WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical follow-up experiments

  1. GRBs optical follow-up observation at Lunin observatory, Taiwan

    Huang, K.Y.; Ip, W.H. [Chung-Li Univ., Taiwan (China). Institute of astronomy; Urata, Y. [RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Physics; Tamagawa, T.; Onda, K. [RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Makishima, K. [RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Department of Physics

    2005-07-15

    The Lulin GRB program, using the Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT) in Taiwan started in July 2003. Its scientific aims are to discover optical counterparts of XRFs and short and long GRBs, then to quickly observe them in multiple bands. Thirteen follow-up observations were provided by LOT between July 2003 and Feb. 2005. One host galaxy was found at GRB 031203. Two optical afterglows were detected for GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. In addition, the optical observations of GRB 031203 and a discussion of the non-detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 031203 are also reported in this article.

  2. GRBs optical follow-up observation at Lunin observatory, Taiwan

    Huang, K.Y.; Ip, W.H.; Makishima, K.; Tokyo Univ., Tokyo

    2005-01-01

    The Lulin GRB program, using the Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT) in Taiwan started in July 2003. Its scientific aims are to discover optical counterparts of XRFs and short and long GRBs, then to quickly observe them in multiple bands. Thirteen follow-up observations were provided by LOT between July 2003 and Feb. 2005. One host galaxy was found at GRB 031203. Two optical afterglows were detected for GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. In addition, the optical observations of GRB 031203 and a discussion of the non-detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 031203 are also reported in this article

  3. Women's experiences of a follow up childbearing journey with ...

    The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse the lived experiences of the follow up journey of a pregnant woman by listening to the voices of women as they reflect on their journey. A qualitative, descriptive and contextual design was used to examine into each woman's experience of her world from pregnancy to ...

  4. Optical follow-up of gravitational wave triggers with DECam

    Herner, K.; Annis, J.; Berger, E.; Brout, D.; Butler, R.; Chen, H.; Cowperthwaite, P.; Diehl, H.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Farr, B.; Finley, D.; Frieman, J.; Holz, D.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Marriner, J.; Nielsen, E.; Palmese, A.; Sako, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Yanny, B.

    2017-10-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) events have several possible progenitors, including black hole mergers, cosmic string cusps, supernovae, neutron star mergers, and black hole{neutron star mergers. A subset of GW events are expected to produce electromagnetic (EM) emission that, once detected, will provide complementary information about their astrophysical context. To that end, the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration has partnered with other teams to send GW candidate alerts so that searches for their EM counterparts can be pursued. One such partner is the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and Dark Energy Camera (DECam) Gravitational Waves Program (DES- GW). Situated on the 4m Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, DECam is an ideal instrument for optical followup observations of GW triggers in the southern sky. The DES-GW program performs subtraction of new search images with respect to preexisting overlapping images to select candidate sources. Due to the short decay timescale of the expected EM counterparts and the need to quickly eliminate survey areas with no counterpart candidates, it is critical to complete the initial analysis of each night's images within 24 hours. The computational challenges in achieving this goal include maintaining robust I/O pipelines during the processing, being able to quickly acquire template images of new sky regions outside of the typical DES observing regions, and being able to rapidly provision additional batch computing resources with little advance notice. We will discuss the search area determination, imaging pipeline, general data transfer strategy, and methods to quickly increase the available amount of batch computing. We will present results from the rst season of observations from September 2015 to January 2016 and conclude by presenting improvements planned for the second observing season.

  5. Optical and X-Ray Early Follow-Up of ANTARES Neutrino Alerts

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ageron, M.; Albert, A.; Samarai, I. Al; Andre, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays with matter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrinosource has yet been discovered. Transient sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, or active galactic nuclei are promising candidates. Multi-messenger programs offer a unique opportunity to detect these transient sources. By combining the information provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope with information coming from other observatories, the probability of detecting a source is enhanced, allowing the possibility of identifyinga neutrino progenitor from a single detected event. A method based on optical and X-ray follow-ups of high-energy neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This method does not require any assumptions on the relation between neutrino and photon spectra other than time-correlation. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROTand ROTSE) and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection, and is therefore well-suited to search for fast transient sources. To identify an optical or Xraycounterpart to a neutrino signal, the images provided by the follow-up observations areanalysed with dedicated pipelines. A total of 42 alerts with optical and 7 alerts with X-ray images taken with a maximum delay of 24 hours after the neutrino trigger have been analyzed. No optical or X-ray counterparts associated to the neutrino triggers have been found, and upper limits on transient source magnitudes have been derived. The probability to reject the gamma-ray burst origin hypothesis has been computed for each alert.

  6. Optical and X-ray early follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ardid, M.; Ageron, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Aubert, J.-J.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays with matter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrino source has yet been discovered. Transient sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, or active galactic nuclei are promising candidates. Multi-messenger programs offer a unique opportunity to detect these transient sources. By combining the information provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope with information coming from other observatories, the probability of detecting a source is enhanced, allowing the possibility of identifying a neutrino progenitor from a single detected event. A method based on optical and X-ray follow-ups of high-energy neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This method does not require any assumptions on the relation between neutrino and photon spectra other than time-correlation. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT and ROTSE) and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection, and is therefore well-suited to search for fast transient sources. To identify an optical or X-ray counterpart to a neutrino signal, the images provided by the follow-up observations are analysed with dedicated pipelines. A total of 42 alerts with optical and 7 alerts with X-ray images taken with a maximum delay of 24 hours after the neutrino trigger have been analysed. No optical or X-ray counterparts associated to the neutrino triggers have been found, and upper limits on transient source magnitudes have been derived. The probability to reject the gamma-ray burst origin hypothesis has been computed for each alert

  7. Optical and X-ray early follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Albert, A.; Samarai, I. Al; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fermani, P.; Folger, F.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herrero, A.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaš, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tönnis, C.; Turpin, D.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Klotz, A.; Boer, M.; Le Van Suu, A.; Akerlof, C.; Zheng, W.; Evans, P.; Gehrels, N.; Kennea, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Coward, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays with matter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrino source has yet been discovered. Transient sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, or active galactic nuclei are promising candidates. Multi-messenger programs offer a unique opportunity to detect these transient sources. By combining the information provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope with information coming from other observatories, the probability of detecting a source is enhanced, allowing the possibility of identifying a neutrino progenitor from a single detected event. A method based on optical and X-ray follow-ups of high-energy neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This method does not require any assumptions on the relation between neutrino and photon spectra other than time-correlation. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT and ROTSE) and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection, and is therefore well-suited to search for fast transient sources. To identify an optical or X-ray counterpart to a neutrino signal, the images provided by the follow-up observations are analysed with dedicated pipelines. A total of 42 alerts with optical and 7 alerts with X-ray images taken with a maximum delay of 24 hours after the neutrino trigger have been analysed. No optical or X-ray counterparts associated to the neutrino triggers have been found, and upper limits on transient source magnitudes have been derived. The probability to reject the gamma-ray burst origin hypothesis has been computed for each alert.

  8. DESGW: Optical Follow-up of BBH LIGO-Virgo Events with DECam

    Butler, Robert E. [Indiana U.; Soares-Santos, M. [Brandeis U.; Annis, j. [Fermilab; Herner, K. [Fermilab

    2017-12-14

    The DESGW program is a collaboration between members of the Dark Energy Survey, the wider astronomical community, and the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration to search for optical counterparts of gravitational wave events, such as those expected from binary neutron star mergers or neutron star-black hole mergers. While binary black hole (BBH) events are not expected to produce an electromagnetic (EM) signature, emission is certainly not impossible. The DESGW program has performed follow-up observations of four BBH events detected by LIGO in order to search for any possible EM counterpart. Failure to nd such counterparts is still relevant in that it produces limits on optical emission from such events. This is a review of follow-up results from O1 BBH events and a discussion of the status of ongoing uniform re-analysis of all BBH events that DESGW has followed up to date.

  9. Optic nerve sheath meningioma treated with radiation conformal therapy. Clinical case report with long follow up

    Zomosa R, Gustavo; Cruz T, Sebastian; Miranda G, Gonzalo; Harbst S, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) are rare tumors of the anterior visual pathway. Without treatment, tumor growth leads to progressive loss of visual acuity and blindness due to optic nerve compression. Case report: Patient, female, 42 years without other morbility , begins in 1992 with decreased visual acuity of the left eye, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed enlargement of the left optic nerve sheath, suggestive of ONSM. On that occasion, orbit exploration failed, so it was decided to follow up with annual clinical and imaging controls. About ten years later, begins with progressive deterioration of visual acuity and visual field , with ptosis and ocular motor palsy of the left eye, confirmed with neuro-ophthalmological examinations. MRI shows tumor progression. A new surgical approach was discarded by the risk of visual worsening. A conformal radiotherapy was performed with a fractionated 54 Gy dose. Today, at age 65, after 24 years of follow up,13 post radiation therapy. clinical and radiological stability of ONSM is confirmed. Discussion: Conformal radiotherapy has been shown as an effective therapy, with fewer complications and better outcomes in the preservation of visual function in the long term follow up Radio-fluoro guided surgery in high grade gliomas

  10. Optic Neuritis in the Older Chinese Population: A 5-Year Follow-Up Study

    Junqing Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aims to describe the clinical manifestations and outcomes in a cohort of older Chinese patients. Method. A retrospective study of patients aged ≥ 45 years who had a first episode of optic neuritis (ON between May 2008 and November 2012. Clinical features at onset and last follow-up were analyzed within subgroups (age 45–65 years and age ≥ 65 years. Results. 76 patients (99 eyes were included, of which 58% were females. The mean age at presentation was 55.53 ± 8.29 years (range: 45–83 years. Vision loss was severe at presentation, with initial best corrected vision activity (BCVA < 20/200 in 93% and final BCVA < 20/200 in 53% of patients at 5-year follow-up. Final BCVA significantly correlated with the initial BCVA and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer. At last follow-up, 14.5% were diagnosed with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD, 1.3% were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS, 5.2% with chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy, 1.3% with infectious ON, and 19.7% with autoimmune ON. None of the elderly group (≥65 years developed NMOSD or MS. Conclusion. Chinese patients in the age group ≥ 65 years with ON are less likely to develop NMOSD or MS. Notwithstanding, they had more severe visual loss at onset and poor recovery.

  11. Retinal and Optic Nerve Degeneration in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Followed up for 5 Years.

    Garcia-Martin, Elena; Ara, Jose R; Martin, Jesus; Almarcegui, Carmen; Dolz, Isabel; Vilades, Elisa; Gil-Arribas, Laura; Fernandez, Francisco J; Polo, Vicente; Larrosa, Jose M; Pablo, Luis E; Satue, Maria

    2017-05-01

    To quantify retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) changes in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls with a 5-year follow-up and to analyze correlations between disability progression and RNFL degeneration. Observational and longitudinal study. One hundred patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 50 healthy controls. All participants underwent a complete ophthalmic and electrophysiologic exploration and were re-evaluated annually for 5 years. Visual acuity (Snellen chart), color vision (Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates), visual field examination, optical coherence tomography (OCT), scanning laser polarimetry (SLP), and visual evoked potentials. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores, disease duration, treatments, prior optic neuritis episodes, and quality of life (QOL; based on the 54-item Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Scale score). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed changes in all RNFL thicknesses in both groups. In the MS group, changes were detected in average thickness and in the mean deviation using the GDx-VCC nerve fiber analyzer (Laser Diagnostic Technologies, San Diego, CA) and in the P100 latency of visual evoked potentials; no changes were detected in visual acuity, color vision, or visual fields. Optical coherence tomography showed greater differences in the inferior and temporal RNFL thicknesses in both groups. In MS patients only, OCT revealed a moderate correlation between the increase in EDSS and temporal and superior RNFL thinning. Temporal RNFL thinning based on OCT results was correlated moderately with decreased QOL. Multiple sclerosis patients exhibit a progressive axonal loss in the optic nerve fiber layer. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning based on OCT results is a useful marker for assessing MS progression and correlates with increased disability and reduced QOL. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Environmental agreements, EIA follow-up and aboriginal participation in environmental management: The Canadian experience

    O'Faircheallaigh, Ciaran

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade a number of environmental agreements (EAs) have been negotiated in Canada involving industry, government and Aboriginal peoples. This article draws on the Canadian experience to consider the potential of such negotiated agreements to address two issues widely recognised in academic and policy debates on environmental impact assessment (EIA) and environmental management. The first relates to the need to secure indigenous participation in environmental management of major projects that affect indigenous peoples. The second and broader issue involves the necessity for specific initiatives to ensure effective follow-up of EIA. The Canadian experience indicates that negotiated environmental agreements have considerable potential to address both issues. However, if this potential is to be realized, greater effort must be made to develop structures and processes specifically designed to encourage Aboriginal participation; and EAs must themselves provide the financial and other resource required to support EIA follow-up and Aboriginal participation

  13. U.S. Navy Womens Experience with Cervical Cancer Screening and Follow-up Care

    2015-07-15

    cancer screening (CCS) results; 2)"Freaked" --- the emotional toll of receiving an abnormal CCS; 3) "I didn’t understand"--- self-discovery to make sense...have a greater risk for acquiring cervical cancer. 14- 18 These risks include: higher rates of smoking, hormonal contraceptive use, unprotected sexual...Women described CCS notification experiences, self-discovery process, emotional impact, colposcopic process anticipation, importance of follow-up care

  14. Optical Follow-up of Gravitational-wave Events with Las Cumbres Observatory

    Arcavi, Iair; McCully, Curtis; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Howell, D. Andrew; Vasylyev, Sergiy [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Poznanski, Dovi; Zaltzman, Michael; Maoz, Dan [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Singer, Leo [Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Valenti, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-5270 (United States); Kasen, Daniel [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8169 (United States); Barnes, Jennifer [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10027 (United States); Piran, Tsvi [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Fong, Wen-fai, E-mail: arcavi@ucsb.edu [CIERA and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2017-10-20

    We present an implementation of the Gehrels et al. galaxy-targeted strategy for gravitational-wave (GW) follow-up using the Las Cumbres Observatory global network of telescopes. We use the Galaxy List for the Advanced Detector Era (GLADE) galaxy catalog, which we show is complete (with respect to a Schechter function) out to ∼300 Mpc for galaxies brighter than the median Schechter function galaxy luminosity. We use a prioritization algorithm to select the galaxies with the highest chance of containing the counterpart given their luminosity, their position, and their distance relative to a GW localization, and in which we are most likely to detect a counterpart given its expected brightness compared to the limiting magnitude of our telescopes. This algorithm can be easily adapted to any expected transient parameters and telescopes. We implemented this strategy during the second Advanced Detector Observing Run (O2) and followed the black hole merger GW170814 and the neutron star merger GW170817. For the latter, we identified an optical kilonova/macronova counterpart thanks to our algorithm selecting the correct host galaxy fifth in its ranked list among the 182 galaxies we identified in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo localization. This also allowed us to obtain some of the earliest observations of the first optical transient ever triggered by a GW detection (as presented in a companion paper).

  15. Optical Follow-up of Gravitational-wave Events with Las Cumbres Observatory

    Arcavi, Iair; McCully, Curtis; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Howell, D. Andrew; Vasylyev, Sergiy; Poznanski, Dovi; Zaltzman, Michael; Maoz, Dan; Singer, Leo; Valenti, Stefano; Kasen, Daniel; Barnes, Jennifer; Piran, Tsvi; Fong, Wen-fai

    2017-10-01

    We present an implementation of the Gehrels et al. galaxy-targeted strategy for gravitational-wave (GW) follow-up using the Las Cumbres Observatory global network of telescopes. We use the Galaxy List for the Advanced Detector Era (GLADE) galaxy catalog, which we show is complete (with respect to a Schechter function) out to ˜300 Mpc for galaxies brighter than the median Schechter function galaxy luminosity. We use a prioritization algorithm to select the galaxies with the highest chance of containing the counterpart given their luminosity, their position, and their distance relative to a GW localization, and in which we are most likely to detect a counterpart given its expected brightness compared to the limiting magnitude of our telescopes. This algorithm can be easily adapted to any expected transient parameters and telescopes. We implemented this strategy during the second Advanced Detector Observing Run (O2) and followed the black hole merger GW170814 and the neutron star merger GW170817. For the latter, we identified an optical kilonova/macronova counterpart thanks to our algorithm selecting the correct host galaxy fifth in its ranked list among the 182 galaxies we identified in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo localization. This also allowed us to obtain some of the earliest observations of the first optical transient ever triggered by a GW detection (as presented in a companion paper).

  16. Deep Rapid Optical Follow-Up of Gravitational Wave Sources with the Dark Energy Camera

    Cowperthwaite, Philip

    2018-01-01

    The detection of an electromagnetic counterpart associated with a gravitational wave detection by the Advanced LIGO and VIRGO interferometers is one of the great observational challenges of our time. The large localization regions and potentially faint counterparts require the use of wide-field, large aperture telescopes. As a result, the Dark Energy Camera, a 3.3 sq deg CCD imager on the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO in Chile is the most powerful instrument for this task in the Southern Hemisphere. I will report on the results from our joint program between the community and members of the dark energy survey to conduct rapid and efficient follow-up of gravitational wave sources. This includes systematic searches for optical counterparts, as well as developing an understanding of contaminating sources on timescales not normally probed by traditional untargeted supernova surveys. I will additionally comment on the immense science gains to be made by a joint detection and discuss future prospects from the standpoint of both next generation wide-field telescopes and next generation gravitational wave detectors.

  17. High Resolution Active Optics Observations from the Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    Gautier, Thomas N.; Ciardi, D. R.; Marcy, G. W.; Hirsch, L.

    2014-01-01

    The ground based follow-up observation program for candidate exoplanets discovered with the Kepler observatory has supported a major effort for high resolution imaging of candidate host stars using adaptive optics wave-front correction (AO), speckle imaging and lucky imaging. These images allow examination of the sky as close as a few tenths of an arcsecond from the host stars to detect background objects that might be the source of the Kepler transit signal instead of the host star. This poster reports on the imaging done with AO cameras on the Keck, Palomar 5m and Shane 3m (Lick Observatory) which have been used to obtain high resolution images of over 500 Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) exoplanet candidate host stars. All observations were made at near infrared wavelengths in the J, H and K bands, mostly using the host target star as the AO guide star. Details of the sensitivity to background objects actually attained by these observations and the number of background objects discovered are presented. Implications to the false positive rate of the Kepler candidates are discussed.

  18. EROSITA: AGN SCIENCE, BACKGROUND DETERMINATION, AND OPTICAL FOLLOW-UP SPECTROSCOPY

    Thomas Boller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available More than 20 years after the highly impacting ROSAT all-sky survey in the soft X-ray spectral range, we are close to the next major X-ray all/sky surveys with eROSITA. eROSITA will be the primary instrument on-board the Russian “Spectrum–Roentgen–Gamma” (SRG satellite which will be launched from Baikonur in 2014 and placed in an L2 orbit. It will perform the first imaging all-sky survey in the medium energy X-ray range up to 10 keV with an unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The eROSITA all sky X-ray survey will take place in a very different context than the ROSAT survey. There is now a wealth of complete, ongoing and planned surveys of the sky in broad range of wavelengths from the gamma, X-ray to the radio. A significant amount of science can be accomplished through the multi-frequency study of the eROSITA AGN and cluster sample, including optical confirmation and photometric redshift estimation of the eROSITA extended sources and AGNs. Optical spectroscopy has been, and will for the foreseeable future be, one of the main tools of astrophysics allowing studies of a large variety of astronomical objects over many fields of research. The fully capitalize on the eROSITA potential, a dedicated spectroscopic follow-up program is needed. 4MOST is the ideal instrument to secure the scientific success of the eROSITA X-ray survey and to overcome the small sample sizes together with selection biases that plagued past samples. The aim is to have the instrument commissioned in 2017, well matched to the data releases of eROSITA and Gaia. The design and implementation of the 4MOST facility simulator aimed to optimize the science output for eROSITA is described in necessary details.

  19. Optical Follow-Up of Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed by WATCH

    Castro-Tirado, A.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1994-01-01

    44 Gamma‐Ray Bursts have been localized by the WATCH experiments on GRANAT and EURECA. For some of them, Schmidt plates were taken within days after the burst. In other cases, time‐correlated plates were found in some of the main astronomical archives. No obvious optical counterpart has been found...

  20. Heart resynchronization therapy: experience, clinical Follow-up and optimization of the device with echocardiography

    Munera, Ana G; Restrepo, Gustavo; Duque, Mauricio; Cubides, Carlos; Uribe, William; Medina, Eduardo; Marin, Jorge; Gil, Efrain; Aristizabal, Dagnovar

    2007-01-01

    In patients with advanced heart failure, functional class lll-IV, mortality reaches 50% at one year and 80% at two years. Some remain asymptomatic and have a poor functional state, regardless of the pharmacologic treatment. Heart resynchronization therapy is a therapeutic alternative that improves hemodynamic and symptoms in these patients. The objective is to analyze the experience in the management of heart failure with heart resynchronization therapy devices with or without cardio defibrillator. Methodological design: an intervention study without aleatory patients assignment, with evaluation before and after the intervention. Results: the cohort was constituted by 82 patients. 73% were men. Mean age was 65.4+/- 11.9 years. The etiology was non-ischemic in 50 patients and ischemic in 32. Mean initial ejection fraction was 19.4% +/- 11.7%. Initial functional class was class lll - IV in 85% of cases and all patients received optimal medical treatment. During the follow-up, it was observed improvement of functional class, diastolic function, diastolic diameter of left ventricle, ejection fraction, mitral insufficiency, left atrial area, systolic lung pressure, synchrony parameters and myocardial function index with statistical significant difference in relation to the initial value (p<0.05). Survival at 44 months was 72%. Conclusion: the experience with heart resynchronization therapy and clinical and echocardiographic follow-up of the studied patients is similar to that found in other studies described in the literature

  1. Primary care follow-up of radical prostatectomy patients: A regional New Zealand experience

    Omid Yassaie

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Our study identified that follow-up by GPs after RP is insufficient. Accordingly, there is a requirement for formal educational programs if primary care is to take a greater role in follow-up of these patients.

  2. The experience of emotional wellbeing for patients with physical injury: A qualitative follow-up study.

    Wiseman, Taneal; Foster, Kim; Curtis, Kate

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic physical injury is abrupt, painful, debilitating, costly and life-altering. The experience of emotional wellbeing following traumatic physical injury has not been well investigated, and the role of health services and how services can support the emotional recovery of injured patients has not been well understood. This has impacted on care provision and contributed to a lack of evidence-informed guidance for clinicians to support patients' emotional wellbeing. To explore the patient experience of emotional wellbeing following injury and to understand how injured patients manage their emotional wellbeing. The study comprises the follow-up qualitative phase of a mixed-methods explanatory sequential study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 14 participants admitted to hospital following physical injury. Participants were purposely selected where they had reported high levels of depression, anxiety and stress on the DASS-21 at 3 and 6-months after injury. The qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified: experiencing the many impacts of injury; facing the emotional journey following injury; and being supported and managing the impacts of injury. Key findings were the extreme negative emotional responses experienced many months after the injury; a strong physical link between the emotional and physical aspects of health; participant reluctance to seek emotional support; a lack of emotional support provision by the health service and a subsequent need for individual and group support in order to develop resilience in the injured person. Finally, male participants who reported extreme emotional responses after injury, including suicidality, were less likely to seek help for their symptoms. Injured patients can experience substantial negative emotional responses following injury. The lack of support provided by health services to injured patients identified highlights the importance of

  3. A qualitative follow-up study of women's experiences with oocyte donation.

    Kalfoglou, A L; Gittelsohn, J

    2000-04-01

    Oocyte donation is growing at an exponential rate. Currently, thousands of women donate each year. The health services that donors receive deserve evaluation. Thirty-three former donors were recruited from IVF clinics, a matching agency, the Internet, advertisements, and word of mouth. In-depth interviews were conducted to learn what motivated the donation, to determine how satisfied donors were with the experience and what issues played a role in donor satisfaction, and to identify recommendations to improve the process. None of the participants regretted their decision to donate, but they were not always completely satisfied with the donation experience. The physical process, compensation, quality of medical care, and level of involvement in the process were the primary factors that affected satisfaction. Matching agencies and IVF clinics may improve donor satisfaction by: minimizing trips to the clinic; using protocols that limit the number of intramuscular injections; reducing the risk of hyperstimulation syndrome; providing follow-up care; reimbursing for expenses such as lost work, travel, and child care; separating direct reimbursements from 'income' to decrease the amount of taxes donors must pay on compensation; treating donors with respect and appreciation; and informing them about the outcome. Improved donor satisfaction is likely to improve donor recruitment and retention.

  4. Parents' experience of a follow-up meeting after a child's death in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Brink, Helle L; Thomsen, Anja K; Laerkner, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: 'To identify parents' experience of a follow up meeting and to explore whether the conversation was adequate to meet the needs of parents for a follow-up after their child's death in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). DESIGN AND SETTING: Qualitative method utilising semi...

  5. Early bilateral radiation-induced optic neuropathy with follow-up MRI

    McClellan, R.L.; El Gammal, T.; Kline, L.B.

    1995-01-01

    Most documented cases of radiation-induced optic neuropathy are unilateral and occur more than 1 year after radiotherapy to the sellar region. We describe a patient with bilateral radiation optic neuropathy 3 months following the completion of radiotherapy. MRI 13 months after the onset of visual failure showed bilateral optic atrophy with residual gadolinium enhancement. (orig.)

  6. Early bilateral radiation-induced optic neuropathy with follow-up MRI

    McClellan, R.L. [Alabama Univ., Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Radiology; El Gammal, T. [Alabama Univ., Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Kline, L.B. [Alabama Univ., Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1995-02-01

    Most documented cases of radiation-induced optic neuropathy are unilateral and occur more than 1 year after radiotherapy to the sellar region. We describe a patient with bilateral radiation optic neuropathy 3 months following the completion of radiotherapy. MRI 13 months after the onset of visual failure showed bilateral optic atrophy with residual gadolinium enhancement. (orig.)

  7. Treatment of early breast cancer, a long-term follow-up study: the GOCS experience.

    Iturbe, Julián; Zwenger, Ariel; Leone, José Pablo; Verdera, Palmira Perez; Vallejo, Carlos; Romero, Alberto; Perez, Juán; Machiavelli, Mario; Leone, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    experience are similar to those reported in international literature. The DFI and OS showed a statistically significant difference among the three groups. This group of pts continues to have a good prognosis as shown by the OS rate at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years, although a high percentage of pts still to have recurrence and die from breast cancer after 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years of follow-up. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations (TAToO)

    Dornic, Damien; Brunner, Jurgen; Basa, Stephane; Al Samarai, Imen; Bertin, Vincent; Boer, Michel; Busto, Jose; Escoffier, Stephanie; Klotz, Alain; Mazure, Alain; Vallage, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    The ANTARES telescope has the opportunity to detect transient neutrino sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, flares of active galactic nuclei. In order to enhance the sensitivity to these sources, we have developed a new detection method based on the follow-up by optical telescopes of 'golden' neutrino events, such as neutrino doublets coincident in time and space or single neutrinos of very high energy. The ANTARES collaboration has therefore implemented a very fast on-line reconstruction with a good angular resolution. These characteristics allow us to trigger an optical telescope network. Since February 2009, ANTARES is sending alert triggers once or twice per month to the two 25 cm robotic telescope of TAROT. This optical follow-up of such special events would not only give access to the nature of the sources, but also would improve the sensitivity to transient neutrino sources.

  9. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations (TAToO)

    Dornic, Damien, E-mail: dornic@cppm.in2p3.f [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3-Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); IFIC, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, CSIC-Universitat de Valenciaa, Apdo. de correos 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Brunner, Jurgen [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3-Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Basa, Stephane [LAM, BP8, Traverse du siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Al Samarai, Imen; Bertin, Vincent [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3-Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Boer, Michel [OHP, 04870 Saint Michel de l' Observatoire (France); Busto, Jose; Escoffier, Stephanie [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3-Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Klotz, Alain [OHP, 04870 Saint Michel de l' Observatoire (France); CESR, Observatiore Midi-Pyrenees, CNRS Universite de Toulouse, BP4346, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Mazure, Alain [LAM, BP8, Traverse du siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Vallage, Bertrand [CEA-IRFU, Centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-01-21

    The ANTARES telescope has the opportunity to detect transient neutrino sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, flares of active galactic nuclei. In order to enhance the sensitivity to these sources, we have developed a new detection method based on the follow-up by optical telescopes of 'golden' neutrino events, such as neutrino doublets coincident in time and space or single neutrinos of very high energy. The ANTARES collaboration has therefore implemented a very fast on-line reconstruction with a good angular resolution. These characteristics allow us to trigger an optical telescope network. Since February 2009, ANTARES is sending alert triggers once or twice per month to the two 25 cm robotic telescope of TAROT. This optical follow-up of such special events would not only give access to the nature of the sources, but also would improve the sensitivity to transient neutrino sources.

  10. CT and VER follow-up of reversible visual loss with fracture of the optic canal

    Shaked, A.; Hadani, M.; Feinsod, M.

    1982-01-01

    A patient with fracture of the optic canal who demonstrated spontaneous recovery of useful vision following acute visual loss is reported. Acute stretching of the involved optic nerve was demonstrated by CT. The return of the optic nerve (ON) to its normal position coincided with the recovery of vision. The visual evoced response (VER) was the first parameter to herald the good visual outcome. (Author)

  11. INITIAL FOLLOW-UP OF OPTICAL TRANSIENTS WITH COLORES USING THE BOOTES NETWORK

    Maria D. Caballero-Garcia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System (BOOTES is a network of telescopes that allows the continuous monitoring of transient astrophysical sources. It was originally devoted to the study of the optical emissions from gamma-raybursts (GRBs that occur in the Universe. In this paper we show the initial results obtained using the spectrograph COLORES (mounted on BOOTES-2, when observing optical transients (OTs of a diverse nature.

  12. A friendly tool to remotely follow-up fusion machines experiments

    Signoret, J.; Balme, S.; Theis, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • ShotListener allows a remote user to easily follow up the shot sequence and receive information on the shot operation. • ShotListener is a java application available for Windows and Linux platform. • ShotListener is suitable for any tokamak. -- Abstract: When the international collaborations gather around a project more and more geographically scattered participants, it is imperative for them to get tools to keep in touch with the laboratory hosting the experiment, to know about the ongoing operations or even to remotely participate in them. The CEA-IRFM developed ShotListener to meet these needs, which should appear for actual or future tokamaks. This Java application intercepts the main events of a discharge sequence and notifies the user with visual or sound alerts, allowing him to follow the distant experiments easily. An API based on an MDSplus server has been developed to insure communication with the local CODAC supervision system. This API translates the Tokamak events as MDSplus events, available for any subscribers. The java application ShotListener, available for Windows and Linux platforms as an auto-installable package, connects to the MDSplus server, subscribes to a list of shot events (customizable by the end-user) and sends a visual or sound alert when a selected event occurs. For example, depending on the selected events, the user can display an extract of the shots log or visualize the video of the pulse. This architecture is obviously suitable for any machine, as long as the specific API sending MDSplus events is implemented. The aim of this paper is to describe the detailed architecture of ShotListener, to present its different functionalities and to introduce some possible enhancements

  13. A friendly tool to remotely follow-up fusion machines experiments

    Signoret, J., E-mail: jacqueline.signoret@cea.fr; Balme, S.; Theis, J.M.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • ShotListener allows a remote user to easily follow up the shot sequence and receive information on the shot operation. • ShotListener is a java application available for Windows and Linux platform. • ShotListener is suitable for any tokamak. -- Abstract: When the international collaborations gather around a project more and more geographically scattered participants, it is imperative for them to get tools to keep in touch with the laboratory hosting the experiment, to know about the ongoing operations or even to remotely participate in them. The CEA-IRFM developed ShotListener to meet these needs, which should appear for actual or future tokamaks. This Java application intercepts the main events of a discharge sequence and notifies the user with visual or sound alerts, allowing him to follow the distant experiments easily. An API based on an MDSplus server has been developed to insure communication with the local CODAC supervision system. This API translates the Tokamak events as MDSplus events, available for any subscribers. The java application ShotListener, available for Windows and Linux platforms as an auto-installable package, connects to the MDSplus server, subscribes to a list of shot events (customizable by the end-user) and sends a visual or sound alert when a selected event occurs. For example, depending on the selected events, the user can display an extract of the shots log or visualize the video of the pulse. This architecture is obviously suitable for any machine, as long as the specific API sending MDSplus events is implemented. The aim of this paper is to describe the detailed architecture of ShotListener, to present its different functionalities and to introduce some possible enhancements.

  14. TAToO, an implementation of an optical follow up of ANTARES events

    Ageron, M.

    2009-01-01

    Completed in May 2008, Antares is a large area water Cherenkov detector comprising a 3-dimensional array of 875 photosensitive detectors, located in the deep Mediterranean Sea close to Toulon, France. It is designed to detect high energy neutrinos emitted by astrophysical sources. These sources can also emit other kind of information, especially visible light. The purpose of the work presented here is to quickly determine the celestial coordinates of such a source and send them to the TAROT robotic optical telescope array, then to analyse the collected images, in order to detect a possible optical counterpart of high energy neutrino events. (authors)

  15. TAToO, an implementation of an optical follow up of ANTARES events

    Ageron, M. [IN2P3, CCPM, Merseille (France)

    2009-07-01

    Completed in May 2008, Antares is a large area water Cherenkov detector comprising a 3-dimensional array of 875 photosensitive detectors, located in the deep Mediterranean Sea close to Toulon, France. It is designed to detect high energy neutrinos emitted by astrophysical sources. These sources can also emit other kind of information, especially visible light. The purpose of the work presented here is to quickly determine the celestial coordinates of such a source and send them to the TAROT robotic optical telescope array, then to analyse the collected images, in order to detect a possible optical counterpart of high energy neutrino events. (authors)

  16. Primary radiotherapy in progressive optic nerve sheath meningiomas: a long-term follow-up study

    Saeed, P.; Blank, L.; Selva, D.; Wolbers, J.G.; Nowak, P.J.C.M.; Geskus, R.B.; Weis, E.; Mourits, M.P.; Rootman, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background/aims To report the outcome of primary radiotherapy in patients with progressive optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods The clinical records of all patients were reviewed in a retrospective, observational, multicentre study. Results Thirty-four consecutive patients were included.

  17. Experiences with tele-health follow-up in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative interview study

    Raunsbæk Knudsen, Line; Thurah, Annette De; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    the patients' different needs, wishes and abilities to take part in tele-health follow-up. Our findings reveal a need for more insight into how tele-health follow-up could be integrated in routine clinical practice, paying special attention to how reluctant patients may be supported.......: Adopting a strategy of interpretive description, we conducted individual, semi-structured interviews with 15 RA patients participating in a tele-health follow-up. Participants were selected purposively and consecutive from both genders and with various ages, disease durations and disease severity....... The analysis was inductive with a constant comparative approach. First, we identified the main themes conveying the participants' experiences. Then, we constructed patient typologies to explain different perspectives on the tele-health follow-up. RESULTS: Five themes covered the participants' experiences: 'A...

  18. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations

    Ageron, Michel; Al Samarai, Imen; Akerlof, Carl; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Boer, Michel; Brunner, Juergen; Busto, Jose; Dornic, Damien; Klotz, Alain; Schussler, Fabian; Vallage, Bertrand; Vecchi, Manuela; Zheng, Weikang

    2012-01-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well suited to detect neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky at all the times with a duty cycle close to unity and an angular resolution better than 0.5°. Potential sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), core collapse supernovae (SNe), and flaring active galactic nuclei (AGNs). To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a new detection method based on coincident observations of neutrinos and optical signals has been developed. A fast online muon track reconstruction is used to trigger a network of small automatic optical telescopes. Such alerts are generated one or two times per month for special events such as two or more neutrinos coincident in time and direction or single neutrinos of very high energy. Since February 2009, ANTARES has sent 37 alert triggers to the TAROT and ROTSE telescope networks, 27 of them have been followed. First results on the optical images analysis to search for GRBs are presented.

  19. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations

    Ageron, Michel; Al Samarai, Imen; Akerlof, Carl; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Boer, Michel; Brunner, Juergen; Busto, Jose; Dornic, Damien; Klotz, Alain; Schussler, Fabian; Vallage, Bertrand; Vecchi, Manuela; Zheng, Weikang

    2012-11-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well suited to detect neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky at all the times with a duty cycle close to unity and an angular resolution better than 0.5°. Potential sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), core collapse supernovae (SNe), and flaring active galactic nuclei (AGNs). To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a new detection method based on coincident observations of neutrinos and optical signals has been developed. A fast online muon track reconstruction is used to trigger a network of small automatic optical telescopes. Such alerts are generated one or two times per month for special events such as two or more neutrinos coincident in time and direction or single neutrinos of very high energy. Since February 2009, ANTARES has sent 37 alert triggers to the TAROT and ROTSE telescope networks, 27 of them have been followed. First results on the optical images analysis to search for GRBs are presented.

  20. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations

    Ageron, Michel [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3 - Universite de Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Al Samarai, Imen, E-mail: samarai@cppm.in2p3.fr [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3 - Universite de Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Akerlof, Carl [Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States); Basa, Stephane [LAM, BP8, Traverse du siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Bertin, Vincent [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3 - Universite de Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Boer, Michel [OHP, 04870 Saint Michel de l' Observatoire (France); Brunner, Juergen; Busto, Jose; Dornic, Damien [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3 - Universite de Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Klotz, Alain [OHP, 04870 Saint Michel de l' Observatoire (France); IRAP, 9 avenue du colonel Roche, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Schussler, Fabian; Vallage, Bertrand [CEA-IRFU, centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vecchi, Manuela [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3 - Universite de Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Zheng, Weikang [Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2012-11-11

    The ANTARES telescope is well suited to detect neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky at all the times with a duty cycle close to unity and an angular resolution better than 0.5 Degree-Sign . Potential sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), core collapse supernovae (SNe), and flaring active galactic nuclei (AGNs). To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a new detection method based on coincident observations of neutrinos and optical signals has been developed. A fast online muon track reconstruction is used to trigger a network of small automatic optical telescopes. Such alerts are generated one or two times per month for special events such as two or more neutrinos coincident in time and direction or single neutrinos of very high energy. Since February 2009, ANTARES has sent 37 alert triggers to the TAROT and ROTSE telescope networks, 27 of them have been followed. First results on the optical images analysis to search for GRBs are presented.

  1. Geographic and Annual Influences on Optical Follow-up of Gravitational Wave Events

    Srivastava, Varun [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Pune, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Bhalerao, Varun; Bose, Sukanta [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Ravi, Aravind P. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Mohanpur, West Bengal 741252 (India); Ghosh, Archisman, E-mail: varun.srivastava@students.iiserpune.ac.in [International Centre for Theoretical Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Survey No. 151, Shivakote, Hesaraghatta Hobli, Bengaluru North 560089 (India)

    2017-03-20

    We investigate the effects of observatory location on the probability of discovering optical/infrared (OIR) counterparts of gravitational wave sources. We show that, for the LIGO–Virgo network, the odds of discovering OIR counterparts show some latitude dependence. A stronger effect is seen to arise from the timing of LIGO–Virgo observing runs during the year, with northern OIR observatories having a better chance of finding the counterparts in northern winters. Assuming identical technical capabilities, the tentative mid-2017 three-detector network observing run favors southern OIR observatories for the discovery of electromagnetic counterparts.

  2. Geographic and Annual Influences on Optical Follow-up of Gravitational Wave Events

    Srivastava, Varun; Bhalerao, Varun; Bose, Sukanta; Ravi, Aravind P.; Ghosh, Archisman

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effects of observatory location on the probability of discovering optical/infrared (OIR) counterparts of gravitational wave sources. We show that, for the LIGO–Virgo network, the odds of discovering OIR counterparts show some latitude dependence. A stronger effect is seen to arise from the timing of LIGO–Virgo observing runs during the year, with northern OIR observatories having a better chance of finding the counterparts in northern winters. Assuming identical technical capabilities, the tentative mid-2017 three-detector network observing run favors southern OIR observatories for the discovery of electromagnetic counterparts.

  3. Virtual cystoscopy, computed tomography urography and optical cystoscopy for the detection and follow-up for bladder cancer.

    Ibáñez Muñoz, D; Quintana Martínez, I; Fernández Militino, A; Sánchez Zalabardo, D; Sarria Octavio de Toledo, L; Cozcolluela Cabrejas, R

    To evaluate the utility of virtual cystoscopy (VC) performed with CT urography in patients being studied under gross hematuria or patients being followed-up after a previous bladder cancer and compare the results with those obtained with gold standard technique (optical cystoscopy). Retrospective study of 117 patients who were referred for VC by the Urology Department between May 2014 and May 2015. Those patients presented with gross hematuria or they were previously treated patients from bladder cancer being followed up. These patients were evaluated with MDCT and virtual cystoscopy after distending the bladder with air. The results were compared with those obtained with optical cystoscopy which was performed no more than a week after. The global sensitivity and specificity of VC were 81,8 and 92,1%. Aditional findings detected in CT urography were an aortic dissection, urinary lithiasis and colonic metastasis. VC seems an useful technique in the diagnosis and follow-up for bladder cancer with a good correlation with OC. The main limitations are the impossibility of biopsy during the procedure and the detection of erythematous lesions. Collateral findings can be detected performed with CT urography although the high radiation exposure does not recommend their combined use. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Optical and X-ray early follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; van Haren, H.; Antares Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays withmatter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrialhigh-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrino source has yetbeen discovered.

  5. Vertebral Augmentation with Nitinol Endoprosthesis: Clinical Experience in 40 Patients with 1-Year Follow-up

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: gc.anselmetti@fastwebnet.it [Villa Maria Hospital, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Manca, Antonio, E-mail: anto.manca@gmail.com [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Marcia, Stefano, E-mail: stemarcia@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari (Italy); Chiara, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.chiara@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Marini, Stefano, E-mail: stemarini@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari (Italy); Baroud, Gamal, E-mail: gamalbaroud@gmail.com [University of Sherbrooke, Departement de Genie Mecanique (Canada); Regge, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.regge@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy); Montemurro, Filippo, E-mail: filippo.montemurro@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Internal Medicine Unit (Italy)

    2013-05-08

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients treated by vertebral augmentation with nitinol endoprosthesis (VNE) to treat painful vertebral compression fractures.MethodsForty patients with one or more painful osteoporotic VCF, confirmed by MRI and accompanied by back-pain unresponsive to a minimum 2 months of conservative medical treatment, underwent VNE at 42 levels. Preoperative and postoperative pain measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), disability measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and vertebral height restoration (measured with 2-dimensional reconstruction CT) were compared at last follow-up (average follow-up 15 months). Cement extravasation, subsequent fractures, and implant migration were recorded.ResultsLong-term follow-up was obtained in 38 of 40 patients. Both VAS and ODI significantly improved from a median of 8.0 (range 5–10) and 66 % (range 44–88 %) to 0.5 (range 0–8) and 6 % (range 6–66 %), respectively, at 1 year (p < 0.0001). Vertebral height measurements comparing time points increased in a statistically significant manner (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Overall cement extravasation rate was 9.5 %. Discal and venous leakage rates were 7.1 and 0 % respectively. No symptomatic extravasations occurred. Five of 38 (13.1 %) patients experienced new spontaneous, osteoporotic fractures. No device change or migration was observed.ConclusionsVNE is a safe and effective procedure that is able to provide long-lasting pain relief and durable vertebral height gain with a low rate of new fractures and cement leakages.

  6. Partial repair in irreparable rotator cuff tear: our experience in long-term follow-up.

    Di Benedetto, E D; Di Benedetto, Paolo; Fiocchi, Andrea; Beltrame, Alessandro; Causero, Araldo

    2017-10-18

    Massive rotator cuff tears are a common source of shoulder pain and dysfunction, especially in middle age patient; these lesions represent about 20% of all rotator cuff tears and 80% of recurrent tears. Some lesions are not repairable or should not be repaired: in this case, a rotator cuff partial repair should be recommended. The aim of the study is to evaluate the outcome of rotator cuff partial repair in irreparable rotator cuff massive tear at medium and long-term follow-up. We have evaluated 74 consecutive patients treated with functional repair of rotator cuff by the same surgeon between 2006 and 2014. We divided patients into 2 groups, obtaining 2 average follow-up: at about 6,5 (group A) and 3 years (group B). In December 2015, we evaluated in every patient ROM and Constant Score. We analyzed difference between pre-operatory data and the 2 groups.  Results: We found statistical significant difference in ROM and in Constant Score between pre-operatory data and group A and group B. Between group A and group B there is relevant difference in Constant Score but not in ROM. Partial repair can give good results in a medium follow-up, in terms of pain relief and improvement of ROM, as well as in quality of life. Difference in ROM and Constant Score between group A and group B may indicate the begin of partial repair failure; according to our data, 6-7 years may be the time limit for this surgery technique.

  7. Vertebral Augmentation with Nitinol Endoprosthesis: Clinical Experience in 40 Patients with 1-Year Follow-up

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Manca, Antonio; Marcia, Stefano; Chiara, Gabriele; Marini, Stefano; Baroud, Gamal; Regge, Daniele; Montemurro, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients treated by vertebral augmentation with nitinol endoprosthesis (VNE) to treat painful vertebral compression fractures.MethodsForty patients with one or more painful osteoporotic VCF, confirmed by MRI and accompanied by back-pain unresponsive to a minimum 2 months of conservative medical treatment, underwent VNE at 42 levels. Preoperative and postoperative pain measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), disability measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and vertebral height restoration (measured with 2-dimensional reconstruction CT) were compared at last follow-up (average follow-up 15 months). Cement extravasation, subsequent fractures, and implant migration were recorded.ResultsLong-term follow-up was obtained in 38 of 40 patients. Both VAS and ODI significantly improved from a median of 8.0 (range 5–10) and 66 % (range 44–88 %) to 0.5 (range 0–8) and 6 % (range 6–66 %), respectively, at 1 year (p < 0.0001). Vertebral height measurements comparing time points increased in a statistically significant manner (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Overall cement extravasation rate was 9.5 %. Discal and venous leakage rates were 7.1 and 0 % respectively. No symptomatic extravasations occurred. Five of 38 (13.1 %) patients experienced new spontaneous, osteoporotic fractures. No device change or migration was observed.ConclusionsVNE is a safe and effective procedure that is able to provide long-lasting pain relief and durable vertebral height gain with a low rate of new fractures and cement leakages

  8. Understanding and Preventing Loss to Follow-up: Experiences From the Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems.

    Kim, Hwasoon; Cutter, Gary R; George, Brandon; Chen, Yuying

    2018-01-01

    Background: One of the most critical threats to the validity of any longitudinal research is the bias caused by study attrition. Prevention efforts should be focused on those individuals at high risk of non-participation to improve the generalizability of study findings. Objective: To identify demographic and clinical factors associated with loss to follow-up (FU) at post-injury years 1 to 35 among 25,871 people with spinal cord injury (SCI) enrolled in the National Spinal Cord Injury Database. Methods: Loss to FU was defined as no research information obtained from participants who were eligible for the planned data collection. Generalized linear mixed models were used for analysis of factors at each post-injury year. Results: The loss to FU rates were 23.1% and 32.9% for post-injury years 1 and 5, respectively, and remained >40% between post-injury years 20 and 35. The FU rate varied by study sites and was improved in recent injury cohorts. People who were more seriously injured and those who attained higher levels of education were more likely to return for FU than their counterparts. People who were at risk of being marginalized in society (non-whites, those with less education, the unemployed, victims of violence, and those with no health insurance) had the highest odds of being lost to FU across all post-injury years. Conclusion: These findings can be used to identify individuals who are less likely to participate in follow-up, which may allow targeted attention to improve their response rate.

  9. Unsatisfactory exfoliative anal cytology samples, 15-year experience with histologic, cytologic, and molecular follow-up.

    Khattab, Ruba; McMeekin, Emily; Taege, Alan J; Hekman, James M; Brainard, Jennifer A; Underwood, Dawn; Procop, Gary W; Sturgis, Charles D

    2018-02-01

    The incidence of anal carcinoma has risen in recent decades. Exfoliative cytology screening of selected high risk patients is performed in many centers. Unsatisfactory cytology results are frustrating to patients, clinicians, and laboratorians. The aim of this study is to ascertain outcomes of patients with non-diagnostic anal cytology. A retrospective review of anal cytology testing performed at the Cleveland Clinic between 01/01/2001 and 12/31/2015 was performed. All cases were received as liquid-based samples and processed as ThinPreps (Hologic, Marlborough, MA). Co-testing for HR-HPV DNA was performed using Hybrid Capture 2® (Qiagen, Germantown, MD) in the majority of patients. Of 1,276 ThinPrep anal cytology samples, 130 (10%) were deemed unsatisfactory. 77% of patients were HIV positive. 85% were males. Of the unsatisfactory cases, 116 (89%) were co-tested for HR-HPV DNA. Of those, 40 patients (34%) had a simultaneous positive HR-HPV DNA. Adequate follow up cytology within a one year and a two year period revealed that 18/130 (14%) and 26/130 (20%) of patients had ASC or SIL respectively. Histologic follow-up within one and two years showed 3 patients (2%) and 8 patients (6%) with HSIL or worse. High risk patients with unsatisfactory anal cytology are not "negative". At least one-third proved to be concomitantly HR-HPV DNA positive with one-fifth showing subsequent cytologic squamous abnormalities and with more than 5% being diagnosed with a high grade intraepithelial lesion within two years. Prompt repeat cytology and/or HR-HPV DNA is recommended for high risk patients with non-diagnostic cytology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cardiac myxoma: diagnostic approach, surgical treatment and follow-up. A twenty years experience.

    Jelic, J; Milicić, D; Alfirević, I; Anić, D; Baudoin, Z; Bulat, C; Corić, V; Dadić, D; Husar, J; Ivanćan, V; Korda, Z; Letica, D; Predrijevac, M; Ugljen, R; Vućemilo, I

    1996-12-01

    years after the operation. Among them there was no evidence of the tumour recurrence, 15 pts were asymptomatic and 7 had NYHA II class symptoms. For 17 pts with a left atrial myxoma preoperative and postoperative echocardiographic data were available for comparison, showing a significant reduction of the left atrial diameter (p<0.001) during the postoperative follow-up. Our data, presenting one of the biggest reports concerning cardiac myxomas, showed a broad spectrum of their clinical presentation, importance of echocardiography in diagnosing and postoperative follow-up and efficacy of a proper surgical intervention as a definite, curative therapy since there were no deaths and no significant cardiac dysfunction neither tumour reccurrence as well.

  11. Adolescent boys with autism spectrum disorder growing up : follow-up of self-reported sexual experience

    Dewinter, J.; Vermeiren, R.; Vanwesenbeeck, W.M.A.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch

    Systematic research on sexual development in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) remains scant, notwithstanding the often-suggested relation between ASD, atypical, and even sexually offensive behaviours. This study compared follow-up data related to lifetime sexual experience (LTSE) in a

  12. The temporal stability of children's neighborhood experiences: A follow-up from birth to age 15

    Tom Kleinepier

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite increasing attention being paid to the temporal dynamics of childhood disadvantage, children's neighborhood characteristics are still frequently measured at a single point in time. Whether such cross-sectional measures serve as reliable proxies for children's long-run neighborhood conditions depends on the stability in children's neighborhood experiences over time. Objective: We investigate stability in children's neighborhood environment over time, focusing on two of the most commonly studied neighborhood socioeconomic conditions: The ethnic composition and mean income of the neighborhood. Methods: Drawing on data from the Dutch population registers, an entire cohort of children born in the Netherlands in 1999 (n=179,166 is followed from birth up until age 15. We use year-to-year correlations in the percentage of non-Western ethnic minorities and the mean logged income in the neighborhood to evaluate the temporal stability of children's neighborhood experiences. Results: Results indicate that children's neighborhood characteristics are more stable over time with regard to ethnic composition than with regard to the mean income. Children who had moved at least once had less stability in neighborhood characteristics than children who never moved. Finally, neighborhood experiences were found to be more stable over time for ethnic minority children, although differences were small with regard to mean income in the neighborhood. Conclusions: We conclude that single point-in-time measurements of neighborhood characteristics are reasonable proxies for the long-run ethnic composition of children's neighborhood environment, but rather noisy proxies for the long-run income status of their neighborhood, particularly for those who moved. Contribution: We examine the temporal stability of children's neighborhood experiences over almost the entire childhood life course in the European context.

  13. Fear of childbirth: mothers' experiences of team-midwifery care - a follow-up study.

    Lyberg, Anne; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate mothers' fear of childbirth and their experiences of the team-midwifery care model during pregnancy, childbirth and the postnatal period. Maternal anxiety and fear of childbirth lead to emotional suffering and affected women's well-being. A previous negative experience of childbirth may result in postnatal depression or avoidance of future pregnancies. This hermeneutic study comprised interviews with 13 women, which were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim, after which interpretative content analysis was performed. Ethical approval was granted. The findings revealed one main theme: The woman's right to ownership of the pregnancy, childbirth and postnatal care as a means of maintaining dignity and three themes; Being aware of barriers and reasons for fear; Being prepared for childbirth and Being confirmed and treated with dignity by the midwife. Each theme contained several sub-themes. The findings contribute insights into how midwives can be educated to reduce fear of childbirth and promote positive birth experiences, despite the existence of negative memories of previous births. In order to achieve continuity and a trusting relationship it is necessary to organise leadership and to adopt models that are flexible and support women's health.

  14. Opportunities and Challenges of Unplanned Follow-up Interviews: Experiences with Polish Migrants in London

    Louise Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although there is growing interest in qualitative longitudinal research as a way of taking time seriously (ADAM, 2000, this approach still holds many challenges for the social researcher. In this article we use a reflexive approach, drawing on a Goffmanian analysis of self-presentation, to consider our separate but related experience of re-interviewing Polish migrants over intervals of several years. In each case, the repeat interviews were not part of the original research design and were undertaken years later for a range of different reasons. After briefly presenting case studies from our individual interviews, we critically reflect upon some opportunities and challenges of researching change through time. We first consider the ways in which repeat interviews may challenge earlier analyses and findings. We then explore some of the ethical considerations involved in unplanned repeat interviews. Next, we reflect upon dilemmas about self-revelation, particularly in contexts of social media and on-line technologies. Finally, we discuss what we have learned from our different experiences and what implications there are for this kind of ad hoc longitudinal research in migration studies. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1602266

  15. Optical coherence tomography at follow-up after percutaneous coronary intervention: relationship between procedural dissections, stent strut malapposition and stent healing

    Radu, Maria; Jørgensen, Erik; Kelbæk, Henning

    2011-01-01

    To analyse the relationship between strut apposition as visualised with optical coherence tomography (OCT) at follow-up and clinical and procedural characteristics at stent implantation, and to examine the relationship between strut apposition and stent healing.......To analyse the relationship between strut apposition as visualised with optical coherence tomography (OCT) at follow-up and clinical and procedural characteristics at stent implantation, and to examine the relationship between strut apposition and stent healing....

  16. Detection of a Type IIn Supernova in Optical Follow-up Observations of IceCube Neutrino Events

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory pursues a follow-up program selecting interesting neutrino events in real-time and issuing alerts for electromagnetic follow-up observations. In 2012 March, the most significant neutrino alert during the first three years of operation was issued by IceCube. In the follow-up observations performed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) PTF12csy was found 0.degrees 2 away from the neutrino alert direction, with an error radius of 0...

  17. Emotional experiences predict the conversion of individuals with Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome to psychosis: A six-month follow up study

    Fa Zhan Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored the conversion rate in individuals with Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (APS and potential predictor for transition in China. Sixty-three participants were identified as APS were followed up six months later. The results showed that 17% of individuals with APS converted to psychosis. The converters exhibited poorer emotional experience and expression than the non-converters at baseline. A further binary logistic regression analysis showed that emotional experience could predict the transition (Wald = 4.18, p = 0.041, 95% CI = 1.04~6.82. The current study suggested an important role of emotional processing in the prediction of the development of full-blown psychosis.

  18. Spontaneous closure of the idiopathic macular hole. Follow-up of this case by optical coherence tomography and microperimetry MP1

    Molina Martin, Julio Cesar; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Violeta; Mendoza Santiesteban, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The case of spontaneous closure of a stage 4 idiopathic macular hole at followed up by Optical Coherence Tomography and microperimetry MP1 before and after the closure was presented. The spontaneous closure of a stage 4 macular hole is rare but it can occur in patients with hole upper diameters less than 150 μm. The OCT and the microperimetry MP1 are very useful tools in the diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up of this maculopathy

  19. Restoration of the photoreceptor layer and improvement of visual acuity in successfully treated optic disc pit maculopathy: a long follow-up study by optical coherence tomography.

    Theodossiadis, George P; Grigoropoulos, Vlassis G; Liarakos, Vasilis S; Rouvas, Alexandros; Emfietzoglou, Ioannis; Theodossiadis, Panagiotis G

    2012-07-01

    To investigate by optical coherence tomography (OCT) the evolution of the photoreceptor layer and its association with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in optic disc pit (ODP) maculopathy after successful surgical treatment. Fourteen eyes of 14 patients were included in this study, and followed up from 36 to 95 months (mean 57.36 ± 18.32 months). The follow-up period started at the time of complete subretinal fluid absorption. Examination was performed by time-domain OCT before and after treatment. Spectral-domain OCT was used after treatment. Parameters assessed were type of elevation, central foveal thickness, time elapsed from onset to treatment, type of treatment, BCVA, and inner segment outer segment (IS/OS) junction line. The IS/OS junction was characterized after treatment as intact, interrupted, or absent (not distinguishable). Significant restoration of the IS/OS junction line was first noticed between 6 and 12 months after fluid absorption (p = 0.02; Wilcoxon signed rank test). Restoration was continuous up to the 24th month of postoperative examination after fluid absorption (p = 0.14; Wilcoxon signed rank test). BCVA was 0.99 ± 0.38 logMar before treatment, 0.81 ± 0.26 logMar (p = 0.011; paired t-test) immediately after fluid absorption and 0.61 ± 0.33 logMar (p = 0.026; one-way ANOVA) 24 months after fluid resolution. BCVA was significantly positively correlated with the integrity of the IS/OS junction line during follow-up (Pearson r = 0.775; p final photoreceptor layer condition and BCVA immediately after fluid absorption are the main factors predicting final BCVA after successful surgical treatment of ODP maculopathy.

  20. Primary non-refluxive megaureter in children: single-center experience and follow-up of 212 patients.

    Rubenwolf, P; Herrmann-Nuber, J; Schreckenberger, M; Stein, R; Beetz, R

    2016-11-01

    Primary non-refluxing megaureter (pMU) is a multifaceted and challenging congenital pathology of the urinary tract. We report our 23-year experience with this anomaly in terms of presentation, diagnostic work-up and management. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 212 children diagnosed with pMU between 1986 and 2009 at our institution. Mean follow-up was 45.17 (0-192) months. Of the total, 168 (79 %) children presented with upper urinary tract dilation on perinatal ultrasound screening. In 44 (21 %) patients, the diagnosis was made following diagnostic work-up of a urinary tract infection (UTI, 18 %) or flank pain (3 %). In total, 203 of 254 pMUs (79.9 %) were successfully treated conservatively during the 23-year observation period. Forty-eight children (23 %) underwent ureteric reimplantation. UTIs occurred in 91 of 212 children (43 %). Of these, 41 (45 %) occurred despite antibacterial infection prophylaxis. Within the past three decades, there has been a marked shift from surgical toward conservative therapy at our institution. Neonatal renal ultrasound is the method of choice to timely identify children with pMU and, alongside dynamic renography, to monitor the clinical course. Nowadays, only a minor subset of children with asymptomatic course requires surgical correction. Antibacterial prophylaxis has the potential to reduce the risk of febrile UTIs. Prospective randomized studies are warranted to provide evidence of the beneficial effect of antibacterial prophylaxis.

  1. Lumbar total disc replacement from an extreme lateral approach: clinical experience with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up.

    Pimenta, Luiz; Oliveira, Leonardo; Schaffa, Thomas; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Marchi, Luis

    2011-01-01

    current lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) devices require an anterior approach for implantation. This approach has inherent limitations, including risks to abdominal structures and the need for resection of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL). Placement of a TDR device from a true lateral (extreme lateral interbody fusion [XLIF]) approach is thought to offer a less invasive option to access the disc space, preserving the stabilizing ligaments and avoiding scarring of anterior vasculature. In this study, the authors attempted to quantify the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a lateral approach to lumbar TDR from a prospective, single-center experience. a TDR device designed for implantation through a true lateral, retroperitoneal, transpsoas approach (XLIF) was implanted in 36 patients with discography-confirmed 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease. Clinical (pain and function) and radiographic (range of motion [ROM]) data were prospectively collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and serially for a minimum of 24 months' follow-up. thirty-six surgeries were performed in 16 men and 20 women (mean age 42.6 years). Surgeries included 15 single-level TDR procedures at L3-4 or L4-5, three 2-level TDR procedures spanning L3-4 and L4-5, and 18 hybrid procedures (anterior lumbar interbody fusion [ALIF]) at L5-S1 and TDR at L4-5 [17] or L3-4 [1]). Operative time averaged 130 minutes, with an average blood loss of 60 ml and no intraoperative complications. Postoperative radiographs showed good device placement. All patients were walking within 12 hours of surgery and all but 9 were discharged the next day (7 of 9 had hybrid TDR/ALIF procedures). Five patients (13.8%) had psoas weakness and 3 (8.3%) had anterior thigh numbness postoperatively, both resolving within 2 weeks. One patient (2.8%) demonstrated weakness of the leg ipsilateral to the approach side, which lasted through the 3-month visit but was resolved by the 6-month visit. One patient (2.8%) was

  2. Intervention among new parents followed up by an interview study exploring their experiences of telemedicine after early postnatal discharge.

    Danbjørg, D B; Wagner, L; Kristensen, B R; Clemensen, J

    2015-06-01

    a move towards earlier postnatal discharge raises the challenge of finding new ways to support families when they are discharged early after childbirth. to explore how postnatal parents experienced the use of telemedicine following early discharge from hospital (i.e. 24 hours after childbirth) by investigating if they consider that their postnatal needs are met, and whether or not they experience a sense of security and parental self-efficacy. intervention followed by a qualitative interview study. The intervention took place on a postnatal ward with approximately 1000 births a year. An app including chat, a knowledgebase and automated messages was trialled between postnatal parents at home and the hospital. Parents had access to the app for seven days after discharge. 42 new mothers were recruited from the postnatal ward in accordance with the inclusion criteria (i.e. discharged within 24 hours of childbirth). Both parents were invited for interview. 42 sets of parents participated in the trial, and 28 sets agreed to be interviewed. Interviews (n=28) were conducted with 27 mothers and 11 fathers. Parents were interviewed together in 10 cases, 17 mothers were interviewed alone, and one father was interviewed alone. The data analysis was inspired by systematic text condensation based on Giorgi׳s descriptive phenomenological method. parents were confident in use of the app, and did not experience any barriers in contacting the nurses via asynchronous communication. Parents received timely information and guidance by communicating online, and felt that their follow-up support needs were met. parents viewed the app as a lifeline, and saw it as a means of informing and guiding them following early discharge from hospital after childbirth. As such, this app shows potential for enhancing self-efficacy and postnatal sense of security. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimal Length of Follow-up for the Detection of Unsuccessful Pediatric Pyeloplasty: A Single-Center Experience

    Utsav K. Bansal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesTo assess the optimal length of follow-up for patients undergoing both open and minimally invasive pyeloplasties to ensure prompt detection of a recurrent obstruction. There are no standard guidelines on ideal follow-up and imaging post-pediatric pyeloplasty currently.MethodsA retrospective chart review identified 264 patients (<18 years old who underwent pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction obstruction between April 2002 and December 2014. Ultrasound was obtained every 3–4 months for the first year following pyeloplasty and thereafter at discretion of treating physician. Patient characteristics including symptoms and imaging were reviewed.ResultsOf the 264 patients, 72% were male with mean age of 51 months and follow-up of 26.8 months. Approximately 73% followed up to 3 years. Fourteen patients (5.3% had a recurrent obstruction. Among the failures, 85% were diagnosed and underwent successful redo pyeloplasty within 3 years. Six infants had a recurrence (43% of all unsuccessful surgeries and were diagnosed within 3 years of the initial surgery. Patients undergoing a minimally invasive procedure were less likely to be followed for more than 3 years compared to an open procedure (p < 0.001. Patients with severe hydronephrosis preoperatively were followed longer (p = 0.031. Age at surgery and type of surgical approach (p < 0.01 were significant predictors of length of follow-up in a negative binomial regression.ConclusionBased on the results, a minimum of 3 years of follow-up is necessary to detect the majority of recurrent obstructions. Those patients who have higher than average lengths of follow-up tend to be younger and/or underwent an open surgical approach.

