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Sample records for optical counterpart search

  1. SEARCH FOR THE OPTICAL COUNTERPART TO SGR 0418+5729

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, Martin; Kargaltsev, Oleg [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Pavlov, George G., E-mail: martin.durant@astro.ufl.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    We report broadband Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the field of soft {gamma}-ray repeater SGR 0418+5729 with Advanced Camera for Surveys/Wide Field Channel and Wide Field Camera 3/IR. Observing in two wide filters, F606W and F110W, we find no counterpart within the positional error circle derived from Chandra observations, to limiting magnitudes m{sub F606W} > 28.6 and m{sub F110W} > 27.4 (Vega system), equivalent to reddening-corrected luminosity limits L{sub F606W} < 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} and L{sub F110W} < 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} erg s{sup -1} for a distance d = 2 kpc, at 3{sigma} confidence. This, in turn, imposes lower limits on the contemporaneous X-ray/optical flux ratio of {approx_equal}1100 and the X-ray/near-infrared flux ratio of {approx_equal}1000. We derive an upper limit on the temperature and/or size of any fall-back disk around the magnetar. We also compare the detection limits with observations of other magnetars.

  2. Searching for Optical Counterparts to Ultra-compact High Velocity Clouds: Possible Detection of a Counterpart to AGC 198606

    CERN Document Server

    Janesh, William; Salzer, John J; Janowiecki, Steven; Adams, Elizabeth A K; Haynes, Martha P; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Cannon, John M; Muñoz, Ricardo R

    2015-01-01

    We report on initial results from a campaign to obtain optical imaging of a sample of Ultra Compact High Velocity Clouds (UCHVCs) discovered by the ALFALFA neutral hydrogen (HI) survey. UCHVCs are sources with velocities and sizes consistent with their being low-mass dwarf galaxies in the Local Volume, but without optical counterparts in existing catalogs. We are using the WIYN 3.5-m telescope and pODI camera to image these objects and search for an associated stellar population. In this paper, we present our observational strategy and method for searching for resolved stellar counterparts to the UCHVCs. We combine careful photometric measurements, a color-magnitude filter, and spatial smoothing techniques to search for stellar overdensities in the g- and i-band images. We also run statistical tests to quantify the likelihood that whatever overdensities we find are real and not chance superpositions of sources. We demonstrate the method by applying it to two data sets: WIYN imaging of Leo P, a UCHVC discovere...

  3. Searches for Optical Counterparts to Fermi Unassociated Sources with the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellm, Eric Christopher; Prince, Thomas A.; Kaplan, David L. A.; Kupfer, Thomas; DeCesar, Megan E.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank J.; Shupe, David L.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) has accumulated an extensive optical variability dataset across the Northern Sky, including at low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 20 degrees). We are using this dataset to search for optical counterparts to unassociated Fermi gamma-ray sources, particular the companions of eclipsing binary millisecond pulsars. So-called redback binary millisecond pulsars are a key evolutionary stage in the recycling process that spins up millisecond pulsars. The Roche-distorted and irradiated pulsar companion produces a periodic signature at the orbital period that may be readily identified with iPTF. We report on the progress of this search and present interesting candidates found.

  4. A Search for an Optical Counterpart to the Gravitational-wave Event GW151226

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartt, S. J.; Chambers, K. C.; Smith, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Young, D. R.; Chen, T.-W.; Inserra, C.; Wright, D. E.; Coughlin, M.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Heinze, A.; Jerkstrand, A.; Magnier, E. A.; Maguire, K.; Mueller, B.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Della Valle, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Dimitriadis, G.; Firth, R. E.; Fraser, M.; Frohmaier, C.; Gal-Yam, A.; Harmanen, J.; Kankare, E.; Kotak, R.; Kromer, M.; Mandel, I.; Sollerman, J.; Gibson, B.; Primak, N.; Willman, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present a search for an electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational-wave source GW151226. Using the Pan-STARRS1 telescope we mapped out 290 square degrees in the optical i P1 filter, starting 11.5 hr after the LIGO information release and lasting for an additional 28 days. The first observations started 49.5 hr after the time of the GW151226 detection. We typically reached sensitivity limits of i P1 = 20.3-20.8 and covered 26.5% of the LIGO probability skymap. We supplemented this with ATLAS survey data, reaching 31% of the probability region to shallower depths of m ≃ 19. We found 49 extragalactic transients (that are not obviously active galactic nuclei), including a faint transient in a galaxy at 7 Mpc (a luminous blue variable outburst) plus a rapidly decaying M-dwarf flare. Spectral classification of 20 other transient events showed them all to be supernovae. We found an unusual transient, PS15dpn, with an explosion date temporally coincident with GW151226, that evolved into a type Ibn supernova. The redshift of the transient is secure at z = 0.1747 ± 0.0001 and we find it unlikely to be linked, since the luminosity distance has a negligible probability of being consistent with that of GW151226. In the 290 square degrees surveyed we therefore do not find a likely counterpart. However we show that our survey strategy would be sensitive to NS-NS mergers producing kilonovae at D L ≲ 100 Mpc, which is promising for future LIGO/Virgo searches.

  5. A DECam Search for an Optical Counterpart to the LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW151226

    CERN Document Server

    Cowperthwaite, P S; Soares-Santos, M; Annis, J; Brout, D; Brown, D A; Buckley-Geer, E; Cenko, S B; Chen, H Y; Chornock, R; Diehl, H T; Doctor, Z; Drlica-Wagner, A; Drout, M R; Farr, B; Finley, D A; Foley, R J; Fong, W; Fox, D B; Frieman, J; Garcia-Bellido, J; Gill, M S S; Gruendl, R A; Herner, K; Holz, D E; Kasen, D; Kessler, R; Lin, H; Margutti, R; Marriner, J; Matheson, T; Metzger, B D; Neilsen, E H; Quataert, E; Rest, A; Sako, M; Scolnic, D; Smith, N; Sobreira, F; Strampelli, G M; Villar, V A; Walker, A R; Wester, W; Williams, P K G; Yanny, B; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Armstrong, R; Bechtol, K; Benoit-Levy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Castander, F J; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Fosalba, P; Gerdes, D W; Giannantonio, T; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Johnson, M W G; Johnson, M D; Krause, E; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Menanteau, F; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reil, K; Romer, A K; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Thomas, R C; Tucker, D L; Weller, J

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a Dark Energy Camera (DECam) optical follow-up of the gravitational wave (GW) event GW151226, discovered by the Advanced LIGO detectors. Our observations cover 28.8 deg$^2$ of the localization region in the $i$ and $z$ bands (containing 3% of the BAYESTAR localization probability), starting 10 hours after the event was announced and spanning four epochs at $2-24$ days after the GW detection. We achieve $5\\sigma$ point-source limiting magnitudes of $i\\approx21.7$ and $z\\approx21.5$, with a scatter of $0.4$ mag, in our difference images. Given the two day delay, we search this area for a rapidly declining optical counterpart with $\\gtrsim 3\\sigma$ significance steady decline between the first and final observations. We recover four sources that pass our selection criteria, of which three are cataloged AGN. The fourth source is offset by $5.8$ arcsec from the center of a galaxy at a distance of 187 Mpc, exhibits a rapid decline by $0.5$ mag over $4$ days, and has a red color of $i-z\\appr...

  6. A DECam Search for an Optical Counterpart to the LIGO Gravitational-wave Event GW151226

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Berger, E.; Soares-Santos, M.; Annis, J.; Brout, D.; Brown, D. A.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Chen, H. Y.; Chornock, R.; Diehl, H. T.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Farr, B.; Finley, D. A.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.; Fox, D. B.; Frieman, J.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gill, M. S. S.; Gruendl, R. A.; Herner, K.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Matheson, T.; Metzger, B. D.; Neilsen, E. H., Jr.; Quataert, E.; Rest, A.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, N.; Sobreira, F.; Strampelli, G. M.; Villar, V. A.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Williams, P. K. G.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D. L.; Weller, J.; DES Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We report the results of a Dark Energy Camera optical follow-up of the gravitational-wave (GW) event GW151226, discovered by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory detectors. Our observations cover 28.8 deg2 of the localization region in the i and z bands (containing 3% of the BAYESTAR localization probability), starting 10 hr after the event was announced and spanning four epochs at 2-24 days after the GW detection. We achieve 5σ point-source limiting magnitudes of i≈ 21.7 and z≈ 21.5, with a scatter of 0.4 mag, in our difference images. Given the two-day delay, we search this area for a rapidly declining optical counterpart with ≳ 3σ significance steady decline between the first and final observations. We recover four sources that pass our selection criteria, of which three are cataloged active galactic nuclei. The fourth source is offset by 5.8 arcsec from the center of a galaxy at a distance of 187 Mpc, exhibits a rapid decline by 0.5 mag over 4 days, and has a red color of i-z≈ 0.3 mag. These properties could satisfy a set of cuts designed to identify kilonovae. However, this source was detected several times, starting 94 days prior to GW151226, in the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (dubbed as PS15cdi) and is therefore unrelated to the GW event. Given its long-term behavior, PS15cdi is likely a Type IIP supernova that transitioned out of its plateau phase during our observations, mimicking a kilonova-like behavior. We comment on the implications of this detection for contamination in future optical follow-up observations.

  7. iPTF Search for an Optical Counterpart to Gravitational Wave Trigger GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Kasliwal, M M; Singer, L P; Corsi, A; Cao, Y; Barlow, T; Bhalerao, V; Bellm, E; Cook, D; Duggan, G E; Ferretti, R; Frail, D A; Horesh, A; Kendrick, R; Kulkarni, S R; Lunnan, R; Palliyaguru, N; Laher, R; Masci, F; Manulis, I; Miller, A A; Nugent, P E; Perley, D; Prince, T A; Rana, J; Rebbapragada, U; Sesar, B; Singhal, A; Surace, J; Van Sistine, A

    2016-01-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) autonomously responded to and promptly tiled the error region of the first gravitational wave event GW150914 to search for an optical counterpart. Only a small fraction of the total localized region was immediately visible in the Northern night sky, due both to sun-angle and elevation constraints. Here, we report on the transient candidates identified and rapid follow-up undertaken to determine the nature of each candidate. Even in the small area imaged of 135 sq. deg., after extensive filtering, 8 candidates were deemed worthy of additional follow-up. Within two hours, all 8 were spectroscopically classified by the Keck II telescope. Curiously, even though such events are rare, one of our candidates was a superluminous supernova. We obtained radio data with the Very Large Array and X-ray follow-up with the Swift satellite for this transient. None of our candidates appear to be associated with the gravitational wave trigger, which is unsurprising given that GW...

  8. A search for an optical counterpart to the gravitational wave event GW151226

    CERN Document Server

    Smartt, S J; Smith, K W; Huber, M E; Young, D R; Chen, T -W; Inserra, C; Wright, D E; Coughlin, M; Denneau, L; Flewelling, H; Heinze, A; Jerkstrand, A; Magnier, E A; Maguire, K; Mueller, B; Rest, A; Sherstyuk, A; Stalder, B; Schultz, A S B; Stubbs, C W; Tonry, J; Waters, C; Wainscoat, R; Della Valle, M; Dennefeld, M; Dimitriadis, G; Firth, R E; Fraser, M; Frohmaier, C; Gal-Yam, A; Harmanen, J; Kankare, E; Kotak, R; Kromer, M; Mandel, I; Sollerman, J; Gibson, B; Primak, N; Willman, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a search for an electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational wave source GW151226. Using the Pan-STARRS1 telescope we mapped out 290 square degrees in the optical i_ps filter over a period starting 11.45hr after the LIGO information release (49.48hr after the GW trigger) and lasting for a further 28 days. We typically reached sensitivity limits of i_ps=20.3-20.8 and covered 26.5% of the LIGO probability skymap. We supplemented this with ATLAS survey data, reaching 31% of the probability region to shallower depths of m~19. We found 49 extragalactic transients (that are not obviously AGN), including a faint transient in a galaxy at 7Mpc (a luminous blue variable outburst) plus a rapidly decaying M-dwarf flare. Spectral classification of 20 other transient events showed them all to be supernovae. We found an unusual transient, PS15dpn, with an explosion date temporally coincident with GW151226 which evolved into a type Ibn supernova. The redshift of the transient is secure at z=0.1747 +/- 0.0001 a...

  9. A search for optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye-Sook

    1995-03-09

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBS) are mysterious flashes of gamma rays lasting several tens to hundreds of seconds that occur approximately once per day. NASA launched the orbiting Compton Gamma Ray Observatory to study GRBs and other gamma ray phenomena. CGRO carries the Burst and Transient Experiment (BATSE) specifically to study GRBS. Although BATSE has collected data on over 600 GRBS, and confirmed that GRBs are localized, high intensity point sources of MeV gamma rays distributed isotropically in the sky, the nature and origin of GRBs remains a fundamental problem in astrophysics. BATSE`s 8 gamma ray sensors located on the comers of the box shaped CGRO can detect the onset of GRBs and record their intensity and energy spectra as a function of time. The position of the burst on the sky can be determined to < {plus_minus}10{degrees} from the BATSE data stream. This position resolution is not sufficient to point a large, optical telescope at the exact position of a GRB which would determine its origin by associating it with a star. Because of their brief duration it is not known if GRBs are accompanied by visible radiation. Their seemingly large energy output suggests thatthis should be. Simply scaling the ratio of visible to gamma ray intensities of the Crab Nebula to the GRB output suggests that GRBs ought to be accompanied by visible flashes of magnitude 10 or so. A few photographs of areas containing a burst location that were coincidentally taken during the burst yield lower limits on visible output of magnitude 4. The detection of visible light during the GRB would provide information on burst physics, provide improved pointing coordinates for precise examination of the field by large telescope and provide the justification for larger dedicated optical counterpart instruments. The purpose of this experiment is to detect or set lower limits on optical counterpart radiation simultaneously accompanying the gamma rays from

  10. First Searches for Optical Counterparts to Gravitational-wave Candidate Events

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; D'\\iaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kucharczyk, C; Kudla, S; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Roux, A Le; Leaci, P; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C -H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levine, B; Lewis, J B; Lhuillier, V; Li, T G F; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lloyd, D; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Luan, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Mokler, F; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Kumar, D Nanda; Nardecchia, I; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R; Necula, V; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishida, E; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; Larcher, W Ortega; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Ou, J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Peiris, P; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pindor, B; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poole, V; Poux, C; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Roever, C; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Soden, K; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stevens, D; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tang, L; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vlcek, B; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vrinceanu, D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, J; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wibowo, S; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yum, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J; Akerlof, C; Baltay, C; Bloom, J S; Cao, Y; Cenko, S B; Ćwiek, A; Ćwiok, M; Dhillon, V; Fox, D B; Gal-Yam, A; Kasliwal, M M; Klotz, A; Laas-Bourez, M; Laher, R R; Law, N M; Majcher, A; Małek, K; Mankiewicz, L; Nawrocki, K; Nissanke, S; Nugent, P E; Ofek, E O; Opiela, R; Piotrowski, L; Poznanski, D; Rabinowitz, D; Rapoport, S; Richards, J W; Schmidt, B; Siudek, M; Sokołowski, M; Steele, I A; Sullivan, M; Żarnecki, A F; Zheng, W

    2013-01-01

    During the LIGO and Virgo joint science runs in 2009-2010, gravitational wave (GW) data from three interferometer detectors were analyzed within minutes to select GW candidate events and infer their apparent sky positions. Target coordinates were transmitted to several telescopes for follow-up observations aimed at the detection of an associated optical transient. Images were obtained for eight such GW candidates. We present the methods used to analyze the image data as well as the transient search results. No optical transient was identified with a convincing association with any of these candidates, and none of the GW triggers showed strong evidence for being astrophysical in nature. We compare the sensitivities of these observations to several model light curves from possible sources of interest, and discuss prospects for future joint GW-optical observations of this type.

  11. FIRST SEARCHES FOR OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS TO GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE CANDIDATE EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M. R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ajith, P. [LIGO - California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Accadia, T. [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Acernese, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Adams, C. [LIGO - Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Adams, T. [Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Agathos, M. [Nikhef, Science Park, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aggarwal, N. [LIGO - Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Aguiar, O. D. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12227-010 - São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Allocca, A. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Amador Ceron, E. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amariutei, D. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration; and others

    2014-03-01

    During the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and Virgo joint science runs in 2009-2010, gravitational wave (GW) data from three interferometer detectors were analyzed within minutes to select GW candidate events and infer their apparent sky positions. Target coordinates were transmitted to several telescopes for follow-up observations aimed at the detection of an associated optical transient. Images were obtained for eight such GW candidates. We present the methods used to analyze the image data as well as the transient search results. No optical transient was identified with a convincing association with any of these candidates, and none of the GW triggers showed strong evidence for being astrophysical in nature. We compare the sensitivities of these observations to several model light curves from possible sources of interest, and discuss prospects for future joint GW-optical observations of this type.

  12. First Searches for Optical Counterparts to Gravitational-wave Candidate Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Denker, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Iafrate, J.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.

    2014-03-01

    During the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and Virgo joint science runs in 2009-2010, gravitational wave (GW) data from three interferometer detectors were analyzed within minutes to select GW candidate events and infer their apparent sky positions. Target coordinates were transmitted to several telescopes for follow-up observations aimed at the detection of an associated optical transient. Images were obtained for eight such GW candidates. We present the methods used to analyze the image data as well as the transient search results. No optical transient was identified with a convincing association with any of these candidates, and none of the GW triggers showed strong evidence for being astrophysical in nature. We compare the sensitivities of these observations to several model light curves from possible sources of interest, and discuss prospects for future joint GW-optical observations of this type.

  13. First Searches for Optical Counterparts to Gravitational-Wave Candidate Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.; Kanner, J. B.; Cenko, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    During the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and Virgo joint science runs in 2009-2010, gravitational wave (GW) data from three interferometer detectors were analyzed within minutes to select GW candidate events and infer their apparent sky positions. Target coordinates were transmitted to several telescopes for follow-up observations aimed at the detection of an associated optical transient. Images were obtained for eight such GW candidates. We present the methods used to analyze the image data as well as the transient search results. No optical transient was identified with a convincing association with any of these candidates, and none of the GW triggers showed strong evidence for being astrophysical in nature. We compare the sensitivities of these observations to several model light curves from possible sources of interest, and discuss prospects for future joint GW-optical observations of this type.

  14. Results from GROCSE, A Real-Time Search for the Optical Counterparts of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlof, Carl; Lee, Brian; Barthelmy, Scott; Cline, Thomas; Gehrels, Neil; Ables, Elden; Bionta, Richard; Ott, Linda; Park, Hye-Sook; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Meegan, Charles; Ferguson, Donald

    1994-12-01

    Since January 12, 1994, an experiment called GROCSE (Gamma-Ray Optical Counterpart Search Experiment) has been monitoring the night sky for the optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts. The basic detector consists of an 8.9 cm aperture electronic camera attached to a rapid slewing computer-controlled mount. This device is activated by the real-time telemetry data stream from the BATSE instrument onboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The BATSE signals are filtered and broadcast via the BACODINE network to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using the UNIX socket communication protocol linked via Internet. The typical response time to obtain the first image is approximately 15 seconds following the initial burst detection. The field of view of the camera is restricted to 0.18 sterdians to match the online angular position errors associated with the BACODINE GRB coordinate estimates. Under dark skys, the limiting detection magnitude is 8.5. By October 1994, the GROCSE camera has been triggered by seven BATSE bursts. Data from these events are being analyzed to provide either a detection or an upper limit for GRB optical luminosity. Results will be presented for the ratio of optical to gamma-ray intensity. A second generation camera system is currently under development that is expected to push the limiting magnitude to approximately m_v = 13. The status of this effort will be briefly reported.

  15. A Dark Energy Camera Search for an Optical Counterpart to the First Advanced LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares-Santos, M. [et al.

    2016-05-27

    We report initial results of a deep search for an optical counterpart to the gravitational wave event GW150914, the first trigger from the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors. We used the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to image a 102 deg$^2$ area, corresponding to 38% of the initial trigger high-probability sky region and to 11% of the revised high-probability region. We observed in i and z bands at 4-5, 7, and 24 days after the trigger. The median $5\\sigma$ point-source limiting magnitudes of our search images are i=22.5 and z=21.8 mag. We processed the images through a difference-imaging pipeline using templates from pre-existing Dark Energy Survey data and publicly available DECam data. Due to missing template observations and other losses, our effective search area subtends 40 deg$^{2}$, corresponding to 12% total probability in the initial map and 3% of the final map. In this area, we search for objects that decline significantly between days 4-5 and day 7, and are undetectable by day 24, finding none to typical magnitude limits of i= 21.5,21.1,20.1 for object colors (i-z)=1,0,-1, respectively. Our search demonstrates the feasibility of a dedicated search program with DECam and bodes well for future research in this emerging field.

  16. A Dark Energy Camera Search for an Optical Counterpart to the First Advanced LIGO Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Soares-Santos, M; Berger, E; Annis, J; Brout, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Chen, H; Cowperthwaite, P S; Diehl, H T; Doctor, Z; Drlica-Wagner, A; Farr, B; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Foley, R; Frieman, J; Gruendl, R A; Herner, K; Holz, D; Lin, H; Marriner, J; Neilsen, E; Rest, A; Sako, M; Scolnic, D; Sobreira, F; Walker, A R; Wester, W; Yanny, B; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Armstrong, R; Banerji, M; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, R A; Bertin, E; Brown, D A; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Castander, F J; Cenko, S B; Chornock, R; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Drout, M R; Eifler, T F; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Fairhurst, S; Fernandez, E; Fischer, J; Fong, W; Fosalba, P; Fox, D B; Fryer, C L; Garcia-Bellido, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D W; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Karliner, I; Kasen, D; Kent, S; Kuropatkin, N; Kuehn, K; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; Margutti, R; Martini, P; Matheson, T; McMahon, R G; Metzger, B D; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Peoples, J; Plazas, A A; Quataert, E; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E S; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schindler, R; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Sheldon, E; Smith, M; Smith, N; Smith, R C; Stebbins, A; Sutton, P J; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, R C; Tucker, D L; Vikram, V; Wechsler, R H; Weller, J

    2016-01-01

    We report initial results of a deep search for an optical counterpart to the gravitational wave event GW150914, the first trigger from the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors. We used the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to image a 102 deg$^2$ area, corresponding to 38% of the initial trigger high-probability sky region and to 11% of the revised high-probability region. We observed in i and z bands at 4-5, 7, and 24 days after the trigger. The median $5\\sigma$ point-source limiting magnitudes of our search images are i=22.5 and z=21.8 mag. We processed the images through a difference-imaging pipeline using templates from pre-existing Dark Energy Survey data and publicly available DECam data. Due to missing template observations and other losses, our effective search area subtends 40 deg$^{2}$, corresponding to 12% total probability in the initial map and 3% of the final map. In this area, we search for objects that decline significantly between days 4-5 and day 7, and are undetectable by day 24, finding none...

  17. Searches for optical counterparts of BATSE gamma-ray bursts with the Explosive Transient Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimm, H. A.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ricker, G. R.

    1996-12-01

    The Explosive Transient Camera (ETC) is a wide-field CCD camera system capable of detecting short (1-10s) celestial optical flashes as faint as m~10 over a field-of-view of 0.75-steradians between -15° and +62° declination. The ETC has been operating automatically under computer control since January 1991. Since the launch of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the ETC has been capable of observing an optical flash coincident with a gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by the Burst and Transient Spectroscopy Experiment (BATSE). Between April 1991 and August 1995, there were seven cases of at least partial spatial overlap between a BATSE 68% confidence positional error box and the ETC field-of-view during an ETC observation. In each case upper limits are placed on the optical-to-gamma-ray flux ratio.

  18. A search for optical counterparts of the complex Vela X system

    CERN Document Server

    Marubini, T E; Venter, C; de Jager, O C

    2015-01-01

    The pulsar wind nebula (PWN) associated with the Vela pulsar is a bright source in the radio, X-ray and gamma-ray bands, but not in the optical. This source is very near, lying at a distance of 290 pc, as inferred from the radio and optical parallax measurements of the pulsar. Knowledge of the brightness and structure of the Vela PWN in optical is important in order to constrain the underlying particle spectrum (and possibly the B-field properties and particle losses) associated with this extended source. We use results from the Digital Sky Survey, as well as results obtained using the SAAO 1.0 m telescope equipped with an imaging CCD (STE4) and BV filters, in an attempt to measure optical radiation from Vela X. To enlarge our field of view, we constructed a mosaic consisting of 3 x 3 frames around the pulsar position. We present spectral measurements from the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.), Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), ASCA, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Very Large Telescope (VLT), New Techn...

  19. Searching for the optical counterparts of two young gamma-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Pierbattista, M; Razzano, M; Salvetti, D; Belfiore, A; Shearer, A; Moran, P

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first deep optical observations of two $\\gamma$-ray pulsars, both among the very first discovered by the {\\em Fermi} Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The two pulsars are the radio-loud PSR\\, J1907+0602 in the TeV pulsar wind nebula (PWN) MGRO\\, J1908+06 and the radio-quiet PSR\\, J1809$-$2332 in the "Taz" radio/X-ray PWN. They are relatively young, with spin-down ages of 19.5 and 67.6 kyr, respectively and energetic, with spin-down energies $\\dot{E}_{\\rm rot} = 2.8 \\times 10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (PSR\\, J1907+0602) and $\\dot{E}_{\\rm rot} = 4.3 \\times 10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (PSR\\, J1809$-$2332). Both pulsars have been detected in the X-rays by \\xmm, which makes them viable targets for optical observations. We observed the pulsar fields in the B and V bands with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in June/July 2015. Neither of the two pulsars has been detected down to $3\\sigma$ limiting magnitudes of $m_{\\rm v} \\sim 26.9$ and $m_{\\rm v} \\sim 27.6$ for PSR\\, J1907+0602 and PSR\\, J1809$-$2332, respectively. We d...

  20. The Pan-STARRS, Mauna Kea, and PESSTO search for optical counterparts to aLIGO gravitational wave events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Kenneth C.; Pan-STARRS Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We have searched for an optical counterpart to the first gravitational wave source discovered by the Advanced LIGO experiment, GW150914, using the Pan-STARRS wide-field telescope and associated data processing to identify transient objects. Interesting candidates are then followed up using the UH88, Gemini, and PESSTO for the spectroscopic characterization. We mapped out 442 square degrees of the northern sky region of the initial LIGO map. We discovered 56 astrophysical transients over a period of 41 days from the discovery of the source. Of these, 19 were spectroscopically classied and a further 13 have host galaxy redshifts. All transients appear to be fairly normal supernovae and AGN variability and none are obviously linked with GW150914. We find one high energey type II supernova with an estimated explosion date consistent with that of GW150914, but no causal link can be inferred. We discuss our results as demonstration of the survey capability of Pan-STARRS, and the spectroscopic capabilities of PESSTO and Mauna Kea.

  1. Pan-STARRS and PESSTO search for the optical counterpart to the LIGO gravitational wave source GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Smartt, S J; Smith, K W; Huber, M E; Young, D R; Cappellaro, E; Wright, D E; Coughlin, M; Schultz, A S B; Denneau, L; Flewelling, H; Heinze, A; Magnier, E A; Primak, N; Rest, A; Sherstyuk, A; Stalder, B; Stubbs, C W; Tonry, J; Waters, C; Willman, M; Anderson, J P; Baltay, C; Botticella, M T; Campbell, H; Dennefeld, M; Chen, T -W; Della Valle, M; Elias-Rosa, N; Fraser, M; Inserra, C; Kankare, E; Kotak, R; Kupfer, T; Harmanen, J; Galbany, L; Gal-Yam, A; Guillou, L L; Lyman, J D; Maguire, K; Mitra, A; Nicholl, M; E, F Olivares; Rabinowitz, D; Razza, A; Sollerman, J; Smith, M; Terreran, G; Valenti, S

    2016-01-01

    We have searched for an optical counterpart to the first gravitational wave source discovered by the LIGO experiment, GW150914, using a combination of the Pan-STARRS1 wide-field telescope and the PESSTO spectroscopic follow-up programme. We mapped out 442 square degrees of the northern sky region of the initial map. We discovered 56 astrophysical transients over a period of 41 days from the discovery of the source. Of these, 19 were spectroscopically classified and a further 13 have host galaxy redshifts. All transients appear to be fairly normal supernovae and AGN variability and none is obviously linked with GW150914. We find one high energy type II supernova with an estimated explosion date consistent with that of GW150914, but no causal link can be inferred. We quantify the upper limits by defining parameterised lightcurves with timescales of 4, 20 and 40 days and use the sensitivity of the Pan-STARRS1 images to set limits on the luminosities of possible sources. The Pan-STARRS1 images reach limiting magn...

  2. Pan-STARRS and PESSTO search for an optical counterpart to the LIGO gravitational-wave source GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartt, S. J.; Chambers, K. C.; Smith, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Young, D. R.; Cappellaro, E.; Wright, D. E.; Coughlin, M.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Heinze, A.; Magnier, E. A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Anderson, J. P.; Baltay, C.; Botticella, M. T.; Campbell, H.; Dennefeld, M.; Chen, T.-W.; Della Valle, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kotak, R.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Gal-Yam, A.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J. D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Olivares E, F.; Rabinowitz, D.; Razza, A.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gibson, B.; Goggia, T.

    2016-11-01

    We searched for an optical counterpart to the first gravitational-wave source discovered by LIGO (GW150914), using a combination of the Pan-STARRS1 wide-field telescope and the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects (PESSTO) spectroscopic follow-up programme. As the final LIGO sky maps changed during analysis, the total probability of the source being spatially coincident with our fields was finally only 4.2 per cent. Therefore, we discuss our results primarily as a demonstration of the survey capability of Pan-STARRS and spectroscopic capability of PESSTO. We mapped out 442 deg2 of the northern sky region of the initial map. We discovered 56 astrophysical transients over a period of 41 d from the discovery of the source. Of these, 19 were spectroscopically classified and a further 13 have host galaxy redshifts. All transients appear to be fairly normal supernovae (SNe) and AGN variability and none is obviously linked with GW150914. We illustrate the sensitivity of our survey by defining parametrized light curves with time-scales of 4, 20 and 40 d and use the sensitivity of the Pan-STARRS1 images to set limits on the luminosities of possible sources. The Pan-STARRS1 images reach limiting magnitudes of iP1 = 19.2, 20.0 and 20.8, respectively, for the three time-scales. For long time-scale parametrized light curves (with full width half-maximum ≃40 d), we set upper limits of M_i ≤ -17.2^{-0.9}_{+1.4} if the distance to GW150914 is DL = 400 ± 200 Mpc. The number of Type Ia SN we find in the survey is similar to that expected from the cosmic SN rate, indicating a reasonably complete efficiency in recovering SN like transients out to DL = 400 ± 200 Mpc.

  3. Observations of the optical counterpart to XTE J1118+480 during outburst by the robotic optical transient search experiment In telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Wren, J; Balsano, R; Bloch, J; Borozdin, K N; Casperson, D E; Gisler, G; Kehoe, R; Lee Byung Cheol; Marshall, S; McKay, T; Priedhorsky, W; Rykoff, E S; Smith, D; Trudolyubov, S P; Vestrand, W T

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray nova XTE J1118+480 exhibited two outbursts in the early part of 2000. As detected by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the first outburst began in early January and the second began in early March. Routine imaging of the northern sky by the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) shows the optical counterpart to XTE J1118+480 during both outbursts. These data include over 60 epochs from January to June 2000. A search of the ROTSE data archives reveal no previous optical outbursts of this source in selected data between April 1998 and January 2000. While the X-ray to optical flux ratio of XTE J1118+480 was low during both outbursts, we suggest that they were full X-ray novae and not mini-outbursts based on comparison with similar sources. The ROTSE measurements taken during the March 2000 outburst also indicate a rapid rise in the optical flux that preceded the X-ray emission measured by the RXTE by approximately 10 days. Using these results, we estimate a pre-outburst accretion dis...

  4. J-GEM follow-up observations to search for an optical counterpart of the first gravitational wave source GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Asakura, Yuichiro; Abe, Fumio; Tristram, Paul J.; Utsumi, Yousuke; Doi, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Kenta; Itoh, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Motohara, Kentaro; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Nagayama, Takahiro; Ohta, Kouji; Saito, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Yoichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Uemura, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2016-08-01

    We present our optical follow-up observations to search for an electromagnetic counterpart of the first gravitational wave source GW150914 in the framework of the Japanese collaboration for Gravitational wave ElectroMagnetic follow-up (J-GEM), which is an observing group utilizing optical and radio telescopes in Japan, as well as in New Zealand, China, South Africa, Chile, and Hawaii. We carried out a wide-field imaging survey with the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC) on the 1.05 m Kiso Schmidt telescope in Japan and a galaxy-targeted survey with Tripole5 on the B&C 61 cm telescope in New Zealand. Approximately 24 deg2 regions in total were surveyed in i-band with KWFC and 18 nearby galaxies were observed with Tripole5 in g-, r-, and i-bands 4-12 days after the gravitational wave detection. Median 5 σ depths are i ˜ 18.9 mag for the KWFC data and g ˜ 18.9 mag, r ˜ 18.7 mag, and i ˜ 18.3 mag for the Tripole5 data. The probability for a counterpart to be in the observed area is 1.2% in the initial skymap and 0.1% in the final skymap. We do not find any transient source associated to an external galaxy with spatial offset from its center, which is consistent with the local supernova rate.

  5. J-GEM Follow-Up Observations to Search for an Optical Counterpart of The First Gravitational Wave Source GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Asakura, Yuichiro; Abe, Fumio; Tristram, Paul J; Utsumi, Yousuke; Doi, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Kenta; Itoh, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Kawabata, Koji S; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Motohara, Kentaro; Murata, Katsuhiro L; Nagayama, Takahiro; Ohta, Kouji; Saito, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Yoichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Uemura, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We present our optical follow-up observations to search for an electromagnetic counterpart of the first gravitational wave source GW150914 in the framework of the Japanese collaboration for Gravitational wave ElectroMagnetic follow-up (J-GEM), which is an observing group utilizing optical and radio telescopes in Japan, as well as those in New Zealand, China, South Africa, Chile, and Hawaii. We carried out a wide-field imaging survey with Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC) on the 1.05-m Kiso Schmidt telescope in Japan and a galaxy-targeted survey with Tripole5 on the B&C 61-cm telescope in New Zealand. Approximately 24 deg2 regions in total were surveyed in i-band with KWFC and 18 nearby galaxies were observed with Tripole5 in g-, r-, and i-bands 4-12 days after the gravitational wave detection. Median 5-sigma depths are i~18.9 mag for the KWFC data and g~18.9 mag, r~18.7 mag, and i~18.3 mag for the Tripole5 data. Probability for a counterpart to be in the observed area is 1.2% in the initial skymap and 0.1% in...

  6. Possible optical counterpart of PSR J1357--6429

    CERN Document Server

    Danilenko, A; Mennickent, R E; Pavlov, G; Shibanov, Yu; Zharikov, S; Zyuzin, D

    2012-01-01

    PSR J1357--6429 is a Vela-like radio pulsar that has been recently detected in X-rays and gamma-rays. It powers a compact tail-like X-ray pulsar wind nebula and X-ray-radio plerion associated with an extended TeV source HESS J1356--645. We have performed deep optical observations with the VLT to search for an optical counterpart of the pulsar and its nebula. A point-like source has been detected in V, R, and I bands whose centre position is within the 1-sigma error circle of the X-ray position of the pulsar, and whose colours are distinct from those of ordinary stars. We consider it as a candidate optical counterpart of the pulsar. If it is indeed the counterpart, its 5-sigma offset from the radio pulsar position, measured about 9 yr earlier, implies the transverse velocity of the pulsar in the range of 1600--2000 km s^{-1} at the distance of 2--2.5 kpc, making it the fastest moving pulsar known. The direction of the estimated proper motion coincides with the extension of the pulsar's X-ray tail, suggesting t...

  7. Optical counterpart of the Foucault pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Okulov, A Yu

    2011-01-01

    The rotation of the Earth was one of the most controversial issues of natural philosophy during centuries in transition from medieval to Renaissances and afterwards. The invention of Foucault pendulum \\cite {Foucault:1852} did not stopped this controversies but further stimulated the new searches of the Earth motion with respect to the "eather wind" which led to Michelson interferometric studies of small displacements and stars dimensions \\cite {Michelson:1904} and to the Saqnac discovery of the phase lag of counter propagating waves caused by rotation of the reference frame \\cite {Sagnac:1913}. Nowadays the Sagnac effect is in the heart of the widespread rotation sensors, technically implemented as a passive fiber gyroscopes and the active laser gyros \\cite {Scully:1997}. The recent activity of researchers is focused upon the photon's rotation, observable as optical vortices \\cite {Padgett:2009, Soskin:2008}. In contrast to classical top the photon has a very remarkable difference: the projection of the angu...

  8. A Search for X-ray Counterparts of Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Prinz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We describe a systematic search for X-ray counterparts of radio pulsars. The search was accomplished by cross-correlating the radio timing positions of all radio pulsars from the ATNF pulsar database (version 1.54) with archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations publicly released by August 1st 2015. In total, 171 of the archival XMM-Newton observations and 215 of the archival Chandra datasets where found to have a radio pulsar serendipitously in the field of view. From the 283 radio pulsars covered by these datasets we identified 19 previously undetected X-ray counterparts. For 6 of them the statistics was sufficient to model the energy spectrum with one- or two-component models. For the remaining new detections and for those pulsars for which we determined an upper limit to their counting rate we computed the energy flux by assuming a Crab-like spectrum. Additionally, we derived upper limits on the neutron stars' surface temperature and on the non-thermal X-ray efficiency for those pulsars for which the sp...

  9. Variability of Optical Counterparts in the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Britt, Christopher T; Johnson, C B; Baldwin, A; Jonker, P G; Nelemans, G; Torres, M A P; Maccarone, T; Steeghs, D; Greiss, S; Heinke, C; Bassa, C G; Collazzi, A; Villar, A; Gabb, M; Gossen, L

    2014-01-01

    We present optical lightcurves of variable stars consistent with the positions of X-ray sources identified with the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey. Using data from the Mosaic-II instrument on the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO, we gathered time-resolved photometric data on timescales from $\\sim2$ hr to 8 days over the $\\frac{3}{4}$ of the X-ray survey containing sources from the initial GBS catalog. Among the lightcurve morphologies we identify are flickering in interacting binaries, eclipsing sources, dwarf nova outbursts, ellipsoidal variations, long period variables, spotted stars, and flare stars. $87\\%$ of X-ray sources have at least one potential optical counterpart. $24\\%$ of these candidate counterparts are detectably variable; a much greater fraction than expected for randomly selected field stars, which suggests that most of these variables are real counterparts. We discuss individual sources of interest, provide variability information on candidate counterparts, and di...

  10. A Comprehensive Archival Search for Counterparts to Ultra-Compact High Velocity Clouds: Five Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sand, D J; Bennet, P; Willman, B; Hargis, J; Strader, J; Olszewski, E; Tollerud, E J; Simon, J D; Caldwell, N; Guhathakurta, P; James, B L; Koposov, S; McLeod, B; Morrell, N; Peacock, M; Salinas, R; Seth, A C; Stark, D P; Toloba, E

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of five Local Volume dwarf galaxies uncovered during a comprehensive archival search for optical counterparts to ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). The UCHVC population of HI clouds are thought to be candidate gas-rich, low mass halos at the edge of the Local Group and beyond, but no comprehensive search for stellar counterparts to these systems has been presented. Careful visual inspection of all publicly available optical and ultraviolet imaging at the position of the UCHVCs revealed six blue, diffuse counterparts with a morphology consistent with a faint dwarf galaxy beyond the Local Group. Optical spectroscopy of all six candidate dwarf counterparts show that five have an H$\\alpha$-derived velocity consistent with the coincident HI cloud, confirming their association; the sixth diffuse counterpart is likely a background object. The size and luminosity of the UCHVC dwarfs is consistent with other known Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies. The gas fraction ($M_{HI}/M_{sta...

  11. Compact Optical Counterparts of Ultraluminous X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Lian; Grise, Fabien; Kaaret, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging data, we report the multiband photometric properties of 13 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that have a unique compact optical counterpart. Both magnitude and color variation are detected at time scales of days to years. The optical color, variability, and X-ray to optical flux ratio indicate that the optical emission of most ULXs is dominated by X-ray reprocessing on the disk, similar to that of low mass X-ray binaries. For most sources, the optical spectrum is a power-law, $F_{\

  12. Searching for electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave transients

    CERN Document Server

    Branchesi, M; Laas-Bourez, M

    2011-01-01

    A pioneering electromagnetic (EM) observation follow-up program of candidate gravitational wave (GW) triggers has been performed, Dec 17 2009 to Jan 8 2010 and Sep 4 to Oct 20 2010, during the recent LIGO/Virgo run. The follow-up program involved ground-based and space EM facilities observing the sky at optical, X-ray and radio wavelengths. The joint GW/EM observation study requires the development of specific image analysis procedures able to discriminate the possible EM counterpart of GW trigger from background events. The paper shows an overview of the EM follow-up program and the developing image analysis procedures as they are applied to data collected with TAROT and Zadko.

  13. The optical counterpart to XMMU J004855.5-734946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, M. J.; McBride, V.; Haberl, F.; Bird, A.; Udalski, A.

    2016-06-01

    The source, XMMU J004855.5-734946, reported to be currently exhibiting an X-ray outburst in ATel #9197, has an optical counterpart in the OGLE IV database, SMC720.11 13342, proposed by McBride et al (2016, in prep).

  14. On the PSR B1133+16 optical counterpart

    CERN Document Server

    Zharikov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is confirming the optical identification of PSR B1133+16, whose candidate optical counterpart was detected in Very Large Telescope (VLT) images obtained back in 2003. We used new deep optical images of the PSR B1133+16 field obtained with both the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) and the VLT in the g' and B bands, respectively, to confirm the detection of its candidate optical counterpart and its coincidence with the most recent pulsar's radio coordinates. We did not detect any object at the position of the pulsar candidate counterpart (B~28), measured in our 2003 VLT images. However, we tentatively detected an object of comparable brightness in both the 2012 GTC and VLT images, whose position is offset by ~3.03" from that of the pulsar's candidate counterpart in the 2003 VLT images and lies along the pulsar's proper motion direction. Accounting for the time span of ~9 years between the 2012 quasi-contemporary GTC and VLT images and the 2003 VLT one, this offset is consistent with th...

  15. The HIPASS Catalogue: III - Optical Counterparts & Isolated Dark Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Doyle, M T; Rohde, D J; Pimbblet, K A; Read, M; Meyer, M J; Zwaan, M A; Ryan-Weber, E; Stevens, J; Koribalski, B S; Webster, R L; Staveley-Smith, L; Barnes, D G; Howlett, M; Kilborn, V A; Waugh, M; Pierce, M J; Bhathal, R; De Blok, W J G; Disney, M J; Ekers, R D; Freeman, K C; García, D A; Gibson, B K; Harnett, J I; Henning, P A; Jerjen, H; Kesteven, M J; Knezek, P M; Mader, S; Marquarding, M; Minchin, R F; O'Brien, J; Oosterloo, T; Price, R M; Putman, M E; Ryder, S D; Sadler, E M; Stewart, I M; Stootman, F; Wright, A E; Doyle, Marianne T.

    2005-01-01

    We present the largest catalogue to date of optical counterparts for HI radio-selected galaxies, Hopcat. Of the 4315 HI radio-detected sources from the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (Hipass) catalogue, we find optical counterparts for 3618 (84%) galaxies. Of these, 1798 (42%) have confirmed optical velocities and 848 (20%) are single matches without confirmed velocities. Some galaxy matches are members of galaxy groups. From these multiple galaxy matches, 714 (16%) have confirmed optical velocities and a further 258 (6%) galaxies are without confirmed velocities. For 481 (11%), multiple galaxies are present but no single optical counterpart can be chosen and 216 (5%) have no obvious optical galaxy present. Most of these 'blank fields' are in crowded fields along the Galactic plane or have high extinctions. Isolated 'Dark galaxy' candidates are investigated using an extinction cut of ABj < 1 mag and the blank fields category. Of the 3692 galaxies with an ABj extinction < 1 mag, only 13 are also blank fields. ...

  16. Optical Counterparts of Ultra Luminous X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Gutíerrez, C M

    2006-01-01

    We present optical identification and characterization of counterparts of four objects previously catalogued as ultra-luminous X-ray sources. The objects were selected from the Colbert & Ptak (2002) catalogue. The optical counterparts are identified as point-like objects with magnitudes in the range \\~17-19. The optical spectra of three of the sources (IXO 32, 37 and 40) show the presence of emission lines typical of quasars. The position of these lines allows a precise estimation of their redshifts (2.769, 0.567 and 0.789 for IXO 32, 37 and 40 respectively). The fourth X-ray source, IXO35, is associated with a red object that has a spectrum typical of an M star in our Galaxy. These identifications are useful for building clean samples of ULX sources, selecting suitable targets for future observations and performing statistical studies on the different populations of X-ray sources.

  17. A search for VHE counterparts of galactic Fermi sources

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, P H Thomas; Tibolla, Omar; Chaves, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Very high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-rays have been detected from a wide range of astronomical objects, such as SNRs, pulsars and pulsar wind nebulae, AGN, gamma-ray binaries, molecular clouds, and possibly star-forming regions as well. At lower energies, sources detected using Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard Fermi provide a rich set of data which can be used to study the behavior of cosmic accelerators in the GeV to TeV energy bands. In particular, the improved angular resolution in both bands compared to previous instruments significantly reduces source confusion and facilitates the identification of associated counterparts at lower energies. In this talk, a comprehensive search for VHE gamma-ray sources which are spatially coincident with Galactic Fermi/LAT bright sources is performed, and the GeV to TeV spectra of selected coincident sources are shown. It is found that LAT bright GeV sources are correlated to TeV sources, in contrast with previous studies using EGRET data.

  18. VARIABILITY OF OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS IN THE CHANDRA GALACTIC BULGE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, C. T.; Hynes, R. I.; Johnson, C. B.; Baldwin, A.; Collazzi, A.; Gossen, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Jonker, P. G.; Torres, M. A. P. [SRON, Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Nelemans, G. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Maccarone, T. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Science Building, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Steeghs, D.; Greiss, S. [Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Heinke, C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-183, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Bassa, C. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Villar, A. [Department of Physics, Massachussettes Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Gabb, M. [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We present optical light curves of variable stars consistent with the positions of X-ray sources identified with the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS). Using data from the Mosaic-II instrument on the Blanco 4 m Telescope at CTIO, we gathered time-resolved photometric data on timescales from ∼2 hr to 8 days over the 3/4 of the X-ray survey containing sources from the initial GBS catalog. Among the light curve morphologies we identify are flickering in interacting binaries, eclipsing sources, dwarf nova outbursts, ellipsoidal variations, long period variables, spotted stars, and flare stars. Eighty-seven percent of X-ray sources have at least one potential optical counterpart. Twenty-seven percent of these candidate counterparts are detectably variable; a much greater fraction than expected for randomly selected field stars, which suggests that most of these variables are real counterparts. We discuss individual sources of interest, provide variability information on candidate counterparts, and discuss the characteristics of the variable population.

  19. The Optical Counterpart of M101 ULX-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Gruendi, Robert A.; Chu, You-Hua; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Still, Martin; Mukai, Koji; Musuotzky, Richard F.

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the optical counterpart of the Ultra-Luminous X-ray source Ml0l ULX-1 (CX- OKM101 J140332.74+542102), by comparing HST ACS images with Chandra ACIS-S images. The optical counterpart has V= 23.75 and colours consistent with those for a mid-B supergiant. Archival WFPC2 observations show that the source brightness is constant to within approximately 0.1 mag. The physical association of this source with the ULX is confirmed by Gemini GMOS spectroscopic observations which show spatially unresolved He II lambda4686 and He I lambda5876 emission. These results suggest that M10l ULX-1 is a HMXB but deep spectroscopic monitoring observations are needed to determine the detailed properties of this system.

  20. Galaxy Strategy for Ligo-Virgo Gravitational Wave Counterpart Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.; Kanner, Jonah; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nissanke, Samaya; Singer, Leo P.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we continue a line of inquiry begun in Kanner et al. which detailed a strategy for utilizing telescopes with narrow fields of view, such as the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT), to localize gravity wave (GW) triggers from LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) / Virgo. If one considers the brightest galaxies that produce 50 percent of the light, then the number of galaxies inside typical GW error boxes will be several tens. We have found that this result applies both in the early years of Advanced LIGO when the range is small and the error boxes large, and in the later years when the error boxes will be small and the range large. This strategy has the beneficial property of reducing the number of telescope pointings by a factor 10 to 100 compared with tiling the entire error box. Additional galaxy count reduction will come from a GW rapid distance estimate which will restrict the radial slice in search volume. Combining the bright galaxy strategy with a convolution based on anticipated GW localizations, we find that the searches can be restricted to about 18 plus or minus 5 galaxies for 2015, about 23 plus or minus 4 for 2017, and about 11 plus or minus for 2020. This assumes a distance localization at the putative neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) merger range mu for each target year, and these totals are integrated out to the range. Integrating out to the horizon would roughly double the totals. For localizations with r (rotation) greatly less than mu the totals would decrease. The galaxy strategy we present in this work will enable numerous sensitive optical and X-ray telescopes with small fields of view to participate meaningfully in searches wherein the prospects for rapidly fading afterglow place a premium on a fast response time.

  1. Altitudinal dependence of meteor radio afterglows measured via optical counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Obenberger, K S; Dowell, J D; Schinzel, F K; Stovall, K; Sutton, E K; Taylor, G B

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the all-sky imaging capabilities of the LWA1 radio telescope along with a host of all-sky optical cameras, we have now observed 44 optical meteor counterparts to radio afterglows. Combining these observations we have determined the geographic positions of all 44 afterglows. Comparing the number of radio detections as a function of altitude above sea level to the number of expected bright meteors we find a strong altitudinal dependence characterized by a cutoff below $\\sim$ 90 km, below which no radio emission occurs, despite the fact that many of the observed optical meteors penetrated well below this altitude. This cutoff suggests that wave damping from electron collisions is an important factor for the evolution of radio afterglows, which agrees with the hypothesis that the emission is the result of electron plasma wave emission.

  2. X(3872) and the search for its bottomonium counterpart at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Toms, Konstantin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    X(3872) history and theoretical status overview. ATLAS study of the ψ(2S) and X(3872) production. Search for X(3872) bottomonium counterpart by ATLAS. Search for Xb at CMS. Determination of X(3872) quantum numbers at LHCb.

  3. Multiwavelength search for counterparts of supersoft X-ray sources in M31

    CERN Document Server

    Chiosi, E; Bernardini, F; Henze, M; Jamialiahmadi, N

    2014-01-01

    We searched optical/UV/IR counterparts of seven supersoft X-ray sources (SSS) in M31 in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) "Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury" (PHAT) archival images and photometric catalog. Three of the SSS were transient, the other four are persistent sources. The PHAT offers the opportunity to identify SSS hosting very massive white dwarfs that may explode as type Ia supernovae in single degenerate binaries, with magnitudes and color indexes typical of symbiotic stars, high mass close binaries, or systems with optically luminous accretion disks. We find evidence that the transient SSS were classical or recurrent novae; two likely counterparts we identified are probably symbiotic binaries undergoing mass transfer at a very high rate. There is a candidate accreting white dwarf binary in the error circle of one of the persistent sources, r3-8. In the spatial error circle of the best studied SSS in M31, r2-12, no red giants or AGB stars are sufficiently luminous in the optical and UV bands t...

  4. Galaxy Strategy for LIGO-Virgo Gravitational Wave Counterpart Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, Neil; Kanner, Jonah; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Nissanke, Samaya; Singer, Leo P

    2015-01-01

    In this work we continue a line of inquiry begun in Kanner et al. which detailed a strategy for utilizing telescopes with narrow fields of view, such as the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT), to localize gravity wave (GW) triggers from LIGO/Virgo. If one considers the brightest galaxies that produce ~50% of the light, then the number of galaxies inside typical GW error boxes will be several tens. We have found that this result applies both in the early years of Advanced LIGO when the range is small and the error boxes large, and in the later years when the error boxes will be small and the range large. This strategy has the beneficial property of reducing the number of telescope pointings by a factor 10 to 100 compared with tiling the entire error box. Additional galaxy count reduction will come from a GW rapid distance estimate which will restrict the radial slice in search volume. Combining the bright galaxy strategy with a convolution based on anticipated GW localizations, we find that the searches can be restri...

  5. HST/ACS Imaging of Omega Centauri: Optical Counterparts of Chandra X-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cool, Adrienne M; Arias, Tersi; Brochmann, Michelle; Dorfman, Jason; Gafford, April; White, Vivian; Anderson, Jay

    2012-01-01

    We present results of a search for optical counterparts of X-ray sources in and toward the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The ACS data consist of a mosaic of Wide Field Channel (WFC) images obtained using F625W, F435W, and F658N filters; with 9 pointings we cover the central ~10'x10' of the cluster and encompass 109 known Chandra sources. We find promising optical counterparts for 59 of the sources, ~40 of which are likely to be associated with the cluster. These include 27 candidate cataclysmic variables (CVs), 24 of which are reported here for the first time. Fourteen of the CV candidates are very faint, with absolute magnitudes in the range M_625 = 10.4 - 12.6, making them comparable in brightness to field CVs near the period minimum discovered in the SDSS (Gansicke et al. 2009). Additional optical counterparts include three BY Dra candidates, a possible blue straggler, and a previously-reported quiescent low-mass X-ray ...

  6. A systematic search for near-infrared counterparts of nearby ultraluminous X-ray sources (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, K. M.; Heida, M.; Jonker, P. G.; Torres, M. A. P.; Roberts, T. P.; Walton, D. J.; Moon, D.-S.; Harrison, F. A.

    2017-07-01

    We present the results of our continued systematic search for near-infrared (NIR) candidate counterparts to ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) within 10 Mpc. We observed 42 ULXs in 24 nearby galaxies and detected NIR candidate counterparts to 15 ULXs. Fourteen of these ULXs appear to have a single candidate counterpart in our images and the remaining ULX has two candidate counterparts. Seven ULXs have candidate counterparts with absolute magnitudes in the range between -9.26 and -11.18 mag, consistent with them being red supergiants (RSGs). The other eight ULXs have candidate counterparts with absolute magnitudes too bright to be a single stellar source. Some of these NIR sources show extended morphology or colours expected for active galactic nuclei (AGNs), strongly suggesting that they are likely stellar clusters or background galaxies. The RSG candidate counterparts form a valuable sample for follow-up spectroscopic observations to confirm their nature, with the ultimate goal of directly measuring the mass of the compact accretor that powers the ULX using binary Doppler shifts.

  7. The $X(3872)$ and the search for its bottomonium counterpart at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Toms, Konstantin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present results on $X(3872)$ particle studies at three LHC experiments: ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. Production cross section measurements are reported, as well as determination of the $X(3872)$ quantum numbers. The search of the $X(3872)$ bottomonium counterpart is also described.

  8. HST/ACS IMAGING OF OMEGA CENTAURI: OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF CHANDRA X-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cool, Adrienne M.; Arias, Tersi; Brochmann, Michelle; Dorfman, Jason; Gafford, April; White, Vivian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States); Haggard, Daryl [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Physics and Astronomy Department, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Anderson, Jay, E-mail: cool@sfsu.edu, E-mail: dhaggard@northwestern.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We present results of a search for optical counterparts of X-ray sources in and toward the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The ACS data consist of a mosaic of Wide Field Channel images obtained using F625W, F435W, and F658N filters; with nine pointings we cover the central {approx}10' Multiplication-Sign 10' of the cluster and encompass 109 known Chandra sources. We find promising optical counterparts for 59 of the sources, {approx}40 of which are likely to be associated with the cluster. These include 27 candidate cataclysmic variables (CVs), 24 of which are reported here for the first time. Fourteen of the CV candidates are very faint, with absolute magnitudes in the range M {sub 625} =10.4-12.6, making them comparable in brightness to field CVs near the period minimum discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Additional optical counterparts include three BY Dra candidates, a possible blue straggler, and a previously reported quiescent low-mass X-ray binary. We also identify 3 foreground stars and 11 probable active galactic nuclei. Finally, we report the discovery of a group of seven stars whose X-ray properties are suggestive of magnetically active binaries, and whose optical counterparts lie on or very near the metal-rich anomalous giant and subgiant branches in {omega} Cen. If the apparent association between these seven stars and the RGB/SGB-a stars is real, then the frequency of X-ray sources in this metal-rich population is enhanced by a factor of at least five relative to the other giant and subgiant populations in the cluster. If these stars are not members of the metal-rich population, then they bring the total number of red stragglers (also known as sub-subgiants) that have been identified in {omega} to Cen 20, the largest number yet known in any globular cluster.

  9. A search for counterparts to massive X-ray binaries using photometric catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Negueruela, I; Negueruela, Ignacio; Schurch, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    (abridged) INTEGRAL has discovered large numbers of new hard X-ray sources, many of which are believed to be high mass X-ray binaries. However, for a significant fraction, their counterparts remain unidentified. We explore the use of photometric catalogues to find optical counterparts to high mass X-ray binaries. Candidates were selected from 2MASS photometry by means of a reddening free Q parameter. Sufficiently bright candidates were spectroscopically observed. Many of the candidates selected turned out to be moderately reddened late A or early F stars, but our method is able to identify the counterpart to IGR J16207-5129, confirmed by a Chandra localisation. We classify this object as a B0 supergiant. In the field of AX J1820.5-1434, we find a mid or early B-type star, but we cannot confirm it as the counterpart. For AX J1700.2-4220, we do not find any suitable candidate within the ASCA error circle. We classify HD 153295, a marginal candidate to be the counterpart, as B0.5IVe, and find a distance compatib...

  10. Photometry and spectroscopy of the GRB 970508 optical counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.; Benitez, N.;

    1998-01-01

    were observed for 1 hour during the decline phase. According to the fireball and afterglow models, the intensity should rise monotonically before the observed optical maximum, but the data indicate that another physical mechanism may be responsible for the constant phase seen during the first hours...

  11. Candidate optical counterparts of MAXI J1543-564

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russell, D.M.; Lewis, F.; Roche, P.; Altamirano, D.

    2011-01-01

    We report on optical observations of the field of the black hole candidate X-ray binary MAXI J1543-564 (ATel #3330, #3331, #3334, #3336, #3341, #3355) with the 2-m Faulkes Telescope South (located at Siding Spring, Australia). Three images were acquired in SDSS i'-band on 2011 May 11th, 14th and 15t

  12. An optimal method for scheduling observations of large sky error regions for finding optical counterparts to transients

    CERN Document Server

    Rana, Javed; Gadre, Bhooshan; Bhalerao, Varun; Bose, Sukanta

    2016-01-01

    The discovery and subsequent study of optical counterparts to transient sources is crucial for their complete astrophysical understanding. Various gamma ray burst (GRB) detectors, and more notably the ground--based gravitational wave detectors, typically have large uncertainties in the sky positions of detected sources. Searching these large sky regions spanning hundreds of square degrees is a formidable challenge for most ground--based optical telescopes, which can usually image less than tens of square degrees of the sky in a single night. We present algorithms for optimal scheduling of such follow--up observations in order to maximize the probability of imaging the optical counterpart, based on the all--sky probability distribution of the source position. We incorporate realistic observing constraints like the diurnal cycle, telescope pointing limitations, available observing time, and the rising/setting of the target at the observatory location. We use simulations to demonstrate that our proposed algorith...

  13. An Extragalactic HI Cloud with No Optical Counterpart?

    CERN Document Server

    Kilborn, V A; Marquarding, M; Webster, R L; Malin, D F; Banks, G D; Bhathal, R; De Blok, W J G; Boyce, P J; Disney, M J; Drinkwater, M J; Ekers, R D; Freeman, K C; Gibson, B K; Henning, P A; Jerjen, H; Knezek, P M; Koribalski, B S; Minchin, R F; Mould, J R; Oosterloo, T A; Price, R M; Putman, M E; Ryder, S D; Sadler, E M; Stewart, I; Stootman, F; Wright, A E

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery, from the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS), of an isolated cloud of neutral hydrogen which we believe to be extragalactic. The HI mass of the cloud (HIPASS J1712-64) is very low, 1.7 x 10^7 Msun, using an estimated distance of ~3.2 Mpc. Most significantly, we have found no optical companion to this object to very faint limits (mu(B)~ 27 mag arcsec^-2). HIPASS J1712-64 appears to be a binary system similar to, but much less massive than, HI 1225+01 (the Virgo HI Cloud) and has a size of at least 15 kpc. The mean velocity dispersion, measured with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), is only 4 km/s for the main component and because of the weak or non-existent star-formation, possibly reflects the thermal linewidth (T<2000 K) rather than bulk motion or turbulence. The peak column density for HIPASS J1712-64, from the combined Parkes and ATCA data, is only 3.5 x 10^19 cm^-2, which is estimated to be a factor of two below the critical threshold for star formation. Apart from i...

