WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical atomic spectra

  1. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  2. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  3. Spectra of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoso, Budi; Arumbinang, Haryono.

    1981-01-01

    Emission spectra of alkali atoms has been determined by using spectrometer at the ultraviolet to infra red waves range. The spectra emission can be obtained by absorption spectrophotometric analysis. Comparative evaluations between experimental data and data handbook obtained by spark method were also presented. (author tr.)

  4. Optical to ultraviolet spectra of sandwiches of benzene and transition metal atoms: Time dependent density functional theory and many-body calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Jose Ignacio; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Lopez, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    The optical spectra of sandwich clusters formed by transition metal atoms (titanium, vanadium, and chromium) intercalated between parallel benzene molecules have been studied by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and many-body perturbation theory. Sandwiches with different number...

  5. Application of some Hartree-Fock model calculations to the analysis of atomic and free-ion optical spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayhurst, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for applying ab-initio calculations to the analysis of atomic spectra are investigated, along with the relationship between the semi-empirical and ab-initio forms of Slater-Condon theory. Slater-Condon theory is reviewed with a focus on the essential features that lead to the effective Hamiltonians associated with the semi-empirical form of the theory. Ab-initio spectroscopic parameters are calculated from wavefunctions obtained via self-consistent field methods, while multiconfiguration Hamiltonian matrices are constructed and diagonalized with computer codes written by Robert Cowan of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Group theoretical analysis demonstrates that wavefunctions more general than Slater determinants (i.e. wavefunctions with radical correlations between electrons) lead to essentially the same parameterization of effective Hamiltonians. In the spirit of this analysis, a strategy is developed for adjusting ab-initio values of the spectroscopic parameters, reproducing parameters obtained by fitting the corresponding effective Hamiltonian. Secondary parameters are used to screen the calculated (primary) spectroscopic parameters, their values determined by least squares. Extrapolations of the secondary parameters determined from analyzed spectra are attempted to correct calculations of atoms and ions without experimental levels. The adjustment strategy and extrapolations are tested on the KI sequence from K 0+ through Fe 7+ , fitting to experimental levels for V 4+ , and Cr 5+ ; unobserved levels and spectra are predicted for several members of the sequence. A related problem is also discussed: Energy levels of the Uranium hexahalide complexes, (UX 6 ) 2- for X = F, Cl, Br, and I, are fit to an effective Hamiltonian (the f 2 configuration in O/sub h/ symmetry) with corrections proposed by Brian Judd

  6. Application of some Hartree-Fock model calculations to the analysis of atomic and free-ion optical spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayhurst, T.L.

    1980-05-01

    Techniques for applying ab-initio calculations to the analysis of atomic spectra are investigated, along with the relationship between the semi-empirical and ab-initio forms of Slater-Condon theory. Slater-Condon theory is reviewed with a focus on the essential features that lead to the effective Hamiltonians associated with the semi-empirical form of the theory. Ab-initio spectroscopic parameters are calculated from wavefunctions obtained via self-consistent field methods, while multi-configuration Hamiltonian matrices are constructed and diagonalized with computer codes written by Robert Cowan of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Group theoretical analysis demonstrates that wavefunctions more general than Slater determinants (i.e., wavefunctions with radial correlations between electrons) lead to essentially the same parameterization of effective Hamiltonians. In the spirit of this analysis, a strategy is developed for adjusting ab-initio values of the spectroscopic parameters, reproducing parameters obtained by fitting the corresponding effective Hamiltonian. Secondary parameters are used to screen the calculated (primary) spectroscopic parameters, their values determined by least squares. Extrapolations of the secondary parameters determined from analyzed spectra are attempted to correct calculations of atoms and ions without experimental levels. The adjustment strategy and extrapolations are tested on the K I sequence from K 0+ through Fe 7+ , fitting to experimental levels for V 4+ , and Cr 5+ ; unobserved levels and spectra are predicted for several members of the sequence. A related problem is also discussed: energy levels of the uranium hexahalide complexes, (UX 6 ) 2- for X = F, Cl, Br, and I, are fit to an effective Hamiltonian (the f 2 configuration in O/sub h/ symmetry) with corrections proposed by Brian Judd

  7. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  8. Optics With Cold Atoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hau, Lene

    2004-01-01

    .... And to test the novel atom sensor, we have built a moving-molasses magneto-optical trap in a geometry tailor-suited to the nanotube detector geometry, involving construction of a highly stable laser...

  9. Spectra of matrix isolated metal atoms and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, B.

    1977-01-01

    The matrix isolation spectra of all of the 40 presently known atomic metal species show strong matrix effects. The transition energies are increased, and the bands are broad and exhibit splitting of sublevels which are degenerate in the gas phase. Several models have been proposed for splitting of levels, but basic effects are not yet understood, and spectra cannot be predicted, yet it is possible to correlate gas phase and matrix in many of the systems. Selective production of diatomics and clusters via thermal and optical annealing of atomic species can be monitored by optical spectra, but yields spectroscopically complex systems which, however, especially in the case of transition metals, can be used as precursors in novel chemical reactions. A combination of absorption, emission, ir, Raman, ESR, and other methods is now quickly yielding data which will help correlate the increasing wealth of existing data. 55 references, 6 figures

  10. Vibration spectra of single atomic nanocontacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourahla, B; Khater, A; Rafil, O; Tigrine, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a simple model for an atomic nanocontact, where its mechanical properties are analysed by calculating numerically the local spectral properties at the contact atom and the nearby atoms. The standard methodology for calculating phonon spectral densities is extended to enable the calculation of localized contact modes and local density of states (DOS). The model system considered for the nanocontact consists of two sets of triple parallel semi-infinite atomic chains joined by a single atom in between. The matching method is used, in the harmonic approximation, to calculate the local Green's functions for the irreducible set of sites that constitute the inhomogeneous nanocontact domain. The Green's functions yield the vibration spectra and the DOS for the atomic sites. These are numerically calculated for different cases of elastic hardening and softening of the nanocontact domain. The purpose is to investigate how the local dynamics respond to local changes in the elastic environment. The analysis of the spectra and of the DOS identifies characteristic features and demonstrates the central role of a core subset of these sites for the dynamics of the nanocontact. The system models a situation which may be appropriate for contact atomic force microscopy

  11. The new NIST atomic spectra database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, D.E.; Martin, W.C.; Wiese, W.L.; Sugar, J.; Fuhr, J.R.; Olsen, K.; Musgrove, A.; Mohr, P.J.; Reader, J.; Dalton, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    The new atomic spectra database (ASD), Version 2.0, of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) contains significantly more data and covers a wider range of atomic and ionic transitions and energy levels than earlier versions. All data are integrated. It also has a new user interface and search engine. ASD contains spectral reference data which have been critically evaluated and compiled by NIST. Version 2.0 contains data on 900 spectra, with about 70000 energy levels and 91000 lines ranging from about 1 Aangstroem to 200 micrometers, roughly half of which have transition probabilities with estimated uncertainties. References to the NIST compilations and original data sources are listed in the ASD bibliography. A detailed ''Help'' file serves as a user's manual, and full search and filter capabilities are provided. (orig.)

  12. IDEN2-A program for visual identification of spectral lines and energy levels in optical spectra of atoms and simple molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarov, V. I.; Kramida, A.; Vokhmentsev, M. Ya.

    2018-04-01

    The article describes a Java program that can be used in a user-friendly way to visually identify spectral lines observed in complex spectra with theoretically predicted transitions between atomic or molecular energy levels. The program arranges various information about spectral lines and energy levels in such a way that line identification and determination of positions of experimentally observed energy levels become much easier tasks that can be solved fast and efficiently.

