrometer III (BESIII) with a multi-gap resistive plate chamber (MRPC), aiming at an overall time resolution of about 80 ps. After completing the entire readout electronics system, some experiments, such as heat radiation, radiation hardness and large-current beam tests, have been carried out to confirm the reliability and stability of the readout electronics. An on-detector test of the readout electronics has also been performed with the beam at the BEPCII E3 line. The test results indicate that the readout electronics system fulfills its design requirements. Supported by Chinese Academy of Sciences (1G201331231172010)

  8. Very forward calorimeters readout and machine interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wojciech Wierba; on behalf of the FCAL Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The paper describes the requirements for the readout electronics and DAQ for the instrumentation of the forward region of the future detector at the international linear collider. The preliminary design is discussed.

  9. Back-Side Readout Silicon Photomultiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Woon-Seng; Holland, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel structure for the back-side readout silicon photomultipler (SiPM). Current SiPMs are front-illuminated structures with front-side readout, which have relatively small geometric fill factor leading to degradation in their photon detection efficiency (PDE). Back-side readout devices will provide an advantageous solution to achieve high PDE. We designed and investigated a novel structure that would allow back-side readout while creating a region of high electric field optimized for avalanche breakdown. In addition, this structure has relatively high fill factor and also allow direct coupling of individual micro-cell of the SiPM to application-specific integrated circuits. We will discuss the performance that can be attained with this structure through device simulation and the process flow that can be used to fabricate this structure through process simulation. PMID:23564969

  10. Utilization of optical tracking to validate a software-driven isocentric approach to robotic couch movements for proton radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsi, Wen C., E-mail: Wen.Hsi@Mclaren.org, E-mail: Wenchien.hsi@sphic.org.cn; Zeidan, Omar A., E-mail: omar.zeidan@orlandohealth.com [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); Law, Aaron; Schreuder, Andreas N., E-mail: niek.schreuder@provisionhp.com [ProCure Training and Development Center, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: An optical tracking and positioning system (OTPS) was developed to validate the software-driven isocentric (SDI) approach to control the six-degrees-of-freedom movement of a robotic couch. Methods: The SDI approach to movements rotating around a predefined isocenter, referred to as a GeoIso, instead of a mechanical pivot point was developed by the robot automation industry. With robotic couch-sag corrections for weight load in a traditional SDI approach, movements could be accurately executed for a GeoIso located within a 500 mm cubic volume on the couch for treatments. The accuracy of SDI movement was investigated using the OTPS. The GeoIso was assumed to align with the proton beam isocenter (RadIso) for gantry at the reference angle. However, the misalignment between GeoIso and RadIso was quantitatively investigated by measuring the displacements at various couch angles for a target placed at the RadIso at an initial couch angle. When circular target displacements occur on a plane, a relative isocenter shift (RIS) correction could be applied in the SDI movement to minimize target displacements. Target displacements at a fixed gantry angle without and with RIS correction were measured for 12 robotic couches. Target displacements for various gantry angles were performed on three couches in gantry rooms to study the gantry-induced RadIso shift. The RIS correction can also be applied for the RadIso shift. A new SDI approach incorporating the RIS correction with the couch sag is described in this study. In parallel, the accuracy of SDI translation movements for various weight loads of patients on the couch was investigated during positioning of patients for proton prostate treatments. Results: For a fixed gantry angle, measured target displacements without RIS correction for couch rotations in the horizontal plane varied from 4 to 20 mm. However, measured displacements perpendicular to couch rotation plane were about 2 mm for all couches. Extracted

  11. Cell tracking with gadophrin-2: a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, optical imaging, and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [Department of Radiology, UCSF Medical Center, University of California in San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, CA 94143, San Francisco (United States); Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen [Institute of Pathology, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Department of Radiology, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Pichler, Bernd [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis (United States); Heinzmann, Ulrich [National Research Center for Environment and Health, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Oostendorp, Robert A.J. [3. Clinic of Internal Medicine, Laboratory of Stem Cell Physiology, Technical University, Munich (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of use of gadophrin-2 to trace intravenously injected human hematopoietic cells in athymic mice, employing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (OI), and fluorescence microscopy. Mononuclear peripheral blood cells from GCSF-primed patients were labeled with gadophrin-2 (Schering AG, Berlin, Germany), a paramagnetic and fluorescent metalloporphyrin, using established transfection techniques with cationic liposomes. The labeled cells were evaluated in vitro with electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Then, 1 x 10{sup 6}-3 x 10{sup 8} labeled cells were injected into 14 nude Balb/c mice and the in vivo cell distribution was evaluated with MR imaging and OI before and 4, 24, and 48 h after intravenous injection (p.i.). Five additional mice served as controls: three mice were untreated controls and two mice were investigated after injection of unlabeled cells. The contrast agent effect was determined quantitatively for MR imaging by calculating signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) data. After completion of in vivo imaging studies, fluorescence microscopy of excised organs was performed. Intracellular cytoplasmatic uptake of gadophrin-2 was confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectrometry determined an uptake of 31.56 nmol Gd per 10{sup 6} cells. After intravenous injection, the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells in nude mice could be visualized by MR, OI, and fluorescence microscopy. At 4 h p.i., the transplanted cells mainly distributed to lung, liver, and spleen, and 24 h p.i. they also distributed to the bone marrow. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells to these target organs. Gadophrin-2 is suited as a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, OI, and fluorescence microscopy and may be used to combine the advantages of each individual imaging modality for in vivo tracking of intravenously injected hematopoietic cells

  12. Security of Quantum-Readout PUFs against quadrature based challenge estimation attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skoric, B.; Mosk, A.P.; Pinkse, P.W.H.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of quantum-secure readout of Physical Unclonable Functions (PUFs) has recently been realized experimentally in an optical PUF system. We analyze the security of this system under the strongest type of classical attack: the challenge estimation attack. The adversary performs a measurement

  13. New Optical Link Technologies for HEP Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Delurgio, P; Salvachua, B; Lopez, D; Stanek, R; Underwood, D

    2011-01-01

    As a concern with the reliability and mass of current optical links in LHC experiments, we are investigating CW lasers and light modulators as an alternative to VCSELs. In addition we are developing data links in air, utilizing steering by MEMS mirrors and optical feedback paths for the control loop. Laser, modulator, and lens systems used are described, as well as two different electronic systems for a free space steering feedback loop. Our prototype system currently operates at 1.25 Gb/s, but could be upgraded. This link works over distances of order meters. Such links might enable one to move communication lasers (e.g. VCSELs) and optical fibers out of tracking detectors, for reasons such as reliability and power consumption. Some applications for free space data links, such as local triggering and data readout and trigger-clock distribution and links for much longer distances are also discussed.

  14. The readout system of the MAGIC-II Cherenkov Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Tescaro, D; Barcelo, M; Bitossi, M; Cortina, J; Fras, M; Hadasch, D; Illa, J M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Paoletti, R; Pegna, R

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution we describe the hardware, firmware and software components of the readout system of the MAGIC-II Cherenkov telescope on the Canary island La Palma. The PMT analog signals are transmitted by means of optical fibers from the MAGIC-II camera to the 80 m away counting house where they are routed to the new high bandwidth and fully programmable receiver boards (MONSTER), which convert back the signals from optical to electrical ones. Then the signals are split, one half provide the input signals for the level ONE trigger system while the other half is sent to the digitizing units. The fast Cherenkov pulses are sampled by low-power Domino Ring Sampler chips (DRS2) and temporarily stored in an array of 1024 capacitors. Signals are sampled at the ultra-fast speed of 2 GSample/s, which allows a very precise measurement of the signal arrival times in all pixels. They are then digitized with 12-bit resolution by an external ADC readout at 40 MHz speed. The Domino samplers are integrated in the newly...

  15. Massively Parallel Atomic Force Microscope with Digital Holographic Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sache, L [Laboratory of Robotic Systems, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFLSRO1, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kawakatsu, H [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Emery, Y [Lyncee Tec SA, PSE-A, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bleuler, H [Laboratory of Robotic Systems, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFLSRO1, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-03-15

    Massively Parallel Scanning Probe Microscopy is an obvious path for data storage (E Grochowski, R F Hoyt, Future Trends in Hard disc Drives, IEEE Trans. Magn. 1996, 32, 1850- 1854; J L Griffin, S W Schlosser, G R Ganger and D F Nagle, Modeling and Performance of MEMS-Based Storage Devices, Proc. ACM SIGMETRICS, 2000). Current experimental systems still lay far behind Hard Disc Drive (HDD) or Digital Video Disk (DVD), be it in access speed, data throughput, storage density or cost per bit. This paper presents an entirely new approach with the promise to break several of these barriers. The key idea is readout of a Scanning Probes Microscope (SPM) array by Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM). This technology directly gives phase information at each pixel of a CCD array. This means that no contact line to each individual SPM probes is needed. The data is directly available in parallel form. Moreover, the optical setup needs in principle no expensive components, optical (or, to a large extent, mechanical) imperfections being compensated in the signal processing, i.e. in electronics. This gives the system the potential for a low cost device with fast Terabit readout capability.

  16. High-resolution tracking using large capillary bundles filled with liquid scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Annis, P; Benussi, L; Bruski, N; Buontempo, S; Currat, C; D'Ambrosio, N; Van Dantzig, R; Dupraz, J P; Ereditato, A; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Fanti, V; Feyt, J; Frekers, D; Frenkel, A; Galeazzi, F; Garufi, F; Goldberg, J; Golovkin, S V; Gorin, A M; Grégoire, G; Harrison, K; Höpfner, K; Holtz, K; Konijn, J; Kozarenko, E N; Kreslo, I E; Kushnirenko, A E; Liberti, B; Martellotti, G; Medvedkov, A M; Michel, L; Migliozzi, P; Mommaert, C; Mondardini, M R; Panman, J; Penso, G; Petukhov, Yu P; Rondeshagen, D; Siegmund, W P; Tyukov, V E; Van Beek, G; Vasilchenko, V G; Vilain, P; Visschers, J L; Wilquet, G; Winter, Klaus; Wolff, T; Wörtche, H J; Wong, H; Zimyn, K V

    2000-01-01

    We have developed large high-resolution tracking detectors based on glass capillaries filled with organic liquid scintillator of high refractive index. These liquid-core scintillating optical fibres act simultaneously as detectors of charged particles and as image guides. Track images projected onto the readout end of a capillary bundle are visualized by an optoelectronic chain consisting of a set of image-intensifier tubes followed by a photosensitive CCD or by an EBCCD camera. Two prototype detectors, each composed of \\hbox{$\\approx 10^6$} capillaries with \\hbox{20$-$25 $\\mu$m} diameter and \\hbox{0.9$-$1.8 m} length, have been tested, and a spatial resolution of the order of \\hbox{20$-$40 $\\mu$m} has been attained. A high scintillation efficiency and a large light-attenuation length, in excess of 3 m, was achieved through special purification of the liquid scintillator. Along the tracks of minimum-ionizing particles, the hit densities obtained were $\\sim$ 8 hits/mm at the readout window, and \\hbox{$\\sim$ 3 ...

  17. Design and characterization of the SiPM tracking system of the NEXT-100 demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Álvarez, V; Borges, F I G M; Cárcel, S; Carmona, J M; Castel, J; Catalá, J M; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Chan, D; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Egorov, M; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Freitas, E D C; Garcia, A N C; Gehman, V M; Gil, A; Giomataris, I; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González, K; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Herrero, V; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Kalinnikov, V; Kiang, D; Labarga, L; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Martínez, A; Miller, T; Moiseenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Monzó, J M; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Segui, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomás, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Vázquez, D; Velicheva, E; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R C; Weber, T; White, J; Yahlali, N

    2012-01-01

    NEXT-100 is a new experiment to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of the Xe-136 isotope using a TPC filled with a 100 kg of high-pressure gaseous xenon with 90% isotopic enrichment. The experiment will take place at the Laboratorio Subterr\\'aneo de Canfranc (LSC), Spain. NEXT-100 uses electroluminescence (EL) technology for high energy resolution measurements. The gaseous xenon in the TPC allows additionally to record the tracks of the two beta particles, expected to have up to 30 cm length at 10 bar pressure. A full 3D sampling of the space points along the event tracks, using an optical readout system of the EL light, enables the identification of the double-beta events by means of a pattern recognition algorithm. In this paper, the SiPM-based tracking concept of NEXT-100 and its implementation in the demonstrator prototype NEXT-DEMO are presented. The characterization of the SiPM system and its readout electronics are described and shown to meet the experiment's requirements for the optimal recordi...

  18. Upgrade Analog Readout and Digitizing System for ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Akerstedt, H; Biot, A; Bohm, C; Carrio, F; Drake, G; Hildebrand, K; Muschter, S; Oreglia, M; Paramonov, A

    2013-01-01

    A potential upgrade for the front-end electronics and signal digitization and data acquisition system of the ATLAS hadron calorimeter for the high luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) is described. A Demonstrator is being built to readout a slice of the TileCal detector. The on-detector electronics includes up to 48 Analog Front-end Boards for PMT analog signal processing, 4 Main Boards for data digitization and slow controls, 4 Daughter Boards with high speed optical links to interface the on-detector and off-detector electronics. Two super readout driver boards are used for off-detector data acquisition and fulfilling digital trigger.\

  19. High-speed crystal detection and characterization using a fast-readout detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishima, Jun; Owen, Robin L; Axford, Danny; Shepherd, Emma; Winter, Graeme; Levik, Karl; Gibbons, Paul; Ashton, Alun; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2010-09-01

    A novel raster-scanning method combining continuous sample translation with the fast readout of a Pilatus P6M detector has been developed on microfocus beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source. This fast grid-scan tool allows the rapid evaluation of large sample volumes without the need to increase the beam size at the sample through changes in beamline hardware. A slow version is available for slow-readout detectors. Examples of grid-scan use in centring optically invisible samples and in detecting and characterizing numerous microcrystals on a mesh-like holder illustrate the most common applications of the grid scan now in routine use on I24.

  20. A prototype for the upgraded readout electronics for TileCal

    CERN Document Server

    Eriksson, D; The ATLAS collaboration; Bohm, C; Kavianipour, H; Muschter, S; Oreglia, M; Tang, F

    2011-01-01

    Upgrade plans for ATLAS hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) include full readout of all data to the counting room. We are developing a possible implementation of the future readout and trigger electronics aiming at a full functional demonstrator during Phase 0, starting from an existing functional test slice assembled using a combination of prototypes and emulators. Presently the first version of two PCBs in charge of digitization, control and communication are being developed. The design is highly redundant, using FPGAs with fault tolerant firmware for control and protocol conversion. Communication between on and off detector electronics is implemented via high speed optical links.

  1. Research on the Methods of Testing Tracking Ability of Optical Antenna%光学天线跟踪性能测试方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵克寒; 张立中; 王霞

    2015-01-01

    一对多激光通信组网技术是一种基于光学天线结构的激光通信网络技术,光学天线是一种能够实现对多个目标同时进行捕获、跟踪,并实现一对多通信的关键结构。为了保证组网技术的可靠性,设计了测试光学天线跟踪性能的一整套系统。系统中包含两套目标模拟器结构,以激光信号为目标源提供给光学天线,从而测试光学天线的跟踪性能。根据测试效果及实验数据可判定此测试方法能够达到实用要求。%The network technology of one-to-many laser communication is based on the mechanism of optical antenna. Optical antenna is the key mechanism, it can be used for acquiring and tracking different targets at the same time, while it can also be used for communication. We have designed a whole test system to test the tracking ability of the optical antenna, so it will ensure the network technology reliable. The test system is made up of two sets of target simulators. And the target simulator will provides a target to the optical antenna,so we can test it’s tracking ability.

  2. TPC-like readout for thermal neutron detection using a GEM-detector

    CERN Document Server

    Flierl, Bernhard; Hertenberger, Ralf; Zeitelhack, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Spatial resolution of less than 200 um is challenging for thermal neutron detection. A novel readout scheme based on the time-projection-chamber (TPC) concept is used in a gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detector. Thermal neutrons are captured in a single 2 um thick Boron-10 converter cathode and secondary Helium and Lithium ions are produced with a combined energy of 2.8 MeV. These ions have sufficient energy to form straight tracks of several mm length. With a time resolving 2-dimensional readout of 400 um pitch in both directions, based on APV25 chips, the ions are tracked and their respective origin in the cathode converter foil is reconstructed. Using an Ar-CO2 93:7% gas mixture, a resolution of 100 um (FWHM 235 um) has been observed with a triple GEM-detector setup at the Garching neutron source (FRMII) for neutrons of 4.7 Angstrom.

  3. Irradiation Tests of the Pixel Front-End Readout Electronics for the ALICE Experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Riggi, F; Barbera, R; Palmeri, A; Pappalardo, G S; Di Liberto, S; Meddi, F; Cavagnoli, A; Morando, M; Scarlassara, F; Segato, G F; Soramel, F; Vannucci, Luigi

    2002-01-01

    The problem of radiation damage for the electronics of the pixel detectors in the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment is discussed. Simulations allowed to estimate the cumulated doses andparticle fluences during a ten year operational period. Several irradiation tests have been carried out on the various prototypes of the readout chips. The results obtained so far point out that the recent prototypes will retain their functionality up to doses and neutron fluences well above those expected in ALICE.

  4. Production Performance of the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker Readout System

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsou, V A

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) together with the pixel and the transition radiation detectors will form the tracking system of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It will consist of 20000 single-sided silicon microstrip sensors assembled back-to-back into modules mounted on four concentric barrels and two end-cap detectors formed by nine disks each. The SCT module production and testing has finished while the macro-assembly is well under way. After an overview of the layout and the operating environment of the SCT, a description of the readout electronics design and operation requirements will be given. The quality control procedure and the DAQ software for assuring the electrical functionality of hybrids and modules will be discussed. The focus will be on the electrical performance results obtained during the assembly and testing of the end-cap SCT modules.

  5. Characterization of the JUDIDT Readout Electronics for Neutron Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbri, R; Engels, R; Kemmerling, G; van Waasen, S; Juelich, Forschungszentrum

    2013-01-01

    The Group for the development of neutron and gamma detectors in the Central Institute of Engineering, Electronics and Analytics (ZEA-2) at Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) has developed, in collaboration with European institutes, an Anger Camera prototype for improving the impact point reconstruction of neutron tracks. The detector is a chamber filled with $^3He+CF_4$ gas for neutron capture and subsequent production of a tritium and a proton. The energy deposition by the ions gives rise to drifting electrons with an avalanche amplification as they approach a micro-strip anode structure. The scintillating light, generated during the electron drift and avalanche stage, is collected by four vacuum photomultipliers. The position reconstruction is performed via software algorithms. The JUDIDT readout electronics was modified at ZEA-2 to cope with the data acquisition requirements of the prototype. The results of the commissioning of the electronics are here presented and commented.

  6. The readout chain for the bar PANDA MVD strip detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, R.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Di Pietro, V.; Kleines, H.; Goerres, A.; Riccardi, A.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Sohlbach, H.; Zaunick, H.-G.