  4. New graduate nurses' experiences in a clinical specialty: a follow up study of newcomer perceptions of transitional support.

    Hussein, Rafic; Everett, Bronwyn; Ramjan, Lucie M; Hu, Wendy; Salamonson, Yenna

    2017-01-01

    Given the increasing complexity of acute care settings, high patient acuity and demanding workloads, new graduate nurses continue to require greater levels of support to manage rising patient clinical care needs. Little is known about how change in new graduate nurses' satisfaction with clinical supervision and the practice environment impacts on their transitioning experience and expectations during first year of practice. This study aimed to examine change in new graduate nurses' perceptions over the 12-month Transitional Support Program, and identify how organizational factors and elements of clinical supervision influenced their experiences. Using a convergent mixed methods design, a prospective survey with open-ended questions was administered to new graduate nurses' working in a tertiary level teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia. Nurses were surveyed at baseline (8-10 weeks) and follow-up (10-12 months) between May 2012 and August 2013. Two standardised instruments: the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS-26) and the Practice Environment Scale Australia (PES-AUS) were used. In addition to socio-demographic data, single -item measures were used to rate new graduate nurses' confidence, clinical capability and support received. Participants were also able to provide open-ended comments explaining their responses. Free-text responses to the open-ended questions were initially reviewed for emergent themes, then coded as either positive or negative aspects of these preliminary themes. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the quantitative data and the qualitative data was analysed using conventional content analysis (CCA). The study was approved by the relevant Human Research Ethics Committees. Eighty seven new graduate nurses completed the follow-up surveys, representing a 76% response rate. The median age was 23 years (Range: 20 to 53). No change was seen in new graduate nurses' satisfaction with clinical supervision (mean MCSS

  5. Longitudinal relationship between traumatic brain injury and the risk of incident optic neuropathy: A 10-year follow-up nationally representative Taiwan survey.

    Chen, Ying-Jen; Liang, Chang-Min; Tai, Ming-Cheng; Chang, Yun-Hsiang; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Lin, Fu-Huang; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Chien, Wu-Chien

    2017-10-17

    Accumulating evidences had shown that traumatic brain injury was associated with visual impairment or vision loss. However, there were a limited number of empirical studies regarding the longitudinal relationship between traumatic brain injury and incident optic neuropathy. We studied a cohort from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance data comprising 553918 participants with traumatic brain injury and optic neuropathy-free in the case group and 1107836 individuals without traumatic brain injury in the control group from 1st January 2000. After the index date until the end of 2010, Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to compare the risk of incident optic neuropathy. During the follow-up period, case group was more likely to develop incident optic neuropathy (0.24%) than the control group (0.11%). Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that the case group had a 3-fold increased risk of optic neuropathy (HR = 3.017, 95% CI = 2.767-3.289, p optic neuropathy. Our study provided evidence of the increased risk of incident optic neuropathy after traumatic brain injury during a 10-year follow-up period. Patients with traumatic brain injury required periodic and thorough eye examinations for incident optic neuropathy to prevent potentially irreversible vision loss.

  6. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy 4 years after radiation: report of a case followed up with MRI

    Piquemal, R.; Renard, J.P.; Cottier, J.P.; Herbreteau, D.; Arsene, S.; Rospars, C.; Lioret, E.; Jan, M.

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced optic neuropathy in a 32-year-old man with Cushing's disease and a recurrent tumour of the left cavernous sinus. The patient experienced rapid, painless loss of vision 4 years after treatment without recurrence of tumour or other visual disorder. MRI showed enlargement and contrast enhancement of the optic chiasm. A year later the patient was almost blind and MRI showed atrophy and persistent contrast enhancement of the chiasm. (orig.)

  7. Evolution of an Astrocytic Hamartoma of the Optic Nerve Head in a Patient with Retinitis Pigmentosa – Photographic Documentation over 2 Years of Follow-Up

    Loukianou, Eleni; Kisma, Nacima; Pal, Bishwanathan

    2011-01-01

    Aim To report photographically the evolution of an astrocytic hamartoma of the left optic nerve head over a 2-year follow-up in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods A 14-year-old boy was seen in the medical retina clinic with a 3-year history of night blindness. Best corrected visual acuity was 6/18 in both eyes. Colour vision was normal in both eyes and confrontation fields showed peripheral constriction. Fundus examination revealed bone spicule pigmentary changes at the retinal mid periphery typical of retinitis pigmentosa and superficial globules at the margins of both optic nerve heads. Electrodiagnostic tests confirmed moderately severe rod cone dystrophy with macular involvement bilaterally. Results Two years later, the ocular examination was unchanged except for the appearance of the optic nerve head lesion in the left eye. There was an increase in the size of the lesion which was diagnosed as an astrocytic hamartoma. Further investigations were recommended to exclude neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis. Conclusion Astrocytic hamartomas of the optic nerve head and optic nerve head drusen have both been described in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. They can be a diagnostic dilemma although drusen are more common (10%). To differentiate these two entities it is very important to document any growth during the follow-up period which is suggestive of astrocytic hamartoma rather than optic disc drusen. PMID:21347192

  8. Evolution of an Astrocytic Hamartoma of the Optic Nerve Head in a Patient with Retinitis Pigmentosa - Photographic Documentation over 2 Years of Follow-Up.

    Loukianou, Eleni; Kisma, Nacima; Pal, Bishwanathan

    2011-02-02

    To report photographically the evolution of an astrocytic hamartoma of the left optic nerve head over a 2-year follow-up in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa. A 14-year-old boy was seen in the medical retina clinic with a 3-year history of night blindness. Best corrected visual acuity was 6/18 in both eyes. Colour vision was normal in both eyes and confrontation fields showed peripheral constriction. Fundus examination revealed bone spicule pigmentary changes at the retinal mid periphery typical of retinitis pigmentosa and superficial globules at the margins of both optic nerve heads. Electrodiagnostic tests confirmed moderately severe rod cone dystrophy with macular involvement bilaterally. Two years later, the ocular examination was unchanged except for the appearance of the optic nerve head lesion in the left eye. There was an increase in the size of the lesion which was diagnosed as an astrocytic hamartoma. Further investigations were recommended to exclude neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis. Astrocytic hamartomas of the optic nerve head and optic nerve head drusen have both been described in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. They can be a diagnostic dilemma although drusen are more common (10%). To differentiate these two entities it is very important to document any growth during the follow-up period which is suggestive of astrocytic hamartoma rather than optic disc drusen.

  9. Evolution of an Astrocytic Hamartoma of the Optic Nerve Head in a Patient with Retinitis Pigmentosa – Photographic Documentation over 2 Years of Follow-Up

    Eleni Loukianou

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report photographically the evolution of an astrocytic hamartoma of the left optic nerve head over a 2-year follow-up in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods: A 14-year-old boy was seen in the medical retina clinic with a 3-year history of night blindness. Best corrected visual acuity was 6/18 in both eyes. Colour vision was normal in both eyes and confrontation fields showed peripheral constriction. Fundus examination revealed bone spicule pigmentary changes at the retinal mid periphery typical of retinitis pigmentosa and superficial globules at the margins of both optic nerve heads. Electrodiagnostic tests confirmed moderately severe rod cone dystrophy with macular involvement bilaterally. Results: Two years later, the ocular examination was unchanged except for the appearance of the optic nerve head lesion in the left eye. There was an increase in the size of the lesion which was diagnosed as an astrocytic hamartoma. Further investigations were recommended to exclude neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis. Conclusion: Astrocytic hamartomas of the optic nerve head and optic nerve head drusen have both been described in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. They can be a diagnostic dilemma although drusen are more common (10%. To differentiate these two entities it is very important to document any growth during the follow-up period which is suggestive of astrocytic hamartoma rather than optic disc drusen.

  10. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy 4 years after radiation: report of a case followed up with MRI

    Piquemal, R.; Renard, J.P. [Service de Medecine Interne A, Hopital Bretonneau, Tours (France); Cottier, J.P.; Herbreteau, D. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Hopital Bretonneau, Tours (France); Arsene, S.; Rospars, C. [Service d`Ophthalmologie, Hopital Bretonneau, Tpurs (France); Lioret, E.; Jan, M. [Service de Neurochirurgie, Hopital Bretonneau, Tours (France)

    1998-07-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced optic neuropathy in a 32-year-old man with Cushing`s disease and a recurrent tumour of the left cavernous sinus. The patient experienced rapid, painless loss of vision 4 years after treatment without recurrence of tumour or other visual disorder. MRI showed enlargement and contrast enhancement of the optic chiasm. A year later the patient was almost blind and MRI showed atrophy and persistent contrast enhancement of the chiasm. (orig.) With 3 figs., 13 refs.

  11. Total aortic arch replacement with the frozen elephant trunk technique: 10-year follow-up single-centre experience.

    Ius, Fabio; Fleissner, Felix; Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Karck, Matthias; Martens, Andreas; Haverich, Axel; Shrestha, Malakh

    2013-11-01

    Since August 2001, the frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique has been used at our institution to treat degenerative or dissecting aneurysms involving the aortic arch and descending aorta as a potential 'single-stage' procedure. The aim of this study was to review our FET experience and to present the 10-year results. Between August 2001 and January 2012, 131 patients underwent FET implant with three different prostheses: the custom-made Chavan-Haverich (n = 66), the Jotec E-vita (n = 30) and the Vascutek Thoraflex (n = 35) prostheses. Concomitant procedures included aortic valve-sparing operations (David, n = 17) and aortic root replacement (Bentall, n = 25). Patient records and the first postoperative and last available computer tomography (CT) were retrospectively reviewed. Incidence of rethoracotomy for bleeding, stroke, spinal cord injury, prolonged ventilatory support (>96 h) and acute renal failure requiring dialysis were 18, 11, 1, 41 and 16%, respectively. In-hospital mortality was 15%. The mean follow-up was 42 ± 37 (range 1-134 months). At 1, 5 and 10 years, survivals were 82 ± 3, 72 ± 5 and 58 ± 8%, respectively. Freedoms from distal aortic operation were 81 ± 4, 67 ± 5 and 43 ± 13%, respectively. Thirty-six patients underwent 40 distal aortic operations, either open surgical (n = 22, 55%) or endovascular (n = 18, 45%). Chronic aortic dissection was identified as an independent risk factor for distal aortic operation (odds ratio = 3.8; 95% confidence interval 1.5-9.3; P = 0.004). At last CT control, false-lumen thrombosis rates up to 93% were achieved around the stent graft. An FET concept adds to the armament of the surgeon in the treatment of complex and diverse aortic arch pathologies. The preoperative patient risk profile explains the postoperative morbidity and in-hospital mortality. The FET can potentially be still a 'one-stage' procedure in selected patients. However, the extension of FET to patients with extensive aortic aneurysms has led

  12. Serological follow-up of infants born to mothers with positive syphilis serology - real-world experiences.

    Wallace, Harriet E; Broomhall, Harriet M; Isitt, Catherine E; Miall, Lawrence S; Wilson, Janet D

    2016-11-01

    The 2008 UK syphilis guideline recommends infants born to women with any positive syphilis serology be followed up until both treponemal and nontreponemal tests are negative to exclude congenital syphilis, whereas Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines recommend using only nontreponemal tests. Historically, we had low infant follow-up rates with no coherent pathways. We initiated a change in multidisciplinary team practice of infant testing for syphilis in 2011 and evaluated the results before and after by retrospective review of testing of infants born to women with positive syphilis serology between 2005 and 2012. A total of 28 infants' mothers were treated in pregnancy (termed 'high risk'); 26 had adequate treatment prior to pregnancy (termed 'low risk'). There was a significant increase in serological testing after 2011 compared with before (83% versus 48%; OR 5.07 [95% CI 1.22-22.77] p = 0.01) but mainly in low risk infants with no significant improvement in high risk infants who are the priority group. Using nontreponemal tests only in the infants would have reduced the tests required by at least 50%, allowing health resources to be concentrated on achieving adequate follow-up for those infants most at risk. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Treatment and Follow Up

    ... Close Celiac Disease Understanding Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Symptoms Screening and Diagnosis Treatment and Follow-Up Dermatitis ... you find the right healthcare practitioner to discuss symptoms, diagnose, and ... Our nationwide Healthcare Practitioner Directory lists primary care ...

  14. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES. IV. RESULTS OF THE 2014 FOLLOW-UP CAMPAIGN

    Ricci, F.; Massaro, F.; Landoni, M.; D’Abrusco, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Stern, D.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.

    2015-01-01

    The extragalactic γ-ray sky is dominated by the emission arising from blazars, one of the most peculiar classes of radio-loud active galaxies. Since the launch of Fermi several methods were developed to search for blazars as potential counterparts of unidentified γ-ray sources (UGSs). To confirm the nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic observations are necessary. In 2013 we started a spectroscopic campaign to investigate γ-ray blazar candidates selected according to different procedures. The main goals of our campaign are: (1) to confirm the nature of these candidates, and (2) whenever possible, determine their redshifts. Optical spectroscopic observations will also permit us to verify the robustness of the proposed associations and check for the presence of possible source class contaminants to our counterpart selection. This paper reports the results of observations carried out in 2014 in the northern hemisphere with Kitt Peak National Observatory and in the southern hemisphere with the Southern Astrophysical Research telescopes. We also report three sources observed with the Magellan and Palomar telescopes. Our selection of blazar-like sources that could be potential counterparts of UGSs is based on their peculiar infrared colors and on their combination with radio observations both at high and low frequencies (i.e., above and below ∼1 GHz) in publicly available large radio surveys. We present the optical spectra of 27 objects. We confirm the blazar-like nature of nine sources that appear to be potential low-energy counterparts of UGSs. Then we present new spectroscopic observations of 10 active galaxies of uncertain type associated with Fermi sources, classifying all of them as blazars. In addition, we present the spectra for five known γ-ray blazars with uncertain redshift estimates and three BL Lac candidates that were observed during our campaign. We also report the case for WISE J173052.85−035247.2, candidate counterpart of the

  15. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES. IV. RESULTS OF THE 2014 FOLLOW-UP CAMPAIGN

    Ricci, F. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146, Roma (Italy); Massaro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Landoni, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Emilio Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); D’Abrusco, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-221, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G., E-mail: riccif@fis.uniroma3.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    The extragalactic γ-ray sky is dominated by the emission arising from blazars, one of the most peculiar classes of radio-loud active galaxies. Since the launch of Fermi several methods were developed to search for blazars as potential counterparts of unidentified γ-ray sources (UGSs). To confirm the nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic observations are necessary. In 2013 we started a spectroscopic campaign to investigate γ-ray blazar candidates selected according to different procedures. The main goals of our campaign are: (1) to confirm the nature of these candidates, and (2) whenever possible, determine their redshifts. Optical spectroscopic observations will also permit us to verify the robustness of the proposed associations and check for the presence of possible source class contaminants to our counterpart selection. This paper reports the results of observations carried out in 2014 in the northern hemisphere with Kitt Peak National Observatory and in the southern hemisphere with the Southern Astrophysical Research telescopes. We also report three sources observed with the Magellan and Palomar telescopes. Our selection of blazar-like sources that could be potential counterparts of UGSs is based on their peculiar infrared colors and on their combination with radio observations both at high and low frequencies (i.e., above and below ∼1 GHz) in publicly available large radio surveys. We present the optical spectra of 27 objects. We confirm the blazar-like nature of nine sources that appear to be potential low-energy counterparts of UGSs. Then we present new spectroscopic observations of 10 active galaxies of uncertain type associated with Fermi sources, classifying all of them as blazars. In addition, we present the spectra for five known γ-ray blazars with uncertain redshift estimates and three BL Lac candidates that were observed during our campaign. We also report the case for WISE J173052.85−035247.2, candidate counterpart of the

  16. Alcohol-related hospital admissions: Missed opportunities for follow up? A focus group study about general practitioners' experiences

    Lid, Torgeir Gilje; Oppedal, Kristian; Pedersen, Bolette

    2012-01-01

    in the hospital had been recognised by the GP and how this knowledge affected their follow up of the patient's alcohol problem. Systematic text condensation was applied for analysis. Findings: A majority of the GPs had experienced patients with already recognised alcohol problems being rediscovered...... by the hospital staff. Still, they presented examples of how seeing the patient in a different context might present new opportunities. Few participants had received adequate information from the hospital about their patient's alcohol status, and they emphasised that a report about what had happened and what...

  17. Macular thickness and volume after uncomplicated phacoemulsification surgery evaluated by optical coherence tomography. A one-year follow-up.

    Kecik, Dariusz; Makowiec-Tabernacka, Marta; Golebiewska, Joanna; Moneta-Wielgos, Joanna; Kasprzak, Jan

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate changes in the macular thickness and volume using optical coherence tomography in patients after phacoemulsification and intracapsular implantation of a foldable intraocular lens. The study included 82 patients (37 males and 45 females) after phacoemulsification and intracapsular implantaion of the same type of a foldable intraocular lens, without any other eye disease. Phacoemulsification was performed with an INFINITI machine. In all patients, macular thickness and volume were measured with an optical coherence tomograph (Stratus OCT) using the Fast Macular Thickness Map. The OCT evaluation was performed on days 1, 7, 30 and 90 postoperatively. In 58 patients (71%), it was additionally performed at 12 months after surgery and in 52 patients (63%) the macular parameters in the healthy and operated eyes were compared. A statistically significant increase in the minimal retinal thickness was observed on days 30 (p<0.0005) and 90 (p<0.005) postoperatively compared to post-operative day 1. A statistically significant increase in the foveal volume was seen on days 30 (p<0.00005) and 90 (p<0.0005). A statistically significant increase in the volume of the entire macula was found on days 7, 30 and 90 (p<0.00005). Uncomplicated cataract phacoemulsification is followed by increases in the central retinal thickness, foveal volume and volume of the entire macula on days 30 and 90 and at 12 months postoperatively. Further observation of patients is required to confirm whether the macular parameters will return to their values on day 1 postoperatively and if so, when this will occur.

  18. Primitive experience of three dimensional multi-slice spiral CT angiography for the follow-up of intracranial aneurysm clipping

    Yang Yunjun; Chen Weijian; Hu Zhangyong; Wu Enfu; Wang Meihao; Zhuge Qichuan; Zhongming; Cheng Jingliang; Ren Cuiping; Zhang Yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate multi-slice three-dimensional CT angiography (MS 3D-CTA) for the follow-up of intracranial aneurysm clipping. Methods: MS 3D-CTA of 16 patients with intracranial aneurysm clipping were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were scanned on a 16-slice spiral CT (GE Lightspeed pro). Volume rendering(VR), thin maximum intensity projection(thin MIP) and multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) were employed in image postprocessing in all cases. Results: There were 17 clips in the 16 patients with aneurysm clipping. Six clips were located at the posterior communicating artery, 5 at the anterior communicating artery, 4 at the middle cerebral artery, and the remaining 2 clips were located at the pericallosal artery, in 1 patient. There were no abnormalities found in the aneurysm clipping region in 7 cases by MS 3D- CTA. There were residual aneurysm in 2 cases, parent artery stenosis in 4 cases, and artery spasm in 3 eases. There was no parent artery occlusion and clip displacement in all cases. VR showed excellent 3D spacial relations between the clip and parent artery in 12 cases, and showed good relations in 3 cases. The 1 case with 2 clips in the pericallosal artery showed heavy beam-hardening artifacts. The size and shape of aneurysm clips were clearly depicted by MPR and thin MIP, while 3D spacial relation of aneurysm clip and parent artery were poorly showed. Conclusion: MS 3D-CTA is a safe and efficient method for the follow-up of intracranialaneurysm clipping. Combined VR with MPR or thin MIP can well reveal postoperative changes after aneurysm clipping. (authors)

  19. The relationship between post-stent strut apposition and follow-up strut coverage assessed by a contour plot optical coherence tomography analysis.

    Kim, Jung-Sun; Ha, Jinyong; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Shin, Dong-Ho; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2014-06-01

    This study sought to evaluate the relationship between post-stent strut apposition and follow-up strut coverage using contour plot optical coherence tomographic analysis. Tracking the fate of interested regions of struts at different time points has not been investigated. Post-intervention and 6-month follow-up optical coherence tomographic evaluations were performed in 82 patients treated with biolimus- (n = 37) or sirolimus-eluting stents (n = 45). Post-stent apposition was classified as embedded, apposed, or malapposed. For volumetric stent evaluation, the post-intervention strut-artery distance and the neointimal thickness at follow-up were measured as a function of the circumferential arc length and longitudinal stent length. Computer-generated contour plots of the strut-artery distance and neointimal thickness were compared. The percentages of embedded and malapposed struts after intervention were 1.8% (Interquartile range [IQR]: 0.6% to 6.2%) and 2.3% (IQR: 0.5% to 5.2%), respectively. The percentages of uncovered and malapposed struts at 6 months were 16.0% (IQR: 7.4% to 33.3%) and 0% (IQR: 0% to 0.7%), respectively. The percentage of uncovered struts at 6 months varied significantly with post-stent strut apposition (0% [IQR: 0% to 11.4%] in embedded, 16.3% [IQR: 8.1% to 31.3%] in apposed, and 26.8% [IQR: 0% to 56.3%] in malapposed, p < 0.001 for all pairwise comparisons). In lesions without tissue prolapse, embedded struts were all covered (100% covered struts) compared with those with tissue prolapse (76.8% covered, p < 0.001). The optical coherence tomography-guided optimization of stent strut apposition enhances strut coverage at follow-up. This comprehensive method for evaluating strut apposition may provide more useful information to understanding the serial changes in strut coverage. (Neointimal Coverage After Implantation of Biolimus Eluting Stent With Biodegradable Polymer: Optical Coherence Tomographic Assessment According to the Treatment of

  20. Follow-Up Testing

    ... second should occur after 1 year on the gluten-free diet. After that, a celiac should receive follow-up ... test result is straightforward—a celiac on the gluten-free diet should have a negative test. The numerical value ...

  1. Long-term follow-up of children with high-risk neuroblastoma: the ENSG5 trial experience.

    Moreno, Lucas; Vaidya, Sucheta J; Pinkerton, C Ross; Lewis, Ian J; Imeson, John; Machin, David; Pearson, Andrew D J

    2013-07-01

    Therapy for high-risk neuroblastoma is intensive and multimodal, and significant long-term adverse effects have been described. The aim of this study was to identify the nature and severity of late complications of metastatic neuroblastoma survivors included in the ENSG5 clinical trial. The trial protocol included induction chemotherapy (randomized "Standard" OPEC/OJEC vs. "Rapid" COJEC), surgery of primary tumor and high-dose melphalan with stem cell rescue. Two hundred and sixty-two children were randomized, 69 survived >5 years, and 57 were analyzed. Data were obtained from the ENSG5 trial database and verified with questionnaires sent to participating centers. Median follow-up was 12.9 (6.9-16.5) years. No differences were found in late toxicities between treatment arms. Twenty-eight children (49.1%) developed hearing loss. Nine patients (15.8%) developed glomerular filtration rate <80 ml/min/1.73 m(2), but no cases of chronic renal failure were documented. Endocrine complications (28.1% of children) included mainly hypogonadism and delayed growth. Four children developed second malignancies, three of them 5 years after diagnosis: one osteosarcoma, one carcinoma of the parotid gland and one ependymoma. There were no hematological malignancies or deaths in remission. This study analyzed a wide cohort of high-risk neuroblastoma survivors from a multi-institutional randomized trial and established the profile of long-term toxicity within the setting of an international clinical trial. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Effectiveness of percutaneous metal stent placement in cholangiocarcinoma patients with midterm follow-up: Single center experience

    Kose, Fatih; Oguzkurt, Levent; Besen, Ayberk; Sumbul, Taner; Sezer, Ahmet; Karadeniz, Cemile; Disel, Umut; Mertsoylu, Huseyin; Ozyilkan, Ozgur

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma present with high rate of local complications. The primary aim of this study is to report clinical course of advanced cholangiocarcinoma patients those who were presented with biliary obstruction and treated with percutaneous biliary stenting. Material and methods: Patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic cholangiocarcinoma followed by our center for a period of 4 years were analyzed. For statistical analysis demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, primary biliary drainage method, metal stent occlusion rate, time to stent occlusion, and overall survival rates were recorded. Results: A total of 34 eligible patients were analyzed. 27 patients had metal stent placement. These 27 patients formed the basis of this study. Median overall survival (OS) was 6.0 months. After metal stent deployment bilurubin levels were normalized within a mean of 10 days. During the follow-up period, 13 patients were experienced metal stent occlusion. Median TtSO was 10 weeks. Cytotoxic chemotherapy was administered to 14 (52%) patients. Patients without stent dysfunction had significantly higher rate of chemotherapy exposure rate (p = 0.021). Statistical analysis, however, failed to exhibit significant effect of stent dysfunction on OS. Conclusion: In advanced cholangiocarcinoma, relief of bile duct obstruction is an important part of the initial patient management. This study therefore described the clinical value of percutaneous metal stent in cholangiocarcinoma patients and raises the question about patency of metal stent in cholangiocarcinoma whether we can expect success similar to the success achieved in pancreas carcinoma.

  3. Effectiveness of percutaneous metal stent placement in cholangiocarcinoma patients with midterm follow-up: Single center experience

    Kose, Fatih, E-mail: fatihkose@gmail.com [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology, Adana (Turkey); Oguzkurt, Levent [Department of Interventional Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Besen, Ayberk; Sumbul, Taner; Sezer, Ahmet; Karadeniz, Cemile; Disel, Umut; Mertsoylu, Huseyin; Ozyilkan, Ozgur [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology, Adana (Turkey)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma present with high rate of local complications. The primary aim of this study is to report clinical course of advanced cholangiocarcinoma patients those who were presented with biliary obstruction and treated with percutaneous biliary stenting. Material and methods: Patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic cholangiocarcinoma followed by our center for a period of 4 years were analyzed. For statistical analysis demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, primary biliary drainage method, metal stent occlusion rate, time to stent occlusion, and overall survival rates were recorded. Results: A total of 34 eligible patients were analyzed. 27 patients had metal stent placement. These 27 patients formed the basis of this study. Median overall survival (OS) was 6.0 months. After metal stent deployment bilurubin levels were normalized within a mean of 10 days. During the follow-up period, 13 patients were experienced metal stent occlusion. Median TtSO was 10 weeks. Cytotoxic chemotherapy was administered to 14 (52%) patients. Patients without stent dysfunction had significantly higher rate of chemotherapy exposure rate (p = 0.021). Statistical analysis, however, failed to exhibit significant effect of stent dysfunction on OS. Conclusion: In advanced cholangiocarcinoma, relief of bile duct obstruction is an important part of the initial patient management. This study therefore described the clinical value of percutaneous metal stent in cholangiocarcinoma patients and raises the question about patency of metal stent in cholangiocarcinoma whether we can expect success similar to the success achieved in pancreas carcinoma.

  4. Diagnosis, Treatment and Long-Term Follow Up of Patients with ADA Deficiency: a Single-Center Experience.

    Baffelli, Renata; Notarangelo, Lucia D; Imberti, Luisa; Hershfield, Michael S; Serana, Federico; Santisteban, Ines; Bolda, Federica; Porta, Fulvio; Lanfranchi, Arnalda

    2015-10-01

    We carried out a retrospective analysis of 27 patients with Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) deficiency diagnosed in a single center from 1997 to the 2013, for evaluating whether data regarding types of disease-inducing mutations, biochemical and immunological features as well as clinical outcomes of patients treated with enzyme replacement or transplantation, were comparable to those obtained in multicenter studies. The ADA deficiency diagnosis was performed with biochemical, immunological and molecular techniques. Ten patients treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and three in treatment with enzyme replacement were followed up in our center. Twenty-four different mutations were identified and five were not previously reported. Identical mutations were found among patients from the same Romani ethnic group or from the same geographical region. A more rapid recovery was observed in enzyme replacement treated patients in comparison with those transplanted that, however, showed a continuous and long-lasting improvement both in terms of immune and metabolic recovery. The data obtained in our single center are comparable with those that have been reported in multicenter surveys.

  5. Aortic aneurysm sac pressure measurements after endovascular repair using an implantable remote sensor: initial experience and short-term follow-up

    Hoppe, Hanno; Kaufman, John A.; Segall, Jocelyn A.; Liem, Timothy K.; Landry, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this single-center study was to report our initial experience with an implantable remote pressure sensor for aneurysm sac pressure measurement in patients post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) including short-term follow-up. A pressure sensor (EndoSure, Atlanta, GA) was implanted in 12 patients treated with different commercially available aortic endografts for EVAR. Pressure was read pre- and post-EVAR in the operating room. One-month follow-up (30 days ± 6 days) was performed including sac pressure readings and IV contrast CT scans. Variables were compared using the paired Student's t test. An intraprocedure type-I endoleak and a type-III endoleak were successfully treated resulting in decreasing sac pressures. In all patients, post-EVAR systolic sac pressure decreased by an average of 33% (P ≤ 0.005) compared to pre-EVAR measurements. One-month follow-up demonstrated a 47% decrease in systolic sac pressure (P ≤ 0.05). On follow-up CT scans, the average maximum aneurysm diameter pre-EVAR was 6.3 ± 1.6 cm and post-EVAR 6.0 ± 1.7 cm (P≤0.05). The diameter of the aneurysm sac was larger only in one patient with a type-III endoleak. Remote sac pressure measurement may provide important information in addition to imaging and may help to reduce the number of follow-up CT scans. (orig.)

  6. Experiences with late effects-related care and preferences for long-term follow-up care among adult survivors of childhood lymphoma.

    Lie, Hanne C; Mellblom, Anneli V; Brekke, Mette; Finset, Arnstein; Fosså, Sophie D; Kiserud, Cecilie E; Ruud, Ellen; Loge, Jon H

    2017-08-01

    Given childhood cancer survivors' risk of treatment-induced late effects, long-term follow-up care is recommended. We explored experiences with late effects-related care and preferences for long-term follow-up care among adult survivors of childhood malignant lymphoma in Norway. We conducted five focus group interviews with 34 survivors (19 females; 21 Hodgkin/13 non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors; mean age 39 years; mean time from diagnosis 26 years). Data was analyzed using principles of thematic analysis. Two main themes were identified: (1) the survivors' experiences with late effects-related care and (2) their preferences for long-term follow-up care. Most of the survivors were dissatisfied with their late effects-related care due to perceptions of poor coordination of healthcare needs in a fragmented system, combined with a perceived lack of knowledge of late effects among themselves and general practitioners (GPs). All survivors valued long-term follow-up care. Oncologists were the preferred care providers, but GPs were considered acceptable providers if they had sufficient knowledge of late effects and routine examinations, short waiting times, and improved GP-oncologist collaboration. Our results suggest that a shared care model of long-term follow-up care involving specialists, GPs, and the survivors themselves is likely to fulfill several of the currently unmet needs among adult survivors of childhood cancers. Improved patient education about late effects and follow-up care would aid self-management. The survivors' concerns regarding lack of sufficient knowledge of late effects among GPs suggest a need for improving access to, and dissemination of, information of late effects.

  7. Endoscopic mucosal resection of flat and sessile colorectal adenomas: Our experience with long-term follow-ups

    Grgov Saša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR or mucosectomy is a removing method of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to mucosa or the surface part of the submucosa. The aim of the study was to estimate the efficacy and safety of EMR in removing flat and sessile colorectal adenomas. Methods. This prospective study involved 140 patients during the period of 8 years. A total of 187 colorectal adenomas were removed using the EMR method “inject and cut with snare”. Results. The approximate size of mucosectomised adenomas was 13.6 mm (from 8 mm to 60 mm. There was a total of 48 (25.7% flat adenomas and 139 (74.3% sessile adenomas, (p < 0.01. Using “en bloc” and “piecemeal” resection, 173 (92.5% and 14 (7.5% of colorectal adenomas were removed, respectively. In all the cases, a complete removal of colorectal adenomas was achieved. Two (1.4% patients had adenoma removal with intramucosal carcinoma each. In the average follow-up period of 21.2 ± 17.8 months, 2 (1.4% patients had adenoma relapse after EMR. Considering complications, there was bleeding in 1 (0.7% patient with a big rectum adenoma removed with EMR. Furthermore, one (0.7% patient had a postcoagulation syndrome after cecal adenoma was removed by EMR. Conclusion. EMR is an efficient, safe and minimally invasive technique of removing flat and sessile adenomas in the colon and the rectum, with a very low percentage of adenoma recurrence over a long period of monitoring.

  8. CONTRACT FOLLOW UP TRAINING

    Technical Training; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    SPL is organizing Training Sessions on the Contract Follow Up application. CFU is a Web based tool, developped and supported by the Administrative Information Services. It allows the creation of Divisional Requests and the follow up of their processing, from the Market Survey to the Invitation to Tender or Price Enquiry, approval by the Finance Committee, up to the actual signature of a Contract, acccording to the CERN Purchasing procedures. It includes a document management component. It also provides link with other AIS applications such as BHT and EDH. The course is primarily intended for DPOs, Contract Technical responsibles in the division and their assistants, but is beneficial to anybody involved in the follow up of such Purchasing Procedures. This course is free of charge, but application is necessary. The details of the course may be found at http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/ENSTEC/P2001/Bureautique/cfu4_f.htm General information of CFU may be found at http://ais.cern.ch/apps/cfu/ The dates of t...

  9. Medical students' experiences of their own professional development during three clinical terms: a prospective follow-up study.

    Kalén, Susanne; Lachmann, Hanna; Varttinen, Maria; Möller, Riitta; Bexelius, Tomas S; Ponzer, Sari

    2017-02-27

    A modern competency-based medical education is well implemented globally, but less is known about how the included learning activities contribute to medical students' professional development. The aim of this study was to explore Swedish medical students' perceptions of the offered learning activities and their experiences of how these activities were connected to their professional development as defined by the CanMEDS framework. A prospective mixed method questionnaire study during three terms (internal medicine, scientific project, and surgery) in which data were collected by using contextual activity sampling system, i.e., the students were sent a questionnaire via their mobile phones every third week. All 136 medical students in the 6th of 11 terms in the autumn of 2012 were invited to participate. Seventy-four students (54%) filled in all of the required questionnaires (4 per term) for inclusion, the total number of questionnaires being 1335. The questionnaires focused on the students' experiences of learning activities, especially in relation to the CanMEDS Roles, collaboration with others and emotions (positive, negative, optimal experiences, i.e., "flow") related to the studies. The quantitative data was analysed statistically and, for the open-ended questions, manifest inductive content analysis was used. Three of the CanMEDs Roles, Medical Expert, Scholar, and Communicator, were most frequently reported while the four others, e.g., the role Health Advocate, were less common. Collaboration with students from other professions was most usual during the 8th term. Positive emotions and experience of "flow" were most often reported during clinical learning activities while the scientific project term was connected with more negative emotions. Our results showed that it is possible, even during clinical courses, to visualise the different areas of professional competence defined in the curriculum and connect these competences to the actual learning activities

  10. Follow-up of the fate of imazalil from post-harvest lemon surface treatment to a baking experiment.

    Vass, Andrea; Korpics, Evelin; Dernovics, Mihály

    2015-01-01

    Imazalil is one of the most widespread fungicides used for the post-harvest treatment of citrus species. The separate use of peel during food preparation and processing may hitherto concentrate most of the imazalil into food products, where specific maximum residue limits hardly exist for this fungicide. In order to monitor comprehensively the path of imazalil, our study covered the monitoring of the efficiency of several washing treatments, the comparison of operative and related sample preparation methods for the lemon samples, the validation of a sample preparation technique for a fatty cake matrix, the preparation of a model cake sample made separately either with imazalil containing lemon peel or with imazalil spiking, the monitoring of imazalil degradation into α-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol because of the baking process, and finally the mass balance of imazalil throughout the washing experiments and the baking process. Quantification of imazalil was carried out with an LC-ESI-MS/MS set-up, while LC-QTOF was used for the monitoring of imazalil degradation. Concerning the washing, none of the addressed five washing protocols could remove more than 30% of imazalil from the surface of the lemon samples. The study revealed a significant difference between the extraction efficiency of imazalil by the EN 15662:2008 and AOAC 2007.1 methods, with the advantage of the former. The use of the model cake sample helped to validate a modified version of the EN 15662:2008 method that included a freeze-out step to efficiently recover imazalil (>90%) from the fatty cake matrix. The degradation of imazalil during the baking process was significantly higher when this analyte was spiked into the cake matrix than in the case of preparing the cake with imazalil-containing lemon peel (52% vs. 22%). This observation calls the attention to the careful evaluation of pesticide stability data that are based on solution spiking experiments.

  11. Evolution of the complications of laparoscopic hysterectomy after a decade: a follow up of the Monash experience.

    Tan, Jason J; Tsaltas, Jim; Hengrasmee, Pattaya; Lawrence, Anthony; Najjar, Haider

    2009-04-01

    A retrospective review of medical records was performed to assess the incidence and types of significant complications encountered during laparoscopic hysterectomy which would affect the use of a laparoscopic approach versus other routes of hysterectomy. A total of 526 consecutive patients' medical data between January 1994 and August 2007 were reviewed. Two hundred and thirty-two laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomies and 294 total laparoscopic hysterectomies were performed at Monash Medical Centre, a Melbourne tertiary public hospital, and three Melbourne private hospitals, by or under the supervision of three surgeons. Sixteen significant complications occurred. There were two cases of ureteric fistula, two bladder injuries, two bowel obstructions, four postoperative haematomas, one case of a bladder fistula, four conversions to laparotomy and one superficial epigastric artery injury. Inpatient stay ranged from two to six days. Our complication and inpatient stay rates are consistent with the previously reported rates, although there has been a reduction of incidence of visceral injuries with experience and introduction of new equipment.

  12. Lasting Effects of Workplace Strength Training for Neck/Shoulder/Arm Pain among Laboratory Technicians: Natural Experiment with 3-Year Follow-Up

    Larsen, Anders I.; Zebis, Mette K.; Pedersen, Mogens T.; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study investigated long-term effects and implementation processes of workplace strength training for musculoskeletal disorders. Methods. 333 and 140 laboratory technicians from private and public sector companies, respectively, replied to a 3-year follow-up questionnaire subsequent to a 1-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) with high-intensity strength training for prevention and treatment of neck, shoulder, and arm pain. Being a natural experiment, the two participating companies implemented and modified the initial training program in different ways during the subsequent 2 years after the RCT. Results. At 3-year follow-up the pain reduction in neck, shoulder, elbow, and wrist achieved during the first year was largely maintained at both companies. However, the private sector company was rated significantly better than the public sector company in (1) training adherence, (2) training culture, that is, relatively more employees trained at the workplace and with colleagues, (3) self-reported health changes, and (4) prevention of neck and wrist pain development among initially pain-free employees. Conclusions. This natural experiment shows that strength training can be implemented successfully at different companies during working hours on a long-term basis with lasting effects on pain in neck, shoulder, and arm. PMID:24734247

  13. Lasting Effects of Workplace Strength Training for Neck/Shoulder/Arm Pain among Laboratory Technicians: Natural Experiment with 3-Year Follow-Up

    Peter Mortensen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study investigated long-term effects and implementation processes of workplace strength training for musculoskeletal disorders. Methods. 333 and 140 laboratory technicians from private and public sector companies, respectively, replied to a 3-year follow-up questionnaire subsequent to a 1-year randomized controlled trial (RCT with high-intensity strength training for prevention and treatment of neck, shoulder, and arm pain. Being a natural experiment, the two participating companies implemented and modified the initial training program in different ways during the subsequent 2 years after the RCT. Results. At 3-year follow-up the pain reduction in neck, shoulder, elbow, and wrist achieved during the first year was largely maintained at both companies. However, the private sector company was rated significantly better than the public sector company in (1 training adherence, (2 training culture, that is, relatively more employees trained at the workplace and with colleagues, (3 self-reported health changes, and (4 prevention of neck and wrist pain development among initially pain-free employees. Conclusions. This natural experiment shows that strength training can be implemented successfully at different companies during working hours on a long-term basis with lasting effects on pain in neck, shoulder, and arm.

  14. The disease management program for type 2 diabetes in Germany enhances process quality of diabetes care - a follow-up survey of patient's experiences.

    Schäfer, Ingmar; Küver, Claudia; Gedrose, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Falk; Russ-Thiel, Barbara; Brose, Hans-Peter; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna

    2010-03-03

    In summer 2003 a disease management program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes was introduced on a nationwide basis in Germany. Patient participation and continuity of care within the DMP are important factors to achieve long-term improvements in clinical endpoints. Therefore it is of interest, if patients experience any positive or negative effects of the DMP on their treatment that would support or hamper further participation. The main objective of the study was to find out if the German Disease Management Program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes improves process and outcome quality of medical care for patients in the light of their subjective experiences over a period of one year. Cohort study with a baseline interview and a follow-up after 10.4 +/- 0.64 months. Data on process and outcome measures were collected by telephone interviews with 444 patients enrolled and 494 patients not enrolled in the German DMP for type 2 diabetes. Data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analyses. DMP enrolment was significantly associated with a higher process quality of care. At baseline enrolled patients more often reported that they had attended a diabetes education course (OR = 3.4), have > or = 4 contacts/year with the attending physician (OR = 3.3), have at least one annual foot examination (OR = 3.1) and one referral to an ophthalmologist (OR = 3.4) and possess a diabetes passport (OR = 2.4). Except for the annual referral to an ophthalmologist these parameters were also statistically significant at follow-up. In contrast, no differences between enrolled and not enrolled patients were found concerning outcome quality indicators, e.g. self-rated health, Glycated hemoglobin (GHb) and blood pressure. However, 16-36% of the DMP participants reported improvements of body weight and/or GHb and/or blood pressure values due to enrolment - unchanged within one year of follow-up. In the light of patient's experiences the DMP enhances the process quality of medical care for type 2

  15. Achieving community-based postpartum follow up in eastern Uganda: the field experience from the MamaMiso Study on antenatal distribution of misoprostol.

    Ditai, James; Frye, Laura J; Durocher, Jill; Byrne, Meagan E; Ononge, Sam; Winikoff, Beverly; Weeks, Andrew D

    2017-10-26

    Advance provision of misoprostol to women during antenatal care aims to achieve broader access to uterotonics for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. Studies of this community-based approach usually involve antenatal education as well as timely postpartum follow-up visits to confirm maternal and neonatal outcomes. The MamaMiso study in Mbale, Uganda sought to assess the feasibility of conducting follow-up visits in the postpartum period following advance provision of misoprostol for postpartum hemorrhage prevention. MamaMiso recruited women during antenatal care visits. Participants were asked to contact the research team within 48 h of giving birth so that postpartum follow-up visits could be carried out at their homes. Women's baseline and delivery characteristics were collected and analyzed with respect to follow-up time ('on time' ≤ 7 days, 'late' > 7 days, and 'lost to follow up'). Every woman who was followed up late due to a failure to report the delivery was asked for the underlying reasons for the delay. When attempts at following up participants were unsuccessful, a file note was generated explaining the details of the failure. We abstracted data and identified themes from these notes. Of 748 recruited women, 700 (94%) were successfully followed up during the study period, 465 (62%) within the first week postpartum. The median time to follow up was 4 days and was similar for women who delivered at home or in facilities and for women who had attended or unattended births. Women recruited at the urban hospital site (as opposed to rural health clinics) were more likely to be lost to follow up or followed up late. Of the women followed up late, 202 provided a reason. File notes explaining failed attempts at follow up were generated for 164 participants. Several themes emerged from qualitative analysis of these notes including phone difficulties, inaccurate baseline information, misperceptions, postpartum travel, and the condition of the mother

  16. The Medical Mission and Modern Core Competency Training: A 10-Year Follow-Up of Resident Experiences in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Yao, Caroline A; Swanson, Jordan; McCullough, Meghan; Taro, Trisa B; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Bradshaw, Allison; Campbell, Alex; Magee, William P; Magee, William P

    2016-09-01

    The emphasis on cultural competency for physicians and surgeons is increasingly important, as communication with both patients and other providers significantly affects individual and system-wide outcomes. International surgical training has been shown to improve leadership skills, cultural competency, and technical proficiency of participants in short-term follow-up. This study explores the long-term impact of international surgical mission experiences on developing participants' core competencies, professional outcomes, and commitment to global health. All 208 plastic and reconstructive surgeons who completed the Operation Smile Regan/Stryker fellowship programs between 2006 and 2015 were surveyed electronically. One hundred sixty-five surveys were returned, for an overall response rate of 79.3 percent. The majority of participants reported that the fellowship positively impacted all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Most participants who were attending physicians at the time of the survey were practicing general plastic surgery, with 42 percent in an academic/teaching environment, 32 percent in assistant/associate professor positions, and 6 percent in either a program director or department chairman position. The majority currently volunteer on local or international missions, and all respondents would consider volunteering again. Carefully structured and rigorously proctored programs such as the Regan/Stryker Fellowship offer plastic surgery residents the opportunity to gain valuable professional and personal experiences that benefit them long after their service experience. Programs of this nature can not only effectively improve cultural competency of physicians, but also positively influence their attitudes toward leadership and direct that potential to meet the growing need for surgical care in low- and middle-income countries.

  17. Clinical experience of laboratory follow-up with noninvasive prenatal testing using cell-free DNA and positive microdeletion results in 349 cases.

    Schwartz, S; Kohan, M; Pasion, R; Papenhausen, P R; Platt, L D

    2018-02-01

    Screening via noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) involving the analysis of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from plasma has become readily available to screen for chromosomal and DNA aberrations through maternal blood. This report reviews a laboratory's experience with follow-up of positive NIPT screens for microdeletions. Patients that were screened positive by NIPT for a microdeletion involving 1p, 4p, 5p, 15q, or 22q who underwent diagnostic studies by either chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis were evaluated. The overall positive predictive value for 349 patients was 9.2%. When a microdeletion was confirmed, 39.3% of the cases had additional abnormal microarray findings. Unrelated abnormal microarray findings were detected in 11.8% of the patients in whom the screen positive microdeletion was not confirmed. Stretches of homozygosity in the microdeletion were frequently associated with a false positive cfDNA microdeletion result. Overall, this report reveals that while cfDNA analysis will screen for microdeletions, the positive predictive value is low; in our series it is 9.2%. Therefore, the patient should be counseled accordingly. Confirmatory diagnostic microarray studies are imperative because of the high percentage of false positives and the frequent additional abnormalities not delineated by cfDNA analysis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Experiment of nurture: ablatio penis at 2 months, sex reassignment at 7 months, and a psychosexual follow-up in young adulthood.

    Bradley, S J; Oliver, G D; Chernick, A B; Zucker, K J

    1998-07-01

    Guidelines of psychosexual management for infants born with physical intersex conditions are intended to assist physicians and parents in making decisions about sex of assignment and rearing including the following: 1) sex assignment should be to the gender that carries the best prognosis for good reproductive function, good sexual function, normal-looking external genitalia and physical appearance, and a stable gender identity; 2) the decision regarding sex assignment should be made as early as possible, preferably during the newborn period, with an upper age limit for reversal of an initial sex assignment no later than 18 to 24 months; and 3) there should be minimal uncertainty and ambiguity on the part of parents and professionals regarding the final decision about sex assignment and rearing. J. Money used these guidelines in a case of a biologically normal male infant (one of a pair of monozygotic twins) whose penis was accidentally ablated during a circumcision at the age of 7 months. The decision to reassign the infant boy to the female sex and to rear him as a girl was made at 17 months, with surgical castration and initial genital reconstruction occurring at 21 months. Money reported follow-up data on this child through the age of 9 years. Although the girl was described as having many "tomboyish" behavioral traits, a female gender identity had apparently differentiated. Thus, it was concluded that gender identity is sufficiently incompletely differentiated at birth as to permit successful assignment of a genetic male as a girl, in keeping with the experiences of rearing. Subsequent follow-up by other investigators reported that by early adolescence the patient had rejected the female identity and began to live as a male at the age of 14 years. In adulthood, the patient recalled that he had never felt comfortable as a girl, and his mother reported similar recollections. At age 25, the patient married a woman and adopted her children. The patient reported

  19. Traumatic experiences and mental health consequences among child survivors of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake: a community-based follow-up study

    Jia Zhaobao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study was implemented to examine the relationship between traumatic experiences and longitudinal development of mental health for children and adolescents who survived the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. Methods Using the method of multistage systematic sampling, 596 children aged between 8 and 16 years were randomly selected from severely affected areas of the earthquake. These children were interviewed with standardized instruments of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and depression at the 15th month after the earthquake, and re-interviewed at the 36th month. Results From the initial to the follow-up assessments, there were no significant changes in both PTSD and depression scores. In addition, no significant change was found on the overall prevalence rates of the symptoms: from 12.4% to 10.7% for PTSD, from 13.9% to 13.5% for depression, and from 4.2% to 4.7% for their co-occurrence. The study also indicated that the earthquake might have a delayed impact on the psychosocial functioning of children and adolescents who were not directly affected by the disaster. Conclusions For child and adolescent survivors of the earthquake, symptoms of PTSD and depression seemed to persist over time. The finding that children reduced their use of mental health services raised great concerns over how to fulfill the unmet psychological needs of these children. More mental health interventions should be allocated to children who had elevated risk for developing persistent course of the symptoms.

  20. Achieving community-based postpartum follow up in eastern Uganda: the field experience from the MamaMiso Study on antenatal distribution of misoprostol

    Ditai, James; Frye, Laura J.; Durocher, Jill; Byrne, Meagan E.; Ononge, Sam; Winikoff, Beverly; Weeks, Andrew D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Advance provision of misoprostol to women during antenatal care aims to achieve broader access to uterotonics for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. Studies of this community-based approach usually involve antenatal education as well as timely postpartum follow-up visits to confirm maternal and neonatal outcomes. The MamaMiso study in Mbale, Uganda sought to assess the feasibility of conducting follow-up visits in the postpartum period following advance provision of misoprost...

  1. The experience of patients with early-stage testicular cancer during the transition from active treatment to follow-up surveillance.

    Shen, Abra H; Howell, Doris; Edwards, Elizabeth; Warde, Padraig; Matthew, Andrew; Jones, Jennifer M

    2016-04-01

    To gain a better understanding of the experiences of patients with early-stage testicular cancer during the transition from active cancer treatment to follow-up care. Cross-sectional multimethod study (questionnaires, focus groups, and telephone interviews) to describe experiences of patients with testicular cancer transitioning to survivorship. Questionnaire package included standardized measures of survivorship knowledge, feeling of preparedness, health-related distress, and perspectives on care coordination. Standard descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney tests to examine associations between all outcomes based on demographic and clinical variables were performed. Qualitative results (focus groups and interviews) were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Based on quantitative data (n = 90) and qualitative analyses (n = 13), participants had relatively high survivorship knowledge, most testicular cancer survivors were not provided with any formal transition planning or documentation, and a substantial minority felt unprepared to cope with the aftereffects of testicular cancer and the posttreatment survivorship phase. Younger men had lower survivorship knowledge, feelings of preparedness, and continuity of care scores and were less likely to report having received any self-management tools and education or information of patient resources. Participants reported that they did not know what to expect physically or emotionally after treatment ended and many continued to be frustrated and worried about their health problems. They expressed the need for reliable and personalized resources on what to expect after treatment and more formal transition care planning. Patients with testicular cancer continue to struggle in their transition to posttreatment survivorship. Quality of care must emphasize a shift from a purely disease-focused approach to a wellness-centered approach that provides coordinated, patient-centered, and comprehensive care to optimize quality

  2. Complications of Celect, Günther tulip, and Greenfield inferior vena cava filters on CT follow-up: a single-institution experience.

    McLoney, Eric D; Krishnasamy, Venkatesh P; Castle, Jordan C; Yang, Xiangyu; Guy, Gregory

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate and compare the rates of complications on follow-up computed tomography (CT) studies of patients with Celect, Günther Tulip, and Greenfield inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. Retrospective review of CT studies obtained 0-1,987 days after infrarenal placement of an IVC filter identified 255 Celect, 160 Tulip, and 50 Greenfield filters. Follow-up CT studies were independently evaluated by two observers for IVC perforation, contact with adjacent organs, and filter fracture. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors associated with higher rates of IVC perforation, including age, IVC diameter, sex, and history of malignancy. IVC perforation was observed in 126 of 255 Celect filters (49%) with a mean follow-up of 277 days, 69 of 160 Tulip filters (43%) with a mean follow-up of 437 days, and one of 50 Greenfield filters (2%) with a mean follow-up of 286 days. A significantly higher IVC perforation rate was observed in women (45.5%) compared with men (30.8%; P = .002) and in patients with a history of malignancy (43.7%) compared with patients with no history of malignancy (29.9%; P Tulip filters (0.6%), and none of 50 Greenfield filters. No significant difference was observed in IVC perforation rate between Celect and Tulip filters. Greenfield filters had a significantly lower rate of IVC perforation than Celect and Tulip filters. Higher IVC perforation rates were observed in women and patients with a history of malignancy. © SIR, 2013.

  3. Stent coverage and neointimal proliferation in bare metal stents postdilated with a Paclitaxel-eluting balloon versus everolimus-eluting stents: prospective randomized study using optical coherence tomography at 6-month follow-up.

    Poerner, Tudor C; Otto, Sylvia; Gassdorf, Johannes; Nitsche, Kristina; Janiak, Florian; Scheller, Bruno; Goebel, Björn; Jung, Christian; Figulla, Hans R

    2014-12-01

    In this randomized trial, strut coverage and neointimal proliferation of a therapy of bare metal stents (BMSs) postdilated with the paclitaxel drug-eluting balloon (DEB) was compared with everolimus drug-eluting stents (DESs) at 6-month follow-up using optical coherence tomography. We hypothesized sufficient stent coverage at follow-up. A total of 105 lesions in 90 patients were treated with either XIENCE V DES (n=51) or BMS postdilated with the SeQuent Please DEB (n=54). At follow-up, comparable results on the primary optical coherence tomography end point (percentage uncovered struts 5.64±9.65% in BMS+DEB versus 4.93±9.29% in DES; P=0.366) were found. Thus, BMS+DEB achieved the prespecified noninferiority margin of 5% uncovered struts versus DES (difference between treatment means, 0.71%; one-sided upper 95% confidence interval, 4.14%; noninferiority P=0.04). Optical coherence tomography analysis showed significantly more global neointimal proliferation in the BMS+DEB group (15.7±7.8 versus 11.0±5.2 mm(3) proliferation volume/cm stent length; P=0.002). No significant focal in-stent stenosis analyzed with angiography (percentage diameter stenosis at follow-up, 22.8±11.9 versus 16.9±10.4; P=0.014) and optical coherence tomography (peak local area stenosis, 39.5±13.8% versus 36.8±15.6%; P=0.409) was found. Good stent strut coverage of >94% was found in both therapy groups. Despite greater suppression of global neointimal growth in DES, both DES and BMS+DEB effectively prevented clinically relevant focal restenosis at 6-month follow-up. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01056744. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Concomitant anterior and posterior urethral valves in pediatrics: A single center experience over 12 years and long-term follow up after endoscopic treatment.

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Hosseini Sharifi, Seyed Hossein; Keihani, Sorena; Soltani, Mohammad Hossein; Tajali, Afshin; Salavati, Alborz; Payabvash, Seyedmehdi; Mehdizadeh, Mehrzad

    2015-05-01

    To report our 12-year experience with endoscopic management of patients with concomitant anterior and posterior urethral valves. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients referred to us for management of urethral valves from 2000 to 2012 to find cases with concomitant anterior and posterior valves. The diagnosis of valves was first suspected on voiding cystourethrography and confirmed by urethrocystoscopy. We collected available data on patients' age at diagnosis, clinical presentations, ultrasound and urodynamic findings, and surgical treatments. The final outcome at last follow up was also recorded. From 38 cases with anterior urethral valve, six (15.8%) presented concomitant anterior and posterior valves. The age at diagnosis in these patients ranged from antenatal diagnosis to 13 years. Initial presenting symptoms were recurrent urinary tract infection, incontinence, urosepsis and poor urinary stream. All valves were ablated by transurethral fulguration/resection using small-sized urethrocystoscopes. Among those with concomitant anterior and posterior valves, four patients had vesicoureteral reflux at presentation that resolved in two patients after valve ablation. One patient progressed to renal failure and required dialysis. Bladder hypercontractility and detrusor overactivity were the main urodynamic patterns in these patients. Concomitant anterior and posterior valves seem to be more prevalent than previously assumed, and might be missed on initial assessment. Oblique view voiding cystourethrography with full-length delineation of the urethra is of paramount diagnostic importance when obstruction is suspected. A meticulous urethrocystoscopy should follow for confirming the diagnosis and endoscopic ablation/resection of the valves. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  5. Differential Validities for Shop Courses: Proposal B: Follow-Up of Subjects' Work Experiences. Final Report. Vol I: Procedures and Results.

    Isabelle, L. A.; Lokan, J. J.

    Follow-up information was collected on 1500 students who attended a two-year occupational high school, in order to relate predictor measures to success during training and subsequent job success. Although not predictive of dropouts, variables in the pre-test battery did predict performance in academic and shop courses; ratings of job success were…

  6. Emergency Contraceptive Pills: A 10-Year Follow-up Survey of Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    Miller, Laura McKeller; Sawyer, Robin G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a 10-year follow-up study using a telephone survey to investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. They also examined related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved,…

  7. DART-bid for loco-regionally advanced NSCLC. Summary of acute and late toxicity with long-term follow-up; experiences with pulmonary dose constraints

    Wurstbauer, Karl [Paracelsus Medical University, Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Zehentmayr, Franz; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University, Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Landeskrankenhaus, Salzburg (Austria); Dagn, Karin; Exeli, Ann-Katrin; Kopp, Peter [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Landeskrankenhaus, Salzburg (Austria); Porsch, Peter; Maurer, Birgit; Studnicka, Michael [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Departement of Pneumology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2017-04-15

    To report acute and late toxicity with long-term follow-up, and to describe our experiences with pulmonary dose constraints. Between 2002 and 2009, 150 patients with 155 histologically/cytologically proven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; tumor stages II, IIIA, IIIB in 6, 55 and 39%, respectively) received the following median doses: primary tumors 79.2 Gy (range 72.0-90.0 Gy), lymph node metastases 59.4 Gy (54.0-73.8 Gy), nodes electively 45 Gy; with fractional doses of 1.8 Gy twice daily (bid). In all, 86% of patients received 2 cycles of chemotherapy previously. Five treatment-related deaths occurred: pneumonitis, n = 1; progressive pulmonary fibrosis in patients with pre-existing pulmonary fibrosis, n = 2; haemorrhage, n = 2. In all, 8% of patients experienced grade 3 and 1.3% grade 4 pneumonitis; 11% showed late fibrotic alterations grade 2 in lung parenchyma. Clinically relevant acute esophagitis (grade 2 and 3) was seen in 33.3% of patients, 2 patients developed late esophageal stenosis (G3). Patients with upper lobe, middle lobe and central lower lobe tumours (n = 130) were treated with V20 (total lung) up to 50% and patients with peripheral lower lobe tumours (n = 14, basal lateral tumours excluded) up to 42%, without observing acute or late pulmonary toxicity >grade 3. Only patients with basal lateral lower lobe tumours (n = 5) experienced grade 4/5 pulmonary toxicity; V20 for this latter group ranged between 30 and 53%. The mean lung dose was below the QUANTEC recommendation of 20-23 Gy in all patients. The median follow-up time of all patients is 26.3 months (range 2.9-149.4) and of patients alive 80.2 months (range 63.9-149.4.). The median overall survival time of all patients is 26.3 months; the 2-, 5- and 8-year survival rates of 54, 21 and 15%, respectively. The local tumour control rate at 2 and 5 years is 70 and 64%, the regional control rate 90 and 88%, respectively. Grade 4 or 5 toxicity occurred in 7/150 patients (4.7%), which can be

  8. Wingspan stent-assisted coiling of intracranial aneurysms with symptomatic parent artery stenosis: Experience in 35 patients with mid-term follow-up results

    Gao Xu; Liang Guobiao; Li Zhiqing; Wei Xuezhong; Wang Xiaogang; Zhang Haifeng; Feng Sizhe; Lin Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a potential risk of aneurysm rupture after parent artery revascularization because of increased blood flow. The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of Wingspan stent-assisted coil embolization in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms with symptomatic parent artery stenosis. Methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients (19 men, 16 women; age range, 48–79 years; mean age, 60.4 years) harboring 35 unruptured wide-necked or fusiform intracranial aneurysms (mean size 6.8 mm; range 2.5–18 mm.) with symptomatic parent artery stenosis (mean degree 71.1%; range 50–92%) were treated with the Wingspan stent-assisted coiling. Twenty-four lesions were located in the anterior circulation and eleven in the posterior circulation. Patients were premedicated with antiplatelet therapy consisting of aspirin 300 mg and clopidogrel 75 mg for at least 3 days before the procedure. Following pre-dilatation and stent placement, a coiling microcatheter entered the aneurysm through the interstices of the stent, and then coiling was performed. After the procedure, clopidogrel 75 mg daily was recommended for an additional 30 days, and aspirin 100 mg was recommended throughout follow-up. For all patients, clinical follow-up was conducted by clinic visitation, or telephone interview. Angiographic follow-up with DSA was recommended at 6 months and 1 year after the procedure. Angiography follow-up (mean time 10.6 months) was obtained in 31 cases (88.6%). The technical feasibility of the procedure, procedure-related complications, angiographic results, clinical outcome and follow-up angiography were evaluated. Results: In every case, technical success was achieved. The degree of stenosis was reduced from 71.1% to 17.4% after balloon angioplasty and stenting. Immediate angiography demonstrated complete occlusion in 25 cases (71.4%), neck remnant in 7 cases (20.0%), and incomplete occlusion in 3 cases (8.6%). Procedure-related morbidity occurred in two

  9. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedure for preparation, follow-up and experience gained from maintenance: application to replacement of pressure vessel

    Lochard, Jacques; Lefaure, Christian

    1990-01-01

    This report proposes the organisation and ALARA procedures for preparation, follow-up and analysis of the lessons learned during maintenance works at a nuclear power plant. After a brief description of the ALARA principle in the first chapter, the following chapters describe proposals for establishing and start-up of a maintenance building site. The proposals are illustrated by the replacement of the pressure vessel as an example

  10. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedure for preparation, follow-up and experience gained from maintenance: application to replacement of pressure vessel

    Lochard, Jacques; Lefaure, Christian

    1989-12-01

    This report proposes the organisation and ALARA procedures for preparation, follow-up and analysis of the lessons learned during maintenance works at a nuclear power plant. After a brief description of the ALARA principle in the first chapter, the following chapters describe proposals for establishing and start-up of a maintenance building site. The proposals are illustrated by the replacement of the pressure vessel as an example

  11. Primary Infrarenal Aortic Stenting With or Without Iliac Stenting for Isolated and Aortoiliac Stenoses: Single-Centre Experience With Long-Term Follow-Up

    Tapping, C. R.; Ahmed, M.; Scott, P. M.; Lakshminarayan, R.; Robinson, G. J.; Ettles, D. F.; Shrivastava, V., E-mail: vivek.shrivastava@hey.nhs.uk [Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical success, complications, long-term clinical outcome, and patency after primary infrarenal aortic stenting for aortic and aortoiliac stenosis. Between January 1999 and January 2006, 22 consecutive patients underwent endovascular treatment because of infrarenal aortic stenosis with and without common iliac stenosis (10 men; mean age 64 {+-} 14 years). Eleven (11 of 22) patients had an isolated aortic stenosis, whereas 11 of 22 had aortic stenosis that extended into the common iliac arteries (CIAs). Thirteen patients were Rutherford classification type 3, and 9 patients were type 4. Statistical analysis included paired Student t test and Kaplan-Meier life table analysis; p < 0.05 was considered significant. Technical and initial clinical success was achieved in all patients. There were three (14 %) procedure-related complications, which included two access-point pseudoaneurysms and one non-flow-limiting left external iliac dissection. Patients were followed-up for a mean period of 88 months (range 60-132). Mean preprocedure ankle brachial pressure indexes (ABPI) were 0.60 {+-} -0.15 (right) and 0.61 {+-} -0.16 (left). After the procedure they were 0.86 {+-} -0.07 (right) and 0.90 {+-} -0.09 (left). The increase in ABPI was significant (p < 0.05), and this continued throughout follow-up. Four (18 %) patients had recurrence of symptoms during follow-up. These occurred at 36, 48, 48, and 50 months after the original procedure. All four patients were successfully treated with repeat angioplasty procedures. There was a significant difference in primary patency between isolated aortic stenosis (100 %) and aortoiliac stenosis (60 %) (p = 0.031). Cumulative follow-up was 1920 months yielding a reintervention rate of 0.025/events/year. Primary stenting of infrarenal stenosis is safe and successful with a low reintervention rate. It should be considered as first-line treatment for patients with infrarenal aortic stenotic

  12. 96 Week Follow-Up of HIV-Infected Patients in Rescue with Raltegravir Plus Optimized Backbone Regimens: A Multicentre Italian Experience

    Capetti, Amedeo; Landonio, Simona; Meraviglia, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Sterrantino, Gaetana; Ammassari, Adriana; Menzaghi, Barbara; Franzetti, Marco; De Socio, Giuseppe Vittorio; Pellicanò, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Elena; Soria, Alessandro; Meschiari, Marianna; Trezzi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long term efficacy of raltegravir (RAL)-including regimens in highly pre-treated HIV-1-infected patients has been demonstrated in registration trials. However, few studies have assessed durability in routine clinical settings. METHODS: Antiretroviral treatment-experienced patients initiating a RAL-containing salvage regimen were enrolled. Routine clinical and laboratory follow-up was performed at baseline, week 4, 12, and every 12 weeks thereafter. Data were censored at week 96. R...