  13. Atomic molecular and optical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Laser-assisted manufacturing and fiber-optics communications are but two of the products of atomic, molecular, and optical physics, (AMO) research. AMO physics provides theoretical and experimental methods and essential data to neighboring areas of science such as chemistry, astrophysics, condensed-matter physics, plasma physics, surface science, biology, and medicine. This book addresses advances in atomic, molecular, and optical fields and provides recommendations for further research. It also looks at scientific applications in national security, manufacturing, medicine, and other fields

  14. Polarization-dependent spectra in the photoassociative ionization of cold atoms in a bright sodium beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; DeGraffenreid, William; Weiner, John

    2002-01-01

    We report measurements of cold photoassociative ionization (PAI) spectra obtained from collisions within a slow, bright Na atomic beam. A high-brightness atom flux, obtained by optical cooling and focusing of the atom beam, permits a high degree of alignment and orientation of binary collisions with respect to the laboratory atom-beam axis. The results reveal features of PAI spectra not accessible in conventional magneto-optical trap studies. We take advantage of this high degree of alignment to selectively excite autoionizing doubly excited states of specific symmetry

  15. Optical absorption spectra of Ag-11 isomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Fernandez, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of the three most; stable structural isomers of the Ag-11 cluster were calculated using the time-dependent, density functional theory within the Casida formalism. The slightly different, spectra, of the isomers may permit the identification of the ground-stale confi......The optical absorption spectra of the three most; stable structural isomers of the Ag-11 cluster were calculated using the time-dependent, density functional theory within the Casida formalism. The slightly different, spectra, of the isomers may permit the identification of the ground...

  16. Atomic and molecular effects in the VUV spectra of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonntag, B.

    1977-10-01

    The VUV spectra of solids are often dominated by atomic or molecular effects, which clearly manifest themselves in the gross features of the spectra and the fine structure at inner shell excitation thresholds. Evidence for the influence of atomic and molecular matrix elements, multiplet-splitting and correlation is presented. Special emphasis is given to the direct experimental verification based on the comparison of atomic and solid state spectra. (orig.) [de

  17. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Atom Optics in a Nutshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meystre, Pierre

    This chapter presents a brief introduction to atom optics, assuming only a basic knowledge of elementary physics ideas such as conservation of energy and conservation of momentum, and making only limited use of elementary algebra. Starting from a historical perspective we introduce the idea of wave-particle duality, a fundamental tenet of quantum mechanics that teaches us that atoms, just like light, behave sometimes as waves, and sometimes as particles. It is this profound but counter-intuitive property that allows one to do with atoms much of what is familiar from conventional optics. However, because in contrast to photons atoms have a mass, there are also fundamental differences between the two that have important consequences. In particular this property opens up a number of applications that are ill-suited for conventional optical methods. After explaining why it is particularly advantageous to work at temperatures close to absolute zero to benefit most readily from the wave nature of atoms we discuss several of these applications, concentrating primarily on the promise of atom microscopes and atom interferometers in addressing fundamental and extraordinarily challenging questions at the frontier of current physics knowledge.

  19. Optical angular momentum and atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom’s angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light’s OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light–matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069766

  20. The coherence and spectra of a Bose condensate generated by an atomic laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlovskii, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    The first-order coherence dynamics of a Bose condensate generated by a cw atomic laser with evaporative cooling is analyzed. For the atomic-laser multimode model, the coherence functions and atomic field spectra are calculated by the master equation technique. Elastic collisions in the trapped atomic gas lead to significant broadening of the atomic laser line, a shift of its center, and a multi peak structure of the spectra. The oscillatory time dynamics of the atomic-field coherence function is studied. For the atomic laser, the free phase diffusion of the field typical of optical lasers, and characterized by monotonically decreasing mean field with a constant mean phase, is absent due to elastic collisions

  1. Atomic, molecular and optical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is related to the actual situation and perspectives of atomic, molecular and optical physics in Brazil. It gives a general overview of the most important research groups in the above mentioned areas. It discusses as well, the future trends of Brazilian universities and the financing of these groups. (A.C.A.S.)

  2. Explanation of the Hund's rule for atomic spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muftakhova, F.I.; Zilberman, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    An original formula for electrostatic interaction in many-electron atoms, based on a new mathematical method, related by recoupling a matrix of n vector coupling momenta and its permutation properties, is given in general form. Hund's rule for atomic spectra-like maximum probability of couple momentum of l 2 configuration in the LS term of lsup(n) configuration is explained. Also, non-competence of exchange interaction notion for d and f atoms is based on mentioned formula. (Auth.)

  3. Determination of the optical absorption spectra of thin layers from their photoacoustic spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychto, Leszek; Maliński, Mirosław; Patryn, Aleksy; Tivanov, Mikhail; Gremenok, Valery

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a new method for computations of the optical absorption coefficient spectra from the normalized photoacoustic amplitude spectra of thin semiconductor samples deposited on the optically transparent and thermally thick substrates. This method was tested on CuIn(Te0.7Se0.3)2 thin films. From the normalized photoacoustic amplitude spectra, the optical absorption coefficient spectra were computed with the new formula as also with the numerical iterative method. From these spectra, the value of the energy gap of the thin film material and the type of the optical transitions were determined. From the experimental optical transmission spectra, the optical absorption coefficient spectra were computed too, and compared with the optical absorption coefficient spectra obtained from photoacoustic spectra.

  4. Raman Optical Activity and Raman Spectra of Amphetamine Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Shim, Irene; White, Peter Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT-molecular orbi......Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT...... are employed for identification purposes. The DFT calculations show that the most stable conformations are those allowing for close contact between the aromatic ring and the amine hydrogen atoms. The internal rotational barrier within the same amphetamine enanti- omer has a considerable influence on the Raman...

  5. Optical spectra analysis for breast cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkov, S. A.; Kochemasov, G. G.; Lyubynskaya, T. E.; Maslov, N. V.; Nuzhny, A. S.; da Silva, L. B.; Rubenchik, A.

    2011-11-01

    Minimally invasive probe and optical biopsy system based on optical spectra recording and analysis seem to be a promising tool for early diagnostics of breast cancer. Light scattering and absorption spectra are generated continuously as far as the needle-like probe with one emitting and several collecting optical fibers penetrates through the tissues toward to the suspicious area. That allows analyzing not only the state of local site, but also the structure of tissues along the needle trace. The suggested method has the advantages of automated on-line diagnosing and minimal tissue destruction and in parallel with the conventional diagnostic procedures provides the ground for decision-making. 165 medical trials were completed in Nizhny Novgorod Regional Oncology Centre, Russia. Independent diagnoses were the results of fine biopsy and histology. Application of wavelet expansion and clasterization techniques for spectra analysis revealed several main spectral types for malignant and benign tumors. Automatic classification algorithm demonstrated specificity ˜90% and sensitivity ˜91%. Large amount of information, fuzziness in criteria and data noisiness make neural networks to be an attractive analytic tool. The model based on three-layer perceptron was tested over the sample of 29 `cancer' and 29 `non-cancer' cases and demonstrated total separation.