    2015-02-01

    The bar PANDA (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt) experiment will study the strong interaction in annihilation reactions between an antiproton beam and a stationary gas jet target. The detector will comprise different sub-detectors for tracking, particle identification and calorimetry. The Micro-Vertex Detector (MVD) as the innermost part of the tracking system will allow precise tracking and detection of secondary vertices. For the readout of the double-sided silicon strip sensors a custom-made ASIC is being developed, employing the Time-over-Threshold (ToT) technique for digitization and utilize time-to-digital converters (TDC) to provide a high-precision time stamp of the hit. A custom-made Module Data Concentrator ASIC (MDC) will multiplex the data of all front-ends of one sensor towards the CERN-developed GBT chip set (GigaBit Transceiver). The MicroTCA-based MVD Multiplexer Board (MMB) at the off-detector site will receive and concentrate the data from the GBT links and transfer it to FPGA-based compute nodes for global event building.

  7. SU-E-T-584: Optical Tracking Guided Patient-Specific VMAT QA with ArcCHECK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Q; Park, C; Lu, B; Barraclough, B; Lebron, S; Li, J; Liu, C; Yan, G [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the novel use of an in-house optical tracking system (OTS) to improve the efficacy of VMAT QA with a cylindrical dosimeter (ArcCHECK™). Methods: The translational and rotational setup errors of ArcCHECK are convoluted which makes it challenging to position the device efficiently and accurately. We first aligned the ArcCHECK to the machine cross-hair at three cardinal angles (0°, 90°, and 270°) to establish a reference position. Four infrared reflective markers were attached to the back of the device. An OTS with 0.2mm/0.2° accuracy was used to control its setup uncertainty. Translational uncertainties of 1 mm and 2 mm in three directions (in, right, and up) were applied on the device. Four open beams of various field sizes and six clinical VMAT arcs were delivered and measured for all simulated setup errors. The measurements were compared with Pinnacle™ calculations using Gamma analysis to evaluate the impact of setup uncertainty. This study also evaluated the improvement in setup reproducibility and efficiency with the aid of the OTS. Results: For open beams, with 3%/3mm, the mean passing rates dropped by less than 5% for all shifts; with 2%/2mm, two significant drops(>5%) were observed: 15.38±6.75% for 2 mm lateral shift and 9.35±4.88% for 2 mm longitudinal shift. For VMAT arcs, the mean passing rates using 2%/2mm dropped by 10.47±7.46% and 22.02±11.39% for 1 and 2 mm shift, respectively. With 3%/3mm, significant drop only occurred with 2 mm longitudinal shift (13.73±8.30%). Setup time could be reduced by >15 min with the aid of the OTS. Conclusion: OTS is an effective tool for separating translational and rotational uncertainties. The current VMAT QA solution was not strongly sensitive to translation errors of 2mm with widely accepted criterion (3%/3mm). This finding raises concerns regarding the efficacy of such QA system in detecting errors in the dynamic VMAT delivery.

  8. ATLAS LAr calorimeters readout electronics upgrade R&D for sLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hucheng

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters consist of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end-caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. A total of 182,468 signals are digitized and processed real-time on detector, to provide energy and time deposited in each detector element at every occurrence of the Level-1 trigger. A luminosity upgrade of the LHC will occur in the years 2018. The current readout electronics will need to be upgraded to sustain the higher radiation levels. A completely innovative readout scheme is being developed. The front-end readout will send out data continuously at each bunch crossing through high speed radiation resistant optical links, the data will be processed real-time with the possibility of implementing trigger algorithms. This article is an overview of the R&D activities and architectural studies the ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Group is developing.

  9. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters Readout Electronics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00388354; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider will provide 5-7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters and their readout system. An improved trigger system with a higher acceptance rate of 1 MHz and a longer latency of up to 60 micro-seconds together with a better radiation tolerance require an upgrade of the readout electronics. Concepts for the future readout of the 182,500 calorimeter channels at 40/80 MHz and 16 bit dynamic range, and the development of low-noise, low-power and high-bandwidth electronic components will be presented. These include ASIC developments towards radiation-tolerant low-noise pre-amplifiers, analog-to-digital converters up to 14 bits and low-power optical links providing transfer rates of at least 10 Gb/s per fiber.

  10. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters Readout Electronics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00388354; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will provide 5-7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters and their readout system. The improved trigger system has a higher acceptance rate of 1 MHz and a longer latency of up to 60 micro-seconds. This requires an upgrade of the readout electronics, a better radiation tolerance is also required. This paper will present concepts for the future readout of the 182,468 calorimeter channels at 40 or 80 MHz with a 16 bit dynamic range. Progress of the development of low-noise, low-power and high-bandwidth electronic components will be presented. These include radiation-tolerant preamplifiers, analog-to-digital converters (ADC) up to 14 bits and low-power optical links providing transfer rates of at least 10 Gbps per fiber.

  11. Interferometer readout-noise below the Standard Quantum Limit of a membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Westphal, Tobias; Kaufer, Henning; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Gossler, Stefan; Mueller-Ebhardt, Helge; Danilishin, Stefan L; Khalili, Farid Ya; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on the realization of a Michelson-Sagnac interferometer whose purpose is the precise characterization of the motion of membranes showing significant light transmission. Our interferometer has a readout noise spectral density (imprecision) of 3E-16 m/sqrt(Hz) at frequencies around the fundamental resonance of a SiN_x membrane at about 100 kHz, without using optical cavities. The readout noise demonstrated is more than 16 dB below the peak value of the membrane's standard quantum limit (SQL). This reduction is significantly higher than those of previous works with nano-wires [Teufel et al., Nature Nano. 4, 820 (2009); Anetsberger et al., Nature Phys. 5, 909 (2009)]. We discuss the meaning of the SQL for force measurements and its relation to the readout performance and conclude that neither our nor previous experiments achieved a total noise spectral density as low as the SQL.

  12. The fast readout system for the MAPMTs of COMPASS RICH-1

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P; Angerer, H; Birsa, R; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, Franco; Bressan, A; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Colantoni, M L; Dafni, T; Dalla Torre, S; Delagnes, E; Denisov, O; Deschamps, H; Díaz, V; Dibiase, N; Duic, V; Eyrich, W; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Gerassimov, S; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Hagemann, R; Von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Joosten, R; Ketzer, B; Kolosov, V N; Königsmann, K C; Konorov, I; Kramer, Daniel; Kunne, F; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Mann, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Mutter, A; Nähle, O; Nerling, F; Neyret, D; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Pesaro, G; Pizzolotto, C; Polak, J; Rebourgeard, P; Robinet, F; Rocco, E; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schoenmeier, P; Schröder, W; Silva, L; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Svec, M; Takekawa, S; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Wollny, H

    2008-01-01

    A fast readout system for the upgrade of the COMPASS RICH detector has been developed and successfully used for data taking in 2006 and 2007. The new readout system for the multi-anode PMTs in the central part of the photon detector of the RICH is based on the high-sensitivity MAD4 preamplifier-discriminator and the dead-time free F1-TDC chip characterized by high-resolution. The readout electronics has been designed taking into account the high photon flux in the central part of the detector and the requirement to run at high trigger rates up to 100 kHz with negligible dead-time. The system is designed in a very compact setup and mounted directly in front of the multi-anode photomultipliers. The data are digitized on the frontend boards and transferred via optical links to the readout system. The read-out electronics system is described in detail together with its measured performances.

  13. INNER TRACKING

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Sharp

    The Silicon Strip Tracker was successfully installed into CMS on December 15, and was subsequently aligned to the LHC beam line to +/- 1mm. Before the Tracker was installed all of the connections from the low voltage power supplies, the cooling plants and optical readout fibres from the ‘off detector’ electronics had been installed to Patch Panel 1 (PP1), on the CMS magnet cryostat, and thoroughly tested. The careful connection of the Tracker to PP1 started in early January and will be completed in early March, just before the central section of the LHC beam pipe is installed into CMS. After initial checks of all the safety interlocks and the cooling circuits, the quality of each of the connections will be verified by commissioning each section of the Tracker in turn and reading back the calibration pulses (tick marks) from the front-end electronics. This process verifies that all of the connections are correct and in particular, that the quality of the fibre connections is good. When ...

  14. Development of a scintillation-fiber detector for real-time particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, D.; Bonanno, D. L.; Longhitano, F.; Pugliatti, C.; Russo, G. V.; Aiello, S.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Giordano, V.; Leonora, E.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Russo, M.; Sipala, V.; Stancampiano, C.; Reito, S.

    2013-04-01

    The prototype of the OFFSET (Optical Fiber Folded Scintillating Extended Tracker) tracker is presented. It exploits a novel system for particle tracking, designed to achieve real-time imaging, large detection areas, and a high spatial resolution especially suitable for use in medical diagnostics. The main results regarding the system architecture have been used as a demonstration of the technique which has been patented by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The prototype of this tracker, presented in this paper, has a 20 × 20 cm2 sensitive area, consisting of two crossed ribbons of 500 micron square scintillating fibers. The track position information is extracted in real time in an innovative way, using a reduced number of read-out channels to obtain very large detection area with moderate enough costs and complexity. The performance of the tracker was investigated using beta sources, cosmic rays, and a 62 MeV proton beam.

  15. Imaging achievements with the Vernier readout

    CERN Document Server

    Lapington, J S; Worth, L B C; Tandy, J A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the Vernier anode, a high resolution and charge division image readout for microchannel plate detectors. It comprises a planar structure of insulated electrodes deposited on an insulating substrate. The charge cloud from an event is divided amongst all nine electrodes and the charge ratio uniquely determines the two-dimensional position coordinate of the charge centroid. We discuss the design of the anode pattern and describe the advantages offered by this readout. The cyclic variation of the electrode structure allows the image resolution to exceed the charge measurement resolution and enables the entire active area of the readout to be utilized. In addition, fixed pattern noise is greatly reduced. We present results demonstrating the position resolution and image linearity. A position resolution of 10 mu m FWHM is demonstrated and the overall imaging performance is shown to be limited by the microchannel plate pore spacing. We present measurements of the image distortions and describe techniques...

  16. The NA60 experiment readout architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Floris, M; Usai, G L; David, A; Rosinsky, P; Ohnishi, H

    2004-01-01

    The NA60 experiment was designed to identify signatures of a new state of matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma, in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchroton. The apparatus is composed of four main detectors: a muon spectrometer (MS), a zero degree calorimeter (ZDC), a silicon vertex telescope (VT), and a silicon microstrip beam tracker (BT). The readout of the whole experiment is based on a PCI architecture. The basic unit is a general purpose PCI card, interfaced to the different subdetectors via custom mezzanine cards. This allowed us to successfully implement several completely different readout protocols (from the VME like protocol of the MS to the custom protocol of the pixel telescope). The system was fully tested with proton and ion beams, and several million events were collected in 2002 and 2003. This paper presents the readout architecture of NA60, with particular emphasis on the PCI layer common to all the subdetectors. (16 refs).

  17. Optical tracking of deep-space spacecraft in Halo L2 orbits and beyond: The Gaia mission as a pilot case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzoni, Alberto; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Galleti, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    We tackle the problem of accurate optical tracking of distant man-made probes, on Halo orbit around the Earth-Sun libration point L2 and beyond, along interplanetary transfers. The improved performance of on-target tracking, especially when observing with small-class telescopes is assessed providing a general estimate of the expected S/N ratio in spacecraft detection. The on-going GAIA mission is taken as a pilot case for our analysis, reporting on fresh literature and original optical photometry and astrometric results. The probe has been located, along its projected nominal path, with quite high precision, within 0.13±0.09 arcsec, or 0.9±0.6 km. Spacecraft color appears to be red, with (V -Rc) =1.1±0.2 and a bolometric correction to the Rc band of (Bol -Rc) = -1.1±0.2 . The apparent magnitude, Rc =20.8±0.2 , is much fainter than originally expected. These features lead to suggest a lower limit for the Bond albedo α =0.11±0.05 and confirm that incident Sun light is strongly reddened by GAIA through its on-board MLI blankets covering the solar shield. Relying on the GAIA figures, we found that VLT-class telescopes could yet be able to probe distant spacecraft heading Mars, up to 30 million km away, while a broader optical coverage of the forthcoming missions to Venus and Mars could be envisaged, providing to deal with space vehicles of minimum effective area A ⩾106 cm2. In addition to L2 surveys, 2 m-class telescopes could also effectively flank standard radar-ranging techniques in deep-space probe tracking along Earth's gravity-assist maneuvers for interplanetary missions.

  18. Description of the TRT Readout Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Luehring, F C

    2002-01-01

    This paper documents the TRT detector readout scheme. A description is provided of the data buffers used in the TRT readout chain: the single TRT channel output data format, the DTMROC output data buffer format, the TRT-ROD input FIFO data format, the TRT-ROD output buffer format, and the ROB output buffer data format. Also documented are the current designs for the TRT-ROD zero suppression and data compression schemes. A proposal is presented for ordering the data generated by individual TRT channels suitably for Level-2 triggering, Level-3 triggering and offline data processing.

  19. In-situ characterization of the thermal state of resonant optical interferometers via tracking of their higher-order mode resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Chris L; Adhikari, Rana X; Arai, Koji; Brooks, Aidan F; Chakraborty, Rijuparna; Frolov, Valery V; Fritschel, Peter; King, Eleanor J; Tanner, David B; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Mueller, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Thermal lensing in resonant optical interferometers such as those used for gravitational wave detection is a concern due to the negative impact on control signals and instrument sensitivity. In this paper we describe a method for monitoring the thermal state of such interferometers by probing the higher-order spatial mode resonances of the cavities within them. We demonstrate the use of this technique to measure changes in the Advanced LIGO input mode cleaner cavity geometry as a function of input power, and subsequently infer the optical absorption at the mirror surfaces at the level of 1 ppm per mirror. We also demonstrate the generation of a useful error signal for thermal state of the Advanced LIGO power recycling cavity by continuously tracking the first order spatial mode resonance frequency. Such an error signal could be used as an input to thermal compensation systems to maintain the interferometer cavity geometries in the presence of transients in circulating light power levels, thereby maintaining o...

  20. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Noll, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Single-particle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  1. Feasibility Study on Acquisition, Tracking, and Pointing Using Earth Thermal Images for Deep-Space Ka-Band and Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Ortiz, G. G.; Roberts, W. T.; Alexander, J. W.

    2003-11-01

    The feasibility of using long-wavelength Earth thermal (infrared) images for antenna/ telescope tracking/pointing applications for both deep-space Ka-band (18 to 35 GHz) and free-space optical communications has been investigated and is reported on here. The advantage of this technology rests on using full Earth images in this band that yield more accurate estimates of geometric centroids than those of Earth images in the visible band. Furthermore, these images are nearly independent of Earth phase angle. The results of the study show that, at a Mars range with currently available sensors, a noise equivalent angle of 10 to 150 nrad and a bias error of better than 80 nrad can be obtained. This would enable precise pointing of both the optical and Ka-band communications beams.

  2. Front end readout electronics for the CMS hadron calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, Terri M

    2002-01-01

    The front-end electronics for the CMS Hadron Calorimeter provides digitized data at the beam interaction rate of 40 MHz. Analog signals provided by hybrid photodiodes (HPDs) or photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are digitized and the data is sent off board through serialized fiber optic links running at 1600 Mbps. In order to maximize the input signal, the front-end electronics are housed on the detector in close proximity to the scintillating fibers or phototubes. To fit the electronics into available space, custom crates, backplanes and cooling methods have had to be developed. During the expected ten-year lifetime, the front-end readout electronics will exist in an environment where radiation levels approach 330 rads and the neutron fluence will be 1.3E11 n/cm sup 2. For this reason, the design approach relies heavily upon custom radiation tolerant ASICs. This paper will present the system architecture of the front-end readout crates and describe their results with early prototypes.

  3. The CMS silicon strip tracker and its electronic readout

    CERN Document Server

    Friedl, M

    2001-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, CH) will be the world's biggest accelerator machine when operation starts in 2006. One of its four detector experiments is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), consisting of a large-scale silicon tracker and electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters, all embedded in a solenoidal magnetic field of 4T, and a muon system surrounding the magnet coil. The Silicon Strip Tracker has a sensitive area of 206m sup 2 with 10 million analog channels which are read out at the collider frequency of 40 MHz. The building blocks of the CMS Tracker are the silicon sensors, APV amplifier ASICs, supporting front-end ASICs, analog and digital optical links as well as data processors and control units in the back-end. Radiation tolerance, readout speed and the huge data volume are challenging requirements. I have modeled the charge collection in silicon detectors which is discussed as well as the concepts of readout amplifiers with respect to the LHC requirements, including the deconvolut...

  4. Development and characterization of the readout system for POLARBEAR-2

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, D; Akiba, Y; Aleman, C; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Bender, A; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, G; Gilbert, A; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Katayama, N; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Morii, H; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Okamura, T; Peloton, J; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Sholl, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, J; Takada, S; Takakura, S; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yamaguchi, H; Zahn, O

    2014-01-01

    POLARBEAR-2 is a next-generation receiver for precision measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)). Scheduled to deploy in early 2015, it will observe alongside the existing POLARBEAR-1 receiver, on a new telescope in the Simons Array on Cerro Toco in the Atacama desert of Chile. For increased sensitivity, it will feature a larger area focal plane, with a total of 7,588 polarization sensitive antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers, with a design sensitivity of 4.1 uKrt(s). The focal plane will be cooled to 250 milliKelvin, and the bolometers will be read-out with 40x frequency domain multiplexing, with 36 optical bolometers on a single SQUID amplifier, along with 2 dark bolometers and 2 calibration resistors. To increase the multiplexing factor from 8x for POLARBEAR-1 to 40x for POLARBEAR-2 requires additional bandwidth for SQUID readout and well-defined frequency channel spacing. Extending to these higher frequencies requires new c...

  5. Simultaneous three-dimensional tracking of individual signals from multi-trap optical tweezers using fast and accurate photodiode detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Dino; Nader, S; Reihani, S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2014-09-22

    Multiple-beam optical traps facilitate advanced trapping geometries and exciting discoveries. However, the increased manipulation capabilities come at the price of more challenging position and force detection. Due to unrivaled bandwidth and resolution, photodiode based detection is preferred over camera based detection in most single/dual-beam optical traps assays. However, it has not been trivial to implement photodiode based detection for multiple-beam optical traps. Here, we present a simple and efficient method based on spatial filtering for parallel photodiode detection of multiple traps. The technique enables fast and accurate 3D force and distance detection of multiple objects simultaneously manipulated by multiple-beam optical tweezers.