  13. OCT guidance during stent implantation in primary PCI: A randomized multicenter study with nine months of optical coherence tomography follow-up

    Kala, P.; Červinka, P.; Jakl, M.; Kanovský, J.; Kupec, A.; Špaček, R.; Kvasnak, M.; Poloczek, M.; Červinková, M.; Bezerra, H.; Valenta, Zdeněk; Attizzani, G.; Schnell, A.; Hong, L.; Costa, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 250, 1 January (2018), s. 98-103 ISSN 0167-5273 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : optical coherence tomography * OCT * primary PCI * ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction * drug-eluting stents Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 6.189, year: 2016

  14. Comparative analysis method of permanent metallic stents (XIENCE) and bioresorbable poly-L-lactic (PLLA) scaffolds (Absorb) on optical coherence tomography at baseline and follow-up

    T. Nakatani (Tomoya); Y. Sotomi (Yohei); Y. Ishibashi (Yuki); M.J. Grundeken (Maik); H. Tateishi (Hiroki); E. Tenekecioglu (Erhan); Y. Zeng (Yaping); P. Suwannasom (Pannipa); E.S. Regar (Eveline); M. Radu (Maria); L. Räber (Lorenz); H.G. Bezerra (Hiram); M.A. Costa (Marco); Fitzgerald, P. (Peter); F. Prati (Francesco); R.A. Costa (Ricardo); J. Dijkstra (Jouke); T. Kimura (Takeshi); K. Kozuma (Ken); K. Tanabe (Kengo); T. Akasaka (Takashi); C. di Mario (Carlo); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); Y. Onuma (Yoshinobu); G. Guagliumi (Giulio)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAims: Fully bioresorbable Absorb poly-L-lactic-acid (PLLA) scaffolds (Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA, USA) are a novel approach for the treatment of coronary narrowing. Due to the translucency of the material (PLLA), the optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurement methods used in

  15. Long-term follow-up in patients treated with larynx preservation approach using sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy: the Memorial Hospital experience

    Maluf, Fernando; Sherman, Eric J.; Bosl, George J.; Pfister, David G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Medicine. Div. of Solid Tumor Oncology; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States).Dept. of Surgery. Head and Neck Service; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology]. E-mail: pfisterd@mskcc.org

    2000-06-01

    While many combined modality, organ preservation programs are reported in the literature, few provide long-term follow-up with functional outcomes. The goal of this report is to provide this outcome data for patients treated with a sequential chemotherapy/radiotherapy (CT/RT) approach - the only strategy successfully compared to surgery and RT in randomized trials to date - treated at our institution with a median follow-up of over 10 years. Eligible patients had advanced, resectable, histologically-confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of larynx or pharynx for which standard surgical management would have jeopardized the larynx. Treatment occurred as part of three consecutive larynx preservation protocols and consisted of three cycles of induction, cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed, if the primary site had a major response, by definitive dose radiation therapy (65-70 Gy to sites of initial disease bulk) via conventional fractionation (1.8-2 Gy fraction). If the tumor did not respond to the induction chemotherapy or persisted after radiation therapy, appropriate locoregional treatment was pursued. Response to induction chemotherapy, initial rendered disease-free rate, local control with a functional larynx (without any surgery except biopsy to the primary site, permanent tracheostomy or gastrostomy - LCLP), and actuarial survival rates were calculated. A multivariate assessment of prognostic variables was performed using Cox-proportional hazards model to evaluate for predictors of successful larynx preservation. One hundred and ten patients (109 evaluable) with cancer of the larynx (40%), hypopharynx (29%), and oropharynx (30%) were enrolled from 1983 to 1990. The median age was 60 years With a median Karnofsky Performance Status of 80%. The stage of the patients consisted of 33% T4, 74% node positive, and 69% stage IV. The major response rate at the primary site to induction chemotherapy was 74% (complete response in 36%). Seventy-eight percent were rendered

  16. Long-term follow-up in patients treated with larynx preservation approach using sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy: the Memorial Hospital experience

    Maluf, Fernando; Sherman, Eric J.; Bosl, George J.; Pfister, David G.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    While many combined modality, organ preservation programs are reported in the literature, few provide long-term follow-up with functional outcomes. The goal of this report is to provide this outcome data for patients treated with a sequential chemotherapy/radiotherapy (CT/RT) approach - the only strategy successfully compared to surgery and RT in randomized trials to date - treated at our institution with a median follow-up of over 10 years. Eligible patients had advanced, resectable, histologically-confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of larynx or pharynx for which standard surgical management would have jeopardized the larynx. Treatment occurred as part of three consecutive larynx preservation protocols and consisted of three cycles of induction, cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed, if the primary site had a major response, by definitive dose radiation therapy (65-70 Gy to sites of initial disease bulk) via conventional fractionation (1.8-2 Gy fraction). If the tumor did not respond to the induction chemotherapy or persisted after radiation therapy, appropriate locoregional treatment was pursued. Response to induction chemotherapy, initial rendered disease-free rate, local control with a functional larynx (without any surgery except biopsy to the primary site, permanent tracheostomy or gastrostomy - LCLP), and actuarial survival rates were calculated. A multivariate assessment of prognostic variables was performed using Cox-proportional hazards model to evaluate for predictors of successful larynx preservation. One hundred and ten patients (109 evaluable) with cancer of the larynx (40%), hypopharynx (29%), and oropharynx (30%) were enrolled from 1983 to 1990. The median age was 60 years With a median Karnofsky Performance Status of 80%. The stage of the patients consisted of 33% T4, 74% node positive, and 69% stage IV. The major response rate at the primary site to induction chemotherapy was 74% (complete response in 36%). Seventy-eight percent were rendered

  17. Primary Infrarenal Aortic Stenting With or Without Iliac Stenting for Isolated and Aortoiliac Stenoses: Single-Centre Experience With Long-Term Follow-Up

    Tapping, C. R.; Ahmed, M.; Scott, P. M.; Lakshminarayan, R.; Robinson, G. J.; Ettles, D. F.; Shrivastava, V.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical success, complications, long-term clinical outcome, and patency after primary infrarenal aortic stenting for aortic and aortoiliac stenosis. Between January 1999 and January 2006, 22 consecutive patients underwent endovascular treatment because of infrarenal aortic stenosis with and without common iliac stenosis (10 men; mean age 64 ± 14 years). Eleven (11 of 22) patients had an isolated aortic stenosis, whereas 11 of 22 had aortic stenosis that extended into the common iliac arteries (CIAs). Thirteen patients were Rutherford classification type 3, and 9 patients were type 4. Statistical analysis included paired Student t test and Kaplan–Meier life table analysis; p < 0.05 was considered significant. Technical and initial clinical success was achieved in all patients. There were three (14 %) procedure-related complications, which included two access-point pseudoaneurysms and one non–flow-limiting left external iliac dissection. Patients were followed-up for a mean period of 88 months (range 60–132). Mean preprocedure ankle brachial pressure indexes (ABPI) were 0.60 ± −0.15 (right) and 0.61 ± −0.16 (left). After the procedure they were 0.86 ± −0.07 (right) and 0.90 ± −0.09 (left). The increase in ABPI was significant (p < 0.05), and this continued throughout follow-up. Four (18 %) patients had recurrence of symptoms during follow-up. These occurred at 36, 48, 48, and 50 months after the original procedure. All four patients were successfully treated with repeat angioplasty procedures. There was a significant difference in primary patency between isolated aortic stenosis (100 %) and aortoiliac stenosis (60 %) (p = 0.031). Cumulative follow-up was 1920 months yielding a reintervention rate of 0.025/events/year. Primary stenting of infrarenal stenosis is safe and successful with a low reintervention rate. It should be considered as first-line treatment for patients with infrarenal aortic

  18. 15-Year Follow-Up

    Karjula, Salla; Morin-Papunen, Laure; Auvinen, Juha; Ruokonen, Aimo; Puukka, Katri; Franks, Stephen; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Tapanainen, Juha S.; Jokelainen, Jari; Miettunen, Jouko; Piltonen, Terhi T.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with increased psychological distress, obesity and hyperandrogenism being suggested as key promoters. Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of anxiety/depression and their coexistence in women with PCOS/PCOS-related symptoms at ages 31 and 46. The roles of obesity, hyperandrogenism, and awareness of PCOS on psychological distress were also assessed. Design: Population-based follow-up. Setting: Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 with ...

  19. Long-term outcomes of the Ross procedure in adults with severe aortic stenosis: single-centre experience with 20 years of follow-up.

    Kalfa, David; Mohammadi, Siamak; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Kharroubi, Mounir; Doyle, Daniel; Marzouk, Mohamed; Metras, Jacques; Perron, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The optimal prosthesis option for aortic valve replacement in adult patientsreplacement (n=190; 86%) or the subcoronary technique (n=31; 14%). There were 169 patients with bicuspid valves and 33 redo operations including previous aortic valve repair (n=6) and replacement (n=9) for severe AS. Demographic, preoperative, postoperative and longitudinal clinical and echocardiographic data were collected prospectively. The median and mean follow-up were 11.4 years (range: 1-20.1 years) and 10.1±5.9 years, respectively. The follow-up was complete in all patients. Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival analysis was performed to assess long-term survival, freedom from reoperation for autograft and/or homograft failure and freedom from autograft valve insufficiency. Cox regression risk analysis was performed to identify factors associated with autograft or homograft reoperations. The perioperative mortality rate was 0.9% (n=2). The incidence rate of early reoperation for bleeding was 5.9%. The actuarial survival rate at 10 and 15 years following surgery was 92.1 and 90.5%, respectively. Ross-related reoperations occurred in 21 patients during follow-up: autograft dysfunction (n=9), homograft dysfunction (n=6) and both (n=6). The rate of freedom from Ross-related reoperation was 94.7 and 87.7% at 10 and 15 years, respectively. The rate of freedom from reoperation for autograft failure was 97.6 and 91.5%, the rate of freedom from reoperation for homograft failure was 95.7 and 90.8%, and the rate of freedom from moderate or severe autograft regurgitation was 94.1 and 85.6% at 10 and 15 years, respectively. Compared with available aortic bioprosthetic alternatives in young adults with severe AS, the Ross procedure provides an excellent long-term option for patients with predominant severe AS who seek a durable operation without anticoagulation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights

  20. Usefulness of 64-slice MDCT for follow-up of young children with coronary artery aneurysm due to Kawasaki disease: initial experience.

    Peng, Yun; Zeng, Jinjin; Du, Zhongdong; Sun, Guoqiang; Guo, Huling

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the initial application and value of 64-slice multidetector computed tomography as an alternative diagnostic modality in the follow-up of young children with coronary artery aneurysm due to Kawasaki disease. Twelve boys (mean age 5.1 years, range 1.8-7.8 years) for follow-up (time range from 1.1 to 5.1 years) of known Kawasaki disease and coronary artery aneurysm underwent 64-slice MDCT ECG-gated coronary angiography. All data were acquired without breath holding. Two pediatric radiologists independently assessed image quality and the diameter of all coronary segments were measured for each patient. The number, position, shape and size of each coronary artery aneurysm were observed and compared with those of ECHO performed previously. A total of 118/156 segments permitted visualization with diagnostic image quality, the CT measurements showed good inter-observer and intra-observer reliability, coefficients were 0.93 and 0.88, respectively. A total of 30 coronary artery aneurysms were identified with measured mean of 7.5+/-3.8 mm in diameter, and of 12.4+/-9.1 mm in longitudinal lengths.10 tumors were small, 8 tumors were medium and 12 tumors were giant aneurysm. The affected segments included LM7/12(58.3%), 9/12(75%) of LAD1, 4/12(33.3%) of LAD2, 2/12(16.7%) of LCX1; 6/12(50%) of RCA1, 9/12(75%) of RCA2 and 4/12(33.3%) of RCA3, including affected two segments in 9 tumors and three segments in 1 tumor. Calcifications were found in 5 aneurysms and 3/5 with thrombosis; six stenotic segments were found. ECHO failed to detect 8 tumors with 2/8 in LAD, 1/8 in LCX and 5/8 in RCA, and those included 4 small aneurysms. The use of 64-slice MDCT angiography proved valuable for monitoring young children with Kawasaki disease. However, further study is necessary to specify the sensitivity and specificity of MDCT in the follow-up.

  1. Usefulness of 64-slice MDCT for follow-up of young children with coronary artery aneurysm due to Kawasaki disease: Initial experience

    Peng Yun; Zeng Jinjin; Du Zhongdong; Sun Guoqiang; Guo Huling

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the initial application and value of 64-slice multidetector computed tomography as an alternative diagnostic modality in the follow-up of young children with coronary artery aneurysm due to Kawasaki disease. Twelve boys (mean age 5.1 years, range 1.8-7.8 years) for follow-up (time range from 1.1 to 5.1 years) of known Kawasaki disease and coronary artery aneurysm underwent 64-slice MDCT ECG-gated coronary angiography. All data were acquired without breath holding. Two pediatric radiologists independently assessed image quality and the diameter of all coronary segments were measured for each patient. The number, position, shape and size of each coronary artery aneurysm were observed and compared with those of ECHO performed previously. A total of 118/156 segments permitted visualization with diagnostic image quality, the CT measurements showed good inter-observer and intra-observer reliability, coefficients were 0.93 and 0.88, respectively. A total of 30 coronary artery aneurysms were identified with measured mean of 7.5 ± 3.8 mm in diameter, and of 12.4 ± 9.1 mm in longitudinal lengths.10 tumors were small, 8 tumors were medium and 12 tumors were giant aneurysm. The affected segments included LM7/12(58.3%), 9/12(75%) of LAD1, 4/12(33.3%) of LAD2, 2/12(16.7%) of LCX1; 6/12(50%) of RCA1, 9/12(75%) of RCA2 and 4/12(33.3%) of RCA3, including affected two segments in 9 tumors and three segments in 1 tumor. Calcifications were found in 5 aneurysms and 3/5 with thrombosis; six stenotic segments were found. ECHO failed to detect 8 tumors with 2/8 in LAD, 1/8 in LCX and 5/8 in RCA, and those included 4 small aneurysms. The use of 64-slice MDCT angiography proved valuable for monitoring young children with Kawasaki disease. However, further study is necessary to specify the sensitivity and specificity of MDCT in the follow-up.

  2. Usefulness of 64-slice MDCT for follow-up of young children with coronary artery aneurysm due to Kawasaki disease: Initial experience

    Peng Yun [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China)], E-mail: ppengyun@yahoo.com; Zeng Jinjin [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China); Du Zhongdong [Pediatric Cardiovascular Department, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China); Sun Guoqiang [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China); Guo Huling [Pediatric Cardiovascular Department, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China)

    2009-03-15

    To evaluate the initial application and value of 64-slice multidetector computed tomography as an alternative diagnostic modality in the follow-up of young children with coronary artery aneurysm due to Kawasaki disease. Twelve boys (mean age 5.1 years, range 1.8-7.8 years) for follow-up (time range from 1.1 to 5.1 years) of known Kawasaki disease and coronary artery aneurysm underwent 64-slice MDCT ECG-gated coronary angiography. All data were acquired without breath holding. Two pediatric radiologists independently assessed image quality and the diameter of all coronary segments were measured for each patient. The number, position, shape and size of each coronary artery aneurysm were observed and compared with those of ECHO performed previously. A total of 118/156 segments permitted visualization with diagnostic image quality, the CT measurements showed good inter-observer and intra-observer reliability, coefficients were 0.93 and 0.88, respectively. A total of 30 coronary artery aneurysms were identified with measured mean of 7.5 {+-} 3.8 mm in diameter, and of 12.4 {+-} 9.1 mm in longitudinal lengths.10 tumors were small, 8 tumors were medium and 12 tumors were giant aneurysm. The affected segments included LM7/12(58.3%), 9/12(75%) of LAD1, 4/12(33.3%) of LAD2, 2/12(16.7%) of LCX1; 6/12(50%) of RCA1, 9/12(75%) of RCA2 and 4/12(33.3%) of RCA3, including affected two segments in 9 tumors and three segments in 1 tumor. Calcifications were found in 5 aneurysms and 3/5 with thrombosis; six stenotic segments were found. ECHO failed to detect 8 tumors with 2/8 in LAD, 1/8 in LCX and 5/8 in RCA, and those included 4 small aneurysms. The use of 64-slice MDCT angiography proved valuable for monitoring young children with Kawasaki disease. However, further study is necessary to specify the sensitivity and specificity of MDCT in the follow-up.

  3. Follow-up study of patients treated by x-ray epilation for Tinea capitis. Resurvey of post-treatment illness and mortality experience

    Shore, R.E.; Albert, R.E.; Pasternack, B.S.

    1976-01-01

    This is the second follow-up study of 2,215 persons who during childhood between 1940 and 1959 had been given x-ray therapy for tinea capitis and of 1,395 persons well matched for age, sex, and race who were treated for the same disease during the same period without the use of x-ray therapy. The major finding of the study was an excess incidence in the irradiated cases of tumors of the head and neck including the skin, brain, thyroid, and parotid. However, between the groups there was no difference in death due to malignant neoplasms or any other cause. Among white patients, a 40 percent excess of treated psychiatric disorders was observed in the irradiated group, but there was no difference among blacks

  4. Clinical experiences with laser-welded titanium frameworks supported by implants in the edentulous mandible: a 10-year follow-up study.

    Ortorp, Anders; Jemt, Torsten

    2006-01-01

    Long-term follow-up studies for more than 5 years are not available on laser-welded titanium frameworks. To report and compare 10-year data on implant-supported prostheses in the edentulous mandible provided with laser-welded titanium frameworks and conventional gold alloy frameworks. Altogether, 155 patients were consecutively treated with prostheses at abutment level with two generations of fixed laser-welded titanium frameworks (test groups). A control group of 53 randomly selected patients with conventional gold alloy castings was used for comparison. Clinical and radiographic 10-year data were collected for the three groups. All patients followed-up for 10 years (n=112) still had fixed prostheses in the mandible (cumulative success rate [CSR] 100%). The overall 10-year cumulative success rate (CSR) was 92.8 and 100.0% for titanium and gold alloy frameworks, respectively. Ten-year implant cumulative survival rate (CSR) was 99.4 and 99.6% for the test and control groups, respectively. Average 10-year bone loss was 0.56 (SD 0.45) mm for the titanium group and 0.77 (SD 0.36) mm for the control group (p screw components were below 3%. Excellent overall long-term results with 100% CSR could be achieved with the present treatment modality. Fractures of the metal frames and remade prostheses were more common for the laser-welded titanium frameworks, and the first generation of titanium frameworks worked poorly when compared with gold alloy frameworks during 10 years (p < 0.05). However, on average more bone loss was observed for implants supporting gold alloy frameworks during 10 years. The reasons for this difference are not clear.

  5. 96 Week Follow-Up of HIV-Infected Patients in Rescue with Raltegravir Plus Optimized Backbone Regimens: A Multicentre Italian Experience

    Capetti, Amedeo; Landonio, Simona; Meraviglia, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Sterrantino, Gaetana; Ammassari, Adriana; Menzaghi, Barbara; Franzetti, Marco; De Socio, Giuseppe Vittorio; Pellicanò, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Elena; Soria, Alessandro; Meschiari, Marianna; Trezzi, Michele; Sasset, Lolita; Celesia, Benedetto Maurizio; Zucchi, Patrizia; Melzi, Sara; Ricci, Elena; Rizzardini, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Background Long term efficacy of raltegravir (RAL)-including regimens in highly pre-treated HIV-1-infected patients has been demonstrated in registration trials. However, few studies have assessed durability in routine clinical settings. Methods Antiretroviral treatment-experienced patients initiating a RAL-containing salvage regimen were enrolled. Routine clinical and laboratory follow-up was performed at baseline, week 4, 12, and every 12 weeks thereafter. Data were censored at week 96. Results Out of 320 patients enrolled, 292 (91.25%) subjects maintained their initial regimen for 96 weeks; 28 discontinued prematurely for various reasons: death (11), viral failure (8), adverse events (5), loss to follow-up (3), consent withdrawal (1). Eight among these 28 subjects maintained RAL but changed the accompanying drugs. The mean CD4+ T-cell increase at week 96 was 227/mm3; 273 out of 300 patients (91%), who were still receiving RAL at week 96, achieved viral suppression (HIV-1 RNA 4 (n = 40), CD4+ T-cell gain was similar across strata: +270, +214, +216, and +240 cells/mm3, respectively, as was the proportion of subjects with undetectable viral load. Laboratory abnormalities (elevation of liver enzymes, total cholesterol and triglycerides) were rare, ranging from 0.9 to 3.1%. The mean 96-week total cholesterol increase was 23.6 mg/dL. Conclusions In a routine clinical setting, a RAL-based regimen allowed most patients in salvage therapy to achieve optimal viral suppression for at least 96 weeks, with relevant immunologic gain and very few adverse events. PMID:22808029

  6. 96 Week follow-up of HIV-infected patients in rescue with raltegravir plus optimized backbone regimens: a multicentre Italian experience.

    Amedeo Capetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long term efficacy of raltegravir (RAL-including regimens in highly pre-treated HIV-1-infected patients has been demonstrated in registration trials. However, few studies have assessed durability in routine clinical settings. METHODS: Antiretroviral treatment-experienced patients initiating a RAL-containing salvage regimen were enrolled. Routine clinical and laboratory follow-up was performed at baseline, week 4, 12, and every 12 weeks thereafter. Data were censored at week 96. RESULTS: Out of 320 patients enrolled, 292 (91.25% subjects maintained their initial regimen for 96 weeks; 28 discontinued prematurely for various reasons: death (11, viral failure (8, adverse events (5, loss to follow-up (3, consent withdrawal (1. Eight among these 28 subjects maintained RAL but changed the accompanying drugs. The mean CD4+ T-cell increase at week 96 was 227/mm(3; 273 out of 300 patients (91%, who were still receiving RAL at week 96, achieved viral suppression (HIV-1 RNA 4 (n = 40, CD4+ T-cell gain was similar across strata: +270, +214, +216, and +240 cells/mm(3, respectively, as was the proportion of subjects with undetectable viral load. Laboratory abnormalities (elevation of liver enzymes, total cholesterol and triglycerides were rare, ranging from 0.9 to 3.1%. The mean 96-week total cholesterol increase was 23.6 mg/dL. CONCLUSIONS: In a routine clinical setting, a RAL-based regimen allowed most patients in salvage therapy to achieve optimal viral suppression for at least 96 weeks, with relevant immunologic gain and very few adverse events.

  7. The Modified Bentall Procedure: A Single-Institution Experience in 249 Patients with a Maximum Follow Up of 21.5 Years.

    Celiento, Michele; Ravenni, Giacomo; Margaryan, Rafik; Ferrari, Gabriele; Blasi, Stefania; Pratali, Stefano; Bortolotti, Uberto

    2016-07-01

    The study aim was to evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes of the modified Bentall procedure (MBP) with a mechanical conduit. Between 1993 and 2014, a total of 249 patients (mean age 62 ± 12 years; range: 25-87 years) underwent a MBP at the authors' institution. The main indication was annuloaortic ectasia in 102 patients (41%), followed by acute aortic dissection in 82 patients (33%); moderate to severe aortic regurgitation was present in 79% of cases. A bicuspid aortic valve was found in 17% of patients, and Marfan syndrome in 7%. The mean NYHA functional class was 2.5 ± 1.1. Concomitant procedures were performed in 36 patients (14%). The mean follow up was 8.7 ± 5.0 years (range: 0.3-21.5 years) and was 99% complete. The total follow up was 6.475 patient-years (pt-yr). Operative mortality was 3% in elective cases. Age, prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass times and mechanical ventilation >96 h were independent risk factors for early mortality. Actuarial survival at 15 and 20 years was 62% and 60%, respectively. Risk factors for late mortality were age and emergency operation. Actuarial freedom from thromboembolism (linearized incidence 0.93%/pt-yr) was 82% at 15 years, and 74% at 20 years. Seven patients required reoperation (0.38%/pt-yr), with an actuarial freedom from reoperation of 91% at 15 years and 87% at 20 years. The incidence of overall valve-related complications was 0.32%/pt-yr, with actuarial freedoms of 94% at 15 and 20 years. The MBP has shown excellent long-term results with a low incidence of procedure-related complications up to 20 years postoperatively. For this reason, it is considered to be a valid option for the treatment of aortic root disease, whenever valvesparing procedures are not indicated.

  8. Our experience of high dose I-131 therapy in 75 patients with well differentiated carcinoma thyroid followed up over 5 years

    Dougall, P.; Kumar, A.; Ashok, P.; Chinwan, B.P.; Khan, B.; Pandey, D.; Joshi, N.D.

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. The epidemiology of thyroid cancer is variable, depending on the geographic location of the patient population. Well differentiated thyroid cancer (WTC), is responsive to high dose I-131 treatment, and is the most accepted form of therapy, even though the dose administered for ablation of residual thyroid tissue maybe controversial. At our centre, 75 patients of WTC, mean age 42.4 years, 22 males and 53 females (M:F 1:2.4), were treated with high dose oral I-131 therapy with a Total Mean Dose (TMD) of 263.6 mCi, 4 - 6 weeks post thyroidectomy. They were followed up over a period of 6 years. Twenty ( 26.7%) patients had follicular cancer (FC), 47 (62.7%) papillary cancer (PC) and 8 (10.7%) were mixed (MC), on histopathology, at presentation. 38 (50.7%) patients had only residual thyroid tissue (RTT) on I-131 whole body bone scan (WBS) and 37 (49.3%) presented with metastatic disease (MD) at the time of therapy. Of the 37 patients with MD, 21 (56.8%) had metastases to the lymph nodes, 6 (16.2%) to the lungs, 4 (10.8%) to bone, 3 (8.1%) to bone and lung, and 4 (10.8%) to lung plus lymph nodes. Twenty-three patients (7 FC , 13 - PC and 3 MC; 6 RTT, 17 - MD) , received more than one dose of I-131 with a TMD of 422.7 mCi (Range 88 1590 mCi ). 52 patients (13 FC, 34 PC, 5 MC; 20 MD and 32 RTT) received a single TMD of 104.4 (Range 39.5 219 mCi). On follow-up, 3 patients of FC with MD (2 lung metastasis and 1 with extensive lymph node metastasis), died within 3 months 2 years of therapy. 3 patients of MD (2 FC, 1-MC; 2 bone metastasis and 1 bone with lung metastasis) died after 5 .5 years, Of the 6 patients who died, 5 were FC and only 1 was MC. 2 patients with MD to lungs and bone had received a single dose and were lost to follow up. All patients with PC and FC with only RTT, were surviving at the end of 5 years. None of the patients with MD to lymph nodes died at the end of 5 years, either receiving single or

  9. Socioeconomic status, child enrichment factors, and cognitive performance among preschool-age children: results from the Follow-Up of Growth and Development Experiences study.

    Christensen, Deborah L; Schieve, Laura A; Devine, Owen; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn

    2014-07-01

    Lower cognitive performance is associated with poorer health and functioning throughout the lifespan and disproportionately affects children from lower socioeconomic status (SES) populations. Previous studies reporting positive associations between child home enrichment and cognitive performance generally had a limited distribution of SES. We evaluated the associations of SES and child enrichment with cognitive performance in a population with a wide range of SES, particularly whether enrichment attenuates associations with SES. Children were sampled from a case-control study of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) conducted in a public hospital serving a low SES population (final n=198) and a private hospital serving a middle-to-high SES population (final n=253). SES (maternal education and income) and perinatal factors (SGA, maternal smoking and drinking) were obtained from maternal birth interview. Five child home enrichment factors (e.g. books in home) and preschool attendance were obtained from follow-up interview at age 4.5 years. Cognitive performance was assessed with the Differential Ability Scales (DAS), a standardized psychometric test administered at follow-up. SES and enrichment scores were created by combining individual factors. Analyses were adjusted for perinatal factors. Children from the public birth hospital had a significantly lower mean DAS general cognitive ability (GCA) score than children born at the private birth hospital (adjusted mean difference -21.4, 95% CI: -24.0, -18.7); this was substantially attenuated by adjustment for individual SES, child enrichment factors, and preschool attendance (adjusted mean difference -5.1, 95% CI: -9.5, -0.7). Individual-level SES score was associated with DAS score, beyond the general SES effect associated with hospital of birth. Adjustment for preschool attendance and home enrichment score attenuated the association between individual SES score and adjusted mean DAS-GCA among children born at both of the

  10. Clinical experiences of implant-supported prostheses with laser-welded titanium frameworks in the partially edentulous jaw: a 5-year follow-up study.

    Ortorp, A; Jemt, T

    1999-01-01

    Titanium frameworks have been used in the endentulous implant patient for the last 10 years. However, knowledge of titanium frameworks for the partially dentate patient is limited. To report the 5-year clinical performance of implant-supported prostheses with laser-welded titanium frameworks in the partially edentulous jaw. A consecutive group of 383 partially edentulous patients were, on a routine basis, provided with fixed partial prostheses supported by Brånemark implants in the mandible or maxilla. Besides conventional frameworks in cast gold alloy, 58 patients were provided with titanium frameworks with three different veneering techniques, and clinical and radiographic 5-year data were collected for this group. The overall cumulative survival rate was 95.6% for titanium-framework prostheses and 93.6% for implants. Average bone loss during the follow-up period was 0.4 mm. The most common complications were minor veneering fractures. Loose and fractured implant screw components were fewer than 2%. An observation was that patients on medications for cardiovascular problems may lose more implants than others (p laser-welded titanium frameworks was similar to that reported for conventional cast frames in partially edentulous jaws. Low-fusing porcelain veneers also showed clinical performance comparable to that reported for conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal techniques.

  11. Clinical experiences with laser-welded titanium frameworks supported by implants in the edentulous mandible: a 5-year follow-up study.

    Ortorp, A; Linden, B; Jemt, T

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the 5-year clinical performance of implant-supported prostheses with laser-welded titanium frameworks and to compare their performance with that of prostheses provided with conventional cast frameworks. On a routine basis, a consecutive group of 824 edentulous patients were provided with fixed prostheses supported by implants in the edentulous mandible. In addition to conventional gold-alloy castings, patients were at random provided with 2 kinds of laser-welded titanium frameworks. In all, 155 patients were included in the 2 titanium framework groups. A control group of 53 randomly selected patients with conventional gold-alloy castings was used for comparison. Clinical and radiographic 5-year data was collected for the 3 groups. All followed patients still had fixed prostheses in the mandible after 5 years. The overall cumulative success rates were 95.9% and 99.7% for titanium-framework prostheses and implants, respectively. The corresponding success rates for the control group were 100% and 99.6%, respectively. Bone loss was 0.5 mm on average during the 5-year follow-up period. The most common complications for titanium frameworks were resin or tooth fractures, gingival inflammation, and fractures of the metal frames (10%). One of the cast frameworks fractured and was resoldered. Loose and fractured implant screw components were few (laser-welded titanium frameworks seem to be a viable alternative to conventional castings in the edentulous mandible.

  12. Longitudinal study of sodium MRI of articular cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis: initial experience with 16-month follow-up

    Madelin, Guillaume; Xia, Ding; Brown, Ryan; Babb, James; Chang, Gregory; Regatte, Ravinder R. [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Center for Biomedical Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Krasnokutsky, Svetlana [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Division, New York, NY (United States)

    2018-01-15

    To evaluate the potential of sodium MRI to detect changes over time of apparent sodium concentration (ASC) in articular cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The cartilage of 12 patients with knee OA were scanned twice over a period of approximately 16 months with two sodium MRI sequences at 7 T: without fluid suppression (radial 3D) and with fluid suppression by adiabatic inversion recovery (IR). Changes between baseline and follow-up of mean and standard deviation of ASC (in mM), and their rate of change (in mM/day), were measured in the patellar, femorotibial medial and lateral cartilage regions for each subject. A matched-pair Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to assess significance of the changes. Changes in mean and in standard deviation of ASC, and in their respective rate of change over time, were only statistically different when data was acquired with the fluid-suppressed sequence. A significant decrease (p = 0.001) of approximately 70 mM in mean ASC was measured between the two IR scans. Quantitative sodium MRI with fluid suppression by adiabatic IR at 7 T has the potential to detect a decrease of ASC over time in articular cartilage of patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  13. Longitudinal study of sodium MRI of articular cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis: initial experience with 16-month follow-up

    Madelin, Guillaume; Xia, Ding; Brown, Ryan; Babb, James; Chang, Gregory; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of sodium MRI to detect changes over time of apparent sodium concentration (ASC) in articular cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The cartilage of 12 patients with knee OA were scanned twice over a period of approximately 16 months with two sodium MRI sequences at 7 T: without fluid suppression (radial 3D) and with fluid suppression by adiabatic inversion recovery (IR). Changes between baseline and follow-up of mean and standard deviation of ASC (in mM), and their rate of change (in mM/day), were measured in the patellar, femorotibial medial and lateral cartilage regions for each subject. A matched-pair Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to assess significance of the changes. Changes in mean and in standard deviation of ASC, and in their respective rate of change over time, were only statistically different when data was acquired with the fluid-suppressed sequence. A significant decrease (p = 0.001) of approximately 70 mM in mean ASC was measured between the two IR scans. Quantitative sodium MRI with fluid suppression by adiabatic IR at 7 T has the potential to detect a decrease of ASC over time in articular cartilage of patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  14. Data Linkage from Clinical to Study Databases via an R Data Warehouse User Interface. Experiences from a Large Clinical Follow-up Study.

    Kaspar, Mathias; Ertl, Maximilian; Fette, Georg; Dietrich, Georg; Toepfer, Martin; Angermann, Christiane; Störk, Stefan; Puppe, Frank

    2016-08-05

    Data that needs to be documented for clinical studies has often been acquired and documented in clinical routine. Usually this data is manually transferred to Case Report Forms (CRF) and/or directly into an electronic data capture (EDC) system. To enhance the documentation process of a large clinical follow-up study targeting patients admitted for acutely decompensated heart failure by accessing the data created during routine and study visits from a hospital information system (HIS) and by transferring it via a data warehouse (DWH) into the study's EDC system. This project is based on the clinical DWH developed at the University of Würzburg. The DWH was extended by several new data domains including data created by the study team itself. An R user interface was developed for the DWH that allows to access its source data in all its detail, to transform data as comprehensively as possible by R into study-specific variables and to support the creation of data and catalog tables. A data flow was established that starts with labeling patients as study patients within the HIS and proceeds with updating the DWH with this label and further data domains at a daily rate. Several study-specific variables were defined using the implemented R user interface of the DWH. This system was then used to export these variables as data tables ready for import into our EDC system. The data tables were then used to initialize the first 296 patients within the EDC system by pseudonym, visit and data values. Afterwards, these records were filled with clinical data on heart failure, vital parameters and time spent on selected wards. This solution focuses on the comprehensive access and transformation of data for a DWH-EDC system linkage. Using this system in a large clinical study has demonstrated the feasibility of this approach for a study with a complex visit schedule.

  15. Radioimmunotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; positioning, safety, and efficacy of 90Y-Ibritumomab. 10 years of experience and follow-up.

    Martínez, A; Martínez-Ramirez, M; Martínez-Caballero, D; Beneit, P; Clavel, J; Figueroa, G; Verdú, J

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is one of the therapies directed against molecular targets in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). To evaluate the positioning, safety, and effectiveness of RIT with 90Y-Ibritumomab in NHL patients. A retrospective study was conducted on patients with NHL who received RIT with 90Y-Ibritumomab. An evaluation was made of the concordance with clinical guidelines, toxicity as rated by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), and effectiveness was assessed based on response to treatment, overall survival (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS). RIT was requested in 26 patients, of whom 21 (11 women, mean age 56±10 years) were included in the study, with the following distribution: Follicular NHL, 67%, Mantle NHL, 14%, Diffuse large B-cell NHL, 9.5%, and Transformed NHL 9.5%. Twelve patients with refractory NHL, 7 for consolidation response, and 2 transplant conditioning, were treated. Adverse effects were observed in 71% of patients, which were usually manageable and transient, and with the most common being thrombocytopenia. At 3-4 months, overall response rate was 76.2% (71.4% complete and 4.8% partial response), and 19% had progression of disease. With a median follow up of 70 months, the OS was 96±8 months, and the PFS was 54±11 months. RIT showed a moderate correlation with clinical guidelines, and is probably underused. Adverse effects were common, mild, and manageable. The data show a high complete response rate and an increase in the OS and PFS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  16. Women with provoked vestibulodynia experience clinically significant reductions in pain regardless of treatment: results from a 2-year follow-up study.

    Davis, Seth N P; Bergeron, Sophie; Binik, Yitzchak M; Lambert, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a prevalent genital pain syndrome that has been assumed to be chronic, with little spontaneous remission. Despite this assumption, there is a dearth of empirical evidence regarding the progression of PVD in a natural setting. Although many treatments are available, there is no single treatment that has demonstrated efficacy above others. The aims of this secondary analysis of a prospective study were to (i) assess changes over a 2-year period in pain, depressive symptoms, and sexual outcomes in women with PVD; and (ii) examine changes based on treatment(s) type. Participants completed questionnaire packages at Time 1 and a follow-up package 2 years later. Visual analog scale of genital pain, Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction, Female Sexual Function Index, Beck Depression Inventory, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, and sexual intercourse attempts over the past month. Two hundred thirty-nine women with PVD completed both time one and two questionnaires. For the sample as a whole, there was significant improvement over 2 years on pain ratings, sexual satisfaction, sexual function, and depressive symptoms. The most commonly received treatments were physical therapy, sex/psychotherapy, and medical treatment, although 41.0% did not undergo any treatment. Women receiving no treatment also improved significantly on pain ratings. No single treatment type predicted better outcome for any variable except depressive symptoms, in which women who underwent surgery were more likely to improve. These results suggest that PVD may significantly reduce in severity over time. Participants demonstrated clinically significant pain improvement, even when they did not receive treatment. Furthermore, the only single treatment type predicting better outcomes was surgery, and only for depressive symptoms, accounting for only 2.3% of the variance. These data do not demonstrate the superiority of any one treatment and underscore the need to have control groups in

  17. "We're Not Slaves--We Are Actually the Future!" A Follow-up Study of Apprentices' Experiences in the Norwegian Hospitality Industry

    Bakkevig Dagsland, Åse Helene; Mykletun, Reidar Johan; Einarsen, Ståle

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the socialisation processes taking place during the apprenticeship period within the hospitality industry, searching for explanations of drop-out and early staff turnover in the personal, social and educational experiences of the apprentices during their organisational socialisation process and vocational training. Data were…

  18. A 6-year follow-up of children assessed for suspected autism spectrum disorder: parents’ experiences of society’s support

    Westman Andersson, Gunilla; Miniscalco, Carmela; Gillberg, Nanna

    2017-01-01

    Background Early support and interventions are suggested to be important for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental problems and their families. Parents are described to have a burdensome life situation where the child’s problems have a great impact on the family’s well-being. Aim To obtain increased knowledge of parents’ experiences of support and interventions 6 years after their child was assessed for ASD. Methods and procedures A semi-structured questionnaire was sent to all parents (n=101) whose preschool children (questions were analyzed thematically using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Outcomes and results Parents of 56 children answered 30 questions about their experiences concerning support from society after the neuropsychiatric assessment. From the eight open-ended questions, three themes were identified: parental responsibility, resources and competence among actors in society, and inequality. The parents experienced that they had to take responsibility for meeting the needs of and securing support for their child. They found that the support given was unequal, uncoordinated, and with great variations between both geographical areas and professionals. Parents’ own resources were described as impacting the possibility to secure adequate interventions, resulting in unequal treatment of families depending on socioeconomic status. Several parents also expressed experiencing a lack of individualization of services and interventions. All children had received some kind of action from society, but not to the degree they had wished for when the children got their ASD diagnosis. Conclusion and implications The essence of parents’ comments was the experience of authorities and societal actors trying to push the responsibility onto someone else. The study indicates a need for continuous longitudinal support for children identified with neurodevelopmental problems before the age of 3 years. This requires

  19. Holography Experiments on Optical Imaging.

    Bonczak, B.; Dabrowski, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes experiments intended to produce a better understanding of the holographic method of producing images and optical imaging by other optical systems. Application of holography to teaching physics courses is considered. (Author/SA)

  20. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: a.morrison-saunders@murdoch.edu.au [Murdoch University (Australia); North-West University (South Africa); Pope, Jenny, E-mail: jenny@integral-sustainability.net [North-West University (South Africa); Integral Sustainability (Australia); Curtin University (Australia); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [North-West University (South Africa); University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [North-West University (South Africa)

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  1. Follow-up utterances in QA dialogue

    van Schooten, B.W.; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The processing of user follow-up utterances by a QA system is a topic which is still in its infant stages, but enjoys growing interest in the QA community. In this paper, we discuss the broader issues related to handling follow-up utterances in a real-life "information kiosk" setting. With help of a

  2. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Pope, Jenny; Bond, Alan; Retief, Francois

    2014-01-01

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently

  3. Follow-up in Childhood Functional Constipation

    Modin, Line; Walsted, Anne-Mette; Rittig, Charlotte Siggaard

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Guidelines recommend close follow-up during treatment of childhood functional constipation. Only sparse evidence exists on how follow-up is best implemented. Our aim was to evaluate if follow-up by phone or self-management through web-based information improved treatment outcomes....... METHODS: In this randomized, controlled trial, conducted in secondary care, 235 children, aged 2-16 years, who fulfilled the Rome III criteria of childhood constipation, were assigned to one of three follow-up regimens: (I) control group (no scheduled contact), (II) phone group (2 scheduled phone contacts......: Improved self-management behavior caused by access to self-motivated web-based information induced faster short-term recovery during treatment of functional constipation. Patient empowerment rather than health care promoted follow-up might be a step towards more effective treatment for childhood...

  4. One-year follow-up of basic body awareness therapy in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder. A small intervention study of effects on movement quality, PTSD symptoms, and movement experiences.

    Blaauwendraat, Conny; Levy Berg, Adrienne; Gyllensten, Amanda Lundvik

    2017-07-01

    The present study with mixed methods design evaluated the long-term effects of Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) for patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Fifteen patients received 12 individual sessions of BBAT treatment as usual (TAU) when needed. The patients were assessed at baseline (T0), directly after treatment (T1) and at one-year follow-up (T2), using the Body Awareness Scale Movement Quality and Experience (BAS MQ-E), the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). The results at T1 showed significant improvement in the quality of movement (p = 0.001), body experience (p = 0.007), and symptoms (p = 0.001). At T2, the improvements were sustained. Pain in stillness (p = 0.017) and during movement (p = 0.007) had decreased. The verbal ability to describe the body experiences in words was poor at T0, but became more detailed at T1 and even more so at T2. Our findings suggest that BBAT in addition to TAU can be a viable physiotherapeutic treatment for patients with PTSD. This knowledge may influence future treatment strategies for patients with PTSD and be of guidance to physiotherapists working with persons with trauma experiences in the community or psychiatry/mental healthcare areas.

  5. Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS) is used to track, monitor, and report on audits and open recommendations of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM)...

  6. Undergraduate experiments on statistical optics

    Scholz, Ruediger; Friege, Gunnar; Weber, Kim-Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Since the pioneering experiments of Forrester et al (1955 Phys. Rev. 99 1691) and Hanbury Brown and Twiss (1956 Nature 177 27; Nature 178 1046), along with the introduction of the laser in the 1960s, the systematic analysis of random fluctuations of optical fields has developed to become an indispensible part of physical optics for gaining insight into features of the fields. In 1985 Joseph W Goodman prefaced his textbook on statistical optics with a strong commitment to the ‘tools of probability and statistics’ (Goodman 2000 Statistical Optics (New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc.)) in the education of advanced optics. Since then a wide range of novel undergraduate optical counting experiments and corresponding pedagogical approaches have been introduced to underpin the rapid growth of the interest in coherence and photon statistics. We propose low cost experimental steps that are a fair way off ‘real’ quantum optics, but that give deep insight into random optical fluctuation phenomena: (1) the introduction of statistical methods into undergraduate university optical lab work, and (2) the connection between the photoelectrical signal and the characteristics of the light source. We describe three experiments and theoretical approaches which may be used to pave the way for a well balanced growth of knowledge, providing students with an opportunity to enhance their abilities to adapt the ‘tools of probability and statistics’. (paper)

  7. Rectal neoplasms. Postoperative follow-up

    Galano Urgelles, Rolando; Rodriguez Fernandez, Zenen; Casaus Prieto, Arbelio

    1997-01-01

    A study of 31 patients operated on for rectal neoplasms between September, 1989 and September, 1995 in SantiAug de Cuba was performed. Patients Webre followed-up during this period for the purpose of the study. There was a frank predominance of males and ages between 45 and 64, of the stage II and the groups BI and BII according to Dukes' classification. Most patients received 5-fluoracil, without tumor relapses. The current survival rate of the series was 76 % at the end of the investigation. It is recommended that all patients operated on for this segment be followed-up after the operation; to continue with cytostatic treatment using 5-fluoracil, and to emphasize the importance of the use of tumor markers during the follow-up, in addition to transrectal ultrasound, as well as to make an early diagnosis through mass screening methods

  8. Follow-up after rectal cancer

    Hovdenak Jakobsen, Ida; Juul, Therese; Bernstein, Inge

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main treatment for non-metastatic rectal cancer (RC) is surgical resection. Late adverse effects that are highly prevalent and negatively impact patients' symptom burden and quality of life are: bowel-, urological and sexual dysfunctions; psychological distress; fear of recurrence....... As a consequence, the randomized controlled trial Follow-up after Rectal Cancer (FURCA) has been launched, testing the effect of a new patient-led, follow-up program. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology used in the FURCA study and to report results from the development of the patient-led, follow......, or a control group following the current follow-up program with routine medicals. The primary outcomes are symptom burden and quality of life, measured by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Colorectal (FACT-C) questionnaire. Other outcome and demographic data are collected as patient...

  9. The Kepler follow-up observation program

    Gautier...[], T.N.; Batalha, N.M.; Borucki, W. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched on March 6, 2009 to perform a photometric survey of more than 100,000 dwarf stars to search for terrestrial-size planets with the transit technique. Follow-up observations of planetary candidates identified by detection of transit-like events are needed both...

  10. Predicting Retear after Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear: Two-Point Dixon MR Imaging Quantification of Fatty Muscle Degeneration-Initial Experience with 1-year Follow-up.

    Nozaki, Taiki; Tasaki, Atsushi; Horiuchi, Saya; Ochi, Junko; Starkey, Jay; Hara, Takeshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the degree of preoperative fatty degeneration within muscles, postoperative longitudinal changes in fatty degeneration, and differences in fatty degeneration between patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears who do and those who do not experience a retear after surgery. Materials and Methods This prospective study had institutional review board approval and was conducted in accordance with the Committee for Human Research. Informed consent was obtained. Fifty patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears (18 men, 32 women; mean age, 67.0 years ± 8.0; age range, 41-91 years) were recruited. The degrees of preoperative and postoperative fatty degeneration were quantified by using a two-point Dixon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence; two radiologists measured the mean signal intensity on in-phase [S(In)] and fat [S(Fat)] images. Estimates of fatty degeneration were calculated with "fat fraction" values by using the formula S(Fat)/S(In) within the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis muscles at baseline preoperative and at postoperative 1-year follow-up MR imaging. Preoperative fat fractions in the failed-repair group and the intact-repair group were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The preoperative fat fractions in the supraspinatus muscle were significantly higher in the failed-repair group than in the intact-repair group (37.0% vs 19.5%, P muscle tended to progress at 1 year postoperatively in only the failed-repair group. Conclusion MR imaging quantification of preoperative fat fractions by using a two-point Dixon sequence within the rotator cuff muscles may be a viable method for predicting postoperative retear. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  11. An 8-Week Knee Osteoarthritis Treatment Program of Hyaluronic Acid Injection, Deliberate Physical Rehabilitation, and Patient Education is Cost Effective at 2 Years Follow-up: The OsteoArthritis Centers of America Experience

    Larry E. Miller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous nonsurgical interventions have been reported to improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA over the short term. However, longer follow-up is required to accurately characterize outcomes such as cost effectiveness and delayed arthroplasty. A total of 553 patients with symptomatic knee OA who previously underwent a single 8-week multimodal treatment program were contacted at 1 year ( n = 336 or 2 years ( n = 217 follow-up. The percentage of patients who underwent knee arthroplasty was 10% at 1 year and 18% at 2 years following program completion. The treatment program was highly cost effective at $12,800 per quality-adjusted life year at 2 years. Cost effectiveness was maintained under a variety of plausible assumptions and regardless of gender, age, body mass index, disease severity, or knee pain severity. In summary, a single 8-week multimodal knee OA treatment program is cost effective and may lower knee arthroplasty utilization through 2 years follow-up.

  12. Follow-up of colorectal cancer patients: quality of life and attitudes towards follow-up

    Stiggelbout, A. M.; de Haes, J. C.; Vree, R.; van de Velde, C. J.; Bruijninckx, C. M.; van Groningen, K.; Kievit, J.

    1997-01-01

    The aims of our study were to assess the effect of follow-up on the quality of life of colorectal cancer patients and to assess the attitudes of patients towards follow-up as a function of patient characteristics. Patients who had been treated with curative intent were selected from four types of

  13. Progressive Occlusion of Enterprise Stent-Assisted Coiling of Ruptured Wide-Necked Intracranial Aneurysms and Related Factors on Angiographic Follow-Up: A Single-Center Experience with 468 Patients

    Liu, Aihua; Li, Youxiang; Jiang, Chuhan; Wu, Zhongxue

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of the Enterprise stent on progressive occlusion of wide-necked aneurysms and to evaluate the association between dubious factors and progressive occlusion, which is a consecutive, retrospective, single-center study. Data from 468 patients with 495 wide-necked aneurysms, who had undergone Enterprise stent-assisted coiling (SAC) were reviewed, and the clinical outcomes and the angiographic results were analyzed. A 14-month clinical follow-up was achieved in 421 of the 468 patients (90.0%), showing modified Rankin Scale (mRS) 0–1 in 364 (86.4%), mRS 2 in 17 (4.1%), mRS 3 in 17 (4.1%), mRS 4–5 in 9 (2.1%), and mRS 6 in 14 (3.3%) patients. Overall, the morbidity and mortality were 10.2% and 3.3%, respectively. Initial angiographic results showed Raymond scale (RS)1 in 273 (55.2%), RS2 in 194 (39.2%), and RS3 in 28 (5.6%) patients. Eight-month angiographic follow-up was available in 394 of 495 patients (79.6%), and RS1 was seen in 315 (79.9%), RS2 in 65 (16.5%) and RS3 in 14 (3.6%) cases. At the end of the follow-up, 115 of the 165 (69.7%) patients with initial RS2 and RS3 showed progressive occlusion. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between progressive occlusion and age (p = 0.654), sex (p = 0.016), aneurysm diameter (p = 0.010), neck size (p = 0.124), dome-to neck ratio (DNR) (p = 0.018) and location (p = 0.001) at the time of follow-up. SAC using Enterprise stent is not only feasible for wide-necked aneurysms, but can achieve a high rate of progressive occlusion with good clinical outcomes at medium-term follow-up. Patient age and aneurysm neck size showed no associated with progressive occlusion at follow-up, while sex, aneurysm diameter, DNR and location were significantly associated with progressive occlusion. PMID:24658387

  14. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars...... and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using...

  15. Tissue coverage of a hydrophilic polymer-coated zotarolimus-eluting stent vs. a fluoropolymer-coated everolimus-eluting stent at 13-month follow-up: an optical coherence tomography substudy from the RESOLUTE All Comers trial

    Gutiérrez-Chico, Juan Luis; van Geuns, Robert Jan; Regar, Evelyn

    2011-01-01

    To compare the tissue coverage of a hydrophilic polymer-coated zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES) vs. a fluoropolymer-coated everolimus-eluting stent (EES) at 13 months, using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in an 'all-comers' population of patients, in order to clarify the mechanism of eventual...

  16. Sixteen years follow-up results of a randomized phase II trial of neoadjuvant fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FAC) compared with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil (CMF) in stage III breast cancer: GOCS experience.

    Leone, José Pablo; Leone, Julieta; Vallejo, Carlos Teodoro; Pérez, Juan Eduardo; Romero, Alberto Omar; Machiavelli, Mario Raul; Romero Acuña, Luis; Domínguez, María Ester; Langui, Mario; Fasce, Hebe Margot; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Ortiz, Eduardo; Iturbe, Julián; Zwenger, Ariel Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) allows direct evaluation of the tumor's sensitivity to therapy, eradication of micrometastatic disease and the possibility of performing breast conserving surgery. The aim of this study was to describe long-term results of NAC in stage III breast cancer patients. We evaluated 126 patients that participated in a phase II randomized trial of neoadjuvant FAC compared with CMF. Chemotherapy was administered for three cycles prior to definitive surgery and radiotherapy, and then for six cycles as adjuvant. Median follow-up was 4.5 years (range 0.2-16.4). Objective response rate (OR) was similar in both groups (61 % for FAC, 66 % for CMF, P = NS). There were no differences in median disease free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS) (5.1 vs 3.3 years and 6.7 vs 6.3 years for FAC and CMF, respectively). After 16 years of follow-up, 53 patients are still alive. Multivariate analysis showed that the number of pathologically involved lymph nodes (pLN) was the only factor associated with both, DFS and OS (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.0005, respectively). Both regimens were well tolerated, CMF had higher incidence of grade 3-4 leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and stomatitis, whereas alopecia was more common in FAC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report long-term outcomes of FAC and CMF in the neoadjuvant setting. Within the sensitivity of our study, both regimens showed similar OR, long-term toxicity, DFS, and OS rate at 16 years. After 5 years, the hazard of death seems to decline. The prolonged follow-up of this study provides a unique opportunity to evaluate factors that predict long-term outcomes. After 16 years of follow-up, the number of pLN remains the most powerful predictor of survival.

  17. Role of imaging in glaucoma diagnosis and follow-up

    Vizzeri Gianmarco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the review is to provide an update on the role of imaging devices in the diagnosis and follow-up of glaucoma with an emphasis on techniques for detecting glaucomatous progression and the newer spectral domain optical coherence tomography instruments. Imaging instruments provide objective quantitative measures of the optic disc and the retinal nerve fiber layer and are increasingly utilized in clinical practice. This review will summarize the recent enhancements in confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, scanning laser polarimetry, and optical coherence tomography with an emphasis on how to utilize these techniques to manage glaucoma patients and highlight the strengths and limitations of each technology. In addition, this review will briefly describe the sophisticated data analysis strategies that are now available to detect glaucomatous change overtime.

  18. Flatland optics. II. Basic experiments.

    Lohmann, A W; Wang, D; Pe'er, A; Friesem, A A

    2001-05-01

    In "Flatland optics: fundamentals" [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 1755 (2000)] we described the basic principles of two-dimensional (2D) optics and showed that a wavelength lambda in three-dimensional (3D) space (x,y,z) may appear in Flatland (x,z) as a wave with another wavelength, lambda = lambda/cosalpha. The tilt angle alpha can be modified by a 3D (Spaceland) individual who then is able to influence the 2D optics in a way that must appear to be magical to 2D Flatland individuals-in the spirit of E. A. Abbott's science fiction story [Flatland, a Romance of Many Dimensions, 6th ed. (Dover, New York, 1952)] of 1884. We now want to establish the reality or objectivity of the 2D wavelength lambda by some basic experiments similar to those that demonstrated roughly 200 years ago the wave nature of light. Specifically, we describe how to measure the 2D wavelength lambda by mean of five different arrangements that involve Young's biprism configuration, Talbot's self-imaging effect, measuring the focal length of a Fresnel zone plate, and letting light be diffracted by a double slit and by a grating. We also performed experiments with most of these arrangements. The results reveal that the theoretical wavelength, as predicted by our Flatland optics theory, does indeed coincide with the wavelength lambda as measured by Flatland experiments. Finally, we present an alternative way to understand Flatland optics in the spatial frequency domains of Flatland and Spaceland.

  19. Morbidity follow-up feasibility study

    Carpenter, M.

    1988-02-01

    The report reviews the available sources of data within Canada for undertaking morbidity follow-up studies to both supplement and complement studies using Canadian mortality data. Such studies would permit earlier detection and more sensitive measures of differences in risk for exposures to radiation and allow timely measures to be taken to minimize any occupational and environmental health risk to radiation workers. The technical feasibility of using these sources was reviewed using the criteria of adequate personal identifying information, automation of data records, file size and the accuracy of the morbidity diagnosis information. At the present time certain of the provincial cancer registry files meet these criteria best. A work plan was prepared suggesting a morbidity pilot study to clarify the role of occupational factors in the incidence of cancer among radiation workers using the Alberta Cancer Registry file and the National Dose Registry (NDR) file of radiation workers. For the longer term a full cohort study using the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System (NCIRS) and the NDR workers as the study population would provide information on all radiation workers on a national basis. A work plan was prepared and some initial format conversion of historical data was undertaken to begin developing the NCIRS into a data base suitable for long-term health studies

  20. Therapeutic abortion follow-up study.

    Margolis, A J; Davison, L A; Hanson, K H; Loos, S A; Mikkelsen, C M

    1971-05-15

    To determine the long-range psychological effects of therapeutic abortion, 50 women (aged from 13-44 years), who were granted abortions between 1967 and 1968 Because of possible impairment of mental and/or physical health, were analyzed by use of demographic questionnaires, psychological tests, and interviews. Testing revealed that 44 women had psychiatric problems at time of abortion. 43 patients were followed for 3-6 months. The follow-up interviews revealed that 29 patients reacted positively after abortion, 10 reported no significant change and 4 reacted negatively. 37 would definitely repeat the abortion. Women under 21 years of age felt substantially more ambivalent and guilty than older patients. A study of 36 paired pre- and post-abortion profiles showed that 15 initially abnormal tests had become normal. There was a significant increase in contraceptive use among the patients after the abortion, but 4 again became pregnant and 8 were apparently without consistent contraception. It is concluded that the abortions were therapeutic, but physicians are encouraged to be aware of psychological problems in abortion cases. Strong psychological and contraceptive counselling should be exercised.

  1. Colon neoplasms. Postoperative follow-up

    Galano Urgelles, Rolando; Rodriguez Fernandez, Zenen; Casaus Prieto, Arbelio

    1997-01-01

    A longitudinal and prospective study of 69 patients operated on for colon cancer was carried out during 6 years. Patients Webre folloWebd-up for the purpose of the study. The analysis evidenced that the most frequent age group ranged betWeben 65 and 74 years and that there was a predominance of females, as Webll as of stages II and III b and groups BI and BII according to Dukes' classification. Certain relapses resulting in re operations Webre detected. 5-fluoracil was used as a therapeutic agent, while the highest survival rate was attained in patients presenting with tumors in 0, I, II, and III a stages from groups A, BI, and CI of Dukes, or in those who complied with the cytostatic treatment. Survival outcomes Webre higher than the ones reported. Recommendations include to encourage mass screening in those risk groups at primary care level in order to detect early the entity, and thus improve the surgical outcomes and the results of postoperative follow-up

  2. Follow-up of prenatally diagnosed unilateral hydronephrosis

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Lenz, K; Rabol, A

    1996-01-01

    Based on previous experience with prenatally diagnosed unilateral hydronephrosis, we found that the primary indications for surgical intervention should be symptoms or functional impairment of the hydronephrotic kidney. Nonoperative management of neonates without symptoms and with normal function...... of the affected kidney was proposed. However, the strategy of treatment after prenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis is still controversial. We studied 28 consecutive children with suspected unilateral pelviureteral junction obstruction and a normal contralateral kidney. The overall follow-up period varied between 2...

  3. A Decade of GRB Follow-Up by BOOTES in Spain (2003–2013

    Martin Jelínek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article covers ten years of GRB follow-ups by the Spanish BOOTES stations: 71 follow-ups providing 23 detections. Follow-ups by BOOTES-1B from 2005 to 2008 were given in a previous article and are here reviewed and updated, and additional detection data points are included as the former article merely stated their existence. The all-sky cameras CASSANDRA have not yet detected any GRB optical afterglows, but limits are reported where available.

  4. Follow-up radiological surveillance, Marshall Islands

    Greenhouse, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    The political approvals have been given for the return of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls to their original inhabitants. These two regions, which comprised the Pacific Nuclear Testing Areas from 1946 to 1958, are now being repopulated by their original inhabitants and their families. Recent assessments of internal and external exposure pathways at Bikini and Enewetak have indicated that doses and dose commitments in excess of current radiation protection guidelines are possible or even likely for persons living in these areas. Rongelap and Utirik Atolls, which were downwind of the 1954 Bravo event, also received significant fallout; potential radiological problems exist in these areas as well. In view of this prospect, follow-up environmental monitoring and personnel monitoring programs are being established to maintain our cognizance of radiological conditions, and to make corrective action where necessary. The unexpected finding of detectable amounts (above background) of plutonium in the urine of individuals at Bikini and Rongelap Atolls also raises the possibility of radiological problems in the long term from environmentally-derived plutonium via pathways which are not completely understood. This finding adds further impetus to the surveillance programs for an area where real radiological concerns for the general public are already known to exist. The continuing environmental and personnel monitoring programs which this paper describes are a necessary part of the BNL radiological safety program in the Marshall Islands, which is designed to do the following: (1) elucidate the internal exposure pathways; (2) define the external radiation environment; (3) assess the doses and dose commitments from radioactivity in the environment; (4) provide the feedback necessary to improve existing predictive modelling of radiological trends; and (5) suggest actions which will minimize doses via the more significant pathways. (author)

  5. Initial Clinical Experience With the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) Breast Brachytherapy Device for Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation (APBI): First 100 Patients With More Than 1 Year of Follow-Up

    Yashar, Catheryn M.; Scanderbeg, Daniel; Kuske, Robert; Wallace, Anne; Zannis, Victor; Blair, Sarah; Grade, Emily; Swenson, Virginia H.; Quiet, Coral

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI; Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA) is a multichannel single-entry brachytherapy device designed to allow dose modulation to minimize normal tissue dose while simultaneously maximizing target coverage. This is the first report on the initial 102 patients with nearly 2 years of median follow-up. Methods and Materials: One hundred two patients were treated at two institutions. Data were collected on eligibility and dosimetry and followed for toxicity and recurrence. Results: The median follow-up is 21 months. Overall dosimetry is outstanding (median percent of target volume receiving 90% of the prescription dose was 95.9%, volume of target receiving 150% of the prescription dose was 27.8 mL, and volume of target receiving 200% of the prescription dose was 14.0 cm 3 ). No devices were pulled prior to treatment completion. For patients with a skin bridge of less than 7 mm, the maximum median skin dose was 280 cGy (median percent of target volume receiving 90% of the prescription dose was 95.2%, volume of target receiving 150% of the prescription dose was 25.8 cm 3 and volume of target receiving 200% of the prescription dose was 12.7 mL). For patients with both chest wall and skin of less than 7 mm, the maximum median lung dose was 205 cGy with simultaneous skin dose of 272 cGy. The rate of telangiectasia was 1.9%. Grade 1 hyperpigmentation developed in 10 patients (9.8%) and Grade 2 fibrosis in 2 patients (1.9%). There were 2 symptomatic seromas and 2 cases of asymptomatic fat necrosis (1.9%). Of the patients, 27% were not eligible for MammoSite balloon brachytherapy (Hologic, Inc., Marlborough, MA) and 5% were not eligible for any balloon brachytherapy. The recurrence rate was 1%. Conclusions: The SAVI appears to safely allow an increase in eligibility for APBI over balloon brachytherapy or three-dimensional conformal radiation, highlighting the outstanding device flexibility to maximize the target dose and minimize the

  6. Two-stage treatment protocol of keratocystic odontogenic tumour in young patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: marsupialization and later enucleation with peripheral ostectomy. A 5-year-follow-up experience.