  6. Atomic optics. The optics of the year 2000?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, Angela M.

    1998-01-01

    In atom optics the roles of light and matter are exchanged with respect to those of conventional optics. Atom optics makes possible the manipulation of atoms with lasers. This review deals with foundations and recent developments on atom optics: laser cooling and trapping, optical lattices, Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC), and the atom laser. Main features of BEC and theoretical models for generation of a coherent atomic beam are described, indicating the technological challenges involved in their implementation. Special attention is devoted to the model of Guzman et al. perspectives and possible applications are mentioned

  7. Optics with an Atom Laser Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, Immanuel; Koehl, Michael; Greiner, Markus; Haensch, Theodor W.; Esslinger, Tilman

    2001-01-01

    We report on the atom optical manipulation of an atom laser beam. Reflection, focusing, and its storage in a resonator are demonstrated. Precise and versatile mechanical control over an atom laser beam propagating in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is achieved by optically inducing spin flips between atomic ground states with different magnetic moment. The magnetic force acting on the atoms can thereby be effectively switched on and off. The surface of the atom optical element is determined by the resonance condition for the spin flip in the inhomogeneous magnetic field. More than 98% of the incident atom laser beam is reflected specularly

  8. ASAS: Computational code for Analysis and Simulation of Atomic Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhonatha R. dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The laser isotopic separation process is based on the selective photoionization principle and, because of this, it is necessary to know the absorption spectrum of the desired atom. Computational resource has become indispensable for the planning of experiments and analysis of the acquired data. The ASAS (Analysis and Simulation of Atomic Spectra software presented here is a helpful tool to be used in studies involving atomic spectroscopy. The input for the simulations is friendly and essentially needs a database containing the energy levels and spectral lines of the atoms subjected to be studied.

  9. Classical and Quantum Chaos in Atom Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Saif, Farhan

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of an atom with an electromagnetic field is discussed in the presence of a time periodic external modulating force. It is explained that a control on atom by electromagnetic fields helps to design the quantum analog of classical optical systems. In these atom optical systems chaos may appear at the onset of external fields. The classical and quantum chaotic dynamics is discussed, in particular in an atom optics Fermi accelerator. It is found that the quantum dynamics exhibits ...

  10. Quantum chaos in atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Arcy, Michael Brendan

    2002-01-01

    This thesis presents an account of experimental and numerical investigations of two quantum systems whose respective classical analogues are chaotic. These are the δ-kicked rotor, a paradigm in classical chaos theory, and the novel δ-kicked accelerator, created by application of a constant external acceleration or torque to the rotor. The experimental realisation of these systems has been achieved by the exposure of laser-cooled caesium atoms to approximate δ-kicks from a pulsed, high-intensity, vertical standing wave of laser light. Gravity's effect on the atoms can be controlled by appropriate shifting of the profile of the standing wave. Numerical simulations of the systems are based on a diffractive model of the potential's effect. Each system's dynamics are characterised by the final form of the momentum distribution and the dependence of the atoms' mean kinetic energy on the number and time period of the δ-kicks. The phenomena of dynamical localisation and quantum resonances in the δ-kicked rotor, which have no counterparts in the system's classical analogue, are observed and investigated. Similar experiments on the δ-kicked accelerator reveal the striking phenomenon of the quantum accelerator mode, in which a large momentum is transferred to a substantial fraction of the atomic ensemble. This feature, absent in the system's classical analogue, is characterised and an analytic explanation is presented. The effect on each quantum system of decoherence, introduced through spontaneous emission in the atoms, is examined and comparison is made with the results of classical simulations. While having little effect on the classical systems, the level of decoherence used is found to degrade quantum signatures of behaviour. Classical-like behaviour is, to some extent, restored, although significant quantum features remain. Possible applications of the quantum accelerator mode are discussed. These include use as a tool in atom optics and interferometry, a

  11. Optical lattice on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego, D.; Hofferberth, S.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2009-01-01

    Optical dipole traps and atom chips are two very powerful tools for the quantum manipulation of neutral atoms. We demonstrate that both methods can be combined by creating an optical lattice potential on an atom chip. A red-detuned laser beam is retroreflected using the atom chip surface as a high......-quality mirror, generating a vertical array of purely optical oblate traps. We transfer thermal atoms from the chip into the lattice and observe cooling into the two-dimensional regime. Using a chip-generated Bose-Einstein condensate, we demonstrate coherent Bloch oscillations in the lattice....

  12. Atoms, molecules and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hertel, Ingolf V

    2015-01-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginner...

  13. Atomic and molecular data for optical stellar spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiter, U; Lind, K; Barklem, P S; Asplund, M; Bergemann, M; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Mikolaitis, Š; Pickering, J C; Ruffoni, M P

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2–10 m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available data is facilitated by databases and electronic infrastructures such as the NIST Atomic Spectra Database, the VALD database, or the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre. We illustrate the current status of atomic data for optical stellar spectra with the example of the Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey. Data sources for 35 chemical elements were reviewed in an effort to construct a line list for a homogeneous abundance analysis of up to 10 5 stars. (paper)

  14. Atomic and molecular data for optical stellar spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiter, U.; Lind, K.; Asplund, M.; Barklem, P. S.; Bergemann, M.; Magrini, L.; Masseron, T.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.

    2015-05-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2-10 m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available data is facilitated by databases and electronic infrastructures such as the NIST Atomic Spectra Database, the VALD database, or the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre. We illustrate the current status of atomic data for optical stellar spectra with the example of the Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey. Data sources for 35 chemical elements were reviewed in an effort to construct a line list for a homogeneous abundance analysis of up to 105 stars.

  15. HIGH RESOLUTION OPTICAL AND NIR SPECTRA OF HBC 722

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Park, Sunkyung [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Green, Joel D.; Cochran, William D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Kang, Wonseok; Lee, Sang-Gak [National Youth Space Center, 200 Deokheungyangjjok-gil, Dongil-myeon, Goheung-gun, Jeollanam-do 548-951 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Hyun-Il, E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: sunkyung@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: joel@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: wdc@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: wskang@kywa.or.kr, E-mail: sanggak@kywa.or.kr, E-mail: hisung@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    We present the results of high resolution (R ≥ 30,000) optical and near-IR spectroscopic monitoring observations of HBC 722, a recent FU Orionis object that underwent an accretion burst in 2010. We observed HBC 722 in the optical/near-IR with the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph, Hobby–Eberly Telescope-HRS, and Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph, at various points in the outburst. We found atomic lines with strongly blueshifted absorption features or P Cygni profiles, both evidence of a wind driven by the accretion. Some lines show a broad double-peaked absorption feature, evidence of disk rotation. However, the wind-driven and disk-driven spectroscopic features are anti-correlated in time; the disk features became strong as the wind features disappeared. This anti-correlation might indicate that the rebuilding of the inner disk was interrupted by the wind pressure during the first 2 years. The half-width at half-depth of the double-peaked profiles decreases with wavelength, indicative of the Keplerian rotation; the optical spectra with the disk feature are fitted by a G5 template stellar spectrum convolved with a rotation velocity of 70 km s{sup −1} while the near-IR disk features are fitted by a K5 template stellar spectrum convolved with a rotation velocity of 50 km s{sup −1}. Therefore, the optical and near-IR spectra seem to trace the disk at 39 and 76 R{sub ⊙}, respectively. We fit a power-law temperature distribution in the disk, finding an index of 0.8, comparable to optically thick accretion disk models.