  6. Post-processing to remove residual clouds from aerosol optical depth retrieved using the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Virtanen, Timo H.; Rodriguez, Edith; Saponaro, Giulia; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2017-02-01

    Cloud misclassification is a serious problem in the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD), which might considerably bias the AOD results. On the one hand, residual cloud contamination leads to AOD overestimation, whereas the removal of high-AOD pixels (due to their misclassification as clouds) leads to underestimation. To remove cloud-contaminated areas in AOD retrieved from reflectances measured with the (Advanced) Along Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR-2 and AATSR), using the ATSR dual-view algorithm (ADV) over land or the ATSR single-view algorithm (ASV) over ocean, a cloud post-processing (CPP) scheme has been developed at the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) as described in Kolmonen et al. (2016). The application of this scheme results in the removal of cloud-contaminated areas, providing spatially smoother AOD maps and favourable comparison with AOD obtained from the ground-based reference measurements from the AERONET sun photometer network. However, closer inspection shows that the CPP also removes areas with elevated AOD not due to cloud contamination, as shown in this paper. We present an improved CPP scheme which better discriminates between cloud-free and cloud-contaminated areas. The CPP thresholds have been further evaluated and adjusted according to the findings. The thresholds for the detection of high-AOD regions (> 60 % of the retrieved pixels should be high-AOD (> 0.6) pixels), and cloud contamination criteria for low-AOD regions have been accepted as the default for AOD global post-processing in the improved CPP. Retaining elevated AOD while effectively removing cloud-contaminated pixels affects the resulting global and regional mean AOD values as well as coverage. Effects of the CPP scheme on both spatial and temporal variation for the period 2002-2012 are discussed. With the improved CPP, the AOD coverage increases by 10-15 % with respect to the existing scheme. The validation versus AERONET shows an improvement of the correlation

  7. Development of microwave kinetic inductance detectors and their readout system for LiteBIRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Kibe, Y.; Mima, S.; Okamura, T.; Sato, N.; Tomaru, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Yuasa, T.; Watanabe, H.

    2013-12-01

    Primordial gravitational waves generated by inflation have produced an odd-parity pattern B-mode in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. LiteBIRD (Light satellite for the studies of B-mode polarization and Inflation from cosmic background Radiation Detection) aims at detecting this B-mode polarization precisely. It requires about 2000 detectors capable of detecting a frequency range from 50 GHz to 250 GHz with ultra low noise. Superconducting detectors are suitable for this requirement. We have fabricated and tested microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) and developed a new readout system. We have designed antenna-coupled MKIDs. Quasi-particles are created by incident radiation and are detected as a change of the surface impedance of a superconductor strip. This change of the surface impedance is translated into the change of the resonant frequency of a microwave signal transmitted through the resonator. We also have developed a new readout system for MKIDs. The newly developed readout system is not only able to read out the amplitude and the phase data with the homodyne detection for multi-channels, but also provides a unique feature of tracking the resonant frequency of the target resonator. This mechanism enables us to detect signals with a large dynamic range. We report on the recent R&D status of the developing MKIDs and on the read-out system for LiteBIRD.

  8. Front-end electronics and readout system for the ILD TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Hedberg, V; Lundberg, B; Mjörnmark, U; Oskarsson, A; Österman, L; De Lentdecker, G; Yang, Y; Zhang, F

    2015-01-01

    A high resolution TPC is the main option for a central tracking detector at the future International Linear Collider (ILC). It is planned that the MPGD (Micro Pattern Gas Detector) technology will be used for the readout. A Large Prototype TPC at DESY has been used to test the performance of MPGDs in an electron beam of energies up to 6 GeV. The first step in the technology development was to demonstrate that the MPGDs are able to achieve the necessary performance set by the goals of ILC. For this ’proof of principle’ phase, the ALTRO front-end electronics from the ALICE TPC was used, modified to adapt to MPGD readout. The proof of principle has been verified and at present further improvement of the MPGD technology is going on, using the same readout electronics. The next step is the ’feasibility phase’, which aims at producing front-end electronics comparable in size (few mm2) to the readout pads of the TPC. This development work is based on the succeeding SALTRO16 chip, which combines the analogue ...

  9. Microwave multiplex readout for superconducting sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, E.; Becker, D.; Bennett, D.; Faverzani, M.; Fowler, J.; Gard, J.; Giachero, A.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Hilton, G.; Maino, M.; Mates, J.; Puiu, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Reintsema, C.; Schmidt, D.; Swetz, D.; Ullom, J.; Vale, L.

    2016-07-01

    The absolute neutrino mass scale is still an outstanding challenge in both particle physics and cosmology. The calorimetric measurement of the energy released in a nuclear beta decay is a powerful tool to determine the effective electron-neutrino mass. In the last years, the progress on low temperature detector technologies has allowed to design large scale experiments aiming at pushing down the sensitivity on the neutrino mass below 1 eV. Even with outstanding performances in both energy (~ eV on keV) and time resolution (~ 1 μs) on the single channel, a large number of detectors working in parallel is required to reach a sub-eV sensitivity. Microwave frequency domain readout is the best available technique to readout large array of low temperature detectors, such as Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) or Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). In this way a multiplex factor of the order of thousands can be reached, limited only by the bandwidth of the available commercial fast digitizers. This microwave multiplexing system will be used to readout the HOLMES detectors, an array of 1000 microcalorimeters based on TES sensors in which the 163Ho will be implanted. HOLMES is a new experiment for measuring the electron neutrino mass by means of the electron capture (EC) decay of 163Ho. We present here the microwave frequency multiplex which will be used in the HOLMES experiment and the microwave frequency multiplex used to readout the MKID detectors developed in Milan as well.

  10. Authenticated communication from quantum readout of PUFs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skoric, Boris; Pinkse, Pepijn W.H.; Mosk, Allard P.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum Readout of Physical Unclonable Functions (PUFs) is a recently introduced method for remote authentication of objects. We present an extension of the protocol to enable the authentication of data: a verifier can check if received classical data was sent by the PUF holder. We call this modific

  11. Quantifying the high-speed running and sprinting profiles of elite female soccer players during competitive matches using an Optical Player Tracking System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Jocelyn K; Thompson, Kevin G; Pumpa, Kate L; Morgan, Stuart

    2016-09-06

    The aim of this study was to determine the high-speed running and sprinting profiles of elite female soccer players during competitive matches using a new Optical Player Tracking System. Eight stationary video cameras were positioned at vantage points surrounding the soccer field so that when each camera view was combined the entire field could be viewed simultaneously. Following each match, an optical player tracking system detected the coordinates (x,y) of each player for every video frame. Algorithms applied to the x and y coordinates were used to determine activity variables for twelve elite female players across seven competitive matches. Players covered 9,220-10,581 m of total distance, 1,772-2,917 m of high-speed running (3.4-5.3 m·s) distance and 417-850 m of sprinting (>5.4 m·s) distance, with variations between positional groups (p sprints (71-78 %) were performed over distances less than 10 m. Mean time between high-speed runs (13.9 s ± 4.4) and sprints (86.5 s ± 38.0) varied according to playing position (p drills, and shows that coaches should take an individualised approach to training load monitoring according to position.

  12. Optical tracking of deep-space spacecraft in Halo L2 orbits and beyond: the Gaia mission as a pilot case

    CERN Document Server

    Buzzoni, Alberto; Galleti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We tackle the problem of accurate optical tracking of distant man-made probes, on Halo orbit around the Earth-Sun libration point L2 and beyond, along interplanetary transfers. The improved performance of on-target tracking, especially when observing with small-class telescopes is assessed providing a general estimate of the expected S/N ratio in spacecraft detection. The on-going Gaia mission is taken as a pilot case for our analysis, reporting on fresh literature and original optical photometry and astrometric results. The probe has been located, along its projected nominal path, within 0.13 +/- 0.09 arcsec, or 0.9 +/- 0.6 km. Spacecraft color appears to be red, with (V-R_c) = 1.1 +/- 0.2 and a bolometric correction to the R_c band of (Bol-R_c) = -1.1 +/- 0.2. The apparent magnitude, R_c = 20.8 +/- 0.2, is much fainter than originally expected. These features lead to suggest a lower limit for the Bond albedo a = 0.11 +/- 0.05 and confirm that incident Sun light is strongly reddened by Gaia through its on-bo...

  13. Readout techniques and radiation damage of undoped cesium iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woody, C.L.; Levy, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Skwarnicki, T.; Sobolewski, Z.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Souder, P.; Anderson, D.F. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Syracuse Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Physics; Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Several readout techniques for undoped CsI have been studied which utilize the fast scintillation component for speed, and the high photon yield for good energy resolution. Quantum yields have been measured for samples up to 30 cm in length using photomultiplier tubes, wavelength shifters, and silicon photodiodes. A study has also been made of the scintillation properties of undoped CsI. It is found that the light output and decay time of the 310 nm fast component increases and the emission spectrum shifts to longer wavelengths at lower temperatures. The effects on the optical transmission and scintillation light output due to radiation damage from {sup 60}Co gamma rays has been measured for doses up to {approximately}10{sup 6} rad. It is found that the radiation resistance of undoped CsI is substantially higher than has been reported for thallium doped CsI. 16 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Radiation tolerance of prototype BTeV pixel detector readout chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriele Chiodini et al.

    2002-07-12

    High energy and nuclear physics experiments need tracking devices with increasing spatial precision and readout speed in the face of ever-higher track densities and increased radiation environments. The new generation of hybrid pixel detectors (arrays of silicon diodes bump bonded to arrays of front-end electronic cells) is the state of the art technology able to meet these challenges. We report on irradiation studies performed on BTeV pixel readout chip prototypes exposed to a 200 MeV proton beam at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Prototype pixel readout chip preFPIX2 has been developed at Fermilab for collider experiments and implemented in standard 0.25 micron CMOS technology following radiation tolerant design rules. The tests confirmed the radiation tolerance of the chip design to proton total dose up to 87 MRad. In addition, non destructive radiation-induced single event upsets have been observed in on-chip static registers and the single bit upset cross section has been extensively measured.

  15. Development of pixel readout integrated circuits for extreme rate and radiation

    CERN Multimedia

    Tomasek, L; Loddo, F; Liberali, V; Rizzi, A; Re, V; Minuti, M; Pangaud, P; Barbero, M B; Pacher, L; Kluit, R; Hinchliffe, I; Giubilato, P; Faccio, F; Pernegger, H; Krueger, H; Gensolen, F D; Prydderch, M L; Bilei, G M; Da rocha rolo, M D; Fanucci, L; Grillo, A A; Bellazzini, R; Manghisoni, M; Palomo pinto, F R; Michelis, S; Huegging, F G; Kishishita, T; Marchiori, G; Christian, D C; Kaestli, H C; Meier, B; Key-charriere, M; Andreazza, A; Traversi, G; De canio, F; Linssen, L; Dannheim, D; Conti, E; Hemperek, T; Menouni, M; Fougeron, D; Genat, J; Bomben, M; Marzocca, C; Demaria, N; Mazza, G; Van bakel, N A; Palla, F; Grippo, M T; Magazzu, G; Ratti, L; Abbaneo, D; Crescioli, F; Deptuch, G W; Neue, G; De robertis, G; Passeri, D; Placidi, P; Gromov, V; Morsani, F; Bisello, D; Paccagnella, A; Christiansen, J; Dho, E; Wermes, N; Rymaszewski, P; Rozanov, A; Wang, A; Lipton, R J; Havranek, M; Neviani, A; Karagounis, M; Godiot, S; Calderini, G; Seidel, S C; Horisberger, R P; Garcia-sciveres, M A; Stabile, A; Beccherle, R; Bacchetta, N

    The present hybrid pixel detectors in operation at the LHC represent a major achievement. They deployed a new technology on an unprecedented scale and their success firmly established pixel tracking as indispensable for future HEP experiments. However, extrapolation of hybrid pixel technology to the HL-LHC presents major challenges on several fronts. We propose a new RD collaboration specifically focused on the development of pixel readout Integrated Circuits (IC). The IC challenges include: smaller pixels to resolve tracks in boosted jets, much higher hit rates (1-2 GHz/cm$^{2}$), unprecedented radiation tolerance (10 MGy), much higher output bandwidth, and large IC format with low power consumption in order to instrument large areas while keeping the material budget low. We propose a collaboration to design the next generation of hybrid pixel readout chips to enable the ATLAS and CMS Phase 2 pixel upgrades. This does not imply that ATLAS and CMS must use the same exact pixel readout chip, as most of the dev...

  16. Approximated Vector Diffraction Theory for Readout Signal of Multi-Level Run-Length-Limited Discs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jie; XIA Si-Fei; XU Duan-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Multi-level run-length-limited read-only optical storage is a kind of high density storage method. The width and height of recording marks are varied with different levels, which is the key technology for the optical storage. When the readout signal of these discs with complex recording marks is computed by vector analysis method, it is very hard and time-consuming. Approximated vector computation combines the convenience of scalar method and precision of vector method, which is effective for multi-level run-length-limited read-only optical storage.

  17. Charge Identification of Highly Ionizing Particles in Desensitized Nuclear Emulsion Using High Speed Read-Out System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanematsu, N.; Komori, M.; Sato, S.; Asai, M.; /Nagoya U. /Aichi U. of Education /Gunma U., Maebashi /JAXA, Sagamihara /KEK, Tsukuba /Kobe

    2006-05-10

    We performed an experimental study of charge identification of heavy ions from helium to carbon having energy of about 290 MeV/u using an emulsion chamber. Emulsion was desensitized by means of forced fading (refreshing) to expand a dynamic range of response to highly charged particles. For the track reconstruction and charge identification, the fully automated high speed emulsion read-out system, which was originally developed for identifying minimum ionizing particles, was used without any modification. Clear track by track charge identification up to Z=6 was demonstrated. The refreshing technique has proved to be a powerful technique to expand response of emulsion film to highly ionizing particles.

  18. Online track and vertex reconstruction on GPUs for the Mu3e experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruch, Dorothea vom [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: Mu3e-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Mu3e experiment searches for the lepton flavour violating decay μ → eee, aiming at a branching ratio sensitivity better than 10{sup -16}.To reach this sensitivity, muon rates above 10{sup 9} μ/s are required. A high precision silicon tracking detector combined with excellent timing resolution from scintillating fibers and tiles will measure the momenta, vertices and timing of the decay products of muons stopped in the target to suppress background. The trigger-less readout system will deliver about 100 GB/s of zero-suppressed data. A network of optical links and switching FPGAs sends the complete detector data for a time slice to one node of the filter farm. An FPGA inside the filter farm PC transfers the event data to the GPU via PCIe direct memory access. The GPU finds and fits tracks using a 3D tracking algorithm for multiple scattering dominated resolution. In a second step, a three track vertex fit is performed, allowing for a reduction of the output data rate to below 100 MB/s by removing combinatorial background. The talk discusses the data flow from the FPGA to the GPU as well as the implementation and performance of the track and vertex fits on the GPU.

  19. LHC optics determination with proton tracks measured in the CT-PPS detectors in 2016, before TS2

    CERN Document Server

    Nemes, F

    2017-01-01

    Novel optics estimation methods have been developed for the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS), in order to determine the horizontal dispersion function $D_{x}$ and the orbit between IP5 and the Roman Pot detectors. The tools have been successfully applied at $\\sqrt{s} = $13 TeV collision energy and $\\beta^{*} = $0.4 m optics with $\\alpha = 370\\,\\mu$rad horizontal crossing angle (settings valid in 2016 before Technical Stop 2 - TS2).

  20. LHC optics determination with proton tracks measured in the CT-PPS detectors in 2016, before TS2

    CERN Document Server

    Nemes, F

    2017-01-01

    Novel optics estimation methods have been developed for the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS), in order to determine the horizontal dispersion function $D_{x}$ and the orbit between IP5 and the Roman Pot detectors. The tools have been successfully applied at $\\sqrt{s} = $13 TeV collision energy and $\\beta^{*} = $0.4 m optics with $\\alpha = 370\\,\\mu$rad horizontal crossing angle (settings valid in 2016 before Technical Stop 2 - TS2).

  1. Cool Timepix – Electronic noise of the Timepix readout chip down to −125 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schön, R., E-mail: rolfs@nikhef.nl; Alfonsi, M.; Bakel, N. van; Beuzekom, M. van; Koffeman, E.

    2015-01-21

    The Timepix readout chip with its 65k pixels on a sensitive area of 14 mm×14 mm provides a fine spatial resolution for particle tracking or medical imaging. We explore the operation of Timepix in a dual-phase xenon environment (around −110 °C). Used in dual-phase xenon time projection chambers, e.g. for dark matter search experiments, the readout must have a sufficiently low detection limit for small energy deposits. We measured the electronic pixel noise of three bare Timepix chips. For the first time Timepix readout chips were cooled to temperatures as low as −125 °C. In this work, we present the results of analysing noise transition curves recorded while applying a well-defined charge to the pixel's input. The electronic noise reduces to an average of 99e{sup −}, a reduction of 23% compared to operation at room temperature.

  2. Local-Oscillator Noise Coupling in Balanced Homodyne Readout for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Steinlechner, Sebastian; Bell, Angus S; Danilishin, Stefan L; Gläfke, Andreas; Gräf, Christian; Hennig, Jan-Simon; Houston, E Alasdair; Huttner, Sabina H; Leavey, Sean S; Pascucci, Daniela; Sorazu, Borja; Spencer, Andrew; Strain, Kenneth A; Wright, Jennifer; Hild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The second generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors are quickly approaching their design sensitivity. For the first time these detectors will become limited by quantum back-action noise. Several back-action evasion techniques have been proposed to further increase the detector sensitivity. Since most proposals rely on a flexible readout of the full amplitude- and phase-quadrature space of the output light field, balanced homodyne detection is generally expected to replace the currently used DC readout. Up to now, little investigation has been undertaken into how balanced homodyne detection can be successfully transferred from its ubiquitous application in table-top quantum optics experiments to large-scale interferometers with suspended optics. Here we derive implementation requirements with respect to local oscillator noise couplings and highlight potential issues with the example of the Glasgow Sagnac Speed Meter experiment, as well as for a future upgrade to the Advanced LIGO detectors.

  3. Intensity-based readout of resonant-waveguide grating biosensors: Systems and nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Moritz; Jahns, Sabrina; Gerken, Martina

    2017-09-01

    Resonant waveguide gratings (RWG) - also called photonic crystal slabs (PCS) - have been established as reliable optical transducers for label-free biochemical assays as well as for cell-based assays. Current readout systems are based on mechanical scanning and spectrometric measurements with system sizes suitable for laboratory equipment. Here, we review recent progress in compact intensity-based readout systems for point-of-care (POC) applications. We briefly introduce PCSs as sensitive optical transducers and introduce different approaches for intensity-based readout systems. Photometric measurements have been realized with a simple combination of a light source and a photodetector. Recently a 96-channel, intensity-based readout system for both biochemical interaction analyses as well as cellular assays was presented employing the intensity change of a near cut-off mode. As an alternative for multiparametric detection, a camera system for imaging detection has been implemented. A portable, camera-based system of size 13 cm × 4.9 cm × 3.5 cm with six detection areas on an RWG surface area of 11 mm × 7 mm has been demonstrated for the parallel detection of six protein binding kinetics. The signal-to-noise ratio of this system corresponds to a limit of detection of 168 M (24 ng/ml). To further improve the signal-to-noise ratio advanced nanostructure designs are investigated for RWGs. Here, results on multiperiodic and deterministic aperiodic nanostructures are presented. These advanced nanostructures allow for the design of the number and wavelengths of the RWG resonances. In the context of intensity-based readout systems they are particularly interesting for the realization of multi-LED systems. These recent trends suggest that compact point-of-care systems employing disposable test chips with RWG functional areas may reach market in the near future.