  14. Spectral Classification of Optical Counterparts to ROSAT All-Sky Survey X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Dragomir, D; Rutledge, R E; Dragomir, Diana; Roy, Philippe; Rutledge, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work statistically identified 5492 optical counterparts, with approximately 90% confidence, from among the approximately 18,000 X-ray sources appearing in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC). Using low resolution spectra in the wavelength range 3700-7900 angstroms, we present spectroscopic classifications for 195 of these counterparts which have not previously been classified. Of these 195, we find 168 individual stars of F, G, K or M type, 6 individual stars of unknown type, 6 double stars, 6 AGN or galaxies and 7 unclassifiable objects; the spectra of the 2 remaining objects were saturated.

  15. Optical counterpart positions of extragalactic radio sources and connecting optical and radio reference frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Z.; Gumerov, R.; Jin, W.; Khamitov, I.; Maigurova, N.; Pinigin, G.; Tang, Z.; Wang, S.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the results of an investigation of astrometric positions of extragalactic radio sources from a list for the International Celestial Reference Frame. About 300 fields around extragalactic radio sources were observed during the years 2000-2003. The observations were performed mainly using two telescopes equipped with CCD cameras at TUG, Turkey (Russian-Turkish Telescope - RTT150) and at YAO (1 m telescope), (Kunming, China). The mean accuracies of the measured positions are 38 mas in right ascension and 35 mas in declination. A comparison between the measured optical positions determined using the UCAC2 catalog and the radio positions from the current ICRF shows that the overall optical-minus- radio offsets are -4 and +15 mas for right ascension and declination, respectively. The formal internal errors of these mean offsets are 4 mas. The results of optical positions with respect to the reference catalogue 2MASS are also given. A search for a relation between optical and radio reference frames indicates that the orientation angles are near zero within their accuracy of about 5 mas. The link accuracy becomes 3 mas when our observations are combined with other studies. Tables 2 and 3 giving the positions are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/510/A10Present address: İstanbul Kültür University, Ataköy Yerleşkesi, 34156 Istanbul, Turkey

  16. An Enhanced Method for Scheduling Observations of Large Sky Error Regions for Finding Optical Counterparts to Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Javed; Singhal, Akshat; Gadre, Bhooshan; Bhalerao, Varun; Bose, Sukanta

    2017-04-01

    The discovery and subsequent study of optical counterparts to transient sources is crucial for their complete astrophysical understanding. Various gamma-ray burst (GRB) detectors, and more notably the ground-based gravitational wave detectors, typically have large uncertainties in the sky positions of detected sources. Searching these large sky regions spanning hundreds of square degrees is a formidable challenge for most ground-based optical telescopes, which can usually image less than tens of square degrees of the sky in a single night. We present algorithms for better scheduling of such follow-up observations in order to maximize the probability of imaging the optical counterpart, based on the all-sky probability distribution of the source position. We incorporate realistic observing constraints such as the diurnal cycle, telescope pointing limitations, available observing time, and the rising/setting of the target at the observatory’s location. We use simulations to demonstrate that our proposed algorithms outperform the default greedy observing schedule used by many observatories. Our algorithms are applicable for follow-up of other transient sources with large positional uncertainties, such as Fermi-detected GRBs, and can easily be adapted for scheduling radio or space-based X-ray follow-up.

  17. The Optical Counterpart of the Isolated Neutron Star RX J1605.3+3249

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D. L.; Kulkarni, S. R.; van Kerkwijk, M. H.

    2003-05-01

    We have detected the optical counterpart to the nearby isolated neutron star RX J1605.3+3249 using observations from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrometer aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The counterpart, with m50CCD=26.84+/-0.07 mag and very blue colors, lies close to the ROSAT HRI error circle and within the Chandra error circle. The spectrum is consistent with a Rayleigh-Jeans tail whose emission is a factor of ~14 above the extrapolation of the X-ray blackbody, and the source has an unabsorbed X-ray-to-optical flux ratio of log(fX/fopt)=4.4, similar to that of other isolated neutron stars. This confirms the classification of RX J1605.3+3249 as a neutron star.

  18. Detailed atmospheric abundance analysis of the optical counterpart of the IR source IRAS 16559-2957

    CERN Document Server

    Molina, R E

    2013-01-01

    We have undertaken a detailed abundance analysis of the optical counterpart of the IR source IRAS16559-2957 with the aim of confirming its possible post-AGB nature. The star shows solar metallicity and our investigation of a large number of elements including CNO and 12C/13C suggests that this object has experienced the first dredge-up and it is likely still at RGB stage.

  19. First low-latency LIGO+Virgo search for binary inspirals and their electromagnetic counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Belletoile, A.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Del Pozzo, W.; del Prete, M.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Geng, R.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, N.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, T.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.

    2012-05-01

    Aims: The detection and measurement of gravitational-waves from coalescing neutron-star binary systems is an important science goal for ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. In addition to emitting gravitational-waves at frequencies that span the most sensitive bands of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, these sources are also amongst the most likely to produce an electromagnetic counterpart to the gravitational-wave emission. A joint detection of the gravitational-wave and electromagnetic signals would provide a powerful new probe for astronomy. Methods: During the period between September 19 and October 20, 2010, the first low-latency search for gravitational-waves from binary inspirals in LIGO and Virgo data was conducted. The resulting triggers were sent to electromagnetic observatories for followup. We describe the generation and processing of the low-latency gravitational-wave triggers. The results of the electromagnetic image analysis will be described elsewhere. Results: Over the course of the science run, three gravitational-wave triggers passed all of the low-latency selection cuts. Of these, one was followed up by several of our observational partners. Analysis of the gravitational-wave data leads to an estimated false alarm rate of once every 6.4 days, falling far short of the requirement for a detection based solely on gravitational-wave data.

  20. X-ray sources and their optical counterparts in the globular cluster M 22

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, N A; Gendre, B; Barret, D; Lasota, J P; Rizzi, L

    2004-01-01

    Using XMM-Newton EPIC imaging data, we have detected 50 low-luminosity X-ray sources in the field of view of M 22, where 5 +/- 3 of these sources are likely to be related to the cluster. Using differential optical photometry, we have identified probable counterparts to those sources belonging to the cluster. Using X-ray spectroscopic and timing studies, supported by the optical colours, we propose that the most central X-ray sources in the cluster are cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, active binaries and a blue straggler. We also identify a cluster of galaxies behind this globular cluster.

  1. An optical counterpart to the anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U0142+61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulleman, F; van Kerkwijk, M H; Kulkarni, S R

    2000-12-01

    The energy source of the anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) is not understood, hence their designation as anomalous. Unlike binary X-ray pulsars, no companions are seen, so the energy cannot be supplied by accretion of matter from a companion star. The loss of rotational energy, which powers radio pulsars, is insufficient to power AXPs. Two models are generally considered: accretion from a large disk left over from the birth process, or decay of a very strong magnetic field (10(15) G) associated with a 'magnetar'. The lack of counterparts at other wavelengths has hampered progress in our understanding of these objects. Here we report deep optical observations of the field around 4U0142+61, which is the brightest AXP in X-rays. The source has no associated supernova remnant, which, together with its spin-down timescale of approximately 10(5) yr (ref. 5), suggests that it may be relatively old. We find an object with peculiar optical colours at the position of the X-ray source, and argue that it is the optical counterpart. The optical emission is too faint to admit the presence of a large accretion disk, but may be consistent with magnetospheric emission from a magnetar.

  2. The Optical Counterpart of the NGC 6624 X-Ray Burster

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ivan R.; Stanford, S. Adam

    1993-05-01

    On a pair of 30-min HST FOC images taken at 1400 Angstroms (F140W), we have identified the optical counterpart of the X-ray burster in the globular cluster NGC 6624; this object completely dominates these UV images. Its flux agrees with the UV flux seen by Rich et al. \\ (1993,ApJ,406,489) with the large aperture of IUE. In the blue (F430W) the object is at B =~ 18.6, while in the V band (F480LP) we can find no trace of it. The 1400-B color is consistent with a Rayleigh--Jeans spectrum. (For an interpretation of this radiation as X-ray energy reprocessed by the accretion disk around the LMXB and by the binary companion, see a separate paper by Arons and King at this meeting.) The X-ray source is now found to be only 0.3 arcsec from the cluster center, increasing the likelihood that the bizarre dot P of the binary is influenced by gravitational acceleration. The counterpart of the LMXB is surrounded by several brighter red giants, one only 80 mas away, so that it cannot be observed from the ground. Our new astrometry corrects the previously published positions of the cluster center and places the counterpart within 2 sigma of the X-ray position. The optical counterpart is very close to the radio position of Johnston and Kulkarni (1992,ApJL,393,L17), but that position is now recognized to refer to a coincidentally neighboring pulsar rather than to the LMXB. Further analysis of the UV light will be pursued with HST's High Speed Photometer.

  3. The optical counterpart of the bright X-ray transient Swift J1745-26

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Darias, T; Russell, D M; Guziy, S; Gorosabel, J; Casares, J; Padilla, M Armas; Charles, P A; Fender, R P; Belloni, T M; Lewis, F; Motta, S; Castro-Tirado, A; Mundell, C G; Sánchez-Ramírez, R; Thöne, C C

    2013-01-01

    We present a 30-day monitoring campaign of the optical counterpart of the bright X-ray transient Swift J1745-26, starting only 19 minutes after the discovery of the source. We observe the system peaking at i' ~17.6 on day 6 (MJD 56192) to then decay at a rate of ~0.04 mag/day. We show that the optical peak occurs at least 3 days later than the hard X-ray (15-50 keV) flux peak. Our measurements result in an outburst amplitude greater than 4.3 magnitudes, which favours an orbital period 250 km/s. The breadth of the line and the observed optical and X-ray fluxes suggest that Swift J1745-26 is a new black hole candidate located closer than ~7 kpc.

  4. The ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 1313 X-2 - Its optical counterpart and environment

    CERN Document Server

    Grisé, F; Soria, R; Motch, C; Smith, I A; Ryder, S D; Böttcher, M

    2008-01-01

    NGC 1313 X-2 is one of the brightest ultraluminous X-ray sources in the sky, at both X-ray and optical wavelengths; therefore, quite a few studies of available ESO VLT and HST data have appeared in the literature. Here, we present our analysis of VLT/FORS1 and HST/ACS photometric data, confirming the identification of the B ~ 23 mag blue optical counterpart. We show that the system is part of a poor cluster with an age of 20 Myr, leading to an upper mass limit of some 12 M_sun for the mass donor. We attribute the different results with respect to earlier studies to the use of isochrones in the F435W and F555W HST/ACS photometric system that appear to be incompatible with the corresponding Johnson B and V isochrones. The counterpart exhibits significant photometric variability of about 0.2 mag amplitude, both between the two HST observations and during the one month of monitoring with the VLT. This includes variability within one night and suggests that the light is dominated by the accretion disk in the syste...

  5. VLT/FORS2 observations of the optical counterpart of the isolated neutron star RBS 1774

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Turolla, R; Haberl, F; Cropper, M; Motch, C; Treves, A; Zampieri, L

    2011-01-01

    X-ray observations performed with ROSAT led to the discovery of a group (seven to date) of X-ray dim and radio-silent middle-aged isolated neutron stars (a.k.a. XDINSs), which are characterised by pure blackbody spectra (kT~40-100 eV), long X-ray pulsations (P=3-12 s), and appear to be endowed with relatively high magnetic fields, (B~10d13-14 G). RBS 1774 is one of the few XDINSs with a candidate optical counterpart, which we discovered with the VLT. We performed deep observations of RBS 1774 in the R band with the VLT to disentangle a non-thermal power-law spectrum from a Rayleigh-Jeans, whose contributions are expected to be very much different in the red part of the spectrum. We did not detect the RBS 1774 candidate counterpart down to a 3 sigma limiting magnitude of R~27. The constraint on its colour, (B-R)<0.6, rules out that it is a background object, positionally coincident with the X-ray source. Our R-band upper limit is consistent with the extrapolation of the B-band flux (assuming a 3 sigma uncer...

  6. The optical counterpart to the Be/X-ray binary SAX J2239.3+6116

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, P.; Blay, P.; Blinov, D.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Be/X-ray binaries represent the main group of high-mass X-ray binaries. The determination of the astrophysical parameters of the counterparts of these high-energy sources is important for the study of X-ray binary populations in our Galaxy. X-ray observations suggest that SAX J2239.3+6116 is a Be/X-ray binary. However, little is known about the astrophysical parameters of its massive companion. Aims: The main goal of this work is to perform a detailed study of the optical variability of the Be/X-ray binary SAX J2239.3+6116. Methods: We obtained multi-colour BVRI photometry and polarimetry and 4000-7000 Å spectroscopy. The 4000-5000 Å spectra allowed us to determine the spectral type and projected rotational velocity of the optical companion; the 6000-7000 Å spectra, together with the photometric magnitudes, were used to derive the colour excess E(B-V), estimate the distance, and to study the variability of the Hα line. Results: The optical counterpart to SAX J2239.3+6116 is a V = 14.8 B0Ve star located at a distance of 4.9 kpc. The interstellar reddening in the direction of the source is E(B-V) = 1.70 ± 0.03 mag. The monitoring of the Hα line reveals a slow long-term decline of its equivalent width since 2001. The line profile is characterized by a stable double-peak profile with no indication of large-scale distortions. We measured intrinsic optical polarization for the first time. Although somewhat higher than predicted by the models, the optical polarization is consistent with electron scattering in the circumstellar disk. Conclusions: We attribute the long-term decrease in the intensity of the Hα line to the dissipation of the circumstellar disk of the Be star. The longer variability timescales observed in SAX J2239.3+6116 compared to other Be/X-ray binaries may be explained by the wide orbit of the system.

  7. The optical counterpart to the Be/X-ray binary SAX J2239.3+6116

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, P; Blinov, D

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to perform a detailed study of the optical variability of the Be/X-ray binary SAX J2239.3+6116. We obtained multi-colour BVRI photometry and polarimetry and 4000-7000 A spectroscopy. The optical counterpart to SAX J2239.3+6116 is a V=14.8 B0Ve star located at a distance of ~4.9 kpc. The interstellar reddening in the direction of the source is E(B-V)=1.70 mag. The monitoring of the Halpha line reveals a slow long-term decline of its equivalent width since 2001. The line profile is characterized by a stable double-peak profile with no indication of large-scale distortions. Although somewhat higher than predicted by the models, the optical polarization is consistent with electron scattering in the circumstellar disk. We attribute the long-term decrease in the intensity of the Halpha line to the dissipation of the circumstellar disk of the Be star. The longer variability timescales observed in SAX J2239.3+6116 compared to other Be/X-ray binaries may be explained by the wide orbit of ...

  8. Optical Counterparts of Undetermined Type -Ray Active Galactic Nuclei with Blazar-Like Spectral Energy Distributions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Giovanni La Mura; Graziano Chiaro; Stefano Ciroi; Piero Rafanelli; David Salvetti; Marco Berton; Valentina Cracco; Fermi-LAT collaboration

    2015-12-01

    During its first four years of scientific observations, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) detected 3033 -ray sources above a 4 significance level. Although most of the extra-galactic sources are active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the blazar class, other families of AGNs are observed too, while a still high fraction of detections (∼30%) remains with uncertain association or classification. According to the currently accepted interpretation, the AGN -ray emission arises from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of low energy photons by relativistic particles confined in a jet, which, in the case of blazars, is oriented very close to our line-of-sight. Taking advantage of data from radio and X-ray wavelengths, which we expect to be produced together with -rays, providing a much better source localization potential, we focused our attention on a sample of -ray Blazar Candidates of Undetermined type (BCUs), starting a campaign of optical spectroscopic observations. The main aims of our investigation include a census of the AGN families that contribute to -ray emission and a study of their redshift distribution, with the subsequent implications on the intrinsic source power. We furthermore analyze which -ray properties can better constrain the nature of the source, thus helping in the study of objects not yet associated with a reliable low frequency counterpart. Here we report on the instruments and techniques used to identify the optical counterparts of -ray sources, we give an overview on the status of our work, and we discuss the implications of a large scale study of -ray emitting AGNs.

  9. Search of MeV-GeV counterparts of TeV sources with AGILE in pointing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappoldi, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Longo, F.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Verrecchia, F.; Tavani, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Chen, A. W.; Colafrancesco, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Giuliani, A.; Morselli, A.; Sabatini, S.; Vercellone, S.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Known TeV sources detected by major Čerenkov telescopes are investigated to identify possible MeV-GeV γ-ray counterparts. Aims: A systematic study of the known sources in the web-based TeVCat catalog has been performed to search for possible γ-ray counterparts on the AGILE data collected during the first period of operations in observing pointing mode. Methods: For each TeV source, a search for a possible γ-ray counterpart that is based on a multi-source maximum likelihood algorithm is performed on the AGILE data taken with the GRID instrument from July 2007 to October 2009. Results: In the case of high-significance detection, the average γ-ray flux is estimated. For cases of low-significance detection the 95% confidence level (CL) flux upper limit is given. 52 TeV sources out of 152 (corresponding to ~34% of the analysed sample) show a significant excess in the AGILE data covering the pointing observation period. Conclusions: This analysis found 26 new AGILE sources with respect to the AGILE reference catalogs, 15 of which are galactic, 7 are extragalactic and 4 are unidentified. Detailed tables with all available information on the analysed sources are presented. An interactive online version of the considered source list including all the analysis results is also available at the website http://www.asdc.asi.it/agiletevcat/

  10. X-ray Sources and their Optical Counterparts in the Globular Cluster M4

    CERN Document Server

    Bassa, C; Homer, L; Verbunt, F; Gaensler, B M; Lewin, W H G; Anderson, S F; Margon, B; Kaspi, V M; Van der Klis, M; Bassa, Cees; Pooley, David; Homer, Lee; Verbunt, Frank; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Anderson, Scott F.; Margon, Bruce; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Klis, Michiel van der

    2004-01-01

    We report on the Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S3 imaging observation of the Galactic globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121). We detect 12 X-ray sources inside the core and 19 more within the cluster half-mass radius. The limiting luminosity of this observation is Lx~10e29 erg/sec for sources associated with the cluster, the deepest X-ray observation of a globular cluster to date. We identify 6 X-ray sources with known objects and use ROSAT observations to show that the brightest X-ray source is variable. Archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope allow us to identify optical counterparts to 16 X-ray sources. Based on the X-ray and optical properties of the identifications and the information from the literature, we classify two (possibly three) sources as cataclysmic variables, one X-ray source as a millisecond pulsar and 12 sources as chromospherically active binaries. Comparison of M4 with 47 Tuc and NGC 6397 suggests a scaling of the number of active binaries in these clusters with the cluster (core) mass.

  11. Search for Optical Pulsations in PSR J0337+1715

    CERN Document Server

    Strader, M J; Meeker, S R; Szypryt, P; Walter, A B; van Eyken, J C; Ulbricht, G; Stoughton, C; Bumble, B; Kaplan, D L; Mazin, B A

    2016-01-01

    We report on a search for optical pulsations from PSR J0337+1715 at its observed radio pulse period. PSR J0337+1715 is a millisecond pulsar (2.7 ms spin period) in a triple hierarchical system with two white dwarfs, and has a known optical counterpart with g-band magnitude 18. The observations were done with the Array Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry (ARCONS) at the 200" Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory. No significant pulsations were found in the range 4000-11000 angstroms, and we can limit pulsed emission in g-band to be fainter than 25 mag.

  12. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey: optical catalogue and point-source counterparts to X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wevers, T.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C.; Nelemans, G.; van Grunsven, T.; Gonzalez-Solares, E. A.; Torres, M. A. P.; Heinke, C.; Steeghs, D.; Maccarone, T. J.; Britt, C.; Hynes, R. I.; Johnson, C.; Wu, Jianfeng

    2016-06-01

    As part of the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS), we present a catalogue of optical sources in the GBS footprint. This consists of two regions centred at Galactic latitude b = 1.5° above and below the Galactic Centre, spanning (l × b) = (6° × 1°). The catalogue consists of two or more epochs of observations for each line of sight in r', i' and H α filters. The catalogue is complete down to r' = 20.2 and i' = 19.2 mag; the mean 5σ depth is r' = 22.5 and i' = 21.1 mag. The mean root-mean-square residuals of the astrometric solutions is 0.04 arcsec. We cross-correlate this optical catalogue with the 1640 unique X-ray sources detected in Chandra observations of the GBS area, and find candidate optical counterparts to 1480 X-ray sources. We use a false alarm probability analysis to estimate the contamination by interlopers, and expect ˜10 per cent of optical counterparts to be chance alignments. To determine the most likely counterpart for each X-ray source, we compute the likelihood ratio for all optical sources within the 4σ X-ray error circle. This analysis yields 1480 potential counterparts (˜90 per cent of the sample). 584 counterparts have saturated photometry (r' ≤ 17, i' ≤ 16), indicating these objects are likely foreground sources and the real counterparts. 171 candidate counterparts are detected only in the i' band. These sources are good qLMXB and CV candidates as they are X-ray bright and likely located in the Bulge.

  13. Optical counterparts of two ultraluminous X-ray sources NGC4559 X-10 and NGC4395 ULX-1

    CERN Document Server

    Vinokurov, A; Atapin, K

    2016-01-01

    We study the optical counterparts of ultraluminous X-ray sources NGC4559 X-10 and NGC4395 ULX-1. Their absolute magnitudes, after taking the reddening into account, are $M_V \\approx -5.3$ and $M_V \\approx -6.2$, respectively. The spectral energy distribution of the NGC4559 X-10 counterpart is well fitted by a spectrum of an F-type star, whereas NGC4395 ULX-1 has a blue power-law spectrum. Optical spectroscopy of NGC4395 ULX-1 has shown a broad and variable HeII~$\\lambda$4686 emission, which puts this object in line with all the other spectrally-studied ULXs. Using the Swift archival X-ray data for NGC4395 ULX-1, we have found a period of $62.8\\pm 2.3$ days. The X-ray phase curve of the source is very similar to the precession curve of SS433. The optical variation of the counterpart (between two accurate measurements) amounts to 0.10 mag. Analyzing the absolute magnitudes of 16 well-studied ULX counterparts one may suggest that as the original accretion rate decreases (but nevertheless remains supercritical), ...

  14. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey: optical catalogue and point-source counterparts to X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wevers, T; Jonker, P G; Bassa, C; Nelemans, G; van Grunsven, T; Gonzalez-Solares, E A; Torres, M A P; Heinke, C; Steeghs, D; Maccarone, T J; Britt, C; Hynes, R I; Johnson, C; Wu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS), we present a catalogue of optical sources in the GBS footprint. This consists of two regions centered at Galactic latitude b = 1.5 degrees above and below the Galactic Centre, spanning (l x b) = (6x1) degrees. The catalogue consists of 2 or more epochs of observations for each line of sight in r', i' and H{\\alpha} filters. It is complete down to r' = 20.2 and i' = 19.2 mag; the mean 5{\\sigma} depth is r' = 22.5 and i' = 21.1 mag. The mean root-mean-square residuals of the astrometric solutions is 0.04 arcsec. We cross-correlate this optical catalogue with the 1640 unique X-ray sources detected in Chandra observations of the GBS area, and find candidate optical counterparts to 1480 X-ray sources. We use a false alarm probability analysis to estimate the contamination by interlopers, and expect ~ 10 per cent of optical counterparts to be chance alignments. To determine the most likely counterpart for each X-ray source, we compute the likelihood ratio for all o...

  15. Discovery of the Optical Counterparts to Four Energetic Fermi Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Breton, R P; Roberts, M S E; Hessels, J W T; Camilo, F; McLaughlin, M A; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Stairs, I H

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, over 43 millisecond radio pulsars have been discovered by targeted searches of unidentified gamma-ray sources found by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. A large fraction of these millisecond pulsars are in compact binaries with low-mass companions. These systems often show eclipses of the pulsar signal and are commonly known as black widows and redbacks because the pulsar is gradually destroying its companion. In this paper, we report on the optical discovery of four strongly irradiated millisecond pulsar companions. All four sources show modulations of their color and luminosity at the known orbital periods from radio timing. Light curve modelling of our exploratory data shows that the equilibrium temperature reached on the companion's dayside with respect to their nightside is consistent with about 10-30% of the available spin-down energy from the pulsar being reprocessed to increase the companion's dayside temperature. This value compares well with the range observed in other irra...

  16. Discovery of the optical counterparts to four energetic Fermi millisecond pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Van Kerkwijk, M. H. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Roberts, M. S. E. [Eureka Scientific Inc., 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West, 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, White Hall, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ray, P. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7655, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Stairs, I. H., E-mail: r.breton@soton.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2013-06-01

    In the last few years, over 43 millisecond radio pulsars have been discovered by targeted searches of unidentified γ-ray sources found by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. A large fraction of these millisecond pulsars are in compact binaries with low-mass companions. These systems often show eclipses of the pulsar signal and are commonly known as black widows and redbacks because the pulsar is gradually destroying its companion. In this paper, we report on the optical discovery of four strongly irradiated millisecond pulsar companions. All four sources show modulations of their color and luminosity at the known orbital periods from radio timing. Light curve modeling of our exploratory data shows that the equilibrium temperature reached on the companion's dayside with respect to their nightside is consistent with about 10%-30% of the available spin-down energy from the pulsar being reprocessed to increase the companion's dayside temperature. This value compares well with the range observed in other irradiated pulsar binaries and offers insights about the energetics of the pulsar wind and the production of γ-ray emission. In addition, this provides a simple way of estimating the brightness of irradiated pulsar companions given the pulsar spin-down luminosity. Our analysis also suggests that two of the four new irradiated pulsar companions are only partially filling their Roche lobe. Some of these sources are relatively bright and represent good targets for spectroscopic follow-up. These measurements could enable, among other things, mass determination of the neutron stars in these systems.

  17. Optical Counterparts of Ultra-Luminous X-ray Sources identified from Archival Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2

    CERN Document Server

    Ptak, A; Van der Marel, R; Roye, E; Heckman, T; Towne, B

    2006-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of archival HST WFPC2 ``Association'' data sets that correlate with the Chandra positions of a set of 44 ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) of nearby galaxies. We have improved the Chandra-HST relative astrometry whenever possible. Disparate numbers of potential ULX counterparts are found, and in some cases none are found. The lack of or low number of counterparts in some cases may be due to insufficient depth in the WFPC2 images. Particularly in late-type galaxies, the HST image in the ULX region was often complex or crowded. We therefore address various scenarios for the nature of the ULX since it is not known which, if any, of the sources found are true counterparts. The optical luminosities of the sources are typically in the range 10^4-6 L_sun. In several cases color information is available, with the colors roughly tending to be more red in early-type galaxies. This suggests that, in general, the (potential) counterparts found in early-type galaxies are likely to be old...

  18. Discovery of the Optical/Ultraviolet/Gamma-ray Counterpart to the Eclipsing Millisecond Pulsar J1816+4510

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, D L; Ransom, S M; Roberts, M S E; Kotulla, R; Archibald, A M; Biwer, C M; Boyles, J; Dartez, L; Day, D F; Ford, A J; Garcia, A; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Karako, C; Kaspi, V M; Kondratiev, V I; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R S; McLaughlin, M A; Rohr, M D W; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; van Leeuwen, J

    2012-01-01

    The energetic, eclipsing millisecond pulsar J1816+4510 was recently discovered in a low-frequency radio survey with the Green Bank Telescope. With an orbital period of 8.7 hr and minimum companion mass of 0.16 Msun it appears to belong to an increasingly important class of pulsars that are ablating their low-mass companions. We report the discovery of the gamma-ray counterpart to this pulsar, and present a likely optical/ultraviolet counterpart as well. Using the radio ephemeris we detect pulsations in the unclassified gamma-ray source 2FGL J1816.5+4511, implying an efficiency of ~25% in converting the pulsar's spin-down luminosity into gamma-rays and adding PSR J1816+4510 to the large number of millisecond pulsars detected by Fermi. The likely optical/UV counterpart was identified through position coincidence (15,000 K it would be among the brightest and hottest of low-mass pulsar companions, and appears qualitatively different from other eclipsing pulsar systems. In particular, current data suggest that it ...

  19. Detection of an Optical Counterpart to the ALFALFA Ultra-compact High-velocity Cloud AGC 249525

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesh, William; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Janowiecki, Steven; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Cannon, John M.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the detection at >98% confidence of an optical counterpart to AGC 249525, an ultra-compact high-velocity cloud (UCHVC) discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey blind neutral hydrogen survey. UCHVCs are compact, isolated H i clouds with properties consistent with their being nearby low-mass galaxies, but without identified counterparts in extant optical surveys. Analysis of the resolved stellar sources in deep g- and i-band imaging from the WIYN pODI camera reveals a clustering of possible red giant branch stars associated with AGC 249525 at a distance of 1.64 ± 0.45 Mpc. Matching our optical detection with the H i synthesis map of AGC 249525 from Adams et al. shows that the stellar overdensity is exactly coincident with the highest-density H i contour from that study. Combining our optical photometry and the H i properties of this object yields an absolute magnitude of -7.1≤slant {M}V≤slant -4.5, a stellar mass between 2.2+/- 0.6× {10}4 {M}⊙ and 3.6+/- 1.0× {10}5 {M}⊙ , and an H i to stellar mass ratio between 9 and 144. This object has stellar properties within the observed range of gas-poor ultra-faint dwarfs in the Local Group, but is gas-dominated.

  20. GW150914: First search for the electromagnetic counterpart of a gravitational-wave event by the TOROS collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz, Mario C; Peñuela, Tania; Macri, Lucas M; Oelkers, Ryan J; Yuan, Wenlong; Lambas, Diego García; Cabral, Juan; Colazo, Carlos; Domínguez, Mariano; Sánchez, Bruno; Gurovich, Sebastián; Lares, Marcelo; Schneiter, Matías; Graña, Darío; Renzi, Victor; Rodriguez, Horacio; Starck, Manuel; Vrech, Rubén; Artola, Rodolfo; Ferreyra, Antonio Chiavassa; Girardini, Carla; Quiñones, Cecilia; Tapia, Luis; Tornatore, Marina; Marshall, Jennifer L; DePoy, Darren L; Branchesi, Marica; Brocato, Enzo; Padilla, Nelson; Pereyra, Nicolás A; Mukherjee, Soma; Benacquista, Matthew; Key, Joey

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of the optical follow-up conducted by the TOROS collaboration of the first gravitational-wave event GW150914. We conducted unfiltered CCD observations (0.35-1 micron) with the 1.5-m telescope at Bosque Alegre starting ~2.5 days after the alarm. Given our limited field of view (~100 square arcmin), we targeted 14 nearby galaxies that were observable from the site and were located within the area of higher localization probability. We analyzed the observations using two independent implementations of difference-imaging algorithms, followed by a Random-Forest-based algorithm to discriminate between real and bogus transients. We did not find any bona fide transient event in the surveyed area down to a 5-sigma limiting magnitude of r=21.7 mag (AB). Our result is consistent with the LIGO detection of a binary black hole merger, for which no electromagnetic counterparts are expected, and with the expected rates of other astrophysical transients.

  1. The radio and optical counterpart of the new Fermi LAT flaring source J0109+6134

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, J. M.; Martí, J.; Peracaula, M.

    2010-02-01

    Following the recent ATELs #2414, #2416 and #2420 concerning the Fermi-LAT, AGILE and Swift/XRT consistent detections of the new gamma-ray flaring source J0109+6134, we wish to remind that the proposed radio counterpart (VCS2 J0109+6133/GT 0106+613) was extensively observed nearly two decades ago by different authors in the context of the GT catalogue of Galactic Plane radio sources (Taylor and Gregory 1983, AJ, 88, 1784; Gregory and Taylor 1986, AJ 92, 371).

  2. Identification of the optical and quiescent counterparts to the bright X-ray transient in NGC 6440

    CERN Document Server

    in 't Zand, J J M; Pooley, D; Verbunt, F; Wijnands, R; Lewin, W H G

    2001-01-01

    After 3 years of quiescence, the globular cluster NGC 6440 exhibited a bright transient X-ray source turning on in August 2001, as noted with the RXTE All-Sky Monitor. We carried out a short target of opportunity observation with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and are able to associate the transient with the brightest of 24 X-ray sources detected during quiescence in July 2000 with Chandra. Furthermore, we securely identify the optical counterpart and determine that the 1998 X-ray outburst in NGC 6440 was from the same object. This is the first time that an optical counterpart to a transient in a globular cluster is securely identified. Since the transient is a type I X-ray burster, it is established that the compact accretor is a neutron star. Thus, this transient provides an ideal case to study the quiescent emission in the optical and X-ray of a transiently accreting neutron star while knowing the distance and reddening accurately. One model that fits the quiescent spectrum is an absorbed power law plus neu...

  3. Long duration radio transients lacking optical counterparts are possibly Galactic Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ofek, E O; Gal-Yam, A; Frail, D; Kasliwal, M M; Kulkarni, S R; Waxman, E

    2009-01-01

    (abridged) Recently, a new class of radio transients in the 5-GHz band was detected by Bower et al. We present new deep near-Infrared (IR) observations of the field containing these transients, and find no counterparts down to a limiting magnitude of K=20.4 mag. We argue that the bright (>1 Jy) radio transients recently reported by Kida et al. are consistent with being additional examples of the Bower et al. transients. We refer to these groups of events as "long-duration radio transients". The main characteristics of this population are: time scales longer than 30 minute but shorter than several days; rate, ~10^3 deg^-2 yr^-1; progenitors sky surface density of >60 deg^-2 (95% C.L.) at Galactic latitude ~40 deg; 1.4-5 GHz spectral slopes, f_\

  4. Discovery of the Optical Counterparts to Four Energetic Fermi Millisecond Pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breton, R.P.; van Kerkwijk, M.H.; Roberts, M.S.E.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Camilo, F.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Ransom, S.M.; Ray, P.S.; Stairs, I.H.

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, over 43 millisecond radio pulsars have been discovered by targeted searches of unidentified γ-ray sources found by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. A large fraction of these millisecond pulsars are in compact binaries with low-mass companions. These systems often show

  5. The X-Ray, optical, and infrared counterpart to GRB 980703

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, P.M.; Galama, T.J.; Owens, A.; Oosterbroek, T.; Geballe, T.R.; van Paradijs, J.; Groot, P.J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    We report on X-ray, optical, and infrared follow-up observations of GRB 980703. We detect a previously unknown X-ray source in the GRB error box; assuming a power-law decline, we find for its decay index alpha<-0.91 (3 sigma). We invoke host-galaxy extinction to match the observed spectral slope wit

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF THE OPTICAL COUNTERPART OF FERMI BLACK WIDOW MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J1544+4937

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Sumin; Phinney, E. Sterl; Prince, Thomas A.; Bellm, Eric; Cao, Yi; Perley, Daniel A. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kaplan, David L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Breton, Rene P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Bildsten, Lars [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Kong, Albert K. H.; Yen, T.-C. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Sesar, Branimir [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wolf, William M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    We report the optical identification of the companion to the Fermi black widow millisecond pulsar PSR J1544+4937. We find a highly variable source on Keck Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer images at the nominal pulsar position, with 2 mag variations over orbital period in the B, g, R, and I bands. The nearly achromatic light curves are difficult to explain with a simply irradiated hemisphere model, and suggest that the optical emission is dominated by a nearly isothermal hot patch on the surface of the companion facing the pulsar. We roughly constrain the distance to PSR J1544+4937 to be between 2 and 5 kpc. A more reliable distance measurement is needed in order to constrain the composition of the companion.

  7. Identification of the Optical Counterpart of Fermi Black Widow Millisecond Pulsar PSR J1544+4937

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Sumin; Phinney, Sterl; Prince, Thomas A; Breton, Rene; Bellm, Eric; Bildsten, Lars; Cao, Yi; Kong, A K H; Perley, Daniel A; Sesar, Branimir; Wolf, William M; Yen, T -C

    2014-01-01

    We report the optical identification of the companion to the {\\it Fermi} black widow millisecond pulsar PSR J1544+4937. We find a highly variable source on Keck LRIS images at the nominal pulsar position, with 2 magnitude variations over orbital period in the B, g, R, and I bands. The nearly achromatic light curves are difficult to explain with a simply irradiated hemisphere model, and suggest that the optical emission is dominated by a nearly isothermal hot patch on the surface of the companion facing the pulsar. We roughly constrain the distance to PSR J1544+4937 to be between 2 and 5 kpc. A more reliable distance measurement is needed in order to constrain the composition of the companion.

  8. HST Data Suggest Proper Motion for the Optical Counterpart of GRB 970228

    CERN Document Server

    Caraveo, P A; Tavani, M; Bignami, Giovanni Fabrizio

    1997-01-01

    After a quarter of a century of gamma-ray burst (GRB) astronomy, the Italian-Dutch satellite BeppoSAX on Feb 28th, 1997 detected a soft X-ray afterglow from GRB 970228 and positioned it accurately. This made possible the successful detection of an optical transient. Two public Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the GRB/optical transient region were taken on March 26th and April 7th, 1997. They are analyzed here, with the purpose of understanding the nature of GRB 970228. We find that the position of the faint point-like object V ~ 26 seen at the transient location changed by 0.40 +/-0.10 pixels in 12 days, corresponding to a proper motion of ~ 550 mas/year. By comparison, four adjacent sources in the same field do not show any significant displacement, with astrometric residuals close to zero and average absolute displacements less than 0.09 pixels. If confirmed, this result would strongly support the galactic nature of GRB 970228.

  9. A candidate optical counterpart to the middle-aged gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1741-2054

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Salvetti, D; Belfiore, A; Pierbattista, M; Razzano, M; Shearer, A; Moran, P

    2016-01-01

    We carried out deep optical observations of the middle-aged $\\gamma$-ray pulsar PSR J1741-2054 with the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We identified two objects, of magnitudes $m_v=23.10\\pm0.05$ and $m_v=25.32\\pm0.08$, at positions consistent with the very accurate Chandra coordinates of the pulsar, the faintest of which is more likely to be its counterpart. From the VLT images we also detected the known bow-shock nebula around PSR J1741-2054. The nebula is displaced by $\\sim 0\\farcs9$ (at the $3\\sigma$ confidence level) with respect to its position measured in archival data, showing that the shock propagates in the interstellar medium consistently with the pulsar proper motion. Finally, we could not find evidence of large-scale extended optical emission associated with the pulsar wind nebula detected by Chandra, down to a surface brightness limit of $\\sim 28.1$ magnitudes arcsec$^{-2}$. Future observations are needed to confirm the optical identification of PSR J1741-2054 and characterise the spectrum of its co...

  10. Optical Counterparts of Undetermined Type γ-Ray Active Galactic Nuclei with Blazar-Like Spectral Energy Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mura, Giovanni; Chiaro, Graziano; Ciroi, Stefano; Rafanelli, Piero; Salvetti, David; Berton, Marco; Cracco, Valentina

    2015-12-01

    During its first four years of scientific observations, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) detected 3033 γ-ray sources above a 4 σ significance level. Although most of the extra-galactic sources are active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the blazar class, other families of AGNs are observed too, while a still high fraction of detections (˜30%) remains with uncertain association or classification. According to the currently accepted interpretation, the AGN γ-ray emission arises from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of low energy photons by relativistic particles confined in a jet, which, in the case of blazars, is oriented very close to our line-of-sight. Taking advantage of data from radio and X-ray wavelengths, which we expect to be produced together with γ-rays, providing a much better source localization potential, we focused our attention on a sample of γ-ray Blazar Candidates of Undetermined type (BCUs), starting a campaign of optical spectroscopic observations. The main aims of our investigation include a census of the AGN families that contribute to γ-ray emission and a study of their redshift distribution, with the subsequent implications on the intrinsic source power. We furthermore analyze which γ-ray properties can better constrain the nature of the source, thus helping in the study of objects not yet associated with a reliable low frequency counterpart. Here we report on the instruments and techniques used to identify the optical counterparts of γ-ray sources, we give an overview on the status of our work, and we discuss the implications of a large scale study of γ-ray emitting AGNs.

  11. Discovery of the optical counterpart to the X-ray pulsar SAX J2103.5+4545

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, P; Fabregat, J; Chato, R; Blay, P; Mavromatakis, F

    2004-01-01

    We report optical and infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations that identify the counterpart to the 358.6-s X-ray transient pulsar SAX J2103.5+4545 with a moderately reddened V=14.2 B0Ve star. This identification makes SAX J2103.5+4545 the Be/X-ray binary with the shortest orbital period known, Porb= 12.7 days. The amount of absorption to the system has been estimated to be Av=4.2+-0.3, which for such an early-type star implies a distance of about 6.5 kpc. The optical spectra reveal major and rapid changes in the strength and shape of the Halpha line. The Halpha line was initially observed as a double peak profile with the ratio of the intensities of the blue over the red peak greater than one (V/R > 1). Two weeks later this ratio reversed (V/R< 1). Subsequently, in less than a month, the emission ceased and Halpha appeared in absorption. This fast spectral variability is interpreted within the viscous decretion disc model and demonstrates the significant role of the neutron star on the evolutio...

  12. Optical and infrared counterparts of the X-ray sources detected in the Chandra Cygnus OB2 Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Guarcello, M G; Wright, N J; Naylor, T; Flaccomio, E; Kashyap, V L; Garcia-Alvarez, D

    2015-01-01

    The young massive OB association Cygnus OB2, in the Cygnus X complex, is the closest (1400 pc) star forming region to the Sun hosting thousands of young low mass stars and up to 1000 OB stars, among which are some of the most massive stars known in our Galaxy. This region holds great importance for several fields of modern astrophysics, such as the study of the physical properties of massive and young low-mass stars and the feedback provided by massive stars on star and planet formation process. Cygnus OB2 has been recently observed with Chandra/ACIS-I as part of the 1.08Msec Chandra Cygnus OB2 Legacy Project. This survey detected 7924 X-ray sources in a square degree area centered on Cyg OB2. Since a proper classification and study of the observed X-ray sources also requires the analysis of their optical and infrared counterparts, we combined a large and deep set of optical and infrared catalogs available for this region with our new X-ray catalog. In this paper we describe the matching procedure and present...

  13. The optical counterpart of XTE J0929-314, the third transient millisecond X-ray pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Giles, A B; Hill, K M; Sanders, E

    2005-01-01

    A blue and variable optical counterpart of the X-ray transient XTE J0929-314 was identified on 2002 May 1. We conducted frequent BVRI broadband photometry on this object using the Mt Canopus 1-m telescope during May and June until it had faded to below 21'st magnitude. Nearly continuous I band CCD photometry on 2002 May 2, 3 and 4 revealed a ~ 10 % sinusoidal modulation at the binary period lasting ~ 6 cycles during the latter half of May 2. The phase indicates that the modulation may be due to a combination of emission by a hot spot on the disc and X-ray heating of the secondary. The emission generally trended bluer with B-I decreasing by 0.6 magnitudes during the observations but there were anomalous changes in colour during the first few days after optical identification when the I band flux decreased slightly while fluxes in other bands increased. Spectral analysis of the BVRI broadband photometry show evidence of a variable excess in the R and I bands. We suggest that this may be due to synchrotron emiss...

  14. X-ray Sources and Their Optical Counterparts in the Galactic Globular Cluster M12 (NGC 6218)

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Ting-Ni; Bassa, Cees; Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H G; Anderson, Scott F; Pooley, David

    2009-01-01

    We study a Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S observation of the Galactic globular cluster M12. With a 26 ks exposure time, we detect 6 X-ray sources inside the half-mass radius (2'.16) and two of them are inside the core radius (0'.72) of the cluster. If we assume these sources are all within the globular cluster M12, the luminosity Lx among these sources between 0.3-7.0 keV varies roughly from 10^30 to 10^32 ergs s^-1. For identification, we also analyzed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) data and identified the optical counterparts to five X-ray sources inside the HST field of view. According to the X-ray and optical features, we found 2-5 candidate active binaries (ABs) or cataclysmic variables (CVs) and 0-3 background galaxies within the HST ACS field of view. Based on the assumption that the number of X-ray sources scales with the encounter rate and the mass of the globular cluster, we expect 2 X-ray source inside M12, and the expectation is consistent with our observation...

  15. Peculiarities of the atmosphere and envelope of a post-AGB star, the optical counterpart of IRAS 23304+6347

    CERN Document Server

    Klochkova, V G; Tavolganskaya, N S

    2015-01-01

    Based on high-spectral resolution observations performed with the echelle spectrograph NES of the 6-meter telescope, we have studied the peculiarities of the spectrum and the velocity field in the atmosphere and envelope of the optical counterpart of the infrared source IRAS 23304+6347. We have concluded about the absence of significant variations in the radial velocity Vr inferred from atmospheric absorptions and about its coincidence with the systemic velocity deduced from radio data. The envelope expansion velocity Vexp=15.5 km/s has been determined from the positions of rotational band lines of the C$_2$ Swan (0; 0) band. A complex emission-absorption profile of the Swan (0; 1) 5635 \\AA{} has been recorded. Analysis of the multicomponent NaI~D doublet line profile has revealed interstellar components V(IS)=$-61.6$ and $-13.2$ km/s as well as a circumstellar component with V(CS)=$-41.0$ km/s whose position corresponds to the velocity inferred from C$_2$ features. The presence of the interstellar component ...

  16. Search for gamma ray burst quasi simultaneous optical emission with BOOTES-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Soldán, J.; Hudec, R.; Bernas, M.; Páta, P.; Mateo Sanguino, T. J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Berná, J. Á; Nekola, M.; Gorosabel, J.; de la Morena, B. A.; Más-Hesse, J. M.; Giménez, Á.; Torres Riera, J.

    The Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System experiment (BOOTES) has been designed to provide an automatic real time observing response to the detection of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). It achieves such response by using wide field cameras attached to small robotic telescopes and imaging in the B,I and R bands. To date we have obtained images for about 50 events with the Wide Field Camera (WFC), starting, in several ocasions, 3 minutes after the burst commenced. One of the last searches resulted in the detection of an optical transient, candidate to be the optical counterpart of the GRB 000313, although such relation has not been established to absolute certainty yet.

  17. A blind search for prompt gamma-ray counterparts of fast radio bursts with Fermi-LAT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shotaro; Totani, Tomonori; Kawanaka, Norita

    2016-08-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are a mysterious flash phenomenon detected in radio wavelengths with a duration of only a few milliseconds, and they may also have prompted gamma-ray flashes. Here, we carry out a blind search for ms-duration gamma-ray flashes using the 7-yr Fermi Large Area Telescope all-sky gamma-ray data. About 100 flash candidates are detected, but after removing those associated with bright steady point sources, we find no flash events at high Galactic latitude region (|b| > 20°). Events at lower latitude regions are consistent with statistical flukes originating from the diffuse gamma-ray background. From these results, we place an upper limit on the GeV gamma-ray to radio flux ratio of FRBs as ξ ≡ (νLν)γ/(νLν)radio ≲ (4.2-12) × 107, depending on the assumed FRB rate evolution index β = 0-4 [cosmic FRB rate ΦFRB ∝ (1 + z)β]. This limit is comparable with the largest value found for pulsars, though ξ of pulsars is distributed in a wide range. We also compare this limit with the spectral energy distribution of the 2004 giant flare of the magnetar SGR 1806-20.

  18. A Blind Search for Prompt Gamma-ray Counterparts of Fast Radio Bursts with Fermi-LAT Data

    CERN Document Server

    Yamasaki, Shotaro; Kawanaka, Norita

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are a mysterious flash phenomenon detected in radio wavelengths with a duration of only a few milliseconds, and they may also have prompt gamma-ray flashes. Here we carry out a blind search for msec-duration gamma-ray flashes using the 7-year Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) all-sky gamma-ray data. About 100 flash candidates are detected, but after removing those associated with bright steady point sources, we find no flash events at high Galactic latitude region (|b|>20 deg). Events at lower latitude regions are consistent with statistical flukes originating from the diffuse gamma-ray background. From these results, we place an upper limit on the GeV gamma-ray to radio flux ratio of FRBs as xi \\equiv (nu L_nu)_gamma / (nu L_nu)_radio < 10^8, depending on the assumed FRB rate evolution. This limit is comparable with the largest value found for pulsars, though xi of pulsars is distributed in a wide range. We also compare this limit with the spectral energy distribution of the ...

  19. Herschel/PACS observations of young sources in Taurus: the far-infrared counterpart of optical jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podio, L.; Kamp, I.; Flower, D.; Howard, C.; Sandell, G.; Mora, A.; Aresu, G.; Brittain, S.; Dent, W. R. F.; Pinte, C.; White, G. J.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Observations of the atomic and molecular line emission associated with jets and outflows emitted by young stellar objects provide sensitive diagnostics of the excitation conditions, and can be used to trace the various evolutionary stages they pass through as they evolve to become main sequence stars. Aims: To understand the relevance of atomic and molecular cooling in shocks, and how accretion and ejection efficiency evolves with the evolutionary state of the sources, we will study the far-infrared counterparts of bright optical jets associated with Class I and II sources in Taurus (T Tau, DG Tau A, DG Tau B, FS Tau A+B, and RW Aur). Methods: We have analysed Herschel/PACS observations of a number of atomic ([O i]63 μm, 145 μm, [C ii]158 μm) and molecular (high-J CO, H2O, OH) lines, collected within the open time key project GASPS (PI: W. R. F. Dent). To constrain the origin of the detected lines we have compared the obtained FIR emission maps with the emission from optical-jets and millimetre-outflows, and the measured line fluxes and ratios with predictions from shock and disk models. Results: All of the targets are associated with extended emission in the atomic lines; in particular, the strong [O i] 63 μm emission is correlated with the direction of the optical jet/mm-outflow. The line ratios suggest that the atomic lines can be excited in fast dissociative J-shocks occurring along the jet. The molecular emission, on the contrary, originates from a compact region, that is spatially and spectrally unresolved, and lines from highly excited levels are detected (e.g., the o-H2O 818-707 line, and the CO J = 36-35 line). Disk models are unable to explain the brightness of the observed lines (CO and H2O line fluxes up to 10-15-6 × 10-16 W m-2). Slow C- or J-shocks with high pre-shock densities reproduce the observed H2O and high-J CO lines; however, the disk and/or UV-heated outflow cavities may contribute to the observed emission. Conclusions

  20. Hard X-Ray Emission from Sh 2-104: A NuSTAR Search for Gamma-Ray Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Mori, K.; Aliu, E.; Paredes, J. M.; Tomsick, J. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Hong, J. S.; Rahoui, F.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2016-07-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of Sh 2-104, a compact H ii region containing several young massive stellar clusters (YMSCs). We have detected distinct hard X-ray sources coincident with localized VERITAS TeV emission recently resolved from the giant gamma-ray complex MGRO J2019+37 in the Cygnus region. Fainter, diffuse X-rays coincident with the eastern YMSC in Sh2-104 likely result from the colliding winds of a component star. Just outside the radio shell of Sh 2-104 lies 3XMM J201744.7+365045 and a nearby nebula, NuSTAR J201744.3+364812, whose properties are most consistent with extragalactic objects. The combined XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectrum of 3XMM J201744.7+365045 is well-fit to an absorbed power-law model with {N}{{H}}=(3.1+/- 1.0)× {10}22 cm-2 and a photon index {{Γ }}=2.1+/- 0.1. Based on possible long-term flux variation and the lack of detected pulsations (≤43% modulation), this object is likely a background active galactic nucleus rather than a Galactic pulsar. The spectrum of the NuSTAR nebula shows evidence of an emission line at E = 5.6 keV, suggesting an optically obscured galaxy cluster at z = 0.19 ± 0.02 (d = 800 Mpc) and L X = 1.2 × 1044 erg s-1. Follow-up Chandra observations of Sh 2-104 will help identify the nature of the X-ray sources and their relation to MGRO J2019+37. We also show that the putative VERITAS excess south of Sh 2-104, is most likely associated with the newly discovered Fermi pulsar PSR J2017+3625 and not the H ii region.

  1. Optical counterparts of two Fermi millisecond pulsars: PSR J1301+0833 and PSR J1628–3205

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Miao; Halpern, Jules P. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Thorstensen, John R., E-mail: miao@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    Using the 1.3 m and 2.4 m Telescopes of the MDM Observatory, we identified the close companions of two eclipsing millisecond radio pulsars that were discovered by the Green Bank Telescope in searches of Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope sources, and measured their light curves. PSR J1301+0833 is a black widow pulsar in a 6.5 hr orbit whose companion star is strongly heated on the side facing the pulsar. It varies from R = 21.8 to R > 24 around the orbit. PSR J1628–3205 is a 'redback', a nearly Roche-lobe-filling system in a 5.0 hr orbit whose optical modulation in the range 19.0 < R < 19.4 is dominated by strong ellipsoidal variations, indicating a large orbital inclination angle. PSR J1628–3205 also shows evidence for a long-term variation of about 0.2 mag, and an asymmetric temperature distribution possibly due to either off-center heating by the pulsar wind, or large starspots. Modeling of its light curve restricts the inclination angle to i > 55°, the mass of the companion to 0.16 < M{sub c} < 0.30 M {sub ☉}, and the effective temperature to 3560 < T {sub eff} < 4670 K. As is the case for several redbacks, the companion of PSR J1628–3205 is less dense and hotter than a main-sequence star of the same mass.

  2. Searching for high-energy gamma-ray counterparts to Gravitational Wave sources with Fermi-LAT: a needle in a haystack

    CERN Document Server

    Vianello, Giacomo; Chiang, James

    2016-01-01

    At least a fraction of Gravitational Wave (GW) progenitors are expected to emit an electromagnetic (EM) signal in the form of a short gamma-ray burst (sGRB). The discovery of such a transient EM counterpart is challenging because the LIGO/VIRGO localization region is much larger (several hundreds of square degrees) than the field of view of X-ray, optical and radio telescopes. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has a wide field of view ($\\sim 2.4$ sr), and detects $\\sim 2-3$ sGRBs per year above 100 MeV. It can detect them not only during the short prompt phase, but also during their long-lasting high-energy afterglow phase. If other wide-field high-energy instruments such as Fermi-GBM, Swift-BAT or INTEGRAL-ISGRI cannot detect or localize with enough precision an EM counterpart during the prompt phase, the LAT can potentially pinpoint it with $\\lesssim 10$ arcmin accuracy during the afterglow phase. This routinely happens with gamma-ray bursts. Moreover, the LAT will cover the entire localization region wi...

  3. The Optical Counterpart to the Accreting Millisecond X-Ray Pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021 in the Globular Cluster NGC 6440

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadelano, M.; Pallanca, C.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.; Patruno, A.

    2017-07-01

    We used a combination of deep optical and {{H}}α images of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6440, acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope, to identify the optical counterpart to the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021 during quiescence. A strong {{H}}α emission has been detected from a main-sequence star (hereafter COM-SAX J1748.9-2021) located at only 0.″15 from the nominal position of the X-ray source. The position of the star also agrees with the optical counterpart found by Verbunt et al. during an outburst. We propose this star as the most likely optical counterpart to the binary system. By direct comparison with isochrones, we estimated that COM-SAX J1748.9-2021 has a mass of 0.70{--}0.83 {M}⊙ , a radius of 0.88+/- 0.02 {R}⊙ , and a superficial temperature of 5250 ± 80 K. These parameters, combined with the orbital characteristics of the binary, suggest that the system is observed at a very low inclination angle (˜ 8^\\circ {--}14^\\circ ) and that the star is filling or even overflowing its Roche lobe. This, together with the EW of the {{H}}α emission (˜20 Å), suggests possible ongoing mass transfer. The possible presence of such an ongoing mass transfer during a quiescence state also suggests that the radio pulsar is not active yet and thus this system, despite its similarity with the class of redback millisecond pulsars, is not a transitional millisecond pulsar. Based on observations collected with the NASA/ESA HST (Prop. 12517, 13410), obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  4. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. II. RADIO, INFRARED, AND OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF THE GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Giroletti, M. [INAF-Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2013-06-01

    A significant fraction ({approx}30%) of the high-energy gamma-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) are still of unknown origin, being not yet associated with counterparts at low energies. We recently developed a new association method to identify if there is a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic 2FGL source. This method is entirely based on the discovery that blazars have distinct infrared colors with respect to other extragalactic sources found, thanks to the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky observations. Several improvements have also been performed to increase the efficiency of our method in recognizing {gamma}-ray blazar candidates. In this paper we applied our method to two different samples, the first constituted by unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs), and the second by active galaxies of uncertain type, both listed in the 2FGL. We present a catalog of IR counterparts for {approx}20% of the UGSs investigated. Then, we also compare our results for the associated sources with those present in the literature. In addition, we illustrate the extensive archival research carried out to identify the radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray counterparts of the WISE-selected, {gamma}-ray blazar candidates. Finally, we discuss the future developments of our method based on ground-based follow-up observations.

  5. Optical-digital hybrid image search system in cloud environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Kodate, Kashiko; Watanabe, Eriko

    2016-09-01

    To improve the versatility and usability of optical correlators, we developed an optical-digital hybrid image search system consisting of digital servers and an optical correlator that can be used to perform image searches in the cloud environment via a web browser. This hybrid system employs a simple method to obtain correlation signals and has a distributed network design. The correlation signals are acquired by using an encoder timing signal generated by a rotating disk, and the distributed network design facilitates the replacement and combination of the digital correlation server and the optical correlator.

  6. The isolated neutron star RBS1774 revisited. Revised XMM-Newton X-ray parameters and an optical counterpart from deep LBT-observations

    CERN Document Server

    Schwope, A; Kohnert, J; Lamer, G; Steinmetz, M; Strassmeier, K; Zinnecker, H; Bechtold, J; Diolaiti, E; Fontana, A; Gallozzi, S; Giallongo, E; Ragazzoni, R; De Santis, C; Testa, V

    2009-01-01

    We report optical B-band observations with the Large Binocular Telescope LBT of the isolated neutron star RBS1774. The stacked image with total exposure 2.5h reveals a candidate optical counterpart at mB = 26.96 +- 0.20 at position RA(2000) = 21:43:03.4, DEC(2000)} = +06:54:17:5, within the joint Chandra and XMM-Newton error circles. We analyse archival XMM-Newton observations and derive revised spectral and positional parameters. The predicted optical flux from the extrapolated X-ray spectrum is likely twice as high as reported before. The measured optical flux exceeds the extrapolated X-ray spectral flux by a factor ~40 (15 - 60 at 1sigma confidence). We interpret our detection and the spectral energy distribution as further evidence of a temperature structure over the neutron star's surface and present a pure thermal model reflecting both the SED and the pulsed fraction of the light curve.

  7. Optical counterparts of undetermined type $\\gamma$-ray Active Galactic Nuclei with blazar-like Spectral Energy Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    La Mura, G; Ciroi, S; Rafanelli, P; Salvetti, D; Berton, M; Cracco, V

    2015-01-01

    During its first four years of scientific observations, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) detected 3033 $\\gamma$-ray sources above a 4$\\sigma$ significance level. Although most of the extra-Galactic sources are active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the blazar class, other families of AGNs are observed too, while a still high fraction of detections ($\\sim 30\\%$) remains with uncertain association or classification. According to the currently accepted interpretation, the AGN $\\gamma$-ray emission arises from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of low energy photons by relativistic particles confined in a jet that, in the case of blazars, is oriented very close to our line of sight. Taking advantage of data from radio and X-ray wavelengths, which we expect to be produced together with $\\gamma$-rays, providing a much better source localization potential, we focused our attention on a sample of $\\gamma$-ray Blazar Candidates of Undetermined Type (BCUs), starting a campaign of optical spectroscopic observations. The...

  8. Search for Optical Binding with Shape Phase Holographic Optical Trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roichman, Yohai; Polin, Marco; Cholis, Ilias; Grier, David

    2007-03-01

    Light scattered by an illuminated particle should repel that particle's neighbors through radiation pressure. Nearly two decades ago, Burns, Fournier and Golovchenko (BFG) proposed that the coherent superposition of scattered fields can lead to an attractive interparticle interaction, which they called optical binding. Their pioneering experimental observation has generated considerable interest, most of which has focused on developing the theory for the effect. Accurate measurements of the optical binding force in the BFG geometry have been lacking, however. The need to quantify optical binding forces is particularly acute for colloidal interaction measurements on linear optical traps. We present a new method to directly measure optical binding forces between colloidal spheres that exploits the ability of shape-phase holography to create linear optical traps with accurately specified intensity and phase profiles. Our ability to control the trap's phase profile makes possible precise discrimination between intensity- and field-dependent interactions, i.e. between radiation pressure and optical binding. The same novel technique that allows us to project holographic line traps also can be used to project two- and three-dimensionally structured ring traps, novel Bessel-beam traps, which we also will describe.