  16. Curious behavior of optically trapped neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieman, C.; Walker, T.; Sesko, D.; Monroe, C.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the behavior of clouds of neutral atoms contained in a spontaneous force optical trap. Because of the low temperatures of the atoms ( 5 atoms. These include the expansion of the cloud as the number is increased and dramatic changes in the distribution of the atoms at higher numbers. We can explain much of the collective behavior using a simple model that includes a 1/r 2 force between the atoms arising from the multiple scattering of photons. Finally, we discuss the optical trapping of atoms directly from a low pressure vapor in a small glass cell. We have used these optically trapped atoms to load a magnetostatic trap in the same cell. This provided a high density sample of atoms with a temperature of less than 2 μK

  17. Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Geffert, Otfried; Santra, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Compton scattering is the nonresonant inelastic scattering of an x-ray photon by an electron and has been used to probe the electron momentum distribution in gas-phase and condensed-matter samples. In the low x-ray intensity regime, Compton scattering from atoms dominantly comes from bound electrons in neutral atoms, neglecting contributions from bound electrons in ions and free (ionized) electrons. In contrast, in the high x-ray intensity regime, the sample experiences severe ionization via x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics. Thus, it becomes necessary to take into account all the contributions to the Compton scattering signal when atoms are exposed to high-intensity x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). In this paper, we investigate the Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity, using an extension of the integrated x-ray atomic physics toolkit, xatom. As the x-ray fluence increases, there is a significant contribution from ionized electrons to the Compton spectra, which gives rise to strong deviations from the Compton spectra of neutral atoms. The present study provides not only understanding of the fundamental XFEL-matter interaction but also crucial information for single-particle imaging experiments, where Compton scattering is no longer negligible. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Sang-Kil Son was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  18. Classical and quantum chaos in atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saif, Farhan

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of an atom with an electro-magnetic field is discussed in the presence of a time periodic external modulating force. It is explained that a control on atom by electro-magnetic fields helps to design the quantum analog of classical optical systems. In these atom optical systems chaos may appear at the onset of external fields. The classical and quantum chaotic dynamics is discussed, in particular in an atom optics Fermi accelerator. It is found that the quantum dynamics exhibits dynamical localization and quantum recurrences

  19. Optical orientation of atoms in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhitnikov, R

    1979-06-01

    The results are summed up of experimental work on the optical orientation of atoms in a plasma conducted by the Atomic Radiospectroscopy Group at the AN SSSR Physical Technology Institute. The main methods of forming and observing the optical orientation of atoms in a helium plasma and an alkali metal plasma are described in detail. A quantum mechanical explanation is given of all observed phenomena. The most significant results include the discovery of the effect of the optical orientation of atoms in a plasma on the plasma optical and electrical properties, such as electric conductivity, emitted light intensity, ionization degree, and electron density. The phenomenon applies generally and is inherent to plasmas of different chemical compositions, at the optical orientation of atoms of different elements. The methods are indicated of the practical application of the phenomenon in designing principally new precision quantum magnetometers.

  20. Optical orientation of atoms in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhitnikov, R.

    1979-01-01

    The results are summed up of experimental work on the optical orientation of atoms in a plasma conducted by the Atomic Radiospectroscopy Group at the AN SSSR Physical Technology Institute. The main methods of forming and observing the optical orientation of atoms in a helium plasma and an alkali metal plasma are described in detail. A quantum mechanical explanation is given of all observed phenomena. The most significant results include the discovery of the effect of the optical orientation of atoms in a plasma on the plasma optical and electrical properties, such as electric conductivity, emitted light intensity, ionization degree, and electron density. The phenomenon applies generally and is inherent to plasmas of different chemical compositions, at the optical orientation of atoms of different elements. The methods are indicated of the practical application of the phenomenon in designing principally new precision quantum magnetometers. (J.U.)

  1. High resolution atomic spectra of rare earths : progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saksena, G.D.; Ahmad, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    High resolution studies of atomic spectra of neodymium and gadolinium are being carried out on a recording Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The present progress report concerns work done on new assignments as well as confirmation of recently assigned electronic configurations and evaluation of isotope shifts of energy levels which have been possible from the isotope shift data obtained for several transitions of NdI, NdII and GdI, GdII respectively. (author)

  2. Atom optics in the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, M.; Szriftgiser, P.; Dalibard, J.; Steane, A. M.

    1996-05-01

    Atom-optics experiments are presented using a time-modulated evanescent light wave as an atomic mirror in the trampoline configuration, i.e., perpendicular to the direction of the atomic free fall. This modulated mirror is used to accelerate cesium atoms, to focus their trajectories, and to apply a ``multiple lens'' to separately focus different velocity classes of atoms originating from a point source. We form images of a simple two-slit object to show the resolution of the device. The experiments are modelled by a general treatment analogous to classical ray optics.

  3. Theoretical Atomic Physics code development IV: LINES, A code for computing atomic line spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, J. Jr.; Clark, R.E.H.

    1988-12-01

    A new computer program, LINES, has been developed for simulating atomic line emission and absorption spectra using the accurate fine structure energy levels and transition strengths calculated by the (CATS) Cowan Atomic Structure code. Population distributions for the ion stages are obtained in LINES by using the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) model. LINES is also useful for displaying the pertinent atomic data generated by CATS. This report describes the use of LINES. Both CATS and LINES are part of the Theoretical Atomic PhysicS (TAPS) code development effort at Los Alamos. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. Magnetic atom optics: mirrors, guides, traps, and chips for atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinds, E.A.; Hughes, I.G. [Sussex Centre for Optical and Atomic Physics, University of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-21

    For the last decade it has been possible to cool atoms to microkelvin temperatures ({approx}1 cm s{sup -1}) using a variety of optical techniques. Light beams provide the very strong frictional forces required to slow atoms from room temperature ({approx}500 m s{sup -1}). However, once the atoms are cold, the relatively weak conservative forces of static electric and magnetic fields play an important role. In our group we have been studying the interaction of cold rubidium atoms with periodically magnetized data storage media. Here we review the underlying principles of the forces acting on atoms above a suitably magnetized substrate or near current-carrying wires. We also summarize the status of experiments. These structures can be used as smooth or corrugated reflectors for controlling the trajectories of cold atoms. Alternatively, they may be used to confine atoms to a plane, a line, or a dot and in some cases to reach the quantum limit of confinement. Atoms levitated above a magnetized surface can be guided electrostatically by wires deposited on the surface. The flow and interaction of atoms in such a structure may form the basis of a new technology, 'integrated atom optics' which might ultimately be capable of realizing a quantum computer. (author)

  5. Non-Hermitian optics in atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Ma, Danmeng; Sheng, Jiteng; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2018-04-01

    A wide class of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians can possess entirely real eigenvalues when they have parity-time (PT) symmetric potentials. Recently, this family of non-Hermitian systems has attracted considerable attention in diverse areas of physics due to their extraordinary properties, especially in optical systems based on solid-state materials, such as coupled gain-loss waveguides and microcavities. Considering the desired refractive index can be effectively manipulated through atomic coherence, it is important to realize such non-Hermitian optical potentials and further investigate their distinct properties in atomic systems. In this paper, we review the recent theoretical and experimental progress of non-Hermitian optics with coherently prepared multi-level atomic configurations. The realizations of (anti-) PT symmetry with different schemes have extensively demonstrated the special optical properties of non-Hermitian optical systems with atomic coherence.

  6. Theory of optical spectra of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestner, N.R.

    1975-01-01

    During the last few years better theoretical models of solvated electron have been developed. These models allow one to calculate a priori the observable properties of the trapped electron. One of the most important and most widely determined properties is the optical spectrum. In this paper we consider the predictions of the theories not only as to the band maximum but line shape and width. In addition we will review how the theories predict these will depend on the solvent, pressure, temperature, and solvent density. In all cases extensive comparisons will be made with experimental work. In addition four new areas will be explored and recent results will be presented. These concern electrons in dense polar gases, the time development of the solvated electron spectrum, solvated electrons in mixed solvents, and photoelectron emission spectra (PEE) as it relates to higher excited states. This paper will review all recent theoretical calculations and present a critical review of the present status and future developments which are anticipated. The best theories are quite successful in predicting trends, and qualitative agreement concerning band maximum. The theory is still weak in predicting line shape and line width

  7. Cold atoms in optical cavities and lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, P.

    1996-11-01

    The thesis is organized in three chapters covering different aspects of the interaction of atoms and light in the framework of theoretical quantum optics. In chapter 1 a special case of a microscopic laser where one or two atoms interact with several quantized cavity modes is discussed. In particular I investigate the properties of the light field created in one of the cavity modes. It is shown that a single-atom model already predicts average photon numbers in agreement with a semiclassical many-atom theory. The two-atom model exhibits additional collective features, such as superradiance and subradiance. In chapter 2 effects of the photon recoil on cold atoms in the limit of long-lived atomic transitions are investigated. First, I demonstrate that, in principle, relying on this scheme, a continuous-wave laser in the ultraviolet frequency domain could be established. Second, the splitting of an atomic beam into two coherent subbeams is discussed within the same scheme. Such beamsplitters play an important role in high-precision measurements using atomic interferometers. Finally, chapter 3 deals with cooling and trapping of atoms by the interaction with laser light. I discuss the properties and the light scattering of atoms trapped in a new light field configuration, a so-called dark optical superlattice. In principle, such systems allow the trapping of more than one atom in the ground state of a single optical potential well. This could give rise to the observation of e.g. atom-atom interactions and quantum statistical effects. (author)

  8. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bederson, Benjamin

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics, established in 1965, continues its tradition of excellence with Volume 32, published in honor of Founding Editor Sir David Bates upon his retirement as editorof the series. This volume presents reviews of topics related to the applications of atomic and molecular physics to atmospheric physics and astrophysics.