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Di Lascia, Stefano; Grossi, Giovanni; Maiorana, Carlo

    2011-12-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) is a benign uni- or multicystic intraosseous odontogenic tumour with potential for local destruction and tendency for multiplicity, especially when associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. We suggest a conservative surgical treatment based on marsupialization and later enucleation with peripheral ostectomy in order to preserve jaw's integrity in young patients. Three young patients affected of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome) presented large and multiple KCOTs, which have been treated following a two-stage surgical strategy. Initially marsupialization was performed and after a mean period of 10 months, contextually to evident reduction in radiological size image, enucleation with peripheral ostectomy was carried out. All the patients showed high collaboration in daily self-irrigation of the stomia with chlorhexidine 0.2% during the period of marsupialization. Definitive surgical intervention led to complete healing and no signs of recurrence have been observed during a 5-year-follow-up. The main advantage of this modality is the preservation of important anatomical structures involved in the lesion and jaw's continuity. Therefore in a selected group of cooperative patients, especially those affected of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, the surgical protocol exposed allows for a less invasive approach with excellent results avoiding extensive disfiguring procedures. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy prolongs the survival of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma compared with conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy: A 10-year experience with a large cohort and long follow-up.

    Zhang, Meng-Xia; Li, Jing; Shen, Guo-Ping; Zou, Xiong; Xu, Jun-Jie; Jiang, Rou; You, Rui; Hua, Yi-Jun; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun; Hong, Ming-Huang; Chen, Ming-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the survival benefit of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-CRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) using a large cohort with long follow-up. We retrospectively analysed 7081 non-metastatic NPC patients who received curative IMRT or 2D-CRT from February 2002 to December 2011. Of the 7081 patients, 2245 (31.7%) were administered IMRT, while 4836 (68.3%) were administered 2D-CRT. At 5 years, the patients administered IMRT had significantly higher local relapse-free survival (LRFS), loco-regional relapse-free survival (LRRFS), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (95.6%, 92.5%, 82.1% and 87.4%, respectively) than those administered 2D-CRT (90.8%, 88.5%, 76.7% and 84.5%, respectively; p<0.001). The distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was higher for IMRT than 2D-CRT, with borderline significance (87.6% and 85.7%, respectively; p=0.056). However, no difference was observed between IMRT and 2D-CRT in nodal relapse-free survival (NRFS; 96.3% and 97.4%, respectively; p=0.217). Multivariate analyses showed that IMRT was an independent protective prognostic factor for LRFS, LRRFS and PFS, but not NRFS, DMFS or OS. IMRT provided an improved LRFS, LRRFS and PFS in both the early and advanced T classifications and overall stage for non-disseminated NPC compared with 2D-CRT. However, no significant advantage was observed in NRFS, DMFS or OS when IMRT was used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Monetary value of lost productivity over a five year follow up in early rheumatoid arthritis estimated on the basis of official register data on patients' sickness absence and gross income: experience from the FIN-RACo trial.

    Puolakka, K; Kautiainen, H; Pekurinen, M; Möttönen, T; Hannonen, P; Korpela, M; Hakala, M; Arkela-Kautiainen, M; Luukkainen, R; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2006-07-01

    To explore the monetary value of rheumatoid arthritis related loss of productivity in patients with early active disease. In a prospective cohort substudy of the FIN-RACo Trial, 162 patients with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis, aged 18 to 65 years and available to the workforce, were followed up for five years. Loss of work productivity in euros 2002 was estimated by data on absence for sickness and on income (human capital approach) from official databases. Treatment responses were evaluated by area under the curve (AUC) of the ACR-N measure and by increase in number of erosions in radiographs of hands and feet. The health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) at six months was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). In all, 120 (75%) patients, women more often (82%) than men (61%) (p=0.002), lost work days. The mean lost productivity per patient-year was euro7217 (95% confidence interval (CI), 5561 to 9148): for women, euro6477 (4858 to 8536) and for men, euro8443 (5389 to 12,898). There was an inverse correlation with improvement: euro1101 (323 to 2156) and euro14 952 (10,662 to 19,852) for the highest and lowest quartiles of AUC of ARC-N, respectively. Lost productivity was associated with increase in the number of erosions and with disability in "changing and maintaining body position" subcategory of the ICF. Despite remission targeted treatment with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, early rheumatoid arthritis results in substantial loss of productivity. A good improvement in the disease reduces the loss markedly.

  9. "Productivity performance measurement - follow-up"

    Kristensen, Troels

    2008-01-01

    The Danish Ministry of Health has published the third annual report on hospital productivity. This experience has contributed to policy goals becoming more detailed and ambitious. New policy goals are: to include hospital productivity measures at less aggregated levels, to include labour producti...... productivity and hospital psychiatric care, to provide web-based solutions that facilitate access to productivity data, and to develop new classifications of hospital levels related to structural reforms....

  10. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam

    2012-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (∼1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 μm, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 μm. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 μm, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10 13 L ☉ . These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  11. Submillimeter Follow-up of Wise-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; hide

    2013-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approximately 1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at zeta = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 micrometers, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 micrometers. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (zeta greater than 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 micrometers, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) solar luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  12. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie [Division of Physics, Math and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benford, Dominic [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blain, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, LE1 7RH Leicester (United Kingdom); Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bussmann, Shane [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78731 (United States); Lonsdale, Carol [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Rho, Jeonghee [SETI Institute, 189 BERNARDO Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Stanford, S. Adam, E-mail: jingwen.wu@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare ({approx}1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 {mu}m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 {mu}m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  13. Meeting increased demand for total knee replacement and follow-up: determining optimal follow-up.

    Meding, J B; Ritter, M A; Davis, K E; Farris, A

    2013-11-01

    The strain on clinic and surgeon resources resulting from a rise in demand for total knee replacement (TKR) requires reconsideration of when and how often patients need to be seen for follow-up. Surgeons will otherwise require increased paramedical staff or need to limit the number of TKRs they undertake. We reviewed the outcome data of 16 414 primary TKRs undertaken at our centre to determine the time to re-operation for any reason and for specific failure mechanisms. Peak risk years for failure were determined by comparing the conditional probability of failure, the number of failures divided by the total number of TKRs cases, for each year. The median times to failure for the most common failure mechanisms were 4.9 years (interquartile range (IQR) 1.7 to 10.7) for femoral and tibial loosening, 1.9 years (IQR 0.8 to 3.9) for infection, 3.1 years (IQR 1.6 to 5.5) for tibial collapse and 5.6 years (IQR 3.4 to 9.3) for instability. The median time to failure for all revisions was 3.3 years (IQR 1.2 to 8.5), with an overall revision rate of 1.7% (n = 282). Results from our patient population suggest that patients be seen for follow-up at six months, one year, three years, eight years, 12 years, and every five years thereafter. Patients with higher pain in the early post-operative period or high body mass index (≥ 41 kg/m(2)) should be monitored more closely.

  14. How do line managers experience and handle the return to work of employees on sick leave due to work-related stress? A one-year follow-up study.

    Ladegaard, Yun; Skakon, Janne; Elrond, Andreas Friis; Netterstrøm, Bo

    2017-08-28

    To examine how line managers experience and manage the return to work process of employees on sick leave due to work-related stress and to identify supportive and inhibiting factors. Semi-structured interviews with 15 line managers who have had employees on sick leave due to work-related stress. The grounded theory approach was employed. Even though managers may accept the overall concept of work-related stress, they focus on personality and individual circumstances when an employee is sick-listed due to work-related stress. The lack of a common understanding of stress creates room for this focus. Line managers experience cross-pressure, discrepancies between strategic and human-relationship perspectives and a lack of organizational support in the return to work process. Organizations should aim to provide support for line managers. Research-based knowledge and guidelines on work-related stress and return to work process are essential, as is the involvement of coworkers. A commonly accepted definition of stress and a systematic risk assessment is also important. Cross-pressure on line managers should be minimized and room for adequate preventive actions should be provided as such an approach could support both the return to work process and the implementation of important interventions in the work environment. Implication for rehabilitation Organizations should aim to provide support for line managers handling the return to work process. Cross-pressure on line managers should be minimized and adequate preventive actions should be provided in relation to the return to work process. Research-based knowledge and guidelines on work-related stress and return to work are essential. A common and formal definition of stress should be emphasized in the workplace.

  15. Cierre espontáneo de agujero macular idiopático:: seguimiento por tomografía de coherencia óptica y microperimetría MP1 Spontaneous closure of the idiopathic macular hole.: Follow-up of this case by optical coherence tomography and microperimetry MP1

    Julio César Molina Martín

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de cierre espontáneo de agujero macular idiopático seguido por tomografía de coherencia óptica y microperimetría MP1 antes y después del cierre. El cierre espontáneo de un estadio 4 no ocurre con frecuencia, sin embargo, puede aparecer fundamentalmente en pacientes con diámetro superior del agujero menor a 150 micras. La tomografía de coherencia óptica y la microperimetría constituyen herramientas útiles en el diagnóstico, pronóstico y seguimiento de esta entidad.The case of spontaneous closure of a stage 4 idiopathic macular hole at followed up by Optical Coherence Tomography and microperimetry MP1 before and after the closure was presented. The spontaneous closure of a stage 4 macular hole is rare but it can occur in patients with hole upper diameters less than 150 µm. The OCT and the microperimetry MP1 are very useful tools in the diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up of this maculopathy.

  16. Patients’ Vulnerability in Follow-up After Colorectal Cancer

    Thomsen, Thora Grothe; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    and reorganizing follow-up after cancer treatment. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to identify the perspectives of fast-track colorectal cancer surgery patients on challenges experienced in the transition from being a hospitalized patient with cancer to being a cancer survivor. METHODS:: The current article......BACKGROUND:: In the transition between being a hospitalized patient with cancer and resuming “normal” life, many patients experience physical, mental, and social challenges. Scientifically, as well as politically, it is therefore recommended to undertake research with a focus on rethinking...... hospital after a few days; however, shortly after returning home, most of them became mentally overwhelmed by the feeling of vulnerability that was closely related to the feeling of being handed over the responsibility for a newly cancer-operated body and a fragile life situation. Four issues...

  17. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B.; Kilsmark, Jannie

    2010-01-01

    that follow-up affects the women's quality of life. CONCLUSIONS:: The main purpose of follow-up after treatment of cancer is improved survival. Our review of the literature showed no evidence of a positive effect on survival in women followed up after primary treatment of endometrial or ovarian cancer......INTRODUCTION:: To explore the extent of evidence-based data and cost-utility of follow-up after primary treatment of endometrial and ovarian cancer, addressing perspectives of technology, organization, economics, and patients. METHODS:: Systematic literature searches according......:: None of the identified studies supported a survival benefit from hospital-based follow-up after completion of primary treatment of endometrial or ovarian cancer. The methods for follow-up were of low technology (gynecologic examination with or without ultrasound examination). Other technologies had...

  18. Follow-up experience with coronary hybrid-revascularisation

    Wittwer, T; Haverich, A; Cremer, J; Boonstra, P; Franke, U; Wahlers, T

    2000-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass (MIDCAB) grafting is an accepted therapeutical option especially in multimorbid, elderly and reoperative patients with single vessel disease. To expand the benefits of MIDCAB to patients with multivessel disease, an interdisciplinary

  19. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor Office... § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... include the reference numbers the auditor assigns to audit findings under § 99.510(c). Since the summary...

  20. National screening program vs. standardized neurodevelopmental follow-up

    Maschke, Cornelia; Ellenrieder, Birte; Hecher, Kurt; Bartmann, Peter

    Background: Long-term follow-up is urgently needed to decide on the consequences of new therapies. Objective: This study assesses the use of a national child development screening program for a follow-up examination of a defined patient group. Patients and methods: Neurodevelopmental outcome of 139

  1. Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in colorectal cancer follow-up

    Verberne, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer follow-up aims to detect recurrent disease as soon as possible, since earlier detection of recurrent disease is associated with greater chances for cure. A part of follow-up is the measurement of Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in the blood of the patient. This tumor marker is

  2. Follow-up methods for retrospective cohort studies in New Zealand.

    Fawcett, Jackie; Garrett, Nick; Bates, Michael N

    2002-01-01

    To define a general methodology for maximising the success of follow-up processes for retrospective cohort studies in New Zealand, and to illustrate an approach to developing country-specific follow-up methodologies. We recently conducted a cohort study of mortality and cancer incidence in New Zealand professional fire fighters. A number of methods were used to trace vital status, including matching with records of the New Zealand Health Information Service (NZHIS), pension records of Work and Income New Zealand (WINZ), and electronic electoral rolls. Non-electronic methods included use of paper electoral rolls and the records of the Registrar of Births Deaths and Marriages. 95% of the theoretical person-years of follow-up of the cohort were traced using these methods. In terms of numbers of cohort members traced to end of follow-up, the most useful tracing methods were fire fighter employment records, the NZHIS, WINZ, and the electronic electoral rolls. The follow-up process used for the cohort study was highly successful. On the basis of this experience, we propose a generic, but flexible, model for follow-up of retrospective cohort studies in New Zealand. Similar models could be constructed for other countries. Successful follow-up of cohort studies is possible in New Zealand using established methods. This should encourage the use of cohort studies for the investigation of epidemiological issues. Similar models for follow-up processes could be constructed for other countries.

  3. Towards increasing the utility of follow-up in Canadian EIA

    Noble, Bram; Storey, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The importance of follow-up in the EIA process is clearly recognized in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (Act) in which, where it is considered appropriate, the responsible authority for a project will design a follow-up program and ensure its implementation. The Act is also explicit in recommending that the results of follow-up programs be used to improve the quality of environmental assessments (EAs). The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the specific requirements for follow-up under the Act in fact provide the best opportunity for such quality improvements. The definition of follow-up under the Act requires the verification of the accuracy of the environmental assessment and determination of the effectiveness of measures taken to mitigate the adverse environmental effects of a project. We argue that the Act, generally, and the requirements for follow-up specifically, adopts a negative perspective towards project effects by focusing on the mitigation of adverse effects and discourages the follow-up of important social or economic effects which are independent of project-related changes to the biophysical environment. Secondly, we argue that verification of accuracy places an unwarranted emphasis on 'what was expected' rather than on 'what was wanted' in terms of environmental outcomes. Using examples from Canadian experience, we illustrate the limitations of the current approach to follow-up and suggest that greater utility would be achieved by focusing on whether the environmental objectives of the project in question have been achieved

  4. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments

    Huang, K.; Le Jeannic, H.; Ruaudel, J.; Morin, O.; Laurat, J.

    2014-01-01

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments

  5. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments.

    Huang, K; Le Jeannic, H; Ruaudel, J; Morin, O; Laurat, J

    2014-12-01

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments.

  6. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments

    Huang, K. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Sorbonne Universités, CNRS, ENS-PSL Research University, Collège de France, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Le Jeannic, H.; Ruaudel, J.; Morin, O.; Laurat, J., E-mail: julien.laurat@upmc.fr [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Sorbonne Universités, CNRS, ENS-PSL Research University, Collège de France, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

    2014-12-15

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments.

  7. The follow-up time issue on small roundabouts

    Janusz WOCH

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The follow-up time was investigated. The aim of this analysis was to create a formula that allows the follow-up time calculated using the most important external parameters. The studies were based on empirical data collected at small roundabouts localized on Upper Silesia. The follow-up time is the average time gap between two cars of the minor stream being queued and entered the same major stream gap one behind the other. Follow-up times were measured directly by observing traffic flow. Resulting follow-up times were analyzed to determine their dependence on parameters such as intersection layout, roundabouts diameter and left visibility. These parameters were tested using the conventional calculation method (regression analysis. The dependence of follow-up time was then integrated into the own capacity estimation method for small roundabouts localized on urban areas. One of the biggest advantages this dependence is that capacity and traffic flow on small roundabouts can be determined reliably and appropriately for actual situations. The new follow-up time values for all range of external diameters of small roundabout 26 (22 – 40 m have been presented in this article.

  8. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Program

    Rasmussen, Helle Mätzke; Nordbye-Nielsen, Kirsten; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Program is a combined follow-up program and national clinical quality database that aims to monitor and improve the quality of health care for children with cerebral palsy (CP). STUDY POPULATION: The database includes children with CP aged 0...... indicators in three of five regions in Denmark comprising 432 children with CP, corresponding to a coverage of 82% of the expected population. CONCLUSION: The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Program is currently under development as a national clinical quality database in Denmark. The database holds...

  9. Electron beam optics for the FEL experiment and IFEL experiment

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1990-01-01

    Electron beam transport system parameters for the FEL experiment and for the FEL experiment are given. The perturbation of the ''interaction region'' optics due to wiggler focussing is taken into account and a range of solutions are provided for relevant Twiss parameters in the FEL or IFEL region. Modifications of the transport optics in specific sections of the overall beam transport lines, for reasons of enhanced diagnostic capability or enhanced beam momentum analysis resolution, is also presented

  10. Thoracic aortic coarctation: MR evaluation and follow-up

    Papavero, R.; Kastler, B.; Clair, C.; Livolsi, A.; Papavero, R.; Site, O.; Kastler, B.; Clair, C.; Litzler, J.F.; Delabrousse, E.; Scheneider, P.; Bernard, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Report our experience in the evaluation and follow-up of thoracic aortic coarctation with MRI and describe its role to estimate trans-stenotic flow. Material and methods: 43 MR examinations were performed in 30 patients (age range 15 days to 73 years) referred to our institution in the last 7 years. Results: MRI visualized the ascending, horizontal and descending portions of the aorta and the supra-aortic vessels in 42/43 patients. MRI clearly identified preoperatively an aortic coarctation in 11/12 cases confirmed by surgery. Postoperatively MRI depicted 4 restenosis and one aneurysm. In 5 patients MRI demonstrated pseudo-coarctation. A significant correlation was established between the maximal trans-stenotic pressure gradient when measured by Doppler US or angiography and the size of the signal void measured on cine-MR images (r=0.72; p<0.01). Conclusion: MRI is a reliable non invasive investigation method for the diagnosis and semi-quantitative evaluation of aortic coarctation particularly when colour Doppler US is not satisfactory. (authors)

  11. Follow-up Medical Care After Cancer Treatment

    ... Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Follow-Up Medical Care Once you’re done with cancer treatment, ...

  12. Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Analysis reported in Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization by Medicare Patients, 2007-2010, published in Volume 4, Issue 2 of Medicare and...

  13. Quantum optics experiments with atoms

    Bachor, H.A.; McClelland, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations of light ultimately limit the sensitivity of spectroscopic measurements. The quantum properties of coherent laser light and of nonclassical types of light are reviewed. Two recent experiments are described which generate light with suppressed quantum noise, pointing the way to improved and more sensitive measurements. (orig.)

  14. Reasons for women's non-participation in follow-up screening after gestational diabetes

    Nielsen, Jane Hyldgaard; Olesen, Christinna Rebecca; Kristiansen, Tine Mechlenborg

    2015-01-01

    . The women's experiences of treatment and care during their pregnancies may affect participation. Aim: This study aimed at understanding the women's experiences with treatment and care during pregnancy and to understand how these experiences influence participation in follow-up screening. Methods...

  15. BOOTES-IR: near IR follow-up GRB observations by a robotic system

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Postrigo, A. de Ugarte; Jelinek, M.

    2005-01-01

    BOOTES-IR is the extension of the BOOTES experiment, which operates in Southern Spain since 1998, to the near IR (NIR). The goal is to follow up the early stage of the gamma ray burst (GRB) afterglow emission in the NIR, alike BOOTES does already at optical wavelengths. The scientific case that drives the BOOTES-IR performance is the study of GRBs with the support of spacecraft like INTEGRAL, SWIFT and GLAST. Given that the afterglow emission in both, the NIR and the optical, in the instances immediately following a GRB, is extremely bright (reached V = 8.9 in one case), it should be possible to detect this prompt emission at NIR wavelengths too. The combined observations by BOOTES-IR and BOOTES-1 and BOOTES-2 will allow for real time identification of trustworthy candidates to have a high redshift (z > 5). It is expected that, few minutes after a GRB, the IR magnitudes be H ∼ 7-10, hence very high quality spectra can be obtained for objects as far as z = 10 by larger instruments

  16. Internet of things and bariatric surgery follow-up: Comparative study of standard and IoT follow-up.

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Lecube, Albert; Fort, José Manuel; Boleko, Maria Angeles; Hidalgo, Marta; Armengol, Manel

    2013-09-01

    Follow-up of obese patient is difficult. There is no literature related to patient follow-up that incorporates the concept of Internet of Things (IoT), use of WiFi, Internet, or portable devices for this purpose. This prospective observational study commenced in June 2011. Patients were prospectively offered to participate in the IoT study group, in which they received a WiFi scale (Withing®, Paris) that provides instant WiFi data to the patient and surgeon. Other patients were admitted to the standard follow-up group at the outpatient clinic. A total of 33 patients were included in our study (ten in the IoT group). Twelve patients did not have WiFi at home, ten lacked of computer knowledge, and seven preferred standard for follow-up. All patients underwent different surgical procedures. There were no complications. Excess weight loss (EWL) was similar in both groups. More than 90% of patients were satisfied. In the IoT group, patients considered it valuable in saving time, and considered seeing their evolution graphics extremely motivating. IoT technology can monitor medical parameters remotely and collect data. A WiFi scale can facilitate preoperative and follow-up. Standard follow-up in a classical outpatient clinic setting with the surgeon was preferred globally.

  17. Nurse-led telephone follow-up after total knee arthroplasty

    Szöts, Kirsten; Konradsen, Hanne; Solgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To generate information on how telephone follow-up consultations, structured by nursing status according to the VIPS-model, functioned after total knee arthroplasty. The objectives were to unfold the content of the telephone follow-ups according to the structure for nursing...... status and to explore the patients' views of the telephone follow-ups. BACKGROUND: The length of stay in hospital following total knee arthroplasty has fallen markedly, and patients now have to be responsible for their recovery from a very early stage. After discharge, patients may experience a variety...... Telephone follow-up was valued by total knee arthroplasties patients as representing a holistic approach and providing adequate information, counselling and support after discharge to home. Three categories were identified with regard to the patients' views: 'A means for reflection and provision of adequate...

  18. Nonimaging aspects of follow-up in breast cancer reconstruction.

    Wood, W C

    1991-09-01

    Follow-up of patients with breast cancer is directed to the early detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and the detection of new primary breast cancer. The survival benefit of early detection is limited to some patients with local failure or new primary tumors. That imaging is not used in follow-up of patients who have had breast cancer reconstruction is related to possible interference with this putative benefit by the reconstructive procedure. Such follow-up is accomplished by the patient's own surveillance, clinical examination, and laboratory testing supplemented by imaging studies. Clinical follow-up trials of women who have undergone breast reconstructive surgery show no evidence that locally recurrent breast carcinoma is masked when compared with follow-up of women who did not undergo reconstructive procedures. Reshaping of the contralateral breast to match the reconstructed breast introduces the possibility of interference with palpation as well as mammographic distortion in some women. This is an uncommon practical problem except when complicated by fat necrosis.

  19. Follow-up care of children suffered from burns

    Konstantin Aleksandrovich Afonichev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes of III-VI AB degree burns in children,regardless of the nature of treatment in the acute andrecovery period, are the development of scar contractures and deformities of the joints. However, thecorrect organization of follow-up care and rehabilitation treatment can significantly reduce the severity and facilitates the full recovery of the affected segment. Based on the analysis of their own material, the author defines the early stage of rehabilitation in these patients before full maturation of scar tissue or before the formation of functionally significant joint contractures, and later period, when there are indications for surgical rehabilitation. In the early period, follow-up care is recommended in 1 month after discharge and then on a quarterly basis, and with the appearance of deformities - at least once in 2 months. At the2nd stage of rehabilitation, older children and children of secondary school age are subject to follow-up care at least 1 time per year of primary school age - atleast once in 6 months, preschool children - every3 months. The proposed assessment of scar tissuehelps to determine the terms of follow-up care. Usingthis scheme of follow-up care and appropriate treatment allowed the author to obtain excellent and goodresults in 87-90 % of cases at the stages of rehabilitaion.

  20. Peritoneal inclusion cysts: Changes on follow-up ultrasonography

    Kim, Jung Sik; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Sung Moon; Woo, Seong Ku

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the volume change of peritoneal inclusion cysts on the follow-up ultrasonography (US). From March 1995 to May 1999, thirty seven women with ultrasonographically diagnosed peritoneal inclusion cysts were included in this study. Six patients underwent surgery for several reasons. Follow-up ultrasonography was performed 70-456 days (mean=191 days) after initial US examination in 12 of the remaining 31 patient with no further treatment. US was performed with a 3.5 or 4 MHz transabdominal probe in all 18 patients who underwent either surgery or follow-up US, and additional tranvaginal US examination using a 5-7 MHz probe in 15 of 18 patients. The volume change of the cysts was recorded for each US examination. Three cysts (25%) (volume=170 cm 3 , 61 cm 3 , and 38 cm 3 , respectively) were completely resolved on the follow-up US while the other nine cysts showed a decreased volume in seven patients (58%) and increased volume in two patients (17%). Spontaneous regression of peritoneal inclusion cysts is more common than it is believed to be, and ultrasonography may be a useful follow-up examination for peritoneal inclusion cysts.

  1. Course of disease and follow-up in breast cancer

    Ebner, F.; Hackl, H.; Hoermann, M.; Schneider, G.

    1986-01-01

    Besides individual care, regular follow-up studies in breast cancer patients have different aims, relative to different tumor stages at presentation. In early stages emphasis has to be laid on detection of loco-regional recurrences, which will not reduce overall survival if diagnosed and treated early. In addition, treatment effects and changes in the activity of disease are evaluated. Radiographic studies for detection of distant metastases are justified if followed by proper treatment. Early diagnosis of cancer of the opposite breast and of such cancers that are associated with breast cancer (colon, ovaries, endometrium) is imperative. The aim of a regular follow-up in more advanced tumor stages is to monitor the extent of disease and to prevent complications (e.g. fractures, spinal cord compression). In familial breast cancer first degree relatives should be included in the follow-up plan. The patient's psychosocial needs, even if not verbalized, should not be neglected. (Author)

  2. Follow up of Graves' Opthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy

    Miah, M.S.R.; Paul, A. K.; Rahman, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy may first appear or worsen during or after treatment for hyperthyroidism. We followed up 158 Graves' hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine of which 49 had Grave's' ophthalmopathy during presentation in Nuclear Medicine Centre, Khulna during the period from 1995 to 2000. The aim of our study is to see the effect of radioiodine in Graves' ophthalmopathy. All the patients received radioiodine at fixed dose regime ranged from 7 mCi to 12 mCi. The duration of follow up was at least 12 months Graves' ophthalmopathy patients, 4 (4/49 i.e., 8.2%) showed exaggeration of ophthalmopathy and the rest (45/49 i.e., 91.8%) remained unchanged. None of ophthalmopathy developed among any of Graves' hyperthyroid or disappeared after radioiodine treatment during follow up period. From the study we concluded that eye changes in Graves' hyperthyroidism remain unchanged or exaggerated after radioiodine therapy and needs ophthalmologist care.(author)

  3. Esophageal atresia: long-term interdisciplinary follow-up

    Lidia B. Giúdici

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: We provide protocolized interdisciplinary follow-up to babies born with Esophageal Atresia (EA. There are few reports in Argentina about follow-up of EA patients.Objective: To describe outcomes in follow-up of EA patients at 1, 3 and 6 years old and to compare outcomes at age 1 with those at age 6.Methods: Prospective, longitudinal, analytic study of the cohort of babies born with EA, admitted to the follow-up program from 11/01/03 to 10/31/14. Follow-up includes: growth (weight > 10th centile, WHO, neurology-psychomotor development, audiology, vision, genetic, mental health, surgical reintervention, phonostomatology, language, pulmonology, re-hospitalization for clinical causes, lost to follow-up. Outcomes were described at age 1, 3 and 6. We included all EA patients who had reached age 1 at the start of this study.Results: 27 babies were admitted; 30% had long-gap EA; 18% presented VACTERL association; 23 children met inclusion criteria. Genetics  was assessed in 18 newborns (78%; a chromosomal map was performed in 11 babies; 3 had an abnormal karyotype. Mental health: 5/14 of the assessed children showed problems. Phonostomatology: 11 newborns checked (6 required treatment, 4 recovered at age 1. Pulmonologist evaluated 18 babies (7 with recurrent wheezing, 6 with moderate tracheomalacia. Gastroenterology and endoscopy: 80% presented gastroesophageal reflux (GER grade 3-4, and 50% showed a pathologic pHmetry. Lost to follow-up: age 1, 2 (8%; age 3, 3 (17%; age 6, 3 (23%. Normal outcomes observed are the following. Age 1 – growth: 81%; neurologic-psychomotor developmental index (NPDI: 76%; audiology: 95%; vision: 85%; language: 62%; re-hospitalization for clinical causes: 38%; surgical reinterventions: 47%. Age 3 – growth: 78%; NPDI: 50%; audiology: 93%; vision: 93%; language: 43%; re-hospitalization: 35%; surgical reinterventions: 14%. Age 6 – growth: 50%; NPDI: 30%; audiology: 90%; vision: 40%; language: 50%; re

  4. Exercise-Induced Ventricular Fibrillation: Seven Years Follow-Up

    Gökmen Gemici

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a 7-year follow-up of a 55-year-old male who experienced ventricular fibrillation during the recovery period of exercise testing and refused implantation of an ICD. Normal left ventricular systolic function was found on echocardiographic examination, and coronary angiography revealed only a side branch disease with a vessel diameter of less than 2 millimeters. The patient was discharged on metoprolol and ASA in addition to his previous treatment with lisinopril and simvastatin. Outpatient cardiac evaluation by repeated 24-hour ECG monitorizations (Holter revealed normal findings. On follow up visits every six months for the past seven years, the patient was found to be asymptomatic.

  5. Group anxiety management: effectiveness, perceived helpfulness and follow-up.

    Cadbury, S; Childs-Clark, A; Sandhu, S

    1990-05-01

    An evaluation was conducted on out-patient cognitive-behavioural anxiety management groups. Twenty-nine clients assessed before and after the group and at three-month follow-up showed significant improvement on self-report measures. A further follow-up on 21 clients, conducted by an independent assessor at an average of 11 months, showed greater improvement with time. Clients also rated how helpful they had found non-specific therapeutic factors, and specific anxiety management techniques. 'Universality' was the most helpful non-specific factor, and 'the explanation of anxiety' was the most helpful technique.

  6. Barrett's esophagus. Diagnosis, follow-up and treatment

    Bremholm, Lasse; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Eriksen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    gastroesophageal junction. The extent of the endoscopic findings is described by the Prague classification. The metaplasia is histologically confirmed by the presence of intestinal metaplasia. The diagnosis of BE can only be made by a combined macroscopic and microscopic examination. The histological description...... and it is not recommended outside controlled studies. Treatment of high grade dysplasia and carcinoma in situ is handled in departments treating esophageal cancer. Follow-up with endoscopy and biopsy can be offered. Follow-up endoscopy with biopsy can only be recommended after thorough information to the patients...

  7. Danish offshore wind. Key environmental issues - a follow-up

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    This follow-up to the Danish environmental monitoring programme on large-scale offshore wind power builds on the result of the former programme of 2006 and focuses on updated knowledge on harbour porpoises, water birds and fish communities, and on the cumulative effects of wind farms. The scientific quality of the projects in this follow-up has been assessed by experts from the International Advisory Panel of Experts on Marine Ecology (IAPEME), who have commented on the results in an independent evaluation which is reproduced in this publication. (LN)

  8. Optical closure experiments for biomass smoke aerosols

    L. A. Mack; E. J. T. Levin; S. M. Kreidenweis; D. Obrist; H. Moosmuller; K. A. Lewis; W. P. Arnott; G. R. McMeeking; A. P. Sullivan; C. E. Wold; W.-M. Hao; J. L. Collett; W. C. Malm

    2010-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments at the Fire Laboratory at Missoula (FLAME) investigated chemical, physical, and optical properties of fresh smoke samples from combustion of wildland fuels that are burned annually in the western and southeastern US The burns were conducted in the combustion chamber of the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula,...

  9. Comfort monitoring? Environmental assessment follow-up under community-industry negotiated environmental agreements

    Noble, Bram; Birk, Jasmine

    2011-01-01

    Negotiated environmental agreements are becoming common practice in the mining industry. In principle, negotiated environmental agreements are said to respond to many of the shortcomings of environmental impact assessment by providing for improved follow-up of project impacts through, among other things, data provision, engaging stakeholders in the monitoring and management of project impacts, and building capacity at the local level to deal with project-induced environmental change. In practice, however, little is known about the efficacy of follow-up under negotiated environmental agreements between proponents and communities and the demonstrated value added to project impact management. This paper examines follow-up practice under negotiated environmental agreements with a view to understanding whether and how community-based monitoring under privatized agreements actually contributes to improved follow-up and impact management. Based on lessons emerging from recent experiences with environmental agreements in Canada's uranium industry, we show that follow-up under negotiated agreements may be described as 'comfort monitoring'. While such monitoring does improve community-industry relations and enhance corporate image, it does little to support effects-based management. If follow-up under negotiated agreements is to be credible over the long term, there is a need to ensure that monitoring results are useful for, and integrated with, regulatory-based monitoring and project impact management practices.

  10. Advances in diagnosis and follow-up in kidney cancer

    Rioja, Jorge; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Laguna, M. Pilar

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the most recent data on preoperative diagnostic methods in kidney cancer and in follow-up and monitoring after ablation therapy. RECENT FINDINGS: Although the role of the percutaneous biopsy in the diagnostics of renal masses has been limited, new data suggest a high

  11. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    2010-07-01

    ... include audit findings from multiple years, it shall include the fiscal year in which the finding... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... (CONTINUED) AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 41.315 Audit...

  12. Follow-up of conservatively treated sleep apnoea patients

    Health of School Children: Treatment of /ntestinal. Helminths and Schistosomiasis (WHO/GDS/IPI/GTD 92.1). Geneva: WHO, 1992. Accepted 17 June 1994. Follow-up of conservatively treated sleep apnoea patients. P. R. Bartel, J. Verster, P. J. Becker. Polysomnograms have been recorded at our laboratory since 1985 for ...

  13. Nimh Treatment Study of ADHD Follow-Up

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of changes in medication use between 14 and 24 months follow-up on effectiveness (symptom ratings and growth (height and weight measures were analyzed, comparing 4 groups of patients, in the Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (MTA reported by the MTA Cooperative Group.

  14. Handbook of Exemplary Practices in Placement and Follow-Up.

    Mehallis, Mantha Vlahos

    This handbook for teachers, counselors, and administrators presents exemplary practices in the use of job placement and follow-up services based on results of a survey of Florida school districts and community colleges. A description of survey methodology and the survey questionnaire, as well as a statewide profile of Florida exemplary practices…

  15. Factors Associated with Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

    Fish, Laura J.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Wordlaw-Stintson, Lashawn; Vidal, Adriana; Smith, Jennifer S.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose: To examine the relationship…

  16. Immunological follow-up of hydatid cyst cases

    Bulut Vedat

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is caused by Echinococcus granulosus. In this study, we aimed to investigate the benefit of monitoring cases with hydatid cyst by means of immune components in patients in a long-term follow-up after surgery. Eighty-four preoperative and postoperative serum samples from 14 cases undergoing surgery for hydatid disease were evaluated in terms of immune parameters, such as total and specific IgE, IgG, IgM, IgA and complement. Total and specific IgE were determined by ELISA. Specific IgG levels were measured by indirect hemaglutination.Total IgG, IgM, IgA and complement (C3 and C4 were detected by nephelometry. Imaging studies were also carried out during the follow-up. In none of the patients hydatid cysts were detected during the follow-up. Total IgE levels in the sera of the patients decreased to normal six months after surgery. Although specific IgE against echinococcal antigens decreased one year after operation, levels were still significantly high. There were no changes in the levels of anti-Echinococcus IgG and total IgG in follow-up period. Additionally, other parameters, such as IgA, IgM, C3 and C4, were not affected.

  17. Refractive surgery for accommodative esotropia: 5-year follow-up.

    Magli, Adriano; Forte, Raimondo; Gallo, Flavio; Carelli, Roberta

    2014-02-01

    To assess the long-term effectiveness and safety of refractive surgery with LASIK or photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for treating accommodative esotropia in adults. All patients with accommodative esotropia treated with LASIK or PRK until December 2007 and with a minimum follow-up of 5 years were retrospectively included. LASIK was performed on 44 eyes of 22 patients (12 women, 10 men; mean age: 22.7 ± 2.9 years). Mean postoperative follow-up was 62.1 ± 3.2 months. PRK was performed on 16 eyes of 8 patients (4 women, 4 men; mean age: 23.7 ± 1.7 years). Mean postoperative follow-up was 61.3 ± 2.8 months. At the 5-year follow-up, the mean cycloplegic refraction was more hyperopic in the PRK group (0.3 ± 0.8 vs 0.06 ± 0.3 diopters, P = .01). Correction of esotropia to esophoria or orthotropia was present in 21 patients (95.4%) treated with LASIK and in all patients treated with PRK. Both LASIK and PRK were effective in the long-term reduction of accommodative esotropia. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. [Follow-up and treatment outcome of early anorexia nervosa].

    Schulze, U; Neudörfl, A; Krill, A; Warnke, A; Remschmidt, H; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B

    1997-03-01

    In a two-center follow-up study on the early-onset form of anorexia nervosa, we reexamined 43 (74%) of 58 former patients who had developed anorexia nervosa at the age of 13 years or younger. In addition to make a standardized assessment of the eating disorder at follow-up we assessed psychiatric comorbidity with a structured interview based on the criteria of DSM-III-R and ICD-10. After an average follow-up period of 6.8 years, 8 (18%) of our former patients had an eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) and 4 (9%) still suffered from anorexia nervosa. 5 (11%) of the subjects had developed bulimia nervosa. In 3 cases (7%) we found both syndromes. 12 (28%) of our former patients had an additional psychiatric disorder. The results of our study indicate that the quality of outcome in patients with an early-onset form of anorexia nervosa does not differ from that in individuals with a later manifestation of the eating disorder. Factors of prognostic relevance were the existence of an eating disorder during the first year of life and the duration of the follow-up period.

  19. Eight to ten years follow-up after carotid endarterectomy

    Knudsen Rathenborg, Lisbet; Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T

    1990-01-01

    Follow-up information was obtained on 185 patients who consecutively underwent carotid endarterectomy eight to ten years previously. Doppler ultrasound examination was performed in 59 patients who were still alive and living within 100 miles of the hospital. Using lifetable analysis, the annual r...

  20. Challenges of loss to follow-up in tuberculosis research

    Nissen, Thomas N; Rose, Michala V; Kimaro, Godfather

    2012-01-01

    In studies evaluating methods for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB), follow-up to verify the presence or absence of active TB is crucial and high dropout rates may significantly affect the validity of the results. In a study assessing the diagnostic performance of the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test...

  1. Nurse-Initiated Telephone Follow Up after Ureteroscopic Stone Surgery.

    Tackitt, Helen M; Eaton, Samuel H; Lentz, Aaron C

    2016-01-01

    This article presents findings of a quality improvement (QI) project using the DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) model designed to decrease the rate of emergency department (ED) visits and nurse advice line calls after ureteroscopic stone surgery. Results indicated that nurse-initiated follow- up phone calls can decrease ED visits.

  2. A Follow-Up Study of the Deaf.

    Reich, P. A.; Reich, C. M.

    Followed up through interviews and questionnaires were 278 former students, average age 28 years, of two residential schools and one day school for the deaf in Ontario. Data was collected on the degree of hearing loss, use of a hearing aid, educational and occupational history, social integration, methods of communication, and attitudes toward…

  3. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  4. MRI of penile fracture: diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up

    Uder, Michael; Gohl, Dietrich; Takahashi, Masahide; Kramann, Bernhard; Schneider, Guenther

    2002-01-01

    A rupture of corpus cavernosum (CC) is a rare injury of the erect penis. The present study describes the role of MRI for diagnosis and follow-up of this injury. Four patients with clinically suspected acute penile fractures underwent MRI. Imaging findings were confirmed at surgery. In three patients, follow-up MRI was also available at 1, 6 and 16 weeks after surgical repair. In all patients pre-contrast T1-weighted images (T1WI) clearly disclosed ruptures of CC, which depicted as discontinuity of low signal intensity of the tunica albuginea (TA). Concomitant subcutaneous haematoma were well visualised both on T1-weighted (T1WI) and T2-weighted images, whereas haematoma in CC were optimally demonstrated on contrast-enhanced T1WI. On follow-up MRI all fractures presented similar healing process. Shortly after the repair, the tunical suture showed an increase in signal intensity on pre-contrast T1WI and was strongly enhanced with the administration of contrast material. Then the tear site gradually recovered low signal intensity on all spin-echo sequences by 4 months after surgery. These serial findings may suggest the formation of vascularised granulation tissue during cicatrisation. Magnetic resonance imaging is of great value for the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with penile fracture. (orig.)

  5. A formula for continued improvement: Audit follow-up

    Maday, J.H. Jr.

    1989-10-01

    In his book Management Audits, Allan J. Sayle states, ''QA standards stipulate that corrective action, required as a result of performing an audit, be followed up and closed out. There would, indeed, be little point in performing audits, requiring corrective action, or having a QA system at all if the auditee knows that the auditor will never verify that the corrective action has been efficaciously implemented.'' The QA auditor has an obligation to include follow-up in the overall audit planning. All too often the auditor will go to great lengths to plan and perform an audit only to have a recurring finding in the next audit. The proposed corrective action was only promissory and was not designed to stop the problem from recurring or to identify its root cause. Auditors do a disservice to the overall QA program and particularly to the customer when they fail to follow up and verify that an audit corrective action has been effectively implemented. In this paper, the techniques used by the quality assurance auditors at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) will be presented. Although PNL is a research and development laboratory, the techniques outlined in this paper could be applied to any industry conducting quality assurance audits. Most important, they provide a formula for continued improvement by assuring that audit follow-up is timely, meaningful, and permanent

  6. Analytical framework and tool kit for SEA follow-up

    Nilsson, Mans; Wiklund, Hans; Finnveden, Goeran; Jonsson, Daniel K.; Lundberg, Kristina; Tyskeng, Sara; Wallgren, Oskar

    2009-01-01

    Most Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) research and applications have so far neglected the ex post stages of the process, also called SEA follow-up. Tool kits and methodological frameworks for engaging effectively with SEA follow-up have been conspicuously missing. In particular, little has so far been learned from the much more mature evaluation literature although many aspects are similar. This paper provides an analytical framework and tool kit for SEA follow-up. It is based on insights and tools developed within programme evaluation and environmental systems analysis. It is also grounded in empirical studies into real planning and programming practices at the regional level, but should have relevance for SEA processes at all levels. The purpose of the framework is to promote a learning-oriented and integrated use of SEA follow-up in strategic decision making. It helps to identify appropriate tools and their use in the process, and to systematise the use of available data and knowledge across the planning organization and process. It distinguishes three stages in follow-up: scoping, analysis and learning, identifies the key functions and demonstrates the informational linkages to the strategic decision-making process. The associated tool kit includes specific analytical and deliberative tools. Many of these are applicable also ex ante, but are then used in a predictive mode rather than on the basis of real data. The analytical element of the framework is organized on the basis of programme theory and 'DPSIR' tools. The paper discusses three issues in the application of the framework: understanding the integration of organizations and knowledge; understanding planners' questions and analytical requirements; and understanding interests, incentives and reluctance to evaluate

  7. Follow-up of Antihypertensive Therapy Improves Blood Pressure Control: Results of HYT (HYperTension survey) Follow-up.

    Fici, F; Seravalle, G; Koylan, N; Nalbantgil, I; Cagla, N; Korkut, Y; Quarti-Trevano, F; Makel, W; Grassi, G

    2017-09-01

    Although improved during the past few years, blood pressure control remains sub optimal. The impact of follow-up assessment on blood pressure control was evaluated in a group of patients of the HYT (HYperTension survey), treated with a combination of different dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers (CCBs regimen) and inhibitors of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and with uncontrolled blood pressure. This was obtained assessing (a) the rate of blood pressure control at 3 and 6 months of follow-up in the whole group of patients, (b) the rate of blood pressure control and the average blood pressure values in subjects treated with different DHP-CCBs regimen. From the 4993 patients with uncontrolled blood pressure, (BP ≥ 140/90 or ≥140/85 in patients with diabetes), 3729 (mean age 61.2 ± 11.5 years), maintained CCBs regimen combined wih RAAS blockers and were evaluated at 3 and 6 months follow-up. At each visit BP (semiautomatic device, Omron-M6, 3 measurements), heart rate, adverse events and treatment persistence were collected. At 1st and 2nd follow-up the rate of controlled BP was 63.5 and 72.8% respectively (p blood pressure control; (b) there is no significant difference in the antihypertensive effect between different CCBs regimen; (c) lipophilic CCBs induce less ankle edema.

  8. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedure for preparation, follow-up and experience gained from maintenance: application to replacement of pressure vessel; Proposition d'organisation et procedure ALARA pour la preparation le suivi et le retour d'experience des chantiers de maintenance: application au RGV

    Lochard, Jacques; Lefaure, Christian

    1990-01-01

    This report proposes the organisation and ALARA procedures for preparation, follow-up and analysis of the lessons learned during maintenance works at a nuclear power plant. After a brief description of the ALARA principle in the first chapter, the following chapters describe proposals for establishing and start-up of a maintenance building site. The proposals are illustrated by the replacement of the pressure vessel as an example.

  9. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedure for preparation, follow-up and experience gained from maintenance: application to replacement of pressure vessel; Proposition d'organisation et procedure ALARA pour le suivi et le retour d'experience des chantiers de maintenance: application au RGV

    Lochard, Jacques; Lefaure, Christian

    1989-12-01

    This report proposes the organisation and ALARA procedures for preparation, follow-up and analysis of the lessons learned during maintenance works at a nuclear power plant. After a brief description of the ALARA principle in the first chapter, the following chapters describe proposals for establishing and start-up of a maintenance building site. The proposals are illustrated by the replacement of the pressure vessel as an example.

  10. CT follow-up of conservatively treated lumbar disc herniation

    Schumacher, M.; Fischer, R.; Thoden, U.

    1990-01-01

    A CT study was carried out on 43 patients with low back pain and sciatica who were treated conservatively. They were followed up for over 20 months (mean) clinically and monitored by CT before and after treatment. Initially, 38 of them had herniation and 5 had protrusion of the disc. At the time of follow-up only 24 of the initial 40 patients still had neurological deficits. In 76.7% of the patients CT showed an improvement (clear regression in 15 patients, moderate decrease in 18 patients). A favourable tendency towards regression was observed in disc herniation at the L5-S1 level and in cases showing sequestration. The prognosis was unfavourable in herniations at higher levels than L5-S1 and in lateral herniation reaching the intervertebral foramen. (orig.) [de

  11. [Laparoscopic management of ureteroileal stenosis: Long term follow up.

    Emiliani, Esteban; Gavrilov, Pavel; Mayordomo, Olga; Salvador, Josep; Palou, Joan; Rosales, Antonio; Villavicencio, Humberto

    2017-05-01

    To describe the laparoscopic approach for uretero-ileal anastomosis strictures and to analyse our long term series. A retrospective review was performed evaluating our series of patients with benign ureteroileal anastomosis strictures treated laparoscopically from 2011 to 2017. Demographics and perioperative data were obtained and analyzed. Complications were described with the Clavien-Dindo classification. The surgical technique was described and a literature review was performed. Eleven procedures were performed in ten patients. Mean blood loss was 180 ml. All the operations were performed laparoscopically without conversion. Mean hospital stay was 10 days (4-23). Early complications were Clavien-Dindo I y II: Two cases of limited anastomosis leakage, one lymphorrea, one paralitic ileum and one accidental descent of the ureteral catheter. Mean follow-up was 56 months (12-179) No late complications have been described. Based on our series with 5 year follow up, the laparoscopic approach for uretero-ileal anastomosis strictures is feasible and safe.

  12. Role of cytology in screening, staging and follow-up

    Fischnaller, M.

    1986-01-01

    Cytology has become an integral component in the battery of diagnostic tools for a rational diagnosis of tumors. When all materials obtainable with sophisticated methods are utilized, almost every pulmonary lesion can be defined micromorphologically. In urgent cases instant staining techniques will permit a 'stat diagnosis'. The characterization of a tumor cell by cytology with accurate typing and grading offers preliminary information for subsequent staging efforts. Bronchial cancer may be both of the single-cell and of the mixed-cell type with the more aggressive cell elements determining the metastasising potential and prognosis. Sampling for cytology is devoid of risks and does not make any special demands on the patients; it can safely be repeated for follow-up studies; it helps to detect tumor regrowths or secondaries at an early stage during postoperative follow-up programs and to monitor treatment-related cellular changes. (Author)

  13. Treatment of craniopharyngioma estimated by follow-up CT

    Kubota, T.; Ito, H.; Aizumi, S.; Yamamoto, S.; (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-12-01

    Follow-up CT scans were taken from 12 cases of craniopharyngiomas after various treatment. Preoperative CT findings of craniopharyngiomas could be classified into three types. Type 1 was a non-enhanced or a thinly ring-like enhanced large cystic mass. Type 2 was a thickly enhanced large cystic mass with small solid mass. Type 3 was a large solid mass. Postoperative follow-up CT findings were as follows: Type 1 had a favorable postoperative course because the tumor tissues of the thin cystic wall seemed to collapse only with the procedure of cystic fluid aspiration. Recurrence frequently took place in patients of Type 2 and 3 if the tumor couldn't be radically removed or radiotherapy was not given after partial resection. Radiotherapy was most effective in these cases.

  14. Treatment of craniopharyngioma estimated by follow-up CT

    Kubota, Toshihiko; Ito, Haruhide; Aizumi, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Shinjiro

    1981-01-01

    Follow-up CT scans were taken from 12 cases of craniopharyngiomas after various treatment. Preoperative CT findings of craniopharyngiomas could be classified into three types. Type 1 was a non-enhanced or a thinly ring-like enhanced large cystic mass. Type 2 was a thickly enhanced large cystic mass with small solid mass. Type 3 was a large solid mass. Postoperative follow-up CT findings were as follows: Type 1 had a favorable postoperative course because the tumor tissues of the thin cystic wall seemed to collapse only with the procedure of cystic fluid aspiration. Recurrence frequently took place in patients of Type 2 and 3 if the tumor couldn't be radically removed or radiotherapy was not given after partial resection. Radiotherapy was most effective in these cases. (author)

  15. Electronic Whiteboards and Intensive Care Unit follow up

    Østergaard, Kija Lin; Brandrup, Morten

    -ended dry-erase whiteboard (make-up-your-own-sentences). In conclusion the primary feature in the two subjects is to optimize communication/collaboration and information between ICU and general wards in the transition. To make it a long term solution the content of such a support would need involvement...... of the end-users in the design process (Participatory Design). Hence these two findings, this review is setting the stage for further research on how electronic whiteboards can support the initial follow up when patients are transferred from an ICU to a general ward.......This paper is reviewing the existing literature on Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Outreach, in-hospital follow up 24 hours after the transition to a general ward from an ICU. It also touches upon the use of Electronic Whiteboards in a hospital setting and how the electronic whiteboards might support...

  16. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. From themes to hypotheses: following up with quantitative methods.

    Morgan, David L

    2015-06-01

    One important category of mixed-methods research designs consists of quantitative studies that follow up on qualitative research. In this case, the themes that serve as the results from the qualitative methods generate hypotheses for testing through the quantitative methods. That process requires operationalization to translate the concepts from the qualitative themes into quantitative variables. This article illustrates these procedures with examples that range from simple operationalization to the evaluation of complex models. It concludes with an argument for not only following up qualitative work with quantitative studies but also the reverse, and doing so by going beyond integrating methods within single projects to include broader mutual attention from qualitative and quantitative researchers who work in the same field. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. [Normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism: recommendations for management and follow-up].

    Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo; Jódar Gimeno, Esteban; Reyes García, Rebeca; Gómez Sáez, José Manuel; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    To provide practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (PubMed), using the terms normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism and primary hyperparathyroidism, for articles in English published before 22 November 2012. Literature was reviewed by 2 members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology, and after development of recommendations, the manuscript was reviewed by all other members of the Group, and their suggestions were incorporated. The document provides practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. There is however little evidence available about different aspects of this disease, mainly progression rate and clinical impact. More data are therefore needed before definite recommendations may be made. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Pneumatic dilatation in achalasia cardia results and follow-up.

    Supe A

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic dilatation is one of the more recent methods in the management of achalasia cardia. Fifty dilatations were done in 42 patients with achalasia cardia over 5 years. There was a significant decrease in the maximum diameter of the oesophagus and a significant increase in diameter in the narrowed lower oesophageal segment in all the patients. Of the patients studied, 95.23% were relieved of their symptoms after only one to two sessions. There were no immediate complications. Out of the 38 patients on long term follow up, 8 (21.05% had recurrence of symptoms. On repeat dilatations, 4 (50% of them had good response. Late complication like reflux oesophagitis was observed in only 1 patient over a median follow up period of 22 months. It was thus concluded that pneumatic dilatation is a safe, simple and effective procedure in managing patients with achalasia cardia.

  20. Hyperfunctioning thyroid cancer: a five-year follow-up.

    Azevedo, Monalisa Ferreira; Casulari, Luiz Augusto

    2010-02-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer rarely occurs in association with hyperfunctioning nodules. We describe a case of a 47-year-old woman who developed symptoms of hyperthyroidism associated with a palpable thyroid nodule. Thyroid scintigraphy showed an autonomous nodule, and fine-needle aspiration biopsy was suggestive of papillary carcinoma. Laboratorial findings were consistent with the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism. The patient underwent thyroidectomy and a papillary carcinoma of 3.0 x 3.0 x 2.0 cm, follicular variant, was described by histological examination. The surrounding thyroid tissue was normal. Postoperatively, the patient received 100 mCi of (131)I, and whole body scans detected only residual uptake. No evidence of metastasis was detected during five years of follow-up. Hot thyroid nodules rarely harbor malignancies, and this case illustrated that, when a carcinoma occurs the prognosis seems to be very good with no evidence of metastatic dissemination during a long-term follow-up.

  1. Radiological follow-up of uncemented knee prostheses. Preliminary study

    Martin Hervas, C.; Gomez Barrena, E.; Marquez Moreno, I.; Calle Yuste, F.; Ordonez Parra, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The preliminary results of a prospective study of 40 uncemented total knee prostheses (TKP) are presented following a radiological protocol with fluoroscopic control and follow-up of over 2 years. The prosthesis-bone interface and the components alignment were assessed. Several radiological signs were studied to assess this interface with respect to the fixing of the component, but they showed little clinical correlation. Statistical significance (p<0.05, chisquare) was found only in the observation of sclerosis in areas of support for the tibital tray as a reaction of the bone. This radiological follow-up is of interest to determine the evolution of the interface and position of the implant to prevent complications (especially loosening) in patients, particularly those under 60 years old, who represent the group that can most benefit from prosthetic systems with uncemented anchorage because of their life expectation and level of activity. Author

  2. Feasibility of an EIS Follow-up Program

    Nelson, I.C.; Jaquish, R.E.; Watson, D.G.

    1982-12-01

    The proposed level of an EIS Follow-up Program is believed to be feasible and that it can and should be implemented. Guidance to authors should result in fewer, but more important, commitments for mitigating adverse environmental impacts. Selecting the significant commitments from Records of Decisions published since July 1, 1979 for tracking to satisfaction should result in conformance with regulations, orders, and the intent of the NEPA

  3. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  4. Radiographic follow-up study of Little Leaguer's shoulder

    Kanematsu, Yoshiji; Iwase, Takenobu; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Sairyo, Koichi; Kashiwaguchi, Shinji; Iwame, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Little Leaguer's shoulder is a syndrome involving the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. Conservative treatment usually resolves the symptoms. However, there are no reports of a radiographic follow-up study of this disease. The purpose of this study was to show the radiographic healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder. A total of 19 male baseball players diagnosed as having Little Leaguer's shoulder were retrospectively evaluated. The mean age at first presentation was 12.7 years. External rotation anteroposterior radiographs of the shoulder were taken. All patients were treated with rest from throwing, and no throwing was recommended until remodeling was confirmed. Follow-up radiographs were taken at 1-month intervals to assess healing. All patients were observed until healing was confirmed radiographically, after which they returned to baseball. The mean follow-up period was 8.5 months. In addition to radiography, patients were asked whether they had any symptoms and whether they had been able to return to baseball. At the first examination, radiographs showed a wider epiphyseal plate of the throwing side compared with the asymptomatic contralateral shoulder. Healing was observed in all cases. Healing occurred first along the medial side and was then extended laterally. The mean time required for healing was 4.7 months. All patients were able to return to playing baseball at their pre-injury level of play and were asymptomatic when examined at the final follow-up. The healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder advanced from medial to lateral, and healing was achieved about 5 months after initial examination. (orig.)

  5. Follow-up of permanent hearing impairment in childhood.

    Della Volpe, A; De Lucia, A; Pastore, V; Bracci Laudiero, L; Buonissimo, I; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    Programmes for early childhood childhood hearing impairment identification allows to quickly start the appropriate hearing aid fitting and rehabilitation process; nevertheless, a large number of patients do not join the treatment program. The goal of this article is to present the results of a strategic review of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats connected with the audiologic/prosthetic/language follow-up process of children with bilateral permanent hearing impairment. Involving small children, the follow-up includes the involvement of specialised professionals of a multidisciplinary team and a complex and prolonged multi-faced management. Within the framework of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the purpose of this analysis was to propose recommendations that can harmonise criteria for outcome evaluation and provide guidance on the most appropriate assessment methods to be used in the follow-up course of children with permanent hearing impairment. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  6. Neonatal follow-up program: Where do we stand?

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal follow-up program (NFP) is becoming the corner stone of standard, high quality care provided to newborns at risk of future neuorodevelopmental delay. Most of the recognized neonatal intensive care units in the developed countries are adopting NFP as part of their mandatory care for the best long term outcome of high risk infants, especially very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Unfortunately, in the developing and in underdeveloped countries, such early detection and intervention programs are rarely existing, mainly because of the lack of awareness of and exposure to such programs in spite of the increasing numbers of surviving sick newborns due to advancement in neonatal care in these countries. This is a review article to explore the Neonatal follow-up programs looking at historical development, benefts and aims, and standard requirements for successful program development that can be adopted in our countries. In conclusion, proper Neonatal follow-up programs are needed to improve neonatal outcome. Therefore all professionals working in the feld of neonatal care in developing countries should cooperate to create such programs for early detection and hence early intervention for any adverse long term outcome in high-risk newborn infants PMID:27493326

  7. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    Hauth, Elke A.M.; Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of ≥70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS

  8. Mortality in acromegaly: a 20-year follow-up study.

    Ritvonen, Elina; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Jaatinen, Pia; Ebeling, Tapani; Moilanen, Leena; Nuutila, Pirjo; Kauppinen-Mäkelin, Ritva; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla

    2016-06-01

    It is unclear whether mortality still is increased in acromegaly and whether there are gender-related differences. We dynamically assessed outcome during long-term follow-up in our nationwide cohort. We studied standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) relative to the general population and causes of death in acromegaly (n=333) compared with age- and gender-matched controls (n=4995). During 20 (0-33) years follow-up, 113 (34%) patients (n=333, 52% women) and 1334 (27%) controls (n=4995) died (P=0.004). SMR (1.9, 95% CI: 1.53-2.34, Pacromegaly. Overall distribution of causes of death (Pacromegaly, but not in controls, causes of deaths shifted from 44% cardiovascular and 28% cancer deaths during the first decade, to 23% cardiovascular and 35% cancer deaths during the next two decades. In acromegaly, cancer deaths were mostly attributed to pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n=5), breast (n=4), lung (n=3) and colon (n=3) carcinoma. In acromegaly, men were younger than women at diagnosis (median 44.5 vs 50 years, Pacromegaly, men are younger at diagnosis and death than women. Compared with controls, mortality is increased during 20 years of follow-up, especially in women. Causes of deaths shift from predominantly cardiovascular to cancer deaths. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  9. [Guidelines for the follow up of patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia].

    Pérez Tarazona, S; Rueda Esteban, S; Alfonso Diego, J; Barrio Gómez de Agüero, M I; Callejón Callejón, A; Cortell Aznar, I; de la Serna Blázquez, O; Domingo Miró, X; García García, M L; García Hernández, G; Luna Paredes, C; Mesa Medina, O; Moreno Galdó, A; Moreno Requena, L; Pérez Pérez, G; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sánchez Solís de Querol, M; Torrent Vernetta, A; Valdesoiro Navarrete, L; Vilella Sabaté, M

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common complication of preterm birth, and remains a major problem in pediatric pulmonology units. The decision of discharging from the Neonatal Unit should be based on a thorough assessment of the condition of the patient and compliance with certain requirements, including respiratory and nutritional stability, and caregiver education on disease management. For proper control of the disease, a schedule of visits and complementary tests should be established prior to discharge, and guidelines for prevention of exacerbations and appropriate treatment should be applied. In this paper, the Working Group in Perinatal Respiratory Diseases of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonology proposes a protocol to serve as a reference for the follow up of patients with BPD among different centers and health care settings. Key factors to consider when planning discharge from the Neonatal Unit and during follow up are reviewed. Recommendations on treatment and prevention of complications are then discussed. The final section of this guide aims to provide a specific schedule for follow-up and diagnostic interventions to be performed in patients with BPD. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Follow-Up Photometry of Kelt Transiting Planet Candidates

    Stephens, Denise C.; Joner, Michael D.; Hintz, Eric G.; Martin, Trevor; Spencer, Alex; Kelt Follow-Up Network (FUN) Team

    2017-10-01

    We have three telescopes at BYU that we use to follow-up possible transiting planet canidates for the KELT team. These telescopes were used to collect data on Kelt-16b and Kelt-9b, which is the hottest known exoplanet. More recently we used the newest of these telescopes, a robotic 8-inch telescope on the roof of our building, to confirm the most recent Kelt planet that will be published soon. This research has been ideal for the teaching and training of undergraduate students in the art of photometric observing and data reduction. In this presentation I will highlight how we are using our membership in the Kelt team to further the educational objective of our undergraduate astronomy program, while contributing meaningful science to the ever growing field of exoplanet discovery. I will also highlight a few of the more interesting Kelt planets and the minimum telescope requirements for detecting these planets. I will then discuss the sensitivities required to follow-up future TESS candidates, which may be of interest to others interested in joining the TESS follow-up teams.

  11. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    Wessels, Jan-Albert, E-mail: janalbert.wessels@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: A.Morrison-Saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Environmental Assessment, School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University, Australia. (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  12. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    Wessels, Jan-Albert; Retief, Francois; Morrison-Saunders, Angus

    2015-01-01

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  13. Conceptualizing patient empowerment in cancer follow-up by combining theory and qualitative data

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Eskildsen, Nanna Bjerg; Thomsen, Thora Grothe

    2017-01-01

    and sensitive questionnaire for this population. Material and Methods: A theoretical model of PE was made, based on Zimmerman’s theory of psychological empowerment. Patients who were in follow-up after first line treatment for their cancer (n = 16) were interviewed about their experiences with follow...

  14. Follow-up of patients with rheumatic heart diseases in the outpatient setting

    B S Belov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The major tasks of a follow-up of patients with rheumatic cardiac defects (RCD are formulated on the basis of the recommendations of international and national scientific associations. At the same time, a clinicianXs experience and judgments play an important role in supervising patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease and RCD.

  15. What Facilitates "Patient Empowerment" in Cancer Patients During Follow-Up

    Jørgensen, Clara R; Thomsen, Thora G; Ross, Lone

    2018-01-01

    Empowerment is a concept of growing importance in cancer care, but little is known about cancer patients' experiences of empowerment during follow-up. To explore this area, a qualitative systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. A total of 2,292 papers were...

  16. The Effect of Auditor Quality on the Follow-Up of Audit Recommendation

    Dyah Setyaningrum

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to measure auditor quality of The Audit Board of the Republic of Indonesia (BPK and investigates the effect of auditor quality on the follow-up of audit recommendation. This study uses sample of local government financial statements in Indonesia from 2010-2012. Using principle component analysis method, the result shows that there are four components extracted that form auditor quality which is experience, training, motivation, and education. All four components are then combined into a single auditor quality index that represents comprehensive measure of auditor quality. The test result shows positive effect between auditor quality and follow-up of audit recommendation. This indicates that high quality auditor is able to produce appropriate recommendations that can be easily followed up by the auditee. The more recommendations are acted upon, the better the quality of local government financial statements.

  17. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  18. Long-term follow-up of psilocybin-facilitated smoking cessation.