  9. The discovery of the optical/IR counterpart of the 12s transient X-ray pulsar GS 0834-43

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, G L; Campana, S; Polcaro, V F; Roche, P; Stella, L; Di Paola, A; Lazzati, D; Mereghetti, S; Giallongo, E; Fontana, A; Verrecchia, P

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery of the optical/infra-red counterpart of the 12.3s transient X-ray pulsar GS0834-43. We re-analysed archival ROSAT PSPC observations of GS0834-43, obtaining two new refined positions, about 14" and 18" away from the previously published one, and a new spin period measurement. Within the new error circles we found a relatively faint (V=20.1) early type reddened star (V-R=2.24). The optical spectrum shows a strong Halpha emission line. The IR observations of the field confirm the presence of an IR excess for the Halpha-emitting star (K'=11.4, J-K'=1.94) which is likely surrounded by a conspicuous circumstellar envelope. Spectroscopic and photometric data indicate a B0-2 V-IIIe spectral-type star located at a distance of 3-5kpc and confirm the Be-star/X-ray binary nature of GS0834-43.

  10. Searching the Gamma-ray Sky for Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Sources: Fermi GBM and LAT Observations of LVT151012 and GW151226

    CERN Document Server

    Racusin, J L; Goldstein, A; Connaughton, V; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Jenke, P; Blackburn, L; Briggs, M S; Broida, J; Camp, J; Christensen, N; Hui, C M; Littenberg, T; Shawhan, P; Singer, L; Veitch, J; Bhat, P N; Cleveland, W; Fitzpatrick, G; Gibby, M H; von Kienlin, A; McBreen, S; Mailyan, B; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Roberts, O J; Stanbro, M; Veres, P; Zhang, B -B; Ackermann, M; Albert, A; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonino, R; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caputo, R; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cavazzuti, E; Charles, E; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Costanza, F; Cuoco, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Digel, S W; Di Lalla, N; Di Mauro, M; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Gill, R; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Granot, J; Green, D; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Jogler, T; Johannesson, G; Kamae, T; Kensei, S; Kocevski, D; Kuss, M; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Magill, J D; Maldera, S; Malyshev, D; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Negro, M; Nuss, E; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Principe, G; Raino, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Parkinson, P M Saz; Scargle, J D; Sgro, C; Simone, D; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spada, F; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Thayer, J B; Torres, D F; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vianello, G; Wood, K S; Wood, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the LIGO binary black hole merger event GW151226 and candi- date LVT151012. No candidate electromagnetic counterparts were detected by either the GBM or LAT. We present a detailed analysis of the GBM and LAT data over a range of timescales from seconds to years, using automated pipelines and new techniques for char- acterizing the upper limits across a large area of the sky. Due to the partial GBM and LAT coverage of the large LIGO localization regions at the trigger times for both events, dif- ferences in source distances and masses, as well as the uncertain degree to which emission from these sources could be beamed, these non-detections cannot be used to constrain the variety of theoretical models recently applied to explain the candidate GBM counterpart to GW150914.

  11. Searching for near-infrared counterparts of the faint neutron star X-ray transients XMMU J174716.1-281048 and SAX J1806.5-2215

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Kamble, Atish; Cackett, Edward M; Kutulla, Ralf; Kaplan, David; Degenaar, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    We present our near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations of the two neutron star low mass X-ray binaries XMMU J174716.1-281048 and SAX J1806.5-2215 obtained using the PANIC instrument on the 6.5-meter Magellan telescope and the WHIRC instrument on 3.5-meter WIYN telescope. Both sources are members of the group of faint to very-faint X-ray binaries and are undergoing very long X-ray outbursts since 2003 and 2011, respectively- `the quasi-persistent X-ray binaries'. The goal of our observations is to identify the NIR counterpart of both sources. We identified two NIR stars consistent with the Chandra X-ray error circle of XMMU J174716.1-281048 and one for SAX J1806.5-2215. We studied the magnitude variations of the possible counterparts with respect to the UKIRT NIR Galactic plane observations. For XMMU J174716.1-281048, we also investigated the candidate counterparts using the color-color diagram and spectral energy distribution. We observed large variability in one NIR star having position consistent with the ...

  12. Search for Millicharged Particles Using Optically Levitated Microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, David C; Gratta, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for stable particles with charge > $10^{-5}$ e in bulk matter using levitated dielectric microspheres in high vacuum. No evidence for such particles was found in a total sample of 1.4 ng, providing an upper limit on the abundance per nucleon of 2.5 x $10^{-14}$ at the 95% confidence level for the material tested. These results provide the first direct search for single particles with charge < 0.1 e bound in macroscopic quantities of matter and demonstrate the ability to perform sensitive force measurements using optically levitated microspheres in vacuum.

  13. Searching for dark matter with optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Wcislo, Piotr; Bober, Marcin; Cygan, Agata; Lisak, Daniel; Ciurylo, Roman; Zawada, Michal

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions of modern physics is the existence of yet unknown forms of matter and interactions. The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by some hypothetical dark matter (DM). However, beyond its gravitational interaction at galactic scale, little is known about the DM nature and properties. One possibility is that it has a form of stable topological defects built from light scalar fields which, for nonzero DM-SM coupling, would result in transient variations of fundamental constants. Optical atomic clocks, highly sensitive to variations of the fine-structure constant, seem to be natural candidates for such searches. Here we demonstrate the first experimental constraint on the strength of transient DM-SM coupling determined with optical atomic clocks. Instead of measuring the phase difference between two distant clocks we determine a common component of their readouts. We show that our constraint, even for one-day measurement, greatly exceeds previous laboratory...

  14. Hard X-Ray Emission from Sh 2-104: A NuSTAR Search for Gamma-Ray Counterparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Mori, K.; Aliu, E.;

    2016-01-01

    +37 in the Cygnus region. Fainter, diffuse X-rays coincident with the eastern YMSC in Sh2-104 likely result from the colliding winds of a component star. Just outside the radio shell of Sh 2–104 lies 3XMM J201744.7+365045 and a nearby nebula, NuSTAR J201744.3+364812, whose properties are most consistent...... with extragalactic objects. The combined XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectrum of 3XMM J201744.7+365045 is well-fit to an absorbed power-law model with cm−2 and a photon index . Based on possible long-term flux variation and the lack of detected pulsations (≤43% modulation), this object is likely a background active...... galactic nucleus rather than a Galactic pulsar. The spectrum of the NuSTAR nebula shows evidence of an emission line at E = 5.6 keV, suggesting an optically obscured galaxy cluster at z = 0.19 ± 0.02 (d = 800 Mpc) and LX = 1.2 × 1044 erg s−1. Follow-up Chandra observations of Sh 2–104 will help identify...

  15. $\\gamma$-Ray Burster Counterparts HST Blue and Ultraviolet Data

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, B E; Hurley, K; Laros, J G; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cline, Thomas; Hurley, Kevin; Laros, John

    1997-01-01

    The surest solution of the Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) mystery is to find an unambiguous low-energy quiescent counterpart. However, to date no reasonable candidates have been identified in the x-ray, optical, infrared, or radio ranges. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has now allowed for the first deep ultraviolet searches for quiescent counterparts. This paper reports on multiepoch ultraviolet searches of five GRB positions with HST. We found no sources with significant ultraviolet excesses, variability, parallax, or proper motion in any of the burst error regions. In particular, we see no sources similar to that proposed as a counterpart to the GRB970228. While this negative result is disappointing, it still has good utility for its strict limits on the no-host-galaxy problem in cosmological models of GRBs. For most cosmological models (with peak luminosity 6X10^50 erg/s), the absolute B magnitude of any possible host galaxy must be fainter than -15.5 to -17.4. These smallest boxes for some of the brightest burst...

  16. Searching for soft relativistic jets in core-collapse supernovae with the IceCube optical follow-up program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Benzvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brown, A. M.; Buitink, S.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; de Clercq, C.; Degner, T.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, B.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Marotta, A.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schmidt, T.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Stüer, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration; Akerlof, C. W.; Pandey, S. B.; Yuan, F.; Zheng, W.; ROTSE Collaboration

    2012-03-01

    Context. Transient neutrino sources such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and supernovae (SNe) are hypothesized to emit bursts of high-energy neutrinos on a time-scale of ≲100 s. While GRB neutrinos would be produced in high relativistic jets, core-collapse SNe might host soft-relativistic jets, which become stalled in the outer layers of the progenitor star leading to an efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. Aims: To increase the sensitivity to these neutrinos and identify their sources, a low-threshold optical follow-up program for neutrino multiplets detected with the IceCube observatory has been implemented. Methods: If a neutrino multiplet, i.e. two or more neutrinos from the same direction within 100 s, is found by IceCube a trigger is sent to the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment, ROTSE. The 4 ROTSE telescopes immediately start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect an optical counterpart to the neutrino events. Results: No statistically significant excess in the rate of neutrino multiplets has been observed and furthermore no coincidence with an optical counterpart was found. Conclusions: The search allows, for the first time, to set stringent limits on current models predicting a high-energy neutrino flux from soft relativistic hadronic jets in core-collapse SNe. We conclude that a sub-population of SNe with typical Lorentz boost factor and jet energy of 10 and 3 × 1051 erg, respectively, does not exceed 4.2% at 90% confidence.

  17. Optical dipole trapping of radium atoms for EDM search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, W. L.; Sulai, I. A.; Parker, R. H.; Bailey, K.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Korsch, W.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Singh, J.

    2010-03-01

    We are developing an EDM search based on laser-cooled and trapped Ra-225 (half-life = 15 d) atoms. Due to octupole deformation of the nucleus, Ra-225 is predicted to be 2-3 orders of magnitude more sensitive to T-violating interactions than Hg-199, which currently sets the most stringent limits in the nuclear sector. Recently, we have succeeded in transferring Ra-226 atoms from a MOT into an optical dipole trap formed by a fiber laser beam at 1550 nm. For the EDM measurement, the cold atoms will be moved into the neighboring vacuum chamber inside magnetic shields where a pair of electrodes apply a 10 kV cm-1electric field. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. The REM Telescope Detecting the Near Infra-Red Counterparts of Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Prompt Behaviour of Their Optical Continuum

    CERN Document Server

    Zerbi, F M; Ghisellini, G; Rodono, M

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the prompt afterglow of Gamma Ray Burst events are unanimously considered of paramount importance for GRB science and related cosmology. Such observations at NIR wavelengths are even more promising allowing one to monitor high-z Ly-alpha absorbed bursts as well as events occurring in dusty star-forming regions. In these pages we present REM (Rapid Eye Mount), a fully robotized fast slewing telescope equipped with a high throughput NIR (Z', J, H, K') camera dedicated to detecting the prompt IR afterglow. REM can discover objects at extremely high red-shift and trigger large telescopes to observe them. The REM telescope will simultaneously feed ROSS (REM Optical Slitless spectrograph) via a dichroic. ROSS will intensively monitor the prompt optical continuum of GRB afterglows. The synergy between REM-IR cam and ROSS makes REM a powerful observing tool for any kind of fast transient phenomena.

  19. Searching for soft relativistic jets in Core-collapse Supernovae with the IceCube Optical Follow-up Program

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Allen, M M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Degner, T; Demirörs, L; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, B; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Kampert, K -H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stössl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Stüer, M; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Akerlof, C W; Pandey, S B; Yuan, F; Zheng, W

    2011-01-01

    Context. Transient neutrino sources such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are hypothesized to emit bursts of high-energy neutrinos on a time-scale of \\lesssim 100 s. While GRB neutrinos would be produced in high relativistic jets, core-collapse SNe might host soft-relativistic jets, which become stalled in the outer layers of the progenitor star leading to an efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. Aims. To increase the sensitivity to these neutrinos and identify their sources, a low-threshold optical follow-up program for neutrino multiplets detected with the IceCube observatory has been implemented. Methods. If a neutrino multiplet, i.e. two or more neutrinos from the same direction within 100 s, is found by IceCube a trigger is sent to the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment, ROTSE. The 4 ROTSE telescopes immediately start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect an optical counterpart to the neutrino events. Results. No statistically si...

  20. A Search for Brief Optical Flashes Associated with the SETI Target KIC 8462852

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, D. J.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hütten, M.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Lin, T. T. Y.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Brien, S.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Petrashyk, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Ratliff, G.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2016-02-01

    The F-type star KIC 8462852 has recently been identified as an exceptional target for search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) observations. We describe an analysis methodology for optical SETI, which we have used to analyze nine hours of serendipitous archival observations of KIC 8462852 made with the VERITAS gamma-ray observatory between 2009 and 2015. No evidence of pulsed optical beacons, above a pulse intensity at the Earth of approximately 1 {photon} {{{m}}}-2, is found. We also discuss the potential use of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays in searching for extremely short duration optical transients in general.

  1. A Search for Brief Optical Flashes Associated with the SETI Target KIC 8462852

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Archer, A; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Buchovecky, M; Buckley, J H; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Fegan, D J; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Huetten, M; Hakansson, N; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Krennrich, F; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Lin, T T Y; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; O'Brien, S; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Petrashyk, A; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Ratliff, G; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Santander, M; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2016-01-01

    The F-type star KIC 8462852 has recently been identified as an exceptional target for SETI (search for extraterrestrial intelligence) observations. We describe an analysis methodology for optical SETI, which we have used to analyse nine hours of serendipitous archival observations of KIC 8462852 made with the VERITAS gamma-ray observatory between 2009 and 2015. No evidence of pulsed optical beacons, above a pulse intensity at the Earth of approximately 1 photon per m^2, is found. We also discuss the potential use of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays in searching for extremely short duration optical transients in general.

  2. Studying Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: Revealing the Optical Counterpart in 1747-214 and Measuring the Masses of the Black Holes in 1859+226 and 1009-45

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelino, Dawn M.; Tomsick, John A.

    2003-02-01

    Low mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) contain compact, black hole (BH) or neutron star (NS) primaries, and cool, low-mass secondary stars. A limited number of BHs and NSs have accurate mass measurements. It is important to determine the primary mass of the LMXBs to better understand how BH masses influence their outburst behavior, and to better constrain the NS equations of state. To determine the mass of the primary object we need to measure the orbital inclination, i. We propose to determine i for two BH LMXBs, XTE J1859+226 and GRS 1009-45 (=N Vel 93) through modeling of their ellipsoidal variations. Because most LMXBs are not eclipsing, modeling their light curves is currently the only feasible method for determining the inclination. We will model the light curves with WD98. We also propose to identify the optical counterpart to the NS system EXO 1747-214, in order to begin the process of measuring the NS mass. We have successfully used NOAO facilities and this modeling technique to find accurate BH masses in four LMXBs. In order to expand the sample of known BH and NS systems, we request seven nights on the KPNO and CTIO 4m to obtain optical and infrared data on XTE J1859+226, GRS 1009-45, and EXO 1747-214.

  3. A Search for Optical Laser Emission Using Keck HIRES

    CERN Document Server

    Tellis, Nathaniel K

    2015-01-01

    We present a search for laser emission coming from point sources in the vicinity of 2796 stars, including 1368 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) that host one or more exoplanets. We search for extremely narrow emission lines in the wavelength region between 3640 and 7890 Angstroms using the Keck 10-meter telescope and spectroscopy with high resolution ($\\lambda/\\Delta \\lambda$ = 60,000). Laser emission lines coming from non-natural sources are distinguished from natural astrophysical sources by being monochromatic and coming from an unresolved point in space. We search for laser emission located 2-7 arcsec from the 2796 target stars. The detectability of laser emission is limited by Poisson statistics of the photons and scattered light, yielding a detection threshold flux of approximately $10^{-2}$ photons $m^{-2} s^{-1}$ for typical Kepler stars and 1 photon $m^{-2} s^{-1}$ for solar-type stars within 100 light-years. Diffraction-limited lasers having a 10-meter aperture can be detected from 100 light-years ...

  4. Core-collapse supernovae as possible counterparts of IceCube neutrino multiplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strotjohann, Nora Linn; Kowalski, Marek; Franckowiak, Anna [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Voge, Markus [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Institut; Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    While an astrophysical neutrino flux has been detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory its sources remain so far unidentified. IceCube's Optical Follow-up Program is designed to search for the counterparts of neutrino multiplets using the full energy range of the IceCube detector down to 100 GeV. Two or more muon neutrinos arriving from the same direction within few seconds can trigger follow-up observations with optical and X-ray telescopes. Since 2010 the Palomar Transient Factory has followed up about 40 such neutrino alerts and detected several supernovae. Many of the detections are however likely random coincidences. In this talk I describe our search for supernovae and the prospects of identifying a supernova as a source of high-energy neutrinos.

  5. Search for Type Ia supernova NUV-optical subclasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinabro, David; Scolnic, Daniel; Kessler, Richard; Li, Ashley; Miller, Jake

    2017-04-01

    In response to a recently reported observation of evidence for two classes of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) distinguished by their brightness in the rest-frame near-ultraviolet (NUV), we search for the phenomenon in publicly available light-curve data. We use the SNANA supernova analysis package to simulate SN Ia light curves in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Supernova Search and the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) with a model of two distinct ultraviolet classes of SNe Ia and a conventional model with a single broad distribution of SN-Ia ultraviolet brightnesses. We compare simulated distributions of rest-frame colours with these two models to those observed in 158 SNe Ia in the SDSS and SNLS data. The SNLS sample of 99 SNe Ia is in clearly better agreement with a model with one class of SN Ia light curves and shows no evidence for distinct NUV sub-classes. The SDSS sample of 59 SNe Ia with poorer colour resolution does not distinguish between the two models.

  6. Search For Type Ia Supernova NUV-Optical Subclasses

    CERN Document Server

    Cinabro, David; Kessler, Richard; Li, Ashley; Miller, Jake

    2016-01-01

    In response to a recently reported observation of evidence for two classes of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) distinguished by their brightness in the rest-frame near ultraviolet (NUV), we search for the phenomenon in publicly available light-curve data. We use the SNANA supernova analysis package to simulate SN Ia-light curves in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Supernova Search (SDSS) and the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) with a model of two distinct ultraviolet classes of SNe Ia and a conventional model with a single broad distribution of SN-Ia ultraviolet brightnesses. We compare simulated distributions of rest-frame colors with these two models to those observed in 158 SNe Ia in the SDSS and SNLS data. The SNLS sample of 99 SNe Ia is in clearly better agreement with a model with one class of SN Ia light curves and shows no evidence for distinct NUV sub-classes. The SDSS sample of 59 SNe Ia with poorer color resolution does not distinguish between the two models.

  7. Search for Screened Interactions Below the Dark Energy Length Scale Using Optically Levitated Microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Rider, Alexander D; Blakemore, Charles P; Louis, Maxime; Lu, Marie; Gratta, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a search for unknown interactions that couple to mass between an optically levitated microsphere and a gold-coated silicon cantilever. The scale and geometry of the apparatus enables a search for new forces that appear at distances below 100 $\\mu$m and which would have evaded previous searches due to screening mechanisms. The data are consistent with electrostatic backgrounds and place upper limits on the strength of new interactions at 5.6 \\times 10^4$ in the region of parameter space where the self-coupling $\\Lambda \\gtrsim 5$ meV and the microspheres are not fully screened.

  8. Searches for Exotic Transient Signals with a Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pustelny, S

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we describe a novel scheme for searching for physics beyond the Standard Model. The idea is based on correlation of time-synchronized readouts of distant ($\\gtrsim$100~km) optical magnetometers. Such an approach limits hard-to-identify local transient noise, providing the system with unique capabilities of identification of global transient events. Careful analysis of the signal can reveal the nature of the events (e.g., its nonmagnetic origin), which opens avenues for new class of exotic-physics searches (searches for global transient exotic spin couplings) and tests of yet unverified theoretical models.

  9. A Line Search Multilevel Truncated Newton Algorithm for Computing the Optical Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Garrido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the implementation details and give the experimental results of three optimization algorithms for dense optical flow computation. In particular, using a line search strategy, we evaluate the performance of the unilevel truncated Newton method (LSTN, a multiresolution truncated Newton (MR/LSTN and a full multigrid truncated Newton (FMG/LSTN. We use three image sequences and four models of optical flow for performance evaluation. The FMG/LSTN algorithm is shown to lead to better optical flow estimation with less computational work than both the LSTN and MR/LSTN algorithms.

  10. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. IV. THE SWIFT CATALOG OF POTENTIAL X-RAY COUNTERPARTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggi, A.; D' Abrusco, R.; Smith, H. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G., E-mail: apaggi@cfa.harvard.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    A significant fraction (∼30%) of the high-energy γ-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog are still of unknown origin, having not yet been associated with counterparts at lower energies. To investigate the nature of these enigmatic sources, we present an extensive search of X-ray sources lying in the positional uncertainty region of a selected sample of these unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) that makes use of all available observations performed by the Swift X-ray Telescope before 2013 March 31, available for 205 UGSs. To detect the fainter sources, we merged all the observations covering the Fermi LAT positional uncertainty region at a 95% level of confidence of each UGS. This yields a catalog of 357 X-ray sources, finding candidate X-ray counterparts for ∼70% of the selected sample. In particular, 25% of the UGSs feature a single X-ray source within their positional uncertainty region, while 45% have multiple X-ray sources. For each X-ray source, we also looked in the corresponding Swift UVOT merged images for optical and ultraviolet counterparts, also performing source photometry. We found ultraviolet-optical correspondences for ∼70% of the X-ray sources. We searched several major radio, infrared, optical, and ultraviolet surveys for possible counterparts within the positional error of the sources in the X-ray catalog to obtain additional information on their nature. Applying the kernel density estimation technique to infrared colors of Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer counterparts of our X-ray sources we select six γ-ray blazar candidates. In addition, comparing our results with previous analyses, we select 11 additional γ-ray blazar candidates.

  11. A search for near-infrared counterparts of two faint neutron star X-ray transients: XMMU J174716.1-281048 and SAX J1806.5-2215

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Wijnands, Rudy; Kamble, Atish; Cackett, Edward M.; Kutulla, Ralf; Kaplan, David; Degenaar, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    We present our near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations of two neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries XMMU J174716.1-281048 and SAX J1806.5-2215 obtained using the PANIC instrument on the 6.5-metre Magellan telescope and the WIYN High-Resolution Infrared Camera instrument on the 3.5-metre WIYN telescope, respectively. Both sources are members of the class of faint to very faint X-ray binaries and undergo very long X-ray outburst, hence classified as `quasi-persistent X-ray binaries'. While XMMU J174716.1-281048 was active for almost 12 yr between 2003 and 2015, SAX J1806.5-2215 has been active for more than 5 yr now since 2011. From our observations, we identify two NIR stars consistent with the Chandra X-ray error circle of XMMU J174716.1-281048. The comparison of our observations with the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) Galactic plane observations taken during the same outburst, colour-colour diagram analysis and spectral energy distribution suggest that both stars are probably a part of the field population and are likely high-mass stars. Hence possibly neither of the two stars is a true NIR counterpart. For the faint X-ray binary SAX J1806.5-2215 during its current outburst, we detected an NIR star in our K-band WIYN observations consistent with its Chandra error circle. The identified NIR star was not detected during the UKIRT observations taken during its quiescent state. The comparison of two observations suggests that there was an increase in flux by at least one magnitude of the detected star during our observations, and hence suggests the detection of the likely counterpart of SAX J1806.5-2215.

  12. A search for near-infrared counterparts of two faint neutron star X-ray transients : XMMU J174716.1-281048 and SAX J1806.5-2215

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Wijnands, Rudy; Kamble, Atish; Cackett, Edward M.; Kutulla, Ralf; Kaplan, David; Degenaar, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    We present our near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations of two neutron star low mass X-ray binaries XMMU J174716.1-281048 and SAX J1806.5-2215 obtained using the PANIC instrument on the 6.5-meter Magellan telescope and the WHIRC instrument on the 3.5-meter WIYN telescope respectively. Both sources are members of the class of faint to very-faint X-ray binaries and undergo very long X-ray outburst, hence classified as `quasi persistent X-ray binaries'. While XMMU J174716.1-281048 was active for almost 12 years between 2003 and 2015, SAX J1806.5-2215 has been active for more than 5 years now since 2011. From our observations, we identify two NIR stars consistent with the Chandra X-ray error circle of XMMU J174716.1-281048. The comparison of our observations with the UKIRT Galactic plane observations taken during the same outburst, color-color diagram analysis and spectral energy distribution suggest that both stars are probably a part of the field population and are likely high mass stars. Hence possibly neither of the two stars is a true NIR counterpart. For the faint X-ray binary SAX J1806.5-2215 during its current outburst, we detected a NIR star in our K band WIYN observations consistent with its Chandra error circle. The identified NIR star was not detected during the UKIRT observations taken during its quiescent state. The comparison of two observations suggest that there was an increase in flux by at least one magnitude of the detected star during our observations, hence suggests the detection of the likely counterpart of SAX J1806.5-2215.

  13. Progress on the Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitri; Gnome Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We discuss progress on the construction, implementation, and coordination of a network of geographically separated, time-synchronized ultrasensitive atomic magnetometers and comagnetometers to search for correlated transient signals heralding new physics. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME) is sensitive to nuclear and electron spin couplings to various exotic fields generated by astrophysical sources. A specific example of new physics detectable with the GNOME, presently unconstrained by previous experiments, is a network of domain walls of light pseudoscalar (axion-like) fields. Supported by the Heising-Simons Foundation, Simons Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.

  14. Spectroscopy of candidate electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave sources

    CERN Document Server

    Steele, Iain A; Piascik, Andrzej S

    2016-01-01

    A programme of worldwide, multi-wavelength electromagnetic follow-up of sources detected by gravitational wave detectors is in place. Following the discovery of GW150914 and GW151226, wide field imaging of their sky localisations identified a number of candidate optical counterparts which were then spectrally classified. The majority of candidates were found to be supernovae at redshift ranges similar to the GW events and were thereby ruled out as a genuine counterpart. Other candidates ruled out include AGN and solar system objects. Given the GW sources were black hole binary mergers, the lack of an identified electromagnetic counterpart is not surprising. However the observations show that is it is possible to organise and execute a campaign that can eliminate the majority of potential counterparts. Finally we note the existence of a "classification gap" with a significant fraction of candidates going unclassified.

  15. Development of a super-resolution optical microscope for directional dark matter search experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrov, A., E-mail: andrey.alexandrov@na.infn.it [INFN - Napoli, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); LPI - Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, RUS-119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Asada, T. [Nagoya University, J-464-8602 Nagoya (Japan); Consiglio, L.; D' Ambrosio, N. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (AQ) (Italy); De Lellis, G. [INFN - Napoli, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); University of Naples, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Di Crescenzo, A. [INFN - Napoli, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Di Marco, N. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Furuya, S.; Hakamata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Katsuragawa, T.; Kuwabara, K.; Machii, S.; Naka, T. [Nagoya University, J-464-8602 Nagoya (Japan); Pupilli, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Sirignano, C. [University of Padova and INFN, Padova (PD), 35131 Italy (Italy); Tawara, Y. [Nagoya University, J-464-8602 Nagoya (Japan); Tioukov, V. [INFN - Napoli, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Umemoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M. [Nagoya University, J-464-8602 Nagoya (Japan)

    2016-07-11

    Nuclear emulsion is a perfect choice for a detector for directional DM search because of its high density and excellent position accuracy. The minimal detectable track length of a recoil nucleus in emulsion is required to be at least 100 nm, making the resolution of conventional optical microscopes insufficient to resolve them. Here we report about the R&D on a super-resolution optical microscope to be used in future directional DM search experiments with nuclear emulsion as a detector media. The microscope will be fully automatic, will use novel image acquisition and analysis techniques, will achieve the spatial resolution of the order of few tens of nm and will be capable of reconstructing recoil tracks with the length of at least 100 nm with high angular resolution.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: YSOs search in LDN 1340 in optical (Kun+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, M.; Moor, A.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Reipurth, B.

    2016-08-01

    We observed the optical spectra of 23 stars, utilizing several instruments, namely CAFOS with the G-100 grism, installed on the 2.2m telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory, FAST on the 1.5m telescope of the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, ALFOSC with grism 8 on the Nordic Optical Telescope in the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos in La Palma, and the low-resolution slit spectrograph operated on the 1m RCC telescope of the Konkoly Observatory between 1999 Aug 07 and 2011 Sep 27 (see table 1). We observed L1340 with the Wide Field Grism Spectrograph 2 (WFGS2), installed on the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope, on 2011 January 1, October 15, 16, and 18, and 2012 August 10. We covered an area of 30x40arcmin, centered on RA=2:30,DE=72:48(J2000), with a mosaic of 12 overlapping fields. We found 75 stars with Hα emission by examining the images visually. See section 2.2 and table 2. Spitzer L1340 was observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope using Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on 2009 March 16 and by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) on 2008 November 26 (Prog. ID: 50691, PI: G. Fazio). A small part of the cloud, centered on RNO 7, was observed in the four IRAC bands on 2006 September 24 (Prog. ID: 30734, PI: D. Figer). All but eight of the Hα sources have counterparts in the AllWISE Source Catalog (Wright et al. 2010AJ....140.1868W; see II/328). L1340 is situated within Stripe 1260 of the SEGUE survey (Yanny et al. 2009, J/AJ/137/4377). Each of our target stars has a counterpart in the SDSS Data Release 9 (Ahn et al. 2012, V/139) within 1" of the 2MASS position. (6 data files).

  17. Toward an optimal search strategy of optical and gravitational wave emissions from binary neutron star coalescence

    CERN Document Server

    Coward, D M; Sutton, P J; Howell, E J; Regimbau, T; Laas-Bourez, M; Klotz, A; Boer, M; Branchesi, M

    2011-01-01

    Observations of an optical source coincident with gravitational wave emission detected from a binary neutron star coalescence will improve the confidence of detection, provide host galaxy localisation, and test models for the progenitors of short gamma ray bursts. We employ optical observations of three short gamma ray bursts, 050724, 050709, 051221, to estimate the detection rate of a coordinated optical and gravitational wave search of neutron star mergers. Model R-band optical afterglow light curves of these bursts that include a jet-break are extrapolated for these sources at the sensitivity horizon of an Advanced LIGO/Virgo network. Using optical sensitivity limits of three telescopes, namely TAROT (m=18), Zadko (m=21) and an (8-10) meter class telescope (m=26), we approximate detection rates and cadence times for imaging. We find a median coincident detection rate of 4 yr^{-1} for the three bursts. GRB 050724 like bursts, with wide opening jet angles, offer the most optimistic rate of 13 coincident dete...

  18. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. III. GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR-LIKE COUNTERPARTS AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Nori, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    About one-third of the {gamma}-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies and so are classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here, we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the northern hemisphere. First, we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of {gamma}-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey. We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in the literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the {gamma}-ray blazar candidates selected using the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the basis of our multifrequency research, we identify 23 new {gamma}-ray blazar candidates out of the 32 UGSs investigated. Comparison with previous results on the UGSs is also presented. Finally, we speculate on the advantages of using low-frequency radio observations to associate UGSs and to search for {gamma}-ray pulsar candidates.

  19. OSETI with STACEE: a search for nanosecond optical transients from nearby stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, D S; Ball, J; Covault, C E; Carson, J E; Driscoll, D D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Mueller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J

    2009-05-01

    We have used the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) high-energy gamma-ray detector to look for fast blue-green laser pulses from the vicinity of 187 stars. The STACEE detector offers unprecedented light-collecting capability for the detection of nanosecond pulses from such lasers. We estimate STACEE's sensitivity to be approximately 10 photons/m(2) at a wavelength of 420 nm. The stars have been chosen because their characteristics are such that they may harbor habitable planets, and they are relatively close to Earth. Each star was observed for 10 minutes, and we found no evidence for laser pulses in any of the data sets. Key Words: Search for extraterrestrial intelligence-Optical search for extraterrestrial intelligence-Interstellar communication-Laser.

  20. Neutron Diffraction and Optics of a Noncentrosymmetric Crystal. New Feasibility of a Search for Neutron EDM

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorov, V. V.; Voronin, V. V.

    2005-01-01

    Recently strong electric fields (up to 10^9 V/cm) have been discovered, which affect the neutrons moving in noncentrosymmetric crystals. Such fields allow new polarization phenomena in neutron diffraction and optics and provide, for instance, a new feasibility of a search for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM). A series of experiments was carried out in a few last years on study of the dynamical diffraction of polarized neutrons in thick (1-10 cm) quartz crystals, using the forward diff...

  1. Frequency domain optical tomography using a conjugate gradient method without line search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Keol [Departement des Sciences Appliquees, Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555 Boulevard de l' Universite, P4-3240, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Charette, Andre [Departement des Sciences Appliquees, Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555 Boulevard de l' Universite, P4-3240, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada)]. E-mail: andre_charette@uqac.ca

    2007-03-15

    A conjugate gradient method without line search (CGMWLS) is presented. This method is used to retrieve the local maps of absorption and scattering coefficients inside the tissue-like test medium, with the synthetic data. The forward problem is solved with a discrete-ordinates finite-difference method based on the frequency domain formulation of radiative transfer equation. The inversion results demonstrate that the CGMWLS can retrieve simultaneously the spatial distributions of optical properties inside the medium within a reasonable accuracy, by reducing cross-talk between absorption and scattering coefficients.

  2. Optical Search for QED vacuum magnetic birefringence, Axions and photon Regeneration

    CERN Multimedia

    Pugnat, P; Hryczuk, A; Slunecka, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Jary, V; Kral, M

    2007-01-01

    Since its prediction in 1936 by Euler, Heisenberg and Weisskopf in the earlier development of the Quantum Electrodynamic (QED) theory, the Vacuum Magnetic Birefringence (VMB) is still a challenge for optical metrology techniques. According to QED, the vacuum behaves as an optically active medium in the presence of an external magnetic field. It can be experimentally probed with a linearly polarized laser beam. After propagating through the vacuum submitted to a transverse magnetic field, the polarization of the laser beam will change to elliptical and the parameters of the polarization are directly related to fundamental constants such as the fine structure constant and the electron Compton wavelength. Contributions to the VMB could also arise from the existence of light scalar or pseudo-scalar particles like axions that couple to two photons and this would manifest itself as a sizeable deviation from the initial QED prediction. On one side, the interest in axion search, providing an answer to the strong-CP p...

  3. Determination of layer thickness and optical constants of thin films by using a modified pattern search method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloua, R; Kebbab, Z; Chiker, F; Sahraoui, K; Khadraoui, M; Benramdane, N

    2012-02-15

    We propose the use of a pattern search optimization technique in combination with a seed preprocessing procedure to determine the optical constants and thickness of thin films using only the transmittance spectra. The approach is quite flexible, straightforward to implement, and efficient in reaching the best fitting. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method in extracting optical constants, even when the films are not displaying interference fringes. Comparison to a real-coded genetic algorithm shows that the modified pattern search is fast, almost accurate, and does not need any parameter adjustments. The approach is successfully applied to extract the thickness and optical constants of spray pyrolyzed nanocrystalline CdO thin films.

  4. Herschel-ATLAS: VISTA VIKING near-IR counterparts in the Phase 1 GAMA 9h data

    CERN Document Server

    Fleuren, S; Dunne, L; Smith, D J B; Maddox, S J; González-Nuevo, J; Findlay, J; Auld, R; Baes, M; Bond, N A; Bonfield, D G; Bourne, N; Cooray, A; Buttiglione, S; Cava, A; Dariush, A; De Zotti, G; Driver, S P; Dye, S; Eales, S; Fritz, J; Gunawardhana, M L P; Hopwood, R; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Jarvis, M J; Kelvin, L; Lapi, A; Liske, J; Michalowski, M J; Negrello, M; Pascale, E; Pohlen, M; Prescott, M; Rigby, E E; Robotham, A; Scott, D; Temi, P; Thompson, M A; Valiante, E; van der Werf, P

    2012-01-01

    We identify near-infrared Ks band counterparts to Herschel-ATLAS sub-mm sources, using a preliminary object catalogue from the VISTA VIKING survey. The sub-mm sources are selected from the H-ATLAS Phase 1 catalogue of the GAMA 9h field, which includes all objects detected at 250, 350 or 500 um with the SPIRE instrument. We apply and discuss a likelihood ratio (LR) method for VIKING candidates within a search radius of 10" of the 22,000 SPIRE sources with a 5 sigma detection at 250 um. We find that 11,294(51%) of the SPIRE sources have a best VIKING counterpart with a reliability $R\\ge 0.8$, and the false identification rate of these is estimated to be 4.2%. We expect to miss ~5% of true VIKING counterparts. There is evidence from Z-J and J-Ks colours that the reliable counterparts to SPIRE galaxies are marginally redder than the field population. We obtain photometric redshifts for ~68% of all (non-stellar) VIKING candidates with a median redshift of 0.405. Comparing to the results of the optical identificati...

  5. The Hunt for a Counterpart to GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    binaries involving neutron stars, they set up a notification system to be able to quickly alert electromagnetic observatories of a gravitational-wave detection. Those observatories would then be able to follow up on the gravitational-wave detectorsrough localization, with the goal of detecting the source by its electromagnetic signature.Given that LIGO had only just come online for testing when GW150914 was detected, its impressive that the pipeline was ready and there were observatories able to follow up so quickly! When the alert went out, 25 teams responded, mobilizing satellites and ground-based telescopes spanning 19 orders of magnitude in electromagnetic wavelength.The Search PartyThe only information the teams were initially given was the localization of the signal to roughly 600 square degrees on the sky. With this starting point, over the next three months, these 25 facilities carefully observed the entirety of the estimated localization area.Footprints of observations in comparison with the initial LIGO localization of GW150914 (black contours). Shown are radio fields (red), optical/infrared fields (green), and X-ray fields (blue circles); not shown are the all-sky Fermi GBM, LAT, INTEGRAL SPI-ACS, and MAXI observations. [Abbott et al. 2016]Some high-energy observatories, like Fermi and INTEGRAL, covered the whole sky. Many optical facilities used a tiling strategy, together covering about 900 square degrees. Still other observatories used a targeted approach, specifically looking at fields that contained a high density of nearby galaxies, in the hopes of detecting signs of a neutron-star merger or a core-collapse supernova.For the transient sources that were found, follow-up spectroscopy and further photometry was performed, to determine if the transient could have been the source of the detected gravitational waves.What Was the Outcome?No electromagnetic counterpart to GW150914 was found. It turns out this isnt surprising; GW150914 was later determined to have

  6. X(3872) and its bottomonium counterpart at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00218332; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the measurement of the differential cross-section of the X(3872) state through its decays to $J/\\psi \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ final state . The cross-section was extracted for both prompt and non-prompt production. The existence of the X(3872) suggests the presence of its bottomonium counterpart $X_b$. Search for $X_b$ with the ATLAS experiment in several final states, including $\\Upsilon \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, is presented.

  7. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageron, Michel; Al Samarai, Imen; Akerlof, Carl; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Boer, Michel; Brunner, Juergen; Busto, Jose; Dornic, Damien; Klotz, Alain; Schussler, Fabian; Vallage, Bertrand; Vecchi, Manuela; Zheng, Weikang

    2012-11-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well suited to detect neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky at all the times with a duty cycle close to unity and an angular resolution better than 0.5°. Potential sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), core collapse supernovae (SNe), and flaring active galactic nuclei (AGNs). To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a new detection method based on coincident observations of neutrinos and optical signals has been developed. A fast online muon track reconstruction is used to trigger a network of small automatic optical telescopes. Such alerts are generated one or two times per month for special events such as two or more neutrinos coincident in time and direction or single neutrinos of very high energy. Since February 2009, ANTARES has sent 37 alert triggers to the TAROT and ROTSE telescope networks, 27 of them have been followed. First results on the optical images analysis to search for GRBs are presented.

  8. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageron, Michel [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3 - Universite de Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Al Samarai, Imen, E-mail: samarai@cppm.in2p3.fr [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3 - Universite de Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Akerlof, Carl [Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States); Basa, Stephane [LAM, BP8, Traverse du siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Bertin, Vincent [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3 - Universite de Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Boer, Michel [OHP, 04870 Saint Michel de l' Observatoire (France); Brunner, Juergen; Busto, Jose; Dornic, Damien [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3 - Universite de Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Klotz, Alain [OHP, 04870 Saint Michel de l' Observatoire (France); IRAP, 9 avenue du colonel Roche, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Schussler, Fabian; Vallage, Bertrand [CEA-IRFU, centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vecchi, Manuela [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3 - Universite de Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Zheng, Weikang [Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2012-11-11

    The ANTARES telescope is well suited to detect neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky at all the times with a duty cycle close to unity and an angular resolution better than 0.5 Degree-Sign . Potential sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), core collapse supernovae (SNe), and flaring active galactic nuclei (AGNs). To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a new detection method based on coincident observations of neutrinos and optical signals has been developed. A fast online muon track reconstruction is used to trigger a network of small automatic optical telescopes. Such alerts are generated one or two times per month for special events such as two or more neutrinos coincident in time and direction or single neutrinos of very high energy. Since February 2009, ANTARES has sent 37 alert triggers to the TAROT and ROTSE telescope networks, 27 of them have been followed. First results on the optical images analysis to search for GRBs are presented.

  9. Galaxy Strategy for LIGO-Virgo Gravitational Wave Counterpart Searches

    OpenAIRE

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Kanner, J.; Kasliwal, M.M.; Nissanke, S.; Singer, L. P.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we continue a line of inquiry begun in Kanner et al. which detailed a strategy for utilizing telescopes with narrow fields of view, such as the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT), to localize gravity wave (GW) triggers from LIGO/Virgo. If one considers the brightest galaxies that produce ~50% of the light, then the number of galaxies inside typical GW error boxes will be several tens. We have found that this result applies both in the early years of Advanced LIGO when the range is small...

  10. A Search for Fast Optical Transients in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey: M-Dwarf Flares, Asteroids, Limits on Extragalactic Rates, and Implications for LSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, E.; Leibler, C. N.; Chornock, R.; Rest, A.; Foley, R. J.; Soderberg, A. M.; Price, P. A.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present a search for fast optical transients (τ ~ 0.5 hr-1 day) using repeated observations of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS) fields. Our search takes advantage of the consecutive g P1 r P1 observations (16.5 minutes in each filter), by requiring detections in both bands, with non-detections on preceding and subsequent nights. We identify 19 transients brighter than 22.5 AB mag (S/N >~ 10). Of these, 11 events exhibit quiescent counterparts in the deep PS1/MDS templates that we identify as M4-M9 dwarfs at d ≈ 0.2-1.2 kpc. The remaining eight transients lack quiescent counterparts, exhibit mild but significant astrometric shifts between the g P1 and r P1 images, colors of (g - r)P1 ≈ 0.5-0.8 mag, non-varying light curves, and locations near the ecliptic plane with solar elongations of about 130°, which are all indicative of main-belt asteroids near the stationary point of their orbits. With identifications for all 19 transients, we place an upper limit of R FOT(τ ~ 0.5 hr) factor of 30-50 times lower than previous limits; the limit for a timescale of ~1 day is R FOT events are limited to M ≈ -10 to ≈ - 14 mag for a timescale of ~0.5 hr to ~1 day, while relativistic sources (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, magnetar-powered transients) can reach much larger luminosities. The resulting volumetric rates are Motivated by the results of our search, we discuss strategies for identifying fast optical transients in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope main survey, and reach the optimistic conclusion that the veil of foreground contaminants can be lifted with the survey data, without the need for expensive follow-up observations.

  11. Unveiling the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources III: gamma-ray blazar-like counterparts at low radio frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F; Giroletti, M; Paggi, A; Masetti, N; Tosti, G; Nori, M; Funk, S

    2013-01-01

    About one third of the gamma-ray sources listed in the second Fermi LAT catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies so being classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) in the northern hemisphere. First we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of gamma-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO VLA Sky survey (NVSS). We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the gamma-ray blazar candidates selected with the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the ...

  12. Searching for fast optical transients by means of a wide-field monitoring observations with high temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Plokhotnichenko, V.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Perkov, A.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.

    We discuss the strategy of search for fast optical transients accompanying gamma-ray bursts by means of continuous monitoring of wide sky fields with high temporal resolution. We describe the design, performance and results of our cameras, FAVOR and TORTORA. Also we discuss the perspectives of this strategy and possible design of next-generation equipment for wide-field monitoring which will be able to detect optical transients and to study their color and polarization properties with high time resolution.

  13. Search for Kilonovae in Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctor, Zoheyr; DES-GW Team; DES-SN Team

    2016-03-01

    The Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4-m Telescope is an ideal instrument for identifying rapid optical transients with its large field of view and four optical filters. We utilize two seasons of data from the Dark Energy Survey to search for kilonovae, an optical counterpart to gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers. Kilonova lightcurves from Barnes and Kasen inform our analysis for removing background signals such as supernovae. We simulate DES observations of kilonovae with the SNANA software package to estimate our search efficiency and optimize cuts. Finally, we report rate limits for binary neutron star mergers and compare to existing rate estimates.

  14. Optimization of parameters for the synthesis of Y2Cu2O5 nanoparticles by Taguchi method and comparison of their magnetic and optical properties with their bulk counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbod, Mansoor; Rafati, Zahra; Shoushtari, Morteza Zargar

    2016-06-01

    Y2Cu2O5 nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel combustion method and effects of different factors on the size of nanoparticles were investigated. In order to reduce the experimental stages, Taguchi robust design method was employed. Acid citric:Cu+2 M ratio, pH, sintering temperature and time were chosen as the parameters for optimization. Among these factors the solution pH had the most influence and the others had nearly the same influence on the nanoparticles sizes. Based on the predicted conditions by Taguchi design, the sample with a minimum particle size of 47 nm was prepared. The magnetic behavior of Y2Cu2O5 nanoparticles were measured and found that at low fields they are soft ferromagnetic but at high fields they behave paramagnetically. The magnetic behavior of nanoparticles were compared to their bulk counterparts and found that the Mr of the samples was slightly different, but the Hc of the nanoparticles was 76% of the bulk sample. The maximum absorbance peak of UV-vis spectrum showed a blue shift for the smaller particles.

  15. Visual search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Bijl, P.

    2003-01-01

    Visual search, with or without the aid of optical or electro-optical instruments, plays a significant role in various types of military and civilian operations (e.g., reconnaissance, surveillance, and search and rescue). Advance knowledge of human visual search and target acquisition performance is

  16. Tracking the eye non-invasively: Simultaneous comparison of the scleral search coil and optical tracking techniques in themacaque monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Kimmel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available From human perception to primate neurophysiology, monitoring eye position is critical to the study of vision, attention, oculomotor control, and behavior. Two principal techniques for the precise measurement of eye position—the long-standing sclera-embedded search coil and more recent optical tracking techniques—are in use in various laboratories, but no published study compares the performance of the two methods simultaneously in the same primates. Here we compare two popular systems—a sclera-embedded search coil from C-N-C Engineering and the EyeLink 1000 optical system from SR Research—by recording simultaneously from the same eye in the macaque monkey while the animal performed a simple oculomotor task. We found broad agreement between the two systems, particularly in positional accuracy during fixation, measurement of saccade amplitude, detection of fixational saccades, and sensitivity to subtle changes in eye position from trial to trial. Nonetheless, certain discrepancies persist, particularly elevated saccade peak velocities, post-saccadic ringing, influence of luminance change on reported position, and greater sample-to-sample variation in the optical system. Our study shows that optical performance now rivals that of the search coil, rendering optical systems appropriate for many if not most applications. This finding is consequential, especially for animal subjects, because the optical systems do not require invasive surgery for implantation and repair of search coils around the eye. Our data also allow laboratories using the optical system in human subjects to assess the strengths and limitations of the technique for their own applications.

  17. Optimization of parameters for the synthesis of Y{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanoparticles by Taguchi method and comparison of their magnetic and optical properties with their bulk counterpart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farbod, Mansoor, E-mail: farbod_m@scu.ac.ir; Rafati, Zahra; Shoushtari, Morteza Zargar

    2016-06-01

    Y{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanoparticles were synthesized by sol–gel combustion method and effects of different factors on the size of nanoparticles were investigated. In order to reduce the experimental stages, Taguchi robust design method was employed. Acid citric:Cu{sup +2} M ratio, pH, sintering temperature and time were chosen as the parameters for optimization. Among these factors the solution pH had the most influence and the others had nearly the same influence on the nanoparticles sizes. Based on the predicted conditions by Taguchi design, the sample with a minimum particle size of 47 nm was prepared. The magnetic behavior of Y{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanoparticles were measured and found that at low fields they are soft ferromagnetic but at high fields they behave paramagnetically. The magnetic behavior of nanoparticles were compared to their bulk counterparts and found that the M{sub r} of the samples was slightly different, but the H{sub c} of the nanoparticles was 76% of the bulk sample. The maximum absorbance peak of UV–vis spectrum showed a blue shift for the smaller particles. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanoparticles (Y202) were synthesized by sol–gel combustion method. • To optimize the synthesis parameters Taguchi statistical method was used. • The solution pH had the most influence and the others had nearly the same effect. • The hysteresis loop of (Y202) nanoparticles showed a soft ferromagnetic behavior. • UV maximum absorbance peak showed a blue shift for the nanoparticle.

  18. SearchCal: a Virtual Observatory tool for searching calibrators in optical long baseline interferometry. I: The bright object case

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneau, D; Delfosse, X; Mourard, D; Cetre, S; Chelli, A; Cruzal`ebes, P; Duvert, G; Zins, G; Bonneau, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    In long baseline interferometry, the raw fringe contrast must be calibrated to obtain the true visibility and then those observables that can be interpreted in terms of astrophysical parameters. The selection of suitable calibration stars is crucial for obtaining the ultimate precision of interferometric instruments like the VLTI. We have developed software SearchCal that builds an evolutive catalog of stars suitable as calibrators within any given user-defined angular distance and magnitude around the scientific target. We present the first version of SearchCal dedicated to the bright-object case V<=10; K<=5). Star catalogs available at the CDS are consulted via web requests. They provide all the useful information for selecting of calibrators. Missing photometries are computed with an accuracy of 0.1 mag and the missing angular diameters are calculated with a precision better than 10%. For each star the squared visibility is computed by taking the wavelength and the maximum baseline of the foreseen ob...

  19. Galaxy counterparts of intervening high-z sub-DLAs/DLAs and MgII absorbers towards gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Schulze, S; Milvang-Jensen, B; Rossi, A; Jakobsson, P; Ledoux, C; De Cia, A; Kruehler, T; Mehner, A; Bjoernsson, G; Chen, H -W; Vreeswijk, P M; Perley, D A; Hjorth, J; Levan, A J; Tanvir, N R; Ellison, S; Moller, P; Worseck, G; Chapman, R; Dall'Aglio, A; Letawe, G

    2012-01-01

    We present the first search for galaxy counterparts of intervening high-z (2counterparts of the absorbers we use deep optical and near-infrared imaging, and low-, mid- and high-resolution spectroscopy acquired with 6 to 10-m class telescopes, the Hubble and the Spitzer space telescopes. Furthermore, we use the spectroscopic information and spectral-energy-distribution fitting techniques to study them in detail. Our main result is the detection and spectroscopic confirmation of the galaxy counterpart of the intervening DLA at z=3.096 in the field of GRB 070721B (z_GRB=3.6298) as proposed by other authors. We also identify good candidates for the galaxy counterparts of the two strong MgII absorbers at z=0.6915 and 1.4288 towards GRB 050820A (z_GRB=2.615). The properties of the detected DLA galaxy are typical for Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at similar re...

  20. UV-B and B-band Optical Flare Search in AR Lacertae, II Pegasi, and UX Arietis Star Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Haagen, G. A.

    2013-11-01

    A high-cadence search was conducted on the known RS CVn-type flare stars AR Lac, II Peg, and UX Ari. Two optical flares were observed in the B-band on AR Lac at 5 milliseconds (ms) resolution for a rate of 0.04 fl/hr. Flare energy of the two B-band fast-flares ranged from 0.55 to 16.7 × 1033 ergs. The UV-B and B-band search of II Peg for 44.5 hours at 5 and 10 ms resolution and UV-B band search of UX Ari for 25.6 hours at 10 ms resolution detected no flare activity.

  1. Application of the MST clustering to the high energy gamma-ray sky. IV - Blazar candidates found as possible counterparts of photon clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, R; Bernieri, E

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a cluster search in the Fermi-LAT Pass 8 gamma-ray sky by means of the Minimum Spanning Tree algorithm, at energies higher than 10 GeV and at Galactic latitudes higher than 25 degrees. The selected clusters have a minimum number of photons higher than or equal to 5, a high degree of concentration, and are without a clear corresponding counterpart in blazar catalogues. A sample of 30 possible gamma-ray sources was obtained. These objects were verified by applying the standard Maximum Likelihood analysis on the Fermi-LAT data. A search for possible radio counterparts in a circle having a radius of 6 arcmin was performed, finding several interesting objects, the majority of them without optical spectroscopical data. These can be considered as new blazar candidates. Some of them were already noticed as possible blazars or Active Galactic Nuclei in previous surveys, but never associated with high energy emission. These possible counterparts are reported and their properties are discussed.

  2. Prompt Optical Observations of $\\gamma$-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Akerlof, Carl W; Barthelmy, S D; Bloch, J; Butterworth, P S; Casperson, D E; Cline, T; Fletcher, S; Frontera, F; Gisler, G; Heise, J; Hills, J; Hurley, K; Kehoe, R; Lee, B; Marshall, S; McKay, T; Pawl, A; Piro, L; Szymanski, J J; Wren, J; Akerlof, Carl; Balsano, Richard; Barthelmy, Scott; Bloch, Jeff; Butterworth, Paul; Casperson, Don; Cline, Tom; Fletcher, Sandra; Frontera, Fillippo; Gisler, Galen; Heise, John; Hills, Jack; Hurley, Kevin; Kehoe, Robert; Lee, Brian; Marshall, Stuart; Kay, Tim Mc; Pawl, Andrew; Piro, Luigi; Szymanski, John; Wren, Jim

    2000-01-01

    The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure simultaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A search for optical counterparts to six GRBs with localization errors of 1 square degree or better produced no detections. The earliest limiting sensitivity is m(ROTSE) > 13.1 at 10.85 seconds (5 second exposure) after the gamma-ray rise, and the best limit is m(ROTSE) > 16.0 at 62 minutes (897 second exposure). These are the most stringent limits obtained for GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. Consideration of the gamma-ray fluence and peak flux for these bursts and for GRB990123 indicates that there is not a strong positive correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray emission.

  3. Electromagnetic Counterparts to Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    During the final moments of a binary black hole (BH) merger, the gravitational wave (GW) luminosity of the system is greater than the combined electromagnetic (EM) output of the entire observable universe. However, the extremely weak coupling between GWs and ordinary matter makes these waves very difficult to detect directly. Fortunately, the inspirating BH system will interact strongly-on a purely Newtonian level-with any surrounding material in the host galaxy, and this matter can in turn produce unique EM signals detectable at Earth. By identifying EM counterparts to GW sources, we will be able to study the host environments of the merging BHs, in turn greatly expanding the scientific yield of a mission like LISA. Here we present a comprehensive review of the recent literature on the subject of EM counterparts, as well as a discussion of the theoretical and observational advances required to fully realize the scientific potential of the field.

  4. The Zadko Telescope: A Southern Hemisphere Telescope for Optical Transient Searches, Multi-Messenger Astronomy and Education

    CERN Document Server

    Coward, D M; Vaalsta, T P; Laas-Bourez, M; Klotz, A; Imerito, A; Yan, L; Luckas, P; Fletcher, A B; Zadnik, M G; Burman, R R; Blair, D G; Zadko, J; Boer, M; Thierry, P; Howell, E J; Gordon, S; Ahmat, A; Moore, J; Frost, K

    2010-01-01

    The new 1-m f/4 fast-slew Zadko Telescope was installed in June 2008 about 70 km north of Perth, Western Australia. It is the only metre-class optical facility at this southern latitude between the east coast of Australia and South Africa, and can rapidly image optical transients at a longitude not monitored by other similar facilities. We report on first imaging tests of a pilot program of minor planet searches, and Target of Opportunity observations triggered by the Swift satellite. In 12 months, 6 gamma-ray burst afterglows were detected, with estimated magnitudes; two of them, GRB 090205 (z = 4.65) and GRB 090516 (z = 4.11), are among the most distant optical transients imaged by an Australian telescope. Many asteroids were observed in a systematic 3-month search. In September 2009, an automatic telescope control system was installed, which will be used to link the facility to a global robotic telescope network; future targets will include fast optical transients triggered by highenergy satellites, radio ...

  5. The Zadko Telescope: A Southern Hemisphere Telescope for Optical Transient Searches, Multi-Messenger Astronomy and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, D. M.; Todd, M.; Vaalsta, T. P.; Laas-Bourez, M.; Klotz, A.; Imerito, A.; Yan, L.; Luckas, P.; Fletcher, A. B.; Zadnik, M. G.; Burman, R. R.; Blair, D. G.; Zadko, J.; Boër, M.; Thierry, P.; Howell, E. J.; Gordon, S.; Ahmat, A.; Moore, J. A.; Frost, K.

    2010-09-01

    The new 1m f/4 fast-slew Zadko Telescope was installed in June 2008 about 70km north of Perth, Western Australia. It is the only metre-class optical facility at this southern latitude between the east coast of Australia and South Africa, and can rapidly image optical transients at a longitude not monitored by other similar facilities. We report on first imaging tests of a pilot program of minor planet searches, and Target of Opportunity observations triggered by the Swift satellite. In 12 months, 6gamma-ray burst afterglows were detected, with estimated magnitudes; two of them, GRB 090205 (z=4.65) and GRB 090516 (z=4.11), are among the most distant optical transients imaged by an Australian telescope. Many asteroids were observed in a systematic 3-month search. In September 2009, an automatic telescope control system was installed, which will be used to link the facility to a global robotic telescope network; future targets will include fast optical transients triggered by high-energy satellites, radio transient detections, and LIGO gravitational wave candidate events. We also outline the importance of the facility as a potential tool for education, training, and public outreach.

  6. First Search for an X-ray -- Optical Reverberation Signal in an Ultraluminous X-ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Pasham, Dheeraj R; Cenko, S Bradley; Trippe, Margaret L; Mushotzky, Richard F; Gandhi, Poshak

    2016-01-01

    Using simultaneous optical (VLT/FORS2) and X-ray (XMM-Newton) data of NGC 5408, we present the first ever attempt to search for a reverberation signal in an ultraluminous X-ray source (NGC 5408 X-1). The idea is similar to AGN broad line reverberation mapping where a lag measurement between the X-ray and the optical flux combined with a Keplerian velocity estimate should enable us to weigh the central compact object. We find that although NGC 5408 X-1's X-rays are variable on a timescale of a few hundred seconds (RMS of 9.0$\\pm$0.5%), the optical emission does not show any statistically significant variations. We set a 3$\\sigma$ upper limit on the RMS optical variability of 3.3%. The ratio of the X-ray to the optical variability is an indicator of X-ray reprocessing efficiency. In X-ray binaries, this ratio is roughly 5. Assuming a similar ratio for NGC 5408 X-1, the expected RMS optical variability is $\\approx$2% which is still a factor of roughly two lower than what was possible with the VLT observations in...

  7. FIRST SEARCH FOR AN X-RAY–OPTICAL REVERBERATION SIGNAL IN AN ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Cenko, S. Bradley [Code 661, Astrophysics Science Division, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Trippe, Margaret L. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD (United States); Mushotzky, Richard F. [Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Gandhi, Poshak, E-mail: dheerajrangareddy.pasham@nasa.gov [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-10

    Using simultaneous optical (VLT/FORS2) and X-ray (XMM-Newton) data of NGC 5408, we present the first ever attempt to search for a reverberation signal in an ultraluminous X-ray source (NGC 5408 X-1). The idea is similar to active galactic nucleus broad line reverberation mapping where a lag measurement between the X-ray and the optical flux combined with a Keplerian velocity estimate should enable us to weigh the central compact object. We find that although NGC 5408 X-1's X-rays are variable on a timescale of a few hundred seconds (rms of 9.0 ± 0.5%), the optical emission does not show any statistically significant variations. We set a 3σ upper limit on the rms optical variability of 3.3%. The ratio of the X-ray to the optical variability is an indicator of X-ray reprocessing efficiency. In X-ray binaries, this ratio is roughly 5. Assuming a similar ratio for NGC 5408 X-1, the expected rms optical variability is ≈2%, which is still a factor of roughly two lower than what was possible with the VLT observations in this study. We find marginal evidence (3σ) for optical variability on a ∼24 hr timescale. Our results demonstrate that such measurements can be made, but photometric conditions, low sky background levels, and longer simultaneous observations will be required to reach optical variability levels similar to those of X-ray binaries.