  9. Optically polarized atoms understanding light-atom interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Rochester, Simon M

    2010-01-01

    This book is addressed at upper-level undergraduate and graduate students involved in research in atomic, molecular, and optical Physics. It will also be useful to researchers practising in this field. It gives an intuitive, yet sufficiently detailed and rigorous introduction to light-atom interactions with a particular emphasis on the symmetry aspects of the interaction, especially those associated with the angular momentum of atoms and light. The book will enable readers to carryout practical calculations on their own, and is richly illustrated with examples drawn from current research topic

  10. Optical ferris wheel for ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, S.; Leach, J.; Padgett, M. J.; Lembessis, V. E.; Ellinas, D.; Wright, A. J.; Girkin, J. M.; Ohberg, P.; Arnold, A. S.

    2007-07-01

    We propose a versatile optical ring lattice suitable for trapping cold and quantum degenerate atomic samples. We demonstrate the realisation of intensity patterns from pairs of Laguerre-Gauss (exp(iℓө) modes with different ℓ indices. These patterns can be rotated by introducing a frequency shift between the modes. We can generate bright ring lattices for trapping atoms in red-detuned light, and dark ring lattices suitable for trapping atoms with minimal heating in the optical vortices of blue-detuned light. The lattice sites can be joined to form a uniform ring trap, making it ideal for studying persistent currents and the Mott insulator transition in a ring geometry.

  11. The optical model in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.

    1978-01-01

    The optical model for electron scattering on atoms has quite a short history in comparison with nuclear physics. The main reason for this is that there were insufficient data. Angular distribution for elastic and some inelastic scattering have now been measured for the atoms which exist in gaseous form at reasonable temperatures, inert gases, hydrogen, alkalies and mercury being the main ones out in. The author shows that the optical model makes sense in atomic physics by considering its theory and recent history. (orig./AH) [de

  12. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Paul R; Arimondo, Ennio

    2006-01-01

    Volume 54 of the Advances Series contains ten contributions, covering a diversity of subject areas in atomic, molecular and optical physics. The article by Regal and Jin reviews the properties of a Fermi degenerate gas of cold potassium atoms in the crossover regime between the Bose-Einstein condensation of molecules and the condensation of fermionic atom pairs. The transition between the two regions can be probed by varying an external magnetic field. Sherson, Julsgaard and Polzik explore the manner in which light and atoms can be entangled, with applications to quantum information processing

  13. Spectra of highly ionized atoms of tokamak interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    The general nature of the change in energy level structures along an isoelectronic sequence is reviewed, with particular emphasis on relativistic effects and changes in coupling conditions. The accuracy of computed wavelengths is checked by comparison with experimental data on inner-shell (x-ray) transitions in singly ionized atoms. Relativistic effects can be extremely important for Δn = 0 transitions, but are taken into account fairly accurately by the approximate relativistic methods used. Computed ionization energies are given for important ions of Cr, Fe, Ni, Kr, Mo, Xe, W, and Au. Computed wavelengths and oscillator strengths are given for resonance lines of most of these elements in the simple isoelectronic sequences of neutral Li, Be, Na, Mg, K, Ni, Cu, and Zn, and more detailed electric- and magnetic-dipole spectra are given for ions of greatest importance

  14. Atomic hydrogen cleaning of EUV multilayer optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Samuel, Jr.; Steinhaus, Charles A.; Clift, W. Miles; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Bajt, Sasa

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies have been conducted to investigate the use of atomic hydrogen as an in-situ contamination removal method for EUV optics. In these experiments, a commercial source was used to produce atomic hydrogen by thermal dissociation of molecular hydrogen using a hot filament. Samples for these experiments consisted of silicon wafers coated with sputtered carbon, Mo/Si optics with EUV-induced carbon, and bare Si-capped and Ru-B4C-capped Mo/Si optics. Samples were exposed to an atomic hydrogen source at a distance of 200 - 500 mm downstream and angles between 0-90° with respect to the source. Carbon removal rates and optic oxidation rates were measured using Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling. In addition, at-wavelength peak reflectance (13.4 nm) was measured using the EUV reflectometer at the Advanced Light Source. Data from these experiments show carbon removal rates up to 20 Å/hr for sputtered carbon and 40 Å/hr for EUV deposited carbon at a distance of 200 mm downstream. The cleaning rate was also observed to be a strong function of distance and angular position. Experiments have also shown that the carbon etch rate can be increased by a factor of 4 by channeling atomic hydrogen through quartz tubes in order to direct the atomic hydrogen to the optic surface. Atomic hydrogen exposures of bare optic samples show a small risk in reflectivity degradation after extended periods. Extended exposures (up to 20 hours) of bare Si-capped Mo/Si optics show a 1.2% loss (absolute) in reflectivity while the Ru-B4C-capped Mo/Si optics show a loss on the order of 0.5%. In order to investigate the source of this reflectivity degradation, optic samples were exposed to atomic deuterium and analyzed using low energy ion scattering direct recoil spectroscopy to determine any reactions of the hydrogen with the multilayer stack. Overall, the results show that the risk of over-etching with atomic hydrogen is much less than previous studies using RF discharge cleaning

  15. Parity nonconserving optical rotation in atomic lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmons, T.P. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement of parity nonconserving optical rotation has been performed on the 1.28 μm atomic lead magnetic dipole transition. Although the technique used in this measurement was similar to that used in earlier measurements done on the 0.876 μm line in atomic bismuth, important differences exist. These are discussed in detail. Since the accuracy of this measurement is limited by systematic errors, a complete analysis of the data is included with a lengthy discussion of systematic effects. The final value obtained for the optical rotation is given. This agrees with atomic calculations based on the Weinberg-Salam-Galshow model for weak interactions. A discussion of the limits on weak interaction theories placed by all the atomic parity nonconservation experiments appears in the conclusion

  16. Rydberg dressing of atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrı, T.; Pohl, T.

    2014-01-01

    We study atoms in optical lattices whose electronic ground state is off-resonantly coupled to a highly excited state with strong binary interactions. We present a time-dependent treatment of the resulting quantum dynamics, which—contrary to recent predictions [36 Li, Ates, and Lesanovsky, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 213005 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.213005]—proves that the strong repulsion between the weakly admixed Rydberg states does not lead to atomic trap loss. This finding provides an important basis for creating and manipulating coherent long-range interactions in optical lattice experiments.

  17. An atom trap relying on optical pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouyer, P.; Lemonde, P.; Ben Dahan, M.; Michaud, A.; Salomon, C.; Dalibard, J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated a new radiation pressure trap which relies on optical pumping and does not require any magnetic field. It employs six circularly polarized divergent beams and works on the red of a J g →J e = J g + 1 atomic transition with J g ≥1/2. We have demonstrated this trap with cesium atoms from a vapour cell using the 852 nm J g = 4→J e = 5 resonance transition. The trap contained up to 3.10 7 atoms in a cloud of 1/√e radius of 330 μm. (orig.)