    Johnson, Matthew W; Garcia-Romeu, Albert; Griffiths, Roland R

    2017-01-01

    A recent open-label pilot study (N = 15) found that two to three moderate to high doses (20 and 30 mg/70 kg) of the serotonin 2A receptor agonist, psilocybin, in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for smoking cessation, resulted in substantially higher 6-month smoking abstinence rates than are typically observed with other medications or CBT alone. To assess long-term effects of a psilocybin-facilitated smoking cessation program at ≥12 months after psilocybin administration. The present report describes biologically verified smoking abstinence outcomes of the previous pilot study at ≥12 months, and related data on subjective effects of psilocybin. All 15 participants completed a 12-month follow-up, and 12 (80%) returned for a long-term (≥16 months) follow-up, with a mean interval of 30 months (range = 16-57 months) between target-quit date (i.e., first psilocybin session) and long-term follow-up. At 12-month follow-up, 10 participants (67%) were confirmed as smoking abstinent. At long-term follow-up, nine participants (60%) were confirmed as smoking abstinent. At 12-month follow-up 13 participants (86.7%) rated their psilocybin experiences among the five most personally meaningful and spiritually significant experiences of their lives. These results suggest that in the context of a structured treatment program, psilocybin holds considerable promise in promoting long-term smoking abstinence. The present study adds to recent and historical evidence suggesting high success rates when using classic psychedelics in the treatment of addiction. Further research investigating psilocybin-facilitated treatment of substance use disorders is warranted.

  19. Sleep During Menopausal Transition: A 6-Year Follow-Up.

    Lampio, Laura; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Himanen, Sari-Leena; Kurki, Samu; Huupponen, Eero; Engblom, Janne; Heinonen, Olli J; Polo, Olli; Saaresranta, Tarja

    2017-07-01

    Menopausal transition is associated with increased dissatisfaction with sleep, but the effects on sleep architecture are conflicting. This prospective 6-year follow-up study was designed to evaluate the changes in sleep stages and sleep continuity that occur in women during menopausal transition. Sixty women (mean age 46.0 years, SD 0.9) participated. All women were premenopausal at baseline, and at the 6-year follow-up, women were in different stages of menopausal transition. Polysomnography was used to study sleep architecture at baseline and follow-up. The effects of aging and menopause (assessed as change in serum follicle-stimulating hormone [S-FSH]) on sleep architecture were evaluated using linear regression models. After controlling for body mass index, vasomotor, and depressive symptoms, aging of 6 years resulted in shorter total sleep time (B -37.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] -71.5 to (-3.3)), lower sleep efficiency (B -6.5, 95%CI -12.7 to (-0.2)), as well as in increased transitions from slow-wave sleep (SWS) to wakefulness (B 1.0, 95%CI 0.1 to 1.9), wake after sleep onset (B 37.7, 95%CI 12.5 to 63.0), awakenings per hour (B 1.8, 95%CI 0.8 to 2.8), and arousal index (B 2.3, 95%CI 0.1 to 4.4). Higher S-FSH concentration in menopausal transition was associated with increased SWS (B 0.09, 95%CI 0.01 to 0.16) after controlling for confounding factors. A significant deterioration in sleep continuity occurs when women age from 46 to 52 years, but change from premenopausal to menopausal state restores some SWS. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Neuroradiolological diagnosis and follow-up of brain tumors

    Kummer, R. von

    1997-01-01

    Primary tumors of the brain and cerebral metastases cause considerable morbidity and mortality. To assess the chance for cure and to develop a valid concept of treatment, the exact assessment of the tumor's location, of the tumor's borders and malignancy is essential. Today, neuroradiological examination mainly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows an almost histological diagnosis and description of the tumor's extent. MRI is as well useful for studying the patient's short- and long-term follow-up clinical course. This is illustrated by 3 case histories. (orig.)

  1. Primary cemented total hip arthroplasty: 10 years follow-up

    Nath Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary cemented total hip arthroplasty is a procedure for non-traumatic and traumatic affections of the hip. Long term follow-up is required to assess the longevity of the implant and establish the procedure. Indo-Asian literature on long term result of total hip arthroplasty is sparse. We present a 10-year follow-up of our patients of primary cemented total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods: We operated 31 hips in 30 patients with primary cemented total hip arthroplasty. We followed the cases for a minimum period of 10 years with a mean follow-up period of 12.7 years. The mean age of the patients was 60.7 years (range 37-82 yrs male to female ratio was 2:1. The clinical diagnoses included - avascular necrosis of femoral head (n=15, sero positive rheumatoid arthritis (n=5, seronegative spondylo-arthropathy (n=4, neglected femoral neck fractures (n=3, healed tubercular arthritis (n=2 and post traumatic osteoarthritis of hip (n=2. The prostheses used were cemented Charnley′s total hip (n=12 and cemented modular prosthesis (n=19. The results were assessed according to Harris hip score and radiographs taken at yearly intervals. Results: The mean follow-up is 12.7 yrs (range 11-16 yrs Results in all operated patients showed marked improvement in Harris hip score from preoperative mean 29.2 to 79.9 at 10 years or more followup. However, the non-inflammatory group showed more sustained long term improvement as compared to the inflammatory group, as revealed by the Harris hip score. Mean blood loss was 450ml (±3.7 ml, mean transfusion rate was 1.2 units (±.3. The complications were hypotension (n=7, shortening> 1.5 cm (n=9, superficial infection (n=2 and malposition of prosthesis (n=1. Conclusion: The needs of Indian Asian patients, vary from what is discussed in literature. The pain tolerance is greater than western population and financial constraints are high. Thus revision surgery among Indian-Asian patients is less compared

  2. Postoperative follow-up studies in biliary atresia using radioisotope

    Kanto, Kei; Ishida, Haruo; Hayashi, Akira; Kamagata, Shoichiro; Sanbonmatsu, Toru; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Ishii, Katsumi

    1988-09-01

    With increasing numbers of long survival patients in biliary atresia, associated diseases such as liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension seem to be more important in their course. We use liver scintigraphy, hepatobiliary scintigraphy and transrectal portal scintigraphy as the follow-up study. Three studies generally correlate the present state of the patients, but there seems to be dissociation in the group of cirrhosis without icterus which are encountered most often in biliary atresia. That can be seen in hepatobiliary scintigraphy especially. So we emphasis that to choose several isotope studies are essential in determination of the postoperative state in biliary atresia.

  3. Follow-up study of memory deficits after ECT.

    Shellenberger, W; Miller, M J; Small, I F; Milstein, V; Stout, J R

    1982-06-01

    Twenty-four patients received ECT induced by either alternating sine wave or brief pulsed-square wave stimulus and were evaluated at follow-up for clinical functioning and subjective memory loss. The hypothesis of less memory loss in the group receiving a weaker stimulus (pulsed-square wave) was not supported. The two treatment groups and a group of controls showed no significant differences on the memory test. On measures of clinical functioning the sine wave group scored better on every measure than the square wave group, although not significantly better.

  4. A follow-up of transients. Stage 1

    Enekull, Aa.; Wallner, B.

    1981-09-01

    A follow-up of the transients of temperature and pressure in the primary pressurized system of a nuclear power plant has been completed for the Barsebaeck-1 reactor. The investigation consists of the following steps:- the collation of transients - drawing up load data based on transients-analyses of stress - recommendations for future programs. It was found that the lifetime of the system will exceed 40 years excluding some of the pipes for feed water. The appendices give a detailed description of the transients.(G.B.)

  5. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this

  6. Follow-up of young road accident victims.

    Gillies, Marjorie L; Barton, Joanne; Di Gallo, Alain

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this study was to follow-up a group of children and young people previously examined for psychological sequelae following road traffic accidents. The group was assessed 18-month postaccident to assess the severity of continuing symptoms and examine any emergence of delayed onset of posttraumatic stress reactions. Participants (N = 31) completed the Revised Impact of Event Scale and the Child Posttraumatic Stress Reaction Index. Parents completed the Child Behavior Check-List and participated in a semistructured interview. Symptoms of PTSD were noted in a quarter of participants as was delayed onset of symptoms. The role of avoidance in symptom reporting and continuing disorder is discussed.

  7. Automated medical follow-up and delayed industrial risks

    Smith, M.E.

    In response to increasing demand for human data to identify social, environmental, and occupational influences upon health, Statistics Canada has been organizing existing files of vital and health records to facilitate such studies on a national scale. In particular, the development of a Canadian Mortality Data Base file, the initiation of the National Cancer Incidence system, and the development of new computer techniques have helped reduce the cost and increase the scale and efficiency of automated medical follow-up to produce statistics of sickness or death attributable to environmental factors. Specific occupational studies now in progress serve to illustrate the methods, practical difficulties, potential size, and products from such investigations

  8. Destructive spondyloarthropathy and radiographic follow-up in hemodialysis patients

    Orzincolo, C.; Cardona, P.; Bedani, P.L.; Gilli, P.; Scutellari, P.N.; Trotta, F.

    1990-01-01

    Nine patients undergoing regular dialytic treatment for more than 60 months showed clinical and radiologic features of a noninfective and destructive spondyloarthropathy. Typically, radiographs and CT scans revealed narrowing of intervertebral spaces, with destruction or sclerosis of the subchondral bone of the vertebral plate. A radiographic follow-up of the cervical spine was performed in seven patients after a period of 12 months and showed that the bone destruction in DSA is very rapid and progressive. The lower biocompatibility of the cuprophan membranes of dialyzers is probably the factor most responsible for hyperproduction of β 2 -m and subsequently osteoarticular deposition of a new type of amyloidosis. (orig./DG)

  9. Simplified method evaluation for piping elastic follow-up

    Severud, L.K.

    1983-05-01

    A proposed simplified method for evaluating elastic follow-up effects in high temperature pipelines is presented. The method was evaluated by comparing the simplified analysis results with those obtained from detailed inelastic solutions. Nine different pipelines typical of a nuclear breeder reactor power plant were analyzed; the simplified method is attractive because it appears to give fairly accurate and conservative results. It is easy to apply and inexpensive since it employs iterative elastic solutions for the pipeline coupled with the readily available isochronous stress-strain data provided in the ASME Code

  10. Follow up study of Alzheimer's type dementia with computed tomography

    Hirata, Nobuhide

    1987-01-01

    In 54 patients who were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's type dementia based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, III, cranial computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained before and after their follow-up study ranging from 6 to 24 months (mean 15.4 +- 4.7 months). Cerebrospinal percentage and CT density in various regions of interest were examined. Six patients died during the study. Comparison of the group of the deceased (Group I) with the group of survivors (Group II) revealed: (1) there was no difference in average age and the degree of mental disorder at first presentation; (2) Group I had decreased activities of daily living; and (3) CT density was significantly decreased in the bilateral lateral and frontal lobes in Group I. As for Group II, decreased CT numbers were noticeable during the follow-up period in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and caudate nucleus in the group evaluated as aggravated, as compared with the group evaluated as unchanged. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome: A 13-Year Follow-Up

    Guillermo Antonio Guerrero-González

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder presenting with poikiloderma and other clinical features, affecting the bones and eyes and, in type II RTS, presenting an increased risk for malignancy. With about 300 cases reported so far, we present a 13-year follow-up including clinical images, X-rays and genetic analysis. A 13-month-old female started with a facial rash with blisters on her cheeks and limbs at the age of 3 months along with congenital hypoplastic thumbs, frontal bossing and fine hair, eyebrows and eyelashes. The patient was lost to follow-up and returned 12 years later with palmoplantar hyperkeratotic lesions, short stature, disseminated poikiloderma and sparse scalp hair, with absence of eyelashes and eyebrows. Radiographic analysis showed radial ray defect, absence of the thumb and three wrist carpal bones, and reduced bone density. Gene sequencing for the RECQL4 helicase gene revealed a mutation on each allele. RTS is a rare disease, and in this patient we observed the evolution of her skin lesions and other clinical features, which were important for the classification of type II RTS. The next years will provide even more information on this rare disease.

  12. [Follow-up of children conceived by assisted reproductive technologies].

    Bouillon, C; Fauque, P

    2013-05-01

    Since the birth of the first baby conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) 30 years ago (Louise Brown in 1978), there has been a rapid and constant increase in the number of couples using assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Around four million of children have been born from couples experiencing fertility problems, through the use of ART, comprising roughly 2-3 % of all births in Europe and U.S. That highlights that these modes of fertilization are now well assumed by our societies. However, several questions on health of these children remain to be elucidated. As evoked in this review, even if methodological limitations exist, numerous studies have reported increased risks of birth defects, like prematurity, foetal hypotrophy, neonatal complications, congenital malformations and epigenetic diseases among ART-conceived children as compared to naturally conceived children. Nowadays, it is difficult to determine if these increased risks found in ART infants are a consequence of the ART procedures or are inherent to the infertility problems per se. However, absolute risks remain moderate and reassuring as well as the data on follow-up into infancy and early childhood. Nevertheless, because the effects may occur at the adulthood, there is a need for long-term follow-up of children born after ART. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Follow-up of pulmonary perfusion recovery after embolism

    Palla, A.; Donnamaria, V.; Petruzzelli, S.; Giuntini, C.

    1986-01-01

    Blood flow recovery in a group of 69 patients with pulmonary embolism was followed by serial lung scans over a six month period. Each patient underwent perfusion lung scan at diagnosis then 7, 30 and 180 days later; i.v. heparin was systematically administered for one week after diagnosis, followed by oral warfarin for six months. Blood flow impairment was evaluated by assessing the total number of unperfused lung segments (ULS), as calculated on both lateral views at each scan. The number of ULS was significantly reduced at each interval (P<0.001), ranging from 8.4±3.3 at diagnosis to 3.6±2.7 six months later; most of the recovery (79%) occurred within the first month. No patient had complete restoration of pulmonary blood flow during the whole follow-up period. No difference was found between the number of ULS in right lung versus that in left lung at each interval. Recovery of blood flow was heavily affected by coexisting cardiac or pulmonary disease. In fact, those patients with underlying cardiopulmonary disease (49.2% of the total) showed significantly smaller perfusion improvement after six months (P<0.001). Eight patients (6 with and 2 without cardiopulmonary disease) had clinical and scintigraphic evidence of recurrent embolism during the follow-up period

  14. Gastric and Duodenal Stents: Follow-Up and Complications

    Pinto Pabon, Isabel Teresa; Paul Diaz, Laura; Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Lopez Herrero, Julio

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of self-expanding metallic stents in treating inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses during follow-up and to evaluate the complications encountered.Methods: A total of 31 patients suffering from gastroduodenal obstruction (29 malignant, 2 benign) were treated with a self-expanding metallic stent (Wallstent). In 24 cases insertion was by the peroral route, in seven cases via gastrostomy.Results: All the strictures were successfully negotiated under fluoroscopic guidance without having to resort to endoscopy. A total of 27 patients (87%) were able to resume a regular diet, a soft diet, or a liquid diet orally. Complications included one case of stent malpositioning, one case of leakage of ascitic fluid through the gastrostomy orifice, one case of perforation and fistula to the biliary tree, and two cases of hematemesis. In two patients (6%) additional stents were implanted to improve patency. In all patients follow-up was maintained until death. Recurrence of symptoms immediately before death occurred in seven cases (23%). Mean survival time of patients was 13.3 weeks (SE ± 4.6).Conclusions: The deployment of gastroduodenal stents resulted in good palliation of inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses. Certain technical aspects, e.g., adaptation of stents to bowel morphology, is critical to proper stent function and avoidance of complications

  15. CT follow-up after radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas

    Rush, S.C.; Newall, J.

    1988-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1985, 105 patients received radiation therapy as all or part of their treatment for pituitary tumor at the New York University Medical Center. Of these, 48 patients underwent computed tomography (CT) at a minimum of 2 years following treatment, with detailed reports available for analysis of tumor regression. There were 28 men with a median age of 46 years (range, 18-71 years) and 20 women with a median age of 53 years (range, 28-80 years). Tumors were classified as secretory in 23 patients, nonsecretory in 21, and undetermined in four. Sixteen patients were treated with radiation therapy alone, 23 patients with surgery and radiation therapy, and the other with bromocriptine and radiation therapy, with or without surgery. With a median follow-up of 5 years (range, 2-14 years), 16 patients developed an empty sella, 25 patients had residual sellar mass, and seven patients had persistent extrasellar components or no change in their intrasellar mass. Among patients who did not have hypopituitarism at the inception of radiation therapy, five of 13 with empty sellas and 12 of 22 with residual mass subsequently required therapy. The authors conclude that residual mass is commonly found in long-term follow-up after radiation therapy, that isolated imaging studies revealing such findings after treatment in no way herald a diagnosis of recurrence, and that hypopituitarism following pituitary radiation therapy does not correlate with the ablation or persistence of tissue within the sella

  16. Follow-up of high energy neutrinos detected by the ANTARES telescope

    Mathieu Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ANTARES telescope is well-suited to detect high energy neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky with a high duty cycle. Potential neutrino sources are gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae and flaring active galactic nuclei. To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a detection method based on follow-up observations from the neutrino direction has been developed. This program, denoted as TAToO, includes a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT, Zadko and MASTER and the Swift-XRT telescope, which are triggered when an “interesting” neutrino is detected by ANTARES. A follow-up of special events, such as neutrino doublets in time/space coincidence or a single neutrino having a very high energy or in the specific direction of a local galaxy, significantly improves the perspective for the detection of transient sources. The analysis of early and long term follow-up observations to search for fast and slowly varying transient sources, respectively, has been performed and the results covering optical and X-ray data are presented in this contribution.

  17. Follow-up of high energy neutrinos detected by the ANTARES telescope

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2016-04-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well-suited to detect high energy neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky with a high duty cycle. Potential neutrino sources are gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae and flaring active galactic nuclei. To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a detection method based on follow-up observations from the neutrino direction has been developed. This program, denoted as TAToO, includes a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT, Zadko and MASTER) and the Swift-XRT telescope, which are triggered when an "interesting" neutrino is detected by ANTARES. A follow-up of special events, such as neutrino doublets in time/space coincidence or a single neutrino having a very high energy or in the specific direction of a local galaxy, significantly improves the perspective for the detection of transient sources. The analysis of early and long term follow-up observations to search for fast and slowly varying transient sources, respectively, has been performed and the results covering optical and X-ray data are presented in this contribution.

  18. GRB follow-up observations in the East-Asian region

    Tamagawa, T.; Urata, Y.; Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo; Huang, K. Y.; Ip, W.H.; Qiu, Y.; Hu, J.Y.; Zhou, Xn.; Onda, K.; Tokyo Univ. of Sciences, Tokyo; Makishima, K.; Tokyo Univ., Tokyo

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, we established a Japan-Taiwan-China collaboration for GBR study in the East-Asian region. This serves as a valuable addiction to the world-wide optical and infrared follow-up network, because the East-Asia region would otherwise be blank. We have been carrying out imaging and spectroscopy follow-up observations at Lulin (Taiwan), Kiso (Japan), WIDGET (Japan) and Xinglong (China). From Xinglong and Kiso, we can locate candidates and obtain early time spectra for afterglows. While WIDGET provides early time observations before the bursts, the high-time resolution for multi-band light curves can be obtained at Lulin. With the data from these sites, we can obtain detailed information about the light curve and redshift of GRBs, which are important to understand the mechanism of the afterglows. Up to March 2005, ten follow-up observations have been provided by this East-Asia cooperation. Two optical afterglows were detected, GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. The results of the two detected afterglows are reported in this paper

  19. GRB follow-up observations in the East-Asian region

    Tamagawa, T. [RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Urata, Y. [RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Physics; Huang, K. Y.; Ip, W.H. [National Centre University, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Astronomy; Qiu, Y.; Hu, J.Y.; Zhou, Xn. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatoires; Onda, K. [RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Tokyo Univ. of Sciences, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Physics; Makishima, K. [RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Department of Physics

    2005-07-15

    In 2004, we established a Japan-Taiwan-China collaboration for GBR study in the East-Asian region. This serves as a valuable addiction to the world-wide optical and infrared follow-up network, because the East-Asia region would otherwise be blank. We have been carrying out imaging and spectroscopy follow-up observations at Lulin (Taiwan), Kiso (Japan), WIDGET (Japan) and Xinglong (China). From Xinglong and Kiso, we can locate candidates and obtain early time spectra for afterglows. While WIDGET provides early time observations before the bursts, the high-time resolution for multi-band light curves can be obtained at Lulin. With the data from these sites, we can obtain detailed information about the light curve and redshift of GRBs, which are important to understand the mechanism of the afterglows. Up to March 2005, ten follow-up observations have been provided by this East-Asia cooperation. Two optical afterglows were detected, GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. The results of the two detected afterglows are reported in this paper.

  20. Follow-up of breast cancer by bone scintigraphy

    Garcia N, E.; Castro, F.; Miranda, R.; Leon, L.; Bustamante, G.; Escobar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women. It is the second most widespread cancer in Mexican women. Among the several methods for diagnosis and follow up of the disease, tumor markers like CA-53 have high sensitivity and specificity. Bone scan is a useful method in the detection of bone metastases. In comparison to other diagnostic modalities, bone scan is more sensitive and less expensive for detection of early bone abnormalities and hence to select an appropriate treatment for better prognosis. In our country, in about 70% of cases diagnosis of breast cancer is made when the disease is in an advanced state - states III and IV. The aim of this study was to evaluate the follow up of breast cancer by bone scans and to correlate these findings with the stage of the disease and other diagnostic modalities. The work was carried out at Mexican General Hospital. A total of 350 patients with breast tumor were included; bone scans were performed in all patients at the time of clinical diagnosis and at every 6 months for a period of 1 to 5 years using an Elscint APEX SP6 HR gamma camera coupled with ultra high resolution collimator. Scan was performed 2-3 hours after intravenous administration of 555-925 MBq of Tc-99m methyl diphosphonate. Tumor classification was made according to TNM criteria. Serum levels of alkaline phosphates, carcino-embrionic antigen (CEA) and Ca 53 were also measured on the same day. Fifty-one patients confirmed to have a diagnosis of benign breast were excluded from the study group. Of the remaining 299 patients, 89 (39%) were between 41 years to 50 years, 69 between 51 to 60 years. The clinical stage most commonly observed was stage III (n=164, 54%) followed by stage II (25%). In 59.5% of patients, scintigraphy showed bone metastasis. Four patients with bone metastases showed regression and 42 (14%) with negative scans became positive on follow up bone scans. Ninety-three patients were free of bone metastases during all

  1. A guide to experiments in quantum optics

    Bachor, Hans-A

    2019-01-01

    In the third, fully revised and expanded edition of this well established textbook, the authors present new concepts, results, techniques, and the latest experiments in the field of quantum optics. They begin with the basic building blocks and concepts, before moving on to detailed procedures, and novel techniques. The focus is on metrology, communications, and quantum logic, with a special emphasis on single photon technology as well as hybrid detection. A new feature to this edition are the end-of-chapter summaries and full problems sets throughout.

  2. Review of retention strategies in longitudinal studies and application to follow-up of ICU survivors.

    Tansey, Catherine M; Matté, Andrea L; Needham, Dale; Herridge, Margaret S

    2007-12-01

    To review the literature on retention strategies in follow-up studies and their relevance to critical care and to comment on the Toronto experience with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) follow-up studies. Literature review and two cohort studies in a tertiary care hospital in Toronto, Canada. ARDS and SARS patients. Review articles from the social sciences and medicine are summarized and our own experience with two longitudinal studies is drawn upon to elucidate strategies that can be successfully used to attenuate participant drop-out from longitudinal studies. Three key areas for retention of subjects are identified from the literature: (a) respect for patients: respect for their ideas and their time commitment to the research project; (b) tracking: collect information on many patient contacts at the initiation of the study and outline tracking procedures for subjects lost to follow-up; and (c) study personnel: interpersonal skills must be reinforced, flexible working hours mandated, and support offered. Our 5-year ARDS and 1-year SARS study retention rates were 86% and 91%, respectively, using these methods. Strategies to reduce patient attrition are time consuming but necessary to preserve internal and external validity. When the follow-up system is working effectively, researchers can acquire the necessary data to advance knowledge in their field and patients are satisfied that they have an important role to play in the research project.

  3. Long term follow up of medical therapy of thyroid cancer

    Jaffiol, C.; Daures, J.P.; Nsakala, N.; Guerenova, J.; Baldet, L.; Pujol, P.; Vannereau, D.; Bringer, J.

    1995-01-01

    106 patients, 114 W, 27 M, were thyroidectomized for differentiated thyroid cancer (follicular 29.3% - papillary 54.3%) with different stages of gravity (N O: 48.2% - N 1: 32.8% - N 2: 19%). Neck dissection was used in cases of involved nodes. One or several doses of 131 I were given to 126 subjects, 106 patients were treated with L thyroxine (LT4) (mean daily dose: 2.5 μg/kg BW). 23 patients presenting intolerance to LT4 with non suppressed TSH for 13 of them were treated by an association of tiratricol (TRIAC) + LT4. The follow up included a yearly check up involving clinical examination, plasma thyroglobulin (Tg) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) assessment, neck ultrasonography and X ray of the chest. Therapy was stopped for 4 weeks in cases with Tg above its detectable value and a total body scan performed with Tg and TSH controls. The mean duration of follow up was 94.5 ± 67.7 months and extended to more than 5 years for 61% of the patients. We observed 22 relapses of the tumor with 4 deaths. Age less then 45 years, appears as the best factor of prognosis. 2 groups of patients were compared to evaluate the incidence of TSH suppression on the relapse free survival (group 1 n = 30 with a TSH ≤ 0.10 mU/1 and group 2 n = 15 with a TSH always > 1 mU/1 during the follow up). The relapse free survival was shorter in group 2 (p 0.01). Association of TRIAC with LT4 leads to a reduction of the daily dose of LT4 (m 25μg/day) with a significant improvement of TSH suppression and clinical tolerance. In conclusion, TSH suppression improves the prognosis in thyroidectomized patients for differentiated carcinoma. Association of TRIAC with LT4 seems able to approve TSH suppression and therapeutic tolerance. (authors). 40 refs., 5 tabs

  4. Vaginismus Treatment: Clinical Trials Follow Up 241 Patients.

    Pacik, Peter T; Geletta, Simon

    2017-06-01

    Vaginismus is mostly unknown among clinicians and women. Vaginismus causes women to have fear, anxiety, and pain with penetration attempts. To present a large cohort of patients based on prior published studies approved by an institutional review board and the Food and Drug Administration using a comprehensive multimodal vaginismus treatment program to treat the physical and psychologic manifestations of women with vaginismus and to record successes, failures, and untoward effects of this treatment approach. Assessment of vaginismus included a comprehensive pretreatment questionnaire, the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), and consultation. All patients signed a detailed informed consent. Treatment consisted of a multimodal approach including intravaginal injections of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) and bupivacaine, progressive dilation under conscious sedation, indwelling dilator, follow-up and support with office visits, phone calls, e-mails, dilation logs, and FSFI reports. Logs noting dilation progression, pain and anxiety scores, time to achieve intercourse, setbacks, and untoward effects. Post-treatment FSFI scores were compared with preprocedure scores. One hundred seventy-one patients (71%) reported having pain-free intercourse at a mean of 5.1 weeks (median = 2.5). Six patients (2.5%) were unable to achieve intercourse within a 1-year period after treatment and 64 patients (26.6%) were lost to follow-up. The change in the overall FSFI score measured at baseline, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year was statistically significant at the 0.05 level. Three patients developed mild temporary stress incontinence, two patients developed a short period of temporary blurred vision, and one patient developed temporary excessive vaginal dryness. All adverse events resolved by approximately 4 months. One patient required retreatment followed by successful coitus. A multimodal program that treated the physical and psychologic aspects of vaginismus enabled women to achieve

  5. Mammographic follow-up after conservation therapy for breast cancer

    Gu Yajia; Xiao Qin; Zheng Xiaojing; Wu Jiong; Chen Jiayi; Gu Rongfeng; Feng Xiaoyuan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To recognize the mammographic changes after conservation therapy for breast carcinoma. Methods: A total of 139 follow-up mammographic examinations in 85 cases were studied during the period between 1999 and 2004. Mammography was performed at intervals of 6 months for the first 2 years, then annually. Attention was paid to mammographic change patterns of conservation therapy for breast carcinoma, including breast edema, skin thickening, architectural disturbance, asymmetric density, architectural distortion retraction, and calcifications. SPSS version 11.0 for windows was used to perform all statistical tests. Kruskal-Wallis H test was used for calculating the overall statistical differences between difference periods. Categorical data were expressed as percentages and analyzed by using the X 2 test. The age of the patients ranged from 25 to 63 years (mediate, 44 years old). The time of follow-up observation ranged from 1 week to 72 months. Results: Two cases were normal on mammograms. High proportion of abnormal mammography was seen in the period of 12 month (40.3%, 56/139) and 24 month (21.6%, 30/139), respectively. Various findings appeared in various periods and the difference was statistically significant(X 2 =30.998, v=6, P=0.001). Mild edema appeared in the first 3 years. Moderately severe or marked breast edema may be present between 6 months to 12 months, then slowly resolved. The appearance and disappearance of skin thickening were similar to the process of breast edema. The changes of architectural disturbance did not correlate with time (X 2 =8.634, P>0.05), but on sequential mammograms for same patient, the extent of architectural disturbance relieved over time (17/19). Asymmetric density was found in only 5 patients, and disappeared in later period of follow-up in 3. Architectural distortion retraction got more and more obvious with time, and kept stable after certain period of time. Calcifications were shown in 2 patients, including 1

  6. RATIR Follow-up of LIGO/Virgo Gravitational Wave Events

    Golkhou, V. Zach; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Strausbaugh, Robert; Troja, Eleonora; Kutyrev, Alexander; Lee, William H.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Watson, Alan M.

    2018-04-01

    We have recently witnessed the first multi-messenger detection of colliding neutron stars through gravitational waves (GWs) and electromagnetic (EM) waves (GW 170817) thanks to the joint efforts of LIGO/Virgo and Space/Ground-based telescopes. In this paper, we report on the RATIR follow-up observation strategies and show the results for the trigger G194575. This trigger is not of astrophysical interest; however, it is of great interest to the robust design of a follow-up engine to explore large sky-error regions. We discuss the development of an image-subtraction pipeline for the six-color, optical/NIR imaging camera RATIR. Considering a two-band (i and r) campaign in the fall of 2015, we find that the requirement of simultaneous detection in both bands leads to a factor ∼10 reduction in false alarm rate, which can be further reduced using additional bands. We also show that the performance of our proposed algorithm is robust to fluctuating observing conditions, maintaining a low false alarm rate with a modest decrease in system efficiency that can be overcome utilizing repeat visits. Expanding our pipeline to search for either optical or NIR detections (three or more bands), considering separately the optical riZ and NIR YJH bands, should result in a false alarm rate ≈1% and an efficiency ≈90%. RATIR’s simultaneous optical/NIR observations are expected to yield about one candidate transient in the vast 100 deg2 LIGO error region for prioritized follow-up with larger aperture telescopes.

  7. Experiments of the origins of optical activity.

    Bonner, W A; Flores, J J

    1975-01-01

    Two recent reports claim that (1) aqueous L-aspartic acid polymerizes faster than D-Asp in the presence of kaolin at 90 degrees, and (2) L-phenylalanine is adsorbed by kaolin more extensively than D-Phe at pH 4(the reverse being true at pH2). The novelty of these observations and their potential significance for the origin of optical activity has prompted us to duplicate these experiments using more sensitive methods. L- and D, L-Asp in 0.01 M solution were incubated with kaolin at 90 degrees for 8 days. Careful examination of the aqueous residues from such experiments failed to demonstrate any preferential polymerization of L-Asp over D-Asp, or indeed any significant gross polymerization of Asp at all. In other experiments 0.001 M solutions of D, L-Phe at pH 6 and pH 2 were stirred with large excesses of kaolin for 24 hr, and the aqueous extracts from these mixtures were examined for gross adsorption using the amino acid analyzer. No significant gross adsorption was noted. We then looked for asymmetric adsorption in the aqueous residues using optical rotatory dispersion, gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography. By none of these analytical criteria could we find any evidence whatsoever for the preferential adsorption of D- versus L-Phe from either pH 6 or pH 2 solutions. Finally, in experiments bearing on the origin of optical activity by parity violation during beta-decay, we have irradiated solid samples of D-, L- and D,L-leucine in a 61700 Ci Sr-90 source at Oak Ridge National Lab. for 1.34 yr (total dose: 4.2 x 10(8) rad). Gas chromatographic examination of the (appropriately derivitized) recovered samples showed that the L-Leu was 16.7% decomposed, the D-Leu 11.4% and theD,L-Leu 13.8% decomposed. The recovered D,L-Leu sample had a gas-chromatographically determined enantiomeric composition of 50.8% D-leu and 49.2% L-Leu. These data, though very close to experimental error, may indicate a slight preferential radiolysis of L-Leu compared to D-Leu by the

  8. Scintigraphic follow-up of fracture healing in animals

    Klug, W.; Franke, W.G.; Schulze, M.

    1983-01-01

    Secondary bone fracture heating was analysed by scintigraphic follow-up studies in rabbits using sup(99m)Tc-HEDP. 24 hours after fracture the activity ratio between the fractured and the non-fractured lower limb was 2,2. The maximal count density in the fracture region is found during the 14th and 28th day after fracture. Concomitantly there is a significant increase of bone marrow vessels and content of copper, magnesium, sodium and water in the callus. Although roentgenographic controls and static investigations with respect to consolidation reveal a complete heating already 126 days after fracture, the complete scintigraphic normalisation of the lower limb fracture of the rabbit is found not earlier than at the 203rd day after fracture. (orig.) [de

  9. Scintigraphic follow-up of fracture healing in animals

    Klug, W.; Franke, W.G.; Schulze, M.

    1983-08-01

    Secondary bone fracture healing was analysed by scintigraphic follow-up studies in rabbits using sup(99m)Tc-HEDP. 24 hours after fracture the activity ratio between the fractured and the non-fractured lower limb was 2,2. The maximal count density in the fracture region is found during the 14th and 28th day after fracture. Concomitantly there is a significant increase of bone marrow vessels and content of copper, magnesium, sodium and water in the callus. Although roentgenographic controls and static investigations with respect to consolidation reveal a complete healing already 126 days after fracture, the complete scintigraphic normalisation of the lower limb fracture of the rabbit is found not earlier than at the 203rd day after fracture.

  10. Epidemiological follow-up study of Japanese Thorotrast cases

    Mori, T.; Maruyama, T.; Kato, Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1979-01-01

    The authors conducted a follow-up study on 243 Thorotrast-administered war-wounded ex-servicemen in 1975, after a lapse of 30 to 38 years from Thorotrast injections, and found 18 cases of malignant hepatic tumor, 15 cases of other malignant tumors, 2 cases of blood diseases, and 9 cases of liver cirrhosis in 224 cases who had been given Thorotrast intravascularly. The incidence of hepatic and other malignant tumors, blood diseases, and liver cirrhosis was significantly higher than in the controls. The total number of deaths in the Thorotrast-administered cases was also significantly higher than in the controls. In the remaining 19 cases who had been given Thorotrast by a route other than intravascularly, no fatal case related to Thorotrast administration was discovered. In the living cases, however, one sarcoma was observed to have developed at the site of the Thorotrast injection

  11. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. A follow-up of 72 cases referred for abortion.

    Gillis, A

    1975-01-01

    Whilst the medical indications for therapeutic abortion and the legal limitations set vary enormously from one country to another there is in general an undoubted trend towards giving the pregnant woman herself a greater say in the decision. During the first year of the operation of the Abortion Act, 1967, in England some 72 pregnant women were referred to the author and his colleagues for a recommendation on abortion. A psychiatric examination and follow-up over a period of one year was made both in those cases where abortion was performed as well as in those cases who were refused therapeutic abortion. In this communication a comparison is made between the reactions and outcome in the two groups. A provisional conclusion is reached that no significant psychiatric disturbance could be attributed to the performance of the operation or on the other hand to refusal of the woman's request.

  13. Vertebral sarcoidosis: long-term follow-up with MRI

    Lefere, M. [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Larbi, A.; Malghem, J.; Vande Berg, B.; Dallaudiere, B. [University Hospitals St Luc, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    Vertebral involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and its clinical and imaging features are non-specific. Indeed, because the lesions are hard to differentiate from metastatic disease based on imaging alone, a histological confirmation is advised. Fatty replacement is a well-known finding indicating stabilization and healing in both benign and malignant conditions. It can be used as an indicator of a favorable disease course and response to treatment. We report the case of a 43-year-old woman with multifocal vertebral sarcoidosis lesions and long-term follow-up showing progressive and gradual fatty involution on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during 4 years of steroid treatment with a final favorable outcome. (orig.)

  14. Hydrotherapy after total knee arthroplasty. A follow-up study.

    Giaquinto, S; Ciotola, E; Dall'Armi, V; Margutti, F

    2010-01-01

    The study evaluated the subjective functional outcome following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in participants who underwent hydrotherapy (HT) six months after discharge from a rehabilitation unit. A total of 70 subjects, 12 of which were lost at follow-up, were randomly assigned to either a conventional gym treatment (N=30) or HT (N=28). A prospective design was performed. Participants were interviewed with Western-Ontario McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) at admission, at discharge and six months later. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were applied for statistical analysis. Both groups improved. The WOMAC subscales, namely pain, stiffness and function, were all positively affected. Statistical analysis indicates that scores on all subscales were significantly lower for the HT group. The benefits gained by the time of discharge were still found after six months. HT is recommended after TKA in a geriatric population. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Probing noncommutative theories with quantum optical experiments

    Sanjib Dey

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the major difficulties of modern science underlies at the unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics. Different approaches towards such theory have been proposed. Noncommutative theories serve as the root of almost all such approaches. However, the identification of the appropriate passage to quantum gravity is suffering from the inadequacy of experimental techniques. It is beyond our ability to test the effects of quantum gravity thorough the available scattering experiments, as it is unattainable to probe such high energy scale at which the effects of quantum gravity appear. Here we propose an elegant alternative scheme to test such theories by detecting the deformations emerging from the noncommutative structures. Our protocol relies on the novelty of an opto-mechanical experimental setup where the information of the noncommutative oscillator is exchanged via the interaction with an optical pulse inside an optical cavity. We also demonstrate that our proposal is within the reach of current technology and, thus, it could uncover a feasible route towards the realization of quantum gravitational phenomena thorough a simple table-top experiment.

  16. Pediatric vocal fold immobility: natural history and the need for long-term follow-up.

    Jabbour, Jad; Martin, Timothy; Beste, David; Robey, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    intervention. In this large database, the majority of patients did not experience resolution. This suggests a need for more regimented follow-up in these patients, a recommendation for which is proposed here.

  17. Experiência com transplante cardíaco heterotópico em pacientes com resistência pulmonar elevada: seguimento tardio Experiencia con trasplante cardíaco heterotópico en pacientes con resistencia pulmonar elevada: seguimiento tardío Experience with heterotopic heart transplantation in patients with elevated pulmonary vascular resistance: late follow-up

    Jose Henrique Andrade Vila

    2010-02-01

    este tipo de alternativa, para pacientes seleccionados.BACKGROUND: Along the past few years the number of papers on heterotopic cardiac transplant has been very scarce in the medical literature, including at the international level; this is particularly true in reference to the long term follow-up of these patients and the reason which led to the presentation of our report. OBJECTIVE: To report the initial clinical experience and late evolution of 4 patients undergoing heterotopic heart transplantation, indications for this procedure and its major complications. METHODS: The surgeries were performed between 1992 and 2001, and all had as indication for heterotopic transplantation the PVR, which ranged from 4.8 WU to 6.5WU, with a transpulmonary gradient above 15mmHg. In the 3rd patient, a direct anastomosis between the pulmonary arteries was performed without the use of a prostetic tube, and a mitral valvuloplasty and a LV aneurysmectomy were performed in the native heart. The immediate immunosuppressive regimens were double, with cyclosporine and azathioprine in the first 3 patients, and cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil in the 4th patient. RESULTS: One immediate death occurred from graft failure, one death occurred after 2 ½ years, from endocarditis in an intraventricular thrombus in the native heart, and a third death occurred 6 years after transplantation, from post-operative complications of the aortic valve surgery in the native heart. The remaining patient is well, 15 years after the transplantation. This patient is in functional class II (NYHA, 6 years after a surgical occlusion of the native heart aortic valve. CONCLUSION: Heterotopic heart transplantation results are inferior to those of orthotopic heart transplantation because they present higher RVP. The intraventricular thrombi, in the native heart, which require prolonged anticoagulation, and aortic valve complications, also in the native heart, may require surgical treatment. However, a patient's 15

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in follow-up assessment of sciatica.

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; Van der Kallen, Bas F; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently performed during follow-up in patients with known lumbar-disk herniation and persistent symptoms of sciatica. The association between findings on MRI and clinical outcome is controversial. We studied 283 patients in a randomized trial comparing surgery and prolonged conservative care for sciatica and lumbar-disk herniation. Patients underwent MRI at baseline and after 1 year. We used a 4-point scale to assess disk herniation on MRI, ranging from 1 for "definitely present" to 4 for "definitely absent." A favorable clinical outcome was defined as complete or nearly complete disappearance of symptoms at 1 year. We compared proportions of patients with a favorable outcome among those with a definite absence of disk herniation and those with a definite, probable, or possible presence of disk herniation at 1 year. The area under the receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve was used to assess the prognostic accuracy of the 4-point scores regarding a favorable or unfavorable outcome, with 1 indicating perfect discriminatory value and 0.5 or less indicating no discriminatory value. At 1 year, 84% of the patients reported having a favorable outcome. Disk herniation was visible in 35% with a favorable outcome and in 33% with an unfavorable outcome (P=0.70). A favorable outcome was reported in 85% of patients with disk herniation and 83% without disk herniation (P=0.70). MRI assessment of disk herniation did not distinguish between patients with a favorable outcome and those with an unfavorable outcome (area under ROC curve, 0.48). MRI performed at 1-year follow-up in patients who had been treated for sciatica and lumbar-disk herniation did not distinguish between those with a favorable outcome and those with an unfavorable outcome. (Funded by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development and the Hoelen Foundation; Controlled Clinical Trials number, ISRCTN26872154.).

  19. Clinical outcome and follow-up of prenatal hydronephrosis

    Afshin Safaei Asl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydronephrosis is probably the most common congenital abnormality detected prenatally by ultrasonography This study was performed to determine the cause and outcome of prenatal hydronephrosis in our hospital. A total of 45 infants, with 57 prenatally hydronephrotic renal units, were enrolled into this study. For the purpose of this study, the degree of hydronephrosis was defined as mild, moderate or severe. Postnatal ultrasonography was performed as soon as possible in those with bilateral hyronephrosis and 3-7 days after birth in those with unilateral hydronephrosis. Voiding cystourethrogram was performed in 6-8 weeks time. In the absence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, Diethylenetriamene penta acetate scan was performed to exclude obstructive uropathy. There were 29 males and 16 females (male:female ratio 1.8:1, and unilateral and bilateral hydronephrosis were seen in 33 (73% and 12 (27% of the cases, res-pectively. Hydronephrosis was caused by ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO in 20 (44.5%, VUR in 10 (22.2%, ureterovesical junction obstruction in four (8.9 %, posteriorurethral valves in four (8.9 %, UPJO with VUR in two (4.4% and non-VUR non-obstructive in one (2.2%. During follow-up, 16 patients (35.5% required operative intervention while seven (15.5% improved spontaneously. Fetal hydronephrosis needs close follow-up during both ante-natal and postnatal periods. In this study, the most common cause for hydronephrosis were UPJO and VUR. Also seen in this study is the noteworthy point that mild fetal hydronephrosis is relatively benign and does not require surgical intervention in most cases and surgery should be performed only if there is renal function compromise. Prenatal consultation with a pediatric nephrologist and urologist is useful in decreasing parental anxiety and facilitating postnatal management.

  20. Follow up study and interested cases in subdural hematoma

    Kano, Mitsumasa; Goh, Jyunto; Koomura, Eiji; Nakao, Kazutami

    1983-01-01

    1. Out of 67 patients ranging from 16 to 82 years old, 20 were followed up by CT scan after operation. 2. Five patients presented hematoma on the both sides after operation, though they had suffered from the lesion of one side before operation. In four patients, hematoma was observed on the both sides before and after operation. Neither preoperative involved side changed nor hematoma appeared on the opposite side after operation in 11 patients. Follow-up examinations lasted up almost three months. 3. The maximum width of the subdural space was divided by the maximum intracranial width. These two factors were measured on horizontal CT scan. The calculated value was expressed in percentage and then, the result was regarded as Subdural Space (SDS) Index. Dividing a difference between the largest SDS Index (before operation) and the smallest by the number of days between the two points gave us a reduction rate of SDS Index. As a result, a reduction rate of 0.4 or less was obtained in all the patients less than 65 years old. There were three patients within the range from 0.7 to 1.0 of the rate. 76-year-old patients showed 2.6 and 5.7. Except the 76-old patients, mean duration of 35.5 days was calculated in Group I and SDS Index was 0, while Group II showed mean duration of 52.4 days, resulting in SDS Index of 0. 4. Specific progresses are shown below: 1) Hemorrhage of the caudate nucleus after operation 2) Subdural effusion of the both sides 3) Appearance of abscess 4) Subtentrial hemorrhage after operation 5) Postoperative epidural hematoma 6) Traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage, resulting in chronic subdural hematoma six months afterward (author)

  1. Postnatal gestational diabetes mellitus follow-up: Perspectives of Australian hospital clinicians and general practitioners.

    Kilgour, Catherine; Bogossian, Fiona Elizabeth; Callaway, Leonie; Gallois, Cindy

    2018-05-04

    The reasons for low postnatal screening rates for women with gestational diabetes mellitus are not well understood. Multiple care providers, settings and changes to diagnostic criteria, may contribute to confusion over postnatal care. Quality of communication between clinicians may be an important influence for the completion of postnatal gestational diabetes mellitus follow-up. Describe and analyse communication processes between hospital clinicians (midwives, medical, allied staff) and general practitioners who provide postnatal gestational diabetes mellitus care. Purposive sampling and convergent interviews explored participants' communication experiences providing gestational diabetes mellitus postnatal follow-up. Data were analysed with Leximancer automated content analysis software; interpretation was undertaken using Communication Accommodation Theory. Clinicians who provided maternity care at a tertiary referral hospital (n=13) in Queensland, Australia, and general practitioners (n=16) who provided maternity shared care with that hospital between December 2012 and July 2013. Thematic analysis identified very different perspectives between the experiences of General Practitioners and hospital clinicians; six themes emerged. General practitioners were concerned about themes relating to discharge summaries and follow-up guidelines. In contrast, hospital clinicians were more concerned about themes relating to gestational diabetes mellitus antenatal care and specialist clinics. Two themes, gestational diabetes mellitus women and postnatal checks were shared. Gestational diabetes mellitus follow-up is characterised by communication where general practitioners appear to be information seekers whose communication needs are not met by hospital clinicians. Midwives are ideally placed to assist in improving communication and postnatal gestational diabetes mellitus follow-up. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  2. On the evaluation of elastic follow-up of a high temperature discontinuous structure

    Lee, J. M.; Kim, J. B.; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    While high temperature structures of LMR experience inelastic deformation such as plasticity and creep due to high temperature operating temperature of 530∼550 .deg. C, geometric nonlinear structures may undergo elastic follow-up behavior due to the interaction between stiff region and weak region. Thus, careful consideration should be given to the design and analysis of high temperature geometric nonlinear structure. In this study, the elastic follow-up behavior of geometric nonlinear structure has been investigated and the current status of design method implemented in the ASME-NH, Japanese BDS, French RCC-MR, and UK R-5 codes to consider elastic follow-up behavior has been reviewed. It has been shown that the ratio of the stiff region and the weak region and the type of loading affect the elastic follow-up behavior greatly from the detailed inelastic analyses of two bar model and L-shaped structure subjected to various loading situation. The applicability and the conservatism of simplified analysis methods implemented among various design codes need to be studied further

  3. Clinical and Radiological Long-Term Follow-up After Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and to assess the quality of life after treatment. A clinical follow-up was undertaken after 67 months (mean) in 35 consecutive patients with 106 PAVMs. Outcome parameters at follow-up were PaO 2 and patients' satisfaction. During follow-up, the patients had a clinical examination, measurement of arterial blood gases, chest X-ray, and contrast echocardiography performed and were asked to fill in a questionnaire exploring experience of the treatment and subjective effect of treatment on physical and social functioning. A significant rise in oxygenation of the blood after embolization was measured. In 77% of the patients symptoms improved, and 71% felt better performance. In eight patients, one of the PAVMs was found insufficiently embolized or recanalized at follow-up angiography and therefore were re-embolized. Endovascular embolization for PAVMs is effective. Clinical parameters and quality of life improved significantly. Regular clinical controls after therapy are necessary to discover insufficiently embolized, recanalized or new PAVMs

  4. Progression of Myopic Maculopathy during 18-Year Follow-up.

    Fang, Yuxin; Yokoi, Tae; Nagaoka, Natsuko; Shinohara, Kosei; Onishi, Yuka; Ishida, Tomoka; Yoshida, Takeshi; Xu, Xian; Jonas, Jost B; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2018-06-01

    To examine the progression pattern of myopic maculopathy. Retrospective, observational case series. Highly myopic patients who had been followed up for 10 years or more. Using fundus photographs, myopic features were differentiated according to Meta-analysis of Pathologic Myopia (META-PM) Study Group recommendations. Progression pattern of maculopathy. The study included 810 eyes of 432 patients (mean age, 42.3±16.8 years; mean axial length, 28.8±1.9 mm; mean follow-up, 18.7±7.1 years). The progression rate of myopic maculopathy was 47.0 per 1000 eye-years. Within the pathologic myopia (PM) group (n = 521 eyes), progression of myopic maculopathy was associated with female gender (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; P = 0.001), older age (OR, 1.03; P = 0.002), longer axial length (OR, 1.20; P = 0.007), greater axial elongation (OR, 1.45; P = 0.005), and development of parapapillary atrophy (PPA; OR, 3.14; P < 0.001). Diffuse atrophy, found in 217 eyes without choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or lacquer cracks (LCs) at baseline, progressed in 111 (51%) eyes, leading to macular diffuse atrophy (n = 64; 64/111 or 58%), patchy atrophy (n = 59; 53%), myopic CNV (n = 18; 16%), LCs (n = 9; 5%), and patchy-related macular atrophy (n = 3; 3%). Patchy atrophy, detected in 63 eyes without CNV or LCs at baseline, showed progression in 60 eyes (95%), leading to enlargement of original patchy atrophy (n = 59; 59/60 or 98%), new patchy atrophy (n = 29; 48%), CNV-related macular atrophy (n = 13; 22%), and patchy-related macular atrophy (n = 5; 8%). Of 66 eyes with LCs, 43 eyes (65%) showed progression with development of new patchy atrophy (n = 38; 38/43 or 88%) and new LCs (n = 7; 16%). Reduction in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was associated mainly (all P < 0.001) with the development of CNV or CNV-related macular atrophy and enlargement of macular atrophy. The most frequent progression patterns were an extension of peripapillary diffuse atrophy to macular diffuse

  5. Diagnosis, surgical treatment and follow-up of thyroid cancers

    Pacini, F.; Pinchera, A.; Vorontsova, T.; Demidchik, E.P.; Delange, F.; Reiners, C.; Schlumberger, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the activities and the results of the research carried out by the Centers participating to the JSP4 project, within the framework of the EU program on the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster. The project was aimed to develop and to control the application of basic principles for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of thyroid carcinoma, with special attention to the peculiar requirement of children and adolescents. To this purpose, training in Western European Centers was offered to a number of scientists from Belarus, Ukraine and Russia. Several official meetings were organized to share views and to discuss the progress of the project. A basic protocol for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of thyroid carcinoma has been developed and approved by all participating Centers. Hopefully, it will be applied to the new cases and to those already under monitoring. A large part of the protocol is dedicated to the post-surgical treatment with thyroid hormones for the suppression of TSH and with calcitriol for the management of surgical hypoparathyroidism. A detailed protocol to asses iodine deficiency and, eventually, to introduce a program of iodine supplementation has been proposed. The collection of control cases of childhood thyroid carcinoma in non-radiation exposed European countries has been initiated in Italy, France and Germany. This data will be used as control for the post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid carcinomas. Here is reported a preliminary comparison of the clinical and epidemiological features of almost all (n=368) radiation-exposed Belarus children who developed thyroid carcinoma (age at diagnosis < 16 years), with respect to 90 children of the same age group, who, in the past 20 years, have received treatment for thyroid carcinoma in two centers in Italy (Pisa and Rome). Finally, by molecular biology, genetic mutations of the RET proto-oncogene have been found in several samples of thyroid carcinomas provided by the Belarus

  6. Long-Term Follow-Up of Intravitreal Bevacizumab in Retinal Arterial Macroaneurysm: A Case Report

    Shani Golan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present the long-term effect of intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin® therapy in a patient suffering from retinal arterial macroaneurysm. Methods: Case report of a 72-year-old female diagnosed with retinal macroaneurysm in the superior temporal artery leading to macular edema. Functional and morphological data at baseline, 4 weeks, 2 months, and 13 months following treatment with two consecutive intravitreal bevacizumab injections are presented. Results: Best-corrected visual acuity improved from 20/160 at baseline to 20/20 at the3-months follow-up and remained stable through 13 months of follow-up. Central retinal thickness measured by optical coherence tomography decreased from 364 µm at baseline to 248 µm at the 13-months follow-up. No ocular or systemic side effects were detected. Conclusions: Intravitreal bevacizumab therapy may lead to resolution of macular edema associated with retinal macroaneurysm and consequently visual improvement. This treatment may promise a long-lasting effect but warrant further investigation in larger series.

  7. Postoperative follow-up CT of malignant gliomas. With special reference to intraventricular and subarachnoid dissemination

    Takada, Akira; Matsukado, Yasuhiko; Hirata, Yoshifumi; Uemura, Shozaburo

    1986-02-01

    Ten postoperative patients with intraventricular and subarachnoid dissemination of supratentorial gliomas were evaluated with a follow-up CT scan. The tumors consisted of 9 malignant gliomas and 1 astrocytoma. In 5 of the 9 malignant gliomas, the ventricles were surgically opened. In 4 of these 5 patients, a regional linear enhancement of the ventricular wall was observed in the early postoperative period. These findings were the initial findings indicative of tumor dissemination in the CSF space; a postoperative CT follow-up should be done within a few weeks after the operation, especially when the ventricles were ruptured. Subarachnoid dissemination and/or ventricular implantation could also be observed in the follow-up CT of such low-grade gliomas as optic gliomas, and there was no marked difference in the CT findings between low-grade and malignant gliomas. Concomittant progressive ventricular dilatation in early postoperative period was noted in 8 of the 10 patients with serial CT studies. It was considered that hydrocephalus was the another indication for advancing subarachnoid dissemination.

  8. The value of various radiological techniques for follow-up of Camurati-Engelmann disease

    Wilhelm, K.R.; Fritz, P.; Bihl, H.; Baldauf, G.

    1987-01-01

    Camurati-Engelmann disease is a rare progressive bone dysplasia; involvement of the skull base can lead to deafness, vestibular disturbances, facial paralysis and damage to the optic nerves. Treatment with corticosteroids, calcitonin and diphosphonates promises only very limited success. Conservative treatment of compression of the cranial nerves is almost ineffective, but the aim of surgical treatment is decompression of involved nerves. The differential diagnosis depends on radiological findings and clinical symptoms. Follow-up depends on radiographic examination and skeletal scintigraphy for showing the extent of the disease. CT may help in demonstrating compression of cranial nerves and define the indications for surgical decompression. (orig.) [de

  9. Operative correction and follow-up of craniofacial duplication.

    Kotrikova, Bibiana; Hassfeld, Stefan; Steiner, Hans H; Hähnel, Stefan; Krempien, Robert; Mühling, Joachim

    2007-03-01

    Anterior craniofacial duplication (diprosopus) is an extremely rare form of conjoined twins. The children share a single trunk with normal extremities and varying degrees of facial malformation. Duplication of specific structures, such as the nose (diprosopus dirrhinus), eyes (diprosopus tetraophthalmus), and ears, is possible. The authors present a case of partial facial duplication (diprosopus dirrhinus) in a male infant. The clinical and radiographic findings and the surgical correction and follow-up are described. In a single surgical session, the authors were able to achieve not only a functionally but also an aesthetically acceptable result. In the postoperative course, the child showed nearly normal growth and satisfactory psychosocial and motor development. However, 40 months postoperatively, we noticed a tendency of the orbitae to diverge (i.e., toward hypertelorism). The surgical management of complex craniofacial malformations such as diprosopus needs a precise morphologic analysis of the patient's deformity followed by a clear treatment plan. A staged reconstructive approach is carried out to coincide with facial growth patterns and brain and eye function. If the interorbital distance in our patient increases progressively, a second operation for reduction of the interorbital distance may be necessary.

  10. [Assessment and follow up of diabetic patients in hemodialysis].

    Sanhueza, María Eugenia; Cotera, Alejandro; Elgueta, Leticia; López S, Gloria; Loncon, Patricia; Macan, Fernando; Pérez, Francisco; Cavada, Gabriel; Alvo, Miriam

    2008-03-01

    Despite a better management of the variables that influence the development of diabetic nephropathy there is a progressive increase in the prevalence of terminal renal failure among diabetics, whose cause is not clear. To study in a group of patients in hemodialysis, the quality of diabetes control previous to the entry to dialysis, their physical condition and their evolution. Diabetic patients with at least three months of hemodialysis answered a questionnaire about diabetes control quality previous to dialysis and had physical and laboratory assessment. They were followed for at least four years thereafter. Fifty seven patients aged 62+/-11 years were studied. Eighty four percent had some degree of disability. Eighty seven percent had high blood pressure and 73% had to enter dialysis as an emergency. Mean glycosilated hemoglobin was 7.7% and 58% had a dialysis dose with a Kt/Vofless than 1.2. Fifty eight percent died during follow up. No relationship between mortality and age, blood pressure, glycosilated hemoglobin of Kt/V, was observed. There is an inadequate management of blood glucose and blood pressure of diabetic patients before entry to dialysis. They are referred inverted exclamation markate to the nephrologist, the dialysis dose is insufficient and they have a high mortality.

  11. SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Candidate RV Follow-up

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SIthajan, Sirinrat

    2014-02-01

    Planetary systems, discovered by the radial velocity (RV) surveys, reveal strong correlations between the planet frequency and stellar properties, such as metallicity and mass, and a greater diversity in planets than found in the solar system. However, due to the sample sizes of extant surveys (~100 to a few hundreds of stars) and their heterogeneity, many key questions remained to be addressed: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate- mass stars and binaries? Is the ``planet desert'' within 0.6 AU in the planet orbital distribution of intermediate-mass stars real? The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars. The latest data pipeline effort at UF has been able to remove long term systematic errors suffered in the earlier data pipeline. 18 high confident giant planet candidates have been identified among newly processed data. We propose to follow up these giant planet candidates with the KPNO EXPERT instrument to confirm the detection and also characterize their orbits. The confirmed planets will be used to measure occurrence rates, distributions and multiplicity of giants planets around F,G,K stars with a broad range of mass (~0.6-2.5 M_⊙) and metallicity ([Fe/H]~-1.5-0.5). The well defined MARVELS survey cadence allows robust determinations of completeness limits for rigorously testing giant planet formation theories and constraining models.

  12. Bilateral sacrospinous fixation without hysterectomy: 18-month follow-up

    Şentürk, Mehmet Baki; Güraslan, Hakan; Çakmak, Yusuf; Ekin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of bilateral sacrospinous fixation (SSF), which was performed with surgical mesh interposition and bilateral vaginal repair. Material and Methods Twenty-two patients underwent SSF between 2010 and 2012, and the results were evaluated retrospectively. The results at preoperative and postoperative 6th, 12th, and 18th months of the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12) were compared using Friedman and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests. Values of p<0.05 and <0.01 were considered statistically significant. Results According to the POP-Q, significant healing was observed on all vaginal vault points (p=0.001), and no prolapse was observed until the 18-month follow-up stage. There were also prominent patients who felt satisfactory with respect to their sexual life according to PISQ-12 (p=0.001). Conclusion This technique appears to provide an adequate clinical resolution, and it may be the primary surgical option for women with pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:26097393

  13. Long term follow up in hemodialysis patients with parathyroidectomy

    Alvarez, A.; Petraglia, A.; Caorsi, H.; Mazzuchi, N.; Olaizola, I.; Acuna, G.; Fajardo, L.; Ambrosoni, P.; Morelli, R.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed in 41 patients, in chronic hemodialysis with severe hyperparathyroidism (HPT), who underwent surgery during time period from 1985 to 1997. 22 females, 19 males, aged 50 and 14 years, with PTHI 1345 and 604 pg/ml were followed up 32 and 22 months. Three surgical methods we evaluated: group I) total para thyroidectomy(PTX) with Implants(n=24); group II) subtotal PTX(n=14) and group III) total PTX(n=3). It considered recurrence of HPT when PTH levels were higher than upper range of normal, after 6 months post surgery. persistence was defined when there was no standardization of PTH levels. In group I, 9 patients had normal parathyroid function, 7 had persistent hypoparathyroidism and had hyperparathyroidism (7 recurrences). Group II patients had parathyroid over function in 5 cases (4 persistence s), 5 were normal and 4 hypoparathyroidism. All patients of the third group had hypoparathyroidism. Long term normalization of parathyroid gland activity was achieved in one third of troduccion patients (34,1%) whereas 34,1% permanent hypoparathyroidism and 31,8% hyperparathyroidism. It found no differences in recurrence and histological subtype of parathyroid gland in the different groups. In conclusion, similar long term clinical results were obtained with the different groups. The surgical ideal treatment is controversial. We think that in the long run, the evolution of parathyroid status is mostly influenced by the persistence of uremic state rather than the type of surgery performed [es

  14. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: treatment, sequelae and follow-up.

    Lombardi, Giuseppina; Garofoli, Francesca; Stronati, Mauro

    2010-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common cause of congenital infection affecting about 1% of all the live births worldwide. Its prevalence in the developed world seems to be slightly lower, ranging between 0.6 and 0.7%. Symptoms can be detected at birth in 10-15% of the congenitally infected of which 50-90% will develop sequelae, the most frequent being sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), visual defect, psychomotor impairment, mental retardation, cerebral palsy and seizures. Eighty-five to 90% of the infected newborns are asymptomatic but 10-15% of them are equally at risk for sensorineural sequelae, like 20-30% of all the infected children. Therefore it is important a time prolonged and closer follow-up of infected children that we propose should be until 6 years of age. This should lead to an early intervention, better management and eventually even control the long-term sequelae. Infants born with symptomatic congenital infection have a worse prognosis than those with no evidence of clinical disease, and ganciclovir (GCV) intravenous 6 mg/kg every 12 h for 6 weeks is the most used therapy for symptomatic newborns. Valganciclovir (V-GCV) syrup is a pro-drug of GCV and presents high oral bioavailability. To date, it is possible to administer this drug at home, and the tolerability profile may allow for wider indications and longer treatments.

  15. Patients’ follow-up using biomechanical analysis of rehabilitation exercises

    Bruno Bonnechère

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the evolution of game controllers video games are becoming more and more popular in physical rehabilitation. The integration of serious games in rehabilitation has been tested for various pathologies. Parallel to this clinical research, a lot of studies have been done in order to validate the use of these game controllers for simple biomechanical evaluation. Currently, it is thus possible to record the motions performed by the patients during serious gaming exercises for later analysis. Therefore, data collected during the exercises could be used for monitoring the evolution of the patients during long term rehabilitation. Before using the parameters extracted from the games to assess patients’ evolution two important aspects must be verified: the reproducibility of measurement and a possible effect of learning of the task to be performed. Ten healthy adults played 9 sessions of specific games developed for rehabilitation over a 3-weeks period. Nineteen healthy children played 2 sessions to study the influence of age. Different parameters were extracted from the games: time, range of motion, reaching area. Results of this study indicates that it is possible to follow the evolution of the patients during the rehabilitation process. The majority of the learning effect occurred during the very first session. Therefore, in order to allow proper regular monitoring, the results of this first session should not be included in the follow-up of the patient.

  16. Bradykinesia in Huntington's disease. A prospective, follow-up study.

    García Ruiz, Pedro J; Hernández, Jaime; Cantarero, Susana; Bartolomé, Manuel; Sánchez Bernardos, Vicenta; García de Yébenez, Justo

    2002-04-01

    Bradykinesia is a frequent finding in Huntington's disease (HD), but some aspects are presently unknown; including the natural evolution of bradykinesia over time and the correlation between bradykinesia and functional capacity. We studied the motor performance of 20 genetically confirmed patients with HD (age: 40+/-10.8 years; age at onset 33.6+/-11 years; total functional capacity (TFC): 9.57+/-3; UHDRS total motor scale: 31.4+/-13, triplet length (CAG)n: 46.7+/-4 triplets). These patients were studied in baseline conditions and after 18.7+/-6 months of follow-up. In addition, HD patients were compared with 20 age-matched normal controls. Motor study included the four CAPIT timed tests commonly used for Parkinson's disease: pronation-supination (PS), finger dexterity (FD), movement between two points (MTP) and walking test (WT). HD patients were significantly slower than controls in all motor tasks. A significant deterioration occurred over time in three of the four motor tasks (especially FD and WT). A significant correlation between timed tests and TFC score was found (for MTP, r: -0.845; p < 0,0001). In addition a significant correlation between timed tests and the UHDRDS total motor scale was also found (for MTP, r: 0.864; p < 0.0001). In conclusion, simple timed motor tests can detect a deterioration of motor activity over time in HD. Timed tests might be useful to follow the natural evolution of HD and to assess the efficacy of new therapies.