  4. Tracking triggers for the upgraded DOe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, S. [California Univ., Davis (United States); Bloom, P. [California Univ., Davis (United States); Mani, S. [California Univ., Davis (United States); Pellett, D. [California Univ., Davis (United States); Costa, J. [CBPF/LAFEX, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Moreira, L. [CBPF/LAFEX, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Baumbaugh, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Blazey, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Borcherding, F. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Johnson, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Wilcox, J. [Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The high luminosity environment of the upgraded Tevatron will require not only the upgrade of various DOe subdetectors, but the trigger system as well. With respect to the present system, the upgraded trigger system must operate faster and provide a higher degree of background rejection while extending the physics acceptance beyond that of the current system. This will be accomplished in part by incorporating the scintillating fiber tracker and the preshower detector into the Level 1 trigger. Track logic, implemented in commercial FPGAs, will be used to identify tracks in the scintillating fiber tracker with P{sub T}>1.5 GeV/c and electron candidates in the preshower detector. Integration of the trigger logic and readout electronics permits the identification of all tracks in a few hundred nanoseconds. Here, preliminary designs for the readout and trigger electronics are presented along with simulation results for trigger efficiencies and rejection factors. (orig.).

  5. Development of Trigger and Readout Electronics for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Guan, Liang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The present small wheel muon detector at ATLAS will be replaced with a New Small Wheel (NSW) detector to handle the increase in data rates and harsh radiation environment expected at the LHC. Resistive Micromegas and small strip Thin Gap Chambers will be used to provide both trigger and tracking primitives. Muon segments found at NSW will be combined with the segments found at the Big Wheel to determine the muon transverse momentum at the first-level trigger. A new trigger and readout system is developed for the NSW detector. The new system has about 2.4 million trigger and readout channels and about 8,000 Front-End boards. The large number of input channels, short time available to prepare and transmit data, harsh radiation environment, and low power consumption all impose great challenges on the design. We will discuss the overall electronics design and studies with various ASICs and high-speed circuit board prototypes.

  6. Self-triggering readout system for the neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisbauer, D.; Konorov, I.; Steffen, D.; Paul, S.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of PENeLOPE (Precision Experiment on Neutron Lifetime Operating with Proton Extraction) at the Forschungsreaktor München II is a high-precision measurement of the neutron lifetime and thereby an improvement of the parameter's precision by one order of magnitude. In order to achieve a higher accuracy, modern experiments naturally require state-of-the-art readout electronics, as well as high-performance data acquisition systems. This paper presents the self-triggering readout system designed for PENeLOPE which features a continuous pedestal tracking, configurable signal detection logic, floating ground up to 30 kV, cryogenic environment and the novel Switched Enabling Protocol (SEP). The SEP is a time-division multiplexing transport level protocol developed for a star network topology.

  7. Self-triggering readout system for the neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaisbauer, D., E-mail: d.gaisbauer@tum.de [Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Konorov, I. [Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Steffen, D. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Paul, S. [Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-11

    The aim of PENeLOPE (Precision Experiment on Neutron Lifetime Operating with Proton Extraction) at the Forschungsreaktor München II is a high-precision measurement of the neutron lifetime and thereby an improvement of the parameter's precision by one order of magnitude. In order to achieve a higher accuracy, modern experiments naturally require state-of-the-art readout electronics, as well as high-performance data acquisition systems. This paper presents the self-triggering readout system designed for PENeLOPE which features a continuous pedestal tracking, configurable signal detection logic, floating ground up to 30 kV, cryogenic environment and the novel Switched Enabling Protocol (SEP). The SEP is a time-division multiplexing transport level protocol developed for a star network topology.

  8. Dual Readout With PWO Crystals and LuAG Crystal Scintillating Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, E; Mavromanolakis, G; Abler, D

    2010-01-01

    One of the main challenges for detectors at future high-energy collider experiments is high-precision measurement of hadrons and jet energy and momentum. Such measurement can be provided by the particle flow approach (PFA) that requires a complex highly segmented calorimeter system to identify and to track all particles in a jet. An alternative so-called dual-readout approach consists of simultaneously recording, in an active medium, scintillation light that is proportional to total energy deposit and Cerenkov light that is proportional to the electromagnetic part only, thus allowing extracting the electromagnetic fraction of the total shower energy on an event-by-event basis. The dual-readout method approach can be implemented using several techniques. The first method proposed uses a copper absorber structure containing two types of fibers: quartz fibers that produce Cerenkov light and plastic scintillating fibers that produce scintillation light. A second method proposed is based on the separation of scint...

  9. RD Collaboration Proposal: Development of pixel readout integrated circuits for extreme rate and radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Chistiansen, J (CERN)

    2013-01-01

    This proposal describes a new RD collaboration to develop the next genrration of hybrid pixel readout chips for use in ATLAS and CMS PHase 2 upgrades. extrapolation of hybrid pixel technology to the HL-LHC presents major challenges on several fronts. Challenges include: smaller pixels to resolve tracks in boosted jets, much higher hit rates (1-2 GHz/cm2 ), unprecedented radiation tolerance (10 MGy), much higher output bandwidth, and large IC format with low power consumption in order to instrument large areas while keeping the material budget low. This collaboration is specifically focused on design of hybrid pixel readout chips, and not on more general chip design or on other aspects of hybrid pixel technology. Participants include 7 institutes on ATLAS and 7 on CMS, plus 2 on both experiments.

  10. Development of Trigger and Readout Electronics for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Antrim, Daniel Joseph; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The present small wheel muon detector at ATLAS will be replaced with a New Small Wheel (NSW) detector to handle the increase in data rates and harsh radiation environment expected at the LHC. Resistive Micromegas and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers will be used to provide both trigger and tracking primitives. Muon segments found at NSW will be combined with the segments found at the Big Wheel to determine the muon transverse momentum at the first-level trigger. A new trigger and readout system is developed for the NSW detector. The new system has about 2.4 million trigger and readout channels and about 8,000 frontend boards. The large number of input channels, short time available to prepare and transmit data, harsh radiation environment, and low power consumption all impose great challenges on the design. We will discuss the overall electronics design and studies with various ASIC and board prototypes.

  11. Design of versatile ASIC and protocol tester for CBM readout system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabołotny, W. M.; Byszuk, A. P.; Emschermann, D.; Gumiński, M.; Juszczyk, B.; Kasiński, K.; Kasprowicz, G.; Lehnert, J.; Müller, W. F. J.; Poźniak, K.; Romaniuk, R.; Szczygieł, R.

    2017-02-01

    Silicon Tracking System (STS), Muon Chamber (MUCH) and Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) subdetectors in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) detector system at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) use the same innovative protocol ensuring reliable synchronization of the communication link between the controller and the front-end ASIC, transmission of time-deterministic commands to the ASIC and efficient readout of data. The paper describes the FPGA-based tester platform which can be used both for the verification of the protocol implementation in a front-end ASIC at the design stage, and for testing of the produced ASICs. Due to its modularity, the platform can be easily adapted for different integrated circuits and readout systems.

  12. Fiber and Crystals Dual Readout calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Cascella, Michele; Lee, Sehwook

    2016-01-01

    The RD52 (DREAM) collaboration is performing R\\&D on dual readout calorimetry techniques with the aim of improving hadronic energy resolution for future high energy physics experiments. The simultaneous detection of Cherenkov and scintillation light enables us to measure the electromagnetic fraction of hadron shower event-by-event. As a result, we could eliminate the main fluctuation which prevented from achieving precision energy measurement for hadrons. We have tested the performance of the lead and copper fiber prototypes calorimeters with various energies of electromagnetic particles and hadrons. During the beam test, we investigated the energy resolutions for electrons and pions as well as the identification of those particles in a longitudinally unsegmented calorimeter. Measurements were also performed on pure and doped PbWO$_{4}$ crystals, as well as BGO and BSO, with the aim of realising a crystal based dual readout detector. We will describe our results, focusing on the more promising properties ...

  13. Event loss rates and readout chips

    CERN Document Server

    Schmelling, M

    1998-01-01

    98-57 The LHCb experiment aims at a deadtimeless readout of B­events at a primary bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz. In order to achieve this goal, information from all events must be stored in a pipeline with latency matched to the time needed for the Level 0 trigger decision. Accepted events, which constitute only a small fraction of the total sample, are stored in a fifo of a certain depth and read out with a fixed clock rate. The fifo, also referred to as multi­event or derandomizing buffer, is needed in order to even out statistical fluctuations in the trigger rate. Apart from the length of the pipeline, which determines the maximum latency of the chip, the crucial parameter characterizing a readout chip is the fraction of triggers lost due to limitations of the chip's architecture. This note describes how the different design parameters and operation conditions determine the chip's performance.

  14. Characterization of Silicon Detector Readout Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, M. [Purdue U.

    2015-07-22

    Configuration and calibration of the front-end electronics typical of many silicon detector configurations were investigated in a lab activity based on a pair of strip sensors interfaced with FSSR2 read-out chips and an FPGA. This simple hardware configuration, originally developed for a telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility, was used to measure thresholds and noise on individual readout channels and to study the influence that different configurations of the front-end electronics had on the observed levels of noise in the system. An understanding of the calibration and operation of this small detector system provided an opportunity to explore the architecture of larger systems such as those currently in use at LHC experiments.

  15. New crystals for dual-readout calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, N; Cardini, A; Carosi, R; Ciapetti, G; Ferrari, R; Franchino, S; Fraternali, M; Gaudio, G; Hauptman, J; Incagli, M; Korzhik, M; Lacava, F; La Rotonda, L; Livan, M; Meoni, E; Nikl, M; Pinci, D; Policicchio, A; Popescu, S; Scuri, F; Sill, A; Vandelli, W; Vedda, A; Venturelli, T; Voena, C; Volobouev, I; Wigmans, R

    2009-01-01

    Lead tungstate crystals doped with small fractions of praesodynium or molybdenum have been tested in beams of high-energy electrons. The goal of these tests was to study the effects of such dopants on the capability to separate the signal components deriving from the Cherenkov and scintillation light generated by the beam particles. These studies were carried out in view of the possible application of such crystals in dual-readout calorimeters.

  16. Preliminary Assessment of Microwave Readout Multiplexing Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croce, Mark Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rabin, Michael W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bennett, D. A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Mates, J. A. B. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Gard, J. D. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Becker, D. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Schmidt, D. R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Ullom, J. N. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-01-23

    Ultra-high resolution microcalorimeter gamma spectroscopy is a new non-destructive assay technology for measurement of plutonium isotopic composition, with the potential to reduce total measurement uncertainty to a level competitive with destructive analysis methods [1-4]. Achieving this level of performance in practical applications requires not only the energy resolution now routinely achieved with transition-edge sensor microcalorimeter arrays (an order of magnitude better than for germanium detectors) but also high throughput. Microcalorimeter gamma spectrometers have not yet achieved detection efficiency and count rate capability that is comparable to germanium detectors, largely because of limits from existing readout technology. Microcalorimeter detectors must be operated at low temperature to achieve their exceptional energy resolution. Although the typical 100 mK operating temperatures can be achieved with reliable, cryogen-free systems, the cryogenic complexity and heat load from individual readout channels for large sensor arrays is prohibitive. Multiplexing is required for practical systems. The most mature multiplexing technology at present is time-division multiplexing (TDM) [3, 5-6]. In TDM, the sensor outputs are switched by applying bias current to one SQUID amplifier at a time. Transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter arrays as large as 256 pixels have been developed for X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy using TDM technology. Due to bandwidth limits and noise scaling, TDM is limited to a maximum multiplexing factor of approximately 32-40 sensors on one readout line [8]. Increasing the size of microcalorimeter arrays above the kilopixel scale, required to match the throughput of germanium detectors, requires the development of a new readout technology with a much higher multiplexing factor.

  17. LSST camera readout chip ASPIC: test tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antilogus, P.; Bailly, Ph; Jeglot, J.; Juramy, C.; Lebbolo, H.; Martin, D.; Moniez, M.; Tocut, V.; Wicek, F.

    2012-02-01

    The LSST camera will have more than 3000 video-processing channels. The readout of this large focal plane requires a very compact readout chain. The correlated ''Double Sampling technique'', which is generally used for the signal readout of CCDs, is also adopted for this application and implemented with the so called ''Dual Slope integrator'' method. We have designed and implemented an ASIC for LSST: the Analog Signal Processing asIC (ASPIC). The goal is to amplify the signal close to the output, in order to maximize signal to noise ratio, and to send differential outputs to the digitization. Others requirements are that each chip should process the output of half a CCD, that is 8 channels and should operate at 173 K. A specific Back End board has been designed especially for lab test purposes. It manages the clock signals, digitizes the analog differentials outputs of ASPIC and stores data into a memory. It contains 8 ADCs (18 bits), 512 kwords memory and an USB interface. An FPGA manages all signals from/to all components on board and generates the timing sequence for ASPIC. Its firmware is written in Verilog and VHDL languages. Internals registers permit to define various tests parameters of the ASPIC. A Labview GUI allows to load or update these registers and to check a proper operation. Several series of tests, including linearity, noise and crosstalk, have been performed over the past year to characterize the ASPIC at room and cold temperature. At present, the ASPIC, Back-End board and CCD detectors are being integrated to perform a characterization of the whole readout chain.

  18. Signal processing for distributed readout using TESs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen J.; Whitford, Chris H.; Fraser, George W.

    2006-04-01

    We describe optimal filtering algorithms for determining energy and position resolution in position-sensitive Transition Edge Sensor (TES) Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs). Improved algorithms, developed using a small-signal finite-element model, are based on least-squares minimisation of the total noise power in the correlated dual TES DROID. Through numerical simulations we show that significant improvements in energy and position resolution are theoretically possible over existing methods.

  19. Signal processing for distributed readout using TESs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stephen J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Research Centre, University of Leicester, Michael Atiyah Building, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sts@star.le.ac.uk; Whitford, Chris H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Research Centre, University of Leicester, Michael Atiyah Building, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Fraser, George W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Research Centre, University of Leicester, Michael Atiyah Building, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15

    We describe optimal filtering algorithms for determining energy and position resolution in position-sensitive Transition Edge Sensor (TES) Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs). Improved algorithms, developed using a small-signal finite-element model, are based on least-squares minimisation of the total noise power in the correlated dual TES DROID. Through numerical simulations we show that significant improvements in energy and position resolution are theoretically possible over existing methods.

  20. Cryogenic readout techniques for germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benato, G. [University of Zurich, (Switzerland); Cattadori, C. [INFN - Milano Bicocca, (Italy); Di Vacri, A. [INFN LNGS, (Italy); Ferri, E. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy); D' Andrea, V.; Macolino, C. [GSSI/INFN LNGS, (Italy); Riboldi, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano/INFN Milano, (Italy); Salamida, F. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    High Purity Germanium detectors are used in many applications, from nuclear and astro-particle physics, to homeland security or environment protection. Although quite standard configurations are often used, with cryostats, charge sensitive amplifiers and analog or digital acquisition systems all commercially available, it might be the case that a few specific applications, e.g. satellites, portable devices, cryogenic physics experiments, etc. also require the development of a few additional or complementary techniques. An interesting case is for sure GERDA, the Germanium Detector Array experiment, searching for neutrino-less double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN - Italy. In GERDA the entire detector array, composed of semi-coaxial and BEGe naked crystals, is operated suspended inside a cryostat filled with liquid argon, that acts not only as cooling medium and but also as an active shield, thanks to its scintillation properties. These peculiar circumstances, together with the additional requirement of a very low radioactive background from all the materials adjacent to the detectors, clearly introduce significant constraints on the design of the Ge front-end readout electronics. All the Ge readout solutions developed within the framework of the GERDA collaboration, for both Phase I and Phase II, will be briefly reviewed, with their relative strength and weakness compared together and with respect to ideal Ge readout. Finally, the digital processing techniques developed by the GERDA collaboration for energy estimation of Ge detector signals will be recalled. (authors)

  1. Qubit readout with the Josephson Photomultiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeill, Guilhem

    Recent demonstrations of error correction in many qubit circuits, as well as efforts to build a logical qubit, have shown the need for a simple and scalable superconducting quantum bit (qubit) readout. Current solutions based on heterodyne detection and cryogenic amplification of microwave readout tones may prove difficult to scale, while photon counting presents an attractive alternative. However, the development of counters operating at these frequencies has proved technically challenging. In this thesis, we describe the development of the Josephson Photomultiplier (JPM), a microwave photon counting circuit. We discuss the JPM theoretically, and describe the fabrication of the JPM using standard thin film lithography techniques. We measure its properties as a microwave photon counter using a qubit as an in-situ calibrated source of photons. We measure a JPM quantum efficiency at the few percent level. We then use the JPM to perform readout of a transmon qubit in both the dispersive and bright regimes. We observe raw measurement fidelities of 35% and 62% respectively. We discuss how the JPM and measurement protocol could be further optimized to achieve fidelities in excess of 90%.

  2. XAMPS Detectors Readout ASIC for LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragone, A; /SLAC; Pratte, J.F.; Rehak, P.; /Brookhaven; Carini, G.A.; /BNL, NSLS; Herbst, R.; /SLAC; O' Connor, P.; /Brookhaven; Siddons, D.P.; /BNL, NSLS

    2008-12-18

    An ASIC for the readout of signals from X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor (XAMPS) detectors to be used at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is presented. The X-ray Pump Probe (XPP) instrument, for which the ASIC has been designed, requires a large input dynamic range on the order of 104 photons at 8 keV with a resolution of half a photon FWHM. Due to the size of the pixel and the length of the readout line, large input capacitance is expected, leading to stringent requirement on the noise optimization. Furthermore, the large number of pixels needed for a good position resolution and the fixed LCLS beam period impose limitations on the time available for the single pixel readout. Considering the periodic nature of the LCLS beam, the ASIC developed for this application is a time-variant system providing low-noise charge integration, filtering and correlated double sampling. In order to cope with the large input dynamic range a charge pump scheme implementing a zero-balance measurement method has been introduced. It provides an on chip 3-bit coarse digital conversion of the integrated charge. The residual charge is sampled using correlated double sampling into analog memory and measured with the required resolution. The first 64 channel prototype of the ASIC has been fabricated in TSMC CMOS 0.25 {micro}m technology. In this paper, the ASIC architecture and performances are presented.

  3. Embedded controller for GEM detector readout system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabołotny, Wojciech M.; Byszuk, Adrian; Chernyshova, Maryna; Cieszewski, Radosław; Czarski, Tomasz; Dominik, Wojciech; Jakubowska, Katarzyna L.; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Poźniak, Krzysztof; Rzadkiewicz, Jacek; Scholz, Marek

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the embedded controller used for the multichannel readout system for the GEM detector. The controller is based on the embedded Mini ITX mainboard, running the GNU/Linux operating system. The controller offers two interfaces to communicate with the FPGA based readout system. FPGA configuration and diagnostics is controlled via low speed USB based interface, while high-speed setup of the readout parameters and reception of the measured data is handled by the PCI Express (PCIe) interface. Hardware access is synchronized by the dedicated server written in C. Multiple clients may connect to this server via TCP/IP network, and different priority is assigned to individual clients. Specialized protocols have been implemented both for low level access on register level and for high level access with transfer of structured data with "msgpack" protocol. High level functionalities have been split between multiple TCP/IP servers for parallel operation. Status of the system may be checked, and basic maintenance may be performed via web interface, while the expert access is possible via SSH server. System was designed with reliability and flexibility in mind.