  18. Optical perturbation of atoms in weak localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedjour, A.

    2018-01-01

    We determine the microscopic transport parameters that are necessary to describe the diffusion process of the atomic gas in optical speckle. We use the self-consistent theory to calculate the self-energy of the atomic gas. We compute the spectral function numerically by an average over disorder realizations in terms of the Greens function. We focus mainly on the behaviour of the energy distribution of the atoms to estimate a correction to the mobility edge. Our results show that the energy distribution of the atoms locates the mobility edge position under the disorder amplitude. This behaviour changes for each disorder parameter. We conclude that the disorder amplitude potential induced modification of the energy distribution of the atoms that plays a major role for the prediction of the mobility edge.

  19. Ultra-narrow EIA spectra of 85Rb atom in a degenerate Zeeman multiplet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Hafeez Ur; Qureshi, Muhammad Mohsin; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-narrow EIA spectral features of thermal 85Rb atom with respect to coupling Rabi frequencies in a degenerate Zeeman multiplet system have been unraveled in the cases of same (σ+ -σ+ , π ∥ π) and orthogonal (σ+ -σ- , π ⊥ π)polarization configurations. The EIA signals with subnatural linewidth of ~ 100 kHz even in the cases of same circular and linear polarizations of coupling and probe laser have been obtained for the first time theoretically and experimentally. In weak coupling power limit of orthogonal polarization configurations, time-dependent transfer of coherence plays major role in the splitting of the EIA spectra while in strong coupling power, Mollow triplet-like mechanism due to strong power bring into broad split feature. The experimental ultra-narrow EIA features using one laser combined with an AOM match well with simulated spectra obtained by using generalized time-dependent optical Bloch equations.

  20. VARIABILITY IN OPTICAL SPECTRA OF ε ORIONIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Gregory B.; Morrison, Nancy D.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a time series analysis of 130 échelle spectra of ε Ori (B0 Ia), acquired over seven observing seasons between 1998 and 2006 at Ritter Observatory. The equivalent widths of Hα (net) and He I λ5876 were measured and radial velocities were obtained from the central absorption of He I λ5876. Temporal variance spectra (TVS) revealed significant wind variability in both Hα and He I λ5876. The He I TVS have a double-peaked profile consistent with radial velocity oscillations. A periodicity search was carried out on the equivalent width and radial velocity data, as well as on wavelength-binned spectra. This analysis has revealed several periods in the variability with timescales of two to seven days. Many of these periods exhibit sinusoidal modulation in the associated phase diagrams. Several of these periods were present in both Hα and He I, indicating a possible connection between the wind and the photosphere. Due to the harmonic nature of these periods, stellar pulsations may be the origin of some of the observed variability. Periods on the order of the rotational period were also detected in the He I line in the 1998-1999 season and in both lines during the 2004-2005 season. These periods may indicate rotational modulation due to structure in the wind.

  1. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillard, X.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr 87 using the 1 S 0 → 3 P 0 transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr 87 atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10 -15 and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10 -15 level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr 88 by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10 -14 . (author)

  2. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    1999-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics.

  3. Resonance spectra of diabolo optical antenna arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A complete set of diabolo optical antenna arrays with different waist widths and periods was fabricated on a sapphire substrate by using a standard e-beam lithography and lift-off process. Fabricated diabolo optical antenna arrays were characterized by measuring the transmittance and reflectance with a microscope-coupled FTIR spectrometer. It was found experimentally that reducing the waist width significantly shifts the resonance to longer wavelength and narrowing the waist of the antennas is more effective than increasing the period of the array for tuning the resonance wavelength. Also it is found that the magnetic field enhancement near the antenna waist is correlated to the shift of the resonance wavelength.

  4. Atomic interferometers in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelle, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the ForCa-G project, for Casimir force and short range Gravitation, lies into the measurement of short range forces between atoms and a mirror using atomic interferometry techniques. Particularly, the Casimir-Polder force and the pursuit of short range gravitational tests in the frame of potential deviations of Newton's law are aimed. This experiment is based on the trapping of neutral atoms in a 1D vertical optical lattice, where the energy eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian describing this system is the so-called Wannier-Stark ladder of discrete energy states localized in each lattice well. This work constitutes a demonstration of principle of this project with atoms set far from the mirror. Each energy state is thus separated from the one of the adjacent well by the potential energy increment between those two wells, called the Bloch frequency ν B . Then, atomic interferometers are realized in the lattice using Raman or microwave pulses where the trapped atomic wave functions are placed, and then recombined, in a superposition of states between different energy states localized either in the same well, either in adjacent wells. This work presents the study of different kinds of atomic interferometers in this optical lattice, characterized in terms of sensibility and systematic effects on the Bloch frequency measurement. One of the studied interferometers accessed to a sensitivity on the Bloch frequency of σ δ ν B /ν B =9.0x10 -6 at 1∼s in relative, which integrates until σ δ ν B /ν B =1. 10 -7 in 2800∼s. This corresponds to a state-of-the-art measurement of the gravity acceleration g for a trapped atomic gravimeter. (author)

  5. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  6. Optical spectra and radio properties of quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    Using high quality spectrophotometric scans obtained at the McDonald Observatory, and data from the literature the author shows that, for quasars, the relative strength of optical Fe II emission (the broad blended feature lambda4570) may be roughly inversely proportional to line widths (full width at half maximum, FWHM). A similar relation between the relative intensity of the UV Fe II blend between 2300 and 2600 A (the lambda2500 feature) and the widths of Mg II and Hβ is shown. She distinguishes between compact and extended radio sources and includes radio quiet quasars, Seyfert 1 galaxies and BLRG's. The quasars associated with extended radio sources have the broadest emission lines and the weakest Fe II, falling close to the region occupied by BLRG's which also have extended radio structure. Those quasars with strong Fe II and compact radio structure are most similar to the Seyfert 1 galaxies. (Auth.)

  7. Interface phonon effect on optical spectra of quantum nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, Alexander Yu.; Proshina, Olga V.; Rusina, Anastasia N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with theory of large radius polaron effect in quantum wells, wires and dots. The interaction of charge particles and excitons with both bulk and interface optical phonons is taken into consideration. The analytical expression for polaron binding energy is obtained for different types of nanostructures. It is shown that the contribution of interface phonons to the polaron binding energy may exceed the bulk phonon part. The manifestation of polaron effects in optical spectra of quantum nanostructures is discussed.

  8. Optical atomic phase reference and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, L; Cornell, E H; Abdelrahmann, A

    2017-08-06

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10 -20 As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, Δ Φ / Φ total  ≤ 10 -20 , that could make an important impact in gravity wave science.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Optical atomic phase reference and timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, L.; Cornell, E. H.; Abdelrahmann, A.

    2017-06-01

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10-20. As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, ΔΦ/Φtotal ≤ 10-20, that could make an important impact in gravity wave science. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  10. Optical response from functionalized atomically thin nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malic, Ermin; Berghaeuser, Gunnar; Feierabend, Maja [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Knorr, Andreas [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Chemical functionalization of atomically thin nanostructures presents a promising strategy to create new hybrid nanomaterials with remarkable and externally controllable properties. Here, we review our research in the field of theoretical modeling of carbon nanotubes, graphene, and transition metal dichalcogenides located in molecular dipole fields. In particular, we provide a microscopic view on the change of the optical response of these technologically promising nanomaterials due to the presence of photo-active spiropyran molecules. The feature article presents a review of recent theoretical work providing microscopic view on the optical response of chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes, graphene, and monolayered transition metal dichalcogenides. In particular, we propose a novel sensor mechanism based on the molecule-induced activation of dark excitons. This results in a pronounced additional peak presenting an unambiguous optical fingerprint for the attached molecules. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Optical emissions from oxygen atom reactions with adsorbates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, David B.; Fraser, Mark E.; Gauthier-Beals, Mitzi; Holtzclaw, Karl W.; Malonson, Mark; Gelb, Alan H.