  8. Infrared Counterparts to Chandra X-Ray Sources in the Antennae

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, D M; Brandl, B R; Wilson, J C; Carson, J C; Henderson, C P; Hayward, T L; Barry, D J; Ptak, A F; Colbert, E J M

    2006-01-01

    We use deep J and Ks images of the Antennae (NGC 4038/9) obtained with WIRC on the Palomar 200-inch telescope, together with the Chandra X-ray source list of Zezas et al. (2002a), to search for IR counterparts to X-ray point sources. We establish an X-ray/IR astrometric frame tie with 0.5" rms residuals over a \\~4.3' field. We find 13 ``strong'' IR counterparts brighter than Ks = 17.8 mag and < 1.0" from X-ray sources, and an additional 6 ``possible'' IR counterparts between 1.0" and 1.5" from X-ray sources. The surface density of IR sources near the X-ray sources suggests only ~2 of the ``strong'' counterparts and ~3 of the ``possible'' counterparts are chance superpositions of unrelated objects. Comparing both strong and possible IR counterparts to our photometric study of ~220 Antennae, IR clusters, we find the IR counterparts to X-ray sources are \\~1.2 mag more luminous in Ks than average non-X-ray clusters. We also note that the X-ray/IR matches are concentrated in the spiral arms and ``overlap'' regi...

  9. Chandra Counterparts of CANDELS GOODS-S Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Fontana, A.; Zamorani, G.; Amorin, R.; Castellano, M.; Merlin, E.; Santini, P.; Elbaz, D.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.; Dunlop, J. S.; Bourne, N.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Michałowski, Michał J.; Derriere, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Faber, S. M.; Vito, F.

    2016-06-01

    Improving the capabilities of detecting faint X-ray sources is fundamental for increasing the statistics on faint high-z active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We performed a simultaneous maximum likelihood point-spread function fit in the [0.5-2] keV and [2-7] keV energy bands of the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) data at the position of the 34,930 CANDELS H-band selected galaxies. For each detected source we provide X-ray photometry and optical counterpart validation. We validated this technique by means of a ray-tracing simulation. We detected a total of 698 X-ray point sources with a likelihood { L }\\gt 4.98 (i.e., >2.7σ). We show that prior knowledge of a deep sample of optical-NIR galaxies leads to a significant increase in the detection of faint (i.e., ˜10-17 cgs in the [0.5-2] keV band) sources with respect to “blind” X-ray detections. By including previous X-ray catalogs, this work increases the total number of X-ray sources detected in the 4 Ms CDFS, CANDELS area to 793, which represents the largest sample of extremely faint X-ray sources assembled to date. Our results suggest that a large fraction of the optical counterparts of our X-ray sources determined by likelihood ratio actually coincides with the priors used for the source detection. Most of the new detected sources are likely SFGs or faint, absorbed AGNs. We identified a few sources with putative photometric redshift z > 4. Despite the low number statistics and the uncertainties on the photo z, this sample significantly increases the number of X-ray-selected candidate high-z AGNs.

  10. Graph search: active appearance model based automated segmentation of retinal layers for optic nerve head centered OCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Enting; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Weifang; Jin, Chao; Sun, Min; Chen, Haoyu; Chen, Xinjian

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a novel approach combining the active appearance model (AAM) and graph search is proposed to segment retinal layers for optic nerve head(ONH) centered optical coherence tomography(OCT) images. The method includes two parts: preprocessing and layer segmentation. During the preprocessing phase, images is first filtered for denoising, then the B-scans are flattened. During layer segmentation, the AAM is first used to obtain the coarse segmentation results. Then a multi-resolution GS-AAM algorithm is applied to further refine the results, in which AAM is efficiently integrated into the graph search segmentation process. The proposed method was tested on a dataset which contained113-D SD-OCT images, and compared to the manual tracings of two observers on all the volumetric scans. The overall mean border positioning error for layer segmentation was found to be 7.09 +/- 6.18μm for normal subjects. It was comparable to the results of traditional graph search method (8.03+/-10.47μm) and mean inter-observer variability (6.35+/-6.93μm).The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  11. MASTER-OAFA: Fermi GRB faded optical counterpart detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrosheva, T.; Lipunov, V.; Podesta, R.; Levato, H.; Buckley, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Gress, O.; Kornilov, V.; Vladimirov, V.; Chazov, V.; Gorbunov, I.; Krylov, A.; Shumkov, V.; Kuvshinov, D.

    2017-02-01

    During Fermi GBM 508295323 trigger ( GRB_TIME: 2017-02-09 01:08:38.08 UT https://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/other/508295323.fermi ) inspection MASTER-OAFA auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) discovered new OT source (Podesta et al. GCN #20650) at (RA, Dec) = 07h 23m 07.30s -52d 14m 46.6s on 2017-02-09 02:07:07.478UT with unfiltered m_OT=17.4 (mlimit=18.1m).

  12. Fast radio bursts counterparts in the scenario of supergiant pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, S. B.; Pshirkov, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss identification of possible counterparts and persistent sources related to fast radio bursts (FRBs) in the framework of the model of supergiant pulses from young neutron stars with large spin-down luminosities. In particular, we demonstrate that at least some of the sources of FRBs can be observed as ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). At the moment no ULXs are known to be coincident with localization areas of FRBs. We searched for a correlation of FRB positions with galaxies in the 2MASS Redshift survey catalogue. Our analysis produced statistically insignificant overabundance (p-value ≈ 4 per cent) of galaxies in error boxes of FRBs. In the very near future with even modestly increased statistics of FRBs and with the help of dedicated X-ray observations and all-sky X-ray surveys it will be possible to decisively prove or falsify the supergiant pulses model.

  13. Liverpool Telescope follow-up of candidate electromagnetic counterparts during the first run of Advanced LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Copperwheat, C M; Piascik, A S; Bersier, D; Bode, M F; Collins, C A; Darnley, M J; Galloway, D K; Gomboc, A; Kobayashi, S; Lamb, G P; Levan, A J; Mazzali, P A; Mundell, C G; Pian, E; Pollacco, D; Steeghs, D; Tanvir, N R; Ulaczyk, K; Wiersema, K

    2016-01-01

    The first direct detection of gravitational waves was made in late 2015 with the Advanced LIGO detectors. By prior arrangement, a worldwide collaboration of electromagnetic follow-up observers were notified of candidate gravitational wave events during the first science run, and many facilities were engaged in the search for counterparts. No counterparts were identified, which is in line with expectations given that the events were classified as black hole - black hole mergers. However these searches laid the foundation for similar follow-up campaigns in future gravitational wave detector science runs, in which the detection of neutron star merger events with observable electromagnetic counterparts is much more likely. Three alerts were issued to the electromagnetic collaboration over the course of the first science run, which lasted from September 2015 to January 2016. Two of these alerts were associated with the gravitational wave events since named GW150914 and GW151226. In this paper we provide an overvie...

  14. A novel method for transient detection in high-cadence optical surveys. Its application for a systematic search for novae in M 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soraisam, Monika D.; Gilfanov, Marat; Kupfer, Thomas; Masci, Frank; Shafter, Allen W.; Prince, Thomas A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Ofek, Eran O.; Bellm, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Context. In the present era of large-scale surveys in the time domain, the processing of data, from procurement up to the detection of sources, is generally automated. One of the main challenges in the astrophysical analysis of their output is contamination by artifacts, especially in the regions of high surface brightness of unresolved emission. Aims: We present a novel method for identifying candidates for variable and transient sources from the outputs of optical time-domain survey data pipelines. We use the method to conduct a systematic search for novae in the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) observations of the bulge part of M 31 during the second half of 2013. Methods: We demonstrate that a significant fraction of artifacts produced by the iPTF pipeline form a locally uniform background of false detections approximately obeying Poissonian statistics, whereas genuine variable and transient sources, as well as artifacts associated with bright stars, result in clusters of detections whose spread is determined by the source localization accuracy. This makes the problem analogous to source detection on images produced by grazing incidence X-ray telescopes, enabling one to utilize the arsenal of powerful tools developed in X-ray astronomy. In particular, we use a wavelet-based source detection algorithm from the Chandra data analysis package CIAO. Results: Starting from 2.5 × 105 raw detections made by the iPTF data pipeline, we obtain approximately 4000 unique source candidates. Cross-matching these candidates with the source-catalog of a deep reference image of the same field, we find counterparts for 90% of the candidates. These sources are either artifacts due to imperfect PSF matching or genuine variable sources. The remaining approximately 400 detections are transient sources. We identify novae among these candidates by applying selection cuts to their lightcurves based on the expected properties of novae. Thus, we recovered all 12 known novae

  15. Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources as Likely Counterparts of Unidentified INTEGRAL Sources (Research Note)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, M.; Landi, R.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-01-01

    Many sources in the fourth INTEGRAL/IBIS catalogue are still unidentified since they lack an optical counterpart. An important tool that can help in identifying and classifying these sources is the cross-correlation with radio catalogues, which are very sensitive and positionally accurate. Moreover, the radio properties of a source, such as the spectrum or morphology, could provide further insight into its nature. In particular, flat-spectrum radio sources at high Galactic latitudes are likely to be AGN, possibly associated to a blazar or to the compact core of a radio galaxy. Here we present a small sample of 6 sources extracted from the fourth INTEGRAL/IBIS catalogue that are still unidentified or unclassified, but which are very likely associated with a bright, flat-spectrum radio object. To confirm the association and to study the source X-ray spectral parameters, we performed X-ray follow-up observations with Swift/XRT of all objects. We report in this note the overall results obtained from this search and discuss the nature of each individual INTEGRAL source. We find that 5 of the 6 radio associations are also detected in X-rays; furthermore, in 3 cases they are the only counterpart found. More specifically, IGR J06073-0024 is a flat-spectrum radio quasar at z = 1.08, IGR J14488-4008 is a newly discovered radio galaxy, while IGR J18129-0649 is an AGN of a still unknown type. The nature of two sources (IGR J07225-3810 and IGR J19386-4653) is less well defined, since in both cases we find another X-ray source in the INTEGRAL error circle; nevertheless, the flat-spectrum radio source, likely to be a radio loud AGN, remains a viable and, in fact, a more convincing association in both cases. Only for the last object (IGR J11544-7618) could we not find any convincing counterpart since the radio association is not an X-ray emitter, while the only X-ray source seen in the field is a G star and therefore unlikely to produce the persistent emission seen by INTEGRAL.

  16. Herschel FIR counterparts of selected Ly-alpha emitters at z~2.2. Fast evolution since z~3 or missed obscured AGNs?

    CERN Document Server

    Bongiovanni, A; Cepa, J; Garcia, A M Perez; Sanchez-Portal, M; Ederoclite, A; Aguerri, J A L; Alfaro, E J; Altieri, B; Andreani, P; Aparicio-Villegas, M T; Aussel, H; Benitez, N; Berta, S; Broadhurst, T; Cabrera-Cano, J; Castander, F J; Cava, A; Cervino, M; Chulani, H; Cimatti, A; Cristobal-Hornillos, D; Daddi, E; Dominguez, H; Elbaz, D; Fernandez-Soto, A; Schreiber, N Forster; Genzel, R; Gomez, M F; Delgado, R M Gonzalez; Grazian, A; Gruppioni, C; Herreros, J M; Iglesias-Groth, S; Infante, L; Lutz, D; Magnelli, B; Magdis, G; Maiolino, R; Marquez, I; Martinez, V J; Masegosa, J; Moles, M; Molino, A; Nordon, R; del Olmo, A; Perea, J; Poglitsch, A; Popesso, P; Pozzi, F; Prada, F; Quintana, J M; Riguccini, L; Rodighiero, G; Saintonge, A; Sanchez, S F; Santini, P; Shao, L; Sturm, E; Tacconi, L; Valtchanov, I

    2010-01-01

    Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) are seen everywhere in the redshift domain from local to z~7. Far-infrared (FIR) counterparts of LAEs at different epochs could provide direct clues on dust content, extinction, and spectral energy distribution (SED) for these galaxies. We search for FIR counterparts of LAEs that are optically detected in the GOODS-North field at redshift z~2.2 using data from the Herschel Space Telescope with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS). The LAE candidates were isolated via color-magnitude diagram using the medium-band photometry from the ALHAMBRA Survey, ancillary data on GOODS-North, and stellar population models. According to the fitting of these spectral synthesis models and FIR/optical diagnostics, most of them seem to be obscured galaxies whose spectra are AGN-dominated. From the analysis of the optical data, we have observed a fraction of AGN or composite over source total number of ~0.75 in the LAE population at z~2.2, which is marginally consistent with the fractio...

  17. Liverpool Telescope follow-up of candidate electromagnetic counterparts during the first run of Advanced LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copperwheat, C. M.; Steele, I. A.; Piascik, A. S.; Bersier, D.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Lamb, G. P.; Levan, A. J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Mundell, C. G.; Pian, E.; Pollacco, D.; Steeghs, D.; Tanvir, N. R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2016-11-01

    The first direct detection of gravitational waves was made in 2015 September with the Advanced LIGO detectors. By prior arrangement, a worldwide collaboration of electromagnetic follow-up observers were notified of candidate gravitational wave events during the first science run, and many facilities were engaged in the search for counterparts. Three alerts were issued to the electromagnetic collaboration over the course of the first science run, which lasted from 2015 September to 2016 January. Two of these alerts were associated with the gravitational wave events since named GW150914 and GW151226. In this paper we provide an overview of the Liverpool Telescope contribution to the follow-up campaign over this period. Given the hundreds of square degree uncertainty in the sky position of any gravitational wave event, efficient searching for candidate counterparts required survey telescopes with large (˜degrees) fields of view. The role of the Liverpool Telescope was to provide follow-up classification spectroscopy of any candidates. We followed candidates associated with all three alerts, observing 1, 9 and 17 candidates respectively. We classify the majority of the transients we observed as supernovae. No counterparts were identified, which is in line with expectations given that the events were classified as black hole-black hole mergers. However these searches laid the foundation for similar follow-up campaigns in future gravitational wave detector science runs, in which the detection of neutron star merger events with observable electromagnetic counterparts is much more likely.

  18. Search for correlated radio and optical events in long-term studies of extragalactic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomphrey, R. B.; Smith, A. G.; Leacock, R. J.; Olsson, C. N.; Scott, R. L.; Pollock, J. T.; Edwards, P.; Dent, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    For the first time, long-term records of radio and optical fluxes of a large sample of variable extragalactic sources have been assembled and compared, with linear cross-correlation analysis being used to reinforce the visual comparisons. Only in the case of the BL Lac object OJ 287 is the correlation between radio and optical records strong. In the majority of cases there is no evidence of significant correlation, although nine sources show limited or weak evidence of correlation. The results do not support naive extrapolation of the expanding source model. The general absence of strong correlation between the radio and optical regions has important implications for the energetics of events occurring in such sources.

  19. From TORTORA to MegaTORTORA—Results and Prospects of Search for Fast Optical Transients

    OpenAIRE

    Grigory Beskin; Sergey Bondar; Sergey Karpov; Vladimir Plokhotnichenko; Adriano Guarnieri; Corrado Bartolini; Giuseppe Greco; Adalberto Piccioni; Andrew Shearer

    2010-01-01

    To study short stochastic optical flares of different objects (GRBs, SNs, etc.) of unknown localizations as well as NEOs it is necessary to monitor large regions of sky with high-time resolution. We developed a system consisting of widefield camera with field of view of 400–600 sq.deg. which uses TV-CCD with 0.13 s temporal resolution to record and classify optical transients, and a fast robotic telescope aimed to perform their spectroscopic and photometric investigation just after detection....

  20. Supersymmetric plasma systems and their nonsupersymmetric counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Czajka, Alina

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis a systematic comparison of supersymmetric plasma systems and their nonsupersymmetric counterparts is presented. The work is motivated by the AdS/CFT correspondence and the main aim is to check how much the plasma governed by the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory resembles the quark-gluon plasma studied experimentally in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The analysis is done in a weak coupling regime where perturbative methods are applicable. Since the Keldysh-Schwinger approach is used, not only equilibrium but also nonequilibrium plasmas, which are assumed to be ultrarelativistic, are under consideration. First, using the functional techniques we introduce Faddeev-Popov ghosts into the Keldysh-Schwinger formalism of nonAbelian gauge theories. Next the collective excitations of the N=1 SUSY QED plasma are considered and compared to those of the usual QED system. The analysis is repeated to confront with each other the plasmas governed by the N=4 super Yang-Mills and QCD theories. Finally, transport ...

  1. Chandra counterparts of CANDELS GOODS-S sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cappelluti, N; Fontana, A; Zamorani, G; Amorin, R; Castellano, M; Merlin, E; Santini, P; Elbaz, D; Schreiber, C; Shu, X; Wang, T; Dunlop, J S; Bourne, N; Bruce, V A; Buitrago, F; Michałowski, Michał J; Derriere, S; Ferguson, H C; Faber, S M; Vito, F

    2015-01-01

    Improving the capabilities of detecting faint X-ray sources is fundamental to increase the statistics on faint high-z AGN and star-forming galaxies.We performed a simultaneous Maximum Likelihood PSF fit in the [0.5-2] keV and [2-7] keV energy bands of the 4 Ms {\\em Chandra} Deep Field South (CDFS) data at the position of the 34930 CANDELS H-band selected galaxies. For each detected source we provide X-ray photometry and optical counterpart validation. We validated this technique by means of a raytracing simulation. We detected a total of 698 X-ray point-sources with a likelihood $\\mathcal{L}$$>$4.98 (i.e. $>$2.7$\\sigma$). We show that the prior knowledge of a deep sample of Optical-NIR galaxies leads to a significant increase of the detection of faint (i.e. $\\sim$10$^{-17}$ cgs in the [0.5-2] keV band) sources with respect to "blind" X-ray detections. By including previous catalogs, this work increases the total number of X-ray sources detected in the 4 Ms CDFS, CANDELS area to 793, which represents the large...

  2. A Mid-IR Search for Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the dearth of relatively faint, compact planetary nebulae (PNe) in uncrowded fields that could serve as potential spectral calibration sources for the Euclid Mission, we have conducted a search for PNe at high Galactic latitudes based on WISE data. Previous studies have largely focused on the Galactic Plane or searched for mid-IR counterparts to optically selected PNe. We instead identify the WISE mid-IR color locus of PNe and investigate the cataloged sources fulfilling these color criteria. We will present preliminary results from this study, including new PNe candidates.

  3. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dornic, D; Busto, J; Samarai, I Al; Basa, S; Gendre, B; Mazure, A; Klotz, Alain; ANTARES, Michel Boer on behalf the

    2009-01-01

    The ANTARES telescope has the opportunity to detect transient neutrino sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, flares of active nuclei... To enhance the sensitivity to these sources, we have developed a new detection method based on the optical follow-up of "golden" neutrino events such as neutrino doublets coincident in time and space or single neutrinos of very high energy. The ANTARES Collaboration has therefore implemented a very fast on-line reconstruction with a good angular resolution. These characteristics allow to trigger an optical telescope network; since February 2009. ANTARES is sending alert trigger one or two times per month to the two 25 cm robotic telescope of TAROT. This follow-up of such special events would not only give access to the nature of the sources but also improves the sensitivity for transient neutrino sources.

  4. Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic Physics Novel scheme for exotic physics searches

    CERN Document Server

    Pustelny, S; Pankow, C; Ledbetter, M P; Wlodarczyk, P; Wcislo, P; Pospelov, M; Smith, J; Read, J; Gawlik, W; Budker, D

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel experimental scheme enabling investigation of transient exotic spin couplings. The scheme is based on synchronous measurements of optical-magnetometer signals of several devices operating in magnetically shielded environments in distant locations ($\\gtrsim100$ km). Although signatures of such exotic couplings may be present in a signal of the single magnetometer, it would be challenging to extract them from noise. With correlation measurements of signals from the magnetometers, not only the effects can be identified but their nature may also be investigated. The ability of the network to investigate physics beyond the Standard Model is discussed by considering the spin coupling to stable topological defects (e.g. domain walls) of axion-like fields. It is shown that the network consisting of sensitive optical magnetometers is capable to probe an axion-like-field parameter space unconstrained by other experiments.

  5. OMC camera experiment for INTEGRAL and search for Compton GRO BATSE LOCBURST optical transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezek, Tomáš; Hudec, René; Hroch, Filip; Soldán, Jan; Mas-Hesse, Miguel; Giménez, Alvaro

    1998-05-01

    The test camera of the Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC) experiment for INTEGRAL spacecraft achieving an angular pixel size of 18 arcsec and a field of view 7.5°×5.1° has been successfully developed and tested at the Astronomical Institute Ondřejov. The test camera is able to provide imaging down to 15 mag over the whole field of view within one exposure of 300 seconds. Although developed primarily to test the OMC performance and help with software development, this device is ideally suited for use as a ground-based camera for sites where Compton Gamma Ray Observatory BATSE Locburst triggers are followed-up in the optical waveband and also for wide-field sky monitoring in general. The low cost of this camera makes it possible to duplicate the system at a number of observing sites. A chart and a corresponding CCD-image for the BACODINE Locburst Position 6368 taken with the OMC test camera at Ondřejov observatory are also presented. The image taken 18 hours after the trigger was computer-blinked with the frame taken 30 days later. No optical activity has been found down to 13.5 mag.

  6. The search for optical emission on and before the GRB trigger with the WIDGET telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Tamagawa, T; Urata, Y; Abe, K; Onda, K; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Fujiwara, H; Miura, N; Hirose, S; Kawai, N; Yoshida, A; Mori, M; Makishima, K

    2005-01-01

    WIDGET is a robotic telescope for monitoring the HETE-2 field-of-view to detect Gamma-ray Burst optical flashes or possible optical precursors. The system has 62degx62deg wide field-of-view which covers about 80% of HETE-2 one with a 2kx2k Apogee U10 CCD camera and a Canon EF 24mm f/1.4 wide-angle lens without a bandpass filter. WIDGET has been in operation since June 2004 at Akeno observing site where is about 200 km apart from Tokyo. Typical limiting magnitude with S/N=3 at the site is V=10mag for 5 seconds exposure and V=11mag for 30 seconds exposure. We had already six coincident observations with HETE-2 position alerts. It was, however, cloudy for all cases due to rainy season in Japan. Expected number of coincident observations under clear sky is about 5 events per year. We will extend the system in early 2005 for Swift era to monitor optical transients in wider field-of-view, multi-color or polarization modes.

  7. Searches for millisecond pulsar candidates among the unidentified Fermi objects

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, C Y; Hu, C P; Lin, L C C; Li, K L; Kong, A K H; Tam, P H T; Takata, J; Cheng, K S; Jin, Ruolan; Yen, T -C; Kim, Chunglee

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the results of searching millisecond pulsar (MSP) candidates from the Fermi LAT second source catalog (2FGL). Seven unassociated $\\gamma-$ray sources in this catalog are identified as promising MSP candidates based on their $\\gamma$-ray properties. Through the X-ray analysis, we have detected possible X-ray counterparts, localized to an arcsecond accuracy. We have systematically estimated their X-ray fluxes and compared with the corresponding $\\gamma$-ray fluxes. The X-ray to $\\gamma$-ray flux ratios for 2FGL J1653.6-0159 and 2FGL J1946.4-5402 are comparable with the typical value for pulsars. For 2FGL J1625.2-0020, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 and 2FGL J1946.4-5402, their candidate X-ray counterparts are bright enough for performing a detailed spectral and temporal analysis to discriminate their thermal/non thermal nature and search for the periodic signal. We have also searched for possible optical/IR counterparts at the X-ray positions. For the optical/IR source coincident with the brightest X-ray obje...

  8. A TABU SEARCH APPROACH TOWARDS CONGESTION AND TOTAL FLOW MINIMIZATION IN OPTICAL NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valter BOLJUN(C)I(C); Darko SKORIN-KAPOV; Jadranka SKORIN-KAPOV

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers rearrangeable multihop lightwave networks whereby each network node is equipped with a number p of transmitters and receivers, and a spectrum of wavelengths is accessible by, and shared among, all nodes by using the Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM). Depending on input traffic flow, nodal transmitters and receivers can be re-tuned to create virtual connectivity best suited with respect to a given optimization criterion. We present an efficient heuristic algorithm that combines two criteria for optimization: throughput maximization, as well as total flow minimization. Throughput maximization criterion is equivalent to congestion minimization, while minimizing total flow under the assumption of having links with equal lengths implies minimization of the average number of hops. Taking into account lengths of the links (i.e. link costs proportional with distances), the total flow minimization becomes equivalent to the total delay minimization. Tabu search is implemented as a two-phase strategy dealing with diversification as well as intensification of search. Computational experiments include consecutive runs with different sets of weights associated with the two criteria. Results for a benchmark set of problems are presented.

  9. Search and Characterization of Optical Ceramics and Crystals for Diode-pumped Laser Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Higher microhardness ; - No cleavage planes; - Large size; Also for some experiments, the optical quality of the resultant ceramic material was...samples to lase was tested in the setup shown in Fig.19. The samples were pumped with a 967 nm fiber coupled (fiber core 120 m) 10 W laser diode with...Because of low levels of heating, testing of the CaF2:Yb 3+ ceramics could be performed in the continuous wave (CW) mode of operation. In Fig.23

  10. A search for thermal X-ray signatures in Gamma-Ray Bursts I: Swift bursts with optical supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Starling, R L C; Pe'er, A; Beardmore, A P; Osborne, J P

    2012-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of Gamma-Ray Bursts can generally be described by an absorbed power law. The landmark discovery of thermal X-ray emission in addition to the power law in the unusual GRB 060218, followed by a similar discovery in GRB 100316D, showed that during the first thousand seconds after trigger the soft X-ray spectra can be complex. Both the origin and prevalence of such spectral components still evades understanding, particularly after the discovery of thermal X-ray emission in the classical GRB 090618. Possibly most importantly, these three objects are all associated with optical supernovae, begging the question of whether the thermal X-ray components could be a result of the GRB-SN connection, possibly in the shock breakout. We therefore performed a search for blackbody components in the early Swift X-ray spectra of 11 GRBs that have or may have associated optical supernovae, accurately recovering the thermal components reported in the literature for GRBs 060218, 090618 and 100316D. We present the ...

  11. Optimizing heliostat positions with local search metaheuristics using a ray tracing optical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholz, Andreas; Husenbeth, Christof; Schwarzbözl, Peter; Buck, Reiner

    2017-06-01

    The life cycle costs of solar tower power plants are mainly determined by the investment costs of its construction. Significant parts of these investment costs are used for the heliostat field. Therefore, an optimized placement of the heliostats gaining the maximal annual power production has a direct impact on the life cycle costs revenue ratio. We present a two level local search method implemented in MATLAB utilizing the Monte Carlo raytracing software STRAL [1] for the evaluation of the annual power output for a specific weighted annual time scheme. The algorithm was applied to a solar tower power plant (PS10) with 624 heliostats. Compared to former work of Buck [2], we were able to improve both runtime of the algorithm and quality of the output solutions significantly. Using the same environment for both algorithms, we were able to reach Buck's best solution with a speed up factor of about 20.

  12. A search for fast optical transients in the Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: M-dwarf flares, asteroids, limits on extragalactic rates, and implications for LSST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.; Leibler, C. N.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Soderberg, A. M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Price, P. A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Metcalfe, N. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Stubbs, C. W. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    We present a search for fast optical transients (τ ∼ 0.5 hr-1 day) using repeated observations of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS) fields. Our search takes advantage of the consecutive g {sub P1} r {sub P1} observations (16.5 minutes in each filter), by requiring detections in both bands, with non-detections on preceding and subsequent nights. We identify 19 transients brighter than 22.5 AB mag (S/N ≳ 10). Of these, 11 events exhibit quiescent counterparts in the deep PS1/MDS templates that we identify as M4-M9 dwarfs at d ≈ 0.2-1.2 kpc. The remaining eight transients lack quiescent counterparts, exhibit mild but significant astrometric shifts between the g {sub P1} and r {sub P1} images, colors of (g – r){sub P1} ≈ 0.5-0.8 mag, non-varying light curves, and locations near the ecliptic plane with solar elongations of about 130°, which are all indicative of main-belt asteroids near the stationary point of their orbits. With identifications for all 19 transients, we place an upper limit of R {sub FOT}(τ ∼ 0.5 hr) ≲ 0.12 deg{sup –2} day{sup –1} (95% confidence level) on the sky-projected rate of extragalactic fast transients at ≲ 22.5 mag, a factor of 30-50 times lower than previous limits; the limit for a timescale of ∼1 day is R {sub FOT} ≲ 2.4 × 10{sup –3} deg{sup –2} day{sup –1}. To convert these sky-projected rates to volumetric rates, we explore the expected peak luminosities of fast optical transients powered by various mechanisms, and find that non-relativistic events are limited to M ≈ –10 to ≈ – 14 mag for a timescale of ∼0.5 hr to ∼1 day, while relativistic sources (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, magnetar-powered transients) can reach much larger luminosities. The resulting volumetric rates are ≲ 13 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –10 mag), ≲ 0.05 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –14 mag), and ≲ 10{sup –6} Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –24 mag), significantly above the nova, supernova

  13. Search for global oscillations on Jupiter with a double-cell sodium magneto-optical filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciani, A.; Dolci, M.; Moretti, P. F.; D'Alessio, F.; Giuliani, C.; Micolucci, E.; Di Cianno, A.

    2001-06-01

    Doppler observations on Jupiter are presented and discussed. A two-cells Magneto-Optical Filter (MOF), able to obtain two separate signals, Red and Blue, on the opposite wings of the Sodium D-lines, along with a continuum reference signal, has been used. This set of data permits to discriminate between real oscillations and albedo ``modes" by means of the two algorithms D=(B-R)/(B+R) and S=(B+R)/continuum. No unambiguous oscillation modes were detected with amplitudes above the 1-sigma level of ~ 1.2 m s-1 in the range between 0.5 and 0.7 mHz. However, using refined analysis for signal recovery in a noisy background we notice an increase of power also in the region of the solar 5 min oscillations. The albedo variations on the Jupiter's surface and instrumental effects are addressed to be responsible for the spurious signals.

  14. Red Optical Planet Survey: A radial velocity search for low mass M dwarf planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J. R.; Jenkins, J. S.; Jones, H. R. A.; Rojo, P.; Arriagada, P.; Jordán, A.; Minniti, D.; Tuomi, M.; Jeffers, S. V.; Pinfield, D.

    2013-04-01

    We present radial velocity results from our Red Optical Planet Survey (ROPS), aimed at detecting low-mass planets orbiting mid-late M dwarfs. The ˜10 ms-1 precision achieved over 2 consecutive nights with the MIKE spectrograph at Magellan Clay is also found on week long timescales with UVES at VLT. Since we find that UVES is expected to attain photon limited precision of order 2 ms-1 using our novel deconvolution technique, we are limited only by the (≤10 ms-1) stability of atmospheric lines. Rocky planet frequencies of η⊕ = 0.3-0.7 lead us to expect high planet yields, enabling determination of η⊕ for the uncharted mid-late M dwarfs with modest surveys.

  15. Red Optical Planet Survey: A radial velocity search for low mass M dwarf planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minniti D.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We present radial velocity results from our Red Optical Planet Survey (ROPS, aimed at detecting low-mass planets orbiting mid-late M dwarfs. The ∼10 ms−1 precision achieved over 2 consecutive nights with the MIKE spectrograph at Magellan Clay is also found on week long timescales with UVES at VLT. Since we find that UVES is expected to attain photon limited precision of order 2 ms−1 using our novel deconvolution technique, we are limited only by the (≤10 ms−1 stability of atmospheric lines. Rocky planet frequencies of η⊕ = 0.3−0.7 lead us to expect high planet yields, enabling determination of η⊕ for the uncharted mid-late M dwarfs with modest surveys.

  16. An HI line search for optically identified dwarf galaxy candidates in the M81 group

    CERN Document Server

    Van Driel, W; Binggeli, B; Huchtmeier, W K

    1997-01-01

    Sensitive 21cm HI line observations were performed for 23 dwarf members and possible members of the nearby M81 group of galaxies, including five objects of a clustering of extremely low-surface brightness objects of unknown nature. With the Nancay decimetric radio telescope the radial velocity range of -529 to 1826 km/s was searched to an rms noise of ~3-5 mJy. Only three objects were detected. However, their high radial velocities (between 600 and 1150 km/s) show them to lie behind the M81 group. These three objects, classified as dS0: (UGC 4998) and Im (Kar 1N and UGC 5658), have HI masses of 0.5, 2.0 and 2.5 10^8 Msun, for the assumed distance of 4 Mpc, and HI mass-to-blue light ratios of 0.05, 0.91 and 0.22 Msun/LBsun, respectively. Considering that half of the observed objects are classified as irregular dwarfs, hence expected to be relatively gas-rich, the resulting detection rate of about 1/3 is quite low. However, the mean redshift and velocity dispersion of the M81 group ( = 101 km/s, sigma=114 km/s)...

  17. Exploration an the Search for Origins: A Vision for Ultraviolet-Optical-Infrared Space Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Alan (Editor); Brown, Robert A.; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Ellis, Richard S.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Green, Richard F.; Hauser, Michael G.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Lilly, Simon J.; Margon, Bruce H.; Porco, Carolyn C.; Richstone, Douglas O.; Stockman, H. S.; Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Tonry, John L.; Truran, James; Weiler, Edward J.

    1996-01-01

    Public support and enthusiasm for astronomy have been strong in the final decades of the twentieth century. Nowhere is this better demonstrated than with the Hubble Space Telescope (HCT), a grand endeavor, which is enabling astronomers to make giant strides in understanding our universe, our place in it, and our relation to it. The NASAs first infrared observatory, the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), promises to take the crucial next steps towards understanding the formation of stars and galaxies. Toward their completion, the HST and Beyond Committee identifies major goals, whose accomplishment will justify a commitment well into the next century: (1) the detailed study of the birth and evolution of normal galaxies such as the Milky Way; (2) the detection of Earth-like planets around other stars and the search for evidence of life on them; (3) NASA should develop a space observatory of aperture 4m or larger, optimized for imaging and spectroscopy over the wavelength range 1-5 microns; and (4) NASA should develop the capability for space interferometry.

  18. Searching for What I Want

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fei; Xiao, Bo Sophia; Lim, Eric

    2016-01-01

    of anticipa-tory system as our theoretical foundation to articulate the relationships between two salient types of search controls, namely search anticipation and search efficiency. We empirically validate our re-search model by conducting a field survey with 77 university students on an online restaurant...... review website that is modelled after its actual counterpart and populated with real restaurant review data. Findings from this study suggest that both search determination control and search manipulation con-trol enhance search result anticipation, which in turn improves search efficiency. Theoretical...

  19. Monitoring with high temporal resolution to search for optical transients in the wide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Ivanov, Evgeny; Karpov, Sergey; Katkova, Elena; Pozanenko, Alexei; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Piccioni, Adalberto; Greco, Giuseppe; Molinari, Emilio; Covino, Stefano

    2008-02-01

    In order to detect and investigate short stochastic optical flares from a number of variable astrophysical objects (GRBs, SNs, flare stars, CVs, X-Ray binaries) of unknown localizations as well as near-earth objects (NEOs), both natural and artificial, it is necessary to perform the systematic monitoring of large regions of the sky with high temporal resolution. Here we describe the design of a system able to perform such a task, which consists of a wide-field camera with high time resolution able to detect and classify the transient events on a subsecond time scale, and a fast robotic telescope aimed to perform their detailed investigation. In a last few years we've created the prototype FAVOR wide-field camera, placed at North Caucasus near Russian 6-m telescope, and a complete two-telescope complex TORTOREM, combining TORTORA wide-field camera with REM robotic telescope and placed at La Silla ESO observatory. Its technical parameters and first results of operation are described.

  20. A Likely Millisecond Pulsar Binary Counterpart for Fermi Source 2FGL J2039.6-5620

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2015-10-01

    We have identified an optical/X-ray binary with an orbital period of Pb = 5.47 hr as the likely counterpart of the Fermi source 2FGL J2039.6-5620. GROND, SOAR, and DES observations provide an accurate orbital period and allow us to compare to the light curve of an archival XMM exposure. Like many short-period optical/X-ray binaries associated with Large Area Telescope sources, this may be an interacting (black widow/redback) millisecond pulsar binary. The X-ray light curve is consistent with the emission associated with an intrabinary shock. The optical light curve shows evidence of companion heating, but has a peculiar asymmetric double peak. The nature of this optical structure is not yet clear; additional optical studies and, in particular, detection of an orbital modulation in a γ-ray pulsar are needed to elucidate the nature of this peculiar source.

  1. A binary counterpart for 2FGL J2039.6-5620

    CERN Document Server

    Romani, Roger W

    2015-01-01

    We have identified an optical/X-ray binary with orbital period P_b=5.47h as the likely counterpart of the Fermi source 2FGL J2039.6-5620. GROND, SOAR and DES observations provide an accurate orbital period and allow us to compare with the light curve of an archival XMM exposure. Like many short-period optical X-ray binaries associated with LAT sources this may be a interacting (black widow/redback) millisecond pulsar binary. The X-ray light curve is consistent with the emission associated with an intrabinary shock. The optical light curve shows evidence of companion heating, but has a peculiar asymmetric double peak. The nature of this optical structure is not yet clear; additional optical studies and, especially, detection of an orbital modulation in a gamma-ray pulsar are needed to elucidate the nature of this peculiar source.

  2. Search for new optical, structural and electronic properties: From photons to electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng

    With the development of modern computers, scientific computation has been an important facet in designing materials with desired properties. This thesis is devoted to predicting novel optical, structural and electronic properties from first-principles computation, by solving the fundamental governing Maxwell equations for photons and Schrodinger equation for electrons. In Chapter 1, we introduce a method of gradient-based optimization that continuously deforms a periodic dielectric distribution to generate photonic structures that possess any desired figure of merit expressible in terms of the electromagnetic eigenmodes and eigen-frequencies. The gradient is readily available from a perturbation theory that describes the change of eigenmodes and eigen-frequencies to small changes in dielectric pattern. As an example, we generate 2D forbidden regions between specified bands at very low dielectric contrast and very large gaps at a fixed dielectric contrast corresponding to a real material GaAs. In Chapter 2, we demonstrate that well-defined pi bonds can also be formed in two prototypical crystalline Si structures: Schwarzite Si-168 and dilated diamond. The sp2-bonded Si-168 is thermodynamically preferred over diamond silicon at a modest negative pressure of -2.5 GPa. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations of Si-168 at 1000 K reveal significant thermal stability. Si-168 is metallic in density functional theory, but with distinct pi-like and pi*-like valence and conduction band complexes just above and below the Fermi energy. A bandgap buried in the valence band but close to the Fermi level can be accessed via hole doping in semiconducting Si144B24. A less-stable crystalline system with a silicon-silicon triple bond is also examined: a rare-gas intercalated open framework on a dilated diamond lattice. In Chapter 3, we propose that microstructured optical fibers could be an attractive candidate for the imposition of negative pressure on materials deposited inside them

  3. The near-IR counterpart of IGR J17480-2446 in Terzan 5

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, V; D'Antona, F; Menna, M T; Ventura, P; Burderi, L; Riggio, A; Iaria, R; D'Ai', A; Papitto, A; Robba, N; 10.1051/0004-6361/201219904

    2012-01-01

    Some globular clusters in our Galaxy are noticeably rich in low-mass X-ray binaries. Terzan 5 has the richest population among globular clusters of X- and radio-pulsars and low-mass X-ray binaries. The detection and study of optical/IR counterparts of low-mass X-ray binaries is fundamental to characterizing both the low-mass donor in the binary system and investigating the mechanisms of the formation and evolution of this class of objects. We aim at identifying the near-IR counterpart of the 11 Hz pulsar IGRJ17480-2446 discovered in Terzan 5. Adaptive optics (AO) systems represent the only possibility for studying the very dense environment of GC cores from the ground. We carried out observations of the core of Terzan 5 in the near-IR bands with the ESO-VLT NAOS-CONICA instrument. We present the discovery of the likely counterpart in the Ks band and discuss its properties both in outburst and in quiescence. Archival HST observations are used to extend our discussion to the optical bands. The source is located...

  4. Auroral counterpart of magnetic field dipolarizations in Saturn's tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. M.; Badman, S. V.; Achilleos, N.; Bunce, E. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Radioti, A.; Grodent, D.; Dougherty, M. K.; Pryor, W.

    2012-04-01

    Following magnetic reconnection in a planetary magnetotail, newly closed field lines can be rapidly accelerated back towards the planet, becoming "dipolarized" in the process. At Saturn, dipolarizations can be initially identified in magnetometer data by looking for a southward turning of the magnetic field, indicating the transition from a radially stretched configuration to a more dipolar field topology. The highly stretched geometry of the kronian magnetotail lobes gives rise to a tail current which flows eastward (dusk to dawn) in the near equatorial plane across the centre of the tail. During reconnection and associated dipolarization of the field, the inner edge of this tail current can be diverted through the ionosphere, in a situation analogous to the substorm current wedge picture at Earth. We present a picture of the current circuit arising from this tail reconfiguration, and outline the equations which govern the field-current relationship. We show an example of a dipolarization identified in the Cassini magnetometer data and use this formalism to constrain the ionospheric current density that would arise for this example and the implications for auroral electron acceleration in regions of upward directed field-aligned current. We then present a separate example of data from the Cassini UVIS instrument where we observe small 'spots' of auroral emission lying near the main oval; features thought to be associated with dipolarizations in the tail. In the example shown, such auroral spots are the precursor to more intense activity associated with recurrent energisation via particle injections from the tail following reconnection. We conclude that dipolarizations in Saturn's magnetotail have an observable auroral counterpart, opening up the possibility to search for further examples and to use this auroral property as a remote proxy for tail reconnection.

  5. A binary counterpart for 2FGL J2039.6-5620

    OpenAIRE

    Romani, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    We have identified an optical/X-ray binary with orbital period P_b=5.47h as the likely counterpart of the Fermi source 2FGL J2039.6-5620. GROND, SOAR and DES observations provide an accurate orbital period and allow us to compare with the light curve of an archival XMM exposure. Like many short-period optical X-ray binaries associated with LAT sources this may be a interacting (black widow/redback) millisecond pulsar binary. The X-ray light curve is consistent with the emission associated wit...

  6. Discovery of the X-ray Counterpart to the Rotating Radio Transient J1819--1458

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, S P; Gaensler, B M; Rea, N; McLaughlin, M; Possenti, A; Israel, G; Burgay, M; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Krämer, M; Lyne, A; Stairs, I

    2006-01-01

    We present the discovery of the first X-ray counterpart to a Rotating RAdio Transient (RRAT) source. RRAT J1819--1458 is a relatively highly magnetized (B $\\sim 5\\times10^{13}$ G) member of a new class of unusual pulsar-like objects discovered by their bursting activity at radio wavelengths. The position of RRAT J1819--1458 was serendipitously observed by the {\\sl Chandra} ACIS-I camera in 2005 May. At that position we have discovered a pointlike source, CXOU J181934.1--145804, with a soft spectrum well fit by an absorbed blackbody with $N_H = 7^{+7}_{-4} \\times 10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ and temperature $kT=0.12 \\pm 0.04$ keV, having an unabsorbed flux of $\\sim2 \\times 10^{-12}$ ergs cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ between 0.5 and 8 keV. No optical or infrared (IR) counterparts are visible within $1''$ of our X-ray position. The positional coincidence, spectral properties, and lack of an optical/IR counterpart make it highly likely that CXOU J181934.1--145804 is a neutron star and is the same object as RRAT J1819--1458. The sour...

  7. Trawling for transits in a sea of noise: A Search for Exoplanets by Analysis of WASP Optical Lightcurves and Follow-up (SEAWOLF)

    CERN Document Server

    Gaidos, E; Lepine, S; Colon, K D; Maravelias, G; Narita, N; Chang, E; Beyer, J; Fukui, A; Armstrong, J D; Zezas, A; Fulton, B J; Mann, A W; West, R G; Faedi, F

    2013-01-01

    Studies of transiting Neptune-size planets orbiting close to nearby bright stars can inform theories of planet formation because mass and radius and therefore mean density can be accurately estimated and compared with interior models. The distribution of such planets with stellar mass and orbital period relative to their Jovian-mass counterparts can test scenarios of orbital migration, and whether "hot" (period < 10d) Neptunes evolved from "hot" Jupiters as a result of mass loss. We searched 1763 late K and early M dwarf stars for transiting Neptunes by analyzing photometry from the Wide Angle Search for Planets and obtaining high-precision ($<10^{-3}$) follow-up photometry of stars with candidate transit signals. One star in our sample (GJ 436) hosts a previously reported hot Neptune. We identified 92 candidate signals among 80 other stars and carried out 148 observations of predicted candidate transits with 1-2 m telescopes. Data on 70 WASP signals rules out transits for 39 of them; 28 other signals a...

  8. Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopy of five ULX counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Heida, M; Torres, M A P; Roberts, T P; Walton, D J; Moon, D -S; Stern, D; Harrison, F A

    2016-01-01

    We present H-band spectra of the candidate counterparts of five ULXs (two in NGC 925, two in NGC 4136, and Holmberg II X-1) obtained with Keck/MOSFIRE. The candidate counterparts of two ULXs (J022721+333500 in NGC 925 and J120922+295559 in NGC 4136) have spectra consistent with (M-type) red supergiants (RSGs). We obtained two epochs of spectroscopy of the candidate counterpart to J022721+333500, separated by 10 months, but discovered no radial velocity variations with a 2-$\\sigma$ upper limit of 40 km/s. If the RSG is the donor star of the ULX, the most likely options are that either the system is seen at low inclination (< 40$^\\circ$), or the black hole mass is less than 100 M$_\\odot$, unless the orbital period is longer than 6 years, in which case the obtained limit is not constraining. The spectrum of the counterpart to J120922+295559 shows emission lines on top of its stellar spectrum, and the remaining three counterparts do not show absorption lines that can be associated with the atmosphere of a star...

  9. The Gamma-ray Blazar Quest: new optical spectra, state of art and future perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F; D'Abrusco, R; Landoni, M; Masetti, N; Ricci, F; Milisavljevic, D; Paggi, A; Chavushyan, V; Jiménez-Bailón, E; Patiño-Álvarez, V; Strader, J; Chomiuk, L; La Franca, F; Smith, Howard A; Tosti, G

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a procedure to recognize gamma-ray blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty regions of the unidentified/unassociated gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Such procedure was based on the discovery that Fermi blazars show peculiar infrared colors. However, to confirm the real nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic data are necessary. Thus, we performed an extensive archival search for spectra available in the literature in parallel with an optical spectroscopic campaign aimed to reveal and confirm the nature of the selected gamma-ray blazar candidates. Here, we first search for optical spectra of a selected sample of gamma-ray blazar candidates that can be potential counterparts of UGSs using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR12). This search enables us to update the archival search carried out to date. We also describe the state-of-art and the future perspectives of our campaign to discover previously unknown gamma-ray blazars.

  10. Searching for What I Want

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fei; Xiao, Bo Sophia; Lim, Eric

    2016-01-01

    of anticipa-tory system as our theoretical foundation to articulate the relationships between two salient types of search controls, namely search anticipation and search efficiency. We empirically validate our re-search model by conducting a field survey with 77 university students on an online restaurant......Inefficiencies associated with online information search are amplifying in the current era of big data. Despite growing scholarly interest in studying Internet users’ information search behaviour, there is a paucity of theory-guided investigation in this regard. In this paper, we draw on the theory...... review website that is modelled after its actual counterpart and populated with real restaurant review data. Findings from this study suggest that both search determination control and search manipulation con-trol enhance search result anticipation, which in turn improves search efficiency. Theoretical...

  11. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  12. Discovery of the optical counterpart and early optical observations of GRB 990712

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahu, K.C.; Vreesvijk, P.; Bakos, G.

    2000-01-01

    of the decay is similar, but the goodness of fit is worse, which would imply that either this GRB is not associated with an underlying supernova or the underlying supernova is much fainter than the supernova associated with GRB 980425. The galaxy in this case is fainter: V = 22.7 +/- 0.05, R = 22.25 +/- 0...

  13. Continual Lie algebras and noncommutative counterparts of exactly solvable models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuevsky, A.

    2004-01-01

    Noncommutative counterparts of exactly solvable models are introduced on the basis of a generalization of Saveliev-Vershik continual Lie algebras. Examples of noncommutative Liouville and sin/h-Gordon equations are given. The simplest soliton solution to the noncommutative sine-Gordon equation is found.

  14. Searching the co-occurrence of pathogenic mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hearing loss in more than 26,000 whole mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haixin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Chuan-Chao

    2016-09-01

    The co-occurrence of pathogenic or candidate mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and hearing loss has long been suggested to be a rare incident. The "rare" is probably caused by inadequate database searches. In this study, we created and released a comprehensive database with detailed information of haplogroup, variants, coding sites, and potential pathogenic mutations for more than 26,000 whole mitochondrial genomes. We found the co-occurrence in more than 200 individuals including not only LHON or hearing loss patients but also individuals sampled from general populations with various haplogroup backgrounds. The results highlighted the significant importance of adequate database searching in the genetic analysis of mitochondrial disorders.

  15. Prompt Optical Emission from Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kehoe, R; Balsano, R; Barthelmy, S D; Bloch, J; Butterworth, P S; Casperson, D E; Cline, T; Fletcher, S; Frontera, F; Gisler, G; Heise, J; Hills, J; Hurley, K; Lee, B; Marshall, S; McKay, T; Pawl, A; Piro, L; Priedhorsky, B; Szymanski, J J; Wren, J; Kehoe, Robert; Akerlof, Carl; Balsano, Richard; Barthelmy, Scott; Bloch, Jeff; Butterworth, Paul; Casperson, Don; Cline, Tom; Fletcher, Sandra; Frontera, Fillippo; Gisler, Galen; Heise, John; Hills, Jack; Hurley, Kevin; Lee, Brian; Marshall, Stuart; Kay, Tim Mc; Pawl, Andrew; Piro, Luigi; Priedhorsky, Bill; Szymanski, John; Wren, Jim

    2001-01-01

    The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure contemporaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The ROTSE-I telescope array has been fully automated and responding to burst alerts from the GRB Coordinates Network since March 1998, taking prompt optical data for 30 bursts in its first year. We will briefly review observations of GRB990123 which revealed the first detection of an optical burst occurring during the gamma-ray emission, reaching 9th magnitude at its peak. In addition, we present here preliminary optical results for seven other gamma-ray bursts. No other optical counterparts were seen in this analysis, and the best limiting sensitivities are m(V) > 13.0 at 14.7 seconds after the gamma-ray rise, and m(V) > 16.4 at 62 minutes. These are the most stringent limits obtained for GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. This analysis suggests that there is not a strong correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray em...

  16. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  17. Search for TeV $\\gamma$-ray emission from AE Aqr coincident with high optical and X-ray states with the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Coto, R; Cortina, J; Hadasch, D; Takalo, L; Torres, D; Bogosavljevic, M; Ioannou, Z; Mauche, C W; Palaiologou, E V; Perez-Torres, M A; Tuominen, T

    2013-01-01

    We report on observations of the nova-like cataclysmic variable AE Aqr performed by MAGIC. The observations were part of a quasi-simultaneous multi-wavelength campaign carried out between 2012 May and June covering the optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray ranges. MAGIC conducted the campaign and observed the source during 12 hours. The other instruments involved were KVA, Skinakas, and Vidojevica in the optic and Swift in the X-ray. We also used optical data from the AAVSO. The goals were to: monitor the variability of the source at different wavelengths, perform gamma-ray studies coincident with the highest states of the source at the other wavelengths, and confirm or rule out previous claims of detection of very-high-energy emission from this object. We report on a search for steady TeV emission during the whole observation, for variable TeV emission coincident with the highest optical and X-ray states and periodic TeV emission at the 33.08 s rotation period (30.23 mHz rotation frequency) of the white dwarf and...

  18. THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE X-RAY COUNTERPART TO PSR J2021+4026

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Elsner, Ronald F.; O' Dell, Stephen L.; Tennant, Allyn F. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Space Science Office, VP62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Romani, Roger W. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Razzano, Massimiliano [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Belfiore, Andrea; Saz Parkinson, Pablo; Ziegler, Marcus; Dormody, Michael [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ray, Paul S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kerr, Matthew [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Harding, Alice [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 663, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Swartz, Douglas A. [Universities Space Research Association, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Space Science Office, VP62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Carraminana, Alberto [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico); Becker, Werner; Kanbach, Gottfried [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, 85741 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); De Luca, Andrea [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Thompson, David J. [Astroparticle Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    We report the probable identification of the X-ray counterpart to the {gamma}-ray pulsar PSR J2021+4026 using imaging with the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and timing analysis with the Fermi satellite. Given the statistical and systematic errors, the positions determined by both satellites are coincident. The X-ray source position is R.A. 20{sup h}21{sup m}30.{sup s}733, decl. +40 Degree-Sign 26'46.''04 (J2000) with an estimated uncertainty of 1.''3 combined statistical and systematic error. Moreover, both the X-ray to {gamma}-ray and the X-ray to optical flux ratios are sensible assuming a neutron star origin for the X-ray flux. The X-ray source has no cataloged infrared-to-visible counterpart and, through new observations, we set upper limits to its optical emission of i' > 23.0 mag and r' > 25.2 mag. The source exhibits an X-ray spectrum with most likely both a power law and a thermal component. We also report on the X-ray and visible light properties of the 43 other sources detected in our Chandra observation.

  19. Low-{\\Gamma} jets from Compact Binary Mergers as Candidate Electromagnetic Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lamb, Gavin P

    2016-01-01

    Compact binary mergers, with neutron stars or neutron star and black-hole components, are thought to produce various electromagnetic counterparts: short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from ultra-relativistic jets followed by broadband afterglow; semi-isotropic kilonova from radioactive decay of r-process elements; and late time radio flares; etc. If the jets from such mergers follow a similar power-law distribution of Lorentz factors as other astrophysical jets then the population of merger jets will be dominated by low-{\\Gamma} values. The prompt gamma-rays associated with short GRBs would be suppressed for a low-{\\Gamma} jet and the jet energy will be released as X-ray/optical/radio transients when a shock forms in the ambient medium. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the properties of such transients as candidate electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave sources detectable by LIGO/Virgo. Approximately 78% of merger-jets result in failed GRB with optical peaks 14-22 magnitude and an all-sky rate of ...

  20. Discovery of near-ultraviolet counterparts to millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera-Sandoval, L E; Heinke, C O; Cohn, H N; Lugger, P M; Freire, P; Anderson, J; Serenelli, A M; Althaus, L G; Cool, A M; Grindlay, J E; Edmonds, P D; Wijnands, R; Ivanova, N

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of the likely white dwarf companions to radio millisecond pulsars 47 Tuc Q and 47 Tuc S in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. These blue stars were found in near-ultraviolet images from the Hubble Space Telescope for which we derived accurate absolute astrometry, and are located at positions consistent with the radio coordinates to within 0.016 arcsec (0.2sigma). We present near-ultraviolet and optical colours for the previously identified companion to millisecond pulsar 47 Tuc U, and we unambiguously confirm the tentative prior identifications of the optical counterparts to 47 Tuc T and 47 Tuc Y. For the latter, we present its radio-timing solution for the first time. We find that all five near-ultraviolet counterparts have U300-B390 colours that are consistent with He white dwarf cooling models for masses ~0.16-0.3 Msun and cooling ages within ~0.1-6 Gyr. The Ha-R625 colours of 47 Tuc U and 47 Tuc T indicate the presence of a strong Ha absorption line, as expected for white dwarfs with...

  1. A STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME FOR BRITISH COUNCIL ELT PROJECT COUNTERPARTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; Hall

    1997-01-01

    In British Council-managed ELT projects in Chinese universities,Chinese project counterparts areselected from among the English-language teaching staff of the University.They work alongside aBritish Council-recruited lecturer(BCL)in developing whatever it is the project has been set up tocreate:a syllabus,teaching materials,a course,etc.During the lifetime of the project eachcounterpart is sent for a year’s postgraduate training(typically an MA in applied Linguistics)at aBritish university,the rationale being that the combination of training on the job and in the UK willequip them to take over the running of the project and ensure its long-term sustainability.This paperlooks at the staff development of the counterparts prior to their UK training.

  2. No-broadcasting theorem and its classical counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalev, Amir; Hen, Itay

    2008-05-30

    Although it is widely accepted that "no-broadcasting"-the nonclonability of quantum information-is a fundamental principle of quantum mechanics, an impossibility theorem for the broadcasting of general density matrices has not yet been formulated. In this Letter, we present a general proof for the no-broadcasting theorem, which applies to arbitrary density matrices. The proof relies on entropic considerations, and as such can also be directly linked to its classical counterpart, which applies to probabilistic distributions of statistical ensembles.

  3. X-ray Counterparts of Millisecond Pulsars in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, W; Prinz, T

    2010-01-01

    We have systematically studied the X-ray emission properties of globular cluster millisecond pulsars in order to evaluate their spectral properties and luminosities in a uniform way. Cross-correlating the radio timing positions of the cluster pulsars with the high resolution Chandra images revealed 31 X-ray counterparts identified in nine different globular cluster systems, including those in 47 Tuc. Timing analysis has been performed for all sources corresponding to the temporal resolution available in the archival Chandra data. Making use of unpublished data on M28, M4 and NGC 6752 allowed us to obtain further constraints for the millisecond pulsar counterparts located in these clusters. Counting rate and energy flux upper limits were computed for those 36 pulsars for which no X-ray counterparts could be detected. Comparing the X-ray and radio pulse profiles of PSR J1821-2452 in M28 and the 47 Tuc pulsars PSR J0024-7204D,O,R indicated some correspondence between both wavebands. The X-ray efficiency of the g...

  4. Implementation and Testing of the First Prompt Search for Gravitational Wave Transients with Electromagnetic Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Aims. A transient astrophysical event observed in both gravitational wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) channels would yield rich scientific rewards. A first program initiating EM follow-ups to possible transient GW events has been developed and exercised by the LIGO and Virgo community in association with several partners. In this paper, we describe and evaluate the methods used to promptly identify and localize GW event candidates and to request images of targeted sky locations. Methods. During two observing periods (Dec. 17, 2009 to Jan. 8, 2010 and Sep. 2 to Oct. 20, 2010), a low-latency analysis pipeline was used to identify GW event candidates and to reconstruct maps of possible sky locations. A catalog of nearby galaxies and MilkyWay globular clusters was used to select the most promising sky positions to be imaged, and this directional information was delivered to EM observatories with time lags of about thirty minutes. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to evaluate the low-latency GW pipeline's ability to reconstruct source positions correctly. Results. For signals near the detection threshold, our low-latency algorithms often localized simulated GW burst signals to tens of square degrees, while neutron star/neutron star inspirals and neutron star/black hole inspirals were localized to a few hundred square degrees. Localization precision improves for moderately stronger signals. The correct sky location of signals well above threshold and originating from nearby galaxies may be observed with 50% or better probability with a few pointings of wide-field telescopes.

  5. Search for extragalactic astrophysical counterparts of IceCube neutrino events

    CERN Document Server

    Moharana, Reetanjali; Razzaque, Soebur

    2016-01-01

    Detection of 54 very high-energy (VHE) neutrinos by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory has opened a new chapter in multi-messenger astronomy. However due to large errors in measuring the directions of the neutrino shower-type events, which dominate the current event list, it is difficult to identify their astrophysical sources. We perform cross-correlation study of IceCube neutrino events with extragalactic candidate sources using X-ray and gamma-ray selected source catalogues such as Swift-BAT, 3LAC and TeV-Cat. We apply different cuts on the X-ray and gamma-ray fluxes of the sources in these catalogs, and use different source classes in order to study correlation. We use invariant statistic and Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate statistical significance of any correlation.