  4. Reliable and redundant FPGA based read-out design in the ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Akerstedt, H; The ATLAS collaboration; Drake, Gary; Anderson, Kelby; Bohm, C; Oreglia, Mark; Tang, Fukun

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter at ATLAS is a hadron calorimeter based on steel plates and scintillating tiles read out by PMTs. The current read-out system uses standard ADCs and custom ASICs to digitize and temporarily store the data on the detector. However, only a subset of the data is actually read out to the counting room. The on-detector electronics will be replaced around 2023. To achieve the required reliability the upgraded system will be highly redundant. Here the ASICs will be replaced with Kintex-7 FPGAs from Xilinx. This, in addition to the use of multiple 10 Gbps optical read-out links, will allow a full read-out of all detector data. Due to the higher radiation levels expected when the beam luminosity is increased, opportunities for repairs will be less frequent. The circuitry and firmware must therefore be designed for sufficiently high reliability using redundancy and radiation tolerant components. Within a year, a hybrid demonstrator including the new read-out system will be installed in one slice of ...

  5. Reliable and redundant FPGA based read-out design in the ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akerstedt, Henrik; Muschter, Steffen; Drake, Gary; Anderson, Kelby; Bohm, Christian; Oreglia, Mark; Tang, Fukun

    2015-10-01

    The Tile Calorimeter at ATLAS [1] is a hadron calorimeter based on steel plates and scintillating tiles read out by PMTs. The current read-out system uses standard ADCs and custom ASICs to digitize and temporarily store the data on the detector. However, only a subset of the data is actually read out to the counting room. The on-detector electronics will be replaced around 2023. To achieve the required reliability the upgraded system will be highly redundant. Here the ASICs will be replaced with Kintex-7 FPGAs from Xilinx. This, in addition to the use of multiple 10 Gbps optical read-out links, will allow a full read-out of all detector data. Due to the higher radiation levels expected when the beam luminosity is increased, opportunities for repairs will be less frequent. The circuitry and firmware must therefore be designed for sufficiently high reliability using redundancy and radiation tolerant components. Within a year, a hybrid demonstrator including the new readout system will be installed in one slice of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. This will allow the proposed upgrade to be thoroughly evaluated well before the planned 2023 deployment in all slices, especially with regard to long term reliability. Different firmware strategies alongside with their integration in the demonstrator are presented in the context of high reliability protection against hardware malfunction and radiation induced errors.

  6. Readout electronics for CBM-TOF super module quality evaluation based on 10 Gbps ethernet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, D.; Cao, P.; Huang, X.; Zheng, J.; Wang, Q.; Li, B.; Li, J.; Liu, S.; An, Q.

    2017-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter-Time of Flight (CBM-TOF) wall uses high performance of Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) assembled in super modules to identify charged particles with high channel density and high measurement precision at high event rate. Electronics meet the challenge for reading data out from a super module at high speed of about 6 Gbps in real time. In this paper, the readout electronics for CBM-TOF super module quality evaluation is proposed based on 10 Gigabit Ethernet. The digitized TOF data from one super module will be concentrated at the front-end electronics residing on the side of the super module and transmitted to an extreme speed readout module (XSRM) housed in the backend crate through the PCI Express (PCIe) protocol via optic channels. Eventually, the XSRM transmits data to the data acquisition (DAQ) system through four 10 Gbps Ethernet ports in real time. This readout structure has advantages of high performance and expansibility. Furthermore, it is easy to operate. Test results on the prototype show that the overall data readout performance for each XSRM can reach up to 28.8 Gbps, which means XSRM can meet the requirement of reading data out from 4 super modules with 1280 channels in real time.

  7. A Full Slice Test Version of a Tentative Upgraded Readout System for TileCal

    CERN Document Server

    Muschter, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Bohm, C; Eriksson, D; Kavianipour, H; Oreglia, M; Tang, F

    2011-01-01

    The upgrade plans on the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) include the full readout of all data to the counting room. In order to study functional requirements of the future upgraded TileCal readout system we have assembled a minimal TDAQ slice. The aim is to implement a tentative readout chain for TileCal, starting with a newly developed 3-in-1 FE-board from University of Chicago and ending with the storage of triggered data on a PC. Later we will use PMT pulses, amplified and shaped by the 3-in-1 board, as a data source. However, for simplicity we start by using well defined calibration pulses also generated by the 3-in-1 board. The pulses are sampled by a 12 bit ADC, which is connected to an ML605 evaluation board from XILINX. These boards emulate the new on-detector electronics. The ML605 communicates via two 5Gb/s optical links with a Virtex-6 FPGA development board from HighTech Global which emulates the off-detector electronics. The off-detector board is situated in a PC and uses PCIe for readout an...

  8. Optical terminal definition for the Future Service Growth (FSG) module of the Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (ATDRSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Ronald C.; Kalil, Ford

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from preliminary analyses and definition studies for an optical terminal's incorporation into the FSG module of the ATDRS system, which must support crosslinks between selected relay satellites of a modified ATDRS constellation and thereby allow the placement of a relay satellite at an orbital location which eliminates the zone of exclusion. These studies have attempted to identify alternative constellations by means of one or more crosslinks, and to formulate the service-routing requirement for the FSG terminal. Attention is given to an FSG optical terminal that furnishes the functionality and performance required for a crosslink terminal.

  9. Optical terminal definition for the Future Service Growth (FSG) module of the Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (ATDRSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Ronald C.; Kalil, Ford

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from preliminary analyses and definition studies for an optical terminal's incorporation into the FSG module of the ATDRS system, which must support crosslinks between selected relay satellites of a modified ATDRS constellation and thereby allow the placement of a relay satellite at an orbital location which eliminates the zone of exclusion. These studies have attempted to identify alternative constellations by means of one or more crosslinks, and to formulate the service-routing requirement for the FSG terminal. Attention is given to an FSG optical terminal that furnishes the functionality and performance required for a crosslink terminal.

  10. Femtosecond laser aided processing of optical sensor fibers for 3D medical navigation and tracking (FiberNavi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltermann, Christian; Koch, Jan; Angelmahr, Martin; Schade, Wolfgang; Witte, Michael; Kohn, Nils; Wilhelm, Dirk; Schneider, Armin; Reiser, Silvano; Feußner, Hubertus

    2014-05-01

    A new concept for fiber-optical 3D shape sensing applying femtosecond laser technology for highprecision direct writing of Bragg gratings within the core and the cladding of single core standard telecom fibers is presented. This new technology enables a cost-efficient and real-time 3D shape sensing and navigation of medical catheters or endoscopes only by means of passive optical sensor elements. First prototypes showed the possibility to achieve absolute navigation accuracy of four mm per meter and have successfully been tested in clinical environment.

  11. Development of optical quality assurance procedures for the sensors of silicon tracking system (STS) detector of the compressed baryonic matter experiment (CBM) at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrik, Evgeny [Eberhard-Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The CBM experiment aims to study the properties of nuclear matter at high net-baryon densities. The STS is the key detector to reconstruct charged particle tracks created in heavy-ion interactions. In order to assure the quality of about 1300 silicon sensors, highly efficient and highly automated procedures need to be developed. In this contribution we report on a microscope camera based optical inspection system, used to scan along the individual sensors to recognize and classify sensor defects. Examples of these defects are: photo-resist residues, top metallization layer lithography defects, surface scratches. In order to separate and classify these defects various image-processing algorithms are used, including: pattern recognition, object classification, etc.

  12. A 1 mm Scintillating Fibre Tracker Readout by a Multi-anode Photomultiplier

    CERN Document Server

    Leverington, B D; Campana, P; Rosellini, R

    2011-01-01

    This note describes a prototype particle tracking detector constructed with 1 mm plastic scintillating fibres with a 64 channel Hamamatsu H8500 flat-panel multi-anode photomultiplier readout. Cosmic ray tracks from an array of 11 gas-filled drift tubes were matched to signals in the scintillating fibres in order to measure the resolution and efficiency of tracks reconstructed in the fibre-based tracker. A GEANT4 detector simulation was also developed to compare cosmic ray data with MC results and is discussed in the note. Using the parameters measured in this experimental setup, modified fibre tracker designs are suggested to improve resolution and efficiency in future prototypes to meet modern detector specifications.

  13. Unique Search and Track Procedures Utilizing the Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance (GEODSS) Worldwide Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    to affect the success rate of finding lost objects using the GEODSS Optical Sensors. Figure 1. Vela-5A/B satellites in clean room in...author or source of a work, even if it is in the public domain, is still required to avoid plagiarism . Source: http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/vela5b

  14. The CDF-II silicon tracking system

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, T K

    2002-01-01

    The CDF silicon tracking system for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron consists of eight layers arranged in cylinders spanning radii from 1.35 to 28 cm, and lengths from 90 cm to nearly 2 m for a total of 6 m sup 2 of silicon and 722,000 readout channels. With an innermost layer (Layer 00) utilizing radiation tolerant p sup + -in-n silicon and low-mass readout cables between the sensors and readout electronics, double-sided vertexing layers (SVXII) designed for use with a deadtimeless secondary-vertex trigger, and outermost layers (Intermediate Silicon Layers) utilizing mass-producible modules attached to a carbon fiber spaceframe, this system is a starting point for the next generation of silicon trackers for the LHC and Tevatron.

  15. A feasibility study to track cosmic muons using a detector with SiPM devices based on amplitude discrimination

    CERN Document Server

    Stanca, D; Brancus, I; Mitrica, B; Balaceanu, A; Cautisanu, B; Gherghel-Lascu, A; Haungs, A; Mathes, H -J; Rebel, H; Saftoiu, A; Sima, O; Mosu, T

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to build a SiPM-readout muon detector (SiRO), using plastic scintillators with optical fibers as sensitive volume and readout by SiPM photo-diodes, is investigated. SiRO shall be used for tracking cosmic muons based on amplitude discrimination. The detector concept foresees a stack of 6 active layers, grouped in 3 sandwiches for determining the muon trajectories through 3 planes. After investigating the characteristics of the photodiodes, tests have been performed using two detection modules, each being composed from a plastic scintillator sheet, $100 \\times 25 \\times 1\\,$cm$^{3}$, with 12 parallel, equidistant ditches; each ditch filled with an optical fiber of $1.5\\,$mm thickness and always two fibers connected to form a channel. The attenuation of the light response along the optical fiber and across the channels have been tested. The measurements of the incident muons based on the input amplitude discrimination indicate that this procedure is not efficient and therefore not sufficient, as ...

  16. A novel Silicon Photomultiplier with bulk integrated quench resistors: utilization in optical detection and tracking applications for particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovics, Stefan; Andricek, Ladislav; Diehl, Inge; Hansen, Karsten; Jendrysik, Christian; Krueger, Katja; Lehmann, Raik; Ninkovic, Jelena; Reckleben, Christian; Richter, Rainer; Schaller, Gerhard; Schopper, Florian; Sefkow, Felix

    2017-02-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are a promising candidate for replacing conventional photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in many applications, thanks to ongoing developments and advances in their technology. Conventional SiPMs are generally an array of avalanche photo diodes, operated in Geiger mode and read out in parallel, thus leading to the necessity of a high ohmic quenching resistor. This resistor enables passive quenching and is usually located on top of the array, limiting the fill factor of the device. In this paper, a novel detector concept with a bulk integrated quenching resistor will be recapped. In addition, due to other advantages of this novel detector design, a new concept, in which these devices will be utilized as tracking detectors for particle physics applications will be introduced, as well as first simulation studies and experimental measurements of this new approach.

  17. Satellite optical and radar data used to track wetland forest impact and short-term recovery from Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, A.; Middleton, B.; Lu, Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Satellite Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and RADARSAT-1 (radar) satellite image data collected before and after the landfall of Hurricane Katrina in the Pearl River Wildlife Management Area on the Louisiana-Mississippi border, USA, were applied to the study of forested wetland impact and recovery. We documented the overall similarity in the radar and optical satellite mapping of impact and recovery patterns and highlighted some unique differences that could be used to provide consistent and relevant ecological monitoring. Satellite optical data transformed to a canopy foliage index (CFI) indicated a dramatic decrease in canopy cover immediately after the storm, which then recovered rapidly in the Taxodium distichum (baldcypress) and Nyssa aquatica (water tupelo) forest. Although CFI levels in early October indicated rapid foliage recovery, the abnormally high radar responses associated with the cypress forest suggested a persistent poststorm difference in canopy structure. Impact and recovery mapping results showed that even though cypress forests experienced very high wind speeds, damage was largely limited to foliage loss. Bottomland hardwoods, experiencing progressively lower wind speeds further inland, suffered impacts ranging from increased occurrences of downed trees in the south to partial foliage loss in the north. In addition, bottomland hardwood impact and recovery patterns suggested that impact severity was associated with a difference in stand structure possibly related to environmental conditions that were not revealed in the prehurricane 25-m optical and radar image analyses. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  18. Data encoding efficiency in pixel detector readout with charge information

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The minimum number of bits needed for lossless readout of a pixel detector is calculated, in the regime of interest for particle physics where only a small fraction of pixels have a non-zero value per frame. This permits a systematic comparison of the readout efficiency of different encoding implementations. The calculation is compared to the bits used for by the FE-I4 pixel readout chip of the ATLAS experiment.

  19. Data encoding efficiency in pixel detector readout with charge information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice, E-mail: mgs@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wang, Xinkang [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-04-11

    The average minimum number of bits needed for lossless readout of a pixel detector is calculated, in the regime of interest for particle physics where only a small fraction of pixels have a non-zero value per frame. This permits a systematic comparison of the readout efficiency of different encoding implementations. The calculation is compared to the number of bits used by the FE-I4 pixel readout chip of the ATLAS experiment.

  20. The COMPASS RICH-1 read-out system

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, G; Bradamante, Franco; Bressan, A; Chapiro, A; Cicuttin, A; Ciliberti, P; Colavita, A A; Costa, S; Crespo, M; Cristaudo, P; Dalla Torre, S; Díaz, V; Fauland, P; Fratnik, F

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the reconfigurable read-out system for the 82944 RICH-1 channels of the COMPASS experiment (NA58) at CERN. The system is based on 192 identical large front-end boards (BORA board). BORA was designed for acquiring, digitizing, threshold subtracting and transmitting event data. The overall operation of the board is controlled and supervised by a DSP tightly interacting with an FPGA that acts as a parallel co-processor. The DSP allows characterizing each analog channel by locally calculating noise and pedestal. Each BORA communicates with the outside world through two optical fibers and through a dedicated DSP network. One optical fiber is used to receive event triggers, and the other one is used to transmit event data to subsequent processing stages of the acquisition system. The DSP network allows reconfiguring and reprogramming the DSPs and FPGAs as well as acquiring sample events to visualize the overall operation of the system. The whole RICH has eight DSP networks working in parallel. ...

  1. A Readout Mechanism for Latency Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Oran; Shamir, Maoz

    2016-01-01

    Response latency has been suggested as a possible source of information in the central nervous system when fast decisions are required. The accuracy of latency codes was studied in the past using a simplified readout algorithm termed the temporal-winner-take-all (tWTA). The tWTA is a competitive readout algorithm in which populations of neurons with a similar decision preference compete, and the algorithm selects according to the preference of the population that reaches the decision threshold first. It has been shown that this algorithm can account for accurate decisions among a small number of alternatives during short biologically relevant time periods. However, one of the major points of criticism of latency codes has been that it is unclear how can such a readout be implemented by the central nervous system. Here we show that the solution to this long standing puzzle may be rather simple. We suggest a mechanism that is based on reciprocal inhibition architecture, similar to that of the conventional winner-take-all, and show that under a wide range of parameters this mechanism is sufficient to implement the tWTA algorithm. This is done by first analyzing a rate toy model, and demonstrating its ability to discriminate short latency differences between its inputs. We then study the sensitivity of this mechanism to fine-tuning of its initial conditions, and show that it is robust to wide range of noise levels in the initial conditions. These results are then generalized to a Hodgkin-Huxley type of neuron model, using numerical simulations. Latency codes have been criticized for requiring a reliable stimulus-onset detection mechanism as a reference for measuring latency. Here we show that this frequent assumption does not hold, and that, an additional onset estimator is not needed to trigger this simple tWTA mechanism.

  2. Detector with a profile-based cathode and a two-coordinate pad-strip readout system

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchinskiy, N A; Kravchuk, N P; Korenchenko, A S; Khomutov, N V; Smirnov, V S; Chekhovskii, V A; Movchan, S A; Zyazyulya, F E

    2011-01-01

    A detector with a profile-based cathode and a pad-strip cathode readout system is experimentally investigated. Cathode pads arranged along each anode wire are diagonally interconnected and form strips that cross the detector at an angle with respect to the anode wire. Two coordinates from the cathodes and one from the anode wire allow identification of tracks in high multiplicity events with a single detector plane.

  3. Mass-based readout for agglutination assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunara, Rumi; Godin, Michel; Knudsen, Scott M.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-11-01

    We present a mass-based readout for agglutination assays. The suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) is used to classify monomers and dimers that are formed during early stage aggregation, and to relate the total count to the analyte concentration. Using a model system of streptavidin functionalized microspheres and biotinylated antibody as the analyte, we obtain a dose-response curve over a concentration range of 0.63-630nM and show that the results are comparable to what has been previously achieved by image analysis and conventional flow cytometry.

  4. LHCb: A new Readout Control system for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Alessio, F

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has proposed an upgrade towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times its initial design luminosity. The entire readout architecture will be upgraded in order to cope with higher sub-detector occupancies, higher rate and higher network load. In this paper, we describe the architecture, functionalities and the first hardware implementation of a new Readout Control system for the LHCb upgrade. The system is based on FPGAs and bi-directional links for the control of the entire readout architecture. First results on the validation of the system are also given.

  5. Track and vertex reconstruction on GPUs for the Mu3e experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruch, Dorothea vom; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Berger, Niklaus [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: Mu3e-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Mu3e experiment searches for the lepton flavour violating decay μ → eee, aiming at a branching ratio sensitivity better than 10{sup -16}. To reach this sensitivity, muon rates above 10{sup 9} μ/s are required. A high precision silicon pixel tracking detector combined with excellent timing resolution from scintillating fibers and tiles will measure the momenta, vertices and timing of the decay products of muons stopped in the target to suppress background. The trigger-less readout system will deliver about 100 GB/s of zero-suppressed data. A network of optical links and switching FPGAs sends the complete detector data for a time slice to one node of the filter farm. An FPGA inside the filter farm PC transfers the event data to the GPU via PCIe direct memory access. The GPU finds and fits tracks using a 3D tracking algorithm for multiple scattering dominated resolution. In a second step, a three track vertex fit is performed, allowing for a reduction of the output data rate to below 100 MB/s by removing combinatorial background. The talk discusses the implementation of the fits on the GPU, which processes 10{sup 10} combinations of hits from three layers per second.