    1992-12-01

    Although most optical materials are inert to the ambient low earth orbit environment, high velocity oxygen atoms will react with adsorbates to produce optical emissions from the ultraviolet into the infrared. The adsorbates arise from chemical releases or outgassing from the spacecraft itself. We have been investigating kinetic and spectral aspects of these phenomenon by direct observation of the 0.2 to 13 micrometers chemiluminescence from the interaction of a fast atomic oxygen beam with a continuously dosed surface. The dosing gases include fuels, combustion products and outgassed species such as unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH), NO, H2O and CO. The surface studied include gold and magnesium fluoride. In order to relate the results to actual spacecraft conditions these phenomena have been explored as a function of O atom velocity, dosant flux and substrate temperature. UDMH dosed surfaces exhibit spectra typical (wavelength and intensity) of carbonaceous surfaces. The primary emitters are CO, CO2, and OH. H2O dosed surfaces are dominated by OH and /or H2O emission while CO dosed surfaces are dominated by CO and CO2 emissions. The nitric oxide dosed surface produces a glow from 0.4 to 5.4 micrometers due to NO2* continuum emission. The emission was observed to increase by a factor of two upon cooling the surface from 20 degree(s)C to -35 degree(s)C.

  12. Late time optical spectra from the /sup 56/Ni model for Type I supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1980-07-01

    The hypothesis that the optical luminosity of Type I supernovae results from the radioactive decay of /sup 56/Ni synthesized and ejected by the explosion has been investigated by numerical simulation of the optical spectrum resulting from a homologously expanding shell composed initially of pure /sup 56/Ni core. This model, which neglects the effects of material external to the /sup 56/Ni core, is expected to provide a reasonable representation of the supernova at late times when the star is nearly transparent to optical photons. The numerical simulation determines the temperature, ionization state, and non-LTE level populations which result from energy deposition by the radioactive decay products of /sup 56/Ni and /sup 56/Co. The optical spectrum includes the effects of both allowed and forbidden lines. The optical spectra resulting from the simulation are found to be sensitive to the mass and ejection velocity of the /sup 56/Ni shell. A range of these parameters has been found which results in good agreement with the observed spectra of SN1972e over a considerable range of time. In particular, evidence for the expected decaying abundance of /sup 56/Co has been found in the spectra of SN1972e. These results are used to assess the validity of the /sup 56/Ni model and set limits on the mass and explosion mechanism of the Type I progenitor. The possibilities for improvement of the numerical model are discussed and future atomic data requirements defined.

  13. Late time optical spectra from the 56Ni model for Type I supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1980-07-01

    The hypothesis that the optical luminosity of Type I supernovae results from the radioactive decay of 56 Ni synthesized and ejected by the explosion has been investigated by numerical simulation of the optical spectrum resulting from a homologously expanding shell composed initially of pure 56 Ni core. This model, which neglects the effects of material external to the 56 Ni core, is expected to provide a reasonable representation of the supernova at late times when the star is nearly transparent to optical photons. The numerical simulation determines the temperature, ionization state, and non-LTE level populations which result from energy deposition by the radioactive decay products of 56 Ni and 56 Co. The optical spectrum includes the effects of both allowed and forbidden lines. The optical spectra resulting from the simulation are found to be sensitive to the mass and ejection velocity of the 56 Ni shell. A range of these parameters has been found which results in good agreement with the observed spectra of SN1972e over a considerable range of time. In particular, evidence for the expected decaying abundance of 56 Co has been found in the spectra of SN1972e. These results are used to assess the validity of the 56 Ni model and set limits on the mass and explosion mechanism of the Type I progenitor. The possibilities for improvement of the numerical model are discussed and future atomic data requirements defined

  14. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material and detailed descriptions of important recent developments. · Reviews timely fields of atomic physics · Articles written by world leaders in those fields · In depth review of the subject with relevant literature · Suitable for researchers in other fields · Only book series of this kind.

  15. Tightly confined atoms in optical dipole traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, M.

    2002-12-01

    This thesis reports on the design and setup of a new atom trap apparatus, which is developed to confine few rubidium atoms in ultrahigh vacuum and make them available for controlled manipulations. To maintain low background pressure, atoms of a vapour cell are transferred into a cold atomic beam by laser cooling techniques, and accumulated by a magneto-optic trap (MOT) in a separate part of the vacuum system. The laser cooled atoms are then transferred into dipole traps made of focused far-off-resonant laser fields in single- or crossed-beam geometry, which are superimposed with the center of the MOT. Gaussian as well as hollow Laguerre-Gaussian (LG$ ( 01)$) beam profiles are used with red-detuned or blue-detuned light, respectively. Microfabricated dielectric phase objects allow efficient and robust mode conversion of Gaussian into Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams. Trap geometries can easily be changed due to the highly flexible experimental setup. The dipole trap laser beams are focused to below 10 microns at a power of several hundred milliwatts. Typical trap parameters, at a detuning of several ten nanometers from the atomic resonance, are trag depths of few millikelvin, trap frequencies near 30-kHz, trap light scattering rates of few hundred photons per atom and second, and lifetimes of several seconds. The number of dipole-trapped atoms ranges from more than ten thousand to below ten. The dipole-trapped atoms are detected either by a photon counting system with very efficient straylight discrimination, or by recapture into the MOT, which is imaged onto a sensitive photodiode and a CCD-camera. Due to the strong AC-Stark shift imposed by the high intensity trapping light, energy-selective resonant excitation and detection of the atoms is possible. The measured energy distribution is consistent with a harmonic potential shape and allows the determination of temperatures and heating rates. In first measurements, the thermal energy is found to be about 10 % of the

  16. Atomic, molecular, and optical physics charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, F B

    1995-01-01

    With this volume, Methods of Experimental Physics becomes Experimental Methods in the Physical Sciences, a name change which reflects the evolution of todays science. This volume is the first of three which will provide a comprehensive treatment of the key experimental methods of atomic, molecular, and optical physics; the three volumes as a set will form an excellent experimental handbook for the field. The wide availability of tunable lasers in the pastseveral years has revolutionized the field and lead to the introduction of many new experimental methods that are covered in these volumes. Traditional methods are also included to ensure that the volumes will be a complete reference source for the field.

  17. Atomic, molecular, and optical physics electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, F B; Lucatorto, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Combined with Volumes 29A and 29B, this volume is a comprehensive treatment of the key experimental methods of atomic, molecular, and optical physics, as well as an excellent experimental handbook for the field. Thewide availability of tunable lasers in the past several years has revolutionized the field and lead to the introduction of many new experimental methods that are covered in these volumes. Traditional methods are also included to ensure that the volumes will be a complete reference source for the field.

  18. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    2001-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material and detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  19. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    1998-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material as well as detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  20. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    2000-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material and detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  1. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material and detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  2. Probing molecular chirality by coherent optical absorption spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, W. Z. [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wei, L. F. [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2011-11-15

    We propose an approach to sensitively probe the chirality of molecules by measuring their coherent optical-absorption spectra. It is shown that quantum dynamics of the cyclic three-level chiral molecules driven by appropriately designed external fields is total-phase dependent. This will result in chirality-dependent absorption spectra for the probe field. As a consequence, the charality-dependent information in the spectra (such as the locations and relative heights of the characteristic absorption peaks) can be utilized to identify molecular chirality and determinate enantiomer excess (i.e., the percentages of different enantiomers). The feasibility of the proposal with chiral molecules confined in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber is also discussed.