  6. Implementation and testing of the first prompt search for gravitational wave transients with electromagnetic counterparts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadie, J.; et al., [Unknown; Homan, J.; Fender, R.; Stappers, B.W.; Swinbank, J.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: A transient astrophysical event observed in both gravitational wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) channels would yield rich scientific rewards. A first program initiating EM follow-ups to possible transient GW events has been developed and exercised by the LIGO and Virgo community in associati

  7. Implementation and testing of the first prompt search for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave transients

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhillon, V; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endrőczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fridriksson, J K; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Homan, J; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Laas-Bourez, M; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M; Leindecker, N; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J; Li, T G F; Liguori, N; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marandi, A; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McDaniel, P; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McKechan, D J A; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Menendez, D; Mercer, R A; Merill, L; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Moesta, P; Mohan, M; Mohanty, S D; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Mori, T; Mosca, S; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow--Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nawrodt, R; Necula, V; Nelson, J; Newton, G; Nishida, E; Nishizawa, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Nuttall, L; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Oldenburg, R G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Page, A; Pagliaroli, G; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patel, P; Pathak, D; Pedraza, M; Peiris, P; Pekowsky, L; Penn, S; Peralta, C; Perreca, A; Persichetti, G; Phelps, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Poggiani, R; Pöld, J; Postiglione, F; Prato, M; Predoi, V; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C R; Rankins, B; Rapagnani, P; Rapoport, S; Raymond, V; Re, V; Redwine, K; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Rolland, L; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Röver, C; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Ryll, H; Sainathan, P; Sakosky, M; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; de la Jordana, L Sancho; Sandberg, V; Sankar, S; Sannibale, V; Santamaría, L; Santiago-Prieto, I; Santostasi, G; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Satterthwaite, M; Saulson, P R; Savage, R L; Schilling, R; Schlamminger, S; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Soto, J; Speirits, F C; Sperandio, L; Stefszky, M; Stein, A J; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sung, M; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Taffarello, L; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, J R; Taylor, R; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Thüring, A; Titsler, C; Tokmakov, K V; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C; Torrie, C I; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tseng, K; Turner, L; Ugolini, D; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasuth, M; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Veltkamp, C; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Villar, A E; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Wei, P; Weinert, M; We, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, H R; Williams, L; Willke, B; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, K; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yu, P; Yvert, M; Zadroźny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J; Boer, M; Fender, R; Gehrels, N; Klotz, A; Ofek, E O; Smith, M; Sokolowski, M; Stappers, B W; Steele, I; Swinbank, J; Wijers, R A M J

    2011-01-01

    Aims. A transient astrophysical event observed in both gravitational wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) channels would yield rich scientific rewards. A first program initiating EM follow-ups to possible transient GW events has been developed and exercised by the LIGO and Virgo community in association with several partners. In this paper, we describe and evaluate the methods used to promptly identify and localize GW event candidates and to request images of targeted sky locations. Methods. During two observing periods (Dec 17 2009 to Jan 8 2010 and Sep 2 to Oct 20 2010), a low-latency analysis pipeline was used to identify GW event candidates and to reconstruct maps of possible sky locations. A catalog of nearby galaxies and Milky Way globular clusters was used to select the most promising sky positions to be imaged, and this directional information was delivered to EM observatories with time lags of about thirty minutes. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to evaluate the low-latency GW pipeline's ability...

  8. Implementation and testing of the first prompt search for gravitational wave transients with electromagnetic counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Belletoile, A.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarin, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; DeRosa, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Del Prete, M.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; Derosa, R.; Desalvo, R.; Dhillon, V.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; De Paolo Emilio, M.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Diguglielmo, J.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endröczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Farr, W.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Garcia, J.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Geng, R.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, N.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, T.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Homan, J.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: A transient astrophysical event observed in both gravitational wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) channels would yield rich scientific rewards. A first program initiating EM follow-ups to possible transient GW events has been developed and exercised by the LIGO and Virgo community in association with several partners. In this paper, we describe and evaluate the methods used to promptly identify and localize GW event candidates and to request images of targeted sky locations. Methods: During two observing periods (Dec. 17, 2009 to Jan. 8, 2010 and Sep. 2 to Oct. 20, 2010), a low-latency analysis pipeline was used to identify GW event candidates and to reconstruct maps of possible sky locations. A catalog of nearby galaxies and Milky Way globular clusters was used to select the most promising sky positions to be imaged, and this directional information was delivered to EM observatories with time lags of about thirty minutes. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to evaluate the low-latency GW pipeline's ability to reconstruct source positions correctly. Results: For signals near the detection threshold, our low-latency algorithms often localized simulated GW burst signals to tens of square degrees, while neutron star/neutron star inspirals and neutron star/black hole inspirals were localized to a few hundred square degrees. Localization precision improves for moderately stronger signals. The correct sky location of signals well above threshold and originating from nearby galaxies may be observed with ~50% or better probability with a few pointings of wide-field telescopes.

  9. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations (TAToO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornic, Damien, E-mail: dornic@cppm.in2p3.f [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3-Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); IFIC, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, CSIC-Universitat de Valenciaa, Apdo. de correos 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Brunner, Jurgen [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3-Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Basa, Stephane [LAM, BP8, Traverse du siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Al Samarai, Imen; Bertin, Vincent [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3-Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Boer, Michel [OHP, 04870 Saint Michel de l' Observatoire (France); Busto, Jose; Escoffier, Stephanie [CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3-Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Klotz, Alain [OHP, 04870 Saint Michel de l' Observatoire (France); CESR, Observatiore Midi-Pyrenees, CNRS Universite de Toulouse, BP4346, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Mazure, Alain [LAM, BP8, Traverse du siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Vallage, Bertrand [CEA-IRFU, Centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-01-21

    The ANTARES telescope has the opportunity to detect transient neutrino sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, flares of active galactic nuclei. In order to enhance the sensitivity to these sources, we have developed a new detection method based on the follow-up by optical telescopes of 'golden' neutrino events, such as neutrino doublets coincident in time and space or single neutrinos of very high energy. The ANTARES collaboration has therefore implemented a very fast on-line reconstruction with a good angular resolution. These characteristics allow us to trigger an optical telescope network. Since February 2009, ANTARES is sending alert triggers once or twice per month to the two 25 cm robotic telescope of TAROT. This optical follow-up of such special events would not only give access to the nature of the sources, but also would improve the sensitivity to transient neutrino sources.

  10. A LIKELY MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY COUNTERPART FOR FERMI SOURCE 2FGL J2039.6–5620

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romani, Roger W., E-mail: rwr@astro.stanford.edu [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    We have identified an optical/X-ray binary with an orbital period of P{sub b} = 5.47 hr as the likely counterpart of the Fermi source 2FGL J2039.6−5620. GROND, SOAR, and DES observations provide an accurate orbital period and allow us to compare to the light curve of an archival XMM exposure. Like many short-period optical/X-ray binaries associated with Large Area Telescope sources, this may be an interacting (black widow/redback) millisecond pulsar binary. The X-ray light curve is consistent with the emission associated with an intrabinary shock. The optical light curve shows evidence of companion heating, but has a peculiar asymmetric double peak. The nature of this optical structure is not yet clear; additional optical studies and, in particular, detection of an orbital modulation in a γ-ray pulsar are needed to elucidate the nature of this peculiar source.

  11. Radio Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers Detectable in Gravitational Waves: A Simulation for an Optimized Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotokezaka, K.; Nissanke, S.; Hallinan, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Nakar, E.; Piran, T.

    2016-11-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron star binaries produce gravitational-wave (GW) emission and outflows with significant kinetic energies. These outflows result in radio emissions through synchrotron radiation. We explore the detectability of these synchrotron-generated radio signals by follow-up observations of GW merger events lacking a detection of electromagnetic counterparts in other wavelengths. We model radio light curves arising from (i) sub-relativistic merger ejecta and (ii) ultra-relativistic jets. The former produce radio remnants on timescales of a few years and the latter produce γ-ray bursts in the direction of the jet and orphan-radio afterglows extending over wider angles on timescales of weeks. Based on the derived light curves, we suggest an optimized survey at 1.4 GHz with five epochs separated by a logarithmic time interval. We estimate the detectability of the radio counterparts of simulated GW-merger events to be detected by advanced LIGO and Virgo by current and future radio facilities. The detectable distances for these GW merger events could be as high as 1 Gpc. Around 20%-60% of the long-lasting radio remnants will be detectable in the case of the moderate kinetic energy of 3\\cdot {10}50 erg and a circum-merger density of 0.1 {{cm}}-3 or larger, while 5%-20% of the orphan-radio afterglows with kinetic energy of 1048 erg will be detectable. The detection likelihood increases if one focuses on the well-localizable GW events. We discuss the background noise due to radio fluxes of host galaxies and false positives arising from extragalactic radio transients and variable active galactic nuclei, and we show that the quiet radio transient sky is of great advantage when searching for the radio counterparts.

  12. Unique Search and Track Procedures Utilizing the Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance (GEODSS) Worldwide Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    to affect the success rate of finding lost objects using the GEODSS Optical Sensors. Figure 1. Vela-5A/B satellites in clean room in...author or source of a work, even if it is in the public domain, is still required to avoid plagiarism . Source: http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/vela5b

  13. A search for thermally emitting isolated neutron stars in the 2XMMp catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, A. M.; Motch, C.; Janot-Pacheco, E.

    2009-09-01

    The relatively large number of nearby radio-quiet and thermally emitting isolated neutron stars (INSs) discovered in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, dubbed the “Magnificent Seven”, suggests that they belong to a formerly neglected major component of the overall INS population. So far, attempts to discover similar INSs beyond the solar vicinity failed to confirm any reliable candidate. The good positional accuracy and soft X-ray sensitivity of the EPIC cameras onboard the XMM-Newton satellite allow us to efficiently search for new thermally emitting INSs. We used the 2XMMp catalogue to select sources with no catalogued candidate counterparts and with X-ray spectra similar to those of the Magnificent Seven, but seen at greater distances and thus undergoing higher interstellar absorptions. Identifications in more than 170 astronomical catalogues and visual screening allowed us to select fewer than 30 good INS candidates. In order to rule out alternative identifications, we obtained deep ESO-VLT and SOAR optical imaging for the X-ray brightest candidates. We report here on the optical follow-up results of our search and discuss the possible nature of 8 of our candidates. A high X-ray-to-optical flux ratio together with a stable flux and soft X-ray spectrum make the brightest source of our sample, 2XMM J104608.7-594306, a newly discovered thermally emitting INS. The X-ray source 2XMM J010642.3+005032 has no evident optical counterpart and should be further investigated. The remaining X-ray sources are most probably identified with cataclysmic variables and active galactic nuclei, as inferred from the colours and flux ratios of their likely optical counterparts. Beyond the finding of new thermally emitting INSs, our study aims at constraining the space density of this Galactic population at great distances and at determining whether their apparently high density is a local anomaly or not.

  14. Do Lower Calorie or Lower Fat Foods Have More Sodium Than Their Regular Counterparts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Katherine A.; Maalouf, Joyce; B. Barsness, Christina; Yuan, Keming; Cogswell, Mary E.; Gunn, Janelle P.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the sodium content of a regular food and its lower calorie/fat counterpart. Four food categories, among the top 20 contributing the most sodium to the US diet, met the criteria of having the most matches between regular foods and their lower calorie/fat counterparts. A protocol was used to search websites to create a list of “matches”, a regular and comparable lower calorie/fat food(s) under each brand. Nutrient information was recorded and analyzed for matches. In total, 283 matches were identified across four food categories: savory snacks (N = 44), cheese (N = 105), salad dressings (N = 90), and soups (N = 44). As expected, foods modified from their regular versions had significantly reduced average fat (total fat and saturated fat) and caloric profiles. Mean sodium content among modified salad dressings and cheeses was on average 8%–12% higher, while sodium content did not change with modification of savory snacks. Modified soups had significantly lower mean sodium content than their regular versions (28%–38%). Consumers trying to maintain a healthy diet should consider that sodium content may vary in foods modified to be lower in calories/fat. PMID:27548218

  15. Do Lower Calorie or Lower Fat Foods Have More Sodium Than Their Regular Counterparts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Katherine A; Maalouf, Joyce; B Barsness, Christina; Yuan, Keming; Cogswell, Mary E; Gunn, Janelle P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the sodium content of a regular food and its lower calorie/fat counterpart. Four food categories, among the top 20 contributing the most sodium to the US diet, met the criteria of having the most matches between regular foods and their lower calorie/fat counterparts. A protocol was used to search websites to create a list of "matches", a regular and comparable lower calorie/fat food(s) under each brand. Nutrient information was recorded and analyzed for matches. In total, 283 matches were identified across four food categories: savory snacks (N = 44), cheese (N = 105), salad dressings (N = 90), and soups (N = 44). As expected, foods modified from their regular versions had significantly reduced average fat (total fat and saturated fat) and caloric profiles. Mean sodium content among modified salad dressings and cheeses was on average 8%-12% higher, while sodium content did not change with modification of savory snacks. Modified soups had significantly lower mean sodium content than their regular versions (28%-38%). Consumers trying to maintain a healthy diet should consider that sodium content may vary in foods modified to be lower in calories/fat.

  16. Do Lower Calorie or Lower Fat Foods Have More Sodium Than Their Regular Counterparts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. John

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the sodium content of a regular food and its lower calorie/fat counterpart. Four food categories, among the top 20 contributing the most sodium to the US diet, met the criteria of having the most matches between regular foods and their lower calorie/fat counterparts. A protocol was used to search websites to create a list of “matches”, a regular and comparable lower calorie/fat food(s under each brand. Nutrient information was recorded and analyzed for matches. In total, 283 matches were identified across four food categories: savory snacks (N = 44, cheese (N = 105, salad dressings (N = 90, and soups (N = 44. As expected, foods modified from their regular versions had significantly reduced average fat (total fat and saturated fat and caloric profiles. Mean sodium content among modified salad dressings and cheeses was on average 8%–12% higher, while sodium content did not change with modification of savory snacks. Modified soups had significantly lower mean sodium content than their regular versions (28%–38%. Consumers trying to maintain a healthy diet should consider that sodium content may vary in foods modified to be lower in calories/fat.

  17. In search of RR Lyrae type stars in eclipsing binary systems. OGLE052218.07-692827.4: an optical blend

    CERN Document Server

    Prsa, A; Devinney, E J; Engle, S G

    2008-01-01

    During the OGLE-2 operation, Soszynski et al. (2003) found 3 LMC candidates for an RR Lyr-type component in an eclipsing binary system. Two of those have orbital periods that are too short to be physically plausible and hence have to be optical blends. For the third, OGLE052218.07-692827.4, we developed a model of the binary that could host the observed RR Lyr star. After being granted HST/WFPC2 time, however, we were able to resolve 5 distinct sources within a 1.3" region that is typical of OGLE resolution, proving that OGLE052218.07-692827.4 is also an optical blend. Moreover, the putative eclipsing binary signature found in the OGLE data does not seem to correspond to a physically plausible system; the source is likely another background RR Lyr star. There are still no RR Lyr stars discovered so far in an eclipsing binary system.

  18. Sleeping Giants? - X-ray search for low-luminosity AGN candidates in nearby optically bright galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kalcheva, Ivayla E

    2014-01-01

    In this Master's project, the X-ray nuclear properties of a sample of bright nearby galaxies are explored. This is done by matching their comprehensive optical spectroscopic classification to the latest available XMM-Newton catalogue - 3XMM-DR4. The good coverage (approx. 38 per cent) ensures that a statistically representative sample is investigated. All nuclear and morphological subsets found within the original sample of 486 galaxies are encompassed, but early-type galaxies and galaxies with optical features characteristic for active galactic nuclei (AGN) are favoured. The results from the investigation of the properties of our cross-matched sample are overall consistent with the presence of a large fraction of X-ray - detected low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN). The X-ray - detected galaxies within our HII and transition-LINER subsets are of particular interest, as they could harbour LLAGN missed by optical spectroscopic selection. The properties of these nuclei are explored by X-ray spectral fitting of available...

  19. Cat Mammary Tumors: Genetic Models for the Human Counterpart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Adega

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The records are not clear, but Man has been sheltering the cat inside his home for over 12,000 years. The close proximity of this companion animal, however, goes beyond sharing the same roof; it extends to the great similarity found at the cellular and molecular levels. Researchers have found a striking resemblance between subtypes of feline mammary tumors and their human counterparts that goes from the genes to the pathways involved in cancer initiation and progression. Spontaneous cat mammary pre-invasive intraepithelial lesions (hyperplasias and neoplasias and malignant lesions seem to share a wide repertoire of molecular features with their human counterparts. In the present review, we tried to compile all the genetics aspects published (i.e., chromosomal alterations, critical cancer genes and their expression regarding cat mammary tumors, which support the cat as a valuable alternative in vitro cell and animal model (i.e., cat mammary cell lines and the spontaneous tumors, respectively, but also to present a critical point of view of some of the issues that really need to be investigated in future research.

  20. Identification of a Likely Radio Counterpart of the Rapid Burster

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, C B; Fox, D W; Guerriero, R A; Lewin, W H G; Fender, R P; Van Paradijs, J

    1999-01-01

    We have identified a likely radio counterpart to the low-mass X-ray binary MXB 1730-335 (the Rapid Burster). The counterpart has shown 8.4 GHz radio on/off behavior correlated with the X-ray on/off behavior as observed by the RXTE/ASM during six VLA observations. The probability of an unrelated, randomly varying background source duplicating this behavior is 1--3% depending on the correlation time scale. The location of the radio source is RA 17h 33m 24.61s; Dec -33d 23' 19.8" (J2000), +/- 0.1". We do not detect 8.4 GHz radio emission coincident with type II (accretion-driven) X-ray bursts. The ratio of radio to X-ray emission during such bursts is constrained to be below the ratio observed during X-ray persistent emission at the 2.9-sigma level. Synchrotron bubble models of the radio emission can provide a reasonable fit to the full data set, collected over several outbursts, assuming that the radio evolution is the same from outburst to outburst, but given the physical constraints the emission is more likel...

  1. Discovery of a transient gamma-ray counterpart to FRB 131104

    CERN Document Server

    DeLaunay, J J; Murase, K; Mészáros, P; Keivani, A; Messick, C; Mostafá, M A; Oikonomou, F; Tešić, G; Turley, C F

    2016-01-01

    We report our discovery in Swift satellite data of a transient gamma-ray counterpart (3.2$\\sigma$ confidence) to the fast radio burst FRB131104, the first such counterpart to any FRB. The transient has duration $T_{90} \\gtrsim 100$s and fluence $S_\\gamma\\approx 4\\times 10^{-6}$ erg cm$^{-2}$, increasing the energy budget for this event by more than a billion times; at the nominal $z\\approx 0.55$ redshift implied by its dispersion measure, the burst's gamma-ray energy output is $E_\\gamma \\approx 5\\times 10^{51}$ erg. The observed radio to gamma-ray fluence ratio for FRB131104 is consistent with a lower limit we derive from Swift observations of another FRB, which is not detected in gamma-rays, and with an upper limit previously derived for the brightest gamma-ray flare from SGR 1806-20, which was not detected in the radio. X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical observations beginning two days after the FRB do not reveal any associated afterglow, supernova, or transient; Swift observations exclude association with the...

  2. The Herschel-ATLAS Data Release 1 Paper II: Multi-wavelength counterparts to submillimetre sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bourne, N; Maddox, S J; Dye, S; Furlanetto, C; Hoyos, C; Smith, D J B; Eales, S; Smith, M W L; Valiante, E; Alpaslan, M; Andrae, E; Baldry, I K; Cluver, M E; Cooray, A; Driver, S P; Dunlop, J S; Grootes, M W; Ivison, R J; Jarrett, T H; Liske, J; Madore, B F; Popescu, C C; Robotham, A G; Rowlands, K; Seibert, M; Thompson, M A; Tuffs, R J; Viaene, S; Wright, A H

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the second in a pair of articles presenting data release 1 (DR1) of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS), the largest single open-time key project carried out with the Herschel Space Observatory. The H-ATLAS is a wide-area imaging survey carried out in five photometric bands at 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500$\\mu$m covering a total area of 600deg$^2$. In this paper we describe the identification of optical counterparts to submillimetre sources in DR1, comprising an area of 161 deg$^2$ over three equatorial fields of roughly 12$^\\circ$x4.5$^\\circ$ centred at 9$^h$, 12$^h$ and 14.5$^h$ respectively. Of all the H-ATLAS fields, the equatorial regions benefit from the greatest overlap with current multi-wavelength surveys spanning ultraviolet (UV) to mid-infrared regimes, as well as extensive spectroscopic coverage. We use a likelihood-ratio technique to identify SDSS counterparts at r<22.4 for 250-$\\mu$m-selected sources detected at $\\geq$ 4$\\sigma$ ($\\approx$28mJy). We fin...

  3. All sky coordination initiative, simple service for wide-field monitoring systems to cooperate in searching for fast optical transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, S.; Sokołowski, M.; Gorbovskoy, E.

    Here we stress the necessity of cooperation between different wide-field monitoring projects (FAVOR/TORTORA, Pi of the Sky, MASTER, etc), aimed for independent detection of fast optical transients, in order to maximize the area of the sky covered at any moment and to coordinate the monitoring of gamma-ray telescopes' field of view. We review current solutions available for it and propose a simple protocol with dedicated service (ASCI) for such systems to share their current status and pointing schedules.

  4. A Semi-automatic Search for Giant Radio Galaxy Candidates and their Radio-Optical Follow-up

    CERN Document Server

    Santiago-Bautista, I del C; Andernach, H; Coziol, R; Torres-Papaqui, J P; Andrade, E F Jimenez; Plauchu-Frayn, I; Momjian, E

    2015-01-01

    We present results of a search for giant radio galaxies (GRGs) with a projected largest linear size in excess of 1 Mpc. We designed a computational algorithm to identify contiguous emission regions, large and elongated enough to serve as GRG candidates, and applied it to the entire 1.4-GHz NRAO VLA Sky survey (NVSS). In a subsequent visual inspection of 1000 such regions we discovered 15 new GRGs, as well as many other candidate GRGs, some of them previously reported, for which no redshift was known. Our follow-up spectroscopy of 25 of the brighter hosts using two 2.1-m telescopes in Mexico, and four fainter hosts with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), yielded another 24 GRGs. We also obtained higher-resolution radio images with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array for GRG candidates with inconclusive radio structures in NVSS.

  5. Electromagnetic Counterparts of Gravitational Wave Sources : Mergers of Compact Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Kamble, Atish

    2016-01-01

    Mergers of compact objects are considered prime sources of gravitational waves (GW) and will soon be targets of GW observatories such as the Advanced-LIGO, VIRGO etc. Finding electromagnetic counterparts of these GW sources will be important to understand their nature. We discuss possible electromagnetic signatures of the mergers. We show that the BH-BH mergers could have luminosities which exceed Eddington luminosity from unity to several orders of magnitude depending on the masses of the merging BHs. As a result these mergers could be explosive, release up to $10^{51}$ erg of energy and shine as radio transients. At any given time we expect about a few such transients in the sky at GHz frequencies which could be detected out to about 300 Mpc. It has also been argued that these radio transients would look alike radio supernovae with comparable detection rates. Multi-band follow up could, however, distinguish between the mergers and supernovae.

  6. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2IFRS, but if confirmed, the increased AGN numbers at these redshifts will account for the unresolved part of the X-ray background. The identification of X-ray counterparts of IFRS is considered to be the smoking gun for this hypothesis. We propose to observe 8 IFRS using 30ks pointed observations. X-ray detections of IFRS with different ratios of radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  7. Gravitational Coleman–Weinberg potential and its finite temperature counterpart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit [Astroparticle Physics and Cosmology Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Discipline of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Ahmedabad, Gujarat 382424 (India); Majumdar, Parthasarathi [Department of Physics, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananada University, Belur Math, Howrah 711202 (India)

    2014-08-15

    Coleman–Weinberg (CW) phenomena for the case of gravitons minimally coupled to massless scalar field is studied. The one-loop effect completely vanishes if there is no self-interaction term present in the matter sector. The one-loop effective potential is shown to develop an instability in the form of acquiring an imaginary part, which can be traced to the tachyonic pole in the graviton propagator. The finite temperature counterpart of this CW potential is computed to study the behaviour of the potential in the high and low temperature regimes with respect to the typical energy scale of the theory. Finite temperature contribution to the imaginary part of gravitational CW potential exhibits a damped oscillatory behaviour; all thermal effects are damped out as the temperature vanishes, consistent with the zero-temperature result.

  8. Electromagnetic Counterparts to Black Hole Mergers Detected by LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Mergers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), such as GW150914 observed by LIGO, are not expected to have electromagnetic counterparts. However, the Fermi GBM detector identified of a gamma-ray transient 0.4 s after the gravitational wave (GW) signal GW150914 with consistent sky localization. I show that the two signals might be related if the BH binary detected by LIGO originated from two clumps in a dumbbell configuration that formed when the core of a rapidly rotating massive star collapsed. In that case, the BH binary merger was followed by a gamma-ray burst (GRB) from a jet that originated in the accretion flow around the remnant BH. A future detection of a GRB afterglow could be used to determine the redshift and precise localization of the source. A population of standard GW sirens with GRB redshifts would provide a new approach for precise measurements of cosmological distances as a function of redshift.

  9. How do older netcitizens compare with their younger counterparts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucur, A; Renold, C; Henke, M

    1999-01-01

    The Internet is modifying the lives of people around the world. Although many talk about the democratization of knowledge and information, differences remain among users as older netcitizens are under-represented and less involved. We use national and representative U.S. data, the Current Population Survey, to show age-based differences. We complement our analysis with web-based data, the Georgia Tech World Wide Web User Surveys, to show Internet characteristics and trends by age for netcitizens. Results show that older users compose a lower share of Internet users than that of the total U.S. population; however, once they join the ranks of avid Internet users, older netcitizens are similar to their younger counterparts.

  10. Surveying the Bright Stars by Optical Interferometry I: A Search for Multiplicity Among Stars of Spectral Types F - K

    CERN Document Server

    Hutter, Donald; Tycner, Christopher; Benson, James; Hummel, Christian; Sanborn, Jason; Franz, Otto G; Johnston, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from an ongoing survey for multiplicity among the bright stars using the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI). We first present a summary of NPOI observations of known multiple systems, including the first detection of the companion of $\\beta$ Scuti with precise relative astrometry, to illustrate the instrument's detection sensitivity for binaries at magnitude differences $\\Delta$$m$ $\\lessapprox$ 3 over the range of angular separation 3 - 860 milliarcseconds (mas). A limiting $\\Delta$$m_{700}$ $\\sim$ 3.5 is likely for binaries where the component spectral types differ by less than two. Model fits to these data show good agreement with published orbits, and we additionally present a new orbit solution for one of these stars, $\\sigma$ Her. We then discuss early results of the survey of bright stars at $\\delta$ $\\geq$ -20$\\deg$. This survey, which complements previous surveys of the bright stars by speckle interferometry, initially emphasizes bright stars of spectral types F...

  11. The COSMOS AGN Spectroscopic Survey I: XMM Counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Trump, Jonathan R; Elvis, Martin; McCarthy, Patrick J; Huchra, John P; Brusa, Marcella; Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter; Cappelluti, Nico; Civano, Francesca; Comastri, Andrea; Gabor, Jared; Hao, Heng; Hasinger, Gunther; Jahnke, Knud; Kelly, Brandon C; Lilly, Simon J; Schinnerer, Eva; Scoville, Nick Z; Smolcic, Vernesa

    2008-01-01

    We present optical spectroscopy for an X-ray and optical flux-limited sample of 677 XMM-Newton selected targets covering the 2 deg^2 COSMOS field, with a yield of 485 high-confidence redshifts. The majority of the spectra were obtained over three seasons (2005-2007) with the IMACS instrument on the Magellan (Baade) telescope. We also include in the sample previously published Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and supplemental observations with MMT/Hectospec. We detail the observations and classification analyses. The survey is 90% complete to flux limits of f_{0.5-10 keV}>8 x 10^-16 erg cm^-2 s^-1 and i_AB+3 x 10^42 erg s^-1) to z<1, of both optically obscured and unobscured types. We find statistically significant evidence that the obscured to unobscured AGN ratio at z<1 increases with redshift and decreases with luminosity.

  12. SEARCHING FOR BINARY Y DWARFS WITH THE GEMINI MULTI-CONJUGATE ADAPTIVE OPTICS SYSTEM (GeMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opitz, Daniela; Tinney, C. G. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Faherty, Jacqueline K. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Sweet, Sarah [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Gelino, Christopher R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy, E-mail: daniela.opitz@student.unsw.edu.au [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The NASA Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has discovered almost all the known members of the new class of Y-type brown dwarfs. Most of these Y dwarfs have been identified as isolated objects in the field. It is known that binaries with L- and T-type brown dwarf primaries are less prevalent than either M-dwarf or solar-type primaries, they tend to have smaller separations and are more frequently detected in near-equal mass configurations. The binary statistics for Y-type brown dwarfs, however, are sparse, and so it is unclear if the same trends that hold for L- and T-type brown dwarfs also hold for Y-type ones. In addition, the detection of binary companions to very cool Y dwarfs may well be the best means available for discovering even colder objects. We present results for binary properties of a sample of five WISE Y dwarfs with the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System. We find no evidence for binary companions in these data, which suggests these systems are not equal-luminosity (or equal-mass) binaries with separations larger than ∼0.5–1.9 AU. For equal-mass binaries at an age of 5 Gyr, we find that the binary binding energies ruled out by our observations (i.e., 10{sup 42} erg) are consistent with those observed in previous studies of hotter ultra-cool dwarfs.

  13. Discovery of a Cosmological, Relativistic Outburst via its Rapidly Fading Optical Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Cenko, S Bradley; Horesh, Assaf; Corsi, Alessandra; Fox, Derek B; Carpenter, John; Frail, Dale A; Nugent, Peter E; Perley, Daniel A; Gruber, D; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Groot, Paul J; Hallinan, G; Ofek, Eran O; Rau, Arne; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Miller, Adam A; Bloom, Joshua S; Filippenko, Alexei V; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Law, Nicholas M; Morgan, Adam N; Polishook, David; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M; Sesar, Branimir; Shen, Ken J; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Sternberg, Assaf

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) of the transient source PTF11agg, which is distinguished by three primary characteristics: (1) bright, rapidly fading optical transient emission; (2) a faint, blue quiescent optical counterpart; and (3) an associated year-long, scintillating radio transient. We argue that these observed properties are inconsistent with any known class of Galactic transients, and instead suggest a cosmological origin. The detection of incoherent radio emission at such distances implies a large emitting region, from which we infer the presence of relativistic ejecta. The observed properties are all consistent with the population of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), marking the first time such an outburst has been discovered in the distant universe independent of a high-energy trigger. We searched for possible high-energy counterparts to PTF11agg, but found no evidence for associated prompt emission. We therefore consider three possible scenarios to account for ...

  14. ELECTROMAGNETIC COUNTERPARTS TO BLACK HOLE MERGERS DETECTED BY LIGO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Mergers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), such as GW150914 observed by Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), are not expected to have electromagnetic counterparts. However, the Fermi GBM detector identified a γ-ray transient 0.4 s after the gravitational wave (GW) signal GW150914 with consistent sky localization. I show that the two signals might be related if the BH binary detected by LIGO originated from two clumps in a dumbbell configuration that formed when the core of a rapidly rotating massive star collapsed. In that case, the BH binary merger was followed by a γ-ray burst (GRB) from a jet that originated in the accretion flow around the remnant BH. A future detection of a GRB afterglow could be used to determine the redshift and precise localization of the source. A population of standard GW sirens with GRB redshifts would provide a new approach for precise measurements of cosmological distances as a function of redshift.

  15. Electromagnetic Counterparts to Black Hole Mergers Detected by LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    Mergers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), such as GW150914 observed by Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), are not expected to have electromagnetic counterparts. However, the Fermi GBM detector identified a γ-ray transient 0.4 s after the gravitational wave (GW) signal GW150914 with consistent sky localization. I show that the two signals might be related if the BH binary detected by LIGO originated from two clumps in a dumbbell configuration that formed when the core of a rapidly rotating massive star collapsed. In that case, the BH binary merger was followed by a γ-ray burst (GRB) from a jet that originated in the accretion flow around the remnant BH. A future detection of a GRB afterglow could be used to determine the redshift and precise localization of the source. A population of standard GW sirens with GRB redshifts would provide a new approach for precise measurements of cosmological distances as a function of redshift.

  16. A Flaring X-ray Source with an Halpha-bright Counterpart toward the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Laycock, Silas

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of a flaring X-ray source with an optical counterpart with Halpha emission and red-excess, in the direction of the SMC. A 100 ksec X-ray observation with Chandra detected a flare lasting 6 ksec in the source CXO J005428.9-723107. The X-ray spectrum during the flare was consistent with a thermal plasma of temperature kT=2.5 keV. In quiescence following the flare the spectrum was softer (kT= 0.4 keV). Timing analysis did not reveal any significant periodicities or QPOs. Optical images taken with the Magellan-Baade 6.5m telescope show a single star in the (0.9") error circle. This star has apparent magnitude V=19.17, exhibits enhanced Halpha emission (Halpha - r = -0.88), and has a large proper motion. Alternative explanations are explored, leading to identification as a relatively nearby (Galactic) coronally active star of the BY Draconis class.

  17. Lagrangian optics

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan; Thyagarajan, K

    2002-01-01

    Ingeometrical optics, light propagation is analyzed in terms of light rays which define the path of propagation of light energy in the limitofthe optical wavelength tending to zero. Many features oflight propagation can be analyzed in terms ofrays,ofcourse, subtle effects near foci, caustics or turning points would need an analysis based on the wave natureoflight. Allofgeometric optics can be derived from Fermat's principle which is an extremum principle. The counterpart in classical mechanics is of course Hamilton's principle. There is a very close analogy between mechanics ofparticles and optics oflight rays. Much insight (and useful results) can be obtained by analyzing these analogies. Asnoted by H. Goldstein in his book Classical Mechanics (Addison Wesley, Cambridge, MA, 1956), classical mechanics is only a geometrical optics approximation to a wave theory! In this book we begin with Fermat's principle and obtain the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian pictures of ray propagation through various media. Given the ...

  18. A coordinated optical and X-ray spectroscopic campaign on HD179949: searching for planet-induced chromospheric and coronal activity

    CERN Document Server

    Scandariato, G; Lanza, A F; Pagano, I; Fares, R; Shkolnik, E L; Bohlender, D; Cameron, A C; Dieters, S; Donati, J -F; Fiorenzano, A F Martìnez; Jardine, M; Moutou, C

    2013-01-01

    HD179949 is an F8V star, orbited by a close-in giant planet with a period of ~3 days. Previous studies suggested that the planet enhances the magnetic activity of the parent star, producing a chromospheric hot spot which rotates in phase with the planet orbit. However, this phenomenon is intermittent since it was observed in several but not all seasons. A long-term monitoring of the magnetic activity of HD179949 is required to study the amplitude and time scales of star-planet interactions. In 2009 we performed a simultaneous optical and X-ray spectroscopic campaign to monitor the magnetic activity of HD179949 during ~5 orbital periods and ~2 stellar rotations. We analyzed the CaII H&K lines as a proxy for chromospheric activity, and we studied the X-ray emission in search of flux modulations and to determine basic properties of the coronal plasma. A detailed analysis of the flux in the cores of the CaII H&K lines and a similar study of the X-ray photometry shows evidence of source variability, includ...

  19. 光电综合搜索平台集成化设计%Research on the Integrated Design of Electro-optical Search Platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游小嘉; 朱元武; 解志红; 王玉华

    2014-01-01

    Fast target recognition is the premise to weapon attack. Electro-optical search platform is an important reconnaissance equipment under the information condition. Aiming at improving the fast and autonomous target recognition of weapon system,we research on visible camera,IR imager and MMV radar integrated technology. Combing with autonomous recognition and high stability accuracy,detector selection,general design of platform and high stability accuracy control were discussed.%目标的快速捕获是作战武器实施打击的前提,光电综合搜索平台是信息化条件下的重要侦察设备。以提高武器系统快速、自主目标搜索为目标,对可见光摄像机、红外热像仪、毫米波雷达探测综合集成技术进行研究。结合光电综合搜索平台的自主搜索、高精度稳定的要求,从探测器选型、平台总体设计、高精度稳定控制等方面进行了论述。

  20. Long distance runners present upregulated sweating responses than sedentary counterparts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Beom Lee

    Full Text Available Relatively few studies have investigated peripheral sweating mechanisms of long-distance runners. The aim of this study was to compare peripheral sweating mechanisms in male long-distance runners, and sedentary counterparts. Thirty six subjects, including 20 sedentary controls and 16 long-distance runners (with 7-12 years of athletic training, average 9.2±2.1 years were observed. Quantitative sudomotor axon reflex testing (QSART with iontophoresis (2 mA for 5 min and 10% acetylcholine (ACh were performed to determine axon reflex-mediated and directly activated (DIR, muscarinic receptor sweating. Sweat onset time, sweat rate, number of activated sweat glands, sweat output per gland and skin temperature were measured at rest while maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max were measured during maximal cycling. Sweat rate, activated sweat glands, sweat output per gland, skin temperature and VO2max were significantly higher in the trained runners than in the sedentary controls. Sweat onset time was significantly shorter for the runners. In the group of long-distance runners, significant correlations were found between VO2max and sweat onset time (r2 = 0.543, P<0.01, n = 16, DIR sweat rate (r2 = 0.584, P<0.001, n = 16, sweat output per gland (r2 = 0.539, P<0.01, n = 16. There was no correlation between VO2max and activated sweat glands. These findings suggest that habitual long-distance running results in upregulation of the peripheral sweating mechanisms in humans. Additional research is needed to determine the molecular mechanism underlying these changes. These findings complement the existing sweating data in long-distance runners.

  1. Synthetic membranes and membrane processes with counterparts in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Stephen L.

    1996-02-01

    Conventional synthetic membranes, fashioned for the most part from rather unremarkable polymeric materials, are essentially passive structures that achieve various industrial and biomedical separations through simple and selective membrane permeation processes. Indeed, simplicity of membrane material, structure, and function has long been perceived as a virtue of membranes relative to other separation processes with which they compete. The passive membrane separation processes -- exemplified by micro- and ultrafiltration, dialysis, reverse osmosis, and gas permeation -- differ from one another primarily in terms of membrane morphology or structure (e.g., porous, gel-type, and nonporous) and the permeant transport mechanism and driving force (e.g., diffusion, convection, and 'solution/diffusion'). The passive membrane separation processes have in common the fact that interaction between permeant and membrane material is typically weak and physicochemical in nature; indeed, it is frequently an objective of membrane materials design to minimize interaction between permeant and membrane polymer, since such strategies can minimize membrane fouling. As a consequence, conventional membrane processes often provide only modest separation factors or permselectivities; that is, they are more useful in performing 'group separations' (i.e., the separation of different classes of material) than they are in fractionating species within a given class. It has long been recognized within the community of membrane technologists that biological membrane structures and their components are extraordinarily sophisticated and powerful as compared to their synthetic counterparts. Moreover, biomembranes and related biological systems have been 'designed' according to a very different paradigm -- one that frequently maximizes and capitalizes on extraordinarily strong and biochemically specific interactions between components of the membrane and species interacting with them. Thus, in recent

  2. Professional Microsoft search fast search, Sharepoint search, and search server

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Mark; Kehoe, Miles; Voskresenskaya, Natalya

    2010-01-01

    Use Microsoft's latest search-based technology-FAST search-to plan, customize, and deploy your search solutionFAST is Microsoft's latest intelligent search-based technology that boasts robustness and an ability to integrate business intelligence with Search. This in-depth guide provides you with advanced coverage on FAST search and shows you how to use it to plan, customize, and deploy your search solution, with an emphasis on SharePoint 2010 and Internet-based search solutions.With a particular appeal for anyone responsible for implementing and managing enterprise search, this book presents t

  3. The Optical and Near-Infrared Counterpart of IRAS 18476+2054

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kimeswenger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos aquí, por primera vez, una identificación óptica y infrarroja cercana (NIR para los orígenes, hasta ahora sin estudiar, IRAS PSC 18476+2054. Fue obtenida la representación directa en BVRICiJKs y espectroscopia óptica. El complemento óptico se identifica como una estrella variable de la clase Mira –M7 o más gigante o súper gigante– con un exceso en infrarrojo medio (MIR comparado como Miras “normal" teniendo un período corto. El V-IC es notablemente alto, aunque el (B-V no da ninguna indicación de una extinción circumestelar llevando a un enrojecimiento. El color V_[12] demuestra un exceso en infrarrojo medio. Las fotonometrias obtenidas aquí y las placas de cielo investigadas nos permiten estimar un período de 145 días y una amplitud baja inusual de V = 2:m5 0:m2 (para el tipo último de la espectroscopía.

  4. Faint X-ray Binaries and Their Optical Counterparts in M31

    CERN Document Server

    Vulic, N; Barmby, P

    2014-01-01

    X-ray binaries (XRBs) are probes of both star formation and stellar mass, but more importantly remain one of the only direct tracers of the compact object population. To investigate the XRB population in M31, we utilized all 121 publicly available observations of M31 totalling over 1 Ms from $\\it{Chandra's}$ ACIS instrument. We studied 83 star clusters in the bulge using the year 1 star cluster catalogue from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury Survey. We found 15 unique star clusters that matched to 17 X-ray point sources within 1'' (3.8 pc). This population is composed predominantly of globular cluster low-mass XRBs, with one previously unidentified star cluster X-ray source. Star clusters that were brighter and more compact preferentially hosted an X-ray source. Specifically, logistic regression showed that the F475W magnitude was the most important predictor followed by the effective radius, while color (F475W$-$F814W) was not statistically significant. We also completed a matching analysis of 1566...

  5. Candidate counterparts to the soft gamma-ray flare in the direction of LS I +61303

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz-Arjonilla, A J; Combi, J A; Luque-Escamilla, P; Sanchez-Sutil, J R; Zabalza, V; Paredes, J M

    2009-01-01

    Context. A short duration burst reminiscent of a soft gamma-ray repeater/anomalous X-ray pulsar behaviour was detected in the direction of LS I +61 303 by the Swift satellite. While the association with this well known gamma-ray binary is likely, a different origin cannot be excluded. Aims. We explore the error box of this unexpected flaring event and establish the radio, near-infrared and X-ray sources in our search for any peculiar alternative counterpart. Methods. We carried out a combined analysis of archive Very Large Array radio data of LS I +61 303 sensitive to both compact and extended emission. We also reanalysed previous near infrared observations with the 3.5 m telescope of the Centro Astronomico Hispano Aleman and X-ray observations with the Chandra satellite. Results. Our deep radio maps of the LS I +61 303 environment represent a significant advancement on previous work and 16 compact radio sources in the LS I +61 303 vicinity are detected. For some detections, we also identify near infrared and...

  6. Search Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this ... of Top 110 zoster vaccine Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search ...

  7. Optical spectroscopic observations of gamma-ray blazar candidates IV. Results of the 2014 follow-up campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, F; Landoni, M; D'Abrusco, R; Milisavljevic, D; Stern, D; Masetti, N; Paggi, A; Smith, Howard A; Tosti, G

    2015-01-01

    The extragalactic gamma-ray sky is dominated by the emission arising from blazars, one of the most peculiar classes of radio-loud active galaxies. Since the launch of Fermi several methods were developed to search for blazars as potential counterparts of unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). To confirm the nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic observations are necessary. In 2013 we started a spectroscopic campaign to investigate gamma-ray blazar candidates selected according to different procedures. The main goals of our campaign are: 1) to confirm the nature of these candidates, and 2) whenever possible determine their redshifts. Optical spectroscopic observations will also permit us to verify the robustness of the proposed associations and check for the presence of possible source class contaminants to our counterpart selection. This paper reports the results of observations carried out in 2014 in the Northern hemisphere with Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and in the Southern hemi...

  8. Isotropic Detectable X-ray Counterparts to Gravitational Waves from Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Kisaka, Shota; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Neutron star binary mergers are strong sources of gravitational waves (GWs). Promising electromagnetic counterparts are short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) but the emission is highly collimated. We propose that the scattering of the long-lasting plateau emission in short GRBs by the merger ejecta produces nearly isotropic emission for $\\sim 10^4$ s with flux $10^{-10}-10^{-13}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in X-ray. This is detectable by wide field X-ray detectors such as ISS-Lobster, eROSITA and WF-MAXI, which are desired by the infrared and optical follow-ups to localize and measure the distance to the host galaxy. The scattered X-rays obtain linear polarization, which correlates with the jet direction, X-ray luminosity and GW polarizations. The activity of plateau emission is also a natural energy source of a macronova (or kilonova) detected in short GRB 130603B without the $r$-process radioactivity.

  9. Search Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips A to Z Map Search Enter your search term 98 results • Advanced Search Everything News Videos e- ... usda.gov https://www.whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/search/solr-results/im_field_term_program/child-nutrition-cnp-163 We would like ...

  10. Search Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Morville, Peter

    2010-01-01

    What people are saying about Search Patterns "Search Patterns is a delight to read -- very thoughtful and thought provoking. It's the most comprehensive survey of designing effective search experiences I've seen." --Irene Au, Director of User Experience, Google "I love this book! Thanks to Peter and Jeffery, I now know that search (yes, boring old yucky who cares search) is one of the coolest ways around of looking at the world." --Dan Roam, author, The Back of the Napkin (Portfolio Hardcover) "Search Patterns is a playful guide to the practical concerns of search interface design. It cont

  11. Is robotic mitral valve surgery more expensive than its conventional counterpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano

    2015-06-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'Is robotic mitral valve surgery more expensive than its conventional counterpart?' Altogether 19 papers were found using the reported search, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. There is a general impression in the surgical community that robotic operations might incur prohibitive additional costs. There is a paucity of data in the literature regarding cost analysis in cardiac robotic surgery. From the five studies, four were single institution experiences and one was a database inquiry study. These four studies showed that operational costs are higher for robotic cases but this was partially (one study) or completely (three studies) offset by lower postoperative costs. Overall hospital costs were similar between the two approaches in three studies and one study showed higher costs in the robotic group. Higher operating theatre (OT) costs were driven mainly by use of robotic instruments (approximately US$1500 per case) and longer OT times. Savings in postoperative care were driven by shorter length of hospital stay (on average 2 days fewer in robotic cases) and lower morbidity. If amortization cost, that is, the value of the initial capital investment on the robotic system divided by all operations performed, is included in this analysis, robotic approach becomes significantly more expensive by approximately US$3400 per case. The fifth study was a large national database inquiry in which robotic approach was found to be more expensive by US$600 per case excluding amortization cost and by US$3700 if amortization is included. We conclude that the total hospital cost of robotic mitral valve surgery is slightly higher than conventional sternotomy surgery. If

  12. Deep optical observations of the gamma-ray pulsar J0357+3205

    CERN Document Server

    Kirichenko, Aida; Shibanov, Yury; Shternin, Peter; Zharikov, Sergey; Zyuzin, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    A middle-aged radio-quiet pulsar J0357+3205 was discovered in gamma-rays with $Fermi$ and later in X-rays with $Chandra$ and $XMM$-$Newton$ observatories. It produces an unusual thermally-emitting pulsar wind nebula observed in X-rays. Deep optical observations were obtained to search for the pulsar optical counterpart and its nebula using the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The direct imaging mode in the Sloan $g'$ band was used. Archival X-ray data were reanalysed and compared with the optical data. No pulsar optical counterpart was detected down to $g'\\geq~28_{\\cdotp}^{\\text{m}}1$. No pulsar nebula was either identified in the optical. We confirm early results that the X-ray spectrum of the pulsar consists of a nonthermal power-law component of the pulsar magnetospheric origin dominating at high energies and a soft thermal component from the neutron star surface. Using magnetised partially ionised hydrogen atmosphere models in X-ray spectral fits we found that the thermal component can come from entire sur...

  13. Personalized Search

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)749939

    2015-01-01

    As the volume of electronically available information grows, relevant items become harder to find. This work presents an approach to personalizing search results in scientific publication databases. This work focuses on re-ranking search results from existing search engines like Solr or ElasticSearch. This work also includes the development of Obelix, a new recommendation system used to re-rank search results. The project was proposed and performed at CERN, using the scientific publications available on the CERN Document Server (CDS). This work experiments with re-ranking using offline and online evaluation of users and documents in CDS. The experiments conclude that the personalized search result outperform both latest first and word similarity in terms of click position in the search result for global search in CDS.

  14. Search Combinators

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijvers, Tom; Wuille, Pieter; Samulowitz, Horst; Stuckey, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The ability to model search in a constraint solver can be an essential asset for solving combinatorial problems. However, existing infrastructure for defining search heuristics is often inadequate. Either modeling capabilities are extremely limited or users are faced with a general-purpose programming language whose features are not tailored towards writing search heuristics. As a result, major improvements in performance may remain unexplored. This article introduces search combinators, a lightweight and solver-independent method that bridges the gap between a conceptually simple modeling language for search (high-level, functional and naturally compositional) and an efficient implementation (low-level, imperative and highly non-modular). By allowing the user to define application-tailored search strategies from a small set of primitives, search combinators effectively provide a rich domain-specific language (DSL) for modeling search to the user. Remarkably, this DSL comes at a low implementation cost to the...

  15. OPUS: A Comprehensive Search Tool for Remote Sensing Observations of the Outer Planets. Now with Enhanced Geometric Metadata for Cassini and New Horizons Optical Remote Sensing Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, M. K.; Showalter, M. R.; Ballard, L.; Tiscareno, M.; French, R. S.; Olson, D.

    2017-06-01

    The PDS RMS Node hosts OPUS - an accurate, comprehensive search tool for spacecraft remote sensing observations. OPUS supports Cassini: CIRS, ISS, UVIS, VIMS; New Horizons: LORRI, MVIC; Galileo SSI; Voyager ISS; and Hubble: ACS, STIS, WFC3, WFPC2.

  16. Maximizing the Probability of Detecting an Electromagnetic Counterpart of Gravitational-wave Events

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Compact binary coalescences are a promising source of gravitational waves for second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors such as advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo. These are among the most promising sources for joint detection of electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational-wave (GW) emission. To maximize the science performed with these objects, it is essential to undertake a followup observing strategy that maximizes the likelihood of detecting the EM counterpart. We present a follow-up strategy that maximizes the counterpart detection probability, given a fixed investment of telescope time. We show how the prior assumption on the luminosity function of the electro-magnetic counterpart impacts the optimized followup strategy. Our results suggest that if the goal is to detect an EM counterpart from among a succession of GW triggers, the optimal strategy is to perform long integrations in the highest likelihood regions, with a time investment that is proportional to the $2/3$ power of the surface...

  17. Hard X-ray Emission from Sh2-104: A NuSTAR search for Gamma-ray Counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Gotthelf, E V; Aliu, E; Paredes, J M; Tomsick, J A; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hong, J S; Rahoui, F; Stern, D; Zhang, W W

    2016-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of Sh 2-104, a compact HII region containing several young massive stellar clusters (YMSCs). We have detected distinct hard X-ray sources coincident with localized VERITAS TeV emission recently resolved from the giant gamma-ray complex MGRO J2019+37 in the Cygnus region. Faint, diffuse X-ray emission coincident with the eastern YMSC in Sh2-104 is likely the result of colliding winds of component stars. Just outside the radio shell of Sh 2-104 lies 3XMM J201744.7+365045 and a nearby nebula NuSTAR J201744.3+364812, whose properties are most consistent with extragalactic objects. The combined XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectrum of 3XMM J201744.7+365045 is well-fit to an absorbed power-law model with NH = (3.1 +/- 1.0)E22 cm^-2 and photon index Gamma = 2.1 +/- 0.1. Based on possible long-term flux variation and the lack of detected pulsations (< 43% modulation), this object is likely a background AGN rather than a Galactic pulsar. The spectrum of the NuSTAR nebula shows evi...

  18. In Search of a Radio Counterpart for the Ultraluminous X-Ray Source at the Nucleus of M33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Trejo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos un análisis de observaciones de radiocontinuo del núcleo de la galaxia espiral M33, obtenidas del archivo del Very Large Array. La mayoría de estas observaciones fueron hechas con alta resolución angular (<1`` en varias épocas y las hemos utilizado para buscar emisión de radio asociada con la fuente ultraluminosa de rayos X en el centro de M33. A 20 cm, con una resolución angular de 1.3, detectamos una fuente con densidad de flujo de 0:200:02 mJy que coincide dentro de 0.2 con la posición del centro de M33 reportada por 2MASS. Adicionalmente, a 3.6 cm (con una resolución angular de 0.3, detectamos dos fuentes débiles, una de ellas con densidad de ujo de 0:04 0:01 mJy y que coincide con la fuente a 20 cm (y por lo tanto con el centro de M33. La segunda fuente detectada a 3.6 cm, con densidad de flujo de 0:05 0:01 mJy, está 0.6 al norte de la primera fuente. La posición para la fuente ultraluminosa de rayos X del satélite Chandra traslapa dentro del error con ambas fuentes de 3.6 cm.

  19. Discovery and Monitoring of the likely IR Counterpart of SGR 1806-20 during the 2004 gamma-ray burst-active state

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, G L; Mignani, R; Stella, L; Marconi, G; Testa, V; Mereghetti, S; Campana, S; Rea, N; Gotz, D; Perna, R; Curto, G L; Israel, GianLuca; Covino, Stefano; Mignani, Roberto; Stella, Luigi; Marconi, Gianni; Testa, Vincenzo; Mereghetti, Sandro; Campana, Sergio; Rea, Nanda; Gotz, Diego; Perna, Rosalba; Curto, Gaspare Lo

    2005-01-01

    The sky region including the Chandra position of SGR 1806-20 was monitored in the IR band during 2004, following its increased high energy bursting activity. Observations were performed using NAOS-CONICA, the adaptive optics IR camera mounted on Yepun VLT, which provided images of unprecedented quality (FWHM better than 0.1"). After the 2004 December 27th giant flare, the source position has been nailed by VLA observations of its radio counterpart, reducing the positional uncertainty to 0.04". Using IR data from our monitoring campaign, we discovered the likely IR counterpart to SGR 1806-20 based on positional coincidence with the Chandra and VLA uncertainty regions and flux variability of a factor of about 2 correlated with that at higher energies. We compare our findings with other isolated neutron star classes thought to be related, at some level, with SGRs.

  20. Faceted Search

    CERN Document Server

    Tunkelang, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We live in an information age that requires us, more than ever, to represent, access, and use information. Over the last several decades, we have developed a modern science and technology for information retrieval, relentlessly pursuing the vision of a "memex" that Vannevar Bush proposed in his seminal article, "As We May Think." Faceted search plays a key role in this program. Faceted search addresses weaknesses of conventional search approaches and has emerged as a foundation for interactive information retrieval. User studies demonstrate that faceted search provides more

  1. A novel high-contrast imaging technique based on optical tunneling to search for faint companions around bright stars at the limit of diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Derigs, Dominik; Ghosh, Dhriti Sundar; Abel-Tibérini, Laëtitia

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel application of optical tunneling in the context of high-angular resolution, high-contrast techniques with the aim of improving direct imaging capabilities of faint companions in the vicinity of bright stars. In contrast to existing techniques like coronagraphy, we apply well-established techniques from integrated optics to exclusively extinct a very narrow angular direction coming from the sky. This extinction is achieved in the pupil plane and does not suffer from diffraction pattern residuals. We give a comprehensive presentation of the underlying theory as well as first laboratory results.

  2. Identification of the predicted 5s-4f level crossing optical lines with applications to metrology and searches for the variation of fundamental constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windberger, A; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R; Bekker, H; Oreshkina, N S; Berengut, J C; Bock, V; Borschevsky, A; Dzuba, V A; Eliav, E; Harman, Z; Kaldor, U; Kaul, S; Safronova, U I; Flambaum, V V; Keitel, C H; Schmidt, P O; Ullrich, J; Versolato, O O

    2015-04-17

    We measure optical spectra of Nd-like W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt ions of particular interest for studies of a possibly varying fine-structure constant. Exploiting characteristic energy scalings we identify the strongest lines, confirm the predicted 5s-4f level crossing, and benchmark advanced calculations. We infer two possible values for optical M2/E3 and E1 transitions in Ir^{17+} that have the highest predicted sensitivity to a variation of the fine-structure constant among stable atomic systems. Furthermore, we determine the energies of proposed frequency standards in Hf^{12+} and W^{14+}.

  3. Ab initio search for global minimum structures of neutral and anionic B 4H 5 clusters. Optical isomerism in B 4H 5 and B4H5-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jared K.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2011-11-01

    Potential energy surfaces of neutral and anionic B 4H 5 clusters were sampled using the Coalescence Kick method. We found that the neutral B 4H 5 cluster has two optical isomers as either a global minimum structure, or as almost degenerate isomers with the global minimum structure. For the B4H5- anion only the third lowest isomer forms a pair of optical isomers. The chemical bonding patterns revealed by the Adaptive Natural Density Partitioning (AdNDP) analysis can easily explain the geometric structure of even very exotic isomers and global minima. Theoretical vertical electron detachment energies (VDEs) were calculated for comparison with future experimental work.

  4. A search for nEDM and new constraints on short-range "pseudo-magnetic" interaction using neutron optics of noncentrosymmetric crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, I. A.; Voronin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    New approach to measure both neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) and short-range pseudomagnetic nucleon-nucleon interaction using neutron optics of a crystal without center of symmetry is presented. This approach allows getting best direct constraint on the parameters of short range pseudomagnetic interaction of a free neutron with matter for the range of interaction distances λ<10-7 m.

  5. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES. IV. RESULTS OF THE 2014 FOLLOW-UP CAMPAIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci, F. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146, Roma (Italy); Massaro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Landoni, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Emilio Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); D’Abrusco, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-221, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G., E-mail: riccif@fis.uniroma3.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    The extragalactic γ-ray sky is dominated by the emission arising from blazars, one of the most peculiar classes of radio-loud active galaxies. Since the launch of Fermi several methods were developed to search for blazars as potential counterparts of unidentified γ-ray sources (UGSs). To confirm the nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic observations are necessary. In 2013 we started a spectroscopic campaign to investigate γ-ray blazar candidates selected according to different procedures. The main goals of our campaign are: (1) to confirm the nature of these candidates, and (2) whenever possible, determine their redshifts. Optical spectroscopic observations will also permit us to verify the robustness of the proposed associations and check for the presence of possible source class contaminants to our counterpart selection. This paper reports the results of observations carried out in 2014 in the northern hemisphere with Kitt Peak National Observatory and in the southern hemisphere with the Southern Astrophysical Research telescopes. We also report three sources observed with the Magellan and Palomar telescopes. Our selection of blazar-like sources that could be potential counterparts of UGSs is based on their peculiar infrared colors and on their combination with radio observations both at high and low frequencies (i.e., above and below ∼1 GHz) in publicly available large radio surveys. We present the optical spectra of 27 objects. We confirm the blazar-like nature of nine sources that appear to be potential low-energy counterparts of UGSs. Then we present new spectroscopic observations of 10 active galaxies of uncertain type associated with Fermi sources, classifying all of them as blazars. In addition, we present the spectra for five known γ-ray blazars with uncertain redshift estimates and three BL Lac candidates that were observed during our campaign. We also report the case for WISE J173052.85−035247.2, candidate counterpart of the

  6. Radio Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers detectable in Gravitational Waves: A Simulation for an Optimized Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Hallinan, Gregg; Lazio, T Joseph W; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron star binaries produce gravitational-wave (GW) emission and outflows with significant kinetic energies. These outflows result in radio emissions through synchrotron radiation of accelerated electrons in shocks formed with the circum-merger medium. We explore the detectability of these synchrotron generated radio signals by follow-up observations of GW merger events lacking a detection of electromagnetic counterparts in other wavelengths. We model radio light curves arising from (i) sub-relativistic merger ejecta and (ii) ultra-relativistic jets. The former produces radio remnants on timescales of a few years and the latter produces $\\gamma$-ray bursts in the direction of the jet and orphan radio afterglows extending over wider angles on timescales of a week to a month. The intensity and duration of these radio counterparts depend on the kinetic energies of the outflows and on circum-merger densities. We estimate the detectability of the radio counterparts ...

  7. New Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the counterparts to six ultraluminous X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, T P; Goad, M R

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of new Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the positions of six ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Using images in three ACS filters we detect good candidate counterparts to four out of six ULXs, with one more possible detection, and observed magnitudes in the range m ~ 22 - 26 in the F606W filter. The extinction-corrected colours and absolute magnitudes vary from source to source, even after correcting for additional extinction in the host galaxy, and only one counterpart is readily explained as an OB star. Nevertheless, these counterparts are decent candidates for future follow-up in pursuit of dynamical mass constraints on the likely black holes powering these sources.