  6. SU-E-J-206: A Comparison of Different Hardware Design Approaches for Feature-Supported Optical Head-Tracking with Respect to Angular Dependencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stueber, P; Wissel, T; Wagner, B [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Life Science, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Bruder, R; Schweikard, A; Ernst, F [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recent research has shown that optical features significantly improve marker-less optical head-tracking for cranial radiotherapy. Simulations, however, showed that these optical features, which are used to derive tissue thickness, depend on the incident angle of the IR scanning laser beam and the perspective of the camera analyzing the reflective patterns. We present an experimental analysis determining which is the most robust optical setup concerning angular influences. Methods: In three consecutive experiments, the incident angle of the laser (1), the perspective of the camera (2) or both simultaneously (3, ‘inBeam’-perspective) were changed with respect to the target. We analyzed how this affects feature intensity. These intensities were determined from seven concentric regions of interest (ROIs) around the laser spot. Two targets were used: a tissue-like silicone phantom and a human's forehead. Results: For each experiment, the feature intensity generally decreases with increasing angle. We found that the optical properties of the silicone phantom do not fit the properties of human skin. Furthermore, the angular influence of the laser on the features is significantly higher than the perspective of the camera. With the ‘inBeam’- perspective, the smoothest decays of feature intensity were found. We suppose that this is because of a fixed relationship between both devices. This smoothness, suggesting a predictable functional relationship, may simplify angle compensation for machine learning algorithms. This is particularly prominent for the medial ROIs. The inner ROIs highly depend on the angle and power of the laser. The outer ROIs show less angular dependency but the signal strength is critically low and prone to artifacts. Therefore and because of the smooth decays, medial ROIs are a suitable tradeoff between susceptibility, signal-noise-ratio and distance to the center of the laser spot. Conclusion: For tissue thickness correlated

  7. Tracking changes in the optical properties and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter during drinking water production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavonen, E E; Kothawala, D N; Tranvik, L J; Gonsior, M; Schmitt-Kopplin, P; Köhler, S J

    2015-11-15

    Absorbance, 3D fluorescence and ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS) were used to explain patterns in the removal of chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (CDOM and FDOM) at the molecular level during drinking water production at four large drinking water treatment plants in Sweden. When dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal was low, shifts in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition could not be detected with commonly used DOC-normalized parameters (e.g. specific UV254 absorbance - SUVA), but was clearly observed by using differential absorbance and fluorescence or ESI-FT-ICR-MS. In addition, we took a novel approach by identifying how optical parameters were correlated to the elemental composition of DOM by using rank correlation to connect optical properties to chemical formulas assigned to mass peaks from FT-ICR-MS analyses. Coagulation treatment selectively removed FDOM at longer emission wavelengths (450-600 nm), which significantly correlated with chemical formulas containing oxidized carbon (average carbon oxidation state ≥ 0), low hydrogen to carbon ratios (H/C: average ± SD = 0.83 ± 0.13), and abundant oxygen-containing functional groups (O/C = 0.62 ± 0.10). Slow sand filtration was less efficient in removing DOM, yet selectively targeted FDOM at shorter emission wavelengths (between 300 and 450 nm), which commonly represents algal rather than terrestrial sources. This shorter wavelength FDOM correlated with chemical formulas containing reduced carbon (average carbon oxidation state ≤ 0), with relatively few carbon-carbon double bonds (H/C = 1.32 ± 0.16) and less oxygen per carbon (O/C = 0.43 ± 0.10) than those removed during coagulation. By coupling optical approaches with FT-ICR-MS to characterize DOM, we were for the first time able to confirm the molecular composition of absorbing and fluorescing DOM selectively targeted during drinking

  8. Self-triggering readout system for the neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaisbauer, Dominic; Steffen, Dominik [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: PENeLOPE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The aim of PENeLOPE is a high-precision measurement of the neutron lifetime and thereby an increase of the parameter's precision by one order of magnitude. In order to achieve an increasingly higher accuracy, modern experiments naturally require state-of-the-art readout electronics, as well as high-performance data acquisition systems. This talk therefore presents the readout system for the neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE, which is currently being designed at the department of physics at Technische Universitaet Muenchen. The system's readout chain involves preamplifier, shaper, sampling ADC, and a data processing stage implemented on field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). Due to the incorporated signal detection, the system is able to process data from 1,000 self-triggering channels, each of which is hit by 10 particles/sec. The corresponding data rate of 1.5 MB/sec is transferred to the outside of the experiment by a high-speed optical interface, which has been developed to meet the special experimental requirements of PENeLOPE. The main focus of the talk is set on the performance and tests of the trigger algorithm as well as on characteristics and properties of the optical interface.

  9. Readout for intersatellite laser interferometry: Measuring low frequency phase fluctuations of high-frequency signals with microradian precision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerberding, Oliver; Diekmann, Christian; Kullmann, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Precision phase readout of optical beat note signals is one of the core techniques required for inter-satellite laser interferometry. Future space based gravitational wave detectors like eLISA require such a readout over a wide range of MHz frequencies, due to orbit induced Doppler shifts......, with a precision in the order of µ rad/root Hz at frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 1 Hz. In this paper, we present phase readout systems, so-called phasemeters, that are able to achieve such precisions and we discuss various means that have been employed to reduce noise in the analogue circuit domain and during...... digitisation. We also discuss the influence of some non-linear noise sources in the analogue domain of such phasemeters. And finally, we present the performance that was achieved during testing of the elegant breadboard model of the LISA phasemeter, which was developed in the scope of a European Space Agency...

  10. A vertically integrated pixel readout device for the Vertex Detector at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Christian, David; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2008-12-01

    3D-Integrated Circuit technology enables higher densities of electronic circuitry per unit area without the use of nanoscale processes. It is advantageous for mixed mode design with precise analog circuitry because processes with conservative feature sizes typically present lower process dispersions and tolerate higher power supply voltages, resulting in larger separation of a signal from the noise floor. Heterogeneous wafers (different foundries or different process families) may be combined with some 3D integration methods, leading to the optimization of each tier in the 3D stack. Tracking and vertexing in future High-Energy Physics (HEP) experiments involves construction of detectors composed of up to a few billions of channels. Readout electronics must record the position and time of each measurement with the highest achievable precision. This paper reviews a prototype of the first 3D readout chip for HEP, designed for a vertex detector at the International Linear Collider. The prototype features 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 64 x 64 elements and was fabricated in a 3-tier 0.18 {micro}m Fully Depleted SOI CMOS process at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory. The tests showed correct functional operation of the structure. The chip performs a zero-suppressed readout. Successive submissions are planned in a commercial 3D bulk 0.13 {micro}m CMOS process to overcome some of the disadvantages of an FDSOI process.

  11. Electronics and readout of a large area silicon detector for LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borer, K.; Munday, D.J.; Parker, M.A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Aspell, P.; Campbell, M.; Chilingarov, A.; Jarron, P.; Heijne, E.H.M.; Santiard, J.C.; Scampoli, P.; Verweij, H.; Goessling, C.; Lisowski, B.; Reichold, A.; Spiwoks, R.; Tsesmelis, E.; Benslama, K.; Bonino, R.; Clark, A.G.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Kambara, H.; Wu, X.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.; Schultz, T.; Bardos, R.A.; Gorfine, G.W.; Moorhead, G.F.; Taylor, G.N.; Tovey, S.N.; Bibby, J.H.; Hawkings, R.J.; Kundu, N.; Weidberg, A.; Campbell, D.; Murray, P.; Seller, P.; Teiger, J. (Univ. of Bern (Switzerland) Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Dortmund (Germany) DPNC, Geneva Univ. (Switzerland) 1. Inst. fur Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany) School of Physics, Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia) Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom) Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom) Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 Gif

    1994-04-21

    The purpose of the RD2 project is to evaluate the feasibility of a silicon tracker and/or preshower detector for LHC. Irradiation studies with doses equivalent to those expected at LHC have been performed to determine the behavior of operational parameters such as leakage current, depletion voltage and charge collection during the life of the detector. The development of fast, dense, low power and low cost signal processing electronics is one of the major activities of the collaboration. We describe the first fully functional integrated analog memory chip with asynchronous read and write operations and level 1 trigger capture capabilities. A complete test beam system using this analog memory chip at 66 MHz has been successfully operated with RD2 prototype silicon detectors during various test runs. The flexibility of the electronics and readout have allowed us to easily interface our set-up to other data acquisition systems. Mechanical studies are in progress to design a silicon tracking detector with several million channels that may be operated at low (0-10 C) temperature, while maintaining the required geometrical precision. Prototype readout boards for such a detector are being developed and simulation studies are being performed to optimize the readout architecture. (orig.)

  12. Electronics and readout of a large area silicon detector for LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, K.; Munday, D. J.; Parker, M. A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Aspell, P.; Campbell, M.; Chilingarov, A.; Jarron, P.; Heijne, E. H. M.; Santiard, J. C.; Scampoli, P.; Verweij, H.; Gössling, C.; Lisowski, B.; Reichold, A.; Spiwoks, R.; Tsesmelis, E.; Benslama, K.; Bonino, R.; Clark, A. G.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Kambara, H.; Wu, X.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.; Schultz, T.; Bardos, R. A.; Gorfine, G. W.; Moorhead, G. F.; Taylor, G. N.; Tovey, S. N.; Bibby, J. H.; Hawkings, R. J.; Kundu, N.; Weidberg, A.; Campbell, D.; Murray, P.; Seller, P.; Teiger, J.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of the RD2 project is to evaluate the feasibility of a silicon tracker and/or preshower detector for LHC. Irradiation studies with doses equivalent to those expected at LHC have been performed to determine the behavior of operational parameters such as leakage current, depletion voltage and charge collection during the life of the detector. The development of fast, dense, low power and low cost signal processing electronics is one of the major activities of the collaboration. We describe the first fully functional integrated analog memory chip with asynchronous read and write operations and level 1 trigger capture capabilities. A complete test beam system using this analog memory chip at 66 MHz has been successfully operated with RD2 prototype silicon detectors during various test runs. The flexibility of the electronics and readout have allowed us to easily interface our set-up to other data acquistion systems. Mechanical studies are in progress to design a silicon tracking detector with several million channels that may be operated at low (0-10°C) temperature, while maintaining the required geometrical precision. Prototype readout boards for such a detector are being developed and simulation studies are being performed to optimize the readout architecture.

  13. 3D documentation of footwear impressions and tyre tracks in snow with high resolution optical surface scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Ursula; Albertini, Nicola; Naether, Silvio; Thali, Michael J

    2007-09-13

    The three-dimensional documentation of footwear and tyre impressions in snow offers an opportunity to capture additional fine detail for the identification as present photographs. For this approach, up to now, different casting methods have been used. Casting of footwear impressions in snow has always been a difficult assignment. This work demonstrates that for the three-dimensional documentation of impressions in snow the non-destructive method of 3D optical surface scanning is suitable. The new method delivers more detailed results of higher accuracy than the conventional casting techniques. The results of this easy to use and mobile 3D optical surface scanner were very satisfactory in different meteorological and snow conditions. The method is also suitable for impressions in soil, sand or other materials. In addition to the side by side comparison, the automatic comparison of the 3D models and the computation of deviations and accuracy of the data simplify the examination and delivers objective and secure results. The results can be visualized efficiently. Data exchange between investigating authorities at a national or an international level can be achieved easily with electronic data carriers.

  14. Optical tracking of organically modified silica nanoparticles as DNA carriers: A nonviral, nanomedicine approach for gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Indrajit; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Bharali, Dhruba J.; Pudavar, Haridas E.; Mistretta, Ruth A.; Kaur, Navjot; Prasad, Paras N.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports a multidisciplinary approach to produce fluorescently labeled organically modified silica nanoparticles as a nonviral vector for gene delivery and biophotonics methods to optically monitor intracellular trafficking and gene transfection. Highly monodispersed, stable aqueous suspensions of organically modified silica nanoparticles, encapsulating fluorescent dyes and surface functionalized by cationic-amino groups, are produced by micellar nanochemistry. Gel-electrophoresis studies reveal that the particles efficiently complex with DNA and protect it from enzymatic digestion of DNase 1. The electrostatic binding of DNA onto the surface of the nanoparticles, due to positively charged amino groups, is also shown by intercalating an appropriate dye into the DNA and observing the Förster (fluorescence) resonance energy transfer between the dye (energy donor) intercalated in DNA on the surface of nanoparticles and a second dye (energy acceptor) inside the nanoparticles. Imaging by fluorescence confocal microscopy shows that cells efficiently take up the nanoparticles in vitro in the cytoplasm, and the nanoparticles deliver DNA to the nucleus. The use of plasmid encoding enhanced GFP allowed us to demonstrate the process of gene transfection in cultured cells. Our work shows that the nanomedicine approach, with nanoparticles acting as a drug-delivery platform combining multiple optical and other types of probes, provides a promising direction for targeted therapy with enhanced efficacy as well as for real-time monitoring of drug action. nonviral vector | ORMOSIL nanoparticles | confocal microscopy

  15. Monte Carlo calculations of PET coincidence timing: single and double-ended readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W

    2016-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo computational methods for estimating the coincidence resolving time (CRT) of scintillator detector pairs in positron emission tomography (PET) and present results for Lu2SiO5 : Ce (LSO), LaBr3 : Ce, and a hypothetical ultra-fast scintillator with a 1 ns decay time. The calculations were applied to both single-ended and double-ended photodetector readout with constant-fraction triggering. They explicitly include (1) the intrinsic scintillator properties (luminosity, rise time, decay time, and index of refraction), (2) the exponentially distributed depths of interaction, (3) the optical photon transport efficiency, delay, and time dispersion, (4) the photodetector properties (fill factor, quantum efficiency, transit time jitter, and single electron response), and (5) the determination of the constant fraction trigger level that minimizes the CRT. The calculations for single-ended readout include the delayed photons from the opposite reflective surface. The calculations for double-ended readout include (1) the simple average of the two photodetector trigger times, (2) more accurate estimators of the annihilation photon entrance time using the pulse height ratio to estimate the depth of interaction and correct for annihilation photon, optical photon, and trigger delays, and (3) the statistical lower bound for interactions at the center of the crystal. For time-of-flight (TOF) PET we combine stopping power and TOF information in a figure of merit equal to the sensitivity gain relative to whole-body non-TOF PET using LSO. For LSO crystals 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm, a decay time of 37 ns, a total photoelectron count of 4000, and a photodetector with 0.2 ns full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) timing jitter, single-ended readout has a CRT of 0.16 ns fwhm and double-ended readout has a CRT of 0.111 ns fwhm. For LaBr3 : Ce crystals 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm, a rise time of 0.2 ns, a decay time of 18 ns, and a total of 7600 photoelectrons the CRT numbers are 0

  16. Status report on a MicroTCA card for HCAL trigger and readout at SLHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mans, J; Frahm, E, E-mail: frahm@physics.umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We present recent measurements performed using a prototype MicroTCA card for CMS-HCAL Trigger and Readout at SLHC. Our second generation prototype uses a Xilinx XC5VFX70T FPGA to perform the high-speed communication and data processing for up to eight Readout Module fibers that are streaming data at 4.8 Gbps each. The FPGA also uses two SFP+ optical interfaces at 6.4 Gbps each for data transfer to the Trigger System. A local DAQ interface in the FPGA communicates via Gigabit Ethernet with the MicroTCA MCH. Bit Error Rate Test (BERT) results and data integrity analyses are presented in challenging clocking environments including a legacy TTC system. In addition, the status of the IPbus concept for control of deeply embedded devices is presented.

  17. Status report on a MicroTCA card for HCAL trigger and readout at SLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mans, J; 10.1088/1748-0221/5/12/C12027

    2010-01-01

    We present recent measurements performed using a prototype MicroTCA card for CMS-HCAL Trigger and Readout at SLHC. Our second generation prototype uses a Xilinx XC5VFX70T FPGA to perform the high-speed communication and data processing for up to eight Readout Module fibers that are streaming data at 4.8 Gbps each. The FPGA also uses two SFP+ optical interfaces at 6.4 Gbps each for data transfer to the Trigger System. A local DAQ interface in the FPGA communicates via Gigabit Ethernet with the MicroTCA MCH. Bit Error Rate Test (BERT) results and data integrity analyses are presented in challenging clocking environments including a legacy TTC system. In addition, the status of the IPbus concept for control of deeply embedded devices is presented

  18. Light-to-light readout system of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Denes, P; Lustermann, W; Mathez, H; Pangaud, P; Walder, J P

    2001-01-01

    For the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, an 8OOOO-crysral electromagnetic calorimeter will measure electron and photon energies with high precision over a dynamic range of roughly 16 bits. The readout electronics will be located directly behind the crystals, and must survive a total dose of up to 2x10 Gy along with 5x10**1**3 n/cm**2. A readout chain consisting of a custom wide-range acquisition circuit, commercial ADC and custom optical link for each crystal is presently under construction. An overview of the design is presented, with emphasis on the large-scale fiber communication system. 11 Refs.

  19. A prototype for the upgraded readout electronics of TileCal

    CERN Document Server

    Eriksson, D; Bohm, C; Kavianipour, H; Anderson, K; Oreglia, M; Tang, F

    2012-01-01

    Upgrade plans for ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter (TileCal) include full readout of all data to the counting room. R&amp;D activities at different laboratories target different parts of the upgraded system. We are developing a possible implementation of the future readout electronics to be included in a full functional demonstrator. This must be capable of adapting to each of the three different front-end alternatives. Prototypes of the two PCBs that will be in charge of digitization, control and communication have been developed. The design is redundant and uses FPGAs with fault tolerant firmware for control and protocol conversion. Communication and clock synchronization between on and off detector electronics is implemented via high speed optical links using the GBT protocol.

  20. Evolution of the dual-readout calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aldo Penzo; on behalf of 4th Concept and DREAM

    2007-12-01

    Measuring the energy of hadronic jets with high precision is essential at present and future colliders, in particular at ILC. The 4th concept design is built upon calorimetry criteria that result in the DREAM prototype, read-out via two different types of longitudinal fibers, scintillator and quartz respectively, and therefore capable of determining for each shower the corresponding electromagnetic fraction, thus eliminating the strong effect of fluctuations in this fraction on the overall energy resolution. In this respect, 4th is orthogonal to the other three concepts, which rely on particle flow analysis (PFA). The DREAM test-beam results hold promises for excellent performances, coupled with relatively simple construction and moderate costs, making such a solution an interesting alternative to the PFA paradigm. The next foreseen steps are to extend the dual-readout principle to homogeneous calorimeters (with the potential of achieving even better performances) and to tackle another source of fluctuation in hadronic showers, originating from binding energy losses in nuclear break-up (measuring neutrons of few MeV energy).

  1. Fiber and crystals dual readout calorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Michele; Franchino, Silvia; Lee, Sehwook

    2016-11-01

    The RD52 (DREAM) collaboration is performing R&D on dual readout calorimetry techniques with the aim of improving hadronic energy resolution for future high energy physics experiments. The simultaneous detection of Cherenkov and scintillation light enables us to measure the electromagnetic fraction of hadron shower event-by-event. As a result, we could eliminate the main fluctuation which prevented from achieving precision energy measurement for hadrons. We have tested the performance of the lead and copper fiber prototypes calorimeters with various energies of electromagnetic particles and hadrons. During the beam test, we investigated the energy resolutions for electrons and pions as well as the identification of those particles in a longitudinally unsegmented calorimeter. Measurements were also performed on pure and doped PbWO4 crystals, as well as BGO and BSO, with the aim of realizing a crystal based dual readout detector. We will describe our results, focusing on the more promising properties of homogeneous media for the technique. Guidelines for additional developments on crystals will be also given. Finally we discuss the construction techniques that we have used to assemble our prototypes and give an overview of the ones that could be industrialized for the construction of a full hermetic calorimeter.