  17. Measles vaccine: a 27-year follow-up.

    Ramsay, M E

    1994-04-01

    In 1964, the Medical Research Council undertook a trial of measles vaccine in over 36,000 United Kingdom children; 9577 of whom received live vaccine, 10,625 received inactivated followed by live vaccines, and 16,328 acted as unvaccinated controls. Participants in this study have been followed to determine the long term protection from measles vaccine and follow-up data were available on 4194, 4638 and 274 respectively. During the 5-year period 1986-90, the protective efficacy of live measles vaccine has remained high at 87%, but the 95% confidence interval was wide (-43 to 99%) due to the small numbers of cases. Between 1976 and 1990, however, the overall efficacy of the live vaccine was 92% (95% confidence interval 86 to 95%) and there was no evidence of a decline in efficacy (P = 0.13) over the 15-year period. This study suggests that the protection from live measles vaccine persists for up to 27 years after vaccination, and that no change in the current United Kingdom measles immunization policy should be made on the grounds of waning immunity.

  18. Follow-up Sonography after Sonoguided Renal Biopsy

    Kim, Hyung Soo; Park, Cheol Min; Cha, In Ho

    1996-01-01

    To assess ultrasonographic findings and clinical significance after renal biopsy. 174 cases of post-biopsy sonography were studied retrospectively. We classified post-biopsy hematoma on the basis of their size as small (thickness less than 1 cm, length less than 3cm), medium (thickness less than 1cm, length greater than 3 cm), large (thickness greater than 1 cm, length greater than 3 cm). We also compared bleeding parameters (prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time) and renal function in both cases which had hematoma or not. Total 33 hematomas were found (19%). Small hematoma was observed in 14 cases, medium hematoma in 16 cases, large hematoma in 3 cases. Severe complications requiring prompt therapy occurred in 1 case(0.6%). In 6 cases hematocrit fell by more than 4%, all of these hematomas were observed on US. Severe complications after sonoguided renal biopsy were rare. There was poor correlation between prebiopsybleeding parameter, renal function and post-biopsy hematomas. And sonography is considered as adequate method for follow up of post-biopsy hematoma

  19. Follow-up study on energy entrepreneurs; Laempoeyrittaejaet seurannassa

    Solmio, H

    1995-11-01

    Energy supplying (i.e. wood and peat fuels) is a new form of entrepreneurship in which one or more entrepreneurs attend to the supply of energy to local buildings. At present there are about ten localities where this is practised. TTS Institute is engaged in a follow-up study of a chipfired heating system with energy entrepreneurs supplying the chipped wood. The study is part of the nationwide Bioenergy research programme. The targets of the study, three in number during the 1993-94 heating season, are rural schools located in southern and eastern Finland. The primary fuel used to heat these premises is chipped wood made from small-diameter timber with light fuel oil as the supplementary fuel. The entrepreneurs supplying the chip fuel are local farmers, and they both delivered the fuel and attended to the actual heating. The time consumed in transporting the chipped wood to the heating plant and to attend to the actual heating was 0,1-1,1 h/MWh with the work associated with heating representing 0,2-0,5 h/MWh. The productivity of fuelwood harvesting in the study sites was 0,4-0,8 m{sup 3}/h and the productivity of chipping was 3,8-7,5 loose m{sup 3}/h. TTS Institute expanded the study in 1994 to also include a few premises larger in their energy requirement than those mentioned in the above

  20. Spectroscopic follow-up of the Hercules-Aquila Cloud

    Simion, Iulia T.; Belokurov, Vasily; Koposov, Sergey E.; Sheffield, Allyson; Johnston, Kathryn V.

    2018-05-01

    We designed a follow-up program to find the spectroscopic properties of the Hercules-Aquila Cloud (HAC) and test scenarios for its formation. We measured the radial velocities (RVs) of 45 RR Lyrae in the southern portion of the HAC using the facilities at the MDM observatory, producing the first large sample of velocities in the HAC. We found a double-peaked distribution in RVs, skewed slightly to negative velocities. We compared both the morphology of HAC projected on to the plane of the sky and the distribution of velocities in this structure outlined by RR Lyrae and other tracer populations at different distances to N-body simulations. We found that the behaviour is characteristic of an old, well-mixed accretion event with small apo-galactic radius. We cannot yet rule out other formation mechanisms for the HAC. However, if our interpretation is correct, HAC represents just a small portion of a much larger debris structure spread throughout the inner Galaxy whose distinct kinematic structure should be apparent in RV studies along many lines of sight.

  1. Thyroid carcinoma: A follow-up study of 11 years

    Ritzl, F.; Siebers, G.; Neumann, C.; Ritzl, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    During a follow-up of 11 years of thyroid carcinoma 136 patients were repeatedly examined. 43% papillary, 43% follicular, 11% anaplastic and 2% medullary carcinomas was found. The incidence of these types of carcinoma differed considerably; the frequency peak of papillary carcinomas was reached in 45-year-old humans, that of the follicular carcinomas in people aged 60, that of the anaplastic carcinomas in 70-year-old humans. 84% of the patients was female. Classification in pTNM-system: 8% in pT1, 27% in pT2, 12% in pT3 and 49% in pT4. Local and distant metastases were found at a low rate equally in pT1, pT2 and pT3; 26% of patients in pT4 had local metastases and 18% had distant ones in addition. There were 6 patients with metastases of a differentiated adenocarcinoma accumulating no 131-iodine and with no thyroglobulin in serum. 29% of patients had after thyroidectomy an unilateral paresis of the nervus recurrens and 4% a bilateral one. 26% of patients had a permanent hypoparathyroidism after thyroidectomy. (orig.)

  2. Thyroid carcinoma: A follow-up study of 11 years

    Ritzl, F.; Siebers, G.; Neumann, C.; Ritzl, E.K.

    1987-09-01

    During a follow-up of 11 years of thyroid carcinoma 136 patients were repeatedly examined. 43% papillary, 43% follicular, 11% anaplastic and 2% medullary carcinomas was found. The incidence of these types of carcinoma differed considerably; the frequency peak of papillary carcinomas was reached in 45-year-old humans, that of the follicular carcinomas in people aged 60, that of the anaplastic carcinomas in 70-year-old humans. 84% of the patients was female. Classification in pTNM-system: 8% in pT1, 27% in pT2, 12% in pT3 and 49% in pT4. Local and distant metastases were found at a low rate equally in pT1, pT2 and pT3; 26% of patients in pT4 had local metastases and 18% had distant ones in addition. There were 6 patients with metastases of a differentiated adenocarcinoma accumulating no 131-iodine and with no thyroglobulin in serum. 29% of patients had after thyroidectomy an unilateral paresis of the nervus recurrens and 4% a bilateral one. 26% of patients had a permanent hypoparathyroidism after thyroidectomy.

  3. WFIRST Microlensing Exoplanet Characterization with HST Follow up

    Bhattacharya, Aparna; David Bennett, Jay Anderson, J.P. Beaulieu.

    2018-01-01

    More than 50 planets are discovered with the different ground based telescopes available for microlensing. But the analysis of ground based data fails to provide a complete solution. To fulfill that gap, space based telescopes, like Hubble space telescope and Spitzer are used. My research work focuses on extracting the planet mass, host star mass, their separation and their distance in physical units from HST Follow-up observations. I will present the challenges faced in developing this method.This is the primary method to be used for NASA's top priority project (according to 2010 decadal survey) Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Exoplanet microlensing space observatory, to be launched in 2025. The unique ability of microlensing is that with WFIRST it can detect sub-earth- mass planets beyond the reach of Kepler at separation 1 AU to infinity. This will provide us the necessary statistics to study the formation and evolution of planetary systems. This will also provide us with necessary initial conditions to model the formation of planets and the habitable zones around M dwarf stars.

  4. Two Siblings Followed Up for Hereditary Multiple Exostoses

    Meltem Erol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary multiple exostoses is an autosomal dominant disease with abnormal bone formation especially at the long bones. Osteochondromas, which occur in the course of the disease, can cause growth disturbances in affected children. Due to pressure effects of osteochondromas, compression of vessels, nerves and tendons, restriction of joint motion, and neurologic compromise as well as painful local symptoms can be seen. Here, we aimed to present two siblings who had generalized pain and swelling in different parts of the body. We detected multiple osteochondromas in different parts of their bodies, especially at the long bones. Our patients had painful local symptoms. There was no growth retardation, but the presence of many osteochondromas led us to contemplate that it was serious form of the disease. Their father had lesser number of osteochondromas. In this paper, we aimed to emphasize the necessity of close follow-up for the risk of malignant transformation of osteochondromas. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 116-9

  5. Follow-up measles campaign in the Dominican Republic.

    1998-12-01

    The Dominican Republic conducted a national follow-up measles vaccination campaign 6 weeks after sustaining heavy damage from Hurricane Georges, on November 6-12, targeting 830,517 children aged 9 months to 5 years in 29 provinces and the capital city. This campaign was the first mass vaccination effort in the country, following the beginning of the decentralized delivery of health services. Priority was given to vaccinating against diphtheria, whooping cough, and tetanus, especially in refugee camps. More than 500,000 vaccines were given to different age groups, with almost 100,000 of those immunized under 5 years old. Children aged 9 months to 5 years were targeted for immunization regardless of their vaccination status. At the same time, children aged 2 months through 2 years were immunized against poliomyelitis. Vaccination activities were continued until the entire target population was reached and no important side effects have thus far been reported. The government of Mexico donated 300,000 doses of measles vaccine, while other vaccines for the campaign were acquired through the PAHO Revolving Fund for Vaccine Procurement. The decentralized implementation of this campaign allowed the population to actively participate and the resulting high vaccination coverage rates.

  6. Follow-up of obstructive sleep apnea in children.

    Barros, Emília Leite de; Pradella-Hallinan, Marcia; Moreira, Gustavo Antonio; Stefanini, Daniele de Oliveira Soares; Tufik, Sergio; Fujita, Reginaldo Raimundo

    2014-01-01

    the evolution of snoring and OSAS in children is not well established since few studies of patients without surgical treatment have been published. to evaluate the evolution of sleep disordered breathing in children who had not been submitted to upper airway surgery. twenty-six children with snoring who had not undergone upper airway surgery were evaluated prospectively. Patients were evaluated by full physical examination and nocturnal polysomnography, after which they were divided into 2 groups: apnea (16 children) and snoring (10 children). After 6 months following the initial evaluation, patients were submitted to a new nocturnal polysomnography, and all data were compared to those of the first examination. the groups did not show any differences regarding age, weight, height and airway physical examination. After 6 months of follow-up, the apnea index did not change, but the respiratory disturbance index increased in the snoring group and the number of hypopneas decreased in the group apnea. there was an increase in the percentage of N1 sleep stage and the respiratory disturbance index in the patients with primary snore. The AHI did not show significant alteration in both groups, but the number of hypopneas decreased in patients with SAOS. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Follow-up of obstructive sleep apnea in children

    Emília Leite de Barros

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: the evolution of snoring and OSAS in children is not well established since few studies of patients without surgical treatment have been published. OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the evolution of sleep disordered breathing in children who had not been submitted to upper airway surgery. METHOD: twenty-six children with snoring who had not undergone upper airway surgery were evaluated prospectively. Patients were evaluated by full physical examination and nocturnal polysomnography, after which they were divided into 2 groups: apnea (16 children and snoring (10 children. After 6 months following the initial evaluation, patients were submitted to a new nocturnal polysomnography, and all data were compared to those of the first examination. RESULTS: the groups did not show any differences regarding age, weight, height and airway physical examination. After 6 months of follow-up, the apnea index did not change, but the respiratory disturbance index increased in the snoring group and the number of hypopneas decreased in the group apnea. CONCLUSION: there was an increase in the percentage of N1 sleep stage and the respiratory disturbance index in the patients with primary snore. The AHI did not show significant alteration in both groups, but the number of hypopneas decreased in patients with SAOS.

  8. The Effect of Auditor Quality on the Follow-Up of Audit Recommendation

    Dyah Setyaningrum; Lindawati Gani; Dwi Martani; Cris Kuntadi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure auditor quality of The Audit Board of the Republic of Indonesia (BPK) and investigates the effect of auditor quality on the follow-up of audit recommendation. This study uses sample of local government financial statements in Indonesia from 2010-2012. Using principle component analysis method, the result shows that there are four components extracted that form auditor quality which is experience, training, motivation, and education. All four components ...

  9. Follow-Up Study of Behavioral Development and Parenting Stress Profiles in Children with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Mei-Chyn Chao; Pinchen Yang; Hsiu-Yi Hsu; Yuh-Jyh Jong

    2009-01-01

    Recent longitudinal experiences have emphasized that the follow-up of children with treated congenital hypothyroidism (CHT) should not be limited to the cognitive domain. This study attempted to evaluate the emotional–behavioral profiles in children with CHT together with maternal parenting stress profiles. Data for child and family characteristics were collected from 47 families with a 3–12-year-old CHT child diagnosed and treated since the newborn period. Cognitive assessments were performe...

  10. Identifying Pertinent Variables for Nonresponse Follow-Up Surveys. Lessons Learned from 4 Cases in Switzerland

    Caroline Vandenplas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available All social surveys suffer from different types of errors, of which one of the most studied is non-response bias. Non-response bias is a systematic error that occurs because individuals differ in their accessibility and propensity to participate in a survey according to their own characteristics as well as those from the survey itself. The extent of the problem heavily depends on the correlation between response mechanisms and key survey variables. However, non-response bias is difficult to measure or to correct for due to the lack of relevant data about the whole target population or sample. In this paper, non-response follow-up surveys are considered as a possible source of information about non-respondents. Non-response follow-ups, however, suffer from two methodological issues: they themselves operate through a response mechanism that can cause potential non-response bias, and they pose a problem of comparability of measure, mostly because the survey design differs between main survey and non-response follow-up. In order to detect possible bias, the survey variables included in non-response surveys have to be related to the mechanism of participation, but not be sensitive to measurement effects due to the different designs. Based on accumulated experience of four similar non-response follow-ups, we studied the survey variables that fulfill these conditions. We differentiated socio-demographic variables that are measurement-invariant but have a lower correlation with non-response and variables that measure attitudes, such as trust, social participation, or integration in the public sphere, which are more sensitive to measurement effects but potentially more appropriate to account for the non-response mechanism. Our results show that education level, work status, and living alone, as well as political interest, satisfaction with democracy, and trust in institutions are pertinent variables to include in non-response follow-ups of general social

  11. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up

    Raquel Marques

    2015-12-01

    electrodes (SPCEs were used as the transducers. These SPCEs (working volume: ~40 μL are widely employed in the construction of electrochemical (biosensors because of several reasons: simplicity and low cost, versatility of design, small dimensions and possibility of incorporation in portable systems, as well as adequate electroanalytical characteristics. These SPCEs were modified with gold nanoparticles (nAu through the electrochemical deposition of ionic gold from a solution. The developed sensors were applied to the analysis of the selected biomarkers in spiked human serum samples.Besides these immunosensors, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP sensor was developed for the analysis of HER2-ECD. In this case a gold electrode was used as the transducer. The MIP was formed by surface imprinting and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltammetry were used for detection purposes.Results: For the immunoassays the following parameters were optimized: capture and detection antibody concentration, surface blocking, reaction mixtures and incubation times. The best limits of detection obtained were below the established cut-off values (25 U/mL and 15 ng/mL for CA15-3 and HER2-ECD, respectively. For the MIP sensor the most adequate polymer was chosen and the electropolymerization, template removal, and incubation conditions were optimized. The lowest HER2-ECD concentration that was analyzed was 50 µg/mL.Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that the developed sensors could be promising tools in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. However, further studies should be conducted using patients' samples and the results of these assays should be validated with the established analysis procedures for these cancer biomarkers.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Marques R, Pacheco J, Rama EC, Viswanathan S, Nouws H, Delerue-Matos C. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34012.[This

  12. Clinical 3-year follow-up of uterine fibroid embolization

    Radeleff, B.A.; Satzl, S.; Eiers, M.; Fechtner, K.; Hakim, A.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Richter, G.M.; Rimbach, S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term success of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in patients with symptomatic fibroids using spherical particles (Embosphere). Materials and Methods: 34 consecutive patients treated with UAE were initially enrolled in the study which had the following study goals (1) 1-year follow-up MRI evaluation of the fibroid behavior and (2) clinical long-term success due to standardized assessment of the main fibroid-related symptoms (hypermenorrhoea, dysmenorrhoea and dysuria) of the patients' individual overall health status and their therapy satisfaction at 1-year, 2- year and 3-year intervals after UAE. Results: Technical success was achieved in all procedures. Four patients had to be excluded from the long-term evaluation schedule: one because of a hysterectomy due to bleeding after 6 weeks, 3 patients were not available for the designated minimum follow-up interval. The preinterventional severe hypermenorrhoea (n = 27) with a score of 4.4 ± 0.7 (5 = extreme menstrual bleeding) decreased after one year to 2.1 ± 0.5 (p = 0.0001), after two years to 1.7 ± 0.5 (p = 0.0042) and after three years to 1.3 ± 0.6 (p = 0.0001). The preinterventional dysmenorrhoea (n = 15) with a score of 3.1 ± 1.5 (3 = distinctly increased dysmenorrhoea) decreased after one year to 1.1 ± 0.3 (p = 0.0001), after two years to 1.2 ± 0.2 and after three years to 1.2 ± 0.4 (p = 0.148). The pretreatment dysuria (n = 12) with a preinterventional score of 3.1 ± 1.5 (3 = distinctly increased dysuria) decreased after one year to 1.1 ± 0.3 (p 0.0069) and remained after two years at 1.1 ± 0.2 and after three years at 1.2 ± 0.4 (p = 0.905). The initial overall health status was 54.7 ± 20.1 (maximal value 100). After one year it rose to 90.5 ± 15.4 (p = 0.0001), was 91.8 ± 5.6 after two years and was 91.3 ± 8.5 (p = 0.8578) after three years. The satisfaction with the therapy was 2.9 ± 0.2 after one year, 2.6 ± 0.3 after two

  13. Postpartum follow-up: can psychosocial support reduce newborn readmissions?

    Barilla, Dora; Marshak, Helen Hopp; Anderson, S Eric; Hopp, Joyce W

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether there was a relationship between postpartum psychosocial support from healthcare providers and the rate of normal newborn readmissions (NNRs), and whether there was a cost benefit to justify an intervention. Data were abstracted for all normal newborn births from 1999 to 2006 (N = 14,786) at a community hospital in southern California at three different time periods: (1) at baseline prior to any intervention (1999-2000), (2) the 4 years during the comprehensive psychosocial support intervention (2001-2004), and (3) the 2 years during a limited psychosocial support intervention (2004-2006). A cost-benefit analysis was performed to analyze whether the financial benefits from the intervention matched or exceeded the costs for NNRs. There was a significantly lower readmission rate of 1.0% (p = < .001) during the comprehensive intervention time period compared to baseline (2.3%) or to the limited intervention time period (2.3%). Although there was no significant difference in the average cost per newborn readmitted across the three study time periods, during the comprehensive intervention time period the average costs of a NNR were significantly lower ($4,180, p = .041) for the intervention group compared to those who received no intervention ($5,338). There was a cost benefit of 513,540 dollars due to fewer readmissions during the comprehensive time period, but it did not exceed the cost of the intervention. Providing comprehensive follow-up for new mothers in the postpartum period can reduce NNRs, thus lowering the average newborn readmission costs for those who receive psychosocial support. Followup for new mothers should be an accepted norm rather than the exception in postpartum care, but NNRs should not be considered the sole outcome in such programs.

  14. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    Dumas, J.L.; Visy, J.M.; Belin, C.; Gaston, A.; Goldlust, D.; Dumas, M.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. PNH revisited: Clinical profile, laboratory diagnosis and follow-up

    Gupta P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is characterized by intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, nocturnal hemoglobinuria and thrombophila. This acquired disease caused by a deficiency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins on the hematopoietic cells is uncommon in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year were collected. Clinical data (age, gender, various presenting symptoms, treatment information and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results of relevant diagnostic tests were documented i.e., urine analysis, Ham′s test, sucrose lysis test and sephacryl gel card test (GCT for CD55 and CD59. Results: A total of 5 patients were diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year. Presenting symptoms were hemolytic anemia (n=4 and bone marrow failure (n=1. A GCT detected CD59 deficiency in all erythrocytes in 4 patients and CD55 deficiency in 2 patients. A weak positive PNH test for CD59 was seen in 1 patient and a weak positive PNH test for CD55 was seen in 3 patients. All patients were negative by sucrose lysis test. Ham′s test was positive in two cases. Patients were treated with prednisolone and/or androgen and 1 patient with aplastic anemia was also given antithymocyte globulin. A total of 4 patients responded with a partial recovery of hematopoiesis and 1 patient showed no recovery. None of the patients received a bone marrow transplant. Conclusion: The study highlights the diagnostic methods and treatment protocols undertaken to evaluate the PNH clone in a developing country where advanced methods like flowcytometry immunophenotyping (FCMI and bone marrow transplants are not routinely available.

  16. Tracking the follow-up of work in progress papers.

    Mubin, Omar; Arsalan, Mudassar; Al Mahmud, Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    Academic conferences offer numerous submission tracks to support the inclusion of a variety of researchers and topics. Work in progress papers are one such submission type where authors present preliminary results in a poster session. They have recently gained popularity in the area of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) as a relatively easier pathway to attending the conference due to their higher acceptance rate as compared to the main tracks. However, it is not clear if these work in progress papers are further extended or transitioned into more complete and thorough full papers or are simply one-off pieces of research. In order to answer this we explore self-citation patterns of four work in progress editions in two popular HCI conferences (CHI2010, CHI2011, HRI2010 and HRI2011). Our results show that almost 50% of the work in progress papers do not have any self-citations and approximately only half of the self-citations can be considered as true extensions of the original work in progress paper. Specific conferences dominate as the preferred venue where extensions of these work in progress papers are published. Furthermore, the rate of self-citations peaks in the immediate year after publication and gradually tails off. By tracing author publication records, we also delve into possible reasons of work in progress papers not being cited in follow up publications. In conclusion, we speculate on the main trends observed and what they may mean looking ahead for the work in progress track of premier HCI conferences.

  17. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    Dumas, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France)]|[Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France); Visy, J.M. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Belin, C. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Gaston, A. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Goldlust, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Dumas, M. [Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France)

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. [Endoscopic follow-up of translaryngeal Fantoni tracheostomy].

    Succo, G; Crosetti, E; Mattalia, P; Voltolina, M; Bramardi, F; Di Lisi, D; Riva, F; Sartoris, A

    2002-08-01

    Dilatational tracheotomy techniques are widely used in the long-term management of the respiratory tract in patients in intensive care units (ICU). The translaryngeal tracheotomy technique (TLT) was first described by Fantoni in 1993 and rapidly asserted itself, especially in Europe. This technique basically differs from the other percutaneous techniques in that it involves a progressive, retrograde, dilatation of the trachea in a single session conducted from inside the trachea, working outward, simultaneously exerting a counter-pressure on the pre-tracheal soft tissues with the fingers. The present study involves an endoscopy follow-up of 130 patients who had undergone TLT at the Intensive Care Unit of our Hospital between November 2000 and May 2001. The pre-operative oro-tracheal intubation time varied from 1 to 42 days. All patients filled out a brief questionnaire containing validated questions on their general health and quality of life with particular attention focused on respiratory conditions. Then, after receiving informed consent, the patients underwent laryngo-tracheoscopy with local anesthetic using a flexible tracheobronchoscope. All tests were recorded and viewed later by two operators in order to identify and divide the patients according to the level of execution of the tracheotomy and the presence of sequelae. The results obtained have shown that, like other percutaneous tracheotomy techniques, TLT provides some benefits including the fact that procedure can be performed at the bedside in a short time, with few post-operative complications, simpler nursing and fewer sequelae in time. Analysis of data concerning time of tracheostomy execution, tracheal level of stomia and nursing times has revealed three factors that determine severe sequelae: delay in tracheostomy execution, high level of execution with cricoid involvement and onset of problems during first tracheal cannula change.

  19. Long-term follow-up study and long-term care of childhood cancer survivors

    Hyeon Jin Park

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of long-term survivors is increasing in the western countries due to remarkable improvements in the treatment of childhood cancer. The long-term complications of childhood cancer survivors in these countries were brought to light by the childhood cancer survivor studies. In Korea, the 5-year survival rate of childhood cancer patients is approaching 70%; therefore, it is extremely important to undertake similar long-term follow-up studies and comprehensive long-term care for our population. On the basis of the experiences of childhood cancer survivorship care of the western countries and the current Korean status of childhood cancer survivors, long-term follow-up study and long-term care systems need to be established in Korea in the near future. This system might contribute to the improvement of the quality of life of childhood cancer survivors through effective intervention strategies.

  20. Risk-adapted treatment and follow-up management in childhood-onset craniopharyngioma.

    Müller, Hermann L

    2016-05-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are rare embryonic malformations of the sellar/parasellar region with low histological grade. Here, we review findings on the diagnosis, treatment, clinical course, follow-up, and prognosis of craniopharyngioma patients. Clinical manifestations develop from increased intracranial pressure, anterior visual pathway damage, and hypothalamic/pituitary deficiencies. If the tumor is favorably localized (no anatomical involvement with the hypothalamic and optical structures) therapy of choice is complete resection, meticulously performed to preserve hypothalamic and optic functions. In patients with unfavorable tumor involvement, optimal therapy is limited hypothalamus-sparing surgical strategy, followed by judicious irradiation dosage to minimize recurrences and progression. Surgical lesions and/or anatomical involvement of posterior hypothalamic areas result in serious sequelae, mainly hypothalamic syndrome. Craniopharyngioma is a chronic disease and must be managed as such, providing ongoing care of pediatric and adult patients by experienced multidisciplinary teams in the context of multicenter trials.

  1. Selection ofmedical students - a follow-up study

    1990-09-15

    Sep 15, 1990 ... women and applicants with university experience increased. Students who ... can take leave of absence to pursue, for a year, other interests. Students who take ... years of university education 2t the time of admission. Only 97.

  2. XMM FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF THREE SWIFT BAT-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Trippe, M. L.; Reynolds, C. S.; Koss, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Winter, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton observations of three active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken as part of a hunt to find very heavily obscured Compton-thick AGNs. For obscuring columns greater than 10 25 cm -2 , AGNs are only visible at energies below 10 keV via reflected/scattered radiation, characterized by a flat power law. We therefore selected three objects (ESO 417-G006, IRAS 05218-1212, and MCG -01-05-047) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray survey catalog with Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) 0.5-10 keV spectra with flat power-law indices as candidate Compton-thick sources for follow-up observations with the more sensitive instruments on XMM-Newton. The XMM spectra, however, rule out reflection-dominated models based on the weakness of the observed Fe Kα lines. Instead, the spectra are well fit by a model of a power-law continuum obscured by a Compton-thin absorber plus a soft excess. This result is consistent with previous follow-up observations of two other flat-spectrum BAT-detected AGNs. Thus, out of the six AGNs in the 22 month BAT catalog with apparently flat Swift XRT spectra, all five that have had follow-up observations are not likely Compton thick. We also present new optical spectra of two of these objects, IRAS 05218-1212 and MCG -01-05-047. Interestingly, though both the AGNs have similar X-ray spectra, their optical spectra are completely different, adding evidence against the simplest form of the geometric unified model of AGNs. IRAS 05218-1212 appears in the optical as a Seyfert 1, despite the ∼8.5 x 10 22 cm -2 line-of-sight absorbing column indicated by its X-ray spectrum. MCG -01-05-047's optical spectrum shows no sign of AGN activity; it appears as a normal galaxy.

  3. Are Breast Cancer Molecular Classes Predictive of Survival in Patients with Long Follow-Up?

    Danae Pracella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the clinical outcomes of 305 breast cancer (BC patients, aged 55 years or younger, with long follow-up and according to intrinsic subtypes. The cohort included 151 lymph node negative (LN− and 154 lymph node positive (LN+ patients. Luminal A tumors were mainly LN−, well differentiated, and of stage I; among them AR was an indicator of good prognosis. Luminal B and HER2 positive nonluminal cancers showed higher tumor grade and nodal metastases as well as higher proliferation status and stage. Among luminal tumors, those PR positive and vimentin negative showed a longer survival. HER2-positive nonluminal and TN patients showed a poorer outcome, with BC-specific death mostly occurring within 5 and 10 years. Only luminal tumor patients underwent BC death over 10 years. When patients were divided in to LN− and LN+ no differences in survival were observed in the luminal subgroups. LN− patients have good survival even after 20 years of follow-up (about 75%, while for LN+ patients survival at 20 years (around 40% was comparable to HER2-positive nonluminal and TN groups. In conclusion, in our experience ER-positive breast tumors are better divided by classical clinical stage than molecular classification, and they need longer clinical follow-up especially in cases with lymph node involvement.

  4. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A Long Term Follow-up Shows Benefit with Risk Factor Reduction

    Koroush Khalighi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Only sparse data was available on long-term of Takotusbo Cardiomyopathy (TC. Previous studies suggested prognosis is not necessarily benign. We report the long-term follow-up of 12 TC patients actively managed with risk factor reduction. Retrospective analysis of all patients diagnosed with TC at our hospital between 1998 and 2010. We identified 12 patients with TC among 1651 cases of emergent left heart catheterization over 12 years. Mean follow-up time was 8.3 ± 3.6 years. All were female, 87% had hypertension, 25% had history of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD, 67% had hyperlipidemia, 44% had some preceding emotional trauma, and 44% had some physical/physiological stress. Previous studies have shown that over 50% of TC patients experience future cardiac events, and 10% have a recurrence of TC. Patients were prescribed therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLC and guideline directed medical therapy (GDMT for aggressive risk factor reduction. TLC included diet, exercise, and cardiac rehabilitation. GDMT often included aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE-inhibitors, and statins. Follow-up echocardiograms showed recovery and maintenance of the ejection fraction. There was no cardiac mortality and no recurrences of TC. Aggressive risk factor reduction with TLC and GDMT may be effective in improving the long term outcomes of patients with TC.

  5. Laparoscopic splenectomy in pediatric age: long-term follow-up.

    Ates, Ufuk; Tastekin, Nil Y; Gollu, Gulnur; Ergun, Ergun; Yagmurlu, Aydin

    2017-12-01

    In the last century, with the advancement of the diagnostic procedures, hematologic disorders in pediatric age group have been increased dramatically. In parallel with this increase, splenectomy procedures have also been popularized with different techniques and surgical outcomes. Laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) in the pediatric age group is generally accepted as a technically demanding procedure, which needs experience. The purpose of this study is to present the long-term follow-up results of a case series of children who underwent LS for a variety of hematologic disorders, evaluate possible complications and outcomes. All patients who were admitted to the clinic and who were scheduled for LS from 2005 to 2016 were considered for this study. The study parameters were grouped in four categories including socio-demographic data, preoperative evaluation, clinical follow-up and complications. There were 24 male (48.9%) and 25 (51.1%) female patients. The median age and body weight for the study group was 12 years and 35 kg. Most common indications for LS were thalassemia (13; 26.5%) and hereditary spherocytosis (12; 24.4%). As a technical standpoint, 2 patients (4%) underwent singleport LS surgery. The mean time for LS surgeries was found as 80 minutes. The total intraoperative complication rate was 4% (2/57). The mean time for hospital stay was 5 days. Mean follow-up period was 6.4 years (range: 6 months-16 years). There was no long-term complication. Bilirubin levels and need for blood transfusion significantly decreased in the long term follow-up period (p <0.05). LS is a powerful tool in the hands of an experienced surgeon. It's a safe and effective procedure in children with hematologic disorders resulting in shorter length of stay and lower complication rates. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría

  6. Polyurethane-Coated Breast Implants Revisited: A 30-Year Follow-Up

    Nikki Castel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPolyurethane coating of breast implants has been shown to reduce capsular contracture in short-term follow-up studies. This 30-year study is the longest examination of the use of polyurethane-coated implants and their correlation with capsular contracture.MethodsThis study evaluates the senior surgeon's (F.D.P. experience with the use of polyurethane-coated implants in aesthetic breast augmentation in 382 patients over 30 years. Follow-up evaluations were conducted for six months after surgery. After the six-month follow-up period, 76 patients returned for reoperation. The gross findings, histology, and associated capsular contracture were noted at the time of explantation.ResultsNo patient during the six-month follow-up period demonstrated capsular contracture. For those who underwent reoperation for capsular contracture, Baker II/III contractures were noted nine to 10 years after surgery and Baker IV contractures were noted 12 to 21 years after surgery. None of the explanted implants had macroscopic evidence of polyurethane, which was only found during the first five years after surgery. The microscopic presence of polyurethane was noted in all capsules up to 30 years after the original operation.ConclusionsAn inverse correlation was found between the amount of polyurethane coating on the implant and the occurrence of capsular contracture. Increasingly severe capsular contracture was associated with a decreased amount of polyurethane coating on the surface of the implants. No contracture occurred in patients whose implants showed incomplete biodegradation of polyurethane, as indicated by the visible presence of polyurethane coating. We recommend research to find a non-toxic, non-biodegradable synthetic material as an alternative to polyurethane.

  7. Comparing the effects of education using telephone follow-up and smartphone-based social networking follow-up on self-management behaviors among patients with hypertension.

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Sharifian, Sanaz; Nasr Isfahani, Mehdi; Haghani, Hamid

    2018-03-05

    Little is known about the benefits of social networks in the management of patients. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of self-management (SM) education using telephone follow-up and mobile phone-based social networking on SM behaviors among patients with hypertension. This randomized clinical trial was conducted with 100 patients. They were randomly allocated to four groups: (i) control, (ii) SM training without follow-up, (iii) telephone follow-up and (iv) smartphone-based social networking follow-up. The hypertension SM behavior questionnaire was used for data collection before and six weeks after the study. Those patients who underwent SM education training (with and without follow-up) had statistically significant differences from those in the control group in terms of SM behaviors (p social networking follow-up influenced SM behaviors among patients with hypertension.

  8. Follow Up of GW170817 and Its Electromagnetic Counterpart by Australian-Led Observing Programmes

    Andreoni, I.; Ackley, K.; Cooke, J.; Acharyya, A.; Allison, J. R.; Anderson, G. E.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Baade, D.; Bailes, M.; Bannister, K.; Beardsley, A.; Bessell, M. S.; Bian, F.; Bland, P. A.; Boer, M.; Booler, T.; Brandeker, A.; Brown, I. S.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Chang, S.-W.; Coward, D. M.; Crawford, S.; Crisp, H.; Crosse, B.; Cucchiara, A.; Cupák, M.; de Gois, J. S.; Deller, A.; Devillepoix, H. A. R.; Dobie, D.; Elmer, E.; Emrich, D.; Farah, W.; Farrell, T. J.; Franzen, T.; Gaensler, B. M.; Galloway, D. K.; Gendre, B.; Giblin, T.; Goobar, A.; Green, J.; Hancock, P. J.; Hartig, B. A. D.; Howell, E. J.; Horsley, L.; Hotan, A.; Howie, R. M.; Hu, L.; Hu, Y.; James, C. W.; Johnston, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasliwal, M.; Keane, E. F.; Kenney, D.; Klotz, A.; Lau, R.; Laugier, R.; Lenc, E.; Li, X.; Liang, E.; Lidman, C.; Luvaul, L. C.; Lynch, C.; Ma, B.; Macpherson, D.; Mao, J.; McClelland, D. E.; McCully, C.; Möller, A.; Morales, M. F.; Morris, D.; Murphy, T.; Noysena, K.; Onken, C. A.; Orange, N. B.; Osłowski, S.; Pallot, D.; Paxman, J.; Potter, S. B.; Pritchard, T.; Raja, W.; Ridden-Harper, R.; Romero-Colmenero, E.; Sadler, E. M.; Sansom, E. K.; Scalzo, R. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Scott, S. M.; Seghouani, N.; Shang, Z.; Shannon, R. M.; Shao, L.; Shara, M. M.; Sharp, R.; Sokolowski, M.; Sollerman, J.; Staff, J.; Steele, K.; Sun, T.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Tao, C.; Tingay, S.; Towner, M. C.; Thierry, P.; Trott, C.; Tucker, B. E.; Väisänen, P.; Krishnan, V. Venkatraman; Walker, M.; Wang, L.; Wang, X.; Wayth, R.; Whiting, M.; Williams, A.; Williams, T.; Wolf, C.; Wu, C.; Wu, X.; Yang, J.; Yuan, X.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, J.; Zovaro, H.

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave signal has generated follow-up observations by over 50 facilities world-wide, ushering in the new era of multi-messenger astronomy. In this paper, we present follow-up observations of the gravitational wave event GW170817 and its electromagnetic counterpart SSS17a/DLT17ck (IAU label AT2017gfo) by 14 Australian telescopes and partner observatories as part of Australian-based and Australian-led research programs. We report early- to late-time multi-wavelength observations, including optical imaging and spectroscopy, mid-infrared imaging, radio imaging, and searches for fast radio bursts. Our optical spectra reveal that the transient source emission cooled from approximately 6 400 K to 2 100 K over a 7-d period and produced no significant optical emission lines. The spectral profiles, cooling rate, and photometric light curves are consistent with the expected outburst and subsequent processes of a binary neutron star merger. Star formation in the host galaxy probably ceased at least a Gyr ago, although there is evidence for a galaxy merger. Binary pulsars with short (100 Myr) decay times are therefore unlikely progenitors, but pulsars like PSR B1534+12 with its 2.7 Gyr coalescence time could produce such a merger. The displacement ( 2.2 kpc) of the binary star system from the centre of the main galaxy is not unusual for stars in the host galaxy or stars originating in the merging galaxy, and therefore any constraints on the kick velocity imparted to the progenitor are poor.

  9. Single-step transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy in myopia and astigmatism: 18-month follow-up.

    Adib-Moghaddam, Soheil; Soleyman-Jahi, Saeed; Salmanian, Bahram; Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Adili-Aghdam, Fatemeh; Noorizadeh, Farsad; Eslani, Medi

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the long-term quantitative and qualitative optical outcomes of 1-step transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) to correct myopia and astigmatism. Bina Eye Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Prospective interventional case series. Eyes with myopia with or without astigmatism were evaluated. One-step transepithelial PRK was performed with an aberration-free aspheric optimized profile and the Amaris 500 laser. Eighteen-month follow-up results for refraction, visual acuities, vector analysis, higher-order aberrations, contrast sensitivity, postoperative pain, and haze grade were assessed. The study enrolled 146 eyes (74 patients). At the end of follow-up, 93.84% of eyes had an uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/20 or better and 97.94% of eyes were within ±0.5 diopter of the targeted spherical refraction. On vector analysis, the mean correction index value was close to 1 and the mean index of success and magnitude of error values were close to 0. The achieved correction vector was on an axis counterclockwise to the axis of the intended correction. Photopic and mesopic contrast sensitivities and ocular and corneal spherical, cylindrical, and corneal coma aberrations significantly improved (all P < .001). A slight amount of trefoil aberration was induced (P < .001, ocular aberration; P < .01, corneal aberration). No eye lost more than 1 line of corrected distance visual acuity. No eye had a haze grade of 2+ degrees or higher throughout the follow-up. Eighteen-month results indicate the efficacy and safety of transepithelial PRK to correct myopia and astigmatism. It improved refraction and quality of vision. None of the authors has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diagnostics, Treatment, and Follow-Up in Craniopharyngioma

    Müller, Hermann L.

    2011-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are partly cystic embryogenic malformations of the sellar and parasellar region, with up to half the 0.5–2.0 new cases per million population per year occur in children and adolescents. Diagnosis profile for pediatric and adult craniopharyngioma is characterized by a combination of headache, visual impairment, and polyuria/polydipsia, which can also include significant weight gain. In children, growth retardation, and/or premature puberty often occur later or postoperatively. Recommended therapy with favorable tumor localization is complete resection; with unfavorable tumor localization (optic nerve and/or hypothalamic involvement), consensus is still pending whether a limited resection followed by local irradiation is more prudent. Even though overall survival rates are high (92%), recurrences after complete resection and progressions after incomplete resection can be expected. Accordingly, a randomized multinational trial (KRANIOPHARYNGEOM 2007) has been established to identify optimal diagnosis, treatment (particularly the ideal time point of irradiation after incomplete resection), and quality of life strategies of this chronic disease – most notably the morbid hypothalamic obesity in ∼50% of long-term survivors. We report on craniopharyngioma origins, its pathological manifestations, and specific challenges these sequelae pose regarding diagnosis, treatment, and life-long multi-discipline quality of life management for both adult and childhood craniopharyngioma patients. PMID:22654824

  11. Diagnostics, treatment, and follow-up in craniopharyngioma

    Hermann L. Müller

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Craniopharyngiomas (CP are partly cystic embryogenic malformations of the sellar and parasellar region. With an overall incidence of 0.5 to 2.0 new cases / million population / year, approximately 30 to 50% of all cases represent childhood CP. Typical manifestations at diagnosis are headache, visual impairment, polyuria/polydypsia, growth retardation, and significant weight gain. Therapy of choice in patients with favorable tumor localization is complete resection with the intention to maintain optical nerve and hypothalamic-pituitary functions. In patients with unfavorable tumor localization (hypothalamic involvement, a limited resection followed by local irradiation is recommended. The overall survival rates are high (92%. Recurrences after complete resection and progressions of residual tumor after incomplete resection are frequent post-surgical events. Accordingly, the appropriate time point of irradiation after incomplete resection is currently under investigation in a randomized multinational trial (KRANIOPHARYNGEOM 2007. Quality of life is substantially reduced in approximately 50% of long-term survivors due to sequelae, notably morbid hypothalamic obesity. Both, childhood CP and adult onset CP should be recognized as chronic diseases requiring constant monitoring of the consequences and appropriate medical resources for treatment in order to provide optimal quality of survival for patients.

  12. Hyperphosphatasia with massive osteoectasia: a 45-year follow-up

    McCarthy, E.F. [Division of Surgical Pathology, Department of Pathology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sack, G.H. [Department of Internal Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Hyperphosphatasia is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a generalized skeletal disease and increased alkaline phosphatase. Increased bone remodeling secondary to increased osteoclastic activity appears to be the underlying feature of these disorders. These disorders include juvenile Paget's disease, expansile skeletal hyperphosphatasia, hyperostosis generalisata with striations, and Camurati-Engelmann's disease, type II. The genetic mutations for a number of these disorders have been identified. We present a patient with congenital hyperphosphatasia whose clinical and radiographic features were somewhat different from these other well-defined syndromes. The patient was followed for 45 years until his death of at age 49. The patient had massive osteoectasia with dense striations involving the entire shaft of his long bones. His spine, pelvis, short tubular bones, and calvarium were also involved. He suffered hearing loss and optic atrophy, but he kept his teeth throughout his life. He was tall with a marfanoid habitus, and he had hypogonadism and hypothyroidism. There was no evidence of mental retardation, and other laboratory studies where within normal limits. This case, as well as other manifestations of hyperphosphatasia, attests to the complexity of the bone remodeling system. (orig.)

  13. Barriers to follow-up for pediatric cataract surgery in Maharashtra, India: How regular follow-up is important for good outcome. The Miraj Pediatric Cataract Study II

    Parikshit Gogate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular follow up and amblyopia treatment are essential for good outcomes after pediatric cataract surgery. Aim: To study the regularity of follow-up after cataract surgery in children and to gauge the causes of poor compliance to follow up. Subjects: 262 children (393 cataracts who underwent cataract surgery in 2004-8. Materials and Methods: The children were identified and examined in their homes and a "barriers to follow-up" questionnaire completed. Demographic data collected, visual acuity estimated, and ocular examination performed. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 19. Results: Of the 262 children, only 53 (20.6% had been regularly following up with any hospital, 209 (79.4% had not. A total of 150 (57.3% were boys and the average age was 13.23 years (Std Dev 5 yrs. Poor follow up was associated with the older age group ( P 1 line with regular follow-up. Conclusion: Regular follow-up is important and improves vision; eye care practitioners need to take special efforts to ensure better follow-up.

  14. Localization and Broadband Follow-up of the Gravitational-wave Transient GW150914

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F.; Pérez del Pulgar, C.; Castillo-Carrión, S.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Hudec, R.; Caballero-García, M. D.; Páta, P.; Vitek, S.; Adame, J. A.; Konig, S.; Rendón, F.; Mateo Sanguino, T. de J.; Fernández-Muñoz, R.; Yock, P. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Allen, W. H.; Querel, R.; Jeong, S.; Park, I. H.; Bai, J.; Cui, Ch.; Fan, Y.; Wang, Ch.; Hiriart, D.; Lee, W. H.; Claret, A.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Pandey, S. B.; Mediavilla, T.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; BOOTES Collaboration; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Berger, E.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.-F.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D. B.; Frieman, J.; Fryer, C. L.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Herner, K.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Johnson, M. D.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A. G.; Kind, M. C.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Martini, P.; Matheson, T.; Melchior, P.; Metzger, B. D.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Quataert, E.; Roe, N.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A. C.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, N.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration; Dark Energy Camera GW-EM Collaboration; Connaughton, V.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Zhang, B.-B.; Hui, C. M.; Jenke, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Giles, M. M.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kippen, R. M.; McBreen, S.; Mailyan, B.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Roberts, O.; Sparke, L.; Stanbro, M.; Toelge, K.; Veres, P.; Yu, H.-F.; Blackburn, L.; Fermi GBM Collaboration; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Domínguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Salvetti, D.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venters, T. M.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zhu, S.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Brocato, E.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; Grado, A.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L. A.; Capaccioli, M.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Giuffrida, G.; Iannicola, G.; Limatola, L.; Lisi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Pulone, L.; Rossi, A.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Tomasella, L.; Yang, S.; GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm (GRAWITA); Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Ferrigno, C.; Hanlon, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Laurent, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Roques, J. P.; Savchenko, V.; Ubertini, P.; INTEGRAL Collaboration; Kasliwal, M. M.; Singer, L. P.; Cao, Y.; Duggan, G.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bhalerao, V.; Miller, A. A.; Barlow, T.; Bellm, E.; Manulis, I.; Rana, J.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Surace, J.; Rebbapragada, U.; Cook, D.; Van Sistine, A.; Sesar, B.; Perley, D.; Ferreti, R.; Prince, T.; Kendrick, R.; Horesh, A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF Collaboration); Hurley, K.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Aptekar, R. L.; Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Smith, D. M.; Cline, T.; Krimm, H.; InterPlanetary Network; Abe, F.; Doi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kawabata, K. S.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ohta, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yoshida, M.; J-GEM Collaboration; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Ellman, N.; Rostami, S.; La Silla-QUEST Survey; Bersier, D. F.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mazzali, P.; Mundell, C. G.; Piascik, A. S.; Pollacco, Don; Steele, I. A.; Ulaczyk, K.; Liverpool Telescope Collaboration; Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Rowlinson, A.; Stappers, B. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Low Frequency Array (LOFAR Collaboration); Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Poleshuk, V.; Tlatov, A.; Yurkov, V.; MASTER Collaboration; Kawai, N.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Nakahira, S.; Mihara, T.; Tomida, H.; Ueno, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.; MAXI Collaboration; Croft, S.; Feng, L.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Morales, M. F.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Williams, A.; Murchison Wide-field Array (MWA Collaboration); Smartt, S. J.; Chambers, K. C.; Smith, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Young, D. R.; Wright, D. E.; Schultz, A.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E. A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Pan-STARRS Collaboration; Olivares E., F.; Campbell, H.; Kotak, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Anderson, J. P.; Botticella, M. T.; Chen, T.-W.; Della Valle, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J. D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Razza, A.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; PESSTO Collaboration; Ćwiek, A.; Ćwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Opiela, R.; Zaremba, M.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Pi of Sky Collaboration; Onken, C. A.; Scalzo, R. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Wolf, C.; Yuan, F.; SkyMapper Collaboration; Evans, P. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Giommi, P.; Marshall, F. E.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Palmer, D.; Perri, M.; Siegel, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Swift Collaboration; Klotz, A.; Turpin, D.; Laugier, R.; TAROT Collaboration; Zadko Collaboration; Algerian National Observatory Collaboration; C2PU Collaboration; Beroiz, M.; Peñuela, T.; Macri, L. M.; Oelkers, R. J.; Lambas, D. G.; Vrech, R.; Cabral, J.; Colazo, C.; Dominguez, M.; Sanchez, B.; Gurovich, S.; Lares, M.; Marshall, J. L.; DePoy, D. L.; Padilla, N.; Pereyra, N. A.; Benacquista, M.; TOROS Collaboration; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A. J.; Steeghs, D.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Watson, D.; Irwin, M.; Fernandez, C. G.; McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Schulze, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Thoene, C. C.; Cano, Z.; Rosswog, S.; VISTA Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    A gravitational-wave (GW) transient was identified in data recorded by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors on 2015 September 14. The event, initially designated G184098 and later given the name GW150914, is described in detail elsewhere. By prior arrangement, preliminary estimates of the time, significance, and sky location of the event were shared with 63 teams of observers covering radio, optical, near-infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths with ground- and space-based facilities. In this Letter we describe the low-latency analysis of the GW data and present the sky localization of the first observed compact binary merger. We summarize the follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-ray Coordinates Network circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the GW sky localization coverage, the timeline, and depth of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger, there is little expectation of a detectable electromagnetic (EM) signature. Nevertheless, this first broadband campaign to search for a counterpart of an Advanced LIGO source represents a milestone and highlights the broad capabilities of the transient astronomy community and the observing strategies that have been developed to pursue neutron star binary merger events. Detailed investigations of the EM data and results of the EM follow-up campaign are being disseminated in papers by the individual teams.

  15. LOCALIZATION AND BROADBAND FOLLOW-UP OF THE GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENT GW150914

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M. R.; Adhikari, R. X. [LIGO, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. D. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Acernese, F.; Addesso, P. [Università di Salerno, Fisciano, I-84084 Salerno (Italy); Ackley, K. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Adams, C. [LIGO Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Adams, T. [Laboratoire d’Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Université Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K. [Nikhef, Science Park, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aggarwal, N. [LIGO, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Aguiar, O. D. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12227-010 São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Aiello, L. [INFN, Gran Sasso Science Institute, I-67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Ain, A. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune 411007 (India); Ajith, P., E-mail: lsc-spokesperson@ligo.org, E-mail: virgo-spokesperson@ego-gw.eu, E-mail: Julie.E.McEnery@nasa.gov [International Centre for Theoretical Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bangalore 560012 (India); Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration; Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) Collaboration; BOOTES Collaboration; Dark Energy Survey and the Dark Energy Camera GW-EM Collaborations; Fermi GBM Collaboration; Fermi LAT Collaboration; GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm (GRAWITA); INTEGRAL Collaboration; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) Collaboration; InterPlanetary Network; J-GEM Collaboration; La Silla–QUEST Survey; Liverpool Telescope Collaboration; Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Collaboration; MASTER Collaboration; MAXI Collaboration; Murchison Wide-field Array (MWA) Collaboration; Pan-STARRS Collaboration; PESSTO Collaboration; Pi of the Sky Collaboration; SkyMapper Collaboration; Swift Collaboration; TAROT, Zadko, Algerian National Observatory, and C2PU Collaboration; TOROS Collaboration; VISTA Collaboration; and others

    2016-07-20

    A gravitational-wave (GW) transient was identified in data recorded by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors on 2015 September 14. The event, initially designated G184098 and later given the name GW150914, is described in detail elsewhere. By prior arrangement, preliminary estimates of the time, significance, and sky location of the event were shared with 63 teams of observers covering radio, optical, near-infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths with ground- and space-based facilities. In this Letter we describe the low-latency analysis of the GW data and present the sky localization of the first observed compact binary merger. We summarize the follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-ray Coordinates Network circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the GW sky localization coverage, the timeline, and depth of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger, there is little expectation of a detectable electromagnetic (EM) signature. Nevertheless, this first broadband campaign to search for a counterpart of an Advanced LIGO source represents a milestone and highlights the broad capabilities of the transient astronomy community and the observing strategies that have been developed to pursue neutron star binary merger events. Detailed investigations of the EM data and results of the EM follow-up campaign are being disseminated in papers by the individual teams.

  16. New ultra metal-poor stars from SDSS: follow-up GTC medium-resolution spectroscopy

    Aguado, D. S.; Allende Prieto, C.; González Hernández, J. I.; Rebolo, R.; Caffau, E.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The first generation of stars formed in the Galaxy left behind the chemical signatures of their nucleosynthesis in the interstellar medium, visible today in the atmospheres of low-mass stars that formed afterwards. Sampling the chemistry of those low-mass provides insight into the first stars. Aims: We aim to increase the samples of stars with extremely low metal abundances, identifying ultra metal-poor stars from spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). Achieving this goal involves deriving reliable metallicities and carbon abundances from such spectra. Methods: We carry out follow-up observations of faint, V > 19, metal-poor candidates selected from SDSS spectroscopy and observed with the Optical System for Imaging and low-Intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy (OSIRIS) at GTC. The SDSS and follow-up OSIRIS spectra were analyzed using the FERRE code to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, metallicities and carbon abundances. In addition, a well-known extremely metal-poor star has been included in our sample to calibrate the analysis methodology. Results: We observed and analyzed five metal-poor candidates from modest-quality SDSS spectra. All stars in our sample have been confirmed as extremely metal-poor stars, in the [Fe/H] Palma. Programme ID GTC2E-16A and ID GTC65-16B.

  17. LOCALIZATION AND BROADBAND FOLLOW-UP OF THE GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENT GW150914

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M. R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Addesso, P.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Allen, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.

    2016-01-01

    A gravitational-wave (GW) transient was identified in data recorded by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors on 2015 September 14. The event, initially designated G184098 and later given the name GW150914, is described in detail elsewhere. By prior arrangement, preliminary estimates of the time, significance, and sky location of the event were shared with 63 teams of observers covering radio, optical, near-infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths with ground- and space-based facilities. In this Letter we describe the low-latency analysis of the GW data and present the sky localization of the first observed compact binary merger. We summarize the follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-ray Coordinates Network circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the GW sky localization coverage, the timeline, and depth of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger, there is little expectation of a detectable electromagnetic (EM) signature. Nevertheless, this first broadband campaign to search for a counterpart of an Advanced LIGO source represents a milestone and highlights the broad capabilities of the transient astronomy community and the observing strategies that have been developed to pursue neutron star binary merger events. Detailed investigations of the EM data and results of the EM follow-up campaign are being disseminated in papers by the individual teams.

  18. Follow-up of bone mineral contents by single and dual photon absorptiometry

    Krasznai, Istvan; Lakatos, Peter; Horvath, Csaba; Hollo, Istvan

    1988-01-01

    Quality control, performance and long-range reproducibility of SPA and DPA techniques were tested in model experiments. The relative minimum detectable change in bone mineral content, determined with appropriately checked and calibrated instrument amounts to 2.5-3.0 percent by SPA and 4.0-6.0 percent by DPA. To achieve this potential at least two parallel measurements are needed but in case of long-range measurements following-up measurements have to be repeated at least quarterly. DPA requires the same person to evaluate. (author) 6 refs.; 5 tabs

  19. Can follow-up controls improve the confidence of MR of the breast? A retrospective analysis of follow-up MR images of the breast

    Betsch, A.; Arndt, E.; Stern, W.; Claussen, C.D.; Mueller-Schimpfle, M.; Wallwiener, D.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the change in diagnostic confidence between first and follow-up dynamic MR examination of the breast (MRM). Methods: The reports of a total of 175 MRM in 77 patients (mean age 50 years; 36-76) with 98 follow-up MRM were analyzed. All examinations were performed as a dynamic study (Gd-DTPA, 0.16 mmol/kg; 6-7 repetitive studies). The change in diagnostic confidence was retrospectively classified as follows: Controlled lesion vanished during follow-up (category I); diagnostic confidence increases during follow-up (II), more likely benign (IIa), more suspicious (IIb); no difference in diagnostic confidence (III). Long-term follow-up over an average of four years was obtained for 57 patients with category IIa/III findings. Results: In 98 follow-up examinations, only two lesions vanished (2%). In 77/98 cases a category IIa lesion was diagnosed, in 11 cases a category IIb lesion. In 8 cases (8%) there was no change in diagnostic confidence during follow-up. Lesions in category IIb underwent biopsy in 10/11 cases, in one case long-term follow-up proved a completely regredient inflammatory change. In 8/11 suspicious findings (IIb) a malignant tumor was detected. The mean time interval between first and follow-up MRM was 8 months for I-IIb lesions, and 4 months for category III lesions. In the longterm follow-up two patients with a category II a lesion developed a carcinoma in a different breast area after four and five years. Conclusion: MRM follow up increases the diagnostic confidence if the time interval is adequate (>4 months). A persistently or increasingly suspicious finding warrants biopsy. (orig.) [de

  20. Suicide risk among young children after the Great East Japan Earthquake: A follow-up study.

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Yagi, Junko; Homma, Hiroaki; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Nagao, Keizo; Okuyama, Makiko

    2017-07-01

    On 11 March 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent tsunami hit East Japan. We aim to investigate the impact of trauma experiences related to the earthquake on suicide risk among young children, stratified by child sex. Participants at baseline were children who were exposed to the 2011 disaster at preschool age (affected area, n=198; unaffected area, n=82, total n=280). From July 2013 to May 2014, suicide risk was assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents (MINI-KID) in a follow-up interview conducted by a child psychiatrist or psychologist (N=210, follow-up rate: 75%). Among young girls in the affected area, 12 out of 65 (18.5%) showed suicidal ideation, which is significantly higher than girls in the unaffected area (4.7%, p for chi-square=0.036). In the multivariate model adjusted for potential confounders and mediators, the odds ratio for 4 or more trauma experiences related to the earthquake was 5.74 (95% confidence interval: 0.83-39.6, p=0.076) compared to no trauma experience related to the earthquake. Among young boys, trauma exposure was not associated with suicidal ideation. Our findings showed that young girls who experienced earthquake-related trauma at preschool age had a higher suicidal ideation 3 years after the earthquake. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Perform light and optic experiments in Augmented Reality

    Wozniak, Peter; Vauderwange, Oliver; Curticapean, Dan; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Israel, Kai

    2015-10-01

    In many scientific studies lens experiments are part of the curriculum. The conducted experiments are meant to give the students a basic understanding for the laws of optics and its applications. Most of the experiments need special hardware like e.g. an optical bench, light sources, apertures and different lens types. Therefore it is not possible for the students to conduct any of the experiments outside of the university's laboratory. Simple optical software simulators enabling the students to virtually perform lens experiments already exist, but are mostly desktop or web browser based. Augmented Reality (AR) is a special case of mediated and mixed reality concepts, where computers are used to add, subtract or modify one's perception of reality. As a result of the success and widespread availability of handheld mobile devices, like e.g. tablet computers and smartphones, mobile augmented reality applications are easy to use. Augmented reality can be easily used to visualize a simulated optical bench. The students can interactively modify properties like e.g. lens type, lens curvature, lens diameter, lens refractive index and the positions of the instruments in space. Light rays can be visualized and promote an additional understanding of the laws of optics. An AR application like this is ideally suited to prepare the actual laboratory sessions and/or recap the teaching content. The authors will present their experience with handheld augmented reality applications and their possibilities for light and optic experiments without the needs for specialized optical hardware.

  2. Fraxel laser indications and long-term follow-up.

    Tanzi, Elizabeth L; Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Alster, Tina S

    2008-01-01

    Fractional photothermolysis, based on creating spatially precise microscopic thermal wounds, is performed using a 1550-nm erbium fiber laser that targets water-containing tissue to effect the photocoagulation of narrow, sharply defined columns of skin known as microscopic thermal zones. According to the authors, Fraxel resurfacing has been shown to be both safe and effective for facial and nonfacial photodamage, atrophic acne scars, hypopigmented scars, and dyspigmentation. Because only a fraction of the skin is treated during a single session, a series (typically 3 to 6 treatments) of fractional resurfacing at 2- to 4-week intervals is required for the best clinical improvement. It is the authors' experience that a series of Fraxel treatments can achieve a similar clinical result for atrophic scars compared with traditional ablative laser skin resurfacing. However, the improvement seen after a series of Fraxel treatments for perioral laxity and rhytides often falls short of the impressive results that can be achieved with ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  3. Six-year follow-up with Empress veneers.

    Fradeani, M

    1998-06-01

    This study reports on 6 years experience with IPS Empress laminate veneers. A total of 83 anterior veneers were positioned in 21 patients from January 1991 to December 1996 in the author's private practice. Final evaluation was carried out in May and June 1997. Color match, marginal discoloration, recurrent caries, contour, and marginal integrity were evaluated using the modified U.S. Public Health Service criteria at baseline and subsequent recall appointments. On the basis of the criteria used, a large percentage of veneers were rated Alfa. Only one failure was recorded, resulting in a success rate of 98.8%. A thorough description of clinical procedures and laboratory techniques through which anterior teeth can be successfully treated with ceramic veneers is supplied. A clinical case is presented to demonstrate the satisfactory esthetic results obtained using this very conservative restorative technique.

  4. Results of a quantitative survey to explore both perceptions of the purposes of follow-up and preferences for methods of follow-up delivery among service users, primary care practitioners and specialist clinicians after cancer treatment.

    Frew, G; Smith, A; Zutshi, B; Young, N; Aggarwal, A; Jones, P; Kockelbergh, R; Richards, M; Maher, E J

    2010-12-01

    To ascertain perceptions of reasons for follow-up after cancer treatment among service users (patients and carers), primary care practitioners and specialist clinicians (doctors and specialist nurses) and to identify levels of preference for different models of follow-up and the effect of an individual's experience on preferred models. A national survey designed to meet the needs of each key respondent group was carried out after a structured literature review, an extensive consultation process and a pilot scheme. Respondents were asked to assess their degree of preference for 10 pre-selected indications for follow-up. Eight models of follow-up were also identified and respondents were asked to state their experience and preference for each type. The questionnaire was distributed nationally via the 34 cancer networks in England and was available both online and in hard copy (postal). The uptake for the electronic format was in the main by primary care practitioners and specialist clinicians. Service users preferred the paper (postal) format. The survey was also publicised through the primary care and patient partnership forums at a Cancer Network Development event. In total, 2928 responses were received, comprising service users (21% of the sample), primary care practitioners (32%) and specialist clinicians (47%). Eighty-six per cent of responses were received from the 10 strategic health authorities in England, with the remaining 14% from Scotland, Wales and The Isle of Man. The responses from Scotland, Wales and the Isle of Man generally occurred where they interfaced with English cancer networks or had been engaged through word of mouth by colleagues. Among all respondents the main aims of cancer follow-up were considered to be: (1) to monitor for early complications after treatment; (2) to detect recurrences early; (3) to detect late effects of treatment. The most commonly experienced method of follow-up among all respondent groups was outpatient review with a

  5. Optical Rogue Waves: Theory and Experiments

    Taki, M.; Mussot, A.; Kudlinski, A.; Louvergneaux, E.; Kolobov, M.