  8. Radio counterpart of the lensed sub-mm emission in the cluster MS0451.6-0305: new evidence for the merger scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Alba, A Berciano; Garrett, M A; Wucknitz, O; Limousin, M

    2009-01-01

    SMM J04542-0301 is an extended (~1 arcmin) sub-mm source located near the core of the cluster MS0451.6-0305. It has been suggested that part of its emission arises from the interaction between a LBG and two EROs at z~2.9 that are multiply-imaged. However, the dramatic resolution difference between the sub-mm map and the optical/NIR images make it difficult to confirm this hypothesis. In this paper, we present a deep (~ 10 microJy/beam), high resolution (~2 arcsec) 1.4 GHz radio map of the cluster core, in which we have identified 6 sources located within SMM J04542-0301. The strong lensing effect in the radio data has been quantified by constructing a new lens model of the cluster. The brightest and most extended of these sources (RJ) is located in the middle of the sub-mm emission, and has no obvious counterpart in the optical/NIR. Three other detections (E1, E2 and E3) seem to be associated with the images of one of the EROs. The last two detections (CR1 and CR2), for which no optical/NIR counterpart have b...

  9. Comparison of Electronic and Optical Properties of GaN Monolayer and Bulk Structure: a First Principle Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Hussain, Fayyaz; Rashid, Muhammad; Ullah, Hafeez; Sattar, Atif; Iqbal, Faisal; Ahmad, Ejaz

    2016-03-01

    The semiconducting two-dimensional (2D) architectures materials have potential applications in electronics and optics. The design and search of new 2D materials have attracted extensive attention recently. In this study, first principle calculation has been done on 2D gallium nitride (GaN) monolayer with respect to its formation and binding energies. The electronic and optical properties are also investigated. It is found that the single isolated GaN sheet is forming mainly ionic GaN bonds despite a slightly weaker GaN interaction as compared with its bulk counterpart. The dielectric constant value of 2D GaN is smaller as compared to 3D GaN due to less effective electronic screening effect in the layer, which is accompanied by lesser optical adsorption range and suggested to be a promising candidate in electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  10. Optical coatings: Laser radiation damage. (Latest citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theoretical aspects and experimental investigations of laser induced damage to optical coatings. The citations examine damage thresholds of metal, dielectric, and metal-dielectric coating materials used in high power lasers. Topics also include the effects of laser damage on coating processes and materials, and substrate materials which influence the origin and morphology of laser damage. Laser sources are also considered. (Contains a minimum of 100 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Autonomous search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous combinatorial search (AS) represents a new field in combinatorial problem solving. Its major standpoint and originality is that it considers that problem solvers must be capable of self-improvement operations. This is the first book dedicated to AS.

  12. Counterpart experimental study of ISP-42 PANDA tests on PUMA facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jun, E-mail: toyangjun@gmail.com [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Choi, Sung-Won; Lim, Jaehyok; Lee, Doo-Yong; Rassame, Somboon; Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Counterpart tests were performed on two large-scale BWR integral facilities. ► Similarity of post-LOCA system behaviors observed between two tests. ► Passive core and containment cooling systems work as design in both tests. -- Abstract: A counterpart test to the Passive Nachwärmeabfuhr und Druckabbau Test Anlage (Passive Decay Heat Removal and Depressurization Test Facility, PANDA) International Standard Problem (ISP)-42 test was conducted at the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA) facility. Aimed to support code validation on a range of light water reactor (LWR) containment issues, the ISP-42 test consists of six sequential phases (Phases A–F) with separately defined initial and boundary conditions, addressing different stages of anticipated accident scenario and system responses. The counterpart test was performed from Phases A to D, which are within the scope of the normal integral tests performed on the PUMA facility. A scaling methodology was developed by using the PANDA facility as prototype and PUMA facility as test model, and an engineering scaling has been applied to the PUMA facility. The counterpart test results indicated that functions of passive safety systems, such as passive containment cooling system (PCCS) start-up, gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) discharge, PCCS normal operation and overload function were confirmed in both the PANDA and PUMA facilities with qualitative similarities.

  13. Maximizing the probability of detecting an electromagnetic counterpart of gravitational-wave events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Michael; Stubbs, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Compact binary coalescences are a promising source of gravitational waves for second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors such as advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo. These are among the most promising sources for joint detection of electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational-wave (GW) emission. To maximize the science performed with these objects, it is essential to undertake a followup observing strategy that maximizes the likelihood of detecting the EM counterpart. We present a follow-up strategy that maximizes the counterpart detection probability, given a fixed investment of telescope time. We show how the prior assumption on the luminosity function of the electro-magnetic counterpart impacts the optimized followup strategy. Our results suggest that if the goal is to detect an EM counterpart from among a succession of GW triggers, the optimal strategy is to perform long integrations in the highest likelihood regions. For certain assumptions about source luminosity and mass distributions, we find that an optimal time investment that is proportional to the 2/3 power of the surface density of the GW location probability on the sky. In the future, this analysis framework will benefit significantly from the 3-dimensional localization probability.

  14. The political transnationalism of Colombian migrants in New York and New Jersey (1990- 2010: Its understanding from the optics of identity wounds and the search for recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanza Amézquita Quintana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to understand the dynamics of the political transnationalism of Colombian migrants in New York City and the northern area of New Jersey during the 1990-2010 period from the processes of contempt and moral suffering (social stigmatization, the implications of these processes in the migrants’ identity/autonomy (as generators of identity wounds and their search for social recognition. The paper begins with a characterization of the Colombian migration to that setting. Then it shows the experiences of moral contempt faced by Colombian migrants in the contexts of origin and arrival. In the context of origin such experiences were linked to social and political polarization, violence, inequality and strong barriers to upward mobility, while in the context of arrival these experiences were related to the stigma of drug trafficking, the dynamics of cultural racism, discrimination because of low English proficiency, and the absence of a legal immigration status. Finally, the article discusses the participation and mobilization (mainly at informal and collective levels of Colombian migrants in relation to the search for social recognition.

  15. Ion clock and search for the variation of the fine structure constant using optical transitions in Nd$^{13+}$ and Sm$^{15+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V

    2012-01-01

    We study ultranarrow $5s_{1/2}$ - $4f_{5/2}$ transitions in Nd$^{13+}$ and Sm$^{15+}$ and demonstrate that they lie in the optical region. The transitions are insensitive to external perturbations. At the same time they are sensitive to the variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$. The fractional accuracy of the frequency of the transitions can be smaller than $10^{-19}$, which may provide a basis for atomic clocks of superb accuracy. Sensitivity to the variation of $\\alpha$ approaches $10^{-20}$ per year.

  16. [The active search for occupational diseases in the engineering industries. Diseases associated with exposure to welding activities in optical radiation: dry eye syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messineo, A; Leone, M; Sanna, S; Arrigoni, E; Teodori, C; Pecorella, I; Imperatore, A; Villarini, S; Macchiaroli, S

    2011-01-01

    In the project of active research of occupational diseases was conducted a study on 45 welders in the engineering companies, with particular attention to the hazards of exposure to the optical radiation. The protocol used involved the execution of Breack Up test, Schirmer test, corneal staining and scraping cytology. It revealed that more than half of the welders had ocular lesions referable to their work activity as well as some permanent functional damages with the characters of dry eye syndrome. None of these diseases, which could alert for medical-legal and insurance, was highlighted by the occupational health physician.

  17. Cygnus X-3: Its Little Friend's Counterpart, the Distance to Cygnus X-3, and Outflows/Jets

    CERN Document Server

    McCollough, Michael; Dunham, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chandra observations have revealed a feature,within 16" of Cygnus X-3 which varied in phase with Cygnus X-3. This feature was shown to be a Bok globule which is along the line of sight to Cygnus X-3. We report on observations made with Submillimeter Array (SMA) to search for molecular emission from this globule, also known as Cygnus X-3's "Little Friend" (LF). We have found a counterpart in both 12CO (2-1) and 13}CO (2-1) emission. From the velocity shift of the molecular lines, we are able to find two probable distances based on the Bayesian model of Milky Way kinematics of Reid et al. 2016. For the LF velocity of -47.5 km/s, we get a distance of 6.1 +/- 0.6 kpc (62% probability) and 7.8 +/- 0.6 ~kpc (38% probability). This yields a distance to Cyg X-3 of 7.4 +/- 1.1 kpc and 10.2 +/-1.2 ~kpc, respectively. Based on the probabilities entailed, we take 7.4 +/- 1.1 kpc as the preferred distance to Cyg X-3. We also report the discovery of bipolar molecular outflow, suggesting that there is active star formation ...

  18. $A$ searches

    CERN Document Server

    Beacham, James

    The Standard Model of particle physics encompasses three of the four known fundamental forces of nature, and has remarkably withstood all of the experimental tests of its predictions, a fact solidified by the discovery, in 2012, of the Higgs boson. However, it cannot be the complete picture. Many measurements have been made that hint at physics beyond the Standard Model, and the main task of the high- energy experimental physics community is to conduct searches for new physics in as many di↵erent places and regimes as possible. I present three searches for new phenomena in three di↵erent high-energy collider experiments, namely, a search for events with at least three photons in the final state, which is sensitive to an exotic decay of a Higgs boson into four photons via intermediate pseudoscalar particles, a, with ATLAS, at the Large Hadron Collider; a search for a dark photon, also known as an A0 , with APEX, at Thomas Je↵erson National Accelerator Facility; and a search for a Higgs decaying into four...

  19. Study of an Impact-Parameter Optical Discriminator to be used for Beauty Search in Fixed-Target Mode~ at~the~LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD30 \\\\ \\\\ We propose a research and development of an $^{\\prime}$Optical Trigger$^{\\prime}$ to be used for B-meson selection in a LHC fixed-target experiment. The optical trigger relies on the detection of Cerenkov light produced and trapped in a thin spherical crystal viewed by a fast photodetector. The device is, in principle, sensitive to charged particles with large impact parameter arising from secondary vertices belonging to the B-meson chain, but it is blind to minimum bias events originating in a small target. A full prototype using LiF fluoride crystal in 1992 and the experimental results are in agreement with expectations. Backgrounds due to delta-rays and nuclear interactions are measured to be about 2\\%. A second generation prototype with Sapphire crystal and liquid cladding is developed to improve the sensitivity of the device at very low impact parameters (100~$\\mu$m). A third generation prototype with fiber read-out is also under preparation. To improve further the sensitivity a novel read-o...

  20. 超宽温折衍混合红外搜索跟踪光学系统设计%Design of infrared diffractive/refractive search and trace optical system beyond normal temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈满德

    2012-01-01

    To meet environment performance of infrared search and trace optical system.a novel optical system beyond normal temperature of infrared camera in 3.7-4.8 μm with 11.42 degrees of field of view was designed. The IRST system was consisted of three lenses,including two aspheric surfaces and a diffraction surface, which had only two materials Ge and Si. The optical system had compact structure, small volume and light weight. The image quality of the system approached the diffraction limit in the temperature range -80-160℃. It was compatible with staring focal plane array which had a format of 320 ×240 and the pixel pitch of 30 μm,the infrared search and trace system have jarless and good performance beyond normal temperature. The recognition distance of the system was calculated. The system can recognize a vehicle target from 1.0 km.%为满足红外搜索跟踪成像系统的环境适应性的特殊要求,设计了一种用于搜索跟踪的红外超宽温成像系统,其工作波段为3.7~4.8 μm,视场角为11.42°.该系统采用三片式结构,使用锗和硅两种红外材料,引入两个非球面和一个衍射面,使系统具有结构简单、体积小、重量轻、成本低等优点.设计结果表明;该系统在-80~160℃温度范围内成像质量接近衍射极限,适用于像元尺寸为30 μm、像元数为320×240的焦平面阵列探测器,保证了红外搜索跟踪系统在超宽温度下稳定的工作性能,对该系统的探测距离进行了估算,系统能够探测1.0km处的目标.

  1. Hunting for Optical Companions to Binary Msps in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Francesco

    2009-07-01

    Here we present a proposal which exploits the re-newed potential of HST after the Service Mission 4 for probing the population of binary Millisecond Pulsars {MSPs} in Globular Clusters. In particular we intend to: {1} extend the search for optical counterparts in Terzan 5, by pushing the performance of the WFC3 IR channel to sample the entire MS extension down to M=0.1 Mo; {2} perform a deep multi-band search of MSP companions with the WFC3, in 3 clusters {namely NGC6440, M28 and M5}, where recent radio observations have found particularly interesting objects; {3} derive an accurate radial velocity {with STIS} of the puzzling optical companion COM6266B recently discovered by our group, to firmly assess its cluster membership.This program is the result of a large collaboration among the three major groups {lead by Freire, Ransom and Possenti} which are performing extensive MSP search in GCs in the radio bands, and our group which has a large experience in performing accurate stellar photometry in crowded environments. This collaboration has produced a number of outstanding discoveries. In fact, three of the 6 optical counterparts to binary MSP companions known to date in GCs have been discovered by our group. The observations here proposed would easily double/triple the existing sample of known MSP companions, allowing the first meaningful approach to the study of the formation, evolution and recycling process of pulsar in GCs. Moreover, since most of binary MSPs in GCs are thought to form via stellar interactions in the high density core regions, the determination of the nature of the companion and the incidence of this collisionally induced population has a significant impact on our knowledge of the cluster dynamics. Even more interesting, the study of the optical companions to NSs in GCs allows one to derive tighter constraints {than those obtainable for NS binaries in the Galactic field} on the system properties. This has, in turn, an intrisic importance for

  2. On-disk counterparts of type II spicules in the Ca II 854.2 nm and Halpha lines

    CERN Document Server

    van der Voort, L Rouppe; De Pontieu, B; Carlsson, M; Vissers, G

    2009-01-01

    Recently a second type of spicules was discovered at the solar limb with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Japanese Hinode spacecraft. These previously unrecognized type II spicules are thin chromospheric jets that are shorter-lived (10-60 s) and that show much higher apparent upward velocities (of order 50-100 km/s) than the classical spicules. Since they have been implicated in providing hot plasma to coronal loops, their formation, evolution and properties are important ingredients for a better understanding of the mass and energy balance of the low solar atmosphere. Here we report on the discovery of the disk counterparts of type II spicules using spectral imaging data in the Ca II 854.2 nm and Halpha lines with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST) in La Palma. We find rapid blueward excursions in the line profiles of both chromospheric lines that correspond to thin, jet-like features that show apparent velocities of order 50 km/s. These blueward ex...

  3. Functional Counterpart of Lagrangian Theorem and Perturbative Density Functional Theory: a Forgotten Idea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周世琦

    2002-01-01

    In this Letter, we truncate the functional expansion of the non-uniform first-order direct correlation function (DCF) around the bulk density at the lowest order. But the truncation is performed formally and exactly by making use of functional counterpart of the Lagrangian theorem of differential calculus. Consequently the expansion coefficient, i.e. the uniform second-order DCF, is replaced by its non-uniform counterpart whose density argument is an appropriate mixture of calculated density distribution and the bulk density with a mixing parameter determined by a hard-wall sum rule. The non-uniform second-order DCF is then approximated by the uniform second-order DCF with an appropriate weighted density as its density argument. The present formally exact truncated functional expansion predicts the density distribution in good agreement with simulation data for hard sphere and Lennard-Jones fluid exerted by an external field.

  4. Electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves from black hole mergers and naked singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Malafarina, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    We consider the question here whether the proposed electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational wave signals in binary black hole coalescence may be due to the appearance of a `short lived' naked singularity during the merger. We point out that the change in topology that the spacetime undergoes during the merger can cause the appearance of a naked singularity. In case some matter, in the form of a small accretion disk, is present in the surroundings of the black hole system then the emitted luminosity during the merger would allow to distinguish the scenario where the naked singularity forms from the scenario where the horizon exists at all times. In fact the emitted luminosity spectrum would be much higher in the case where a naked singularity forms as opposed to the `pure' black hole case. We suggest that the presence of such a transient naked singularity will explain the high luminosity of an electromagnetic counterpart during the merger much more easily.

  5. The Infrared Counterpart of the X-ray Burster KS 1731-260

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Mirabel, F; Mereghetti, S

    2002-01-01

    We present JK' infrared images of the X-ray transient KS 1731--260, obtained in 1997 and in 1998 with IRAC2b at the ESO/MPI 2.2-m telescope at La Silla. Using as a reference the recent Chandra position, we confirm the identification of the X-ray source with the previously proposed counterpart (Wijnands et al. 2001b), for which we measure J=17.32 +/- 0.2 and K' = 16.36 +/- 0.18. The source was entering a low X-ray state at the epoch of our observations, and the accretion disk was still dominating the infrared flux. Indeed, when compared with the only published magnitudes in the J-band (Orosz et al. 2001), obtained with the source in quiescence, our photometry confirms the fading of the counterpart during the decay of the RXTE/ASM lightcurve.

  6. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barrie W.

    2003-01-01

    Traces the efforts of Searching for Extraterrestrial Technological Intelligence (SETI) since 1960 when a radio-telescope was used to see if any messages were being sent from the vicinity of two nearby stars. Describes attempts to detect microwave/optical signals and technological modification of the cosmic environment. (Author/KHR)

  7. Internet Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Fatmaa El Zahraa Mohamed Abdou

    2004-01-01

    A general study about the internet search engines, the study deals main 7 points; the differance between search engines and search directories, components of search engines, the percentage of sites covered by search engines, cataloging of sites, the needed time for sites appearance in search engines, search capabilities, and types of search engines.

  8. Internet Search Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatmaa El Zahraa Mohamed Abdou

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A general study about the internet search engines, the study deals main 7 points; the differance between search engines and search directories, components of search engines, the percentage of sites covered by search engines, cataloging of sites, the needed time for sites appearance in search engines, search capabilities, and types of search engines.

  9. A novel method for transient detection in high-cadence optical surveys: Its application for a systematic search for novae in M31

    CERN Document Server

    Soraisam, Monika D; Kupfer, Thomas; Masci, Frank; Shafter, Allen W; Prince, Thomas A; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Ofek, Eran O; Bellm, Eric

    2016-01-01

    [abridged] In large-scale time-domain surveys, the processing of data, from procurement up to the detection of sources, is generally automated. One of the main challenges is contamination by artifacts, especially in regions of strong unresolved emission. We present a novel method for identifying candidates for variables and transients from the outputs of such surveys' data pipelines. We use the method to systematically search for novae in iPTF observations of the bulge of M31. We demonstrate that most artifacts produced by the iPTF pipeline form a locally uniform background of false detections approximately obeying Poissonian statistics, whereas genuine variables and transients as well as artifacts associated with bright stars result in clusters of detections, whose spread is determined by the source localization accuracy. This makes the problem analogous to source detection on images produced by X-ray telescopes, enabling one to utilize tools developed in X-ray astronomy. In particular, we use a wavelet-base...

  10. Female recreational athletes demonstrate different knee biomechanics from male counterparts during jumping rope and turning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Hidenori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Harato, Kengo; Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Suda, Yasunori; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Nagura, Takeo

    2014-01-01

    A variety of athletic exercises are performed in sports training or rehabilitation after knee injuries. However, it remains unclear whether males and females exhibit similar joint loading during the various athletic motions. The purpose of this study was to identify gender differences in knee biomechanics during the athletic motions. Three-dimensional knee kinematics and kinetics were investigated in 20 recreational athletes (10 males and 10 females) while jumping rope, backward running, side running, side-to-side running, side-to-forward running, inside turning, and outside turning. The strengths of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles, the knee joint force, the knee joint angle, and the knee joint moment were compared between males and females using one-tailed t tests. Peak knee anterior force was greater in female recreational athletes than in their male counterparts during jumping rope, side-to-forward running, inside turning, and outside turning. Female subjects displayed greater peak knee abduction angles and greater peak knee flexion moments while jumping rope compared to their male counterparts. There were no significant differences between the sexes in knee kinematics and kinetics in the frontal and transverse planes during running and turning motions. Female recreational athletes exhibited significantly different knee biomechanics compared with male counterparts during jumping rope and turning motions.

  11. Comparison of historic Grübler dyes with modern counterparts using thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titford, M

    2007-08-01

    The aniline dye industry was created in 1856 when William Perkin prepared the dye, mauve, from coal tar. Following that discovery, several dye manufacturing businesses were formed in Western Europe, most successfully in Germany. It was to these companies that early investigators turned to obtain these new dyes for the developing field of biology. In 1880, Dr. Georg Grübler started a company in Germany to supply the needs of biologists. Grübler dyes developed a reputation for excellence. In the study reported here, 29 samples of 12 Grübler dyes were compared to modern counterparts using thin layer chromatography. The dyes studied were basic fuchsine, acid fuchsine, safranine, pyronine, aniline blue, ponceau, gentian violet, methylene blue, orange G, malachite green, and Sudan III and IV. I found that these early Grübler dyes closely resembled modern day counterparts; however, the use of synonyms was confusing and some of the fat stains were mislabeled by modern criteria. The chromatograms of some dyes exhibited smearing, probably representing multiple closely related dye species. The study of old dyes provides interesting comparisons with modern counterparts as the center of dye manufacturing is moving from Europe and the United States to Asia.

  12. Near-infrared counterparts of Chandra X-ray sources toward the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    DeWitt, Curtis; Eikenberry, Stephen S; Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut; Sellgren, Kris; Sarajedini, Ata

    2010-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory has now discovered nearly 10,000 X-ray point sources in the 2 x 0.8 degree region around the Galactic Center (Muno 2009). The sources are likely to be a population of accreting binaries in the Galactic Center, but little else is known of their nature. We obtained JHKs imaging of the 17'x 17' region around Sgr A*, an area containing 4339 of these X-ray sources, with the ISPI camera on the CTIO 4-m telescope. We cross-correlate the Chandra and ISPI catalogs to find potential IR counterparts to the X-ray sources. The extreme IR source crowding in the field means that it is not possible to establish the authenticity of the matches with astrometry and photometry alone. We find 2137 IR/X-ray astrometrically matched sources: statistically we estimate that our catalog contains 289 +/- 13 true matches to soft X-ray sources and 154 +/- 39 matches to hard X-ray sources. However, the fraction of true counterparts to candidate counterparts for hard sources is just 11 %, compared to 60 % for s...

  13. Subaru Adaptive-optics High-spatial-resolution Infrared K- and L'-band Imaging Search for Deeply Buried Dual AGNs in Merging Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Imanishi, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of infrared K- (2.2 micron) and L'-band (3.8 micron) high-spatial-resolution (<0.2 arcsec) imaging observations of nearby gas- and dust-rich infrared luminous merging galaxies, assisted by the adaptive optics (AO) system on the Subaru 8.2-m telescope. We investigate the presence and frequency of red K-L' compact sources, which are sensitive indicators of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including AGNs that are deeply buried in gas and dust. We observed 29 merging systems and confirmed at least one AGN in all but one system. However, luminous dual AGNs were detected in only four of the 29 systems (~14%), despite our method's being sensitive to buried AGNs. For multiple nuclei sources, we compared the estimated AGN luminosities with supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses inferred from large aperture K-band stellar emission photometry in individual nuclei. We found that mass accretion rates onto SMBHs are significantly different among multiple SMBHs, such that larger-mass SMBHs generally s...

  14. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic physics (GNOME): A novel scheme to search for physics beyond the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustelny, Szymon [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jackson Kimball, Derek F. [Department of Physics, California State University, Hayward, CA (United States); Pankow, Chris [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology, and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Ledbetter, Micah P. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wlodarczyk, Przemyslaw [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Wcislo, Piotr [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun (Poland); Pospelov, Maxim [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Smith, Joshua R.; Read, Jocelyn [Gravitational-Wave Physics and Astronomy Center, Department of Physics, California State University, Fullerton, CA (United States); Gawlik, Wojciech [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Budker, Dmitry [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-09-15

    A novel experimental scheme enabling the investigation of transient exotic spin couplings is discussed. The scheme is based on synchronous measurements of optical-magnetometer signals from several devices operating in magnetically shielded environments in distant locations (>or similar 100 km). Although signatures of such exotic couplings may be present in the signal from a single magnetometer, it would be challenging to distinguish them from noise. By analyzing the correlation between signals from multiple, geographically separated magnetometers, it is not only possible to identify the exotic transient but also to investigate its nature. The ability of the network to probe presently unconstrained physics beyond the Standard Model is examined by considering the spin coupling to stable topological defects (e.g., domain walls) of axion-like fields. In the spirit of this research, a brief ({proportional_to}2 hours) demonstration experiment involving two magnetometers located in Krakow and Berkeley ({proportional_to}9000 km separation) is presented and discussion of the data-analysis approaches that may allow identification of transient signals is provided. The prospects of the network are outlined in the last part of the paper. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Optical, luminescence and thermal properties of radiopure ZnMoO{sub 4} crystals used in scintillating bolometers for double beta decay search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyak, D.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière, 91405 Orsay (France); Danevich, F.A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Degoda, V.Ya.; Dmitruk, I.M. [Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Ferri, F. [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia dell' Università dell' Insubria, Como I-22100 (Italy); Galashov, E.N. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Giuliani, A., E-mail: Andrea.Giuliani@csnsm.in2p3.fr [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière, 91405 Orsay (France); Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia dell' Università dell' Insubria, Como I-22100 (Italy); Sezione INFN di Milano-Bicocca, I-20126 Italy (Italy); Ivanov, I.M. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kobychev, V.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Mancuso, M.; Marnieros, S. [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière, 91405 Orsay (France); Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia dell' Università dell' Insubria, Como I-22100 (Italy); Mokina, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Nones, C.; Olivieri, E. [Service de Physique des Particules, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Pessina, G. [Sezione INFN di Milano-Bicocca, I-20126 Italy (Italy); Rusconi, C. [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia dell' Università dell' Insubria, Como I-22100 (Italy); Sezione INFN di Milano-Bicocca, I-20126 Italy (Italy); and others

    2013-11-21

    Zinc molybdate (ZnMoO{sub 4}) crystals are an excellent candidate material to fabricate scintillating bolometers for the study of neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 100}Mo, provided that the crystal quality meets strict optical, thermal and radiopurity requirements. This paper addresses the characterization of improved crystalline samples grown by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. Transmittance measurements confirm significant improvement of the material with respect to previously developed samples. Luminescence properties (emission spectra, dependence of intensity on temperature, thermally stimulated luminescence and phosphorescence) have been studied under X-ray excitation from liquid-helium to room temperature. The index of refraction was measured in the wavelength interval 406–655 nm. Samples of ZnMoO{sub 4} crystals with masses of 5.07 g and 23.8 g were operated as scintillating bolometers at temperatures below 30 mK, with simultaneous detection of scintillation and heat signals, confirming an excellent alpha/beta rejection power. Background measurements allowed encouraging radiopurity level estimations. The light collection from ZnMoO{sub 4} scintillators was Monte Carlo simulated, analysing different crystal size, shape and surface properties and different photodetector sizes.

  16. A search for TiO in the optical high-resolution transmission spectrum of HD 209458b: Hindrance due to inaccuracies in the line database

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeijmakers, H J; Snellen, I A G; Brogi, M; Birkby, J L; Schwarz, H

    2014-01-01

    The spectral signature of an exoplanet can be separated from the spectrum of its host star using high-resolution spectroscopy. During such observations, the radial component of the planet's orbital velocity changes, resulting in a significant Doppler shift which allows its spectral features to be extracted. Aims: In this work, we aim to detect TiO in the optical transmission spectrum of HD 209458b. Gaseous TiO has been suggested as the cause of the thermal inversion layer invoked to explain the dayside spectrum of this planet. Method: We used archival data from the 8.2m Subaru Telescope taken with the High Dispersion Spectrograph of a transit of HD209458b in 2002. We created model transmission spectra which include absorption by TiO, and cross-correlated them with the residual spectral data after removal of the dominating stellar absorption features. We subsequently co-added the correlation signal in time, taking into account the change in Doppler shift due to the orbit of the planet. Results: We detect no si...

  17. Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory supports graduate instruction in optics, optical and laser diagnostics and electro-optics. The optics laboratory provides...

  18. Subaru adaptive-optics high-spatial-resolution infrared K- and L'-band imaging search for deeply buried dual AGNs in merging galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Saito, Yuriko, E-mail: masa.imanishi@nao.ac.jp [Also at Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan. (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of infrared K- (2.2 μm) and L'-band (3.8 μm) high-spatial-resolution (<0.''2) imaging observations of nearby gas- and dust-rich infrared luminous merging galaxies, assisted by the adaptive optics system on the Subaru 8.2 m telescope. We investigate the presence and frequency of red K – L' compact sources, which are sensitive indicators of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including AGNs that are deeply buried in gas and dust. We observed 29 merging systems and confirmed at least one AGN in all but one system. However, luminous dual AGNs were detected in only four of the 29 systems (∼14%), despite our method's being sensitive to buried AGNs. For multiple nuclei sources, we compared the estimated AGN luminosities with supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses inferred from large-aperture K-band stellar emission photometry in individual nuclei. We found that mass accretion rates onto SMBHs are significantly different among multiple SMBHs, such that larger-mass SMBHs generally show higher mass accretion rates when normalized to SMBH mass. Our results suggest that non-synchronous mass accretion onto SMBHs in gas- and dust-rich infrared luminous merging galaxies hampers the observational detection of kiloparsec-scale multiple active SMBHs. This could explain the significantly smaller detection fraction of kiloparsec-scale dual AGNs when compared with the number expected from simple theoretical predictions. Our results also indicate that mass accretion onto SMBHs is dominated by local conditions, rather than by global galaxy properties, reinforcing the importance of observations to our understanding of how multiple SMBHs are activated and acquire mass in gas- and dust-rich merging galaxies.

  19. Search for $\

    OpenAIRE

    Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; J. Bouchez; Boyd, S.; A. Bueno; Bunyatov, S.

    2003-01-01

    Neutrinos; We present the results of a search for nu_mu → nu_e oscillations in the NOMAD experiment at Cern. The experiment looked for the appearance of nu_e in a predominantly nu_mu wide-band neutrino beam at the CERN SPS. No evidence for oscillations was found. The 90% confidence limits obtained are Delta m^2 ~ 10 eV^2.

  20. Search for $\

    CERN Document Server

    Astier, Pierre; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldo-Ceolin, Massimilla; Banner, M; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Benslama, K; Besson, N; Bird, I; Blumenfeld, B; Bobisut, F; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S; Bueno, A G; Bunyatov, S A; Camilleri, L L; Cardini, A; Cattaneo, Paolo Walter; Cavasinni, V; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Challis, R C; Chukanov, A; Collazuol, G; Conforto, G; Conta, C; Contalbrigo, M; Cousins, R D; Daniels, D; De Santo, A; Degaudenzi, H M; Del Prete, T; Di Lella, L; Dignan, T; Dumarchez, J; Feldman, G J; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, R; Ferrère, D; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Fraternali, M; Gaillard, J M; Gangler, E; Geiser, A; Geppert, D; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S N; Godley, A; Gosset, J; Gouanère, M; Grant, A; Graziani, G; Guglielmi, A M; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gössling, C; Hagner, C; Hernando, J; Hong, T M; Hubbard, D B; Hurst, P; Hyett, N; Iacopini, E; Joseph, C L; Juget, F R; Kent, N; Kirsanov, M M; Klimov, O; Kokkonen, J; Kovzelev, A; Krasnoperov, A V; Kustov, D; La Rotonda, L; Lacaprara, S; Lachaud, C; Lakic, B; Lanza, A; Laveder, M; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Linssen, Lucie; Ljubicic, A; Long, J; Lupi, A; Lévy, J M; Marchionni, A; Martelli, F; Mendiburu, J P; Meyer, J P; Mezzetto, Mauro; Mishra, S R; Moorhead, G F; Méchain, X; Naumov, D V; Nefedov, Yu A; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nédélec, P; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Peak, L S; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Petti, R; Placci, A; Polesello, G; Pollmann, D; Polyarush, A Yu; Popov, B; Poulsen, C; Rebuffi, L; Renò, R; Rico, J; Riemann, P; Roda, C; Rubbia, André; Salvatore, F; Schahmaneche, K; Schmidt, B; Schmidt, T; Sconza, A; Sevior, M E; Shih, D; Sillou, D; Soler, F J P; Sozzi, G; Steele, D; Stiegler, U; Stipcevic, M; Stolarczyk, T; Tareb-Reyes, M; Taylor, G N; Tereshchenko, V V; Toropin, A N; Touchard, A M; Tovey, Stuart N; Tran, M T; Tsesmelis, E; Ulrichs, J; Vacavant, L; Valdata-Nappi, M; Valuev, V Yu; Vannucci, François; Varvell, K E; Veltri, M; Vercesi, V; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Vieira, J M; Vinogradova, T G; Weber, F V; Weisse, T; Wilson, F F; Winton, L J; Yabsley, B D; Zaccone, Henri; Zuber, K; Zuccon, P; do Couto e Silva, E

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a search for nu_mu → nu_e oscillations in the NOMAD experiment at Cern. The experiment looked for the appearance of nu_e in a predominantly nu_mu wide-band neutrino beam at the CERN SPS. No evidence for oscillations was found. The 90% confidence limits obtained are Delta m^2 ~ 10 eV^2.

  1. Search for $\

    CERN Document Server

    Astier, Pierre; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldo-Ceolin, Massimilla; Banner, M; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Benslama, K; Besson, N; Bird, I; Blumenfeld, B; Bobisut, F; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S; Bueno, A G; Bunyatov, S; Camilleri, L L; Cardini, A; Cattaneo, Paolo Walter; Cavasinni, V; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Challis, R C; Chukanov, A; Collazuol, G; Conforto, G; Conta, C; Contalbrigo, M; Cousins, R; Daniels, D; Degaudenzi, H M; Del Prete, T; De Santo, A; Dignan, T; Di Lella, L; do Couto e Silva, E; Dumarchez, J; Ellis, M; Feldman, G J; Ferrari, R; Ferrère, D; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Fraternali, M; Gaillard, J M; Gangler, E; Geiser, A; Geppert, D; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S N; Godley, A; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gosset, J; Gössling, C; Gouanère, M; Grant, A; Graziani, G; Guglielmi, A M; Hagner, C; Hernando, J A; Hubbard, D B; Hurst, P; Hyett, N; Iacopini, E; Joseph, C L; Juget, F R; Kent, N; Kirsanov, M M; Klimov, O; Kokkonen, J; Kovzelev, A; Krasnoperov, A V; Kustov, D; Lacaprara, S; Lachaud, C; Lakic, B; Lanza, A; La Rotonda, L; Laveder, M; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Lévy, J M; Linssen, Lucie; Ljubicic, A; Long, J; Lupi, A; Marchionni, A; Martelli, F; Méchain, X; Mendiburu, J P; Meyer, J P; Mezzetto, Mauro; Mishra, S R; Moorhead, G F; Naumov, D V; Nédélec, P; Nefedov, Yu A; Nguyen-Mau, C; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Peak, L S; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Petti, R; Placci, A; Polesello, G; Pollmann, D; Polyarush, A Yu; Popov, B; Poulsen, C; Rebuffi, L; Renò, R; Rico, J; Riemann, P; Roda, C; Rubbia, André; Salvatore, F; Schahmaneche, K; Schmidt, B; Schmidt, T; Sconza, A; Sevior, M E; Sillou, D; Soler, F J P; Sozzi, G; Steele, D; Stiegler, U; Stipcevic, M; Stolarczyk, T; Tareb-Reyes, M; Taylor, G; Tereshchenko, V V; Toropin, A N; Touchard, A M; Tovey, Stuart N; Tran, M T; Tsesmelis, E; Ulrichs, J; Vacavant, L; Valdata-Nappi, M; Valuev, V Y; Vannucci, François; Varvell, K E; Veltri, M; Vercesi, V; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Vieira, J M; Vinogradova, T G; Weber, F V; Weisse, T; Wilson, F F; Winton, L J; Yabsley, B D; Zaccone, Henri; Zuber, K; Zuccon, P

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of a search for nu(mu)-->nu(e) oscillations in the NOMAD experiment at CERN. The experiment looked for the appearance of nu(e) in a predominantly nu(mu) wide-band neutrino beam at the CERN SPS. No evidence for oscillations was found. The 90% confidence limits obtained are delta m^2 10 eV^2.

  2. The optical counterpart of sax j1808.4{3658 in quiescence: evidence of an active radio pulsar?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Burderi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available La contraparte optica del pulsar binario SAX J1808.4-3658 que emite en rayos X con un per odo de milisegundos, ha sido detectada durante su estapa de quietud a V = 21.5 mag; lo cual es inconsistente con la d ebil emisi on de la estrella compa~nera. Proponemos que la emisi on en el optico de este sistema durante su etapa de quietud es debida a la irradiaci on de la estrella compa~nera y a un disco de acreci on permanente provocado por la energ a rotacional producida por el r apido giro de la estrella de neutrones que act ua como un dipolo magn etico rotante (radio pulsar. En este escenario, la compa~nera se comporta como un bol ometro, reprocesando en el optico parte de la potencia emitida por el pulsar. La fracci on reprocesada depende s olo de par ametros conocidos del sistema binario; la temperatura de cuerpo negro asociada a la estrella compa~nera puede predecirse y rati carse con observaciones. Nuestros c alculos indican que las magnitudes opticas observadas son totalmente compatibles con esta hip otesis. En el caso de que esto sea as , la luminosidad observada en el optico puede ser la primera evidencia de que hay un radio pulsar activo en este sistema en quietud.

  3. Faint Ultraviolet Objects in the Core of M13 Optical Counterparts of the Low Luminosity X-ray Source?

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Pecci, F F; Rood, R T; Dorman, B; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Paltrinieri, Barbara; Pecci, Flavio Fusi; Rood, Robert T.; Dorman, Ben

    1997-01-01

    The core of the galactic globular cluster M13 (NGC 6205) has been observed with WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope through visual, blue and mid- and far-UV filters in a programme devoted to study the UV population in a sample of Galactic globular clusters. In the UV Color Magnitude Diagrams derived from the HST images we have discovered three faint objects with a strong UV excess, which lie significantly outside the main loci defined by more than 12,000 normal cluster stars. The positions of two of the UV stars are nearly coincident (7" & 1") to those of a low luminosity X-ray source recently found in the core of M13 and to a 3.5-sigma peak in the X-ray contour map. We suggest that the UV stars are physically connected to the X-ray emission. The UV stars are very similar to the quiescent nova in the globular cluster M80, and they might be a, perhaps new, subclass of cataclysmic variable.

  4. Chandra observation of SAX J1818.6-1703: confirmation of optical counterpart & suggestion of non-transient nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    in't Zand, Jean; Jonker, Peter; Mendez, Mariano; Markwardt, Craig

    2006-01-01

    SAX J1818.6-1703, discovered in 1998 with the BeppoSAX Wide Field Cameras (in 't Zand et al. 1998, IAUC #6840), was found with INTEGRAL and RXTE to exhibit few-hours long outbursts similar to the Supergiant Fast X- ray Transients (Grebenev & Sunyaev 2005, AstL 31, 672; Sguera et al. 2005, A&A 444, 2

  5. The optical counterpart of the supersoft X-ray source r3-8 in M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, M.; Luna, G. J. M.; Kotulla, R.; Gallagher, J. S. G.

    2015-10-01

    On behalf of a larger collaboration we announce that we have obtained spectra of the M31 supersoft X-ray source defined as r3-8 in the Chandra catalogs (see Chiosi et al. 2014, MNRAS 443, 1821, and references therein) using GMOS and the B600 grating at Gemini North, in the 4150-7100 Angstrom range, on 2015/9/9.

  6. Optical spectroscopic observations of blazars and γ-ray blazar candidates in the sloan digital sky survey data release nine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Funk, S.

    2014-09-09

    We present an analysis of the optical spectra available in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release nine (SDSS DR9) for the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and for the γ-ray blazar candidates selected according to their IR colors. First, we adopt a statistical approach based on Monte Carlo simulations to find the optical counterparts of the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT catalog. Then, we crossmatched the SDSS spectroscopic catalog with our selected samples of blazars and γ-ray blazar candidates, searching for those with optical spectra available to classify our blazar-like sources and, whenever possible, to confirm their redshifts. Our main objectives are to determine the classification of uncertain blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and to discover new gamma-ray blazars. For the ROMA-BZCAT sources, we investigated a sample of 84 blazars, confirming the classification for 20 of them and obtaining 18 new redshift estimates. For the γ-ray blazars, indicated as potential counterparts of unassociated Fermi sources or with uncertain nature, we established the blazar-like nature of 8 out of the 27 sources analyzed and confirmed 14 classifications.

  7. The Gamma-Ray Source AGL J2241+4454 as the Possible Counterpart of MWC 656

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munar-Adrover, Pere; Sabatini, S.; Piano, Giovanni; Tavani, Marco; Nguyen, L. H.; Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.

    2016-10-01

    AGILE discovered the transient source AGL J2241+4454 in 2010, which triggered the study of the associated field allowing for the discovery of the first Be/black hole binary system: MWC 656. This binary was suggested to be the counterpart of AGL J2241+4454, but this association is still not robust. In this work we explore the archival AGILE and Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT) data to find more transient events compatible with AGL J2241+4454 and address the possibility to link them to the accretion/ejection processes of MWC 656. We found a total of nine other transient events with AGILE compatible with the position of AGL J2241+4454, besides the 2010 one. We folded these events with the period of the binary system and we could not associate the gamma-ray activity with any particular orbital phase. By stacking the 10 transient events we obtained a spectrum that extends between 100 MeV and 1 GeV, and we fitted it with a power law with a photon index {{Γ }}=2.3+/- 0.2. We searched the Fermi/LAT data in order to complement the gamma-ray information provided by AGILE but no significant results arose. To investigate this apparent contradiction between these telescopes, we studied the exposure of the field of AGL J2241+4454 in both instruments, and found significant differences. In particular, AGILE exposed, for a longer time and at a lower off-axis angular distance, the field of AGL J2241+4454. This fact, together with the energy-dependent sensitivity of both instruments, and the soft spectrum found in the stacking analysis, might explain why AGILE observed the transient events not seen by Fermi/LAT.

  8. Energy metabolism in human pluripotent stem cells and their differentiated counterparts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Varum

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells have the ability to generate all cell types present in the adult organism, therefore harboring great potential for the in vitro study of differentiation and for the development of cell-based therapies. Nonetheless their use may prove challenging as incomplete differentiation of these cells might lead to tumoregenicity. Interestingly, many cancer types have been reported to display metabolic modifications with features that might be similar to stem cells. Understanding the metabolic properties of human pluripotent stem cells when compared to their differentiated counterparts can thus be of crucial importance. Furthermore recent data has stressed distinct features of different human pluripotent cells lines, namely when comparing embryo-derived human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs reprogrammed from somatic cells.We compared the energy metabolism of hESCs, IPSCs, and their somatic counterparts. Focusing on mitochondria, we tracked organelle localization and morphology. Furthermore we performed gene expression analysis of several pathways related to the glucose metabolism, including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. In addition we determined oxygen consumption rates (OCR using a metabolic extracellular flux analyzer, as well as total intracellular ATP levels by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Finally we explored the expression of key proteins involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism.Our results demonstrate that, although the metabolic signature of IPSCs is not identical to that of hESCs, nonetheless they cluster with hESCs rather than with their somatic counterparts. ATP levels, lactate production and OCR revealed that human pluripotent cells rely mostly on glycolysis to meet their energy demands. Furthermore, our work points to some of the strategies which human pluripotent stem cells may use to maintain high

  9. Optical and X-ray early follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Albert, A.; Samarai, I. Al; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fermani, P.; Folger, F.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herrero, A.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaš, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tönnis, C.; Turpin, D.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Klotz, A.; Boer, M.; Le Van Suu, A.; Akerlof, C.; Zheng, W.; Evans, P.; Gehrels, N.; Kennea, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Coward, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays with matter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrino source has yet been discovered. Transient sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, or active galactic nuclei are promising candidates. Multi-messenger programs offer a unique opportunity to detect these transient sources. By combining the information provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope with information coming from other observatories, the probability of detecting a source is enhanced, allowing the possibility of identifying a neutrino progenitor from a single detected event. A method based on optical and X-ray follow-ups of high-energy neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This method does not require any assumptions on the relation between neutrino and photon spectra other than time-correlation. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT and ROTSE) and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection, and is therefore well-suited to search for fast transient sources. To identify an optical or X-ray counterpart to a neutrino signal, the images provided by the follow-up observations are analysed with dedicated pipelines. A total of 42 alerts with optical and 7 alerts with X-ray images taken with a maximum delay of 24 hours after the neutrino trigger have been analysed. No optical or X-ray counterparts associated to the neutrino triggers have been found, and upper limits on transient source magnitudes have been derived. The probability to reject the gamma-ray burst origin hypothesis has been computed for each alert.

  10. Understanding possible electromagnetic counterparts to loud gravitational wave events: Binary black hole effects on electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Yoshida, Shin

    2009-01-01

    In addition to producing loud gravitational waves (GW), the dynamics of a binary black hole system could induce emission of electromagnetic (EM) radiation by affecting the behavior of plasmas and electromagnetic fields in their vicinity. We here study how the electromagnetic fields are affected by a pair of orbiting black holes through the merger. In particular, we show how the binary's dynamics induce a variability in possible electromagnetically induced emissions as well as an enhancement of electromagnetic fields during the late-merge and merger epochs. These time dependent features will likely leave their imprint in processes generating detectable emissions and can be exploited in the detection of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational waves.

  11. Stability patterns for a size-structured population model and its stage-structured counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lai; Pedersen, Michael; Lin, Zhigui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we compare a general size-structured population model, where a size-structured consumer feeds upon an unstructured resource, to its simplified stage-structured counterpart in terms of equilibrium stability. Stability of the size-structured model is understood in terms of an equivalent...... delayed system consisting of a renewal equation for the consumer population birth rate and a delayed differential equation for the resource. Results show that the size- and stage-structured models differ considerably with respect to equilibrium stability, although the two models have completely identical...

  12. Geographic and seasonal influences on optical followup of gravitational wave events

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Varun; Ravi, Aravind P; Ghosh, Archisman; Bose, Sukanta

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effects of observatory locations on the probability of discovering optical/infrared counterparts of gravitational wave sources. We show that for the LIGO--Virgo network, the odds of discovering optical/infrared (OIR) counterparts show some latitude dependence, but weak or no longitudinal dependence. A stronger effect is seen to arise from the timing of LIGO/Virgo observing runs, with northern OIR observatories having better chances of finding the counterparts in northern winters. Assuming identical technical capabilities, the tentative mid-2017 three-detector network observing favors southern OIR observatories for discovery of EM counterparts.

  13. Possible Local Spiral Counterparts to Compact Blue Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, E J; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Zee, Liese van

    2001-01-01

    We identify nearby disk galaxies with optical structural parameters similar to those of intermediate-redshift compact blue galaxies. By comparing HI and optical emission-line widths, we show that the optical widths substantially underestimate the true kinematic widths of the local galaxies. By analogy, optical emission-line widths may underrepresent the masses of intermediate-z compact objects. For the nearby galaxies, the compact blue morphology is the result of tidally-triggered central star formation: we argue that interactions and minor mergers may cause apparently compact morphology at higher redshift.

  14. Autonomous Search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Decades of innovations in combinatorial problem solving have produced better and more complex algorithms. These new methods are better since they can solve larger problems and address new application domains. They are also more complex which means that they are hard to reproduce and often harder to fine-tune to the peculiarities of a given problem. This last point has created a paradox where efficient tools are out of reach of practitioners. Autonomous search (AS) represents a new research field defined to precisely address the above challenge. Its major strength and originality consist in the

  15. Search in

    OpenAIRE

    Gaona Román, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    "Search in" consiste en una instalación artística compuesta por escultura y video con un trasfondo conceptual sobre la identidad. Es una obra que invita al espectador a rodearla e introducirse en ella viéndose así como parte de la obra, al igual que el concepto de identidad puede vivirse desde la sensación del “yo” separado del mundo y a su vez desde el “yo” como parte de la sociedad. Nos hace viajar desde nuestros inicios como sociedad y seres conscientes hasta la actualidad, la era de las c...

  16. Optical observations of PSR J2021+3651 in the Dragonfly Nebula with the GTC

    CERN Document Server

    Kirichenko, Aida; Shternin, Peter; Shibanov, Yuriy; Ryspaeva, Elizaveta; Zyuzin, Dima; Durant, Martin; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Pavlov, George; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    PSR J2021+3651 is a 17 kyr old rotation powered pulsar detected in the radio, X-rays, and $\\gamma$-rays. It powers a torus-like pulsar wind nebula with jets, dubbed the Dragonfly, which is very similar to that of the Vela pulsar. The Dragonfly is likely associated with the extended TeV source VER J2019+368 and extended radio emission. We conducted first deep optical observations with the GTC in the Sloan $r'$ band to search for optical counterparts of the pulsar and its nebula. No counterparts were detected down to $r'\\gtrsim27.2$ and $\\gtrsim24.8$ for the point-like pulsar and the compact X-ray nebula, respectively. We also reanalyzed Chandra archival X-ray data taking into account an interstellar extinction--distance relation, constructed by us for the Dragonfly line of sight using the red-clump stars as standard candles. This allowed us to constrain the distance to the pulsar, $D=1.8^{+1.7}_{-1.4}$ kpc at 90% confidence. It is much smaller than the dispersion measure distance of $\\sim$12 kpc but compatible...

  17. Searching Signals in Chinese Ancient Records for the $^{14}$C Increases in AD 774-775 and in AD 992-993

    CERN Document Server

    Chai, Ya-Ting

    2014-01-01

    According to the analysis of the $^{14}$C content of two Japanese trees over a period of approximately 3000 years at high time resolution, Miyake (2012) found a rapid increase at AD 774-775 and later on at AD 992-993 (Miyake 2013). This corresponds to a high-energy event happened within one year that input $\\gamma$-ray energy about 7$\\times{}$10$^{24}$erg to the Earth, leaving the origin a mystery. Such strong event should have an unusual optical counterpart, and have been recorded in historical literature. We searched Chinese historical materials around AD 744-775 and AD 992-993, but no remarkable event was found except a violent thunderstorm in AD 775. However, the possibility of a thunderstorm containing so much energy is still unlikely. We conclude the event caused the $^{14}$C increase is still unclear. This event most probably has no optical counterpart, and short gamma-ray burst, giant flare of a soft gamma-ray repeater and terrestrial $\\gamma$-ray flash may all be the candidates.

  18. Searching for events in Chinese ancient records to explain the increase in 14C from AD 774-775 and AD 993-994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ya-Ting; Zou, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    According to analysis of the 14C content in two Japanese trees, that grew over a period of approximately 3000 years, with high time resolution, Miyake et al. found a rapid increase at AD 774-775 and another one at AD 993-994. These increases correspond to high-energy events that happened within those years and radiated γ-ray energy of about 7×1024 erg toward the Earth. The origin of these events is a mystery. Such strong events should have an unusual optical counterpart, and have been recorded in historical literatures. We searched Chinese historical materials around AD 744-775 and AD 993-994, but no remarkable event was found except for a violent thunderstorm in AD 775. However, the possibility of a thunderstorm containing so much energy is unlikely. We conclude that the events, which caused the 14C increase, are still unclear. These events most probably had no optical counterpart, and a short gamma-ray burst, giant flare of a soft gamma-ray repeater or a terrestrial γ-ray flash could all be candidates.

  19. Heating signatures in the disk counterparts of solar spicules in IRIS observations

    CERN Document Server

    van der Voort, L Rouppe; Pereira, T M D; Carlsson, M; Hansteen, V

    2014-01-01

    We use coordinated observations with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) to identify the disk counterpart of type II spicules in upper-chromospheric and transition region (TR) diagnostics. These disk counterparts were earlier identified through short-lived asymmetries in chromospheric spectral lines: rapid blue- or red-shifted excursions (RBEs or RREs). We find clear signatures of RBEs and RREs in Mg II h & k, often with excursions of the central h3 and k3 absorption features in concert with asymmetries in co-temporal and co-spatial H-alpha spectral profiles. We find spectral signatures for RBEs and RREs in C II 1335 and 1336 A and Si IV 1394 and 1403 A spectral lines and interpret this as a sign that type II spicules are heated to at least TR temperatures, supporting other recent work. These C II and Si IV spectral signals are weaker for a smaller network region than for more extended network regions in our data. A number of bright features around ex...

  20. An Investigation and Analysis of the“Huaxin Model”of Complementary Counterpart Assistance to Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Minghong; Xiang Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Tibet is located in the high Qinghai-Tibet plateau. Surrounded by tall mountains,it, thus,forms a relatively complete inland geograph-ical unit,and is largely sealed off from the rest of the country. The climate and infrastructure condi-tions of the high plateau impede communication be-tween the Tibetan market and the national market. The development of Tibet is facing difficulties. On the one hand,the“invisible hand”of the market cannot fully play its role in promoting Tibet’s de-velopment;and,on the other hand,the sole reli-ance on the“visible hand”of the state administra-tion for the socio-economic development of Tibet lacks strong market support. In 1994,the Central Government’s Third Tibet Work Forum established a formal system regarding assistance for Tibet’s de-velopment. It is ,“taking responsibility by divid-ing the region into zones, providing assistance through complementary counterpart relationships, which were periodically rotated”. This became a method for handling this difficulty. The purpose of providing assistance through complementary coun-terpart relationships to Tibet was to promote Tibet’s self - development capability, and develop a“hematopoietic”system for socio -economic de-velopment.

  1. The Fermi Haze: A Gamma-Ray Counterpart to the Microwave Haze

    CERN Document Server

    Dobler, Gregory; Cholis, Ilias; Slatyer, Tracy R; Weiner, Neal

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope reveals a diffuse inverse Compton signal in the inner Galaxy with the same spatial morphology as the microwave haze observed by WMAP, confirming the synchrotron origin of the microwaves. Using spatial templates, we regress out pi0 gammas, as well as ICS and bremsstrahlung components associated with known soft-synchrotron counterparts. We find a significant gamma-ray excess towards the Galactic center with a spectrum that is significantly harder than other sky components and is most consistent with ICS from a hard population of electrons. The morphology and spectrum are consistent with it being the ICS counterpart to the electrons which generate the microwave haze seen at WMAP frequencies. In addition to confirming that the microwave haze is indeed synchrotron, the distinct spatial morphology and very hard spectrum of the ICS are evidence that the electrons responsible for the microwave and gamma-ray haze originate from a harder source than supernova shocks. We describe the ...

  2. Clinical outcomes of Fränkel appliance therapy assessed with a counterpart analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevidanes, Lucia H S; Franco, Alexandre A; Scanavini, Marco A; Vigorito, Julio W; Enlow, Donald H; Proffit, William R

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate whether the Fränkel Regulator-II (FR-II) induced mandibular growth rotations relative to the nasomaxilla and the middle cranial fossae, cephalometric changes in 28 treated Brazilian children were compared with changes in 28 untreated Class II children and in 28 children with normal occlusion. According to Enlow's counterpart analysis, the 3 groups were not significantly different initially in ramus alignment or relative ramus vertical dimension. These jaw relationships were maintained in both untreated groups. In the treated group, all children had overjet reduction, with correction of the dental arch relationship in 26 of the 28, and there was a significant trend toward a more forward ramus alignment (P =.002) and increased ramus relative vertical dimension (P =.0002). These treatment-induced changes showed a negative correlation with ramus alignment; ie, greater improvement was more likely in children who had backward ramus alignment before treatment and whose Class II malocclusion had not already been intrinsically compensated. Changes in the treated children were similar to but greater than those in the normal children, and different from those in the untreated Class II group. The data suggest that studies of skeletal variations with counterpart analysis can show ramus remodeling compensations from treatment that are missed with conventional cephalometrics.

  3. Low energy electron induced reactions in fluorinated acetamide - probing negative ions and neutral stable counterparts*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopyra, Janina; König-Lehmann, Constanze; Illenberger, Eugen; Warneke, Jonas; Swiderek, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Electron impact to trifluoroacetamide (CF3CONH2, TFAA) in the energy range 0-12 eV leads to a variety of negative fragment ions which are formed via dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The underlying reactions range from single bond cleavages to remarkably complex reactions that lead to loss of the neutral units HF, H2O and HNCO as deduced from their directly observed ionic counterparts (M - H2O)-, (M - HF)- and (M - HNCO)-. Also formed are the pseudo-halogen ions CN- and OCN-. All these reactions proceed dominantly via a resonance located near 1 eV, i.e., electrons at subexcitation energies trigger reactions involving multiple bond cleavages. The electron induced generation of the neutral molecules HF, H2O and HNCO in condensed TFAA films is probed by temperature controlled thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) which can be viewed as a complementary techniques to gas-phase experiments in DEA to directly probe the neutral counterparts. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  4. Probing extra dimension through gravitational wave observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Gu, Bao-Min; Huang, Fa Peng; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Meng, Xin-He; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2017-02-01

    The future gravitational wave (GW) observations of compact binaries and their possible electromagnetic counterparts may be used to probe the nature of the extra dimension. It is widely accepted that gravitons and photons are the only two completely confirmed objects that can travel along null geodesics in our four-dimensional space-time. However, if there exist extra dimensions and only GWs can propagate freely in the bulk, the causal propagations of GWs and electromagnetic waves (EMWs) are in general different. In this paper, we study null geodesics of GWs and EMWs in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time in the presence of the curvature of the universe. We show that for general cases the horizon radius of GW is longer than EMW within equal time. Taking the GW150914 event detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and the X-ray event detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor as an example, we study how the curvature k and the constant curvature radius l affect the horizon radii of GW and EMW in the de Sitter and Einstein-de Sitter models of the universe. This provides an alternative method for probing extra dimension through future GW observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts.

  5. Discovery of the near-infrared counterpart to the luminous neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary GX 3+1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Berg, Maureen; Fridriksson, Joel K. [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Homan, Jeroen [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Linares, Manuel, E-mail: M.C.vandenBerg@uva.nl [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), Vía Láctea s/n, La Laguna, E-38205, S/C de Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-10-01

    Using the High Resolution Camera on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we have measured an accurate position for the bright persistent neutron star X-ray binary and atoll source GX 3+1. At a location that is consistent with this new position, we have discovered the near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to GX 3+1 in images taken with the PANIC and FourStar cameras on the Magellan Baade Telescope. The identification of this K{sub s} = 15.8 ± 0.1 mag star as the counterpart is based on the presence of a Br γ emission line in an NIR spectrum taken with the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph on the Baade Telescope. The absolute magnitude derived from the best available distance estimate to GX 3+1 indicates that the mass donor in the system is not a late-type giant. We find that the NIR light in GX 3+1 is likely dominated by the contribution from a heated outer accretion disk. This is similar to what has been found for the NIR flux from the brighter class of Z sources, but unlike the behavior of atolls fainter (L{sub X} ≈ 10{sup 36}-10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}) than GX 3+1, where optically thin synchrotron emission from a jet probably dominates the NIR flux.

  6. Discovery of the Near-infrared Counterpart to the Luminous Neutron-star Low-mass X-Ray Binary GX 3+1

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Maureen; Homan, Jeroen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Linares, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Using the High Resolution Camera on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we have measured an accurate position for the bright persistent neutron star X-ray binary and atoll source GX 3+1. At a location that is consistent with this new position, we have discovered the near-infrared (NIR) counterpart to GX 3+1 in images taken with the PANIC and FourStar cameras on the Magellan Baade Telescope. The identification of this Ks = 15.8 ± 0.1 mag star as the counterpart is based on the presence of a Br γ emission line in an NIR spectrum taken with the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph on the Baade Telescope. The absolute magnitude derived from the best available distance estimate to GX 3+1 indicates that the mass donor in the system is not a late-type giant. We find that the NIR light in GX 3+1 is likely dominated by the contribution from a heated outer accretion disk. This is similar to what has been found for the NIR flux from the brighter class of Z sources, but unlike the behavior of atolls fainter (LX ≈ 1036-1037 erg s-1) than GX 3+1, where optically thin synchrotron emission from a jet probably dominates the NIR flux. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  7. Web Search Engines: Search Syntax and Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Marydee

    2002-01-01

    Presents a chart that explains the search syntax, features, and commands used by the 12 most widely used general Web search engines. Discusses Web standardization, expanded types of content searched, size of databases, and search engines that include both simple and advanced versions. (LRW)

  8. Web Search Engines: Search Syntax and Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Marydee

    2002-01-01

    Presents a chart that explains the search syntax, features, and commands used by the 12 most widely used general Web search engines. Discusses Web standardization, expanded types of content searched, size of databases, and search engines that include both simple and advanced versions. (LRW)

  9. Using volume holograms to search digital databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Geoffrey W.; Maltezos, George; Grawert, Felix; Kobras, Sebastian; Hanssen, Holger; Coufal, Hans J.

    2002-01-01

    Holographic data storage offers the potential for simultaneous search of an entire database by performing multiple optical correlations between stored data pages and a search argument. This content-addressable retrieval produces one analog correlation score for each stored volume hologram. We have previously developed fuzzy encoding techniques for this fast parallel search, and holographically searched a small database with high fidelity. We recently showed that such systems can be configured to produce true inner-products, and proposed an architecture in which massively-parallel searches could be implemented. However, the speed advantage over conventional electronic search provided by parallelism brings with it the possibility of erroneous search results, since these analog correlation scores are subject to various noise sources. We show that the fidelity of such an optical search depends not only on the usual holographic storage signal-to-noise factors (such as readout power, diffraction efficiency, and readout speed), but also on the particular database query being made. In effect, the presence of non-matching database records with nearly the same correlation score as the targeted matching records reduces the speed advantage of the parallel search. Thus for any given fidelity target, the performance improvement offered by a content-addressable holographic storage can vary from query to query even within the same database.