  2. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  3. Optical fiber read-out for liquid argon scintillation light

    CERN Document Server

    Csáthy, J Janicskó; Kratz, J; Schönert, S; Wiesinger, Ch

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the performance of a light detector for Ar scintillation light made of wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers connected to Silicon-Photomultipliers (SiPM). The setup was conceived to be used as anti-Compton veto for high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors operated directly in liquid Argon (LAr). Background suppression efficiencies for different radioactive sources were measured in a test cryostat with about 800 kg LAr. This work was part of the R\\&D effort for the GERDA experiment.

  4. Optical Readout System for Bi-Material Terahertz Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    multimeter. To convert thermistor resistance information in Kelvins, an electronic table developed by Dada was used [53]. The foil heater was bonded...Accessed: 24- Jul-2011]. [53] B. Dada , Setup Calculations for the Thermistor Slope in the Temperature Control Circuit. New Jersey, USA,. Thorlabs, Inc

  5. MEMS Terahertz Focal Plane Array With Optical Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    V. CONCLUSION ......................................................................................... 49 APPENDIX A. MATLAB CODE FOR THZ TO IR...EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS ................................................................................................ 51 APPENDIX B. MATLAB CODE FOR...THZ TO IR SIMULATION RESULTS ...... 55 APPENDIX C. MATLAB CODE FOR LENS SETUP .......................................... 61 APPENDIX D. ACHROMAT

  6. Digital Image-Based Automatic Tracking Capability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OPTRA proposes to develop an Automated Optical Tracking Capability tailored to NASA's network of optical tracking stations at the Kennedy Space Center. This will be...

  7. Read-out electronics for DC squid magnetic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-01-01

    Read-out electronics for DC SQUID sensor systems, the read-out electronics incorporating low Johnson noise radio-frequency flux-locked loop circuitry and digital signal processing algorithms in order to improve upon the prior art by a factor of at least ten, thereby alleviating problems caused by magnetic interference when operating DC SQUID sensor systems in magnetically unshielded environments.

  8. Development of a one-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector for tracking applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydecker, Leigh Kent, IV

    Optical Position Sensitive Detectors (PSDs) are a non-contact method of tracking the location of a light spot. Silicon-based versions of such sensors are fabricated with standard CMOS processing, are inexpensive and provide a real-time, analog signal output corresponding to the position of the light spot. Because they are non-contact, they do not degrade over time from surface friction due to repetitive sliding motion associated with standard full contact sliding potentiometers. This results in long, reliable device lifetimes. In this work, an innovative PSD was developed to replace the linear hard contact potentiometer currently being used in a human-computer interface architecture. First, a basic lateral effect PSD was developed to provide real-time positioning of the mouthpiece used in the interface architecture which tracks along a single axis. During the course of this work, multiple device geometries were fabricated and analyzed resulting in a down selection of a final design. This final device design was then characterized in terms of resolution and responsivity and produced in larger quantities as initial prototypes for the test product integration. Finally, an electronic readout circuit was developed in order to interface the dual- line lateral effect PSD developed in this thesis with specifications required for product integration. To simplify position sensing, an innovative type of optical position sensor was developed using a linear photodiodes with back-to-back connections. This so- called Self-Balancing Position Sensitive Detector (SBPSD) requires significantly fewer processing steps than the basic lateral effect position sensitive detector discussed above and eliminates the need for external readout circuitry entirely. Prototype devices were fabricated in this work, and the performance characteristics of these devices were established paving the way for ultimate integration into the target product as well as additional applications.

  9. A novel readout system for wireless passive pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huixin; Hong, Yingping; Ge, Binger; Liang, Ting; Xiong, Jijun

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a novel readout system for wireless passive pressure sensors based on the inductively coupled inductor and cavity (LC) resonant circuits. The proposed system consists of a reader antenna inductively coupled to the sensor circuit, a readout circuit, and a personal computer (PC) post processing unit. The readout circuit generates a voltage signal representing the sensor's capacitance. The frequency of the reader antenna driving signal is a constant, which is equal to the sensor's resonant frequency at zero pressure. Based on mechanical and electrical modeling, the pressure sensor design based on the high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) technology is conducted and discussed. The functionality and accuracy of the readout system are tested with a voltage-capacitance measurement system and demonstrated in a realistic pressure measurement environment, so that the overall performance and the feasibility of the readout system are proved.

  10. Prototype ATLAS IBL Modules using the FE-I4A Front-End Readout Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Alimonti, Gianluca; Allport, Phil; Altenheiner, Silke; Ancu, Lucian; Andreazza, Attilio; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arutinov, David; Backhaus, Malte; Bagolini, Alvise; Ballansat, Jacques; Barbero, Marlon; Barbier, Gérard; Bates, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Baudin, Patrick; Beau, Tristan; Beccherle, Roberto; Beck, Hans Peter; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, Jim; Bomben, Marco; Borri, Marcello; Boscardin, Maurizio; Botelho Direito, Jose Antonio; Bousson, Nicolas; Boyd, George Russell Jr; Breugnon, Patrick; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buchholz, Peter; Buttar, Craig; Cadoux, Franck; Calderini, Giovanni; Caminada, Leah; Capeans, Mar; Casse, Gianluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Chauveau, Jacques; Chu, Ming-Lee; Ciapetti, Marco; Cindro, Vladimir; Citterio, Mauro; Clark, Allan; Cobal, Marina; Coelli, Simone; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Colin, Daly; Collot, Johann; Crespo-Lopez, Olivier; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Darbo, Giovanni; DaVia, Cinzia; David, Pierre-Yves; Debieux, Stéphane; Delebecque, Pierre; Devetak, Erik; DeWilde, Burton; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Dinu, Nicoleta; Dittus, Fridolin; Diyakov, Denis; Djama, Fares; Dobos, Daniel Adam; Doonan, Kate; Dopke, Jens; Dorholt, Ole; Dube, Sourabh; Dushkin, Andrey; Dzahini, Daniel; Egorov, Kirill; Ehrmann, Oswin; Elldge, David; Elles, Sabine; Elsing, Markus; Eraud, Ludovic; Ereditato, Antonio; Eyring, Andreas; Falchieri, Davide; Falou, Aboud; Fang, Xiaochao; Fausten, Camille; Favre, Yannick; Ferrere, Didier; Fleta, Celeste; Fleury, Julien; Flick, Tobias; Forshaw, Dean; Fougeron, Denis; Fritzsch, Thomas; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gaglione, Renaud; Gallrapp, Christian; Gan, K; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gariano, Giuseppe; Gastaldi, Thibaut; Gemme, Claudia; Gensolen, Fabrice; George, Matthias; Ghislain, Patrick; Giacomini, Gabriele; Gibson, Stephen; Giordani, Mario Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Gjersdal, Håvard; Glitza, Karl Walter; Gnani, Dario; Godlewski, Jan; Gonella, Laura; Gorelov, Igor; Gorišek, Andrej; Gössling, Claus; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gray, Heather; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gromov, Vladimir; Grondin, Denis; Grosse-Knetter, Jörn; Hansen, Thor-Erik; Hansson, Per; Harb, Ali; Hartman, Neal; Hasi, Jasmine; Hegner, Franziska; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hessey, Nigel; Hetmánek, Martin; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hügging, Fabian; Husi, Coralie; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Idarraga, John; Ikegami, Yoichi; Janoška, Zdenko; Jansen, Jens; Jansen, Luc; Jensen, Frank; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Joseph, John; Kagan, Harris; Karagounis, Michael; Kass, Richard; Kenney, Christopher J; Kersten, Susanne; Kind, Peter; Klingenberg, Reiner; Kluit, Ruud; Kocian, Martin; Koffeman, Els; Kok, Angela; Korchak, Oleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Krieger, Nina; Krüger, Hans; Kruth, Andre; Kugel, Andreas; Kuykendall, William; La Rosa, Alessandro; Lai, Chung-Hang; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laporte, Didier; Lapsien, Tobias; Lounis, abdenour; Lozano, Manuel; Lu, Yunpeng; Lubatti, Henry; Macchiolo, Anna; Mallik, Usha; Mandić, Igor; Marchand, Denis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Massol, Nicolas; Matthias, Wittgen; Mättig, Peter; Mekkaoui, Abderrazak; Menouni, Mohsine; Menu, Johann; Meroni, Chiara; Mesa, Javier; Micelli, Andrea; Michal, Sébastien; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mikuž, Marko; Mitsui, Shingo; Monti, Mauro; Moore, J; Morettini, Paolo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Murray, Peyton; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, David J; Nessi, Marzio; Neumann, Manuel; Nisius, Richard; Nordberg, Markus; Nuiry, Francois-Xavier; Oppermann, Hermann; Oriunno, Marco; Padilla, Cristobal; Parker, Sherwood; Pellegrini, Giulio; Pelleriti, Gabriel; Pernegger, Heinz; Piacquadio, Nicola Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Pohl, David; Polini, Alessandro; Popule, Jiří; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Povoli, Marco; Puldon, David; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Quadt, Arnulf; Quirion, David; Ragusa, Francesco; Rambure, Thibaut; Richards, Erik; Ristic, Branislav; Røhne, Ole; Rothermund, Mario; Rovani, Alessandro; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rummler, André; Ruscino, Ettore; Salek, David; Salzburger, Andreas; Sandaker, Heidi; Schipper, Jan-David; Schneider, Basil; Schorlemmer, Andre; Schroer, Nicolai; Schwemling, Philippe; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Šícho, Petr; Skubic, Patrick; Sloboda, Michal; Smith, D; Sood, Alex; Spencer, Edwin; Strang, Michael; Stugu, Bjarne; Stupak, John; Su, Dong; Takubo, Yosuke; Tassan, Jean; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Todorov, Theodore; Tomášek, Michal; Toms, Konstantin; Travaglini, Riccardo; Trischuk, William; Troncon, Clara; Troska, Georg; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsurin, Ilya; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Unno, Yoshinobu; Vacavant, Laurent; Verlaat, Bart; Vianello, Elisa; Vigeolas, Eric; von Kleist, Stephan; Vrba, Václav; Vuillermet, Raphaël; Wang, Rui; Watts, Stephen; Weber, Michele; Weber, Marteen; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Welch, Steven David; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Wiese, Andreas; Wittig, Tobias; Yildizkaya, Tamer; Zeitnitz, Christian; Ziolkowski, Michal; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zorzi, Nicola; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration will upgrade its semiconductor pixel tracking detector with a new Insertable B-layer (IBL) between the existing pixel detector and the vacuum pipe of the Large Hadron Collider. The extreme operating conditions at this location have necessitated the development of new radiation hard pixel sensor technologies and a new front-end readout chip, called the FE-I4. Planar pixel sensors and 3D pixel sensors have been investigated to equip this new pixel layer, and prototype modules using the FE-I4A have been fabricated and characterized using 120 GeV pions at the CERN SPS and 4 GeV positrons at DESY, before and after module irradiation. Beam test results are presented, including charge collection efficiency, tracking efficiency and charge sharing.

  11. Innovative multi-cantilever array sensor system with MOEMS read-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaldi, F.; Bieniek, T.; Janus, P.; Grabiec, P.; Majstrzyk, W.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T.

    2016-11-01

    Cantilever based sensor system are a well-established sensor family exploited in several every-day life applications as well as in high-end research areas. The very high sensitivity of such systems and the possibility to design and functionalize the cantilevers to create purpose built and highly selective sensors have increased the interest of the scientific community and the industry in further exploiting this promising sensors type. Optical deflection detection systems for cantilever sensors provide a reliable, flexible method for reading information from cantilevers with the highest sensitivity. However the need of using multi-cantilever arrays in several fields of application such as medicine, biology or safety related areas, make the optical method less suitable due to its structural complexity. Working in the frame of a the Joint Undertaking project Lab4MEMS II our group proposes a novel and innovative approach to solve this issue, by integrating a Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical-System (MOEMS) with dedicated optics, electronics and software with a MOEMS micro-mirror, ultimately developed in the frame of Lab4MEMSII. In this way we are able to present a closely packed, lightweight solution combining the advantages of standard optical read-out systems with the possibility of recording multiple read-outs from large cantilever arrays quasi simultaneously.

  12. A Serializer ASIC at 5 Gbps for Detector Front-end Electronics Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Optical data links are used in detector front-end electronics readout systems of experiments in the Tevatron and the LHC. Optical links in high energy particle physics experiments usually have special requirements such as radiation tolerance, ultra high reliability and low power dissipation. These requirements are often not met by commercial components which are designed for applications in non-radiation, accessible (for maintenance) environment, and for multi-vendor systems so the parts must comply with certain standards. Future HEP experiments such as the upgrades for the sLHC call for optical links with ultra high data bandwidth, higher radiation tolerance and ultra low power dissipation. To meet these challenges and in particular those in the upgrade for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter readout that calls for an optical link system of 100 Gbps for each front-end board, we adopted a full custom front-end electronics system design based on application specific integrated circuits. Reported here are the de...

  13. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  14. Self-excited multi-scale skin vibrations probed by optical tracking micro-motions of tracers on arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Chia; Chen, Hsiang-Ying; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Tian, Yong; I, Lin

    2017-07-01

    The self-excited multi-scale mechanical vibrations, their sources and their mutual coupling of different regions on the forearms of supine subjects, are experimentally investigated, using a simple noncontact method, optical video microscopy, which provides 1 μm and 25 ms spatiotemporal resolutions. It is found that, in proximal regions far from the radial artery, the vibrations are the global vibrations of the entire forearm excited by remote sources, propagating through the trunk and the limb. The spectrum is mainly composed of peaks of very low frequency motion (down to 0.05 Hz), low frequency respiration modes, and heartbeat induced modes (about 1 Hz and its harmonics), standing out of the spectrum floor exhibiting power law decay. The nonlinear mode-mode coupling leads to the cascaded modulations of higher frequency modes by lower frequency modes. The nearly identical waveforms without detectable phase delays for a pair of signals along or transverse to the meridian of regions far away from the artery rule out the detectable contribution from the propagation of Qi, some kind of collective excitation which more efficiently propagates along meridians, according to the Chinese medicine theory. Around the radial artery, in addition to the global vibration, the local vibration spectrum shows very slow breathing type vibration around 0.05 Hz, and the artery pulsation induced fundamental and higher harmonics with descending intensities up to the fifth harmonics, standing out of a flat spectrum floor. All the artery pulsation modes are also modulated by respiration and the very slow vibration.

  15. High Dynamics and Precision Optical Measurement Using a Position Sensitive Detector (PSD in Reflection-Mode: Application to 2D Object Tracking over a Smart Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Alexandru Ivan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When related to a single and good contrast object or a laser spot, position sensing, or sensitive, detectors (PSDs have a series of advantages over the classical camera sensors, including a good positioning accuracy for a fast response time and very simple signal conditioning circuits. To test the performance of this kind of sensor for microrobotics, we have made a comparative analysis between a precise but slow video camera and a custom-made fast PSD system applied to the tracking of a diffuse-reflectivity object transported by a pneumatic microconveyor called Smart-Surface. Until now, the fast system dynamics prevented the full control of the smart surface by visual servoing, unless using a very expensive high frame rate camera. We have built and tested a custom and low cost PSD-based embedded circuit, optically connected with a camera to a single objective by means of a beam splitter. A stroboscopic light source enhanced the resolution. The obtained results showed a good linearity and a fast (over 500 frames per second response time which will enable future closed-loop control by using PSD.

  16. High dynamics and precision optical measurement using a position sensitive detector (PSD) in reflection-mode: application to 2D object tracking over a Smart Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, Ioan Alexandru; Ardeleanu, Mihai; Laurent, Guillaume J

    2012-12-06

    When related to a single and good contrast object or a laser spot, position sensing, or sensitive, detectors (PSDs) have a series of advantages over the classical camera sensors, including a good positioning accuracy for a fast response time and very simple signal conditioning circuits. To test the performance of this kind of sensor for microrobotics, we have made a comparative analysis between a precise but slow video camera and a custom-made fast PSD system applied to the tracking of a diffuse-reflectivity object transported by a pneumatic microconveyor called Smart-Surface. Until now, the fast system dynamics prevented the full control of the smart surface by visual servoing, unless using a very expensive high frame rate camera. We have built and tested a custom and low cost PSD-based embedded circuit, optically connected with a camera to a single objective by means of a beam splitter. A stroboscopic light source enhanced the resolution. The obtained results showed a good linearity and a fast (over 500 frames per second) response time which will enable future closed-loop control by using PSD.

  17. Trigger and readout electronics for the Phase-I upgrade of the ATLAS forward muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Moschovakos, Paris; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The upgrades of the LHC accelerator and the experiments in 2019/20 and 2023/24 will increase the instantaneous and integrated luminosity, but also will drastically increase the data and trigger rates. To cope with the huge data flow while maintaining high muon detection efficiency and reducing fake muons found at Level-1, the present ATLAS small wheel muon detector will be replaced with a New Small Wheel (NSW) detector for high luminosity LHC runs. The NSW will feature two new detector technologies: resistive micromegas and small strip Thin Gap Chambers conforming a system of ~2.4 million readout channels. Both detector technologies will provide trigger and tracking primitives. A common readout path and a separate trigger path are developed for each detector technology. The electronics design of such a system will be implemented in about 8000 front-end boards, including the design of a number of custom radiation tolerant Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), capable of driving trigger and tracking...

  18. Towards third generation pixel readout chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sciveres, M., E-mail: mgarcia-sciveres@lbl.gov; Mekkaoui, A.; Ganani, D.

    2013-12-11

    We present concepts and prototyping results towards a third generation pixel readout chip. We consider the 130 nm feature size FE-I4 chip, in production for the ATLAS IBL upgrade, to be a second generation chip. A third generation chip would have to go significantly further. A possible direction is to make the IC design generic so that different experiments can configure it to meet significantly different requirements, without the need for everybody to develop their own ASIC from the ground up. In terms of target technology, a demonstrator 500-pixel matrix containing analog front ends only (no complex functionality), was designed and fabricated in 65 nm CMOS and irradiated with protons in December 2011 and May 2012.

  19. Fast readout of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, Harold; Singh, Vibhor; Schneider, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van der Zant, Herre; Steele, Gary

    2013-03-01

    We perform fast readout measurements of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Using an electronic mixing scheme, we can detect the amplitude of the mechanical motion with an intermediate frequency (IF) of 46 MHz and a timeconstant of 1 us, up to 5 orders of magnitude faster than before. Previous measurements suffered from a low bandwidth due to the combination of the high resistance of the carbon nanotube and a large stray capacitance. We have increased the bandwidth significantly by using a high-impedance, close-proximity HEMT amplifier. The increased bandwidth should allow us to observe the nanotube's thermal motion and its transient response, approaching the regime of real-time detection of the carbon nanotube's mechanical motion.

  20. A Readout ASIC for CZT Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, L

    2008-01-01

    Spectrometers that can identify the energy of gamma radiation and determine the source isotope have until recently used low temperature semiconductors. These require cooling which makes their portability difficult. The material Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is now available which operates at room temperature and can be used to measure the energy of gamma radiation. In a compton camera configuration the direction of the radiation can also be determined. A read-out ASIC has been developed for such a system and features 100 channels of electronics, each with a charge amplifier, CR-RC shaper, and peak-hold. A 12 bit ADC converts the data which is sparsified before being read out. The energy, signal rise time, and timestamp of any hit channel is read out together with the data from all of its neighbours. The ASIC has a selectable lower dynamic range which could be used for lower energy interactions.