    2010-05-01

    In the ocean, giant waves (also called killer waves, freak or rogue waves) are extremely rare and strong events. They are not well understood yet and the conditions which favour their emergence are unclear. Very recently, it was shown that the governing equations [1] as well as the statistical properties of an optical pulse propagating inside an optical fibre [2] mimic very well these gigantic surface waves in the ocean. Here we generate both experimentally and numerically optical rogue waves in a photonic crystal fiber (microstructured fiber) with continuous wave (CW) pumps. This is relevant for establishing an analogy with rogue waves in an open ocean. After recalling fundamental rogue waves [3] known as Akhmediev breathers that are solutions of pure nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, we analytically demonstrate that a generalized NLS equation, which governs the propagation of light in the fiber, exhibits convective modulationnal instability [4]. The latter provides one of the main explanations of the optical rogue wave extreme sensitivity to noisy initial conditions at the linear stage of their formation [5]. In the highly nonlinear regime, we provide the evidence that optical rogue waves result from soliton collisions leading to the rapid appearance/disappearance of a powerful optical pulse [6]. REFERENCES [1] C. Kharif, E. Pelinovsky, and A. Slunyaev, "Rogue Waves in the ocean", Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2009 [2] D. R. Solli, C. Ropers, P. Koonath, and B. Jalali, "Optical rogue waves" Nature 450, 1054-1058, (2008). [3] N. Akhmediev, A. Ankiewicz, and M. Taki, "Waves that appear from nowhere and disappear without a trace", Phys. Lett. A 373, 675 (2009). [4] A. Mussot, E. Louvergneaux, N. Akhmediev, F. Reynaud, Delage, and M. Taki, "Optical fiber systems are convectively unstable", Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 113904 (2008). [5] M. Taki, A. Mussot, A. Kudlinski, E. Louvergneaux, M. Kolobov, M. Douay, "Third-order dispersion for generating optical rogue solitons

  6. On Suggestibility and Placebo: A Follow-Up Study.

    Lifshitz, Michael; Sheiner, Eli O; Olson, Jay A; Thériault, Rémi; Raz, Amir

    2017-04-01

    Identifying what makes some people respond well to placebos remains a major challenge. Here, we attempt to replicate an earlier study in which we found a relationship between hypnotic suggestibility and subjective ratings of relaxation following the ingestion of a placebo sedative (Sheiner, Lifshitz, & Raz, 2016). To assess the reliability of this effect, we tested 34 participants using a similar design. Participants ingested a placebo capsule in one of two conditions: (1) relaxation, wherein we described the capsule as a herbal sedative, or (2) control, wherein we described the capsule as inert. To index placebo response, we collected measures of blood pressure and heart rate, as well as self-report ratings of relaxation and drowsiness. Despite using a similar experimental design as in our earlier study, we were unable to replicate the correlation between hypnotic suggestibility and placebo response. Furthermore, whereas in our former experiment we observed a change in subjective ratings of relaxation but no change in physiological measures, here we found that heart rate dropped in the relaxation condition while subjective ratings remained unchanged. Even within a consistent context of relaxation, therefore, our present results indicate that placebos may induce effects that are fickle, tenuous, and unreliable. Although we had low statistical power, our findings tentatively accord with the notion that placebo response likely involves a complex, multifaceted interaction between traits, expectancies, and contexts.

  7. Ultrasound screening and follow-up of congenital hip dislocation

    Ballerini, G.; Avanzini, A.; Colombo, T.; Micucci, E.

    1990-01-01

    US screening for hip dysplasia was performed on 1421 full-term newborns. The study was aimed at: 1) evaluating US feasibility in an unselected maternity ward population; 2) determining the frequency of the different types of hips, and correlating ours with literature data; 3) evaluating the efficacy of both an early prevention and treatment. All US examination were performed within the first week of life and the 2842 hips classified according to Graf. At birth, normal hips (Ia, Ib) were 2064 (72.6%) (group I); Physiologically immature hips (IIa) were 721 (25.4%) (group II); pathological hips (group III) were: 43 (1.5%) IIc, 8 (o.3%) IId, 6 (0.2%) III. Hips in group B were cheked at 3 months: 502 were normal, 51 were type IIb, and 1 was type IId: the latter 52 hips were treated and normalized in the following months. Hips in group C (types IIc, IId, and III=57 hips) were treated and cheked every seventh week until normalization. Our experience confirm US value in the evaluation of hip dysplasia in the newborn. In our opinion, the use of this method shoul be encouraged, although US screening of all newborns remains controversial on a cost-benefit ratio. Multicentric studies will better define US sensitivity, specificity and reliability. The correlation of ours results with literature data was difficult, because study populations are not always homogeneous. As for therapy, we found the plastic splint very effective and easy to use: In 2 cases, Milgram devices were used for a few months

  8. Evaluation of glass ionomer sealants placed according to the ART approach in a community with high caries experience: 1-year follow-up Avaliação de selantes ionoméricos realizados pela técnica do ART em comunidade com alta experiência de cárie: 1 ano de acompanhamento

    Ana Luiza Falavinha Vieira

    2006-08-01

    avaliados. No grupo controle, 28 (41,8% selantes estavam parcial ou completamente retidos, 38 (56,7% completamente perdidos, 1 (1,5% foi substituído por outro tratamento. No grupo experimental, 30 (43,5% selantes estavam parcial ou completamente retidos, 38 (55,1% foram classificados como completamente perdidos e 1(1,4% foi substituído por outro tratamento. Sete selantes em ambos os grupos não foram avaliados. A presença de lesão cariosa secundária não foi observada em nenhum dos grupos. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre a retenção (p=0,49 e efeito na incidência de cárie (p=0,84 entre os dois grupos. A performance clínica dos selantes ionoméricos foi considerada satisfatória com um alto índice de sucesso (98,5%. Embora os selantes aplicados de acordo com a técnica ART tenham mostrado índices de retenção abaixo de 50% depois de um ano nos primeiros molares recém-erupcionados, este método mostrou-se apropriado para comunidades com alta experiência de cárie.

  9. Optical beam deflection sensor: design and experiments.

    Sakamoto, João M S; Marques, Renan B; Kitano, Cláudio; Rodrigues, Nicolau A S; Riva, Rudimar

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we present a double-pass optical beam deflection sensor and its optical design method. To accomplish that, a mathematical model was proposed and computational simulations were performed, in order to obtain the sensor's characteristic curves and to analyze its behavior as function of design parameters. The mathematical model was validated by comparison with the characteristic curves acquired experimentally. The sensor was employed to detect acoustic pulses generated by a pulsed laser in a sample surface, in order to show its potential for monitoring applications handling high energy input as laser welding or laser ablation.

  10. Myopia Glasses and Optical Power Estimation: An Easy Experiment

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2015-01-01

    Human eye optics is a common high school physics topic and students usually show a great interest during our presentation of this theme. In this article, we present an easy way to estimate a diverging lens' optical power from a simple experiment involving myopia eyeglasses and a smartphone flashlight.

  11. The Liverpool Telescope: rapid follow-up observation of targets of opportunity with a 2 m robotic telescope

    Gomboc, Andreja; Bode, Michael F.; Carter, David; Mundell, Carol G.; Newsam, Andrew; Smith, Robert J.; Steele, Iain A.

    2004-01-01

    The Liverpool Telescope, situated at Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, Canaries, is the first 2-m, fully instrumented robotic telescope. It recently began observations. Among Liverpool Telescope's primary scientific goals is to monitor variable objects on all timescales from seconds to years. An additional benefit of its robotic operation is rapid reaction to unpredictable phenomena and their systematic follow up, simultaneous or coordinated with other facilities. The Target of Opportunity Programme of the Liverpool Telescope includes the prompt search for and observation of GRB and XRF counterparts. A special over-ride mode implemented for GRB/XRF follow-up enables observations commencing less than a minute after the alert, including optical and near infrared imaging and spectroscopy. In particular, the moderate aperture and rapid automated response make the Liverpool Telescope excellently suited to help solving the mystery of optically dark GRBs and for the investigation of currently unstudied short bursts and XRFs

  12. Getting the most from the sleeve: the importance of post-operative follow-up.

    Keren, Dean; Matter, Ibrahim; Rainis, Tova; Lavy, Alexandra

    2011-12-01

    Bariatric approach to obesity provides substantial weight loss and comorbidity resolution. Our unique service includes pre- and postoperative visits to the Health and Nutrition Clinic headed by a specialist in gastroenterology and nutrition. We compared patients attending regular clinic routine with those who were lost to follow-up with regard to anthropometry, comorbidity, quality of life, and food tolerance and determined who benefited most from the operation. A retrospective review was performed on patients 30 months after undergoing sleeve gastrectomy. Body mass index was used to report weight loss. Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS) and Food Tolerance Score were (FTS) completed by all patients at the 30-month follow-up visit and compared between two groups (group I-30 months of active postoperative follow-up; group II-without). A total of 119 patients participated in the study. For groups I and II, the mean percentage of excess BMI loss at 30 months was 82.08 ± 9.83 and 74.88 ± 8.75, respectively, with better comorbidity improvement in group I. BAROS scores were 7.62 ± 0.72 and 6.92 ± 0.92. FTS was 24.30 ± 2.09 and 22.55 ± 2.27, respectively. From our experience, getting the most from the sleeve is attributed to two main factors: surgery and nutrition. Surgery results in optimal restriction and improved satiety, whereas nutrition relies on a professional medical team providing constant, ongoing patient support throughout all the bariatric process stages. These teams of surgeons and gastroenterologists specializing in nutrition, working side by side, each in their area of specialty, are the main pillars leading to the success of the sleeve.

  13. Patients highly value routine follow-up of skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma

    Themstrup, Lotte; Jemec, Gregor E; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Skin cancer follow-up is a substantial burden to outpatient clinics. Few studies have investigated patients' views on skin cancer follow-up and cutaneous melanoma. The objective was to investigate patients' perceived benefits and the impact of follow-up. MATERIAL AND METHODS...

  14. The impact of phone calls on follow-up rates in an online depression prevention study

    R.F. Muñoz

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Adding phone call contacts to email reminders and monetary incentives did increase follow-up rates. However, the rate of response to follow-up was low and the number of phone calls required to achieve one completed follow-up raises concerns about the utility of adding phone calls. We also discuss difficulties with using financial incentives and their implications.

  15. Value of routine timed barium esophagram follow-up in achalasia after myotomy.

    Kachala, Stefan S; Rice, Thomas W; Baker, Mark E; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Thota, Prashanthi N; Murthy, Sudish C; Blackstone, Eugene H; Zanoni, Andrea; Raja, Siva

    2018-03-08

    The value of routine timed barium esophagram (TBE) in longitudinal follow-up of achalasia after Heller myotomy is unknown. We prospectively prescribed a yearly follow-up TBE. Purposes were to characterize esophageal emptying over time after myotomy, identify preoperative TBE measures associated with follow-up TBE, and characterize follow-up TBE over time in relationship to reintervention. From March 1995 to April 2013, 635 patients underwent Heller myotomy for achalasia; 559 had at least 1 follow-up TBE. Temporal trends of 1335 follow-up TBEs in all nonreintervention and reintervention patients were assessed. Multivariable longitudinal analysis identified preoperative TBE measures associated with follow-up TBE. On average, TBE height and width at 1 and 5 minutes decreased approximately 50% and 60%, respectively, at first postoperative follow-up, and remained stable or slightly decreased for up to 5 years. Wider TBE width at 5 minutes was associated with greater follow-up TBE height and width at 1 minute. Of 118 patients undergoing reintervention, 64 (57%) had only 1 reintervention, with follow-up TBE returning to that of nonreintervention patients. Patients whose follow-up TBE remained abnormal underwent a further reintervention, some normalizing on subsequent TBE, and some not. Follow-up TBE is valuable postmyotomy, particularly if there is substantial esophageal dilatation preoperatively. Follow-up TBE reassures patients with stable or decreasing TBE measures, permitting decreased follow-up intensity. Reintervention should not be considered a myotomy failure, because a successful, single, nonsurgical reintervention often results in long-term successful palliation. More than 1 reintervention requires intensification of TBE follow-up, facilitating treatment planning. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An optics education program designed around experiments with small telescopes

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.; Dokter, Erin F. C.

    2010-08-01

    The National Optical Astronomy Observatory has led the development of a new telescope kit for kids as part of a strategic plan to interest young children in science. This telescope has been assembled by tens of thousands of children nationwide, who are now using this high-quality telescope to conduct optics experiments and to make astronomical observations. The Galileoscope telescope kit and its associated educational program are an outgrowth of the NSF sponsored "Hands-On Optics" (HOO) project, a collaboration of the SPIE, the Optical Society of America, and NOAO. This project developed optics kits and activities for upper elementary students and has reached over 20,000 middle school kids in afterschool programs. HOO is a highly flexible educational program and was featured as an exemplary informal science program by the National Science Teachers Association. Our new "Teaching with Telescopes" program builds on HOO, the Galileoscope and other successful optical education projects.

  17. Patient Satisfaction With an Early Smartphone-Based Cosmetic Surgery Postoperative Follow-Up.

    Pozza, Edoardo Dalla; D'Souza, Gehaan F; DeLeonibus, Anthony; Fabiani, Brianna; Gharb, Bahar Bassiri; Zins, James E

    2017-12-13

    While prevalent in everyday life, smartphones are also finding increasing use as a medical care adjunct. The use of smartphone technology as a postoperative cosmetic surgery adjunct for care has received little attention in the literature. The purpose of this effort was to assess the potential efficacy of a smartphone-based cosmetic surgery early postoperative follow-up program. Specifically, could smartphone photography provided by the patient to the plastic surgeon in the first few days after surgery allay patient's concerns, improve the postoperative experience and, possibly, detect early complications? From August 2015 to March 2016 a smartphone-based postoperative protocol was established for patients undergoing cosmetic procedures. At the time of discharge, the plastic surgeon sent a text to the patient with instructions for the patient to forward a postoperative photograph of the operated area within 48 to 72 hours. The plastic surgeon then made a return call/text that same day to review the patient's progress. A postoperative questionnaire evaluated the patients' postoperative experience and satisfaction with the program. A total of 57 patients were included in the study. Fifty-two patients responded to the survey. A total of 50 (96.2%) patients reported that the process improved the quality of their postoperative experience. The protocol allowed to detect early complications in 3 cases. The physician was able to address and treat the complications the following day prior to the scheduled clinic follow up. The smartphone can be effectively utilized by the surgeon to both enhance the patient's postoperative experience and alert the surgeon to early postoperative problems. 4. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. A follow-up study of patients with DSM-IV schizophreniform disorder.

    Iancu, Iulian; Dannon, Pinhas N; Ziv, Reuven; Lepkifker, Elie

    2002-02-01

    Schizophreniform disorder (SFD) has an unclear diagnostic and prognostic status within the psychotic spectrum. We studied 36 inpatients admitted to our ward between 1983 and 1993 due to SFD. The patients were contacted an average of 12 years after index hospitalization, and we noted the course of their illness, as well as their present diagnosis. Of the sample, 84% had additional, mostly psychotic, episodes during the follow-up, and 70% had diagnoses in the schizophrenic spectrum (that is, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder). A survival analysis revealed that confusion and the presence of at least 2 good prognostic factors (GPF) at index hospitalization predicted better outcome. SFD seems to be an early manifestation of schizophrenia. Only a few of those sampled did not experience additional relapses--a pessimistic finding at 12-year follow-up. The findings of this study accord with DSM-IV criteria and the literature regarding the long-term prognosis of SFD and the importance of the GPF.

  19. Long-term follow-up of total abdominal wall reconstruction for prune belly syndrome.

    Lesavoy, Malcolm A; Chang, Eric I; Suliman, Ahmed; Taylor, Jason; Taylor, James; Kim, Sara E; Ehrlich, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    Prune belly syndrome is a rare, congenital condition that consists of a major deficiency or hypoplasia of the abdominal wall musculature, bilateral cryptorchidism, and genitourinary tract malformations. Reconstruction of the abdominal wall in these patients has presented a challenge to plastic surgeons throughout the years. The authors previously described a technique for total abdominal wall reconstruction that permitted simultaneous urinary tract reconstruction and bilateral orchiopexy. This innovative procedure used medial advancement of the fascia in a "double-breasted" fashion with preservation of the umbilicus. The authors reviewed their experience with this particular technique in one of the largest series of patients in the literature and the series with the longest follow-up. Twenty patients underwent total abdominal wall reconstruction with simultaneous urinary tract reconstruction and orchiopexy with a mean follow-up of 20.4 years. There were no major complications noted during this period, and all patients were extremely satisfied with their postoperative result. Total abdominal wall reconstruction using the double-breasted technique in patients with prune belly syndrome is a safe and durable procedure that achieves excellent cosmetic results. Therapeutic, IV.

  20. Psychological effects of chemical weapons: a follow-up study of First World War veterans.

    Jones, E; Everitt, B; Ironside, S; Palmer, I; Wessely, S

    2008-10-01

    Chemical weapons exercise an enduring and often powerful psychological effect. This had been recognized during the First World War when it was shown that the symptoms of stress mimicked those of mild exposure to gas. Debate about long-term effects followed the suggestion that gassing triggered latent tuberculosis. A random sample of 103 First World War servicemen awarded a war pension for the effects of gas, but without evidence of chronic respiratory pathology, were subjected to cluster analysis using 25 common symptoms. The consistency of symptom reporting was also investigated across repeated follow-ups. Cluster analysis identified four groups: one (n=56) with a range of somatic symptoms, a second (n=30) with a focus on the respiratory system, a third (n=12) with a predominance of neuropsychiatric symptoms, and a fourth (n=5) with a narrow band of symptoms related to the throat and breathing difficulties. Veterans from the neuropsychiatric cluster had multiple diagnoses including neurasthenia and disordered action of the heart, and reported many more symptoms than those in the three somatic clusters. Mild or intermittent respiratory disorders in the post-war period supported beliefs about the damaging effects of gas in the three somatic clusters. By contrast, the neuropsychiatric group did not report new respiratory illnesses. For this cluster, the experience of gassing in a context of extreme danger may have been responsible for the intensity of their symptoms, which showed no sign of diminution over the 12-year follow-up.

  1. [Hysteroscopic fallopian tube sterilization procedure: feasibility and one-year follow-up].

    Gibon, E; Lopès, P; Linet, T; Martigny, H; Orieux, C; Philippe, H-J

    2006-03-01

    Hysteroscopic flexible micro-insert (Essure) is an ambulatory improvement of fallopian tube sterilization, which is a deliberated suppression of fertility. The aim of this study was an evaluation of feasibility (learning curve) and the first year outcome of this method. This prospective study, carried out between February 2002 and March 2003, included patients who were matching with manufacturer recommendations. One surgeon only realized all the device placements. Fifty patients were included (one year follow-up). Mean age was 41 (+/-3.3), mean parity was 2.7 (+/-0.8). Mean time needed for device placement was 26 minutes (+/-6.5) and was reduced with increased experience. Six failures of placement (12%) were related, because of submucus leiomyomas, proximal tubal stenotic disease or too retroverted uterus. Only 5 patients (11,4%) described intensive pelvic pain during the placement. The only case of device expulsion benefited from a successful second placement. The one-year follow-up showed no significant difference of body weight increasing, duration or quantity of menstruation, neither significant pelvic pain nor vaginal bleeding. Tolerance was rated at least at "somewhat satisfied". There have been no pregnancies reported in 670 woman-months of effectiveness. Our results agree in any point with those of larger studies. We think that hysteroscopy micro-insert placement is not only reserved to specialized centers but also to any gynecologist who is used to performing hysteroscopy because of its feasibility.

  2. Postoperative follow-up of pituitary adenomas after trans-sphenoidal resection: MRI and clinical correlation

    Rodriguez, O. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo (Spain); Mateos, B. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo (Spain); Pedraja, R. de la [Servicio de Endocrinologia, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo (Spain); Villoria, R. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo (Spain); Hernando, J.I. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo (Spain); Pastor, A. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo (Spain); Pomposo, I. [Servicio de Neurocirugia, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo (Spain); Aurrecoechea, J. [Servicio de Neurocirugia, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo (Spain)

    1996-11-01

    Our purpose was to correlate the morphological changes seen on MRI studies of the sellar region after trans-sphenoidal resection of pituitary adenomas with clinical and hormonal studies. Between January 1993 and March 1994, 16 patients with a pituitary adenoma (9 macroadenomas and 7 microadenomas) were subjected to trans-sphenoidal resection and included in a prospective study. The protocol consisted of MRI, hormonal and visual studies at the following times: immediately postoperative (1st week), 1st month, 4th month and 1st year after surgery. The evolution of the contents of the sella turcica (tumour remnant, packing material and gland tissue), effects on the infundibulum, optic chiasm, cavernous sinus and sphenoid sinus were correlated with the clinical and hormonal studies. Stabilisation of the postsurgical changes occurred by the 4th month. Tumour remnants were noted in the immediate postoperative period in macroadenomas. Compression of the infundibulum was the only reliable indicator of possible involvement. Optic chiasm compression, defined as close contact between the chiasm and the tumour, was the only morphological finding that indicated visual impairment. There was no standard repneumatisation pattern in the sphenoid sinus, since mucosal changes resembling sinusitis were one of the postsurgical changes. We found MRI not to be useful for follow-up of microadenomas. (orig.). With 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Postoperative follow-up of pituitary adenomas after trans-sphenoidal resection: MRI and clinical correlation

    Rodriguez, O.; Mateos, B.; Pedraja, R. de la; Villoria, R.; Hernando, J.I.; Pastor, A.; Pomposo, I.; Aurrecoechea, J.

    1996-01-01

    Our purpose was to correlate the morphological changes seen on MRI studies of the sellar region after trans-sphenoidal resection of pituitary adenomas with clinical and hormonal studies. Between January 1993 and March 1994, 16 patients with a pituitary adenoma (9 macroadenomas and 7 microadenomas) were subjected to trans-sphenoidal resection and included in a prospective study. The protocol consisted of MRI, hormonal and visual studies at the following times: immediately postoperative (1st week), 1st month, 4th month and 1st year after surgery. The evolution of the contents of the sella turcica (tumour remnant, packing material and gland tissue), effects on the infundibulum, optic chiasm, cavernous sinus and sphenoid sinus were correlated with the clinical and hormonal studies. Stabilisation of the postsurgical changes occurred by the 4th month. Tumour remnants were noted in the immediate postoperative period in macroadenomas. Compression of the infundibulum was the only reliable indicator of possible involvement. Optic chiasm compression, defined as close contact between the chiasm and the tumour, was the only morphological finding that indicated visual impairment. There was no standard repneumatisation pattern in the sphenoid sinus, since mucosal changes resembling sinusitis were one of the postsurgical changes. We found MRI not to be useful for follow-up of microadenomas. (orig.). With 4 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Follow-up of Long-term Treatment with Clean Intermittent Catheterization for Neurogenic Bladder in Children

    Panuwat Lertsithichai

    2004-04-01

    Conclusions: For most patients and with close long-term follow-up, early treatment of neurogenic bladder using CIC in children born with myelomeningocele yields better results than late treatment. In our experience, treatment is recommended as soon as possible, especially during the first year of life.

  5. Quantification, validation, and follow-up of small bowel motility in Crohn's disease

    Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Peng, Jennifer Q.; Safdar, Nabile M.; Conklin, Laurie; Sze, Raymond; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has become a mainstay in the evaluation, assessment and follow up of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease (CD), thanks to its high image quality and its non-ionizing nature. In particular, the advent of faster MRE sequences less sensitive to image-motion artifacts offers the possibility to obtain visual, structural and functional information of the patient's small bowel. However, the inherent subjectivity of the mere visual inspection of these images often hinders the accurate identification and monitoring of the pathological areas. In this paper, we present a framework that provides quantitative and objective motility information of the small bowel from free-breathing MRE dynamic sequences. After compensating for the breathing motion of the patient, we create personalized peristaltic activity maps via optical flow analysis. The result is the creation of a new set of images providing objective and precise functional information of the small bowel. The accuracy of the new method was also evaluated from two different perspectives: objective accuracy (1.1 ± 0.6 mm/s of error), i.e., the ability of the system to provide quantitative and accurate information about the motility of moving bowel landmarks, and subjective accuracy (avg. difference of 0.7 ± 0.7 in a range of 1 to 5), i.e., the degree of agreement with the subjective evaluation of an expert. Finally, the practical utility of the new method was successfully evaluated in a preliminary study with 32 studies of healthy and CD cases, showing its potential for the fast and accurate assessment and follow up of CD in the small bowel.

  6. Radio follow-up observations of stellar tidal disruption flares: Constraints on off-axis jets

    Körding E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN and X-ray binaries have shown that relativistic jets are ubiquitous when compact objects accrete. One could therefore anticipate the launch of a jet after a star is disrupted and accreted by a massive black hole. This birth of a relativistic jet may have been observed recently in two stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs, which were discovered in gamma-rays by Swift. Yet no transient radio emission has been detected from the tens of TDF candidates that were discovered at optical to soft X-ray frequencies. Because the sample that was followed-up at radio frequencies is small, the non-detections can be explained by Doppler boosting, which reduces the jet flux for off-axis observers. Plus, the existing followup observation are mostly within ∼ 10 months of the discovery, so the non-detections can also be due to a delay of the radio emission with respect to the time of disruption. To test the conjecture that all TDFs launch jets, we obtained 5 GHz follow-up observations with the Jansky VLA of six known TDFs. To avoid missing delayed jet emission, our observations probe 1–8 years since the estimated time of disruption. None of the sources are detected, with very deep upper limits at the 10 micro Jansky level. These observations rule out the hypothesis that these TDFs launched jets similar to radio-loud quasars. We also constrain the possibility that the flares hosted a jet identical to Sw 1644+57.

  7. Comparison of two Dutch follow-up care models for spinal cord-injured patients and their impact on health problems, re-admissions and quality of care

    Bloemen-Vrencken, J.H.; de Witte, L.P.; Post, M.W.; Pons, C.; van Asbeck, F.W.; van der Woude, L.H.V.; van den Heuvel, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether transmural care for people with spinal cord injury living in the community has more impact on health outcomes than traditional follow-up care within the Netherlands. Design: Quasi-experiment with 12 months of follow-up. Setting: Eight Dutch rehabilitation centres.

  8. Comparison of two Dutch follow-up care models for spinal cord-injured patients and their impact on health problems, re-admissions and quality of care

    Bloemen-Vrencken, J. H. A.; de Witte, L. P.; Post, M. W. M.; Pons, C.; van Asbeck, F. W. A.; van der Woude, L. H. V.; van den Heuvel, W. J. A.

    Objective: To evaluate whether transmural care for people with spinal cord injury living in the community has more impact on health outcomes than traditional follow-up care within the Netherlands. Design: Quasi-experiment with 12 months of follow-up. Setting: Eight Dutch rehabilitation centres.

  9. Multimodal imaging of central retinal disease progression in a 2 year mean follow up of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Sujirakul, Tharikarn; Lin, Michael K.; Duong, Jimmy; Wei, Ying; Lopez-Pintado, Sara; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the rate of progression and optimal follow up time in patients with advanced stage retinitis pigmentosa (RP) comparing the use of fundus autofluorescence imaging and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Design Retrospective analysis of progression rate. Methods Longitudinal imaging follow up in 71 patients with retinitis pigmentosa was studied using the main outcome measurements of hyperautofluoresent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter along with ellipsoid zone line width from spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Test-retest reliability and the rate of progression were calculated. The interaction between the progression rates was tested for sex, age, mode of inheritance, and baseline measurement size. Symmetry of left and right eye progression rate was also tested. Results Significant progression was observed in >75% of patients during the 2 year mean follow up. The mean annual progression rates of ellipsoid zone line, and hyperautofluorescent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter were 0.45° (4.9%), 0.51° (4.1%), and 0.42° (4.0%), respectively. The e llipsoid zone line width, and hyperautofluorescent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter had low test-retest variabilities of 8.9%, 9.5% and 9.6%, respectively. This study is the first to demonstrate asymmetrical structural progression rate between right and left eye, which was found in 19% of patients. The rate of progression was significantly slower as the disease approached the fovea, supporting the theory that RP progresses in an exponential fashion. No significant interaction between progression rate and patient age, sex, or mode of inheritance was observed. Conclusions Fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography detect progression in patients with RP reliably and with strong correlation. These parameters may be useful alongside functional assessments as the outcome measurements for future therapeutic trials. Follow-up at 1 year

  10. Follow-up skeletal surveys for nonaccidental trauma: can a more limited survey be performed?

    Harlan, Susan R. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Nixon, G.W.; Prince, Jeffrey S. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Campbell, Kristine A.; Hansen, Karen [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Studies have demonstrated the value of the follow-up skeletal survey in identifying additional fractures, clarifying indeterminate findings, and improving dating of skeletal injuries in victims of physical abuse. To determine whether a more limited follow-up survey could yield the same radiologic data as a full follow-up survey. The study cohort comprised 101 children who had follow-up surveys that met our inclusion criteria. Consensus readings of both original and follow-up surveys were performed by two pediatric radiologists. These results were compared to determine additional findings from the follow-up surveys. Limited skeletal survey protocols were evaluated to determine whether they would detect the same fractures seen with a complete osseous survey. In the 101 children 244 fractures were identified on the initial osseous survey. Follow-up surveys demonstrated new information in 38 children (37.6%). A 15-view limited follow-up survey identified all additional information seen on the complete follow-up survey. Our data demonstrate that a 15-view limited follow-up skeletal survey could be performed without missing clinically significant new fractures and still allow proper identification of confirmed fractures or normal findings. A limited survey would decrease radiation dose in children. (orig.)

  11. Follow-up skeletal surveys for nonaccidental trauma: can a more limited survey be performed?

    Harlan, Susan R.; Nixon, G.W.; Prince, Jeffrey S.; Campbell, Kristine A.; Hansen, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated the value of the follow-up skeletal survey in identifying additional fractures, clarifying indeterminate findings, and improving dating of skeletal injuries in victims of physical abuse. To determine whether a more limited follow-up survey could yield the same radiologic data as a full follow-up survey. The study cohort comprised 101 children who had follow-up surveys that met our inclusion criteria. Consensus readings of both original and follow-up surveys were performed by two pediatric radiologists. These results were compared to determine additional findings from the follow-up surveys. Limited skeletal survey protocols were evaluated to determine whether they would detect the same fractures seen with a complete osseous survey. In the 101 children 244 fractures were identified on the initial osseous survey. Follow-up surveys demonstrated new information in 38 children (37.6%). A 15-view limited follow-up survey identified all additional information seen on the complete follow-up survey. Our data demonstrate that a 15-view limited follow-up skeletal survey could be performed without missing clinically significant new fractures and still allow proper identification of confirmed fractures or normal findings. A limited survey would decrease radiation dose in children. (orig.)

  12. Effects of EAP follow-up on prevention of relapse among substance abuse clients.

    Foote, A; Erfurt, J C

    1991-05-01

    Clients entering an employee assistance program (EAP) of a large manufacturing plant in 1985 who were assessed as having an alcohol or drug abuse problem (N = 325) were randomized into an experimental "special follow-up" group and a control "regular care" group. The regular care group received follow-up only as needed (following the usual practice of the EAP), while a follow-up counselor was hired to make routine contacts with the special follow-up group. Study intake continued through 1985, and follow-up continued through the end of 1986. Data collected on study subjects included EAP participation data, absenteeism, number of hospitalizations, health care claims paid and disability claims paid. The major study hypothesis was that EAP clients randomly allocated to special follow-up would show better results than regular care clients (i.e., would have fewer relapses, better job attendance and lower health benefit utilization during the follow-up year). The follow-up intervention was incompletely implemented due to a variety of organizational problems. Differences between the two groups on the six outcome measures were not statistically significant, although clients in the special follow-up group did show better results than clients in the regular care group on the three measures related to substance abuse. Differences on these three measures were marginally significant in regression analyses after controlling for the effects of number of follow-up visits, age, race and chronicity.

  13. The importance of adequate follow-up in defining treatment success after external beam irradiation for prostate cancer

    Vicini, Frank A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with localized prostate cancer with external beam radiation therapy (RT) to determine how differences in the length of follow-up affect the determination of treatment outcome using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Panel Definition of biochemical failure (BF). Methods and Materials: From January 1987 through December 1997, 1109 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with definitive external beam RT at William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan. All patients received external beam RT to a median total prostate dose of 66.6 Gy (range: 59.4-70.4 Gy). A total of 1096 patients (99%) had sufficient prostate-specific antigen (PSA) follow-up to determine their biochemical status. To test the impact of differences in follow-up on the calculation of BF, 389 patients with at least 5 years of PSA follow-up were selected as the reference group for the initial analysis. BF was then retrospectively determined using the Consensus Panel definition at yearly intervals, ignoring the remainder of each patient's follow-up. The median follow-up for this group of patients was 6.6 years (range: 5.0-11.6 years). In a second analysis, patient cohorts were randomly selected with varying median PSA follow-up intervals in order to more accurately represent a population whose follow-up is distributed continuously over a defined range. Seven cohorts were randomly selected with 200 patients in each cohort. Cohorts were individually identified such that half of the patients (100) had 2 years or less follow-up than the stated time point for analysis and half (100) had up to 2 years more follow-up than the time point chosen for analysis. For example, in the cohort with a median follow-up of 3 years, 100 patients with a PSA follow-up from 1 to 3 years were randomly selected, and 100 patients with a follow-up from 3 to 5 years were randomly selected, thus generating a

  14. Technical, economic, environmental and social follow-up of innovating farm-based small methanization plants: BIOGAZ PLUS - Report after a 12-month follow-up; Installation: EARL Guilbaud - Report after a 15-month follow-up; Installation: GAEC Des Buissons - Report after a 12-month follow-up

    Lalanne, Mathieu; Cordelier, Marine; Pouech, Philippe; Thual, Julien; Bastide, Guillaume; Faure, Benoit; Faure, Jean-Marie; Bousquet, Dominique; El Habti, Audrey; L'Heriau, Germain; Guianvarch, David; Farcy, Alexandre; Banville, Sandrine; Chauvin, Damien; Frederic, Sylvain; Haumont, Francois; Guilbaud, Gerard; Leroux, Yannick; Tronc, Jean-Sebastien; Menard, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    This document contains three follow-up reports, each concerning a small farm-based methanization unit. For each one, the report proposes a technical description (operation, provisional exploitation assessment, process principle and implementation, installed instrumentation), describes the status of production (noticed dysfunctions and identified causes, returns on experience), an operation assessment after 12 or 15 months in terms of biological performance (composition of input mixture, methane generation potential, organic load) and energetic performance (biogas, electric, thermal and energetic assessments), an assessment of environmental and social performance (time spent, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas assessment, integration of the installation within the farm, risk and pollution assessment), an economic assessment in terms of investment, of operating statements and of indicators of financial profitability. Results of composition measurements performed on input materials and digestates are provided

  15. Long-term follow-up of radiation accident patients in Peru: Review of two cases

    Barriga, L. E.; Zaharia, M.; Pinillos, L.; Moscol, A.; Heredia, A.; Sarria, G.; Marquina, J.; Barriga, O.; Picon, C.

    2012-01-01

    Overexposure to radioactive sources used in radiotherapy or industrial radiography may result in severe health consequences. This report assesses the initial clinical status and the medical and psychological long-term follow-up of two radiation accident patients from Peru during the mid-to-late 1990's: one patient exposed to a radiotherapy 60 Co source in Arequipa, the other patient to a 192 Ir source in Yanango. Commonalities and differences are described. The main causes in both accidents were human error and the failure to apply appropriate safety guidelines and standard operating procedures. Education and training of the personnel working with radiation sources are essential to prevent accidents. The experience gained from the medical management of the two patients is valuable for future treatment of such patients. (authors)

  16. Fibre optic cables for the ALICE experiment

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    These thin fibres will transmit the signal received in detectors at the ALICE experiment when it starts up with the LHC in 2008. The analogue signals produced in the detectors are first converted into digital pulse, which are transported in light down such fibres. Computers then read this digital signal to produce the final set of data.

  17. Atom optical tools for antimatter experiments

    Braeunig, Philippe H.M.

    2014-12-17

    The direct measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter in the earth's field, which represents a test of the weak equivalence principle, is in the focus of several ongoing experimental attempts. This thesis investigates tools and techniques known from the field of atom optics that can be utilised for such a measurement with antihydrogen atoms as envisioned by the AEgIS collaboration. A first experimental step is presented, in which a detection due to an electromagnetic force acting on antiprotons is measured with a Moire deflectometer. This device, which can be described with classical particle trajectories, consists of two gratings and a spatially resolving detector. Key elements of this measurement are the use of an emulsion detector with high spatial resolution and an absolute reference technique based on an interferometric fringe pattern of light, which is not deflected by forces. For future realisations, a new detection and evaluation scheme to measure gravity based on a three-grating system enclosed by a vertex-reconstructing detector is discussed. This allows the use of a grating periodicity that is smaller than the resolution of the detector while making efficient use of the particle flux. Smaller periodicities are favourable to increase the inertial sensitivity of the measurement apparatus but require to take effects of diffraction into account. To explore this near-field regime with antimatter, a Talbot-Lau interferometer for antiprotons is proposed and its possible experimental implementation is discussed.

  18. Follow up Evaluation of Air Force Blood Donors Screening Positive for Chagas Disease

    2017-10-05

    59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 31 JULY2017 Your paper, entitled Follow-up Evaluation of Air Force Blood Donors Screening...PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Follow-up Evaluation of Air Force Blood Donors Screening Positive for Chagas Disease 7. FUNDING RECEIVED FOR THIS STUDY? 0...PREVIOUS EDITIONS ARE OBSOLETE 50. DATE Page 3 of 3 Pages Follow-up Evaluation of Air Force Blood Donors Screening Positive for Chagas Disease

  19. 'Alive' searches as complementing death searches in the epidemiological follow-up of Ontario miners

    Fair, M.E.; Newcombe, H.B.; Lalonde, P.; Poliquin, C.

    1988-02-01

    'Alive' searches have been used to complement the 'death' searches, in a study of the mortality experience of a cohort of Ontario miners. The purpose has been to develop a way of distinguishing between those cohort members who are 'confirmed' alive at a given time, and those who are 'lost to follow-up'. A total of 30,000 Workers' Compensation Board (WCB) records with valid Social Insurance Numbers (SIN) were used to search the income tax files by computer over two consecutive years (1977 and 1978) representing nearly 27 million tax returns. These tax file searches using SIN numbers have provided information on the procedures to be used in, and likely success of, the corresponding searches of the tax files that could be carried out where the SIN number is not available on the work records. The latter kind of search would have to be based on names, birth dates and such, and would be probabilistic in nature. The results of the study were as follows: After the initial death search, it was found that 7.5% of the cohort had died in Canada and their records were found on the Mortality Data Base. The remaining 92.5% has been 'assumed alive' in the earlier analysis. After the 'alive' follow-up using the income tax file, one was able to confirm that 89.1% of the 'assumed alive' had filed an income tax after the study period. Thus only 3.4% of the cohort remained untraced. Among those there could be an admixture of deaths outside of Canada, persons who have moved outside of Canada and are still alive, and/or persons alive within Canada, but who have not filed an income tax return. This study has indicated that the procedures developed are useful for purposes of 'alive' follow-up, for evaluation of the quality of the Mortality Data Base-cohort death file searches, for improving the accuracy of analytical results of epidemiological studies, and for reducing the cost and labour of resolving doubtful death searches

  20. Establishment of an inferior vena cava filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up - retrieval rates and patients lost to follow-up.

    Klinken, Sven; Humphries, Charlotte; Ferguson, John

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the rates of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval and the number of patient's lost to follow-up, before and after the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology (inserting physician) led follow-up. On the 1st of June 2012, an electronic interventional radiology database was established at our Institution. In addition, the interventional radiology team took responsibility for follow-up of IVC filters. Data were prospectively collected from the database for all patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st June 2012 and the 31st May 2014. Data on patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st of June 2009 to the 31st of May 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, insertion indications, filter types, retrieval status, documented retrieval decisions, time in situ, trackable events and complications were obtained in the pre-database (n = 136) and post-database (n = 118) cohorts. Attempted IVC filter retrieval rates were improved from 52.9% to 72.9% (P = 0.001) following the establishment of the database. The number of patients with no documented decision (lost to follow-up) regarding their IVC filter reduced from 31 of 136 (23%) to 0 of 118 patients (P = database group (113 as compared to 137 days, P = 0.129). Following the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the attempted retrieval rates of IVC filters and the number of patient's lost to follow-up. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. Optic neuritis in paediatric patients: Experience over 27 years and a management protocol.

    Monge Galindo, L; Martínez de Morentín, A L; Pueyo Royo, V; García Iñiguez, J P; Sánchez Marco, S; López-Pisón, J; Peña-Segura, J L

    2018-03-08

    In this article, we present our experience on optic neuritis (ON) and provide a diagnostic/therapeutic protocol, intended to rule out other aetiologies (particularly infection), and a fact sheet for parents. We conducted a descriptive, retrospective study of patients with ON over a 27-year period (1990-2017). A review of the available scientific evidence was performed in order to draft the protocol and fact sheet. Our neuropaediatrics department has assessed 20,744 patients in the last 27 years, of whom 14 were diagnosed with ON: 8 had isolated ON, 1 had multiple sclerosis (MS), 1 had clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), 3 had acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and 1 had isolated ON and a history of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis one year previously. Patients' age range was 4-13 years; 50% were boys. Eight patients were aged over 10: 7 had isolated ON and 1 had MS. Nine patients had bilateral ON, and 3 had retrobulbar ON. MRI results were normal in 7 patients and showed involvement of the optic nerve only in 2 patients and optic nerve involvement + central nervous system demyelination in 5. Thirteen patients received corticosteroids. One patient had been vaccinated against meningococcus-C the previous month. Progression was favourable, except in the patient with MS. A management protocol and fact sheet are provided. ON usually has a favourable clinical course. In children aged older than 10 years with risk factors for MS or optic neuromyelitis (hyperintensity on brain MRI, oligoclonal bands, anti-NMO antibody positivity, ON recurrence), the initiation of immunomodulatory treatment should be agreed with the neurology department. The protocol is useful for diagnostic decision-making, follow-up, and treatment of this rare disease with potentially major repercussions. The use of protocols and fact sheets is important. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Early optical follow-up of the nearby active star DG CVn during its 2014 superflare

    Caballero-Garcia, M.D.; Šimon, Vojtěch; Jelínek, M.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Cwiek, A.; Claret, A.; Opiela, R.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Gorosabel, J.; Oates, S.R.; Cunniffe, R.; Jeong, S.; Hudec, René; Sokolov, V. V.; Makarov, D.I.; Tello, J.; Lara-Gil, O.; Kubánek, Petr; Guziy, S.; Bai, J.; Fan, Y.; Wang, C.; Park, I.H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 452, č. 4 (2015), s. 4195-4202 ISSN 0035-8711 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 283783 - GLORIA Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA13-33324S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : stars * activity * flare Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy , Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.952, year: 2015

  3. The positive effect of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion is preserved at long-term follow-up: a RCT with 11-13 year follow-up

    Andersen, Thomas; Videbaek, Tina S; Hansen, Ebbe S

    2008-01-01

    outcome parameter. RESULTS: Follow-up was 83% of the original study population (107 patients). Average follow-up time was 12 years (range 11-13 years). DPQ-scores were significantly lower than preoperatively in both groups (P ... had retired due to low back pain had poorer outcome than patients retired for other reasons, best outcome was seen in patients still at work (P = 0.01 or less in all questionnaires, except SF-36 MCS P = 0.08). DISCUSSION: Improvement in functional outcome is preserved for 10 or more years after...

  4. Role of Electrophysiology in the Early Diagnosis and Follow-Up of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Nicola Pescosolido

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy is a severe and common complication of diabetes, representing a leading cause of blindness among working-age people in developed countries. It is estimated that the number of people with diabetic retinopathy (DR will increase from 126.6 million in 2011 to 191 million by 2030. The pathology seems to be characterized not only by the involvement of retinal microvessels but also by a real neuropathy of central nervous system, similar to what happens to the peripheral nerves, particularly affected by diabetes. The neurophysiological techniques help to assess retinal and nervous (optic tract function. Electroretinography (ERG and visual evoked potentials (VEP allow a more detailed study of the visual function and of the possible effects that diabetes can have on the visual function. These techniques have an important role both in the clinic and in research: the central nervous system, in fact, has received much less attention than the peripheral one in the study of the complications of diabetes. These techniques are safe, repeatable, quick, and objective. In addition, both the ERG (especially the oscillatory potentials and the flicker-ERG and VEP have proved to be successful tools for the early diagnosis of the disease and, potentially, for the ophthalmologic follow-up of diabetic patients.

  5. Afterglow Population Studies from Swift Follow-Up Observations of Fermi LAT GRBs

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; McEnery, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    The small population of Fermi LAT detected GRBs discovered over the last year has been providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 5 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into other components of GRB emission structure. We explore the new ability to utilize both of these observatories to study the same GRBs over 10 orders of magnitude in energy, although not always concurrently. Almost all LAT GRBs that have been followed-up by Swift within 1-day have been clearly detected and carefully observed. We will present the context of the lower-energy afterglows of this special subset of GRBs that has > 100 MeV emission compared to the hundreds in the Swift database that may or may not have been observed by LAT, and theorize upon the relationship between these properties and the origin of the high energy gamma-ray emission.

  6. Gardner's syndrome: a ten year follow up survey of 12 subjects in a family

    Lu Kaimin; Si Liya; Wu Zhiqiang; Lu Xuan; Meng Liancheng

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study the development of Gardner's syndrome by following up 12 subjects in a family for ten years. Methods: 12 subjects with Gardner's syndrome of 4 generations in a family were studied. Six were male and six female. The age of the patients was from 9 to 74 years, with average of 38 years. The examinations consisted of air-barium double contrast radiography of colon, fiber-optic colonoscopy, plain X-ray and body photography. Results: Triology was present in 8 cases (66.7%) and the double signs in 4 cases (33.3%). 4 patients (33.3%) died of malignant degeneration of colonic polyp in 10 years, all occurring in rectum and sigmoid colon, the oldest one was 74 years and the youngest 35 years. Conclusion: The incidence of malignant degeneration of colonic polyp is very high in patients with Gardner's syndrome and may occur in patients older than 30 years, with the peak incidence in the sixth decade. Preventive resection of colonic polyp is still the best treatment

  7. Pediatric familial neuromyelitis optica in two sisters with long term follow-up.

    Chuquilin, Miguel; Mullaguri, Naresh; Weinshenker, Brian

    2016-07-01

    Neuromyelitis optica causes bilateral optic neuritis and longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis. Although usually sporadic, 3% of cases of neuromyelitis optica are familial. The interval over which attacks continue and the long term prognosis for pediatric-onset neuromyelitis optica are not well defined. We describe two patients with pediatric familial neuromyelitis optica with the longest clinical follow-up of a pediatric case reported in the literature to our knowledge. One woman developed blindness with bilateral eye involvement within a few weeks at age 3. This was followed by transverse myelitis with paraparesis at age 19 leading to diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica. Her serum anti-aquaporin 4 antibody was later found to be positive. She continued with sporadic myelitis-related relapses but remained ambulant until age 40 when she had a more severe relapse. There was evidence of longitudinal extensive T2 hyperintensity in the thoracic spinal cord. Her sister also developed blindness at age 3.5 followed by myelitis 1year later with multiple relapses of gait impairment until her death from pneumonia at age 21. These patients represent the rare occurrence of neuromyelitis optica in children within the same family and show that this disease can have prolonged periods of remission but a continued tendency to relapse, supporting the need for lifelong immunosuppression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intralesional curettage of central low-grade chondrosarcoma: A midterm follow-up study.

    Chen, Yi-Chou; Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to review the experience of surgical treatment of low-grade chondrosarcoma and to assess the long-term oncological and functional outcomes between intralesional curettage and wide excision. We included 11 patients with central low-grade chondrosarcoma lesions treated with intralesional curettage or wide excision from 1998 to 2013. Seven patients were treated with intralesional curettage and local adjuvant treatment (Group A), and four patients were treated with wide excision and reconstructive surgery (Group B). The mean age of patients was 43.8±17.6 years (range, 20-71 years), and the mean duration of follow-up was 84.4±47.6 months (range, 48-194 months). Group A had a significantly lower complication rate than Group B; three complications were documented in Group B (0% vs. 75%, p=0.024). The operative time (177.1 hours vs. 366.3 hours, p=0.010) and the hospital stay (6.6 days vs. 12.5 days, p=0.010) were significantly shorter in Group A. There was one local recurrence in Group A without statistical significance. Also, there were no differences between intralesional curettage and wide excision with respect to the blood loss. No metastasis disease occurred in either group during the follow-up period. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) scores in Groups A and B were 99.0±2.5 and 94.2±4.2, respectively, with statistically significant difference (p=0.048). Extended intralesional curettage has the benefits of good MSTS score, shorter operative time, shorter hospital stay, and lower complication rate without increasing local recurrence in central low-grade chondrosarcoma. For central low-grade chondrosarcoma, we suggest extended curettage to decrease soft tissue damage and surgical risk. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  9. Intervention to improve follow-up for abnormal Papanicolaou tests: a randomized clinical trial.

    Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Dawson, Lauren; Grady, James J; Breitkopf, Daniel M; Nelson-Becker, Carolyn; Snyder, Russell R

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of a theory-based, culturally targeted intervention on adherence to follow-up among low-income and minority women who experience an abnormal Pap test. 5,049 women were enrolled and underwent Pap testing. Of these, 378 had an abnormal result and 341 (90%) were randomized to one of three groups to receive their results: Intervention (I): culturally targeted behavioral and normative beliefs + knowledge/skills + salience + environmental constraints/barriers counseling; Active Control (AC): nontargeted behavioral and normative beliefs + knowledge/skills + salience + environmental constraints/barriers counseling; or Standard Care Only (SCO). The primary outcome was attendance at the initial follow-up appointment. Secondary outcomes included delay in care, completion of care at 18 months, state anxiety (STAI Y-6), depressive symptoms (CES-D), and distress (CDDQ). Anxiety was assessed at enrollment, notification of results, and 7-14 days later with the CDDQ and CES-D. 299 women were included in intent-to-treat analyses. Adherence rates were 60% (I), 54% (AC), and 58% (SCO), p = .73. Completion rates were 39% (I) and 35% in the AC and SCO groups, p = .77. Delay in care (in days) was (M ± SD): 58 ± 75 (I), 69 ± 72 (AC), and 54 ± 75 (SCO), p = .75. Adherence was associated with higher anxiety at notification, p < .01 and delay < 90 days (vs. 90+) was associated with greater perceived personal responsibility, p < .05. Women not completing their care (vs. those who did) had higher CES-D scores at enrollment, p < .05. A theory-based, culturally targeted message was not more effective than a nontargeted message or standard care in improving behavior.

  10. Follow-up care of young childhood cancer survivors: attendance and parental involvement.

    Vetsch, Janine; Rueegg, Corina S; Mader, Luzius; Bergstraesser, Eva; Rischewski, Johannes; Kuehni, Claudia E; Michel, Gisela

    2016-07-01

    Despite recommendations, only a proportion of long-term childhood cancer survivors attend follow-up care. We aimed to (1) describe the follow-up attendance of young survivors aged 11-17 years; (2) describe the parental involvement in follow-up, and (3) investigate predictors of follow-up attendance and parental involvement. As part of the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a follow-up questionnaire was sent to parents of childhood cancer survivors aged 11-17 years. We assessed follow-up attendance of the child, parents' involvement in follow-up, illness perception (Brief IPQ), and sociodemographic data. Clinical data was available from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry. Of 309 eligible parents, 189 responded (67 %; mean time since diagnosis 11.3 years, range 6.8-17.2) and 75 % (n = 141) reported that their child still attended follow-up. Of these, 83 % (n = 117) reported ≥1 visit per year and 17 % (n = 23) reported parents (92 %) reported being involved in follow-up (n = 130). In multivariable and Cox regression analyses, longer time since diagnosis (p = 0.025) and lower perceived treatment control (assessed by IPQ4: how much parents thought follow-up can help with late effects; p = 0.009) were associated with non-attendance. Parents' overall information needs was significantly associated with parental involvement in the multivariable model (p = 0.041). Educating survivors and their parents on the importance and effectiveness of follow-up care might increase attendance in the longer term.

  11. Structured nursing follow-up: does it help in diabetes care?

    Shani, Michal; Nakar, Sasson; Lustman, Alex; Lahad, Amnon; Vinker, Shlomo

    2014-01-01

    In 1995 Clalit Health Services introduced a structured follow-up schedule, by primary care nurses, of diabetic patients. This was supplementary care, given in addition to the family physician's follow-up care. This article aims to describe the performance of diabetes follow-up and diabetes control in patients with additional structured nursing follow-up care, compared to those patients followed only by their family physician. We randomly selected 2,024 type 2 diabetic subjects aged 40-76 years. For each calendar year, from 2005-2007, patients who were "under physician follow-up only" were compared to those who received additional structured nursing follow-up care. Complete diabetes follow-up parameters including: HbA1c, LDL cholesterol, microalbumin, blood pressure measurements and fundus examination. The average age of study participants was 60.7 years, 52% were females and 38% were from low socioeconomic status (SES). In 2005, 39.5% of the diabetic patients received structured nursing follow-up, and the comparable figures for 2006 and 2007 were 42.1% 49.6%, respectively. The intervention subjects tended to be older, from lower SES, suffered from more chronic diseases and visited their family physician more frequently than the control patients. Patients in the study group were more likely to perform a complete diabetes follow-up plan: 52.8% vs. 21.5% (2005; p nursing follow-up care were more likely to perform complete diabetes follow-up protocol. Our results reinforce the importance of teamwork in diabetic care. Further study is required to identify strategies for channeling the use of the limited resources to the patients who stand to benefit the most.

  12. Profile and pattern of follow-ups of psychiatry outpatients at Christian Medical College, Ludhiana

    Mamta Singla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: As psychiatric illness requires long-term treatment, some patients are lost to follow-up. Aims: The present study aimed to find the follow-up pattern of psychiatric patients attending psychiatry outpatient department (OPD and to determine the correlation of follow-up with socio-demographic profile and diagnosis, if any. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective data analysis study carried out at the OPD of Psychiatry, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana. Subjects and Methods: New cases attending the OPD from April 2010 to March 2011 were included in this study. The data were scrutinized 1 year after the initial assessment. Socio-demographic data, diagnosis and follow-up information were obtained from the files. The collected data were statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and P value. Results: 53.1% of the patients dropped out after first visit, 29.4% patients had 1-3 follow-up, 14.9% had 4-10 follow-ups and only 2.6% had more than 10 follow-ups. Correlation between follow-up and various socio-demographic variables such as age, gender, place of living or distance from hospital, occupation, religion and marital status was not statistically significant. It was, however, seen that cognitive disorders, conversion disorder, mental retardation, and patients in which diagnosis was deferred, had more dropout rate after first visit. Conclusions: In our study 53.1% of the patients did not attend follow-up at all and only 2.6% had more than 10 follow ups. Correlation between follow-up and various socio-demographic variables was not statistically significant. Patients in which diagnosis was deferred had more drop out rate than patients who had a diagnosis and the difference was statistically significant.

  13. Following-up study on radiation-induced retinopathy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Zhang Qingping; Zhou Weiwei; Xie Chengxi; Huang Guangwu; Ruan Lin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the frequency of ocular complication and the quality of patient's life after radiation therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 254 NPC patients who initially received radiation were followed and analysed. Visual acuity, automational visual field, slit-lamp microscopic findings, pattern visual evoked potential (P-VEP) and fundal findings were determined before, during and after radiation therapy. The severity of retinal impairment was assessed according to the international criteria on late tissue effects. Results: The radiation dose was more than 70 Gy in 241 (94.9%)NPC patients, giving a radiation retinopathy incidence of 8.7% (22) patients after a mean of 46.8±14.4 months. After being diagnosed as radiation retinopathy, 16 patients received combined-modality therapy of the modern medicine and Chinese traditional medicine. The disease condition was controlled in 56%(9) patients but progressed into optic neuropathy in 7 patients, 3 of whom developed radiation encephalopathy in 14 to 20 months after onset of retinopathy. The morbidity of radiation retinopathy was not associated with the patient's age, but was related to the radiation dose. The retinopathy rate was as high as 13.6% in the 75-79 Gy group, which is significantly higher than 5.6% in the 70-74 Gy group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy in NPC patients is related to the radiation dose and individual difference in radiosensitivity. Optic nerve and brain damage are already present when clinical manifestations of radiation retinopathy occur. Therefore CT and MRI of the brain should be carried out. The importance of long-term follow-up should be stressed for early diagnosis and treatment of radiation sequelae for the sake of complete return of visual function and good quality of life

  14. Health Care Engagement and Follow-up After Perceived Discrimination in Maternity Care.

    Attanasio, Laura; Kozhimannil, Katy B

    2017-09-01

    Negative experiences in the health care system, including perceived discrimination, can result in patient disengagement from health care. Four million US women give birth each year, and the perinatal period is a time of sustained interaction with the health care system, but potential consequences of negative experiences have not been examined in this context. We assessed whether perceived discrimination during the birth hospitalization were associated with postpartum follow-up care. Data were from the Listening to Mothers III survey, a nationally drawn sample of 2400 women with singleton births in US hospitals in 2011-2012. We used multivariate logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds of having a postpartum visit in the 8 weeks following birth by perceptions of discrimination due to (1) race/ethnicity; (2) insurance type; and (3) a difference of opinion with a provider about care. Women who experienced any of the 3 types of perceived discrimination had more than twice the odds of postpartum visit nonattendance (adjusted odds ratio=2.28, P=0.001), after adjusting for socioeconomic and medical characteristics. The postpartum visit is an opportunity for a patient and clinician to address continuing health problems following birth, discuss contraception, and screen for chronic disease. Forgoing this care may have negative health effects. The findings from this study underscore the need to reduce discrimination and improve maternity care experiences.

  15. Early Primary Endoscopic Realignment of Posterior Urethral Injury- Evaluation and Follow-Up

    Prasad Mylarappa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of complete orpartial posterior urethral disruption is contro-versial and much debate continues regarding theimmediate, early and delayed definitive therapy.Objective: We report our institutional experi-ence and long term result of early endoscopicrealignment of traumatic posterior urethral in-jury. Method and Materials: Between Septem-ber 1996 and March 2012, ninety six men witheither complete (84 or partial (12 posteriorurethral injury secondary to blunt trauma (11or pelvic fractures (85, presented to our insti-tution and these patients underwent immediatesuprapubic cystostomy followed by early pri-mary endoscopic realignment done 3-8 daysafter injury. Result: Seventy four patients(92.5% were continent after catheter removal.Urethral stricture was seen in seventy two pa-tients (90% of which fifty patients (69.4%had simple urethral stricture who were managedby urethral dilatation on outpatient basis. Four-teen patients (19.4% developed short stric-tures which were successfully treated with vi-sual internal urethrotomy. Eight patients(11.1% required anastomotic urethroplasty fordense stricture. Potency was retained in sev-enty five patients (93.75%. Urinary flow mea-surements at follow-up evaluation were satis-factory.Conclusion:Early primary endoscopic realign-ment in our experience reduces time to spon-taneous voiding, decrease the need for majorreconstructive surgery and long term supra pub-lic urinary diversion.

  16. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    Kafka, Gene [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with signi cant exibility in mind, but without compromising cost e ciency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of di erent variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of- ight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  17. Cardiac abnormalities in a follow-up study on carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    van Westrum, S. M. Schade; Hoogerwaard, E. M.; Dekker, L.; Standaar, T. S.; Bakker, E.; Ippel, P. F.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Majoor-Krakauer, D. F.; van Essen, A. J.; Leschot, N. J.; Wilde, A. A. M.; de Haan, R. J.; de Visser, M.; van der Kooi, A. J.

    Objectives: Cardiac involvement has been reported in carriers of dystrophin mutations giving rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). The progress of these abnormalities during long-term follow-up is unknown. We describe the long-term follow-up of dilated

  18. Cardiac abnormalities in a follow-up study on carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    Schade van Westrum, S. M.; Hoogerwaard, E. M.; Dekker, L.; Standaar, T. S.; Bakker, E.; Ippel, P. F.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Majoor-Krakauer, D. F.; van Essen, A. J.; Leschot, N. J.; Wilde, A. A. M.; de Haan, R. J.; de Visser, M.; van der Kooi, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Cardiac involvement has been reported in carriers of dystrophin mutations giving rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). The progress of these abnormalities during long-term follow-up is unknown. We describe the long-term follow-up of dilated

  19. Colorectal cancer incidence in path_MLH1 carriers subjected to different follow-up protocols

    Seppälä, Toni; Pylvänäinen, Kirsi; Evans, Dafydd Gareth

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenic MLH1 variants (path_MLH1) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy.......We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenic MLH1 variants (path_MLH1) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy....

  20. Hearing screening follow-up return rate in a very low birth weight ...

    These may involve parental education and counselling, as well as involvement of nursing staff and medical professionals in implementation of EHDI programmes. It may be possible to improve followup by aligning follow-up screening with the day of neonatal follow-up clinics in provincial hospitals where such services are ...

  1. Socializing Intellectual Talk: A Case Study of Instructor Follow-Up Statements in Classroom Discourse

    Parsons, Caroline S.

    2017-01-01

    By analyzing the audio recording and transcription of classroom discourse, this case study focused on the ways in which the instructor used follow-up statements to socialize students into intellectual talk. Four relevant categories of follow-up statements emerged: (a) revoicing, (b) contextualization, (c) parallel elaboration, and (d) assistive…

  2. Loss to follow-up in an international, multicentre observational study

    Mocroft, A; Kirk, O; Aldins, P

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to assess loss to follow-up (LTFU) in EuroSIDA, an international multicentre observational cohort study. METHODS: LTFU was defined as no follow-up visit, CD4 cell count measurement or viral load measurement after 1 January 2006. Poisson regression was used...

  3. Anxiety and depression after prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment: 5-year follow-up

    Korfage, I. J.; Essink-Bot, M.-L.; Janssens, A. C. J. W.; Schröder, F. H.; de Koning, H. J.

    2006-01-01

    To document anxiety and depression from pretreatment till 5-year follow-up in 299 men with localized prostate cancer. To assess, if baseline scores were predictive for anxiety and depression at 1-year follow-up. Respondents completed four assessments (pretreatment, at 6 and 12 months, and at 5-year

  4. Breast cancer follow-up: from the perspective of health professionals and patients

    Kwast, A.B.G.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Siesling, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Increased breast cancer incidence and better survival have raised the number of patients requiring follow-up care. Despite guidelines, there is controversy about appropriate breast cancer follow-up. Therefore, semi-structured interviews were conducted in two hospitals with 23 patients and 18 health

  5. Patient's needs and preferences in routine follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    de Bock, GH; Bonnema, J; Zwaan, RE; de Velde, CJH; Kievit, J; Stiggelbout, AM

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the needs of women who participated in a routine follow-up programme after treatment for primary breast cancer. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a postal questionnaire among women without any sign of relapse during the routine follow-up period. The

  6. Methodological guide for the follow-up and elaboration of performance assessments of a methanization plant

    Bastide, Guillaume

    2014-06-01

    This guide aims at giving indications required for a good implementation of an exploitation follow-up of a methanization plant. More precisely, it aims at foreseeing equipment necessary to the follow-up of installation construction, at preparing the operator to the follow-up and command of his installation, at elaborating operation assessments and performance interpretations, at proposing solutions and/or improvements. The described follow-up process can be applied to all the process stages (from receipt to by-product valorization), and addresses technical as well as economic aspects. Thus, four types of assessments are made: technical, energetic, environmental, and social-economic. This guide comprises five parts: a presentation of follow-up objectives (information to be looked for, benefits and drawbacks, follow-up level to be implemented), the follow-up methodology, follow-up assessments (what they are and how to elaborate them), practical sheets (practical presentation of techniques, typical Excel spreadsheets), and a glossary which explains the main technical terms

  7. Follow-up, treatment, and reinfection rates among asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis cases in general practice

    Van Valkengoed, Irene G.M.; Morré, Servaas A.; Van Den Brule, Adriaan J.C.; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Bouter, Lex M.; Van Eijk, Jacques Th M.; Boeke, A. Joan P.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Adequate treatment and follow-up of patients is essential to the success of a screening programme for Chlamydia trachomatis. There has been a lack of data on follow-up, confirmation of infections, and reinfection rates among asymptomatic patients in general practice. Aim: To study the

  8. Follow-up, treatment, and reinfection rates among asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis cases in general practice

    Van Valkengoed, Irene G.M.; Morré, Servaas A.; Van Den Brule, Adriaan J.C.; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Bouter, Lex M.; Van Eijk, Jacques Th M.; Boeke, A. Joan P.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adequate treatment and follow-up of patients is essential to the success of a screening programme for Chlamydia trachomatis. There has been a lack of data on follow-up, confirmation of infections, and reinfection rates among asymptomatic patients in general practice. AIM: 7b study the

  9. Follow-up, treatment, and reinfection rates among asymptomatic chlamydia trachomatis cases in general practice

    van Valkengoed, Irene G. M.; Morré, Servaas A.; van den Brule, Adriaan J. C.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Bouter, Lex M.; van Eijk, Jacques Th M.; Boeke, A. Joan P.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adequate treatment and follow-up of patients is essential to the success of a screening programme for Chlamydia trachomatis. There has been a lack of data on follow-up, confirmation of infections, and reinfection rates among asymptomatic patients in general practice. AIM: 7b study the

  10. Initial non-participation and loss to follow-up in a Danish youth cohort

    Winding, Trine Nøhr; Andersen, Johan H; Labriola, Merete

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Initial non-participation and loss to follow-up in the Danish youth cohort Vestliv could introduce selection bias of the measured risk estimates. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of initial non-participation and loss to follow-up on the validity of descriptive measures and selected...