  10. CONSTRUCTIVISM AND REFLECTIVISM AS THE LOGICAL COUNTERPARTS IN TESOL: LEARNING THEORY VERSUS TEACHING METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah al Mahmud

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The gist of the entire constructivist learning theory is that learners are self-builders of their learning that occurs through a mental process in a social context or communication setting, and teachers as facilitators generate learning by creating the expected environment and/or utilizing the process. This article theoretically proves reflectivism as the logical counterpart of constructivism through establishing their complete interdependence andthen suggests certain strategies of reflection to be used in language teaching for ensuring the best possible constructivist learning of language learners. In doing so, the basic tenets of constructivism and reflective thoughts are elaborated, examining their mutual connection thoroughly in terms of constructivist recommendations. The research also focuses on three case studies to depict how the theory of constructivist learning principles comes into practice through judicious reviews or reflective process.

  11. Strategic wholesale pricing for an incumbent supplier facing with a competitive counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianwu

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a wholesale pricing strategy for an incumbent supplier facing with a competitive counterpart. We propose a profit function which considers both the present loss and future loss from a wholesale price and then study the optimal wholesale prices for different objectives about this profit function for the incumbent supplier. First, we achieve an optimal wholesale price for the incumbent supplier to maximize his expected profit. Then, to reduce the risk originating from the fluctuation in the competitive supplier's wholesale price, we integrate the conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) measure in financial risk management into this study and derive an optimal wholesale price to maximize CVaR about profit for the incumbent supplier. Besides, the properties of the two optimal wholesale prices are discussed. Finally, some management insights are suggested for the incumbent supplier in a competitive setting.

  12. Chitosan nanoparticles and their Tween 80 modified counterparts disrupt the developmental profile of zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhongyue; Li, Ying; Hu, Yulan; You, Jian; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Nagano, Kazuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Gao, Jianqing

    2016-12-30

    Chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) and their Tween 80 modified counterparts (TmCS-NPs) are among the most commonly used brain-targeted vehicles. However, their potential developmental toxicity is poorly understood. In this study, zebrafish embryos are introduced as an in vivo platform. Both NPs showed a dose-dependent increase in developmental toxicity (decreased hatching rate, increased mortality and incidences of malformation). Neurobehavioral changes included decreased spontaneous movement in TmCS-NP treated embryos and hyperactive effect in CS-NP treated larvae. Both NPs remarkably inhibited axonal development of primary and secondary motor neurons, and affected the muscle structure. Overall, this study demonstrated that CS-NPs and TmCS-NPs could affect embryonic development, disrupt neurobehavior of zebrafish larvae and affect muscle and neuron development, suggesting more attention on biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles.

  13. Detections of 2 cm formaldehyde emissions towards Galactic star-forming regions with 6 cm counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Qiong; Yang, Kai; Li, Juan; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Wu, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Rong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Qing; Dong, Jian; Jiang, Dong-Rong; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    We report the detections of H2CO emission at the 2 cm transition towards Galactic star-forming regions with known 6 cm counterpart using the Shanghai Tianma Radio Telescope (TMRT). One significant detection (in NGC7538) and two possible detections (in G23.01-0.41 and G29.96-0.02) were made. Comparing with previous observations, we found that there is a time lag of appearance of 2 cm and 6 cm emissions detected in NGC7538, contradicting with the prediction of radiative pumping via radio continuum radiation. Combinations of the variability of 6 cm masers in NGC7538 suggest that collisional pumping via high-velocity shocks could better explain the 6 cm H2CO maser emission. Under this scheme, excitation of the 2 cm maser may require a higher collision energy compared to the 6 cm transition.

  14. The "Rabbit" A Potential Radio Counterpart of GeV J1417-6100

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, M S E; Johnston, S; Green, A J; Roberts, Mallory S.E.; Romani, Roger W.; Johnston, Simon; Green, Anne J.

    1999-01-01

    We have mapped the radio emission in the error ellipse of GeV J1417-6100 (2EGS J1418-6049) at 13cm and 20cm using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We find a large shell with extended wings, at the edge of which is a non-thermal, polarized structure with a center filled morphology (the `Rabbit'), coincident with an extended, hard X-ray source. We discuss the various sources seen within the ellipse as potential counterparts of the gamma-ray source. We conclude that the most likely scenario is that the Rabbit is a wind nebula surrounding a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar.

  15. When a negative weak value -1 plays the counterpart of a probability 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Kazuhiro; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    When the weak value of a projector is 1, a quantum system behaves as in that eigenstate with probability 1. By definition, however, the weak value may take an anomalous value lying outside the range of probability like -1. From the viewpoint of a physical effect, we show that such a negative weak value of -1 can be regarded as the counterpart of the ordinary value of 1. Using photons, we experimentally verify it as the symmetrical shift in polarization depending on the weak value given by pre-postselection of the path state. Unlike observation of a weak value as an ensemble average via weak measurements, the effect of a weak value is definitely confirmed in Hong-Ou-Mandel effect: the symmetrical shift corresponding to the weak value can be directly observed as the rotation angle of a half wave plate.

  16. Optimization of Integer Order Integrators for Deriving Improved Models of Their Fractional Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesha Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Second and third order digital integrators (DIs have been optimized first using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO with minimized error fitness function obtained by registering mean, median, and standard deviation values in different random iterations. Later indirect discretization using Continued Fraction Expansion (CFE has been used to ascertain a better fitting of proposed integer order optimized DIs into their corresponding fractional counterparts by utilizing their refined properties, now restored in them due to PSO algorithm. Simulation results for the comparisons of the frequency responses of proposed 2nd and 3rd order optimized DIs and proposed discretized mathematical models of half integrators based on them, with their respective existing operators, have been presented. Proposed integer order PSO optimized integrators as well as fractional order integrators (FOIs have been observed to outperform the existing recently published operators in their respective domains reasonably well in complete range of Nyquist frequency.

  17. Searching for Brown Dwarf Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, E T; Bacciotti, F; Randich, S; Natta, A

    2009-01-01

    As outflow activity in low mass protostars is strongly connected to ac- cretion it is reasonable to expect accreting brown dwarfs to also be driving out- flows. In the last three years we have searched for brown dwarf outflows using high quality optical spectra obtained with UVES on the VLT and the technique of spectro-astrometry. To date five brown dwarf outflows have been discovered. Here the method is discussed and the results to date outlined.

  18. A search for thermally emitting isolated neutron stars in the 2XMMp catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Pires, Adriana M; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The relatively large number of nearby radio-quiet and thermally emitting isolated neutron stars (INSs) discovered in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, dubbed the ``Magnificent Seven'' (M7), suggests that they belong to a formerly neglected major component of the overall INS population. So far, attempts to discover similar INSs beyond the solar vicinity failed to confirm any reliable candidate. The EPIC cameras onboard the XMM-Newton satellite allow to efficiently search for new thermally emitting INSs. We used the 2XMMp catalogue to select sources with no catalogued candidate counterparts and with X-ray spectra similar to those of the M7, but seen at greater distances and thus undergoing higher interstellar absorptions. Identifications in more than 170 astronomical catalogues and visual screening allowed to select fewer than 30 good INS candidates. In order to rule out alternative identifications, we obtained deep ESO-VLT and SOAR optical imaging for the X-ray brightest candidates. We report here on the optical follo...

  19. A Search for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American...Examples are the results from the European Space Debris Facility in the Canary Islands, MODEST (the Michigan orbital DEbris Survey Telescope at Cerro ...filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American

  20. Improved Scatter Search Using Cuckoo Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed T.Sadiq Al-Obaidi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Scatter Search (SS is a deterministic strategy that has been applied successfully to some combinatorial and continuous optimization problems. Cuckoo Search (CS is heuristic search algorithm which is inspired by the reproduction strategy of cuckoos. This paper presents enhanced scatter search algorithm using CS algorithm. The improvement provides Scatter Search with random exploration for search space of problem and more of diversity and intensification for promising solutions. The original and improved Scatter Search has been tested on Traveling Salesman Problem. A computational experiment with benchmark instances is reported. The results demonstrate that the improved Scatter Search algorithms produce better performance than original Scatter Search algorithm. The improvement in the value of average fitness is 23.2% comparing with original SS. The developed algorithm has been compared with other algorithms for the same problem, and the result was competitive with some algorithm and insufficient with another.

  1. Searches For Primeval Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, C A

    1998-01-01

    A primeval galaxy represents the earliest stages of a galaxy's life and as such provides clues to the early history of the Universe and the evolution of stars and galaxies. Over the last 20 years astronomers have been engaged in the quest to detect the faint signals from these objects, believed to lie at a distance comparable with the size of the Universe. A wide variety of observational techniques have been employed in this search, with astronomers eagerly awaiting each new generation of astronomical telescope or detector in the hope of finally solving the mystery to the origin of galaxies -- or at least placing new and interesting constraints. Until recently, primeval galaxies have eluded detection in these searches, however experiments over the last couple of years which use either 10m-class optical telescopes or state-of-the-art submillimetre array detectors, may hold the clue to the origin of structure as they have finally uncovered what appears to be a widespread population of young galaxies.

  2. Optic glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  3. Narrowing the Search After Gravitational-Wave Detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    Now that were able to detect gravitational waves, the next challenge is to spot electromagnetic signatures associated with gravitational-wave events. A team of scientists has proposed a new algorithm that might narrow the search.Artists illustrations of the stellar-merger model for short gamma-ray bursts. In the model, 1) two neutron stars inspiral, 2) they merge and produce a gamma-ray burst, 3) a small fraction of their mass is flung out and radiates as a kilonova, 4) a massive neutron star or black hole with a disk remains after the event. [NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)]Light from Neutron-Star MergersJust over a year ago, LIGO detected its first gravitational-wave signal: GW150914, produced when two black holes merged. While we didnt expect to see any sort of light-based signal from this merger, we could expect to see transient electromagnetic signatures in the case of a neutron starblack hole merger or a neutron starneutron star merger in the form of a kilonova or a short gamma-ray burst.While we havent yet detected any mergers involving neutron stars, LIGO has the sensitivity to make these detections in the local universe, and we hope to start seeing them soon! Finding the electromagnetic companions to gravitational-wave signals would be the best way to probe the evolution history of the universe and learn what happens when evolved stars collide. So how do we hunt them down?2D localization maps for LIGOs detection of GW150914 (black contours), as well as the footprints of follow-up observations (red for radio, green for optical/IR, blue for X-ray). [Abbott et al. 2016]Pinpointing a VolumeThe two LIGO detectors can already provide rough 2D localization of where the gravitational-wave signal came from, but the region predicted for GW150914 still covered 600 square degrees, which is a pretty hefty patch of sky! In light of this, the simplest follow-up strategy of tiling large survey observations of the entire predicted region is somewhat impractical and time

  4. Development of a Guide Star Search System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, T.; Omata, K.; Takata, T.; Kosugi, G.; Ozawa, T.; Ichikawa, S.; Sasaki, T.

    1997-03-01

    A Guide Star Search System is developed with the aid of a script language for building GUI, Tcl/Tk. Using a Data Base Management System, the authors have realized quick search for guide stars in an observational field from the Guide Star Catalog and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Star Catalog. This system has been implemented in OOPS (Okoyama Optical Polarimetry and Spectroscopy System) at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory.

  5. Deep optical observations of the γ-ray pulsar J0357+3205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, A.; Danilenko, A.; Shibanov, Yu.; Shternin, P.; Zharikov, S.; Zyuzin, D.

    2014-04-01

    Context. A middle-aged radio-quiet pulsar J0357+3205 was discovered in gamma rays with Fermi and later in X-rays with Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. It produces an unusual thermally emitting pulsar wind nebula that is observed in X-rays. Aims: Deep optical observations were obtained to search for the pulsar optical counterpart and its nebula using the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). Methods: The direct imaging mode in the Sloan g' band was used. Archival X-ray data were reanalysed and compared with the optical data. Results: No pulsar optical counterpart was detected down to g'≥slant 28.1m. No pulsar nebula was identified in the optical either. We confirm early results that the X-ray spectrum of the pulsar consists of a nonthermal power-law component of the pulsar magnetospheric origin dominating at high energies and a soft thermal component from the neutron star surface. Using magnetised, partially ionised hydrogen atmosphere models in X-ray spectral fits, we found that the thermal component can come from the entire surface of the cooling neutron star with a temperature of 36+8-6 eV, making it one of the coldest among cooling neutron stars known. The surface temperature agrees with the standard neutron star cooling scenario. The optical upper limit does not put any additional constraints on the thermal component, however it does imply a strong spectral break for the nonthermal component between the optical and X-rays as is observed in other middle-aged pulsars. Conclusions: The thermal emission from the entire surface of the neutron star very likely dominates the nonthermal emission in the UV range. Observations of PSR J0357+3205 in this range are promising to put more stringent constraints on its thermal properties. Based on observations made with the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), instaled in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, in the island of La Palma under Programme GTC3-12BMEX

  6. “The Scum of the Earth”? Foreign People Smugglers and Their Local Counterparts in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Missbach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2008, the number of asylum seekers and refugees trying to reach Australia from Indonesia by boat has increased. With many of them hailing from conflict-ridden countries such as Afghanistan, Iraq and Sri Lanka, most entered Indonesia with short-term tourist visas or fraudulent papers or no documents at all. It is widely known that a significant number of these ‘irregular’ migrants pay various types of brokers (often labelled, accurately or otherwise, ‘human smugglers’ at least at one stage – either to enter the country or to escape it. As a non-signatory to the UN Refugee Convention, Indonesia does not permit local integration. While a substantial part of these migrants are detained in the 13 immigration detention centres scattered around the archipelago, many roam freely, looking for opportunities for onward migration. Due to the restrictive border protection arrangements between Australia and Indonesia and a number of bilateral intelligence measures for deterring ‘unwanted’ migrants, human smugglers have been gradually forced to adapt strategies, routes and prices. According to much of the available data, most human smugglers are not Indonesians but foreigners who have been lingering in Indonesia for many years. This article demonstrates, moreover, that these foreigners depend upon local contacts to successfully carry out their risky business. Most often, the Indonesian counterparts are solely facilitators or handymen, but in a number of cases Indonesian authorities have also been involved in this highly lucrative business.

  7. The variability of the Crab Nebula in radio: No radio counterpart to gamma-ray flares

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Michael F; Buehler, R; Lobanov, A P; Blandford, R

    2014-01-01

    We present new Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) radio images of the Crab Nebula at 5.5 GHz, taken at two epochs separated by 6 days about two months after a gamma-ray flare in 2012 July. We find no significant change in the Crab's radio emission localized to a region of <2 light-months in radius, either over the 6-day interval between our present observations or between the present observations and ones from 2001. Any radio counterpart to the flare has a radio luminosity of <~ $2 \\times 10^{-4}$ times that of the nebula. Comparing our images to one from 2001, we do however find changes in radio brightness, up to 10% in amplitude, which occur on decade timescales throughout the nebula. The morphology of the changes is complex suggesting both filamentary and knotty structures. The variability is stronger, and the timescales likely somewhat shorter, nearer the centre of the nebula. We further find that even with the excellent uv~coverage and signal-to-noise of the VLA, deconvolution errors are much larger tha...

  8. Experiment data report for semiscale Mod-1 Test S-06-5. (LOFT counterpart test). [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-06-5 of the Semiscale Mod-1 LOFT counterpart test series. These tests are among several Semiscale Mod-1 experiments conducted to investigate the thermal and hydraulic phenomena accompanying a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. Test S-06-5 was conducted from initial conditions of 2272 psia and 536/sup 0/F to investigate the response of the Semiscale Mod-1 system to a depressurization and reflood transient following a simulated double-ended offset shear of the broken loop cold leg piping. During the test, cooling water was injected into the cold legs of the intact and broken loops to simulate emergency core coolant injection in a PWR. The purpose of Test S-06-5 was to assess the influence of the break nozzle geometry on core thermal and system response and on the subcooled and low quality mass flow rates at the break locations.

  9. Moderately differentiated colorectal adenocarcinoma as a lymph node metastatic phenotype: comparison with well differentiated counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura Koichi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differences between the metastatic property of moderately (Mod and well (Wel differentiated colorectal adenocarcinoma remain unclear. Since Mod is unable to form complete acini, therefore an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT can occur in that structure. Herein, we hypothesized that Mod metastasizes more easily than the Wel counterparts. Methods The medical records of 283 consecutive patients with Mod (n = 71 or Wel (n = 212 who underwent surgery were reviewed between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2003, for actual 5-year overall survival. We examined the differences between the clinicopathological characteristics of the Mod and the Wel groups. Results The lymph node involvement (p p = 0.0291, Relative Risk of 1.991: 95% Confidence Interval: 1.073-3.697. A Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed that Mod had a trend towards a poor survival (p = 0.0517. Conclusion Mod metastasizes to the lymph nodes more easily in comparison to Wel. Therefore, patients with Mod may be considered the existence of lymph node involvement.

  10. Discovery of a possible X-ray counterpart to HESS J1804-216

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, A; Hiraga, J S; Hughes, J P; Kohmura, T; Kokubun, M; Maeda, Y; Matsumoto, H; Senda, A; Takahashi, T; Tsuboi, Y; Yamauchi, S; Yuasa, T; Bamba, Aya; Koyama, Katsuji; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hughes, John P.; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Senda, Atsushi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2006-01-01

    Suzaku deep observations have discovered two highly significant nonthermal X-ray sources, Suzaku J1804$-$2142 (Src 1) and Suzaku J1804$-$2140 (Src 2), positionally coincident with the unidentified TeV $\\gamma$-ray source, HESS J1804$-$216. The X-ray sources are not time variable and show no counterpart in other wavebands, except for the TeV source. Src 1 is unresolved at Suzaku spatial resolution, whereas Src 2 is extended or composed of multiple sources. The X-ray spectra are highly absorbed, hard, and featureless, and are well fitted by absorbed power-law models with best-fit photon indices and absorption columns of $-0.3_{-0.5}^{+0.5}$ and $0.2_{-0.2}^{+2.0}\\times 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$ for Src 1, and $1.7_{-1.0}^{+1.4}$ and $1.1_{-0.6}^{+1.0}\\times 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$ for Src 2. The measured X-ray absorption to the latter source is significantly larger than the total Galactic neutral hydrogen column in that direction. The unabsorbed 2--10 keV band luminosities are $7.5\\times 10^{32}(d/{\\rm 5 kpc})^2$ ergs s$^{...

  11. Mycoplasma haemocanis – the canine hemoplasma and its feline counterpart in the genomic era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    do Nascimento Naíla C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mycoplasma haemocanis is a hemotrophic mycoplasma (hemoplasma, blood pathogen that may cause acute disease in immunosuppressed or splenectomized dogs. The genome of the strain Illinois, isolated from blood of a naturally infected dog, has been entirely sequenced and annotated to gain a better understanding of the biology of M. haemocanis. Its single circular chromosome has 919 992 bp and a low G + C content (35%, representing a typical mycoplasmal genome. A gene-by-gene comparison against its feline counterpart, M. haemofelis, reveals a very similar composition and architecture with most of the genes having conserved synteny extending over their entire chromosomes and differing only by a small set of unique protein coding sequences. As in M. haemofelis, M. haemocanis metabolic pathways are reduced and apparently rely heavily on the nutrients afforded by its host environment. The presence of a major percentage of its genome dedicated to paralogous genes (63.7% suggests that this bacterium might use antigenic variation as a mechanism to evade the host’s immune system as also observed in M. haemofelis genome. Phylogenomic comparisons based on average nucleotide identity (ANI and tetranucleotide signature suggest that these two pathogens are different species of mycoplasmas, with M. haemocanis infecting dogs and M. haemofelis infecting cats.

  12. Offshore wind power development in Europe and its comparison with onshore counterpart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilgili, Mehmet; Yasar, Abdulkadir; Simsek, Erdogan [Electrical and Energy Department, Adana Vocational High School, Cukurova University, 01160 Adana (Turkey)

    2011-02-15

    Wind power, as a renewable source of energy, produces no emissions and is an excellent alternative in environmental terms to conventional electricity production based on fuels such as oil, coal or natural gas. At present, the vast majority of wind power is generated from onshore wind farms. However, their growth is limited by the lack of inexpensive land near major population centers and the visual pollution caused by large wind turbines. Comparing with onshore wind power, offshore winds tend to flow at higher speeds than onshore winds, thus it allows turbines to produce more electricity. Estimates predict a huge increase in wind energy development over the next 20 years. Much of this development will be offshore wind energy. This implies that great investment will be done in offshore wind farms over the next decades. For this reason, offshore wind farms promise to become an important source of energy in the near future. In this study, history, current status, investment cost, employment, industry and installation of offshore wind energy in Europe are investigated in detail, and also compared to its onshore counterpart. (author)

  13. Probing extra dimension through gravitational wave observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hao; Huang, Fa Peng; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Meng, Xin-He; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational wave (GW) observations of compact binaries and their possible electromagnetic counterparts may be used to probe the nature of the extra dimension. It is widely accepted that gravitons and photons are the only two completely confirmed objects that can travel along the null geodesics in our four-dimensional space-time. But when one considers that there exists the fifth dimension and only the GW can propagate freely in the bulk, the causal propagations of the GW and electromagnetic wave (EMW) are in general different. In this paper, we compute the null geodesics of the GW and EMW in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time and our four-dimensional universe in the present of the curvature of universe $k$, respectively. We show that for general cases the horizon radius of the GW is longer than the EMW within the equal time. Taking the GW 150914 event detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the X-ray event detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Mo...

  14. Combining Gravitational Wave Events with their Electromagnetic Counterparts: A Realistic Joint False-Alarm Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackley, Kendall; Eikenberry, Stephen; Klimenko, Sergey; LIGO Team

    2017-01-01

    We present a false-alarm rate for a joint detection of gravitational wave (GW) events and associated electromagnetic (EM) counterparts for Advanced LIGO and Virgo (LV) observations during the first years of operation. Using simulated GW events and their recostructed probability skymaps, we tile over the error regions using sets of archival wide-field telescope survey images and recover the number of astrophysical transients to be expected during LV-EM followup. With the known GW event injection coordinates we inject artificial electromagnetic (EM) sources at that site based on theoretical and observational models on a one-to-one basis. We calculate the EM false-alarm probability using an unsupervised machine learning algorithm based on shapelet analysis which has shown to be a strong discriminator between astrophysical transients and image artifacts while reducing the set of transients to be manually vetted by five orders of magnitude. We also show the performance of our method in context with other machine-learned transient classification and reduction algorithms, showing comparability without the need for a large set of training data opening the possibility for next-generation telescopes to take advantage of this pipeline for LV-EM followup missions.

  15. A Mid-Infrared Counterpart to the Magnetar 1E 2259+586

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, David L; Wang, Zhongxiang; Wachter, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of a 4.5 um counterpart to the anomalous X-ray pulsar (magnetar) 1E 2259+586 with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The mid-infrared flux density is 6.3+/-1.0 uJy at 4.5 um and <20 uJy (at 95% confidence) at 8 um, or 0.02% of the 2-10 keV X-ray flux (corrected for extinction). Combining our Spitzer measurements with previously published near-infrared data, we show that the overall infrared emission from 1E 2259+586 is qualitatively similar to that from the magnetar 4U 0142+61. Therefore the passive X-ray-heated dust disk model originally developed for 4U 0142+61 might also apply to 1E 2259+586. However, the IR data from this source can also be fitted by a simple power-law spectrum as might be expected from magnetospheric emission.

  16. Coronal type III radio bursts and their X-ray flare and interplanetary type III counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, Hamish A S

    2016-01-01

    Type III bursts and hard X-rays are both produced by flare energetic electron beams. The link between both emissions has been investigated in many previous studies, but no statistical studies have compared both coronal and interplanetary type III bursts with X-ray flares. Using coronal radio events above 100 MHz exclusively from type III bursts, we revisited long-standing questions: Do all coronal type III bursts have X-ray counterparts. What correlation, if any, occurs between radio and X-ray intensities. What X-ray and radio signatures above 100 MHz occur in connection with interplanetary type III bursts below 14 MHz. We analysed data from 2002 to 2011 starting with coronal type III bursts above 100 MHz. We used RHESSI X-ray data greater than 6 keV to make a list of 321 events that have associated type III bursts and X-ray flares, encompassing at least 28 percent of the initial sample of type III events. We examined the timings, intensities, associated GOES class, and any interplanetary radio signature. For...

  17. Intramuscular keratocyst as a soft tissue counterpart of keratocystic odontogenic tumor: differential diagnosis by immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abé, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Essa, Ahmed; Babkair, Hamzah; Mikami, Toshihiko; Shingaki, Susumu; Kobayashi, Tadaharu; Hayashi, Takafumi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), a developmental jaw cyst previously referred to as odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), typically arises in the jawbone. In this article, however, we report a case of KCOT located within the temporalis muscle. We compared its immunohistochemical profiles with those of authentic jaw KCOT, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, and epidermoid cyst in order to consider whether a soft tissue counterpart of KCOT could be a separate disease entity. The patient was a 46-year-old man with a well-defined cystic lesion within the left temporalis muscle. On computed tomographic images, the lesion was recognized as a cystic lesion, although KCOT was not included in the clinical differential diagnoses. The location of the lesion was not within bone but, rather, within the temporalis muscle that was attached to the jawbones. Our review of the literature has disclosed more than 20 peripheral KCOT cases of the oral mucosa and more than 10 cases of the skin, but only 1 case arising in muscle. Immunohistochemical investigation of the present intramuscular case reveals KCOT-characteristic profiles distinct from the other 3 types of cysts investigated. The results indicate that KCOT-like lesions can arise within soft tissues, although use of the term odontogenic might seem inappropriate in those cases.

  18. Are red-tailed hawks and great horned owls diurnal-nocturnal dietary counterparts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, C.D.; Kochert, Michael N.

    1995-01-01

    Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and Great Homed Owls (Bubo virginianus)are common in North America where they occupy a wide range of habitats, often sympatrically. The two species are similar in size and have been portrayed as ecological counterparts, eating the same prey by day and night. We tested the trophic similarity of the two species by comparing published dietary data from across the United States. Both species ate primarily mammals and birds, and mean proportions of those two prey types did not differ significantly between diets of the two raptors. Red-tailed Hawks ate significantly more reptiles, and Great Homed Owls significantly more invertebrates. Dietary diversity was not significantly different at the level of prey taxonomic class, and diet overlap between the two species averaged 91%. At the prey species level, dietary overlap averaged only 50%, and at that level Red-tailed Hawk dietary diversity was significantly greater than that of Great Horned Owls. Mean prey mass of Red-tailed Hawks was significantly greater than that of Great Homed Owls. Populations of the two species in the western United States differed trophically more than did eastern populations. We conclude that, although the two species are generalist predators, they take largely different prey species in the same localities resulting in distinctive trophic characteristics.

  19. Superatom spectroscopy and the electronic state correlation between elements and isoelectronic molecular counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppernick, Samuel J; Gunaratne, K D Dasitha; Castleman, A W

    2010-01-19

    Detailed in the present investigation are results pertaining to the photoelectron spectroscopy of negatively charged atomic ions and their isoelectronic molecular counterparts. Experiments utilizing the photoelectron imaging technique are performed on the negative ions of the group 10 noble metal block (i.e. Ni-, Pd-, and Pt-) of the periodic table at a photon energy of 2.33 eV (532 nm). The accessible electronic transitions, term energies, and orbital angular momentum components of the bound electronic states in the atom are then compared with photoelectron images collected for isoelectronic early transition metal heterogeneous diatomic molecules, M-X- (M = Ti,Zr,W; X = O or C). A superposition principle connecting the spectroscopy between the atomic and molecular species is observed, wherein the electronic structure of the diatomic is observed to mimic that present in the isoelectronic atom. The molecular ions studied in this work, TiO-, ZrO-, and WC- can then be interpreted as possessing superatomic electronic structures reminiscent of the isoelectronic elements appearing on the periodic table, thereby quantifying the superatom concept.

  20. Possible near-infrared counterpart to the Galactic transient 1RXH J173523.7-354013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Cackett; R. Wijnands; M. Reynolds

    2008-01-01

    Following the recent announcement of an X-ray and optical outburst from a previously unknown Galactic transient possibly associated with 1RXH J173523.7-354013 (Israel et al. 2008, ATel #1528) we obtained near-infrared observations of the source using the PANIC camera on the 6.5-m Magellan Baade tele

  1. From major merger to radio galaxy: low surface-brightness stellar counterpart to the giant HI ring around B2 0648+27

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, B H C; Van Gorkom, J H; Oosterloo, T A; Brogt, E; Tadhunter, C N

    2008-01-01

    We present the detection of a low surface-brightness stellar counterpart to an enormous (190 kpc) ring of neutral hydrogen (HI) gas that surrounds the nearby radio galaxy B2 0648+27. This system is currently in an evolutionary stage between major merger and (radio-loud) early-type galaxy. In a previous paper we investigated in detail the timescales between merger, starburst and AGN activity in B2 0648+27, based on its unusual multi-wavelength properties (large-scale HI ring, dominating post-starburst stellar population and infra-red luminosity). In this Research Note we present deep optical B- and V-band imaging that provides further evidence for the merger origin of B2 0648+27. The host galaxy shows a distorted optical morphology and a broad tidal arm is clearly present. A low surface-brightness stellar tail or partial ring curls around more than half the host galaxy at a distance of up to 55 kpc from the centre of the galaxy, following the large-scale, ring-like HI structure that we detected previously arou...

  2. Google Ajax Search API

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzgerald, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Use the Google Ajax Search API to integrateweb search, image search, localsearch, and other types of search intoyour web site by embedding a simple, dynamicsearch box to display search resultsin your own web pages using a fewlines of JavaScript. For those who do not want to write code,the search wizards and solutions builtwith the Google Ajax Search API generatecode to accomplish common taskslike adding local search results to a GoogleMaps API mashup, adding videosearch thumbnails to your web site, oradding a news reel with the latest up todate stories to your blog. More advanced users can

  3. A Wave Implementation of the Optimal Database Search Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, A

    2004-01-01

    Grover's database search algorithm, although discovered in the context of quantum computation, can be implemented using any system that allows superposition of states. A physical realization of this algorithm is described using coupled simple harmonic oscillators. Such classical wave implementations are far more stable against decoherence compared to their quantum counterparts. In addition to providing convenient demonstration models, they may have a role in diverse practical situations, such as catalysis and structure of genetic languages.

  4. Reversal of functional disorders by aspiration, expiration, and cough reflexes and their voluntary counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomori, Zoltan; Donic, Viliam; Benacka, Roman; Gresova, Sona; Peregrim, Igor; Kundrik, Martin; Pallayova, Maria; Jakus, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Agonal gasping provoked by asphyxia can save ~15% of mammals even from untreated ventricular fibrillation (VF), but it fails to revive infants with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Our systematic study of airway reflexes in cats and other animals indicated that in addition to cough, there are two distinct airway reflexes that may contribute to auto-resuscitation. Gasp- and sniff-like spasmodic inspirations (SIs) can be elicited by nasopharyngeal stimulation, strongly activating the brainstem generator for inspiration, which is also involved in the control of gasping. This “aspiration reflex” (AspR) is characterized by SI without subsequent active expiration and can be elicited during agonal gasping, caused by brainstem trans-sections in cats. Stimulation of the larynx can activate the generator for expiration to evoke the expiration reflex (ExpR), manifesting with prompt expiration without preceding inspiration. Stimulation of the oropharynx and lower airways provokes the cough reflex (CR) which results from activating of both generators. The powerful potential of the AspR resembling auto-resuscitation by gasping can influence the control mechanisms of vital functions, mediating reversal of various functional disorders. The AspR in cats interrupted hypoxic apnea, laryngo- and bronchospasm, apneusis and even transient asphyxic coma, and can normalize various hypo- and hyper-functional disorders. Introduction of a nasogastric catheter evoked similar SIs in premature infants and interrupted hiccough attacks in adults. Coughing on demand can prevent anaphylactic shock and resuscitate the pertinent subject. Sniff representing nasal inspiratory pressure and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (MIP and MEP) are voluntary counterparts of airway reflexes, and are useful for diagnosis and therapy of various cardio-respiratory and neuromuscular disorders. PMID:23248602

  5. Energetic particle counterparts for geomagnetic pulsations of Pc1 and IPDP types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Yahnina

    Full Text Available Using the low-altitude NOAA satellite particle data, we study two kinds of localised variations of energetic proton fluxes at low altitude within the anisotropic zone equatorward of the isotropy boundary. These flux variation types have a common feature, i.e. the presence of precipitating protons measured by the MEPED instrument at energies more than 30 keV, but they are distinguished by the fact of the presence or absence of the lower-energy component as measured by the TED detector on board the NOAA satellite. The localised proton precipitating without a low-energy component occurs mostly in the morning-day sector, during quiet geomagnetic conditions, without substorm injections at geosynchronous orbit, and without any signatures of plasmaspheric plasma expansion to the geosynchronous distance. This precipitation pattern closely correlates with ground-based observations of continuous narrow-band Pc1 pulsations in the frequency range 0.1–2 Hz (hereafter Pc1. The precipitation pattern containing the low energy component occurs mostly in the evening sector, under disturbed geomagnetic conditions, and in association with energetic proton injections and significant increases of cold plasma density at geosynchronous orbit. This precipitation pattern is associated with geomagnetic pulsations called Intervals of Pulsations with Diminishing Periods (IPDP, but some minor part of the events is also related to narrow-band Pc1. Both Pc1 and IPDP pulsations are believed to be the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves generated by the ion-cyclotron instability in the equatorial plane. These waves scatter energetic protons in pitch angles, so we conclude that the precipitation patterns studied here are the particle counterparts of the ion-cyclotron waves.

    Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating – Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions

  6. Life-cycle Analysis of Bioproducts and Their Conventional Counterparts in GREET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Adom, Felix [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sather, Norm [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Snyder, Seth [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); He, Chang [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Gong, Jian [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Yue, Dajun [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); You, Fengqi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    To further expand upon the literature in this field and to develop a platform for bioproduct LCA, we developed LCA results for ten bioproducts produced either from algal glycerol or from corn stover-derived sugars. We used Argonne National Laboratory’s Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREETTM) model as the platform for this study. The data and calculations reported herein are available to GREET users in a bioproducts module included in the fall 2015 GREET release. This report documents our approach to this analysis and the results. In Chapter 2, we review the process we underwent to select the bioproducts for analysis based on market and technology readiness criteria. In Chapter 3, we review key parameters for production of the two feedstocks we considered: corn stover and algae. Given the lack of publicly available information about the production of bioproducts, which is caused in large part by the emerging nature of the industry, we developed Aspen Plus® simulations of the processes that could be used to produce each bioproduct. From these simulations, we extracted the energy and material flows of these processes, which were important inputs to the GREET bioproducts module. Chapter 4 provides the details of these Aspen Plus simulations. It is important to compare the LCA results for bioproducts to those for their petroleum counterparts. We therefore also developed material and energy flow data for conventional products based mostly on the literature. These data are described in Chapter 5 and are also included in the GREET bioproducts module. In Chapter 6, we present results from this analysis and examine areas for refinement and future research.

  7. Reversal of functional disorders by aspiration, expiration and cough reflexes and their voluntary counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan eTomori

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Agonal gasping provoked by asphyxia can save ~15% of mammals even from untreated ventricular fibrillation, but it fails to revive infants with sudden infant death syndrome. Our systematic study of airway reflexes in cats and other animals indicated that in addition to cough, there are 2 distinct airway reflexes that may contribute to auto-resuscitation. Gasp- and sniff-like spasmodic inspirations can be elicited by nasopharyngeal stimulation, strongly activating the brainstem generator for inspiration, which is also involved in the control of gasping. This aspiration reflex (AspR is characterized by spasmodic inspiration without subsequent active expiration and can be elicited during agonal gasping, caused by brainstem trans-sections in cats. Stimulation of the larynx can activate the generator for expiration to evoke the expiration reflex, manifesting with prompt expiration without preceding inspiration. Stimulation of the oro-pharynx and lower airways provokes the cough reflex which results from activating of both generators. The powerful potential of the AspR resembling auto-resuscitation by gasping can influence the control mechanisms of vital functions, mediating reversal of various functional disorders.The AspR in cats interrupted hypoxic apnea, laryngo- and bronchospasm, apneusis and even transient asphyxic coma, and can normalize various hypo- and hyper-functional disorders. Introduction of a nasogastric catheter evoked similar spasmodic inspirations in premature infants and interrupted hiccough attacks in adults. Coughing on demand can prevent anaphylactic shock and resuscitate the pertinent subject. Sniff representing nasal inspiratory pressure and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures are voluntary counterparts of airway reflexes, and are useful for diagnosis and therapy of various cardio-respiratory and neuromuscular disorders.

  8. Independent introductions and admixtures have contributed to adaptation of European maize and its American counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Jean-Tristan; Mary-Huard, Tristan; Rigaill, Guillem; Corti, Hélène; Vitte, Clémentine; Charcosset, Alain; Tenaillon, Maud I.

    2017-01-01

    Through the local selection of landraces, humans have guided the adaptation of crops to a vast range of climatic and ecological conditions. This is particularly true of maize, which was domesticated in a restricted area of Mexico but now displays one of the broadest cultivated ranges worldwide. Here, we sequenced 67 genomes with an average sequencing depth of 18x to document routes of introduction, admixture and selective history of European maize and its American counterparts. To avoid the confounding effects of recent breeding, we targeted germplasm (lines) directly derived from landraces. Among our lines, we discovered 22,294,769 SNPs and between 0.9% to 4.1% residual heterozygosity. Using a segmentation method, we identified 6,978 segments of unexpectedly high rate of heterozygosity. These segments point to genes potentially involved in inbreeding depression, and to a lesser extent to the presence of structural variants. Genetic structuring and inferences of historical splits revealed 5 genetic groups and two independent European introductions, with modest bottleneck signatures. Our results further revealed admixtures between distinct sources that have contributed to the establishment of 3 groups at intermediate latitudes in North America and Europe. We combined differentiation- and diversity-based statistics to identify both genes and gene networks displaying strong signals of selection. These include genes/gene networks involved in flowering time, drought and cold tolerance, plant defense and starch properties. Overall, our results provide novel insights into the evolutionary history of European maize and highlight a major role of admixture in environmental adaptation, paralleling recent findings in humans. PMID:28301472

  9. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  10. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  11. Web Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Rajashekar, TB

    1998-01-01

    The World Wide Web is emerging as an all-in-one information source. Tools for searching Web-based information include search engines, subject directories and meta search tools. We take a look at key features of these tools and suggest practical hints for effective Web searching.

  12. Strategies for Finding Prompt Radio Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Transients with the Murchison Widefield Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D. L.; Murphy, T.; Rowlinson, A.; Croft, S. D.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Wepresent and evaluate several strategies to search for prompt, low-frequency radio emission associated with gravitational wave transients using the Murchison Widefield Array. As we are able to repoint the Murchison Widefield Array on timescales of tens of seconds, we can search for the dispersed radio signal that has been predicted to originate along with or shortly after a neutron star-neutron star merger. We find that given the large, 600 deg2 instantaneous field of view of the Murchison Widefield Array, we can cover a significant fraction of the predicted gravitational wave error region, although due to the complicated geometry of the latter, we only cover > 50% of the error region for approximately 5% of events, and roughly 15% of events will be located < 10° from the Murchison Widefield Array pointing centre such that they will be covered in the radio images. For optimal conditions, our limiting flux density for a 10-s long transient would be 0.1 Jy, increasing to about 1 Jy for a wider range of events. This corresponds to luminosity limits of 1038-39 erg s-1 based on expectations for the distances of the gravitational wave transients, which should be sufficient to detect or significantly constrain a range of models for prompt emission.

  13. Strategies for Finding Prompt Radio Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Transients with the Murchison Widefield Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, D L; Rowlinson, A; Croft, S D; Wayth, R B; Trott, C M

    2016-01-01

    We present and evaluate several strategies to search for prompt, low-frequency radio emission associated with gravitational wave transients using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). As we are able to repoint the MWA on timescales of tens of seconds, we can search for the dispersed radio signal that has been predicted to originate along with or shortly after a neutron star-neutron star merger. We find that given the large, 600 deg^2 instantaneous field-of-view of the MWA we can cover a significant fraction of the predicted gravitational wave error region, although due to the complicated geometry of the latter we only cover >50% of the error region for approximately 5% of events, and roughly 15% of events will be located <10 deg from the MWA pointing center such that they will be covered in the radio images. For optimal conditions our limiting flux density for a 10-s long transient would be 0.1 Jy, increasing to about 1 Jy for a wider range of events. This corresponds to luminosity limits of 1e38-1e39 erg/s...

  14. Large Neighborhood Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pisinger, David; Røpke, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Heuristics based on large neighborhood search have recently shown outstanding results in solving various transportation and scheduling problems. Large neighborhood search methods explore a complex neighborhood by use of heuristics. Using large neighborhoods makes it possible to find better...... candidate solutions in each iteration and hence traverse a more promising search path. Starting from the large neighborhood search method,we give an overview of very large scale neighborhood search methods and discuss recent variants and extensions like variable depth search and adaptive large neighborhood...... search....

  15. Electrically driven optical metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le-van, Quynh; Le Roux, Xavier; Aassime, Abdelhanin; Degiron, Aloyse

    2016-06-01

    The advent of metamaterials more than 15 years ago has offered extraordinary new ways of manipulating electromagnetic waves. Yet, progress in this field has been unequal across the electromagnetic spectrum, especially when it comes to finding applications for such artificial media. Optical metamaterials, in particular, are less compatible with active functionalities than their counterparts developed at lower frequencies. One crucial roadblock in the path to devices is the fact that active optical metamaterials are so far controlled by light rather than electricity, preventing them from being integrated in larger electronic systems. Here we introduce electroluminescent metamaterials based on metal nano-inclusions hybridized with colloidal quantum dots. We show that each of these miniature blocks can be individually tuned to exhibit independent optoelectronic properties (both in terms of electrical characteristics, polarization, colour and brightness), illustrate their capabilities by weaving complex light-emitting surfaces and finally discuss their potential for displays and sensors.

  16. Electrically driven optical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le-Van, Quynh; Le Roux, Xavier; Aassime, Abdelhanin; Degiron, Aloyse

    2016-06-22

    The advent of metamaterials more than 15 years ago has offered extraordinary new ways of manipulating electromagnetic waves. Yet, progress in this field has been unequal across the electromagnetic spectrum, especially when it comes to finding applications for such artificial media. Optical metamaterials, in particular, are less compatible with active functionalities than their counterparts developed at lower frequencies. One crucial roadblock in the path to devices is the fact that active optical metamaterials are so far controlled by light rather than electricity, preventing them from being integrated in larger electronic systems. Here we introduce electroluminescent metamaterials based on metal nano-inclusions hybridized with colloidal quantum dots. We show that each of these miniature blocks can be individually tuned to exhibit independent optoelectronic properties (both in terms of electrical characteristics, polarization, colour and brightness), illustrate their capabilities by weaving complex light-emitting surfaces and finally discuss their potential for displays and sensors.

  17. The Effect of Counterpart Material on the Sliding Wear of TiAlN Coatings Deposited by Reactive Cathodic Pulverization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michell Felipe Cano Ordoñez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study the effect of the counterpart materials (100Cr6, Al2O3 and WC-Co on the tribological properties of TiAlN thin films deposited on AISI H13 steel substrate by reactive magnetron co-sputtering. The structural characterization of the TiAlN films, performed by X-ray diffraction, showed (220 textured fcc crystalline structure. The values of hardness and elastic modulus obtained by nanoindentation were 27 GPa and 420 GPa, respectively, which resulted in films with a relatively high resistance to plastic deformation. Ball-on-disk sliding tests were performed using normal loads of 1 N and 3 N, and 0.10 m/s of tangential velocity. The wear coefficient of the films was determined by measuring the worn area using profilometry every 1000 cycles. The mechanical properties and the chemical stability of the counterpart material, debris formation and the contact stress influences the friction and the wear behavior of the studied tribosystems. Increasing the hardness of the counterpart decreases the coefficient of friction (COF due to lower counterpart material transference and tribofilm formation, which is able to support the contact pressure. High shear stress concentration at the coating/substrate interface was reported for higher load promoting failure of the film-substrate system for all tribopairs

  18. ON THE TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF THE DISK COUNTERPART OF TYPE II SPICULES IN THE QUIET SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekse, D. H.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); De Pontieu, B. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    The newly established type II spicule has been speculated to provide enough hot plasma to play an important role in the mass loading and heating of the solar corona. With the identification of rapid blueshifted excursions (RBEs) as the on-disk counterpart of type II spicules we have analyzed three different high-quality timeseries with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma and subjected to an automated detection routine to detect a large number of RBEs for statistical purposes. Our observations are of a quiet-Sun region at disk center and we find lower Doppler velocities, 15-40 km s{sup -1}, and Doppler widths, 2-15 km s{sup -1}, of RBEs than in earlier coronal hole studies, 30-50 km s{sup -1} and 7-23 km s{sup -1}, respectively. In addition, we examine the spatial dependence of Doppler velocities and widths along the RBE axis and conclude that there is no clear trend to this over the field of view or in individual RBEs in the quiet Sun at disk center. These differences with previous coronal hole studies are attributed to the more varying magnetic field configuration in quiet-Sun conditions. Using an extremely high-cadence data set has allowed us to improve greatly on the determination of lifetimes of RBEs, which we find to range from 5 to 60 s with an average lifetime of 30 s, as well as the transverse motions in RBEs, with transverse velocities up to 55 km s{sup -1} and averaging 12 km s{sup -1}. Furthermore, our measurements of the recurrence rates of RBEs provide important new constraints on coronal heating by spicules. We also see many examples of a sinusoidal wave pattern in the transverse motion of RBEs with periods averaging 54 s and amplitudes from 21.5 to 129 km which agrees well with previous studies of wave motion in spicules at the limb. We interpret the appearance of RBEs over their full length within a few seconds as the result of a combination of three kinds of motions as is earlier reported for

  19. Post-test analysis of the ROSA/LSTF and PKL counterpart test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos, S., E-mail: scarlos@iqn.upv.es [Departament d’Enginyeria Química i Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València Spain (Spain); Querol, A., E-mail: anquevi@iqn.upv.es [Departament d’Enginyeria Química i Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València Spain (Spain); Instituto de Seguridad Industrial, Radiofísica y Medioambiental, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València (Spain); Gallardo, S., E-mail: sergalbe@iqn.upv.es [Departament d’Enginyeria Química i Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València Spain (Spain); Instituto de Seguridad Industrial, Radiofísica y Medioambiental, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València (Spain); Sanchez-Saez, F., E-mail: frasansa@etsii.upv.es [Departament d’Enginyeria Química i Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València Spain (Spain); and others

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • TRACE modelization for PKL and ROSA/LSTF installations. • Secondary-side depressurization as accident management action. • CET vs PCT relation. • Analysis of differences in the vessel models. - Abstract: Experimental facilities are scaled models of commercial nuclear power plants, and are of great importance to improve nuclear power plants safety. Thus, the results obtained in the experiments undertaken in such facilities are essential to develop and improve the models implemented in the thermal-hydraulic codes, which are used in safety analysis. The experiments and inter-comparisons of the simulated results are usually performed in the frame of international programmes in which different groups of several countries simulate the behaviour of the plant under the accidental conditions established, using different codes and models. The results obtained are compared and studied to improve the knowledge on codes performance and nuclear safety. Thus, the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), in the nuclear safety work area, auspices several programmes which involve experiments in different experimental facilities. Among the experiments proposed in NEA programmes, one on them consisted of performing a counterpart test between ROSA/LSTF and PKL facilities, with the main objective of determining the effectiveness of late accident management actions in a small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA). This study was proposed as a result of the conclusion obtained by the NEA Working Group on the Analysis and Management of Accidents, which analyzed different installations and observed differences in the measurements of core exit temperature (CET) and maximum peak cladding temperature (PCT). In particular, the transient consists of a small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) in a hot leg with additional failure of safety systems but with accident management measures (AM), consisting of a fast secondary-side depressurization, activated by the CET. The paper

  20. Optical spectra of 5 new Be/X-ray Binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud and the link of the supergiant B[e] star LHA 115-S 18 with an X-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Maravelias, Grigoris; Antoniou, Vallia; Hatzidimitriou, Despoina

    2013-01-01

    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is well known to harbor a large number of High-Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs). The identification of their optical counterparts provides information on the nature of the donor stars and can help to constrain the parameters of these systems and their evolution. We obtained optical spectra for a number of HMXBs identified in previous Chandra and XMM-Newton surveys of the SMC using the AAOmega/2dF fiber-fed spectrograph at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. We find 5 new Be/X-ray binaries (BeXRBs; including a tentative one), by identifying the spectral type of their optical counterparts, and we confirm the spectral classification of an additional 15 known BeXRBs. We compared the spectral types, orbital periods, and eccentricities of the BeXRB populations in the SMC and the Milky Way and we find marginal evidence for difference between the spectral type distributions, but no statistically significant differences for the orbital periods and the eccentricities. Moreover, our search reveal...

  1. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  2. THE SEARCH FOR SW SEXTANTIS STARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Schmidtobreick

    2009-01-01

    time-resolved optical spectroscopy of all sufficiently bright old novae and nova-like CVs in the orbital period range between 2.8 and 4 h and search for characteristic SWSex behaviour. Eventually we want to quantify the impact of the SWSex phenomenon at the upper boundary of the orbital period gap.

  3. The LIPSS search for light neutral bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Oliver K. Baker; Kevin Beard; George Biallas; James Boyce; Minarni Minarni; Roopchan Ramdon; Michelle D. Shinn; Penny Slocum

    2009-07-01

    An overview is presented of the LIPSS experimental search for very light neutral bosons using laser light from Jefferson Lab's Free Electron Laser. This facility provides very high power beams of photons over a large optical range, particularly at infrared wavelengths. Data has been collected in several experimental runs during the course of the past three years, most recently in the Fall of 2009.

  4. The Search Performance Evaluation and Prediction in Exploratory Search

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The exploratory search for complex search tasks requires an effective search behavior model to evaluate and predict user search performance. Few studies have investigated the relationship between user search behavior and search performance in exploratory search. This research adopts a mixed approach combining search system development, user search experiment, search query log analysis, and multivariate regression analysis to resolve the knowledge gap. Through this study, it is shown that expl...

  5. The Search Performance Evaluation and Prediction in Exploratory Search

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The exploratory search for complex search tasks requires an effective search behavior model to evaluate and predict user search performance. Few studies have investigated the relationship between user search behavior and search performance in exploratory search. This research adopts a mixed approach combining search system development, user search experiment, search query log analysis, and multivariate regression analysis to resolve the knowledge gap. Through this study, it is shown that expl...

  6. Capturing the electromagnetic counterparts of binary neutron star mergers through low latency gravitational wave triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Q; Rowlinson, A; Gao, H; Zhang, B; Tingay, S J; Boer, M; Wen, L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the prospects for joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of low-latency search pipelines we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs using realistic distributions of source parameters to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. To determine what EM observations can be achieved, we consider a selection of facilities with GW follow-up agreements in place, from low-frequency radio to high energy $\\gamma$-ray; we assess the performance of each using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors LIGO and Virgo. We ...

  7. Low Lorentz Factor Jets from Compact Stellar Mergers - Candidate Electromagnetic Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lamb, Gavin P

    2016-01-01

    Short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to be produced by relativistic jets from mergers of neutron stars (NS) and/or black holes (BH). If the Lorentz factors $\\Gamma$ of jets from compact stellar mergers follow a similar power-law distribution as those observed for other high energy astrophysical phenomena (e.g. blazars, AGN), the population of jets would be dominated by low-$\\Gamma$ outflow. These jets will not produce GRB (i.e. the prompt gamma-rays), but their jet energy will be released as optical and radio transients when they collide into the ambient medium. By using simple Monte Carlo simulations, we study the properties of such transient events. Approximately $78 \\%$ of merger jets within 300 Mpc distance will result in a failed GRB if the jet Lorentz factor follows a power-law distribution of index $-1.75$. Optical transients associated with such failed GRBs will have rather broad distributions of the characteristics: the light curve peaks $t_p \\sim 0.1-10$ days after a merger with a peak flux $m...

  8. The StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey. II. Sensitivity of the survey and an Atlas of Synthetic Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beccari, G; Battaglia, G; Ibata, R; Martin, N; Testa, V; Cignoni, M; Correnti, M

    2016-01-01

    SECCO is a survey devoted to the search for stellar counterparts within Ultra Compact High Velocity Clouds. In this contribution we present the results of a set of simulations aimed at the quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of the survey as a function of the total luminosity, size and distance of the stellar systems we are looking for. For all our synthetic galaxies we assumed an exponential surface brightness profile and an old and metal-poor population. The synthetic galaxies are simulated both on the images and on the photometric catalogs, taking into account all the observational effects. In the fields where the available observational material is of the top quality we detect synthetic galaxies as >=5 sigma over-densities of resolved stars down to muV,h=30.0 mag/arcsec2, for D<=1.5 Mpc, and down to muV,h~29.5 mag/arcsec2, for D<=2.5 Mpc. In the field with the worst observational material of the whole survey we detect synthetic galaxies with muV,h<=28.8 mag/arcsec2 out to D<=1.0 Mpc, and ...

  9. SEARCHING FOR NEW {gamma}-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES IN THE THIRD PALERMO BAT HARD X-RAY CATALOG WITH WISE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maselli, A.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Segreto, A. [INAF-IASF Palermo, via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy); Massaro, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2013-06-01

    We searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates among the 382 unidentified hard X-ray sources of the third Palermo BAT Catalog (3PBC) obtained from the analysis of 66 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data and listing 1586 sources. We adopted a recently developed association method based on the peculiar infrared colors that characterize the {gamma}-ray blazars included in the second catalog of active galactic nuclei detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We used this method exploiting the data of the all-sky survey performed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to establish correspondences between unidentified 3PBC sources and WISE {gamma}-ray blazar candidates located within the BAT positional uncertainty region at a 99% confidence level. We obtained a preliminary list of candidates for which we analyzed all the available data in the Swift archive to complement the information in the literature and in the radio, infrared, and optical catalogs with the information on their optical-UV and soft X-ray emission. Requiring the presence of radio and soft X-ray counterparts consistent with the infrared positions of the selected WISE sources, as well as a blazar-like radio morphology, we finally obtained a list of 24 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates.

  10. Hard X-Ray Emission from Sh 2-104: A NuSTAR Search for Gamma-Ray Counterparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Mori, K.; Aliu, E.

    2016-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of Sh 2–104, a compact H ii region containing several young massive stellar clusters (YMSCs). We have detected distinct hard X-ray sources coincident with localized VERITAS TeV emission recently resolved from the giant gamma-ray complex MGRO J2019+37 in t...

  11. Search for Possible Variation of the Fine Structure Constant

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Determination of the fine structure constant alpha and search for its possible variation are considered. We focus on a role of the fine structure constant in modern physics and discuss precision tests of quantum electrodynamics. Different methods of a search for possible variations of fundamental constants are compared and those related to optical measurements are considered in detail.

  12. TANAMI counterparts to IceCube high-energy neutrino events

    CERN Document Server

    Krauß, Felicia; Baxter, Claire; Kadler, Matthias; Mannheim, Karl; Ojha, Roopesh; Gräfe, Christina; Müller, Cornelia; Wilms, Joern; Carpenter, Bryce; Schulz, Robert; TANAMI, on behalf of the

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of a neutrino flux in excess of the atmospheric background by the IceCube Collaboration, searches for the astrophysical sources have been ongoing. Due to the steeply falling background towards higher energies, the PeV events detected in three years of IceCube data are the most likely ones to be of extraterrestrial origin. Even excluding the PeV events detected so far, the neutrino flux is well above the atmospheric background, so it is likely that a number of sub-PeV events originate from the same astrophysical sources that produce the PeV events. We study the high-energy properties of AGN that are positionally coincident with the neutrino events from three years of IceCube data and show the results for event number 4. IC 4 is a event with a low angular error (7.1$^\\circ$) and a large deposited energy of 165 TeV. We use multiwavelength data, including Fermi/LAT and X-ray data, to construct broadband spectra and present parametrizations of the broadband spectral energy distributions with lo...

  13. Where and When: Optimal Scheduling of the Electromagnetic Follow-up of Gravitational-wave Events Based on Counterpart Light-curve Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salafia, Om Sharan; Colpi, Monica; Branchesi, Marica; Chassande-Mottin, Eric; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Vergani, Susanna D.

    2017-09-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) follow-up of a gravitational-wave (GW) event requires scanning a wide sky region, defined by the so-called “skymap,” to detect and identify a transient counterpart. We propose a novel method that exploits the information encoded in the GW signal to construct a “detectability map,” which represents the time-dependent (“when”) probability of detecting the transient at each position of the skymap (“where”). Focusing on the case of a neutron star binary inspiral, we model the associated short gamma-ray burst afterglow and macronova emission using the probability distributions of binary parameters (sky position, distance, orbit inclination, mass ratio) extracted from the GW signal as inputs. The resulting family of possible light curves is the basis for constructing the detectability map. As a practical example, we apply the method to a simulated GW signal produced by a neutron star merger at 75 Mpc whose localization uncertainty is very large (∼1500 deg2). We construct observing strategies for optical, infrared, and radio facilities based on the detectability maps, taking VST, VISTA, and MeerKAT as prototypes. Assuming limiting fluxes of r∼ 24.5, J∼ 22.4 (AB magnitudes), and 500 μ {Jy} (1.4 {GHz}) for ∼1000 s of exposure each, the afterglow and macronova emissions are successfully detected with a minimum observing time of 7, 15, and 5 hr respectively.

  14. A multi-wavelength survey of NGC\\,6752: X-ray counterparts, two new dwarf novae, and a core-collapsed radial profile

    CERN Document Server

    Thomson, G S; Dieball, A; Maccarone, T J; Dolphin, A; Zurek, D; Long, K S; Shara, M; Sarajedini, A

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength (FUV to I-band) survey of the stellar populations of the globular cluster NGC 6752, using STIS, ACS and WFC3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We have confirmed that two previously identified CV candidates are, in fact, dwarf novae which underwent outbursts during our observations. We have also identified previously unknown optical counterparts to two X-ray sources. We estimate the position of the centre of the cluster, and show that the stellar density profile is not well described by a single King model, indicating that this cluster is in a core-collapsed or post-core collapse phase. The colour-magnitude diagram shows a well-populated horizontal branch, numerous blue stragglers and white dwarfs (WDs), as well as 87 sources in the gap region where we expect to find WD - main sequence binaries, including cataclysmic variables (CVs). The X-ray sources and WD binary systems are the most centrally concentrated populations, with dynamically estimated characteristic ...

  15. Any Light Particle Search II - Status Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Bastidon, Noemie

    2015-01-01

    The Any Light Particle Search II (ALPS II) experiment (DESY, Hamburg) searches for photon oscillations into Weakly Interacting Sub-eV Particles (WISPs). This second generation of the ALPS light-shining-through-a-wall (LSW) experiment approaches the finalization of the preparation phase before ALPS IIa (search for hidden photons). In the last years, efforts have been put for the setting up of two optical cavities as well as characterization of a single-photon Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) detector. In the following, we put some emphasis on the detector development. In parallel, the setting up of ALPS IIc (search for axion-like particles), including the unbending of 20 HERA dipoles, has been pursued. The latest progress in these tasks will be discussed.

  16. Comparison of Physical Fitness Parameters with EUROFIT Test Battery of Male Adolescent Soccer Players and Sedentary Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür ERİKOĞLU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare physical fitness parameters of male adolescent soccer players and sedentary counterparts. A total of 26 male adolescents participated in this study voluntarily: Active soccer players (n: 3, age x : 13,00 ± 0,00 and sedentary counterparts (n: 13, age x :12,92 ± 0,75. The EUROFIT test battery was used to determine physical fitness. The test battery includes body height and weight measurements, touching the discs, flamingo balan ce, throwing health ball, vertical jumping, sit and reach, sit - up for 30 s, 20 meter sprint run, and 20 meter shuttle run tests. Data were analyzed by Mann Whitney U test. Significance was defined as p.05. In conclusion, children who do sports are more successful on most of the fitness parameters than sedentary children.