  1. Simulation study of silicon and gaseous tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Beaumont, W; De Lentdecker, G; Devroede, O; Doninck, W V; Dyck, C V; Udo, Fred; Van Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Verbeure, F; Zhukov, V

    2002-01-01

    The performance of microstrip gaseous counters (MSGC, MSGC + GEM) and silicon microstrip sensors has been studied in view of their use in high luminosity tracking applications. Simulations of signal development in the detectors and subsequent signal treatment in the readout electronics were performed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained in test beams.

  2. Thermal design and tests for the CMS HCAL readout box

    CERN Document Server

    Baumbaugh, B; Booke, M; Karmgard, D; Los, S; Lu, Q; Marchant, J; Reidy, J; Ronzhin, A; Ruchti, R C; Wiand, D

    2000-01-01

    A method is necessary to cool the electronics contained in the readout boxes for the CMS HCAL. The electronics to pre-amplify and digitize signals from the optical detectors will generate a large amount of heat that must be removed from the CMS HCAL system. To accomplish this a thermal management system has been designed that uses metallic extrusions, liquid coolant, and thermal foam to transfer the heat from the electronics to the exterior cooling system. Because the electronics are difficult to access throughout the life of the experiment, the temperature must be kept low to extend life expectancy. In order to test the concepts before the final design is implemented a thermal test station was built. Several methods to are under study to determine the best method of making the thermal routing from source of the heat to the liquid for heat removal. The test bed for this evaluation and methods to monitor the electronics temperature in situ will be discussed. 3 Refs.

  3. Proposed STAR Time of Flight Readout Electronics and DAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schambach, Joachim

    2006-04-01

    A novel Time-of-Flight (TOF) subsystem is under design for the STAR detector at RHIC. A total of 3840 Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) of 6 pads each are distributed over 120 trays. The total number of channels is 23040. Each TOF tray consists of 192 detector channels and three different types of electronic circuit cards, called "TINO", "TDIG", and "TCPU", listed in order of the data flow. Every 30 trays send their data to a "THUB" card that interfaces to the STAR trigger and transmits the data over a fiber to a fiber receiver which is part of STAR DAQ. The TINO contains the analog front end electronics based on a custom IC called NINO. The output of TINO is passed to the TDIG, where the data are digitized (using the CERN HPTDC ASIC). The TCPU formats and buffers the digital detector information. This formatted data is passed to THUB, which transmits it over an optical fiber to a data receiver in the STAR DAQ room. The architecture of this readout chain and DAQ will be described, and first results from prototypes of the component boards will be discussed.

  4. Test runs of a Belle II PXD prototype readout system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getzkow, Dennis; Kuehn, Wolfgang; Lange, Soeren; Lautenbach, Klemens [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut (Germany); Gessler, Thomas [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Belle II PXD readout system (called ONSEN for Online Selection Nodes) uses ATCA (Advanced Telecommunications Architecture) boards with Xilinx Virtex-5 FX70T FPGAs and high speed optical links (6.5 Gbit/s each). The full system consists of 9 carrier boards and 33 daughter cards. The ONSEN system has several interfaces: (a) it receives PXD data from the DHH (Data Handling Hybrid) system, (b) it receives ROI (Regions-of-Interest) data for online data reduction from the HLT (High Level Trigger) system by GbE, and (c) it features data ports to two event builders: EVB1 combines data from all detectors except PXD (in order to generate the ROIs) and EVB2 combines the reduced PXD data with all other data. One of the critical issues is the matching of trigger numbers in the data (received by DHH from the timing distribution system) and trigger numbers in the ROIs (received by the HLT). In order to test the interfaces, in particular for a high HLT rate up to 30 kHz, a prototype system with 3 daughter cards was installed at KEK and tested with DHH, HLT and EVB2. Test results are presented.

  5. Probing the defect nanostructure of helium and proton tracks in LiF:Mg,Ti using optical absorption: Implications to track structure theory calculations of heavy charged particle relative efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliyahu, I., E-mail: ilan.eliyahu@gmail.com [Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva 84105 (Israel); Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Horowitz, Y.S. [Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva 84105 (Israel); Oster, L. [Sami Shamoon College of Engineering, Beersheva 84100 (Israel); Weissman, L.; Kreisel, A. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Girshevitz, O. [Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 5290002, Israel. (Israel); Marino, S. [Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, Irvington, New York (United States); Druzhyna, S. [Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva 84105 (Israel); Biderman, S. [Nuclear Research Center Negev, Beersheva (Israel); Mardor, I. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel)

    2015-04-15

    A major objective of track structure theory (TST) is the calculation of heavy charged particle (HCP) induced effects. Previous calculations have been based exclusively on the radiation action/dose response of the released secondary electrons during the HCP slowing down. The validity of this presumption is investigated herein using optical absorption (OA) measurements on LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) samples following irradiation with 1.4 MeV protons and 4 MeV He ions at levels of fluence from 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} to 2 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2}. The major bands in the OA spectrum are the 5.08 eV (F band), 4.77 eV, 5.45 eV and the 4.0 eV band (associated with the trapping structure leading to composite peak 5 in the thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve). The maximum intensity of composite peak 5 occurs at a temperature of ∼200 °C in the glow curve and is the glow peak used for most dosimetric applications. The TST calculations use experimentally measured OA dose response following low ionization density (LID) {sup 60}Co photon irradiation over the dose-range 10–10{sup 5} Gy for the simulation of the radiation action of the HCP induced secondary electron spectrum. Following proton and He irradiation the saturation levels of concentration for the F band and the 4.77 eV band are approximately one order of magnitude greater than following LID irradiation indicating enhanced HCP creation of the relevant defects. Relative HCP OA efficiencies, η{sub HCP}, are calculated by TST and are compared with experimentally measured values, η{sub m}, at levels of fluence from 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} to 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} where the response is linear due to negligible track overlap. For the F band, values of η{sub m}/η{sub HCP} = 2.0 and 2.6 for the He ions and protons respectively arise from the neglect of enhanced Fluorine vacancy/F center creation by the HCPs in the TST calculations. It is demonstrated that kinetic analysis simulating LID F band dose response with enhanced

  6. Upgrade Analog Readout and Digitizing System for ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Akerstedt, H; Biot, A; Bohm, C; Carrio, F; Drake, G; Hildebrand, K; Muschter, S; Oreglia, M; Paramonov, A

    2013-01-01

    A potential upgrade for the front-end electronics and signal digitization and data acquisition system of the ATLAS hadron calorimeter for the high luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) is described. A Demonstrator is being built to readout a slice of the TileCal detector. The on-detector electronics includes up to 48 Analog Front-end Boards for PMT analog signal processing, 4 Main Boards for data digitization and slow controls, 4 Daughter Boards with high speed optical links to interface the on-detector and off-detector electronics. Two super readout driver boards are used for off-detector data acquisition and fulfilling digital trigger. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter on-detector electronics is housed in the drawers at the back of each of the 256 detector wedges. Each drawer services up to 48 photomultiplier tubes. The new readout system is designed to replace the present system as it will reach component lifetime and radiation tolerance limits making it incompatible with continued use into the HL-LHC era. Wi...

  7. RT2016 Phase-I Trigger Readout Electronics Upgrade for the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)478829; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    For the Phase-I luminosity upgrade of the LHC, a higher granularity trigger readout of the ATLAS LAr Calorimeters is foreseen in order to enhance the trigger feature extraction and background rejection. The new readout system digitizes the detector signals, which are grouped into 34000 so-called Super Cells, with 12-bit precision at 40 MHz. The data is transferred via optical links to a digital processing system which extracts the Super Cell energies. A demonstrator version of the complete system has now been installed and operated on the ATLAS detector. The talk will give an overview of the Phase-I Upgrade of the ATLAS LAr Calorimeter readout and present the custom developed hardware including their role in real-time data processing and fast data transfer. This contribution will also report on the performance of the newly developed ASICs including their radiation tolerance and on the performance of the prototype boards in the demonstrator system based on various measurements with the 13 TeV collision data. R...

  8. Readout for intersatellite laser interferometry: Measuring low frequency phase fluctuations of HF signals with microradian precision

    CERN Document Server

    Gerberding, Oliver; Kullmann, Joachim; Tröbs, Michael; Bykov, Ioury; Barke, Simon; Brause, Nils Christopher; Delgado, Juan José Esteban; Schwarze, Thomas S; Reiche, Jens; Danzmann, Karsten; Rasmussen, Torben; Hansen, Torben Vendt; Engaard, Anders; Pedersen, Søren Møller; Jennrich, Oliver; Suess, Martin; Sodnik, Zoran; Heinzel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Precision phase readout of optical beat note signals is one of the core techniques required for intersatellite laser interferometry. Future space based gravitational wave detectors like eLISA require such a readout over a wide range of MHz frequencies, due to orbit induced Doppler shifts, with a precision in the order of $\\mu \\textrm{rad}/\\sqrt{\\textrm{Hz}}$ at frequencies between $0.1\\,\\textrm{mHz}$ and $1\\,\\textrm{Hz}$. In this paper, we present phase readout systems, so-called phasemeters, that are able to achieve such precisions and we discuss various means that have been employed to reduce noise in the analogue circuit domain and during digitisation. We also discuss the influence of some non-linear noise sources in the analogue domain of such phasemeters. And finally, we present the performance that was achieved during testing of the elegant breadboard model of the LISA phasemeter, that was developed in the scope of an ESA technology development activity.

  9. Development of new readout electronics for the ATLAS LAr calorimeter at the sLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Strässner, A

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter consists of 182,486 detector cells whose signals need to be read out, digitized and processed, in order to provide signal timing and the energy deposited in each detector element. The current readout electronics is not designed to sustain the ten times higher radiation levels expected at sLHC in the years beyond 2017, and will be replaced by new electronics with a completely different readout scheme. The future on-detector electronics is planned to send out all data continuously at each bunch crossing, as opposed to the current system which only transfers data at a trigger-accept signal. Multiple high-speed and radiation-resistant optical links will transmit 100 Gbps per front-end board, each covering 128 readout channels. The off-detector processing units will not only process the data in real-time and provide digital data buffering, but will also implement trigger algorithms. An overview about the various components necessary to develop such a complex system will be ...

  10. GPU-based quasi-real-time Track Recognition in Imaging Devices: from raw Data to Particle Tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Bozza, Cristiano; De Sio, Chiara; Stellacci, Simona Maria

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear emulsions as tracking devices have been used by recent experiments thanks to fast automatic microscopes for emulsion readout. Automatic systems are evolving towards GPU-based solutions. Real-time imaging is needed to drive the motion of the microscope axes and 3D track recognition occurs quasi-online in local GPU clusters. The algorithms implemented in the Quick Scanning System are sketched. Most of them are very general and might turn out useful for other detector

  11. Tracking and understanding the acoustic signature of fluido-fractures: a dual optical/micro-seismic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Kvalheim Eriksen, Fredrik; Zecevic, Megan; Daniel, Guillaume; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik

    2015-04-01

    The characterization and comprehension of irreversible rock deformation processes due to fluid flow is a challenging problem with numerous applications in many fields. This phenomenon has received an ever-increasing attention in Earth Science, Physics, with many applications in natural hazard understanding, mitigation or forecast (e.g. earthquakes, control the mechanical stability of rock and soil formations during the injection or extraction of fluids, landslides with hydrological control, volcanic eruptions), or in the industry, as CO2 sequestration. In this study, analogue models are developed (similar to the previous work of Johnsen[1] but in rectangular shape) to study the instabilities developing during motion of fluid in dense porous materials: fracturing, fingering, channelling… We study these complex fluid/solid mechanical systems using two imaging techniques: fast optical imaging and high frequency resolution of acoustic emissions. Additionally, we develop physical models rendering for the fluid mechanics (similar to the work of Niebling[2] but with injection of fluid) in the channels and the propagation of microseismic waves around the fracture. We then confront a numerical resolution of this physical system with the observed experimental system. The experimental setup consists in a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell with three closed boundaries and one semi-permeable boundary which enables the flow of the fluid but not the solid particles. During the experiments, the fluid is injected into the system with a constant injection pressure from the point opposite to the semi-permeable boundary. The fluid penetrates into the solid using the pore network. At the large enough injection pressures, the fluid also makes its way via creating channels, fractures to the semi-permeable boundary. During the experiments acoustic signals are recorded using different sensors then, those signals are compared and investigated further in both time and frequency domains

  12. Spectral Imaging Visualization and Tracking System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA Earth Observation Mission need for innovative optical tracking systems, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Spectral...

  13. Merlin: a fast versatile readout system for Medipix3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plackett, R.; Horswell, I.; Gimenez, E. N.; Marchal, J.; Omar, D.; Tartoni, N.

    2013-01-01

    This contribution reports on the development of a new high rate readout system for the Medipix3 hybrid pixel ASIC developed by the Detector Group at Diamond Light Source. It details the current functionality of the system and initial results from tests on Diamond's B16 beamline. The Merlin system is based on a National Instruments PXI/FlexRIO system running a Xilinx Virtex5 FPGA. It is capable of recording Medipix3 256 by 256 by 12 bit data frames at over 1 kHz in bursts of 1200 frames and running at over 100 Hz continuously to disk or over a TCP/IP link. It is compatible with the standard Medipix3 single chipboards developed at CERN and is capable of driving them over cable lengths of up to 10 m depending on the data rate required. In addition to a standalone graphical interface, a system of remote TCP/IP control and data transfer has been developed to allow easy integration with third party control systems and scripting languages. Two Merlin systems are being deployed on the B16 and I16 beamlines at Diamond and the system has been integrated with the EPICS/GDA control systems used. Results from trigger synchronisation, fast burst and high rate tests made on B16 in March are reported and demonstrate an encouraging reliability and timing accuracy. In addition to normal high resolution imaging applications of Medipix3, the results indicate the system could profitably be used in `pump and probe' style experiments, where a very accurate, high frame rate is especially beneficial. In addition to these two systems, Merlin is being used by the Detector Group to test the Excalibur 16 chip hybrid modules, and by the LHCb VELO Pixel Upgrade group in their forthcoming testbeams. Additionally the contribution looks forward to further developments and improvements in the system, including full rate quad chip readout capability, multi-FPGA support, long distance optical communication and further functionality enhancements built on the capabilities of the Medipix3 chips.

  14. Fringe tracking performance monitoring: FINITO at VLTI

    CERN Document Server

    Merand, A; Berger, J -P; Percheron, I; Poupar, S

    2012-01-01

    Since April 2011, realtime fringe tracking data are recorded simultaneously with data from the VLTI/AMBER interferometric beam combiner. Not only this offers possibilities to post-process AMBER reduced data to obtain more accurate interferometric quantities, it also allows to estimate the performance of the fringe tracking a function of the conditions of seeing, coherence time, flux, etc. First we propose to define fringe tracking performance metrics in the AMBER context, in particular as a function of AMBER's integration time. The main idea is to determine the optimal exposure time for AMBER: short exposures are dominated by readout noise and fringes in long exposures are completely smeared out. Then we present this performance metrics correlated with Paranal local ASM (Ambient Site Monitor) measurements, such as seeing, coherence time or wind speed for example. Finally, we also present some preliminary results of attempts to model and predict fringe tracking performances, using Artificial Neural Networks.

  15. 100 Gbps PCI-Express Readout for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Durante, Paolo; Schwemmer, Rainer; Marconi, Umberto; Balbi, Gabriele; Lax, Ignazio

    2015-01-01

    We present a new data acquisition system under development for the next upgrade of the LHCb experiment at CERN. We focus in particular on the design of a new common readout board, the PCIe40, and on the viability of PCI-Express as an interconnect technology for high speed readout. We describe a new high-performance DMA controller for data acquisition, implemented on an FPGA, coupled with a custom software module for the Linux kernel. Lastly, we describe how these components can be leveraged to achieve a throughput of 100 Gbit/s per readout board.

  16. FFTS readout for large arrays of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, S J C; Baselmans, J J A; Klein, B; Güsten, R

    2009-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) have great potential for large very sensitive detector arrays for use in, for example, sub-mm imaging. Being intrinsically readout in the frequency domain, they are particularly suited for frequency domain multiplexing allowing $\\sim$1000s of devices to be readout with one pair of coaxial cables. However, this moves the complexity of the detector from the cryogenics to the warm electronics. We present here the concept and experimental demonstration of the use of Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FFTS) readout, showing no deterioration of the noise performance compared to low noise analog mixing while allowing high multiplexing ratios.

  17. The FE-I4 pixel readout integrated circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sciveres, M., E-mail: mgarcia-sciveres@bl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Arutinov, D.; Barbero, M. [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Beccherle, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Dube, S.; Elledge, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fleury, J. [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Fougeron, D.; Gensolen, F. [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Marseille (France); Gnani, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gromov, V. [Nationaal Instituut voor Subatomaire Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hemperek, T.; Karagounis, M. [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Kluit, R. [Nationaal Instituut voor Subatomaire Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kruth, A. [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Mekkaoui, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Menouni, M. [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Marseille (France); Schipper, J.-D. [Nationaal Instituut voor Subatomaire Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-04-21

    A new pixel readout integrated circuit denominated FE-I4 is being designed to meet the requirements of ATLAS experiment upgrades. It will be the largest readout IC produced to date for particle physics applications, filling the maximum allowed reticle area. This will significantly reduce the cost of future hybrid pixel detectors. In addition, FE-I4 will have smaller pixels and higher rate capability than the present generation of LHC pixel detectors. Design features are described along with simulation and test results, including low power and high rate readout architecture, mixed signal design strategy, and yield hardening.

  18. A Multi-APD readout for EL detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lux, T; Illa, J; Jover, G; Martin, C; Rico, J; Sanchez, F

    2011-01-01

    Detectors with an electroluminesence readout show an excellence performance in respect of energy resolution making them interesting for various applications as X-ray detection, double beta and dark matter experiments, Compton and gamma cameras, etc. In the following the study of a readout based on avalanche photo diodes to detect directly the VUV photons is presented. Results of measurements with 5 APDs in xenon at pressures between 1 and 1.65 bar are shown indicating that such a readout can provide excellent energy and a moderate position resolution.

  19. Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS Drift Tubes Read-Out system

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro Tobar, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    In order to cope with up to a factor 2 nominal LHC luminosity, the second level of the readout system of the CMS Drift Tubes (DT) electronics needs to be redesigned to minimize event processing time and remove present bottlenecks. The uROS boards are uTCA modules, which include a Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA and equip up to 6 12-channel optical receivers of the 240 Mbps input links. Each board collects the information from up to 72 input links (3 DT sectors), requiring a total of 25 boards. The design of the system and the first validation tests will be described.ation tests will be described.

  20. A simple readout electronics for automatic power controlled self-mixing laser diode systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattini, Stefano; Rovati, Luigi

    2008-08-01

    The paper describes a simple electronic circuit to drive a laser diode for self-mixing interferometry. The network integrates a stable commercial automatic power controller and a current mirror based readout of the interferometric signal. The first prototype version of the circuit has been realized and characterized. The system allows easily performing precise interferometric measurements with no thermostatic circuitry to stabilize the laser diode temperature and an automatic control gain network to compensate emitted optical power fluctuations. To achieve this result, in the paper a specific calibration procedure to be performed is described.