  11. Oral squamous cell carcinoma and a clinically negative neck : the value of follow-up

    Wensing, Bart M; Merkx, Matthias A W; Krabbe, Paul F M; Marres, Henri A M; Van den Hoogen, Frank J A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC), regular follow-up comprises 5 years of prescheduled visits, irrespective of tumor stage/classification and/or treatment. We analyzed our standard treatment and follow-up protocol in patients with a preoperative clinically negative

  12. 48 CFR 2427.305-2 - Follow-up by contractor.

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Follow-up by contractor....305-2 Follow-up by contractor. (b) Contractor reports. Contractors shall complete and submit to the... Contracting Officer shall send the form to those contractors whose contract work may have required the...

  13. Long-Term Follow-up After Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations with Detachable Silicone Balloons

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette D

    2008-01-01

    ) with pulmonary angiography. Fifty-four percent of the balloons were deflated at latest radiographic chest film follow-up, but at pulmonary angiographic follow-up all embolized malformations were without flow irrespective of whether or not the balloons were visible. Detachable silicone balloons are not available...

  14. Risk of Future Suicide Attempts in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients at 18-Month Follow-Up.

    Brinkman-Sull, David C.; Overholser, James C.; Silverman, Eden

    2000-01-01

    Investigates potential predictors of suicidal behavior in adolescent psychiatric patients (N=60) during an 18-month follow-up period. Follow-up suicidality was most strongly predicted by high intake levels of hopelessness, and an increase in or persistent problems with depression. Proposes a model in which the impact of family functioning on…

  15. Infantile Amnesia across the Years: A 2-Year Follow-Up of Children's Earliest Memories

    Peterson, Carole; Warren, Kelly L.; Short, Megan M.

    2011-01-01

    Although infantile amnesia has been investigated for many years in adults, only recently has it been investigated in children. This study was a 2-year follow-up and extension of an earlier study. Children (4-13 years old) were asked initially and 2 years later for their earliest 3 memories. At follow-up, their age at the time of these memories…

  16. Follow-up of treated coeliac patients: Sugar absorption test and intestinal biopsies compared

    Uil, J. J.; van Elburg, R. M.; van Overbeek, F. M.; Meyer, J. W.; Mulder, C. J.; Heymans, H. S.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the sugar absorption test (SAT) during follow-up of patients with coeliac disease on a gluten-free diet (GFD) correlates with improvement of the villous architecture of the small intestine. Methods: The SAT was performed in coeliacs at diagnosis and during follow-up

  17. Nurse-Led Telephone Follow-up: Improving Options for Women With Endometrial Cancer

    Smits, A.; Lopes, A.; Das, N.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Kent, E.; McCullough, Z.; Galaal, K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurse-led follow-up (NLFU) has been identified as a suitable means of follow-up care in cancer patients, and its acceptability has already been demonstrated in other areas of cancer care. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of NLFU on quality of life and

  18. Effective follow-up consultations : the importance of patient-centered communication and shared decision making

    Brand, Paul L. P.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.

    2013-01-01

    Paediatricians spend a considerable proportion of their time performing follow-up visits for children with chronic conditions, but they rarely receive specific training on how best to perform such consultations. The traditional method of running a follow-up consultation is based on the doctor's

  19. International clinical guideline for the management of classical galactosemia: diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up

    Welling, Lindsey; Bernstein, Laurie E.; Berry, Gerard T.; Burlina, Alberto B.; Eyskens, François; Gautschi, Matthias; Grünewald, Stephanie; Gubbels, Cynthia S.; Knerr, Ina; Labrune, Philippe; van der Lee, Johanna H.; MacDonald, Anita; Murphy, Elaine; Portnoi, Pat A.; Õunap, Katrin; Potter, Nancy L.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. Estela; Spencer, Jessica B.; Timmers, Inge; Treacy, Eileen P.; van Calcar, Sandra C.; Waisbren, Susan E.; Bosch, Annet M.

    2017-01-01

    Classical galactosemia (CG) is an inborn error of galactose metabolism. Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and follow-up of CG are currently lacking, and treatment and follow-up have been demonstrated to vary worldwide. To provide patients around the world the same state-of-the-art in care,

  20. Experts Complete IAEA Follow-up Review of Spanish Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear safety experts today concluded an eight-day mission to review Spain's nuclear regulator, the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN). At the request of the Spanish Government, the International Atomic Energy Agency assembled a peer-review team of five high-level regulatory experts from four nations and two IAEA staff members to conduct a follow-up assessment of an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission conducted in 2008. This follow-up IRRS mission examined CSN's progress in acting upon the recommendations and suggestions made during the 2008 IRRS mission and reviewed the areas of significant regulatory changes since that review. Both reviews covered safety and security regulatory aspects of all facilities and activities in Spain. The first mission reviewed Spain's regulatory framework against IAEA Safety Standards and fostered the exchange of information and experience on safety regulation. The mission also included a peer review of the security activities within the regulatory framework. IRRS team leader Luis Reyes, Senior Executive of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, said today, 'In 2008, the mission found particular strengths in CSN's policy, its regulatory framework and its regulatory activities. We made a number of suggestions and recommendations for further improvement of the regulatory framework. CSN should be commended for the significant amount of efforts in addressing all the findings identified in 2008 mission.' The review team found that CSN has made significant progress toward improving its regulatory activities. Most of the findings identified in the 2008 report have been effectively addressed and therefore can be considered closed. Additional findings are being addressed in accordance with a comprehensive and systematic action plan, in particular efforts to revise the CSN Statute. Complementing the CSN strengths identified during the 2008 mission, the 2011 IRRS team noted the following strengths: Improvements in regulatory

  1. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    Chopra I

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an understanding of the goals of follow-up care, and unique psychosocial aspects of care for these patients. The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies focusing on follow-up care in BCSs from the patient's and physician's perspective or from patterns of care and to integrate primary empirical evidence on the different aspects of follow-up care from these studies. Methods: A comprehensive literature review and evaluation was conducted for all relevant publications in English from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2013 using electronic databases. Studies were included in the final review if they focused on BCS’s preferences and perceptions, physician's perceptions, patterns of care, and effectiveness of follow-up care. Results: A total of 47 studies assessing the different aspects of follow-up care were included in the review, with a majority of studies (n=13 evaluating the pattern of follow-up care in BCSs, followed by studies focusing on BCS's perceptions (n=9 and preferences (n=9. Most of the studies reported variations in recommended frequency, duration, and intensity of follow-up care as well as frequency of mammogram screening. In addition, variations were noted in patient preferences for type of health care provider (specialist versus non-specialist. Further, BCSs perceived a lack of psychosocial support and information for management of side effects. Conclusion: The studies reviewed, conducted in a range of settings, reflect variations in

  2. Exploration of Postoperative Follow-up Strategies for Early Staged NSCLC Patients on the Basis of Follow-up Result of 416 Stage I NSCLC Patients after Lobectomy

    Liang DAI

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Currently, there is no consensus on the follow-up strategy (follow-up time interval and content of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in the world, and the relevant clinical evidence is also very limited. In this study, we aimed to summarize the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings of stage I NSCLC patients based on their follow-up data, aiming to provide a basis of follow-up time interval and content for this group of patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the 416 stage I NSCLC patients that underwent continuous anatomic lobectomy between Jan. 2000 to Oct. 2013 in our prospective lung cancer database. According to the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings, the long term follow-up time interval and content were explored. Results The 5-yr disease free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS in the whole group were 82.4% and 85.4%, respectively. There were 76 cases (18.3% had recurrence/metastasis during follow-up, among which the most frequent site was pulmonary metastasis (21 cases, 5.0%, followed by brain metastasis (20 cases, 4.8%, bone metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%, and mediastinal lymph node metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%. Among the factors that could influence recurrence/metastasis, patients with pT2a suffered from a higher recurrence/metastasis rate compared to patients with pT1 (P=0.006, with 5-yr DFS being 73.8% and 87.3%, respectively (P=0.002, and the 5-yr OS being 77.7% and 90.3%, respectively (P=0.011. Conclusion The commonest recurrence/metastasis sites of stage I NSCLC after anatomic lobectomy are lung, brain and mediastinal lymph nodes, the risk of recurrence/metastasis within 2 years were equal to that between 3 years and 5 years. The follow-up frequencies and content within 2 years could be adjusted according to T stages.

  3. Recurrence after surgery due to cervical cancer - An evaluation of the follow-up program

    Fuglsang, Katrine; Petersen, Lone Kjeld; Blaakær, Jan

    Objective During the last 20 years the follow-up program after surgical treatment for cervical cancer has remained unchanged. Surprisingly, little is communicated in relation to the follow-up program even though it has a huge impact on the life of the women and their relatives for five years....... The focus for this study is to evaluate the follow-up program in fulfilling the purpose for early diagnosis of recurrence while reminding and concerning women, who we consider healthy after surgery, 10 times during five years. Already politicians are focusing on the subject due to the socioeconomic...... consequences, but there is a need for a foundation prior to an adjustment of the follow-up program. Methods Design: retrospective study of a cohort of women attending follow-up program after surgery due to cervical cancer. Material: From the patient register at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics...

  4. Increasing Follow-up Outcomes of At-Risk Alcohol Patients Using Motivational Interviewing.

    Wagner, Andrew J; Garbers, Rachael; Lang, Ann; Borgert, Andrew J; Fisher, Mason

    2016-01-01

    Our trauma division implemented a screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) program in 2009 and has maintained more than 92% screening rate for all inpatient admissions since inception. Brief interventions are proven to be more likely to effect and reinforce change if a follow-up contact is made with patients. This led to discussion regarding whether identified patients were more likely to follow up with our SBIRT wellness specialist using motivational interviewing or with our partners, exercise physiology, who use traditional interviewing techniques. We retrospectively reviewed more than 3,000 inpatient admissions in which screening for at-risk alcohol use were positive. Fifty-one percent of identified patients were referred for wellness specialist consultation with a follow-up rate of 52% compared with a follow-up rate of only 21% in the exercise physiology group. Motivational interviewing is more effective in encouraging at-risk alcohol users to participate in follow-up care.

  5. EA follow-up in the Ghanaian mining sector: Challenges and opportunities

    Appiah-Opoku, Seth; Bryan, Hobson C.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental assessment (EA) follow-up provides a means for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of environmental impact studies. It is integral to the success or failure of a project or program. In spite of its importance, very little attention is given to the need for follow-up programs in most jurisdictions in Africa. Using a case study in the Ghanaian mining sector, this paper explores the challenges and opportunities within the country's EA process for an effective follow-up program. The paper is based on informal interviews, content analysis of relevant publications, official EA documents, and internet searches. The authors suggest a standard EA follow-up program to be formalized as an integral part of Ghana's environmental assessment policy. They also propose a follow-up process that harnesses existing opportunities within the country's EA system. This approach can be replicated in other African countries

  6. [Health management system in outpatient follow-up of kidney transplantation patients].

    Zhang, Hong; Xie, Jinliang; Yao, Hui; Liu, Ling; Tan, Jianwen; Geng, Chunmi

    2014-07-01

    To develop a health management system for outpatient follow-up of kidney transplant patients. Access 2010 database software was used to establish the health management system for kidney transplantation patients in Windows XP operating system. Database management and post-operation follow-up of the kidney transplantation patients were realized through 6 function modules including data input, data query, data printing, questionnaire survey, data export, and follow-up management. The system worked stably and reliably, and the data input was easy and fast. The query, the counting and printing were convenient. Health management system for patients after kidney transplantation not only reduces the work pressure of the follow-up staff, but also improves the efficiency of outpatient follow-up.

  7. Nut consumption and incidence of metabolic syndrome after 6-year follow-up: the SUN (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra Follow-up) cohort.

    Fernández-Montero, Alejandro; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Beunza, Juan J; Barrio-Lopez, Maria Teresa; de la Fuente-Arrillaga, Carmen; Moreno-Galarraga, Laura; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel

    2013-11-01

    To assess the long-term relationship between tree nut consumption and the risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS). Nut consumption was collected using a validated 136-item FFQ. The MetS was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation and American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute harmonizing definition. The association between nut consumption and MetS was assessed with logistic regression models adjusting for potential confounders. We compared the incidence of MetS between extreme categories of nut intake (> or = 2 servings/week v. never/almost never) after 6 years of follow-up. The SUN Project (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra Follow-up) is a prospective cohort study, formed of Spanish university graduates. Information is gathered by mailed questionnaires collected biennially. Nut consumption and MetS information was collected by self-reported data. Participants (n 9887) initially free of MetS or diabetes and followed up for a minimum of 6 years were included. We observed 567 new cases of MetS during follow-up. Participants who consumed nuts > or = 2 servings/week presented a 32% lower risk of developing MetS than those who never/almost never consumed (adjusted OR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.50, 0.92). The inverse association was stronger among participants who were health professionals. Nut consumption was significantly associated with lower risk of developing MetS after a 6-year follow-up period in a cohort of Spanish graduates.

  8. Some Early Optics: Classical and Medieval. Experiment No. 6.

    Devons, Samuel

    Information related to the history of optics with emphasis on the classical and medieval periods is presented. Notes are included on experiments dealing with refraction at a plane interface between two media; refraction by transparent spheres; light, color, and reflection by transparent spheres. (Author/SA)

  9. Factors associated with intentions to adhere to colorectal cancer screening follow-up exams

    Ishibashi Teruo

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To increase adherence rate to recommendations for follow-up after abnormal colorectal cancer (CRC screening results, factors that inhibit and facilitate follow-up must be identified. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors associated with intention to adhere to CRC screening follow-up exams. Methods During a 4-week period in October 2003, this survey was conducted with 426 subjects participating in a community-based CRC screening program in Nagano, Japan. Study measures included intention to adhere to recommendation for clinical follow-up in the event of an abnormal fecal occult blood test (FOBT result, perceived susceptibility and severity of CRC, perceived benefits and barriers related to undergoing follow-up examination, social support, knowledge of CRC risk factors, health status, previous CRC screening, personality and social demographic characteristics. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses on intention to adhere to recommendations for follow-up were performed. Results Among the 288 individuals analyzed, approximately 74.7% indicated that they would definitely adhere to recommendations for follow-up. After controlling for age, gender, marital status, education, economic status, trait anxiety, bowel symptoms, family history of CRC, and previous screening FOBT, analyses revealed that lower levels of perceived barriers, higher levers of perceived benefits and knowledge of CRC risk factors were significantly associated with high intention respectively. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that future interventions should focus on reducing modifiable barriers by clarifying misperceptions about follow-up, promoting the acceptance of complete diagnostic evaluations, addressing psychological distress, and making follow-up testing more convenient and accessible. Moreover, educating the public regarding the risk factors of CRC and increasing understanding of the benefits of follow-up is

  10. Utility of MRI in the follow-up of pyogenic spinal infection in children

    Wang, Qiuyan; Babyn, Paul; Branson, Helen; Davila, Jorge; Mueller, Edrise L.; Tran, Dat

    2010-01-01

    MRI is used at an increasing rate in evaluation of pediatric spinal infections both at the time of diagnosis and in follow-up. However, the impact of MRI in follow-up has been rarely evaluated to date. To evaluate serial follow-up spinal MRI changes compared to clinical outcome and assess their impact on clinical management. All pediatric (<18 years) patients with pyogenic spinal infection over a 9-year period with at least one follow-up after treatment were included. Atypical infections were excluded. We examined 35 whole-spine and 16 localized spinal scans from 17 patients (2 months to 16 years, 9F:8 M) who had 51 follow-ups done 2 weeks to 4.75 years after baseline. Seven children (41%) younger than 3 years underwent 33 follow-ups (65%); most required GA or sedation. Short-term follow-up scans demonstrated epidural and/or paraspinal soft-tissue changes correlating with clinical status and laboratory findings in all cases. However, MRI showed that bone and/or disc abnormalities continued and progressed in some cases despite clinical improvement. Long-term follow-up scans showed bone, disc and soft-tissue changes 1-3 years after baseline, despite children being symptom free. Extension of antibiotics occurred in 47% of children partly based on follow-up MRI. Epidural and paraspinal soft-tissue changes correlated with children's clinical symptoms. Progression of bone and disc changes can manifest despite adequate clinical response. Long-term or serial routine follow-ups were not necessary. Management should be made based on clinical response. (orig.)

  11. Detection of incidents and follow-up by the regulatory bodies

    Gouffon, A.

    1990-12-01

    Although France has established a large nuclear program based on PWR type reactors, experience gained up to this are are quite modest. Concept of PWR-900 reactors is based mostly on safety analyses and evaluations done a priori. At the time of their construction and start-up they have been considered as advanced safe systems. No data were available concerning any incidents during operation. The Three Mile Island accident in 1979 has changed the attitude concerning reactor safety. The result is the procedure adopted by Electricite de France for follow-up of incident situations during operation of a number of PWR-900 plants. Standardization of this type of NPPs demands extremely strict standards and control of safety systems. This safety analysis procedure consists of the following: analysis of incidents based on data collected by EDF during operation; every regular annual shutdown of a unit is the subject of detailed analysis; together with the detailed analysis, principal elements of operating experience for the series of PWR units are submitted for analysis to a permanent regulatory body

  12. New methods for estimating follow-up rates in cohort studies

    Xiaonan Xue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The follow-up rate, a standard index of the completeness of follow-up, is important for assessing the validity of a cohort study. A common method for estimating the follow-up rate, the “Percentage Method”, defined as the fraction of all enrollees who developed the event of interest or had complete follow-up, can severely underestimate the degree of follow-up. Alternatively, the median follow-up time does not indicate the completeness of follow-up, and the reverse Kaplan-Meier based method and Clark’s Completeness Index (CCI also have limitations. Methods We propose a new definition for the follow-up rate, the Person-Time Follow-up Rate (PTFR, which is the observed person-time divided by total person-time assuming no dropouts. The PTFR cannot be calculated directly since the event times for dropouts are not observed. Therefore, two estimation methods are proposed: a formal person-time method (FPT in which the expected total follow-up time is calculated using the event rate estimated from the observed data, and a simplified person-time method (SPT that avoids estimation of the event rate by assigning full follow-up time to all events. Simulations were conducted to measure the accuracy of each method, and each method was applied to a prostate cancer recurrence study dataset. Results Simulation results showed that the FPT has the highest accuracy overall. In most situations, the computationally simpler SPT and CCI methods are only slightly biased. When applied to a retrospective cohort study of cancer recurrence, the FPT, CCI and SPT showed substantially greater 5-year follow-up than the Percentage Method (92%, 92% and 93% vs 68%. Conclusions The Person-time methods correct a systematic error in the standard Percentage Method for calculating follow-up rates. The easy to use SPT and CCI methods can be used in tandem to obtain an accurate and tight interval for PTFR. However, the FPT is recommended when event rates and

  13. Ten-Year Follow-up of a Blind Patient Chronically Implanted with Epiretinal Prosthesis Argus I.

    Yue, Lan; Falabella, Paulo; Christopher, Punita; Wuyyuru, Varalakshmi; Dorn, Jessy; Schor, Paulo; Greenberg, Robert J; Weiland, James D; Humayun, Mark S

    2015-12-01

    The Argus I implant is the first-generation epiretinal prosthesis approved for an investigational clinical trial by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Herein we report testing results obtained from a 10-year follow-up to study the physiologic effects of the bioelectronic visual implant after prolonged chronic electrical stimulation. Case report. One man, 55 years of age when enrolled in the study, underwent surgical implantation of the Argus I in June 2004, followed by periodic tests from July 2004 through June 2014, spanning a total of 10 years. The decade-long follow-up consisted of implant system performance tests, subject visual function evaluation, and implant-retina interface analysis. Changes in electrode impedance and perceptual threshold over the time course; subject's performance on visual function task, orientation, and mobility tests; and optical coherence tomography data, fundus imaging, and fluorescein angiography results for the assessment of subject's implant-retina physical interface. Electrically elicited phosphenes were present 10 years after implantation of an epiretinal stimulator. The test subject not only was able to perceive phosphenes, but also could perform visual tasks at rates well above chance. This decade-long follow-up report provides further support for the use of retinal prostheses as a long-lasting treatment for some types of blindness. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of Sjogren's Syndrome Patient: A Case Report of Prosthetic Rehabilitation with 6-Year Follow-Up

    de Mendonça Invernici, Marcos; Finger Stadler, Amanda; Vale Nicolau, Gastão; Naval Machado, Maria Ângela; Soares de Lima, Antônio Adilson; Compagnoni Martins, Marilia

    2014-01-01

    Completely and partially edentulous patients with Sjogren’s syndrome (SS) experience severe hyposalivation, xerostomia, and considerable difficulty in using tissue-supported prosthesis. This clinical paper describes the management, treatment, and 6-year follow-up of a patient diagnosed with SS type II, who uses corticosteroids and antihyperglycemic drugs. The patient received restorative, periodontal, and surgical treatments followed by implant-supported fixed prosthesis. Radiographic evaluat...

  15. Long-term follow-up observation of the safety, immunogenicity, and effectiveness of Gardasil™ in adult women.

    Joaquin Luna

    Full Text Available Previous analyses from a randomized trial in women aged 24-45 have shown the quadrivalent HPV vaccine to be efficacious in the prevention of infection, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and external genital lesions (EGL related to HPV 6/11/16/18 through 4 years. In this report we present long term follow-up data on the efficacy, safety and immunogenicity of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in adult women.Follow-up data are from a study being conducted in 5 sites in Colombia designed to evaluate the long-term immunogenicity, effectiveness, and safety of the qHPV vaccine in women who were vaccinated at 24 to 45 years of age (in the original vaccine group during the base study [n = 684] or 29 to 50 years of age (in the original placebo group during the base study [n = 651]. This analysis summarizes data collected as of the year 6 post-vaccination visit relative to day 1 of the base study (median follow-up of 6.26 years from both the original base study and the Colombian follow-up.There were no cases of HPV 6/11/16/18-related CIN or EGL during the extended follow-up phase in the per-protocol population. Immunogenicity persists against vaccine-related HPV types, and no evidence of HPV type replacement has been observed. No new serious adverse experiences have been reported.Vaccination with qHPV vaccine provides generally safe and effective protection from HPV 6-, 11-, 16-, and 18-related genital warts and cervical dysplasia through 6 years following administration to 24-45 year-old women.Clinicaltrials.govNCT00090220.

  16. The role of the follow-up chest radiograph in suspected non-accidental injury

    Anilkumar, Adikesavalu; Fender, Laura J; Broderick, Nigel J; Somers, John M; Halliday, Katharine E [Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-15

    Rib fractures in children under the age of 2 years have a strong correlation with non-accidental injury (NAI). Follow-up radiographs can improve detection. To evaluate the value of the follow-up chest radiograph in suspected non-accidental injury. The study included all children less than 2 years of age who were investigated for suspected NAI in our institution between January 1998 and October 2003. Prior to January 2000, only selected patients were asked to attend for a follow-up chest radiograph. From January 2000 onwards all children were asked to reattend. Of 200 children included in the study, 59 (29.5%) reattended for a follow-up chest radiograph. The follow-up film provided useful additional information in 7 (12%) of the 59 children. In two children rib fractures were noted only on the follow-up chest radiograph. In a further two patients additional rib fractures were noted. Additional dating information was obtained for two patients. For one child both additional fractures and dating information were noted. The follow-up chest radiograph provides useful information in children with suspected NAI and it is recommended that it should be included routinely in the imaging investigations of these children. (orig.)

  17. The role of the follow-up chest radiograph in suspected non-accidental injury

    Anilkumar, Adikesavalu; Fender, Laura J.; Broderick, Nigel J.; Somers, John M.; Halliday, Katharine E.

    2006-01-01

    Rib fractures in children under the age of 2 years have a strong correlation with non-accidental injury (NAI). Follow-up radiographs can improve detection. To evaluate the value of the follow-up chest radiograph in suspected non-accidental injury. The study included all children less than 2 years of age who were investigated for suspected NAI in our institution between January 1998 and October 2003. Prior to January 2000, only selected patients were asked to attend for a follow-up chest radiograph. From January 2000 onwards all children were asked to reattend. Of 200 children included in the study, 59 (29.5%) reattended for a follow-up chest radiograph. The follow-up film provided useful additional information in 7 (12%) of the 59 children. In two children rib fractures were noted only on the follow-up chest radiograph. In a further two patients additional rib fractures were noted. Additional dating information was obtained for two patients. For one child both additional fractures and dating information were noted. The follow-up chest radiograph provides useful information in children with suspected NAI and it is recommended that it should be included routinely in the imaging investigations of these children. (orig.)

  18. Passive versus active follow-up to investigate the efficacy of primary prevention programs

    Högel, Josef

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Before general application of a primary prevention program its efficacy has to be demonstrated. For this purpose a randomized controlled trial with active or passive follow-up may be conducted. In the last 5 years, the ratio of controlled trials with passive versus those with active follow-up was 1:13. However, under certain circumstances a passive follow-up may be more appropriate and useful to overcome the drawbacks of an active follow-up, as e.g. high costs and many drop-outs. In a randomized controlled trial, a passive follow-up is based on the reporting of cases by physicians or hospitals instead of actively following up all study participants individually. The statistical evaluation can be carried out using a one-sample chi2-test. Advantages and limitations are discussed. A passive follow-up may be advantageous in situations with low incidence, large number of participants, complete ascertainment of conditions with obligatory notification or effective disease registries and should be preferred in such a context.

  19. Can follow-up examination of tuberculosis patients be simplified? A study in Chhattisgarh, India.

    Debashish Kundu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Each follow-up during the course of tuberculosis treatment currently requires two sputum examinations. However, the incremental yield of the second sputum sample during follow-up of different types of tuberculosis patients has never been determined precisely. OBJECTIVES: To assess the incremental yield of the second sputum sample in the follow-up of tuberculosis patients under the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP in Chhattisgarh, India. METHODOLOGY: A record review of tuberculosis (TB patients registered in 2009 using a structured proforma from two sources, Tuberculosis and Laboratory Register, was undertaken in the six districts of Chhattisgarh, India. RESULTS: In smear positive cases, of 10,048 follow-up examinations, 45 (0.5% were found to be smear positive only on the second sputum when the result of the first sample was negative. In smear negative pulmonary and extra pulmonary TB patients, of 6,206 follow-up smear examinations, 11(0.2% were found to be smear positive. CONCLUSIONS: The incremental yield of a second smear examination was very low, indicating that examination of one sputum sample is enough during follow-up among TB patients. There is insufficient yield to support sputum smear microscopy for monitoring smear negative pulmonary TB and extra pulmonary TB patients. These results indicate that the follow-up smear microscopy can be substantially simplified with favourable resource implications.

  20. Adherence to Follow-Up Recommendations by Triathlon Competitors Receiving Event Medical Care.

    Joslin, Jeremy D; Lloyd, Jarem B; Copeli, Nikoli; Cooney, Derek R

    2017-01-01

    Introduction . We sought to investigate triathlete adherence to recommendations for follow-up for participants who received event medical care. Methods . Participants of the 2011 Ironman Syracuse 70.3 (Syracuse, NY) who sought evaluation and care at the designated finish line medical tent were contacted by telephone approximately 3 months after the initial encounter to measure adherence with the recommendation to seek follow-up care after event. Results . Out of 750 race participants, 35 (4.6%) athletes received event medical care. Of these 35, twenty-eight (28/35; 80%) consented to participate in the study and 17 (61%) were available on telephone follow-up. Of these 17 athletes, 11 (11/17; 65%) of participants reported that they had not followed up with a medical professional since the race. Only 5 (5/17; 29%) confirmed that they had seen a medical provider in some fashion since the race; of these, only 2 (2/17; 12%) sought formal medical follow-up resulting from the recommendation whereas the remaining athletes merely saw their medical providers coincidentally or as part of routine care. Conclusion . Only 2 (2/17; 12%) of athletes who received event medical care obtained postrace follow-up within a one-month time period following the race. Event medical care providers must be aware of potential nonadherence to follow-up recommendations.

  1. Adherence to Follow-Up Recommendations by Triathlon Competitors Receiving Event Medical Care

    Jeremy D. Joslin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We sought to investigate triathlete adherence to recommendations for follow-up for participants who received event medical care. Methods. Participants of the 2011 Ironman Syracuse 70.3 (Syracuse, NY who sought evaluation and care at the designated finish line medical tent were contacted by telephone approximately 3 months after the initial encounter to measure adherence with the recommendation to seek follow-up care after event. Results. Out of 750 race participants, 35 (4.6% athletes received event medical care. Of these 35, twenty-eight (28/35; 80% consented to participate in the study and 17 (61% were available on telephone follow-up. Of these 17 athletes, 11 (11/17; 65% of participants reported that they had not followed up with a medical professional since the race. Only 5 (5/17; 29% confirmed that they had seen a medical provider in some fashion since the race; of these, only 2 (2/17; 12% sought formal medical follow-up resulting from the recommendation whereas the remaining athletes merely saw their medical providers coincidentally or as part of routine care. Conclusion. Only 2 (2/17; 12% of athletes who received event medical care obtained postrace follow-up within a one-month time period following the race. Event medical care providers must be aware of potential nonadherence to follow-up recommendations.

  2. Experiences with digital archiving based on optical disk

    Almasi, L.; Bitter, F.; Hellwig, D.; Wulff, P.; Bahr, R.; Weller, R.; Adam, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of using optical disks in nuclear medicine is to achieve the complete picture archiving. The size of the nuclear medicine pictures and the present storing capacity of optical disks is sufficient to solve this problem. We have developed a program system which makes it possible to archive all nuclear medicine pictures automatically. Our experiences we can summarise: 1. Low cost/image ratio (0.75 DM/MB); 2. Fast data transfer rate; 3. Short data access time; 4. Guarantee of data security (not erasable); 5. Storing reliability; 6. Large storing capacity. (orig.)

  3. Compliance with follow-up after cataract surgery in rural China.

    Huang, Guofu; Crooms, Rita; Chen, Qianyun; Congdon, Nathan; He, Mingguang

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate reasons for non-compliance with post-cataract surgical follow-up in rural China, and assess the impact of incentives on improving compliance. Patients having undergone cataract surgery more than 3 months previously at cataract surgery training hospitals in Guangdong were invited by telephone and advertisements to a hospital-based study examination, with compensation for travel costs (US$7). Information on prior post-surgical follow up was collected by questionnaire at the hospital or by telephone. Logistic regression was used to assess predictors of post-operative attendance with or without compensation. Among 518 eligible patients, 426 (82.2%) underwent interviews and 342 (66.0%) attended the compensated study examination. Ninety nine participants (23.2%) reported previously returning for uncompensated follow-up ≥ 3 months post-operatively, and 225 (52.8%) had returned for any prior post-operative examination. Uncompensated follow-up at ≥ 3 months was associated with higher income (P = 0.037), and recalling instruction by a doctor to follow-up (P = 0.001), while age, gender, travel cost, and post-operative satisfaction and vision were not associated. Younger (P = 0.002) patients and those reporting being instructed to follow up (P = 0.008) were more likely to return for the compensated research examination. Among all interviewed subjects, only 170 (39.9%) reported knowing they were to return to hospital. Modest compensation, advertisements and telephone contact can increase medium-term follow-up rates after cataract surgery by three-fold. Better communication of specific targets for follow-up may improve follow-up compliance.

  4. A Facebook Follow-Up Strategy for Rural Drug-Using Women.

    Dickson, Megan F; Staton-Tindall, Michele; Smith, Kirsten E; Leukefeld, Carl; Webster, J Matthew; Oser, Carrie B

    2017-06-01

    Facebook (FB) use has grown exponentially over the past decade, including in rural areas. Despite its popularity, FB has been underutilized as a research follow-up approach to maintain contact with research participants and may have advantages in less densely populated areas and among more hard-to-reach, at-risk groups. The overall goal of this study was to examine FB as a supplemental follow-up approach to other follow-up strategies with rural drug-using women. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with randomly selected women who completed baseline interviews in 3 rural jails in 1 state. Analyses focus on participants who were released from jail and were eligible for 3-month follow-up (n = 284). Bivariate analyses were used to examine differences between FB users and nonusers, and multivariate logistic regression models examined predictors of 3-month follow-up participation and being located for follow-up using FB. About two-thirds (64.4%) of participants were regular FB users. Bivariate analyses indicated that FB users were younger, more educated, and more likely to have used alcohol in the 30 days before incarceration but less likely to have a chronic health problem. Regression analyses indicated that rural FB users had more than 5 times the odds of being located for the 3-month follow-up interview, even after controlling for other variables. There were no significant predictors of being followed up using FB. Findings suggest that FB is widely used and well accepted among rural drug-using women. Among hard-to-reach populations, including those in rural, geographically isolated regions, FB serves as a method to improve participant follow-up. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  5. Functional and morphological assessment of ocular structures and follow-up of patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease.

    Hasanov, Samir; Demirkilinc Biler, Elif; Acarer, Ahmet; Akkın, Cezmi; Colakoglu, Zafer; Uretmen, Onder

    2018-05-09

    To evaluate and follow-up of functional and morphological changes of the optic nerve and ocular structures prospectively in patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease. Nineteen patients with a diagnosis of early-stage Parkinson's disease and 19 age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. All participants were examined minimum three times at the intervals of at least 6 month following initial examination. Pattern visually evoked potentials (VEP), contrast sensitivity assessments at photopic conditions, color vision tests with Ishihara cards and full-field visual field tests were performed in addition to measurement of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness of four quadrants (top, bottom, nasal, temporal), central and mean macular thickness and macular volumes. Best corrected visual acuity was observed significantly lower in study group within all three examinations. Contrast sensitivity values of the patient group were significantly lower in all spatial frequencies. P100 wave latency of VEP was significantly longer, and amplitude was lower in patient group; however, significant deterioration was not observed during the follow-up. Although average peripapillary RNFL thickness was not significant between groups, RNFL thickness in the upper quadrant was thinner in the patient group. While there was no difference in terms of mean macular thickness and total macular volume values between the groups initially, a significant decrease occurred in the patient group during the follow-up. During the initial and follow-up process, a significant deterioration in visual field was observed in the patient group. Structural and functional disorders shown as electro-physiologically and morphologically exist in different parts of visual pathways in early-stage Parkinson's disease.

  6. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    Kubo, Y. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, 882, Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Houdellier, F., E-mail: florent.houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France)

    2017-04-15

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  7. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    Kubo, Y.; Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E.; Houdellier, F.

    2017-01-01

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  8. Occupational disease disclosed by preventive follow-up of former uranium ore miners

    Pacina, V.; Vich, Z.; Elterlein, E.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of preventive follow-up examinations of former employees of the concern Czechoslovak Uranium Mines is to determine possible health damage of chronically exposed workers in an area that can become manifest even following a long time after leaving the high-risk working environment. In a group of 1,139 persons that had undergone preventive follow-up examinations in the years 1977 to 1980 there were 63 cases of newly detected affections that were reported as occupational diseases, and other serious affections. The system of preventive follow-up examinations represents a significant contribution to the improvement of health care of the workers. (author)

  9. A four-year follow-up study in fibromyalgia. Relationship to chronic fatigue syndrome

    Nørregaard, J; Bülow, P M; Prescott, E

    1993-01-01

    the overlap between fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. Only in two of 91 the muscle pain was found to be caused by another somatic disease during the median 4 year follow-up period. In one of the 83 attending subjects a somatic disease associated with muscle symptoms was established at the follow......-up visit. 60 out of 83 reported increased pain, 8 reported improvement of pain. The 83 subjects showed no significant fall in muscle strength during the follow-up period. The majority reported severe fatigue but only one fifth fulfilled the proposed chronic fatigue syndrome criteria....

  10. Long-term follow-up of echolalia and question answering.

    Foxx, R M; Faw, G D

    1990-01-01

    A long-term follow-up of echolalia and correct question answering was conducted for 6 subjects from three previously published studies. The follow-up periods ranged from 26 to 57 months. In a training site follow-up, subjects were exposed to baseline/posttraining conditions in which the original trainer and/or a novel person(s) presented trained and untrained questions. Four subjects displayed echolalia below baseline levels, and another did so in some assessments. Overall, echolalia was lowe...

  11. Long-term adherence to follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    Barken, Sidsel S; Lynge, Elsebeth; Andersen, Erik S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure adherence to annual follow-up among women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. DESIGN: Prospective, population-based, register study. SETTING: Denmark, 1996-2007. POPULATION: All women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with conization. METHODS: Treated...... was poor in Denmark. Our findings suggest that because of this poor adherence, recommendations for long-term annual follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia may not be highly effective. Shorter follow-up schedules using highly sensitive tests appear attractive....

  12. What Happens Next? Follow-Up From the Children's Toddler School Program

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Corsello, Christina; Mahrer, Nicole E.

    2010-01-01

    This study was a follow-up of a group of 29 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders at age 2 who attended an inclusive toddler program until age 3. Children ranged in age from 4 to 12 years at the time of the parent survey and follow-up testing. The majority of children were placed in a special education (noninclusive) preschool class, but among the children who were in elementary school at the time of follow-up, 63% were in general education classroom placement. Diagnoses of autism...

  13. Extended heart failure clinic follow-up in low-risk patients

    Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Videbaek, Lars

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundOutpatient follow-up in specialized heart failure clinics (HFCs) is recommended by current guidelines and implemented in most European countries, but the optimal duration of HFC programmes has not been established. Nor is it known whether all or only high-risk patients, e.g. identified...... by NT-proBNP, might benefit from an extended HFC follow-up.Methods and resultsIn a multi-centre setting, we randomly assigned 921 clinically stable systolic heart failure (HF) outpatients on optimal medical therapy to undergo either an extended follow-up in the HFC (n = 461) or referral back...

  14. Long-term Follow-up and Outcomes in Traumatic Macular Holes.

    Miller, John B; Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Eliott, Dean; Kim, Ivana K; Kim, Leo A; Loewenstein, John I; Sobrin, Lucia; Young, Lucy H; Mukai, Shizuo; Vavvas, Demetrios G

    2015-12-01

    To review presenting characteristics, clinical course, and long-term visual and anatomic outcomes of patients with traumatic macular holes at a tertiary referral center. Retrospective case series. Twenty-eight consecutive patients with traumatic macular holes at a single tertiary referral center were reviewed. In addition to visual acuities and treatments throughout the clinical course, specific dimensions of the macular hole, including diameters, height, configuration, shape, and the presence of a cuff of fluid, were examined using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Twenty-eight patients were identified with a mean initial visual acuity (VA) of logMAR 1.3 (20/400) and a mean follow-up of 2.2 years. Eleven holes (39.3%) closed spontaneously in median 5.7 weeks. Eleven underwent vitrectomy with a median time to intervention of 35.1 weeks. Median time to surgery for the 5 eyes with successful hole closure was 11.0 weeks vs 56.3 weeks for the 6 eyes that failed to close (P = .02). VA improved in closed holes (P holes that did not close (P = .22). There was no relation between initial OCT dimensions and final hole closure status, although there was a trend, which did not reach statistical significance, toward small dimensions for those that closed spontaneously. A fairly high spontaneous closure rate was observed, with a trend toward smaller OCT dimensions. We found no relationship between hole closure and the OCT characteristics of the hole. Surgical intervention was less successful at hole closure when elected after 3 months. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of optical systems for the ALPS II experiment

    Spector, Aaron D.; Baehre, Robin; Willke, Benno; Hannover Univ.

    2016-09-01

    ALPS II is a light shining through a wall style experiment that will use the principle of resonant enhancement to boost the conversion and reconversion probabilities of photons to relativistic WISPs. This will require the use of long baseline low-loss optical cavities. Very high power build up factors in the cavities must be achieved in order to reach the design sensitivity of ALPS II. This necessitates a number of different sophisticated optical and control systems to maintain the resonance and ensure maximal coupling between the laser and the cavity. In this paper we report on the results of the characterization of these optical systems with a 20m cavity and discuss the results in the context of ALPS II.

  16. Science Data Report for the Optical Properties Monitor (OPM) Experiment

    Wilkes, D. R.; Zwiener, J. M.; Carruth, Ralph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This science data report describes the Optical Properties Monitor (OPM) experiment and the data gathered during its 9-mo exposure on the Mir space station. Three independent optical instruments made up OPM: an integrating sphere spectral reflectometer, vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer, and a total integrated scatter instrument. Selected materials were exposed to the low-Earth orbit, and their performance monitored in situ by the OPM instruments. Coinvestigators from four NASA Centers, five International Space Station contractors, one university, two Department of Defense organizations, and the Russian space company, Energia, contributed samples to this experiment. These materials included a number of thermal control coatings, optical materials, polymeric films, nanocomposites, and other state-of-the-art materials. Degradation of some materials, including aluminum conversion coatings and Beta cloth, was greater than expected. The OPM experiment was launched aboard the Space Shuttle on mission STS-81 in January 1997 and transferred to the Mir space station. An extravehicular activity (EVA) was performed in April 1997 to attach the OPM experiment to the outside of the Mir/Shuttle Docking Module for space environment exposure. OPM was retrieved during an EVA in January 1998 and was returned to Earth on board the Space Shuttle on mission STS-89.

  17. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Jinja, Uganda: a six-year follow-up study.

    Martin Mbonye

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We report on the adherence experience of a group of people living with HIV on ART over six years in Uganda. METHODS: Between 2005 and 2009, we followed up 41 participants who were also part of a clinical trial comparing home and facility based delivery of ART in Jinja, eastern Uganda. We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews at enrolment, 3, 6, 18 and 30 months to capture experiences with adherence over time. In 2011 we returned to these participants to find out how they were fairing with long term adherence. We managed to retrace 24 participants and interviewed them about their experience. We thematically analysed the data and compared findings over time. RESULTS: Initially there were few barriers to adherence and many followed the adherence guidance closely. By year six, relaxation of these rules was noticeable although self-reported adherence continued to be high. Alcohol consumption was more common than before. Some relatives of the participants who had died claimed that some deaths were a result of alcohol. While participants reported that ART had allowed them to reclaim independence and return to work the changes in work and social routines created new challenges for adherence. Side effects like lipodystrophy were not only causing some stigma but for some tested their faith in the drugs. Many participants reported resumption of sexual lives but apart from those who selected same status partners, disclosure to new partners was minimal. CONCLUSION: Good adherence practice to ART wanes over the long-term, and people who may have disclosed at initiation find it difficult to do so to new partners once they are healthy. Further adherence interventions and support with disclosure over the course of therapy may need to be considered.

  18. Interventional radiology in the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of pseudoaneurysms.

    Keeling, A N

    2009-01-01

    Arterial wall disruption, as a consequence of inflammation\\/infection, trauma (penetrating or blunt), or iatrogenic causes, may result in pseudoaneurysm formation. Currently, iatrogenic causes are increasing as a result of the growth of endovascular intervention. The frequency of other causes also seems to be increasing, but this may simply be the result of increased diagnosis by better imaging techniques, such as multidetector contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Clinically, pseudoaneurysms may be silent, may present with local or systemic signs, or can rupture with catastrophic consequences. Open surgical repair, previously the mainstay of treatment, has largely been replaced by image-guided occlusion methods. On the basis of an experience of over 100 pseudoaneurysms, treatments at various anatomical sites, imaging modalities used for accurate diagnosis, current changing therapeutic options for pseudoaneurysm management, approved embolization agents, and clinical follow-up requirements to ensure adequate treatment will be discussed. Image-guided direct percutaneous and endovascular embolization of pseudoaneurysms are established treatment options with favorable success rates and minimal morbidity. The pendulum has now swung from invasive surgical repair of pseudoaneurysms to that of image-guided interventional radiology.

  19. Work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses: A follow-up study.

    Khamisa, Natasha; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan; Oldenburg, Brian

    2016-12-01

    Nurses experience high levels of work related stress and burnout as well as low job satisfaction and poor general health owing to the nature of their work. This paper seeks to provide a better understanding of the nature of relationships between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses over one year. This study involved a longitudinal design. Two hundred and seventy seven nurses from four hospitals completed a follow up survey consisting of five questionnaires. Data were collected between 2013 and 2014. The data were analysed using generalized estimation equation analysis. Lack of support was associated with burnout, patient care was associated with job satisfaction and staff issues were associated with general health of nurses. Burnout is more strongly related to job satisfaction than general health. The findings of this study could inform evidence based policy and practice through interventions aimed at improving job satisfaction and reducing the impact of burnout on general health of nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy: technique, indications and clinical follow-up in over 1000 patients

    Bonaldi, G. [Department of Neuroradiology, Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo (Italy)

    2003-10-01

    This paper summarises my experience, over 14 years, treating over 1350 patients suffering from lumbar disc pathology, using minimally invasive intradiscal decompressive percutaneous techniques. The vast majority underwent the method introduced by Onik in 1985, referred to as ''automated'' since it involves a mechanical probe, working by a ''suction and cutting'' action for removal of the nucleus pulposus. Postoperative follow-up of at least 6 months was available for 1047 patients aged 15-92 years, who underwent this procedure up to June 2002. Results, based on a patient satisfaction, have been good in 58% of patients at 2 months and in 67.5% at 6 months; they have been particularly favourable in some subgroups such as elderly people (79.5% of excellent or good results), patients previously operated upon (78%) and those with ''discogenic'' low back pain (79%). Complication rates have been extremely low (less than 1%) and all complications cleared up without sequelae. In comparison with other percutaneous disc treatments, Onik's achieves the best compromise between clinical efficacy, comfort for the patient and low invasiveness. (orig.)

  1. [Four year follow-up of a screening program for prostate cancer in workers].

    Reinoso-Barbero, Luis; Díaz-Garrido, Ramón; Piñaga-Solé, Montserrat; Fernández-Fernández, Miguel; Belanger-Quintana, Diego; Gómez-Gallego, Félix

    2013-01-01

    To analyze our four-year follow-up experience (2008-2011) with a prostate cancer screening program offered to employees of a banking company. Data were obtained from the health examinations carried out by the bank's in-house occupational health service (with centers in Barcelona, Madrid and Valencia). PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood levels were measured and cases with high levels (>4 ng/ml) were followed through diagnosis and treatment, including a telephone survey of confirmed cases. Personal and occupational characteristics of the participants were analyzed as well. 750 workers (99% with administrative and/or commercial jobs) met the inclusion criteria for the screening program. Of these, 110 had elevated PSA levels on at least one occasion. The diagnosis of prostate cancer was confirmed in 21 cases. There were no associations between a diagnosis of cancer and the remaining analyzed variables. Urology and pathology records were retrieved for 76% of the contacted cases. The most frequent histological type was adenocarcinoma (98%), the most common Gleason grade at diagnosis was 6-7% (88%), and the majority of cases were treated surgically (90%).With respect to adverse effects, 48% of cases described erectile dysfunction and 33% reported urinary incontinence. In our program the observed prevalence of prostate cancer was above that expected (respectively, 21 confirmed cases vs. 12 expected). The identified cases unanimously expressed their support for the screening program. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Seguretat i Medicina del Treball.

  2. [Results of long-term follow-up of transsexual patients].

    Rauchfleisch, U; Barth, D; Battegay, R

    1998-09-01

    From 69 transsexual patients (48 men, 21 women) having consulted the Basel University Psychiatric Outpatient-Department between 1970 and 1990, 13 men-to-woman- and 4 woman-to-man-transsexuals could be examined in a follow-up (5-20 years after the operation). The social conditions and the quality of life of the 13 men-to-woman-transsexuals had significantly deteriorated: 9 of the 13 depend on life annuity or on social welfare assistance. The patients live socially very isolated. Eight of them report almost not being able to experience sexual pleasure, 10 suffer from anxieties, depression or addictions. Three regret having demanded the operation and two have passed a second operation for restoration of the original state. The 4 woman-to-man-transsexuals showed slightly better results: 2 of them are fully professionally active and live in constant personal relationships of several years of duration. The 2 others, however, suffer from depression and problems of addiction and give the impression of affective lability. The results lead to the following conclusions: 1. the criteria of indication for the operation of the transsexuals should be observed thoroughly, especially the psychotherapeutic accompaniment before the operation during at least 1 year; 2. the question of emotional stability, of frustration tolerance and of the danger of an outbreak of psychosis are to be examined carefully; 3. the professional and social integration before and after the operation is of central importance.

  3. Schizophrenia and work: aspects related to job acquisition in a follow-up study

    Larissa C. Martini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Work is considered one of the main forms of social organization; however, few individuals with schizophrenia find work opportunities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between schizophrenia symptoms and job acquisition. Method: Fifty-three individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia from an outpatient treatment facility were included in an 18-month follow-up study. After enrollment, they participated in a prevocational training group. At the end of training (baseline and 18 months later, sociodemographic, clinical data and occupational history were collected. Positive and negative symptoms (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale – PANSS, depression (Calgary Depression Scale, disease severity (Clinical Global Impression – CGI, functionality (Global Assessment of Functioning – GAF, personal and social performance (Personal and Social Performance – PSP and cognitive functions (Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia – MATRICS battery were applied at baseline and at the end of the study. Results: Those with some previous work experience (n=19 presented lower scores on the PANSS, Calgary, GAF, CGI and PSP scales (p < 0.05 than those who did not work. Among those who worked, there was a slight worsening in positive symptoms (positive PANSS. Conclusions: Individuals with less severe symptoms were more able to find employment. Positive symptom changes do not seem to affect participation at work; however, this calls for discussion about the importance of employment support.

  4. Leg amputation and dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: A case report with 15 years of follow-up.

    Thevenon, André; Preud'homme, Marguerite; Patenotre, Philippe; Catteau, Benoit; Blanchard-Dauphin, Anne; Wieczorek, Valérie; Tiffreau, Vincent

    2016-10-12

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a rare disease characterized by widespread blistering of the skin and mucous membranes, which may ultimately prompt limb amputation. In this context, the outcome of fitting a prosthesis to a chronically wounded stump is not well known. Our patient's experience (with 15 years of follow-up) should contribute to better knowledge of this topic. A 37-year-old man presented with severe dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Recurrent skin carcinoma had led to an amputation below the knee. Despite incessant development of blisters on the stump and the need for wound dressing and padding, the patient has been able to walk freely with a prosthesis and a cane. A large number of skin sarcomas were excised over the 15-year period of prosthesis use. Two falls have resulted in limb fractures. A new sarcoma on the stump marked the end of the use of the prosthesis. Despite the constant presence of wounds on the stump, amputees with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can successfully be fitted with a prosthesis.

  5. Follow-Up Study of Behavioral Development and Parenting Stress Profiles in Children with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Mei-Chyn Chao

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent longitudinal experiences have emphasized that the follow-up of children with treated congenital hypothyroidism (CHT should not be limited to the cognitive domain. This study attempted to evaluate the emotional–behavioral profiles in children with CHT together with maternal parenting stress profiles. Data for child and family characteristics were collected from 47 families with a 3–12-year-old CHT child diagnosed and treated since the newborn period. Cognitive assessments were performed. The main caregiver completed the following questionnaires: (1 Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, which rated behavioral symptoms in children; (2 Parenting Stress Index, which determined the quality and magnitude of parenting stress experienced by the caregiver; and (3 Symptom Checklist-90-R, which evaluated the psychopathological symptoms of the caregiver. In addition, 31 unaffected siblings were recruited as a comparative control group. The results revealed that children with treated CHT had normal intelligence quotients (mean, 93.6 ± 16.2 at the time of the study. However, CHT children had more problems in emotional–behavioral domains than sibling controls (p = 0.01. Overall, 29.8% (14/47 of the CHT children had emotional–behavioral problems above the clinical cutoff. In addition, 13% of the caregivers of CHT children had parenting stress above the clinical cutoff. Therefore, professional intervention is warranted in these subgroups of CHT children and parents.

  6. Midterm follow-up evaluation after a novel approach to anterior fundoplication for achalasia.

    Richardson, W S; Kennedy, C I; Bolton, J S

    2006-12-01

    This study aimed to compare the outcomes for Heller myotomy alone and combined with different partial fundoplications. The authors retrospectively reviewed their experience with 69 laparoscopic myotomies and 14 Heller myotomies, 80% of which were performed with partial fundoplication including 20 Toupet, 18 Dor, and 17 modified Dor procedures, in which the fundoplication is sutured to both sides of the crura and not the myotomy. The mean age of the study patients was 69 years (range, 15-80 years). Four mucosal perforations were repaired intraoperatively. There was one small bowel fistula in an area of open hernia repair distant from the myotomy. One patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease died of pneumonia. Phone follow-up evaluation was achieved in 68% of the cases at a mean of 37 months (range, 2-97 months). The results for no dysphagia and for heartburn requiring proton pump inhibitors, respectively, were as follows: Heller myotomy (85.7%, 28.5%), Toupet (66.6%, 33.3%), Dor (83.3%, 20%), and modified Dor (84.6%, 15.3%). Two patients with reflux strictures required annual dilation (Toupet, Dor). Two patients required revisions: one redo Heller myotomy (Dor) and one esophageal replacement (Toupet). Heller myotomy provides excellent dysphagia relief with or without fundoplication. Heartburn is a significant problem for a minority of patients. In the authors' hands, Toupet had the worst results and modified Dor was most protective for heartburn.

  7. Current role of bone scan with phosphonates in the follow-up of breast cancer

    Maffioli, Lorenzo; Florimonte, Luigia; Pagani, Luca; Butti, Ivana; Roca, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that bone scintigraphy has high sensitivity and efficacy in the early detection of bone metastases from several tumours, including breast cancer. Bone scintigraphy is the most definitive tool for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic spread of breast cancer. However, in the past decade there has been a wide debate on its impact on survival time, morbidity and quality of life. Worldwide economic restrictions and these studies have led to the adoption of an almost minimalist policy for breast cancer follow-up using evidence-based guidelines. The recommended breast cancer surveillance testing includes only a few procedures (history, physical and breast self-examination, patient education on symptoms, pelvic examination). The routine use of additional tests, such as blood cell count, tumour markers, liver ultrasonography, bone scan and chest X-rays, is not recommended. Accordingly, scintigraphy should be reserved for a limited number of patients. On the other hand, early diagnosis of bone involvement may reduce the risk of skeletal related events, thus leading to a significant improvement in quality of life. Furthermore, new drugs (e.g. bisphosphonates) can now delay the onset of bone metastasis and reduce the number of patients who experience skeletal complications. In conclusion, the evidence of the clinical usefulness of bone scintigraphy (to allow early planning of new treatments in advanced disease) has to be re-evaluated, possibly by large randomised prospective trials. (orig.)

  8. Isolated autosomal dominant growth hormone deficiency: an evolving pituitary deficit? A multicenter follow-up study.

    Mullis, Primus E; Robinson, Iain C A F; Salemi, Souzan; Eblé, Andrée; Besson, Amélie; Vuissoz, Jean-Marc; Deladoey, Johnny; Simon, Dominique; Czernichow, Paul; Binder, Gerhard

    2005-04-01

    Four distinct familial types of isolated GH deficiency have been described so far, of which type II is the autosomal dominant inherited form. It is mainly caused by mutations within the first 6 bp of intervening sequence 3. However, other splice site and missense mutations have been reported. Based on in vitro experiments and transgenic animal data, there is strong evidence that there is a wide variability in phenotype in terms of the severity of GH deficiency. Therefore, we studied a total of 57 subjects belonging to 19 families suffering from different splice site as well as missense mutations within the GH-1 gene. The subjects presenting with a splice site mutation within the first 2 bp of intervening sequence 3 (5'IVS +1/+2 bp) leading to a skipping of exon 3 were found to be more likely to present in the follow-up with other pituitary hormone deficiencies. In addition, although the patients with missense mutations have previously been reported to be less affected, a number of patients presenting with the P89L missense GH form, showed some pituitary hormone impairment. The development of multiple hormonal deficiencies is not age dependent, and there is a clear variability in onset, severity, and progression, even within the same families. The message of clinical importance from these studies is that the pituitary endocrine status of all such patients should continue to be monitored closely over the years because further hormonal deficiencies may evolve with time.

  9. Follow-up study of behavioral development and parenting stress profiles in children with congenital hypothyroidism.

    Chao, Mei-Chyn; Yang, Pinchen; Hsu, Hsiu-Yi; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2009-11-01

    Recent longitudinal experiences have emphasized that the follow-up of children with treated congenital hypothyroidism (CHT) should not be limited to the cognitive domain. This study attempted to evaluate the emotional-behavioral profiles in children with CHT together with maternal parenting stress profiles. Data for child and family characteristics were collected from 47 families with a 3-12-year-old CHT child diagnosed and treated since the newborn period. Cognitive assessments were performed. The main caregiver completed the following questionnaires: (1) Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, which rated behavioral symptoms in children; (2) Parenting Stress Index, which determined the quality and magnitude of parenting stress experienced by the caregiver; and (3) Symptom Checklist-90-R, which evaluated the psychopathological symptoms of the caregiver. In addition, 31 unaffected siblings were recruited as a comparative control group. The results revealed that children with treated CHT had normal intelligence quotients (mean, 93.6 +/- 16.2) at the time of the study. However, CHT children had more problems in emotional-behavioral domains than sibling controls (p = 0.01). Overall, 29.8% (14/47) of the CHT children had emotional-behavioral problems above the clinical cutoff. In addition, 13% of the caregivers of CHT children had parenting stress above the clinical cutoff. Therefore, professional intervention is warranted in these subgroups of CHT children and parents.

  10. Scintigraphic follow up of autologous splenic grafts: An experimental and clinical study

    Reilmann, H.; Creutzig, H.; Pabst, R.; Kamran, D.

    1984-01-01

    The risk of overwhelming sepsis in splenectomized patients is well known and autotransplantation of splenic tissue might be considered as a prophylactic approach. Little is known, however, of the success of grafting in man. In six patients with autologous grafts after emergency splenectomy the ''trapping function'' (TF) was measured by sequential scintigraphy with heat damaged red cells every third month. To correlate TF with blood flow and histology, different experiments were done in pigs: ligation of the splenic artery or partial splenectomy or total splenectomy with grafting of fragments either subfascially or in the greater momentum. TF, blood flow with Rb-86 and immune response was measured at different times after surgery. Remnants left at the main vessels did not grow, while splenic tissue left at smaller vessels increased in size. There were great differences in blood flow per gram splenic tissue, but a significant correlation between TF and blood flow. All experimental grafts showed a normal function both of the white and the red pulp. In patients there was a growth of grafts in four, while in two no TF could be measured. TF is an indicator of relative blood flow to splenic grafts and therefore useful in the follow up of grafted patients

  11. Gianturco metallic biliary stent in malignant biliary obstruction: results of follow-up in dead patients

    Roh, Byung Suk; Kim, Chan Soo; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, See Sung; Won, Jong Jin; Kim, Haak Cheul; Chae, Kwon Mook [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iri (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    In order to study the patency, restenosis, efficacy, and complication of the metallic stent in the course of treatment of malignant biliary obstruction, the results of follow up of the dead patients after stent insertion were reviewed. Self-expandable Gianturco metallic stent with 10-mm diameter was successfully inserted in 33 patients: 10 with Klatskin tumor, 7 with common bile duct cancer, 7 with gallbladder cancer, 5 with pancreatic cancer, 2 with recurred stomach cancer, one with periampullary cancer, one with hepatocellular carcinoma. The overall duration of survival and patency of the stents in 33 patients were 5.2 months(1-12 months) and 4.9 months(1-14 months), respectively. Restenosis of metallic stents was found in 9 cases(27%), after 6.1 months in average. Causes of stent occlusion were overgrowing of tumor in 5, overgrowing and ingrowing of tumor in 3, extraductal dislodgement in one case. Two cases of symptomatic cholangitis after stent placement were successfully treated with percutaneous cholecystostomy. Three cases of destruction and migration of metallic stents were found after 6 months. On the basis of our experience, insertion of Gianturco metallic biliary stent is an acceptable treatment method in the malignant biliary obstruction, especially for whom short term survival is expected.

  12. Treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioactive iodine. Methodological changes and follow-up problems

    Gibold, C.; Delisle, M.J.; Maes, B.; Vaudrey, C.; Pochard, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The experience of treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioactive iodine in the Nuclear Medicine department of the J. Godinot Institute, Rheims, from 1967 till 1987, is described. One thousand one hundred and fifty patients (723 with diffuse and 427 with nodular hyperthyroidism) received a total of 1 565 doses. The dosage calculation method was considerably simplified, enabling a patient to be treated in 24 hours. Thyroid gland mass evaluation, initially based on the scintigraphic projection area, is now performed by ultrasonography. The mean total radioactivity administered is 370 ± 320 MBq per patient. All patients are seen on the 8th post-treatment week for clinical examination and hormone control. Seven out of 10 patients are cured with a single dose. Long-term follow-up, based on a computer file, is effected by means of an annual letter sent to patient and to his family doctor, but in spite fo sustained efforts 36 per cent of the patients are lost sight of. The diagnosis of iodine 131-induced hypothyroidism is based on plasma levels of TSH which, since 1984, are measured by the ultrasensitive method. The overall incidence of hypothyroidism is 6.6 per cent in the first year and 3 per cent thereafter. Despite a simplified procedure, the results obtained by the authors are similar to those found in the literature, and the cost-efficiency ratio is excellent [fr

  13. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  14. Strain concentration at structural discontinuities and its quantification by elastic follow-up parameter

    Kasahara, Naoto; Takasho, Hideki

    1998-12-01

    Elevated temperature structural design codes pay attention to strain concentration at structural discontinuities due to creep and plasticity, since it causes to enlarge creep-fatigue damage of material. One of the difficulties to predict strain concentration is its dependency on loading, constitutive equations, and relaxation time. This study investigated fundamental mechanism of strain concentration and its main factors. It was clarified that strain concentration was caused from strain redistribution between elastic and inelastic regions, which can be quantified by the elastic follow-up parameter. As a function of inelastic strain, the elastic follow-up parameter can describe variation of strain concentration during incremental loading and relaxation process, caused by transition of strain distribution from peak strain concentration to secondary stress redistribution. Structures have their own elastic follow-up characteristics as a function of inelastic strain, which is insensitive to constitutive equations. It means that application of inelastic analysis is not difficult to obtain elastic follow-up characteristics. (author)

  15. Long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery in a national cohort.

    Thereaux, J; Lesuffleur, T; Païta, M; Czernichow, S; Basdevant, A; Msika, S; Millat, B; Fagot-Campagna, A

    2017-09-01

    Lifelong medical follow-up is mandatory after bariatric surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the 5-year follow-up after bariatric surgery in a nationwide cohort of patients. All adult obese patients who had undergone primary bariatric surgery in 2009 in France were included. Data were extracted from the French national health insurance database. Medical follow-up (medical visits, micronutrient supplementation and blood tests) during the first 5 years after bariatric surgery was assessed, and compared with national and international guidelines. Some 16 620 patients were included in the study. The percentage of patients with at least one reimbursement for micronutrient supplements decreased between the first and fifth years for iron (from 27.7 to 24.5 per cent; P bariatric surgery is poor, especially for young men with poor early follow-up. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A Long-Term Follow-Up of Treatment for Severe Self-Injury.

    Williams, Don E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Treatment of a woman with severe mental retardation with the Self-Injurious Behavior Inhibiting System (SIBIS) resulted in significant reductions in SIB behavior which generalized to the natural environment and the brief follow-up sessions. (Author/DB)

  17. ESRD QIP - Pain Assessment and Follow-up - Payment Year 2018

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset includes facility details, measure score, and the state and national average measure scores for the pain assessment and follow up reporting measure...

  18. Postoperative follow-up studies in congenital dilatation of the common bile duct using hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    Hirobe, Seiichi; Ishida, Haruo; Hayashi, Akira; Kamagata, Shoichiro; Fuchimoto, Yasufumi; Mizuno, Dai; Yano, Tsunehiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Kiyose Children`s Hospital (Japan); Ishii, Katsumi

    1995-03-01

    Follow-up studies in congenital dilatation of the common bile duct were done in 20 cases ranging 3 to 20 years after operation. Operative cholangiography had shown dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts in 15 patients (75%), of these, 7 patients had cystic dilatation. Five cases of these 7 patients showed prolonged stasis of the nuclide in the cystic dilated intrahepatic bile ducts by {sup 99m}Tc-PMT hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the follow-up studies even at 10 years after operation. But none of 20 cases had complication such as intrahepatic lithiasis, cholangitis, and liver dysfunction. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy could provide moderate anatomic and excellent functional information which were useful for these follow-up studies and careful follow-up should be done in the case of cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. (author).

  19. ESRD QIP - Clinical Depression Screening and Follow-up - Payment Year 2018

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset includes facility details, measure score, and the state and national average measure scores for the clinical depression screening and follow up...

  20. Health status and follow-up of the liquidators in Belarus

    Okeanov, A.E.; Antipova, S.I.; Polyakov, S.M.; Sobolev, A.V.; Bazulko, N.V.; Cardis, E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents information on the organization of the follow-up of Chernobyl liquidators in Belarus. The characteristics of the liquidators cohort and results of preliminary analyses of their health status, including cancer incidence and general morbidity, are presented