  17. Effect of counterpart metals in carbon-supported Pt-based catalysts prepared using radiation chemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Tomohisa; Seino, Satoshi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki; Otake, Hiroaki; Kugai, Junichiro; Ohkubo, Yuji; Nitani, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2017-04-01

    The process of nanoparticle formation by radiation chemical synthesis in a heterogeneous system has been investigated. Carbon-supported Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized using a high-energy electron beam. Rh, Cu, Ru, and Sn were used as counterpart metals. The nanoparticles were characterized by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. PtRh formed a uniform random alloy nanoparticle, while Cu partially formed an alloy with Pt and the remaining Cu existed as CuO. PtRu formed an alloy structure with a composition distribution of a Pt-rich core and Ru-rich shell. No alloying was observed in PtSn, which had a Pt-SnO2 structure. The alloy and oxide formation mechanisms are discussed considering the redox potentials, the standard enthalpy of oxide formation, and the solid solubilities of Pt and the counterpart metals.

  18. In Search of Tranquility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In China, residents in metropolitan centers such as Beijing and Shanghai, just like their counterparts in New York City or Tokyo, are always surrounded by hustle and bustle. Trapped and exhausted by bread-and-butter issues, they long for a short respite in some quiet place to relax and refresh themselves.

  19. Searching Databases with Keywords

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wang; Kun-Long Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, SQL query language is used to search the data in databases. However, it is inappropriate for end-users, since it is complex and hard to learn. It is the need of end-user, searching in databases with keywords, like in web search engines. This paper presents a survey of work on keyword search in databases. It also includes a brief introduction to the SEEKER system which has been developed.

  20. Integrated vs. Federated Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvschall, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    Oplæg om forskelle og ligheder mellem integrated og federated search i bibliotekskontekst. Holdt ved temadag om "Integrated Search - samsøgning i alle kilder" på Danmarks Biblioteksskole den 22. januar 2009.......Oplæg om forskelle og ligheder mellem integrated og federated search i bibliotekskontekst. Holdt ved temadag om "Integrated Search - samsøgning i alle kilder" på Danmarks Biblioteksskole den 22. januar 2009....

  1. How doctors search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Price, Susan; Delcambre, Lois

    2012-01-01

    to context-specific aspects of the main topic of the documents. We have tested the model in an interactive searching study with family doctors with the purpose to explore doctors’ querying behaviour, how they applied the means for specifying a search, and how these features contributed to the search outcome...

  2. The Information Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doraiswamy, Uma

    2011-01-01

    This paper in the form of story discusses a college student's information search process. In this story we see Kuhlthau's information search process: initiation, selection, exploration, formulation, collection, and presentation. Katie is a student who goes in search of information for her class research paper. Katie's class readings, her interest…

  3. Search and the city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Gautier; C.N. Teulings

    2009-01-01

    We develop a model of an economy with several regions, which differ in scale. Within each region, workers have to search for a job-type that matches their skill. They face a trade-off between match quality and the cost of extended search. This trade-off differs between regions, because search is mor

  4. Quest for COSMOS submillimeter galaxy counterparts using CARMA and VLA: Identifying three high-redshift starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Smolcic, V; Aravena, M; Ilbert, O; Yun, M S; Sheth, K; Salvato, M; McCracken, H J; Diener, C; Aretxaga, I; Riechers, D A; Finoguenov, A; Bertoldi, F; Capak, P; Hughes, D; Karim, A; Schinnerer, E; Scoville, N Z; Wilson, G

    2012-01-01

    We report on interferometric observations at 1.3 mm at 2"-3" resolution using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). We identify multi-wavelength counterparts of three submillimeter galaxies (SMGs; F(1mm)>5.5 mJy) in the COSMOS field, initially detected with MAMBO and AzTEC bolometers at low, ~10"-30", resolution. All three sources -- AzTEC/C1, Cosbo-3 and Cosbo-8 -- are identified to coincide with positions of 20 cm radio sources. Cosbo-3, however, is not associated with the most likely radio counterpart, closest to the MAMBO source position, but that further away from it. This illustrates the need for intermediate-resolution (~2") mm-observations to identify the correct counterparts of single-dish detected SMGs. All of our three sources become prominent only at NIR wavelengths, and their mm-to-radio flux based redshifts suggest that they lie at redshifts z>~2. As a proof of concept, we show that photometric redshifts can be well determined for SMGs, and we find photometric-red...

  5. Discovery of a red supergiant counterpart to RX~J004722.4-252051, a ULX in NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Heida, M; Jonker, P G; Servillat, M; Repetto, S; Roberts, T P; Walton, D J; Moon, D -S; Harrison, F A

    2015-01-01

    We present two epochs of near-infrared spectroscopy of the candidate red supergiant counterpart to RX~J004722.4-252051, a ULX in NGC 253. We measure radial velocities of the object and its approximate spectral type by cross-correlating our spectra with those of known red supergiants. Our VLT/X-shooter spectrum is best matched by that of early M-type supergiants, confirming the red supergiant nature of the candidate counterpart. The radial velocity of the spectrum, taken on 2014, August 23, is $417 \\pm 4$ km/s. This is consistent with the radial velocity measured in our spectrum taken with Magellan/MMIRS on 2013, June 28, of $410 \\pm 70$ km/s, although the large error on the latter implies that a radial velocity shift expected for a black hole of tens of $M_\\odot$ can easily be hidden. Using nebular emission lines we find that the radial velocity due to the rotation of NGC 253 is 351 $\\pm$ 4 km/s at the position of the ULX. Thus the radial velocity of the counterpart confirms that the source is located in NGC ...

  6. Passive ring resonator micro-optical gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venediktov, V. Yu; Filatov, Yu V.; Shalymov, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in passive micro-optical gyroscopes. In the last decade, most research effort in the area of micro-optical gyros has been concentrated on a configuration that takes advantage of a single-mode passive ring resonator, which is usually fabricated using integrated optical technologies. The dimensions of such micro-optical gyros are comparable to those of micromechanical gyroscopes (area of 10 to 100 mm2) and their sensitivity is considerably better than the sensitivity of the latter, approaching that of fibre-optic and laser gyros. Moreover, microoptical gyros can be made as a single integrated circuit, like the micromechanical gyros, but they have no movable parts, in contrast to their micromechanical counterparts. We also describe the development and investigation of micro-optical gyros produced in our studies.

  7. Faceted Semantic Search for Personalized Social Search

    CERN Document Server

    Mas, Massimiliano Dal

    2012-01-01

    Actual social networks (like Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, ...) need to deal with vagueness on ontological indeterminacy. In this paper is analyzed the prototyping of a faceted semantic search for personalized social search using the "joint meaning" in a community environment. User researches in a "collaborative" environment defined by folksonomies can be supported by the most common features on the faceted semantic search. A solution for the context-aware personalized search is based on "joint meaning" understood as a joint construal of the creators of the contents and the user of the contents using the faced taxonomy with the Semantic Web. A proof-of concept prototype shows how the proposed methodological approach can also be applied to existing presentation components, built with different languages and/or component technologies.

  8. Keyword Search in Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jeffrey Xu; Chang, Lijun

    2009-01-01

    It has become highly desirable to provide users with flexible ways to query/search information over databases as simple as keyword search like Google search. This book surveys the recent developments on keyword search over databases, and focuses on finding structural information among objects in a database using a set of keywords. Such structural information to be returned can be either trees or subgraphs representing how the objects, that contain the required keywords, are interconnected in a relational database or in an XML database. The structural keyword search is completely different from

  9. X-ray Pulsation Searches with NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Paul S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an X-ray telescope with capabilities optimized for the study of the structure, dynamics, and energetics of neutron stars through high-precision timing of rotation- and accretion-powered pulsars in the 0.2-12 keV band. It has large collecting area (twice that of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn camera), CCD-quality spectral resolution, and high-precision photon time tagging referenced to UTC through an onboard GPS receiver. NICER will begin its 18-month prime mission as an attached payload on the International Space Station around the end of 2016. I will describe the science planning for the pulsation search science working group, which is charged with searching for pulsations and studying flux modulation properties of pulsars and other neutron stars. A primary goal of our observations is to detect pulsations from new millisecond pulsars that will contribute to NICER’s studies of the neutron star equation of state through pulse profile modeling. Beyond that, our working group will search for pulsations in a range of source categories, including LMXBs, new X-ray transients that might be accreting millisecond pulsars, X-ray counterparts to unassociated Fermi LAT sources, gamma-ray binaries, isolated neutron stars, and ultra-luminous X-ray sources. I will survey our science plans and give an overview of our planned observations during NICER’s prime mission.

  10. Texas Supernova Search: A Wide Field Search for Nearby SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, R. M.; Castro, F.; Gerardy, C. L.; Hoeflich, P.; Kannappan, S. J.; Mondol, P.; Sellers, M.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    ROTSE-IIIb is one four robotic telescopes built by the University of Michigan to observe the prompt optical afterglows associated with gamma-ray bursts. At just 0.45m in diameter, it is the smallest research telescope at McDonald, but its 1.85 x 1.85 deg field of view and autonomous operation make it an excellent survey instrument for rare transient phenomena. We have been using ROTSE-IIIb for the past year to search for supernovae in nearby galaxy clusters such as the Virgo, Coma, and Ursa Major clusters. ROTSE-IIIb's wide field of view allows us to search the thousands of galaxies in these clusters, which cover hundreds of square degrees on the sky, in just a few tens of exposures. We can therefore observe all of these fields in a single night, and repeat the search every night. When we identify a new supernova candidate, we invoke our target of opportunity time on the neighboring 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) the following night to obtain a spectrum. Because of the rolling search and the quick spectral turn-around possible with the HET, we are able to capture spectra of the earliest phases of the explosion. By combining this information with spectra taken at later epochs, we can construct a complete description of the explosion. Through this work we aim to better understand the physical conditions of supernova explosions, identify any systematic effects that may affect how Type Ia supernovae are calibrated as standard candles and used to probe cosmology, and also to better calibrate Type II supernovae as standard candles.

  11. SN 2012au: A GOLDEN LINK BETWEEN SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR LOWER-LUMINOSITY COUNTERPARTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Margutti, Raffaella; Drout, Maria R.; Marion, G. Howie; Sanders, Nathan E.; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Chornock, Ryan; Berger, Edo; Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, Pete; Kirshner, Robert P.; Dittmann, Jason; Bieryla, Allyson; Kamble, Atish; Chakraborti, Sayan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Fesen, Robert A.; Parrent, Jerod T. [6127 Wilder Lab, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Levesque, Emily M., E-mail: dmilisav@cfa.harvard.edu [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); and others

    2013-06-20

    We present optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2012au, a slow-evolving supernova (SN) with properties that suggest a link between subsets of energetic and H-poor SNe and superluminous SNe. SN 2012au exhibited conspicuous Type-Ib-like He I lines and other absorption features at velocities reaching Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} km s{sup -1} in its early spectra, and a broad light curve that peaked at M{sub B} = -18.1 mag. Models of these data indicate a large explosion kinetic energy of {approx}10{sup 52} erg and {sup 56}Ni mass ejection of M{sub Ni} Almost-Equal-To 0.3 M{sub Sun} on par with SN 1998bw. SN 2012au's spectra almost one year after explosion show a blend of persistent Fe II P-Cyg absorptions and nebular emissions originating from two distinct velocity regions. These late-time emissions include strong [Fe II], [Ca II], [O I], Mg I], and Na I lines at velocities {approx}> 4500 km s{sup -1}, as well as O I and Mg I lines at noticeably smaller velocities {approx}< 2000 km s{sup -1}. Many of the late-time properties of SN 2012au are similar to the slow-evolving hypernovae SN 1997dq and SN 1997ef, and the superluminous SN 2007bi. Our observations suggest that a single explosion mechanism may unify all of these events that span -21 {approx}< M{sub B} {approx}< -17 mag. The aspherical and possibly jetted explosion was most likely initiated by the core collapse of a massive progenitor star and created substantial high-density, low-velocity Ni-rich material.

  12. Evaluating search effectiveness of some selected search engines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating search effectiveness of some selected search engines. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL ... seek for information on the World Wide Web (WWW) using variety of search engines.

  13. Judging the Capability of Search Engines and Search Terms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anna Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    .... The present study aims to judge the capability of five selected search engines and search terms on the basis of first ten results and to identify most appropriate search term and search engine...

  14. 8-dimensional lattice optimized formats in 25-GBaud/s VCSEL based IM/DD optical interconnections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2015-01-01

    Temporally combined 4- and 8-dimensional lattice grids optimized modulation formats for VCSEL based IM/DD short-reach optical inter-connections has been proposed and investigated numerically together with its conventional counterpart PAM-4. © 2015 OSA.......Temporally combined 4- and 8-dimensional lattice grids optimized modulation formats for VCSEL based IM/DD short-reach optical inter-connections has been proposed and investigated numerically together with its conventional counterpart PAM-4. © 2015 OSA....

  15. A search for extragalactic methanol masers

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, S P; Whiteoak, J B; Vaile, R A; McCulloch, P M; Price, M

    1994-01-01

    A sensitive search for 6.7--GHz methanol maser emission has been made towards 10 galaxies that have yielded detectable microwave molecular--line transitions. These include several which show OH megamaser or superluminous \\water\\/ maser emission. Within the Galaxy, \\methanol\\/ and OH masers often occur in the same star formation regions and, in most cases, the \\methanol\\/ masers have a greater peak flux density than their OH counterparts. Thus we might expect \\methanol\\/ masers to be associated with extragalactic OH maser sources. We failed to detect any emission or absorption above our 60--mJy detection limit. We conclude that if the physical conditions exist to produce \\methanol\\/ megamaser emission, they are incompatible with the conditions which produce OH megamaser emission.

  16. University Students' Online Information Searching Strategies in Different Search Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Jung; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Hou, Huei-Tse; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the role of search context played in university students' online information searching strategies. A total of 304 university students in Taiwan were surveyed with questionnaires in which two search contexts were defined as searching for learning, and searching for daily life information. Students' online search strategies…

  17. [Advanced online search techniques and dedicated search engines for physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Yoav

    2008-02-01

    In recent years search engines have become an essential tool in the work of physicians. This article will review advanced search techniques from the world of information specialists, as well as some advanced search engine operators that may help physicians improve their online search capabilities, and maximize the yield of their searches. This article also reviews popular dedicated scientific and biomedical literature search engines.

  18. Tiling strategies for optical follow-up of gravitational-wave triggers by telescopes with a wide field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shaon; Bloemen, Steven; Nelemans, Gijs; Groot, Paul J.; Price, Larry R.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: Binary neutron stars are among the most promising candidates for joint gravitational-wave and electromagnetic astronomy. The goal of this work is to investigate various observing strategies that telescopes with wide field of view might incorporate while searching for electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave triggers. Methods: We examined various strategies of scanning the gravitational-wave sky localizations on the mock 2015-16 gravitational-wave events. First, we studied the performance of the sky coverage using a naive tiling system that completely covers a given confidence interval contour using a fixed grid. Then we propose the ranked-tiling strategy where we sample the localization in discrete two-dimensional intervals that are equivalent to the telescope's field of view and rank them based on their sample localizations. We then introduce an optimization of the grid by iterative sliding of the tiles. Next, we conducted tests for all the methods on a large sample of sky localizations that are expected in the first two years of operation of the Laser interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo detectors. We investigated the performance of the ranked-tiling strategy for telescope arrays and compared their performance against monolithic telescopes with a giant field of view. Finally, we studied the ability of optical counterpart detection by various types of telescopes. Results: Our analysis reveals that the ranked-tiling strategy improves the localization coverage over the contour-covering method. The improvement is more significant for telescopes with larger fields of view. We also find that while optimizing the position of the tiles significantly improves the coverage compared to contour-covering tiles. For ranked-tiles the same procedure leads to negligible improvement in the coverage of the sky localizations. We observed that distributing the field of view of the telescopes into arrays of multiple telescopes significantly

  19. Searching for Primordial Antimatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Scientists are on the hunt for evidence of antimatter - matter's arch nemesis - leftover from the very early Universe. New results using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and Compton Gamma Ray Observatory suggest the search may have just become even more difficult. Antimatter is made up of elementary particles, each of which has the same mass as their corresponding matter counterparts --protons, neutrons and electrons -- but the opposite charges and magnetic properties. When matter and antimatter particles collide, they annihilate each other and produce energy according to Einstein's famous equation, E=mc2. According to the Big Bang model, the Universe was awash in particles of both matter and antimatter shortly after the Big Bang. Most of this material annihilated, but because there was slightly more matter than antimatter - less than one part per billion - only matter was left behind, at least in the local Universe. Trace amounts of antimatter are believed to be produced by powerful phenomena such as relativistic jets powered by black holes and pulsars, but no evidence has yet been found for antimatter remaining from the infant Universe. How could any primordial antimatter have survived? Just after the Big Bang there was believed to be an extraordinary period, called inflation, when the Universe expanded exponentially in just a fraction of a second. "If clumps of matter and antimatter existed next to each other before inflation, they may now be separated by more than the scale of the observable Universe, so we would never see them meet," said Gary Steigman of The Ohio State University, who conducted the study. "But, they might be separated on smaller scales, such as those of superclusters or clusters, which is a much more interesting possibility." X-rayChandra X-ray Image In that case, collisions between two galaxy clusters, the largest gravitationally-bound structures in the Universe, might show evidence for antimatter. X-ray emission shows how much hot

  20. The StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey. II. Sensitivity of the survey and the atlas of synthetic dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccari, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Battaglia, G.; Ibata, R.; Martin, N.; Testa, V.; Cignoni, M.; Correnti, M.

    2016-06-01

    The searching for StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey is devoted to the search for stellar counterparts within ultra compact high velocity clouds that are candidate low-mass, low-luminosity galaxies. We present the results of a set of simulations aimed at the quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of the survey as a function of the total luminosity, size, and distance of the stellar systems we are looking for. For all of our synthetic galaxies we assumed an exponential surface brightness profile and an old and metal-poor population. The synthetic galaxies are simulated both on the images and on the photometric catalogues, taking all the observational effects into account. In the fields where the available observational material is of top quality (≃36% of the SECCO fields), we detect synthetic galaxies as ≥5σ over-densities of resolved stars down to μV,h ≃ 30.0 mag/arcsec2, for D ≤ 1.5 Mpc, and down to μV,h ≃ 29.5 mag/arcsec2, for D ≤ 2.5 Mpc. In the field with the worst observational material of the whole survey, we detect synthetic galaxies with μV,h ≤ 28.8 mag/arcsec2 out to D ≤ 1.0 Mpc, and those with μV,h ≤ 27.5 mag/arcsec2 out to D ≤ 2.5 Mpc. Dwarf galaxies with MV = -10.0, with sizes in the range spanned by known dwarfs, are detected by visual inspection of the images up to D = 5 Mpc independent of the image quality. In the best quality images, dwarfs are partially resolved into stars up to D = 3.0 Mpc and completely unresolved at D = 5 Mpc. As an independent test of the sensitivity of our images to low surface brightness galaxies, we report on the detection of several dwarf spheroidal galaxies probably located in the Virgo cluster with MV ≲ -8.0 and μV,h ≲ 26.8 mag/arcsec2. The nature of the previously discovered SECCO 1 stellar system, also likely located in the Virgo cluster, is rediscussed in comparison with these dwarfs. While specific for the SECCO survey, our study may also provide general

  1. Optical processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, S. C.

    1985-12-01

    The technical contributions were as follows: (1) Optical parallel 2-D neighborhood processor and optical processor assessment technique; (2) High accuracy with moderately accurate components and optical fredkin gate architectures; (3) Integrated optical threshold computing, pipelined polynomial processor, and all optical analog/digital converter; (4) Adaptive optical associative memory model with attention; (5) Effectiveness of parallelism and connectivity in optical computers; (6) Optical systolic array processing using an integrated acoustooptic module; (7) Optical threshold elements and networks, holographic threshold processors, adaptive matched spatial filtering, and coherence theory in optical computing; (8) Time-varying optical processing for sub-pixel targets, optical Kalman filtering, and adaptive matched filtering; (9) Optical degrees of freedom, ultra short optical pulses, number representations, content-addressable-memory processors, and integrated optical Givens rotation devices; (10) Optical J-K flip flop analysis and interfacing for optical computers; (11) Matrix multiplication algorithms and limits of incoherent optical computers; (12) Architecture for machine vision with sensor fusion, pattern recognition functions, and neural net implementations; (13) Optical computing algorithms, architectures, and components; and (14) Dynamic optical interconnections, advantages and architectures.

  2. Interactions of visual odometry and landmark guidance during food search in honeybees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, T; Hemmi, JM; Srinivasan, MV; Zeil, J

    2005-01-01

    How do honeybees use visual odometry and goal-defining landmarks to guide food search? In one experiment, bees were trained to forage in an optic-flow-rich tunnel with a landmark positioned directly above the feeder. Subsequent food-search tests indicated that bees searched much more accurately when

  3. QUEST FOR COSMOS SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY COUNTERPARTS USING CARMA AND VLA: IDENTIFYING THREE HIGH-REDSHIFT STARBURST GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolcic, V. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Navarrete, F.; Bertoldi, F. [Argelander Institut for Astronomy, Auf dem Huegel 71, Bonn D-53121 (Germany); Aravena, M.; Sheth, K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ilbert, O. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Universite de Provence, CNRS, BP 8, Traverse du Siphon, F-13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Yun, M. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Salvato, M.; Finoguenov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); McCracken, H. J. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universit Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Diener, C. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zrich, Wolfgang-Pauli-strasse 27, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Aretxaga, I.; Hughes, D.; Wilson, G. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Riechers, D. A.; Capak, P.; Scoville, N. Z. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Karim, A.; Schinnerer, E. [Max Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, Heidelberg D-69117 (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    We report on interferometric observations at 1.3 mm at 2''-3'' resolution using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We identify multi-wavelength counterparts of three submillimeter galaxies (SMGs; F{sub 1m} > 5.5 mJy) in the COSMOS field, initially detected with MAMBO and AzTEC bolometers at low, {approx}10''-30'', resolution. All three sources-AzTEC/C1, Cosbo-3, and Cosbo-8-are identified to coincide with positions of 20 cm radio sources. Cosbo-3, however, is not associated with the most likely radio counterpart, closest to the MAMBO source position, but with that farther away from it. This illustrates the need for intermediate-resolution ({approx}2'') mm-observations to identify the correct counterparts of single-dish-detected SMGs. All of our three sources become prominent only at NIR wavelengths, and their mm-to-radio flux based redshifts suggest that they lie at redshifts z {approx}> 2. As a proof of concept, we show that photometric redshifts can be well determined for SMGs, and we find photometric redshifts of 5.6 {+-} 1.2, 1.9{sup +0.9}{sub -0.5}, and {approx}4 for AzTEC/C1, Cosbo-3, and Cosbo-8, respectively. Using these we infer that these galaxies have radio-based star formation rates of {approx}> 1000 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}and IR luminosities of {approx}10{sup 13} L{sub Sun} consistent with properties of high-redshift SMGs. In summary, our sources reflect a variety of SMG properties in terms of redshift and clustering, consistent with the framework that SMGs are progenitors of z {approx} 2 and today's passive galaxies.

  4. Supporting complex search tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäde, Maria; Hall, Mark; Huurdeman, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks, is fragme......There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks......, and recommendations, and supporting exploratory search to sensemaking and analytics, UI and UX design pose an overconstrained challenge. How do we know that our approach is any good? Supporting complex search task requires new collaborations across the whole field of IR, and the proposed workshop will bring together...

  5. Adaptive Large Neighbourhood Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Stefan

    Large neighborhood search is a metaheuristic that has gained popularity in recent years. The heuristic repeatedly moves from solution to solution by first partially destroying the solution and then repairing it. The best solution observed during this search is presented as the final solution....... This tutorial introduces the large neighborhood search metaheuristic and the variant adaptive large neighborhood search that dynamically tunes parameters of the heuristic while it is running. Both heuristics belong to a broader class of heuristics that are searching a solution space using very large...... neighborhoods. The tutorial also present applications of the adaptive large neighborhood search, mostly related to vehicle routing problems for which the heuristic has been extremely successful. We discuss how the heuristic can be parallelized and thereby take advantage of modern desktop computers...

  6. Search on Rugged Landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billinger, Stephan; Stieglitz, Nils; Schumacher, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a laboratory experiment on human decision-making in a complex combinatorial task. We find strong evidence for a behavioral model of adaptive search. Success narrows down search to the neighborhood of the status quo, while failure promotes gradually more explorative...... search. Task complexity does not have a direct effect on behavior, but systematically affects the feedback conditions that guide success-induced exploitation and failure-induced exploration. The analysis also shows that human participants were prone to over-exploration, since they broke off the search...... for local improvements too early. We derive stylized decision rules that generate the search behavior observed in the experiment and discuss the implications of our findings for individual decision-making and organizational search....

  7. Supporting complex search tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäde, Maria; Hall, Mark; Huurdeman, Hugo;

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks......, is fragmented at best. The workshop addressed the many open research questions: What are the obvious use cases and applications of complex search? What are essential features of work tasks and search tasks to take into account? And how do these evolve over time? With a multitude of information, varying from...... introductory to specialized, and from authoritative to speculative or opinionated, when to show what sources of information? How does the information seeking process evolve and what are relevant differences between different stages? With complex task and search process management, blending searching, browsing...

  8. Approach for mechanism of BH3 domain counterpart BH3I-2′ inducing colorectal cancer cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Wan-yu; LIU Yang; ZHANG Zhi-cheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective To discuss mechanism of BH3 domain counterpart BH3I-2' inducing colorectal cancer cell apoptosis. Methods Detected inhibition ratio and apoptosis of colorectal cancer cells HCT-116, which were treated by BH3I-2', with microplate reader and flow cytometry. Results Inhibition ratio of colorectal cancer cells, which were treated by BH3I-2', could reach about 50 %. Ratio of viable apoptotic cell decreased and that of non-viable apoptotie cell increased as time went. Conclusions BH3I-2' can induce colorectal cancer cell apoptosis.

  9. The covalently bound dimer ion HC dbnd N sbnd C dbnd NH rad + and its neutral counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Karl J.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2010-09-01

    Model chemistry calculations (CBS-QB3 and CBS-APNO methods) and tandem mass spectrometry based experiments indicate that dissociative ionization of 2-methoxy-s-triazine (consecutive losses of CH2O and HCN) yields the elusive covalently bound [H,C,N] dimer ion HCdbnd Nsbnd Cdbnd NHrad+, a species of interest in astrochemistry. Neutralization-Reionization Mass Spectrometry (NRMS) experiments indicate that its neutral counterpart, HCdbnd Nsbnd Cdbnd NH, is a kinetically stable molecule in the rarefied gas-phase.

  10. SeeDNA: A Visualization Tool for K-string Content of Long DNA Sequences and Their Randomized Counterparts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junjie Shen; Shuyu Zhang; Hoong-Chien Lee; Bailin Hao

    2004-01-01

    An interactive tool to visualize the K-string composition of long DNA sequences including bacterial complete genomes is described. It is especially useful for exploring short palindromic structures in the sequences. The SeeDNA program runs on Red Hat Linux with GTK+ support. It displays two-dimensional (2D) or one-dimensional (1D) histograms of the K-string distribution of a given sequence and/or its randomized counterpart. It is also capable of showing the difference of K-string distributions between two sequences. The C source code using the GTK+package is freely available.

  11. Federated Search Scalability

    OpenAIRE

    Txurruka Alberdi, Beñat

    2015-01-01

    The search of images on the internet has become a natural process for the internet surfer. Most of the search engines use complex algorithms to look up for images but their metadata is mostly ignored, in part because many image hosting sites remove metadata when the image is uploaded. The JPSearch standard has been developed to handle interoperability in metadata based searches, but it seems that the market is not interested on supporting it. The starting point of this proje...

  12. Mastering ElasticSearch

    CERN Document Server

    Kuc, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    A practical tutorial that covers the difficult design, implementation, and management of search solutions.Mastering ElasticSearch is aimed at to intermediate users who want to extend their knowledge about ElasticSearch. The topics that are described in the book are detailed, but we assume that you already know the basics, like the query DSL or data indexing. Advanced users will also find this book useful, as the examples are getting deep into the internals where it is needed.

  13. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Written in an engaging, easy-to-follow style, the recipes will help you to extend the capabilities of ElasticSearch to manage your data effectively.If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications, manage data, or have decided to start using ElasticSearch, this book is ideal for you. This book assumes that you've got working knowledge of JSON and Java

  14. Google Power Search

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Behind Google's deceptively simple interface is immense power for both market and competitive research-if you know how to use it well. Sure, basic searches are easy, but complex searches require specialized skills. This concise book takes you through the full range of Google's powerful search-refinement features, so you can quickly find the specific information you need. Learn techniques ranging from simple Boolean logic to URL parameters and other advanced tools, and see how they're applied to real-world market research examples. Incorporate advanced search operators such as filetype:, intit

  15. Delaying information search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Shani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In three studies, we examined factors that may temporarily attenuate information search. People are generally curious and dislike uncertainty, which typically encourages them to look for relevant information. Despite these strong forces that promote information search, people sometimes deliberately delay obtaining valuable information. We find they may do so when they are concerned that the information might interfere with future pleasurable activities. Interestingly, the decision to search or to postpone searching for information is influenced not only by the value and importance of the information itself but also by well-being maintenance goals related to possible detrimental effects that negative knowledge may have on unrelated future plans.

  16. SearchResultFinder: federated search made easy

    OpenAIRE

    Trieschnigg, Rudolf Berend; Tjin-Kam-Jet, Kien; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2013-01-01

    Building a federated search engine based on a large number existing web search engines is a challenge: implementing the programming interface (API) for each search engine is an exacting and time-consuming job. In this demonstration we present SearchResultFinder, a browser plugin which speeds up determining reusable XPaths for extracting search result items from HTML search result pages. Based on a single search result page, the tool presents a ranked list of candidate extraction XPaths and al...

  17. A panchromatic study of BLAST counterparts: total star-formation rate, morphology, AGN fraction and stellar mass

    CERN Document Server

    Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Chapin, Edward L; Cortese, Luca; Devlin, Mark J; Dye, Simon; Eales, Stephen; Griffin, Matthew; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin B; Pascale, Enzo; Scott, Douglas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Viero, Marco; Wiebe, Donald

    2010-01-01

    We carry out a multi-wavelength study of individual galaxies detected by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) and identified at other wavelengths, using data spanning the radio to the ultraviolet (UV). We develop a Monte Carlo method to account for flux boosting, source blending, and correlations among bands, which we use to derive deboosted far-infrared (FIR) luminosities for our sample. We estimate total star-formation rates for BLAST counterparts with z 10^11 L_sun, z > 0.5, but the contribution from unobscured starlight cannot be neglected at L_FIR < 10^11 L_sun, z < 0.25. We assess that about 20% of the galaxies in our sample show indication of a type-1 active galactic nucleus (AGN), but their submillimeter emission is mainly due to star formation in the host galaxy. We compute stellar masses for a subset of 92 BLAST counterparts; these are relatively massive objects with a median mass of 10^11 M_sun. We argue that BLAST is bridging the mass gap at 0 < z < 2 betwe...

  18. The Effect of the Negotiator's Social Power as a Function of the Counterpart's Emotional Reactions in a Computer Mediated Negotiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomo Hareli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A negotiator’s own power and their counterpart’s emotional reaction to the negotiation both influence the outcome of negotiations. The present research addressed the question of their relative importance. On one hand, social power should be potent regardless of the other’s emotions. On the other hand, the counterpart’s emotional reactions inform about the ongoing state of the negotiation, and as such are more diagnostic than the more distal power cue. In a simulated computer mediated negotiation, 248 participants assumed the role of a vendor of computerized avionics test equipment and their objective was to negotiate the price, the warranty period, and the number of software updates that the buyer will receive free of charge. Participants negotiated the sale after being primed with either high or low power or not primed at all (control condition. They received information that their counterpart was either happy or angry or emotionally neutral. The findings showed that even though power was an important factor at the start of negotiations, the informative value of emotion information took precedence over time. This implies that emotional information may erase any advantage that counterparts have in a negotiation thanks to their higher social power.

  19. Geographical structuring of Trypanosoma cruzi populations from Chilean Triatoma infestans triatomines and their genetic relationship with other Latino American counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, J; Rojas, T; DÍaz, F; Miranda, S; Jercic, M I; González, C; Coñoepán, W; Pichuantes, S; RodrÍguez, J; Gajardo, M; Sánchez, G

    2011-01-01

    In order to obtain more information about the population structure of Chilean Trypanosoma cruzi, and their genetic relationship with other Latino American counterparts, we performed the study of T. cruzi samples detected in the midgut content of Triatoma infestans insects from three endemic regions of Chile. The genetic characteristics of these samples were analysed using microsatellite markers and PCR conditions that allow the detection of predominant T. cruzi clones directly in triatomine midgut content. Population genetic analyses using the Fisher’s exact method, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and the determination of FST showed that the northern T. cruzi population sample was genetically differentiated from the two southern population counterparts. Further analysis showed that the cause of this genetic differentiation was the asymmetrical distribution of TcIII T. cruzi predominant clones. Considering all triatomines from the three regions, the most frequent predominant lineages were TcIII (38%), followed by TcI (34%) and hybrid (8%). No TcII lineage was observed along the predominant T. cruzi clones. The best phylogenetic reconstruction using the shared allelic genetic distance was concordant with the population genetic analysis and tree topology previously described studying foreign samples. The correlation studies showed that the lineage TcIII from the III region was genetically differentiated from the other two, and this differentiation was correlated with geographical distance including Chilean and mainly Brazilian samples. It will be interesting to investigate whether this geographical structure may be related with different clinical manifestation of Chagas disease. PMID:22325822

  20. Are both BL Lacs and pulsar wind nebulae the astrophysical counterparts of IceCube neutrino events?

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P

    2014-01-01

    IceCube has recently reported the discovery of high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. These are the highest energy particles produced in cosmic ray interactions ever detected, opening up the possibility of investigating the PeV (10^15 eV) sky. Because of their rather large positional uncertainties, these events have so far not been associated to any astrophysical source. We have found plausible counterparts in the GeV - TeV band by using joint spatial and energetic information. Namely, we looked for sources in the available high-energy gamma-ray catalogues (TeVCat, WHSP, 1FHL) within the median error circles of the IceCube events. We then built the spectral energy distribution of these sources and compared it with the energy and flux of the corresponding neutrino events. The likely counterparts include "classic" BL Lacs, such as MKN 421 and PG 1553+113, as well as Galactic pulsar wind nebulae, namely MGRO J1908+06 and HESS J1809-193. This might indicate the emerging of a mixed scenario of Galactic and...

  1. Citation Searching: Search Smarter & Find More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Chelsea C.; Brown, Stephanie Willen

    2008-01-01

    The staff at University of Connecticut are participating in Elsevier's Student Ambassador Program (SAmP) in which graduate students train their peers on "citation searching" research using Scopus and Web of Science, two tremendous citation databases. They are in the fourth semester of these training programs, and they are wildly successful: They…

  2. Citation Searching: Search Smarter & Find More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Chelsea C.; Brown, Stephanie Willen

    2008-01-01

    The staff at University of Connecticut are participating in Elsevier's Student Ambassador Program (SAmP) in which graduate students train their peers on "citation searching" research using Scopus and Web of Science, two tremendous citation databases. They are in the fourth semester of these training programs, and they are wildly successful: They…

  3. The ESO UVES Advanced Data Products quasar sample - V. Identifying the galaxy counterpart to the sub-damped Lyα system towards Q 2239-2949

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Møller, Palle; Péroux, Céline; Quiret, Samuel; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Ledoux, Cédric; Deharveng, Jean-Michel

    2017-02-01

    Gas flows in and out of galaxies are one of the key unknowns in today's galaxy evolution studies. Because gas flows carry mass, energy, and metals, they are believed to be closely connected to the star formation history of galaxies. Most of these processes take place in the circum-galactic medium (CGM) which remains challenging to observe in emission. A powerful tool to study the CGM gas is offered by combining observations of the gas traced by absorption lines in quasar spectra with detection of the stellar component of the same absorbing-galaxy. To this end, we have targeted the zabs = 1.825 sub-damped Lyα absorber (sub-DLA) towards the zem = 2.102 quasar 2dF J 223941.8-294955 (hereafter Q 2239-2949) with the ESO VLT/X-Shooter spectrograph. Our aim is to investigate the relation between its properties in emission and in absorption. The derived metallicity of the sub-DLA with log N(H I) = 19.84 ± 0.14 cm-2 is [M/H] > -0.75. Using the Voigt profile optical depth method, we measure Δv90(Fe II) = 64 km s-1. The sub-DLA galaxy counterpart is located at an impact parameter of 2{^''.}4 ± 0{^''.}2 (20.8 ± 1.7 kpc at z = 1.825). We have detected Lyα and marginal [O II] emissions. The mean measured flux of the Lyα line is FLy α ∼ 5.7 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 Å-1, corresponding to a dust uncorrected SFR of ∼0.13 M⊙ yr-1.

  4. ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Search for [CII] line and dust emission in $6

    CERN Document Server

    Aravena, Manuel; Walter, Fabian; Bouwens, Rychard; Oesch, Pascal; Carilli, Christopher; Bauer, Franz E; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Daddi, Emanuele; Gónzalez-López, Jorge; Ivison, R J; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian R; Swinbank, Mark; Weiss, Axel; Anguita, Timo; Bacon, Roland; Bell, Eric; Bertoldi, Frank; Cortes, Paulo; Cox, Pierre; Hodge, Jacqueline; Ibar, Eduardo; Inami, Hanae; Infante, Leopoldo; Karim, Alexander; Magnelli, Benjamin; Ota, Kauzuaki; Popping, Gergö; van der Werf, Paul; Wagg, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    We present a search for [CII] line and dust continuum emission from optical dropout galaxies at $z>6$ using ASPECS, our ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF). Our observations, which cover the frequency range $212-272$ GHz, encompass approximately the range $6$4.5 $\\sigma$, two of which correspond to blind detections with no optical counterparts. At this significance level, our statistical analysis shows that about 60\\% of our candidates are expected to be spurious. For one of our blindly selected [CII] line candidates, we tentatively detect the CO(6-5) line in our parallel 3-mm line scan. None of the line candidates are individually detected in the 1.2 mm continuum. A stack of all [CII] candidates results in a tentative detection with $S_{1.2mm}=14\\pm5\\mu$Jy. This implies a dust-obscured star formation rate (SFR) of $(3\\pm1)$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. We find that the two highest--SFR objects have candidate [CII] lines with luminosities that are consistent with the low-redshift $L_{\\rm [C...

  5. Optical confirmation of the outburst of Aql X-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres, M.A.P.; Jonker, P.G.; Bassa, C.; Nelemans, G.

    2007-01-01

    We observed the optical counterpart to the recurrent X-ray transient Aql X-1 on 2007 Sep 11 to Sep 14 UT using the IMACS camera mounted on the 6.5m Magellan Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Single 5-10s R-band images were acquired each night with a seeing of 0.8-1.4 arcsec.

  6. Merging Nonlinear Optics and Negative-Index Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Alexander K

    2011-01-01

    The extraordinary properties of nonlinear optical propagation processes in double-domain positive/negative index metamaterials are reviewed. These processes include second harmonic generation, three- and four-wave frequency mixing, and optical parametric amplification. Striking contrasts with the properties of the counterparts in ordinary materials are shown. We also discuss the possibilities for compensating strong losses inherent to plasmonic metamaterials, which present a major obstacle in numerous exciting applications, and the possibilities for creation of unique ultracompact photonic devices such as data processing chips and nonlinear-optical sensors. Finally, we propose similar extraordinary three-wave mixing processes in crystals based on optical phonons with negative dispersion.

  7. GRBs Optical follow-up observation at Lulin observatory, Taiwan

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, K Y; Ip, W H; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Makishima, K

    2005-01-01

    The Lulin GRB program, using the Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT) in Taiwan started in July 2003. Its scientific aims are to discover optical counterparts of XRFs and short and long GRBs, then to quickly observe them in multiple bands. Thirteen follow-up observations were provided by LOT between July 2003 and Feb. 2005. One host galaxy was found at GRB 031203. Two optical afterglows were detected for GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. In addition, the optical observations of GRB 031203 and a discussion of the non-detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 031203 are also reported in this article.

  8. Human memory search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davelaar, E.J.; Raaijmakers, J.G.W.; Hills, T.T.; Robbins, T.W.; Todd, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of understanding human memory search is hard to exaggerate: we build and live our lives based on what whe remember. This chapter explores the characteristics of memory search, with special emphasis on the use of retrieval cues. We introduce the dependent measures that are obtained

  9. Distributed Deep Web Search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin-Kam-Jet, Kien

    2013-01-01

    The World Wide Web contains billions of documents (and counting); hence, it is likely that some document will contain the answer or content you are searching for. While major search engines like Bing and Google often manage to return relevant results to your query, there are plenty of situations in

  10. With News Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Holly

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many news search engines on the Web, finding the news items one wants can be challenging. Choosing appropriate search terms is one of the biggest challenges. Unless one has seen the article that one is seeking, it is often difficult to select words that were used in the headline or text of the article. The limited archives of…

  11. Towards Accessible Search Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serdyukov, Pavel; Hiemstra, Djoerd; Ruthven, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The SIGIR workshop Towards Accessible Search Systems was the first workshop in the field to raise the discussion on how to make search engines accessible for different types of users. We report on the results of the workshop that was held on 23 July 2010 in conjunction with the 33rd Annual ACM SIGIR

  12. Searches for Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Ventura, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    New and recents results on Supersymmetry searches are shown for the ATLAS and the CMS experiments. Analyses with about 36 fb^-1 are considered for searches concerning light squarks and gluinos, direct pair production of 3rd generation squarks, electroweak production of charginos, neutralinos, sleptons, R-parity violating scenarios and long-lived particles.

  13. Distributed deep web search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin-Kam-Jet, Kien-Tsoi Theodorus Egbert

    2013-01-01

    The World Wide Web contains billions of documents (and counting); hence, it is likely that some document will contain the answer or content you are searching for. While major search engines like Bing and Google often manage to return relevant results to your query, there are plenty of situations in

  14. Fixing Dataset Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Three current search engines are queried for ozone data at the GES DISC. The results range from sub-optimal to counter-intuitive. We propose a method to fix dataset search by implementing a robust relevancy ranking scheme. The relevancy ranking scheme is based on several heuristics culled from more than 20 years of helping users select datasets.

  15. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications and want to sharpen your understanding of the core elements and applications, this is the book for you. It is assumed that you've got working knowledge of JSON and, if you want to extend ElasticSearch, of Java and related technologies.

  16. Search and Recommendation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine

    2014-01-01

    -scale application by companies like Amazon, Facebook, and Netflix. But are search and recommendation really two different fields of research that address different problems with different sets of algorithms in papers published at distinct conferences? In my talk, I want to argue that search and recommendation...

  17. CH2D+, the Search for the Holy Grail

    CERN Document Server

    Roueff, E; Lis, D C; Wootten, A; Marcelino, N; cernicharo, J; Tercero, B

    2013-01-01

    CH2D+, the singly deuterated counterpart of CH3+, offers an alternative way to mediate formation of deuterated species at temperatures of several tens of K, as compared to the release of deuterated species from grains. We report a longstanding observational search for this molecular ion, whose rotational spectroscopy is not yet completely secure. We summarize the main spectroscopic properties of this molecule and discuss the chemical network leading to the formation of CH2D+, with explicit account of the ortho/para forms of H2, H3+ and CH3+. Astrochemical models support the presence of this molecular ion in moderately warm environments at a marginal level.

  18. Tales from the Field: Search Strategies Applied in Web Searching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soohyung Joo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In their web search processes users apply multiple types of search strategies, which consist of different search tactics. This paper identifies eight types of information search strategies with associated cases based on sequences of search tactics during the information search process. Thirty-one participants representing the general public were recruited for this study. Search logs and verbal protocols offered rich data for the identification of different types of search strategies. Based on the findings, the authors further discuss how to enhance web-based information retrieval (IR systems to support each type of search strategy.

  19. CADC Advanced Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, D. N.

    2012-09-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre's (CADC) Advanced Search web application is a modern search tool to access data across the CADC archives. It allows searching in different units, and is well averse in wild card characters and numeric operations. Search results are displayed in a sortable and filterable manner allowing quick and accurate access to downloadable data. The Advanced Search interface makes extremely good use of the Astronomical Data Query Language (ADQL) to scour the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM) Table Access Protocol (TAP) query service and the vast CADC Archive Data (AD) storage system. A new tabular view of the query form and the results data makes it easy to view the query, then return to the query form to make further changes, or, alternatively, filter the data from the paginated table. Results are displayed using a rich, open-source, JavaScript-based VOTable viewer called voview.

  20. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts....... The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improves search in complementary technologies, while demoting it when strategic interests are misaligned in disruptive technologies....... However, incumbent sources engaged in capability reconfiguration to accommodate disruption improve search efforts in disruptive technologies. The paper concludes that the value of external sources is contingent on more than their knowledge. Specifically, interdependence of sources in search gives rise...

  1. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts....... The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improves search in complementary technologies, while demoting it when strategic interests are misaligned in disruptive technologies....... However, incumbent sources engaged in capability reconfiguration to accommodate disruption improve search efforts in disruptive technologies. The paper concludes that the value of external sources is contingent on more than their knowledge. Specifically, interdependence of sources in search gives rise...

  2. Job Search, Search Intensity, and Labor Market Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, Hans G.

    2005-01-01

    Job searches by both the unemployed and employed jobseekers are studied through an empirical structural job search model using a choice variable of search intensity. The resulting influence of search intensity on the labor market transitions is analyzed to give the estimation results of the search and the impact of the benefit level on the search…

  3. How Users Search the Library from a Single Search Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Cory; Sierra, Tito; Boyer, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Academic libraries are turning increasingly to unified search solutions to simplify search and discovery of library resources. Unfortunately, very little research has been published on library user search behavior in single search box environments. This study examines how users search a large public university library using a prominent, single…

  4. An Optical Tri-valued Computing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Peng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new optical computing experimental system is presented. Designed based on tri-valued logic, the system is built as a photoelectric hybrid computer system which is much advantageous over its electronic counterparts. Say, the tri-valued logic of the system guarantees that it is more powerful in information processing than that of systems with binary logic. And the optical characteristic of the system makes it be much capable in huge data processing than that of the electronic computers. The optical computing system includes two parts, electronic part and optical part. The electronic part consists of a PC and two embedded systems which are used for data input/output, monitor, synchronous control, user data combination and separation and so on. The optical part includes three components. They are optical encoder, logic calculator and decoder. It mainly answers for encoding the users' requests into tri-valued optical information, computing and processing the requests, decoding the tri-valued optical information to binary electronic information and so forth. Experiment results show that the system is quite right in optical information processing which demonstrates the feasibility and correctness of the optical computing system.

  5. A Kinematically Unbiased Search for Nearby Young Stars in the Northern Hemisphere Selected Using SuperWASP Rotation Periods

    CERN Document Server

    Binks, A S; Maxted, P F L

    2015-01-01

    We present a kinematically-unbiased search to identify young, nearby low-mass members of kinematic moving groups (MGs). Objects with both rotation periods shorter than 5 days in the SuperWASP All-Sky Survey and X-ray counterparts in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey were chosen to create a catalog of several thousand rapidly-rotating, X-ray active FGK stars. These objects are expected to be either young single stars or tidally-locked spectroscopic binaries. We obtained optical spectra for a sub-sample of 146 stars to determine their ages and kinematics, and in some cases repeat radial velocity (RV) measurements were used to identify binarity. Twenty-six stars are found to have lithium abundances consistent with an age of <=200 Myr, and show no evidence for binarity and in most cases measurements of H-alpha and v\\sin i support their youthful status. Based on their youth, their radial velocities and estimates of their 3-dimensional kinematics, we find 11 objects that may be members of known MGs, 8 that do not appear ...

  6. Modern optics

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther, B D

    2015-01-01

    Modern Optics is a fundamental study of the principles of optics using a rigorous physical approach based on Maxwell's Equations. The treatment provides the mathematical foundations needed to understand a number of applications such as laser optics, fiber optics and medical imaging covered in an engineering curriculum as well as the traditional topics covered in a physics based course in optics. In addition to treating the fundamentals in optical science, the student is given an exposure to actual optics engineering problems such as paraxial matrix optics, aberrations with experimental examples, Fourier transform optics (Fresnel-Kirchhoff formulation), Gaussian waves, thin films, photonic crystals, surface plasmons, and fiber optics. Through its many pictures, figures, and diagrams, the text provides a good physical insight into the topics covered. The course content can be modified to reflect the interests of the instructor as well as the student, through the selection of optional material provided in append...

  7. DISCOVERY AND REDSHIFT OF AN OPTICAL AFTERGLOW IN 71 deg{sup 2}: iPTF13bxl AND GRB 130702A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Leo P.; Brown, Duncan A. [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bradley Cenko, S.; Gehrels, Neil; McEnery, Julie [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Mulchaey, John [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Perley, Daniel A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bellm, Eric; Barlow, Tom; Cao, Yi; Horesh, Assaf [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Nugent, Peter E.; Bloom, Joshua S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, B-20 Hearst Field Annex 3411, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Corsi, Alessandra [George Washington University, Corcoran Hall, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Frail, Dale A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Masci, Frank J., E-mail: lsinger@caltech.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2013-10-20

    We report the discovery of the optical afterglow of the γ-ray burst (GRB) 130702A, identified upon searching 71 deg{sup 2} surrounding the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) localization. Discovered and characterized by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, iPTF13bxl is the first afterglow discovered solely based on a GBM localization. Real-time image subtraction, machine learning, human vetting, and rapid response multi-wavelength follow-up enabled us to quickly narrow a list of 27,004 optical transient candidates to a single afterglow-like source. Detection of a new, fading X-ray source by Swift and a radio counterpart by CARMA and the Very Large Array confirmed the association between iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A. Spectroscopy with the Magellan and Palomar 200 inch telescopes showed the afterglow to be at a redshift of z = 0.145, placing GRB 130702A among the lowest redshift GRBs detected to date. The prompt γ-ray energy release and afterglow luminosity are intermediate between typical cosmological GRBs and nearby sub-luminous events such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218. The bright afterglow and emerging supernova offer an opportunity for extensive panchromatic follow-up. Our discovery of iPTF13bxl demonstrates the first observational proof-of-principle for ∼10 Fermi-iPTF localizations annually. Furthermore, it represents an important step toward overcoming the challenges inherent in uncovering faint optical counterparts to comparably localized gravitational wave events in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo era.

  8. A Search for Signatures of Quasar Evolution: Comparison of the Shapes of the Rest-Frame Optical/Ultraviolet Continua of Quasars at z>3 and z~0.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Olga; Elvis, Martin; Bechtold, Jill; Elston, Richard

    2001-10-01

    For 15 bright (Vz>3) quasars, we have obtained infrared spectra and photometry, and optical spectrophotometry and photometry, which we use to construct their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from λrest~1285-5100 Å. High-resolution spectroscopy for seven enable measurements of their continua shortward of Lyα, and L' detections of four of these extend their SEDs redward to λrest~7500 Å. We examine the optical/UV continuum shapes and compare these to those of a set of 27 well-studied low-redshift (z~0.1) quasars which are matched to the high-redshift ones in evolved luminosity. Single power-law fits to the average fluxes within a set of narrow, line-free, windows between 1285 and 5100 Å, but excluding the 2000-4000 Å region of the Fe II+BaC ``small bump,'' are adequate for most of the objects. For both the high- and low-redshift samples, the distributions of spectral indices, αouv (Fν~ναouv) span a wide range, with Δαouv~1. The cause of such diversity is investigated, and our analysis is consistent with the conclusion of Rowan-Robinson: that it arises from differences in both the emitted continua themselves and in the amounts of intrinsic extinction undergone. The mean (median) optical/UV spectral indices for the high- and low-redshift samples are -0.32 (-0.29) and -0.38 (-0.40), respectively. A Student's t-test indicates that these do not differ significantly, and a K-S test shows likewise for the distributions. Assuming the optical/UV continuum derives from accretion, the similarity of the spectral indices at high and low redshift is inconsistent with models which interpret the statistical evolution as resulting from a single generation of slowly dimming quasars and instead favors those involving multiple generations of short-lived quasars formed at successively lower luminosities. A clear difference between the high- and low-redshift samples occurs in the region of ``small bump.'' The power-law fit residuals for the low-redshift sample show a

  9. Custom Search Engines: Tools & Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notess, Greg R.

    2008-01-01

    Few have the resources to build a Google or Yahoo! from scratch. Yet anyone can build a search engine based on a subset of the large search engines' databases. Use Google Custom Search Engine or Yahoo! Search Builder or any of the other similar programs to create a vertical search engine targeting sites of interest to users. The basic steps to…

  10. Skewed Binary Search Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Moruz, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    It is well-known that to minimize the number of comparisons a binary search tree should be perfectly balanced. Previous work has shown that a dominating factor over the running time for a search is the number of cache faults performed, and that an appropriate memory layout of a binary search tree...... can reduce the number of cache faults by several hundred percent. Motivated by the fact that during a search branching to the left or right at a node does not necessarily have the same cost, e.g. because of branch prediction schemes, we in this paper study the class of skewed binary search trees....... For all nodes in a skewed binary search tree the ratio between the size of the left subtree and the size of the tree is a fixed constant (a ratio of 1/2 gives perfect balanced trees). In this paper we present an experimental study of various memory layouts of static skewed binary search trees, where each...

  11. Myanmar Language Search Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pann Yu Mon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available With the enormous growth of the World Wide Web, search engines play a critical role in retrieving information from the borderless Web. Although many search engines are available for the major languages, but they are not much proficient for the less computerized languages including Myanmar. The main reason is that those search engines are not considering the specific features of those languages. A search engine which capable of searching the Web documents written in those languages is highly needed, especially when more and more Web sites are coming up with localized content in multiple languages. In this study, the design and the architecture of language specific search engine for Myanmar language is proposed. The main feature of the system are, (1 it can search the multiple encodings of the Myanmar Web page, (2 the system is designed to comply with the specific features of the Myanmar language. Finally the experiment has been done to prove whether it meets the design requirements.

  12. Optic Neuritis

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Demyelinating optic neuritis is the most common cause of unilateral painful visual loss in the United States. Although patients presenting with demyelinating optic neuritis have favorable long-term visual prognosis, optic neuritis is the initial clinical manifestation of multiple sclerosis in 20% of patients. The Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial (ONTT) has helped stratify the risk of developing multiple sclerosis after the first episode of optic neuritis based on abnormal findings on brain MRI....

  13. Search Engine Bias and the Demise of Search Engine Utopianism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, E.

    Due to search engines' automated operations, people often assume that search engines display search results neutrally and without bias. However, this perception is mistaken. Like any other media company, search engines affirmatively control their users' experiences, which has the consequence of skewing search results (a phenomenon called "search engine bias"). Some commentators believe that search engine bias is a defect requiring legislative correction. Instead, this chapter argues that search engine bias is the beneficial consequence of search engines optimizing content for their users. The chapter further argues that the most problematic aspect of search engine bias, the "winner-take-all" effect caused by top placement in search results, will be mooted by emerging personalized search technology.

  14. Corrosion Behavior of AlSi10Mg Alloy Produced by Additive Manufacturing (AM vs. Its Counterpart Gravity Cast Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avi Leon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The attractiveness of additive manufacturing (AM relates to the ability of this technology to rapidly produce very complex components at affordable costs. However, the properties and corrosion behavior, in particular, of products produced by AM technology should at least match the properties obtained by conventional technologies. The present study aims at evaluating the corrosion behavior and corrosion fatigue endurance of AlSi10Mg alloy produced by selective laser melting (SLM in comparison with its conventional counterpart, gravity cast alloy. The results obtained indicate that the corrosion resistance of the printed and cast alloys was relatively similar, with a minor advantage to the printed alloy. The corrosion fatigue endurance of the printed alloy was relatively improved compared to the cast alloy. This was mainly attributed to the significant differences between the microstructure and defect characteristics of those two alloys.

  15. Reciprocal functional pseudotyping of HIV-1 and HTLV-1 viral genomes by the heterologous counterpart envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klase, Zachary; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2013-08-15

    HIV-1 and HTLV-1 can infect CD4+ T cells and can co-infect the same individual. In principle, it is possible that both viruses can infect the same CD4+ T cells in dually infected persons. Currently, how efficiently HTLV-1 and HIV-1 co-infects the same cell and the full extent of their biological interactions are not well-understood. Here, we report evidence confirming that both viruses can infect the same cells and that HTLV-1 envelope (Env) can pseudotype HIV-1 viral particles and HIV-1 envelope (Env) can pseudotype HTLV-1 virions to mediate subsequent infections of substrate cells. We also show that the construction of a chimeric HTLV-1 molecular clone carrying the HIV-1 Env in place of its HTLV-1 counterpart results in a replication competent moiety. These findings raise new implications of viral complementation and assortment between HIV-1 and HTLV-1 in dually infected persons.

  16. [Development of the craniofacial structures and mandibular growth rotation: a longitudinal study with Enlow analysis (counterpart analysis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işeri, H

    1989-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the development of craniofacial structures in individuals with different actual mandibular growth rotation pattern. Enlow's counterpart analysis was used for this evaluation. The material was consisted 166 cephalometric films of 83 male and female subjects. A total of fourteen variables were employed and the data was analysed by various statistical methods. The vertical growth of middle cranial fossa and mandibular ramus as the equivalent of nasomaxillary complex was found to be the key sites in the determination of mandibular growth rotation pattern. Besides this, the sagittal location of maxilla and mandible related to the cranial base was different in backward and forward mandibular rotation patterns.

  17. Ectopically hTERT expressing adult human mesenchymal stem cells are less radiosensitive than their telomerase negative counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Graakjaer, Jesper; Cairney, Claire J

    2007-01-01

    radiosensitivity to other mammalian cells so far tested. In this study, we investigated the genetic effects of ionizing radiation (2.5-15 Gy) on normal human mesenchymal stem cells and their telomerised counterpart hMSC-telo1. We evaluated overall genomic integrity, DNA damage/repair by applying a fluorescence...... in the two cell lines. The telomeres were extensively destroyed after irradiation in both cell types suggesting that telomere caps are especially sensitive to radiation. The TERT-immortalized hMSCs showed higher stability at telomeric regions than primary hMSCs indicating that cells with long telomeres...... and high telomerase activity have the advantage of re-establishing the telomeric caps. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Mar-10...

  18. Plasmonic Cu(x)In(y)S2 quantum dots make better photovoltaics than their nonplasmonic counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niezgoda, J Scott; Yap, Eugene; Keene, Joseph D; McBride, James R; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2014-06-11

    A synthetic approach has recently been developed which results in Cu(x)In(y)S2 quantum dots (QDs) possessing localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes in the near-infrared (NIR) frequencies.1 In this study, we investigate the potential benefits of near-field plasmonic effects centered upon light absorbing nanoparticles in a photovoltaic system by developing and verifying nonplasmonic counterparts as an experimental control. Simple QD-sensitized solar cells (QD-SSCs) were assembled which show an 11.5% relative increase in incident photon conversion efficiency (IPCE) achieved in the plasmon-enhanced devices. We attribute this increase in IPCE to augmented charge excitation stemming from near-field "antenna" effects in the plasmonic Cu(x)In(y)S2 QD-SSCs. This study represents the first of its kind; direct interrogation of the influence of plasmon-on-semiconductor architectures with respect to excitonic absorption in photovoltaic systems.

  19. Improving Search Engine Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Jyoti; Kumar, Ela

    2010-11-01

    Search engines on the Internet are used daily to access and find information. While these services are providing an easy way to find information globally, they are also suffering from artificially created false results. This paper describes two techniques that are being used to manipulate the search engines: spam pages (used to achieve higher rankings on the result page) and cloaking (used to feed falsified data into search engines). This paper also describes two proposed methods to fight this kind of misuse, algorithms for both of the formerly mentioned cases of spamdexing.

  20. Modified harmony search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Najihah; Lutfi Amri Ramli, Ahmad; Majid, Ahmad Abd; Piah, Abd Rahni Mt

    2017-09-01

    A metaheuristic algorithm, called Harmony Search is quite highly applied in optimizing parameters in many areas. HS is a derivative-free real parameter optimization algorithm, and draws an inspiration from the musical improvisation process of searching for a perfect state of harmony. Propose in this paper Modified Harmony Search for solving optimization problems, which employs a concept from genetic algorithm method and particle swarm optimization for generating new solution vectors that enhances the performance of HS algorithm. The performances of MHS and HS are investigated on ten benchmark optimization problems in order to make a comparison to reflect the efficiency of the MHS in terms of final accuracy, convergence speed and robustness.