  3. Optical Spectra of Hemoglobin Taken from Alcohol Dependent Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Dudok K.; Dudok T.; Vlokh I.; Vlokh R.

    2005-01-01

    Optical spectra of CNMetHb and CNMetHb-Coomassi G-250, taken from the blood of humans with alcohol dependence, are studied in the spectral range of 450–750nm. The shifts in the spectral absorption maxima of CNMetHb-Coomassi G-250 complexes are observed for the diseased persons with alcohol dependence. The obtained results show that the hemoglobin structure of alcohol dependent humans is changed.

  4. Study of atomic and molecular emission spectra of Sr by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Chet R; Alfarraj, Bader; Ayyalasomayajula, Krishna K; Ghany, Charles; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P

    2015-12-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an ideal analytical technique for in situ analysis of elemental composition. We have performed a comparative study of the quantitative and qualitative analysis of atomic and molecular emission from LIBS spectra. In our experiments, a mixture of SrCl2 and Al2O3 in powder form was used as a sample. The atomic emission from Sr and molecular emission from SrCl and SrO observed in LIBS spectra were analyzed. The optimum laser energies, gate delays, and gate widths for selected atomic lines and molecular bands were determined from spectra recorded at various experimental parameters. These optimum experimental conditions were used to collect calibration data, and the calibration curves were used to predict the Sr concentration. Limits of detection (LODs) for selected atomic and molecular emission spectra were determined.

  5. Position Dependent Spontaneous Emission Spectra of a Λ-Type Atomic System Embedded in a Defective Photonic Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entezar, S. Roshan

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the position dependent spontaneous emission spectra of a Λ-type three-level atom with one transition coupled to the free vacuum reservoir and the other one coupled to a double-band photonic band gap reservoir with a defect mode in the band gap. It is shown that, for the atom at the defect location, we have a two-peak spectrum with a wide dark line due to the strong coupling between the atom and the defect mode. While, when the atom is far from the defect location (or in the absence of the defect mode), the spectrum has three peaks with two dark lines due to the coupling between the atom and the photonic band gap reservoir with the largest density of states near the band edges. On the other hand, we have a four-peak spectrum for the atom at the space in between. Moreover, the average spontaneous emission spectra of the atoms uniformly embedded in high dielectric or low dielectric regions are described. It is shown that the atoms embedded in high (low) dielectric regions far from the defect location, effectively couple to the modes of the lower (upper) photonic band. However, the atoms embedded in high dielectric or low dielectric regions at the defect location, are coupled mainly to the defect modes. While, the atoms uniformly embedded in high (low) dielectric regions with a normal distance from the defect location, are coupled to both of defect and lower (upper) photonic band modes. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  6. Global characteristics of atomic spectra and their use for the analysis of spectra. IV. Configuration interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucas, S.; Jonauskas, V.; Karazija, R.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.III see ibid., vol.52, p.639, 1995. Changes of the moments of atomic spectrum due to configuration interaction (CI), the CI strength, the average shift of the energy of a level due to its interaction with all levels of distant configuration and other global characteristics of CI effects in atoms are systematised and their expressions presented. The results of the calculation of those characteristics for the energy level spectra of the 3s3p 3 + 3s 2 3p3d configurations in Si isoelectronic series, 3p 5 3d N + 3p 6 3d N-2 4p + 3p 6 3d N-2 4f (N = 5, 6, 7, 8) in Cr, Mn, Fe and Co isoelectronic series, ns 2 np N + np N+2 at n = 2 - 5 and N = 2 - 4 in neutral atoms as well as for the characteristic emission spectra corresponding to the 3p 5 3d 9 + 3d 7 4p → 3d 8 transitions as well as for the Auger M 4.3 N 1 N 2.3 spectra in Kr and N 4.5 O 1 O 2.3 in Xe are given and compared with the same characteristics of the more complete experimental spectra. (orig.)

  7. Optical emission line spectra of Seyfert galaxies and radio galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterbrock, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    Many radio galaxies have strong emission lines in their optical spectra, similar to the emission lines in the spectra of Seyfert galaxies. The range of ionization extends from [O I] and [N I] through [Ne V] and [Fe VII] to [Fe X]. The emission-line spectra of radio galaxies divide into two types, narrow-line radio galaxies whose spectra are indistinguishable from Seyfert 2 galaxies, and broad-line radio galaxies whose spectra are similar to Seyfert 1 galaxies. However on the average the broad-line radio galaxies have steeper Balmer decrements, stronger [O III] and weaker Fe II emission than the Seyfert 1 galaxies, though at least one Seyfert 1 galaxy not known to be a radio source has a spectrum very similar to typical broad-line radio galaxies. Intermediate-type Seyfert galaxies exist that show various mixtures of the Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 properties, and the narrow-line or Seyfert 2 property seems to be strongly correlated with radio emission. (Auth.)

  8. The effect of decaying atomic states on integral and time differential Moessbauer spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kankeleit, E.

    1975-01-01

    Moessbauer spectra for time dependent monopole interaction have been calculated for the case that the nuclear transition feeding the Moessbauer state excites an electric state of the atom. This is assumed to decay in a time comparable with the lifetime of the Moessbauer state. Spectra have been calculated for both time differential and integral experiments. (orig.) [de

  9. Bibliography on atomic energy levels and spectra. Special pub., Jul 1971--Jun 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, L.

    1977-01-01

    This is the first supplement to the NBS Special Publication 363, 'Bibliography on Atomic Energy Levels and Spectra, July 1968 through June 1971,' and it covers the most recent literature from July 1971 through June 1975. It contains approximately 2150 references classified by subject for individual atoms and atomic ions. A number index identifies the references. An author index is included. References included contain data on energy levels, classified lines, wavelengths, Zeeman effect, Stark effect, hyperfine structure, isotope shift, ionization potentials, or theory which gives results for specific atoms or atomic ions

  10. Isotope effects on the optical spectra of semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Manuel; Thewalt, M. L. W.

    2005-10-01

    Since the end of the cold war, macroscopic amounts of separated stable isotopes of most elements have been available “off the shelf” at affordable prices. Using these materials, single crystals of many semiconductors have been grown and the dependence of their physical properties on isotopic composition has been investigated. The most conspicuous effects observed have to do with the dependence of phonon frequencies and linewidths on isotopic composition. These affect the electronic properties of solids through the mechanism of electron-phonon interaction, in particular, in the corresponding optical excitation spectra and energy gaps. This review contains a brief introduction to the history, availability, and characterization of stable isotopes, including their many applications in science and technology. It is followed by a concise discussion of the effects of isotopic composition on the vibrational spectra, including the influence of average isotopic masses and isotopic disorder on the phonons. The final sections deal with the effects of electron-phonon interaction on energy gaps, the concomitant effects on the luminescence spectra of free and bound excitons, with particular emphasis on silicon, and the effects of isotopic composition of the host material on the optical transitions between the bound states of hydrogenic impurities.

  11. FHILs in Seyferts and Liners in the optical spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, R. J. C.; Rodriguez, A. M.; Portilla, J. G.

    2014-10-01

    We present the main results from a selection of optical spectra of Seyfert and LINER galaxies taken from the 9^{th} release of the SDSS with detectable emission of forbidden high ionization lines (FHILs), better known as coronal lines. A catalog of 345 Seyfert 1 (Sy1) and Seyfert 2 (Sy2) galaxies with FHILs emission is presented. By analyzing their spectra and utilizing data from the literature we found the following results: (1) The flux ratios between FHILs suggests anisotropy of emission between Sy1 and Sy2 galaxies, which agrees with the results found by Nagao et al. (2002) and Portilla (2012). Sy1 seems to emit more FHILs than Sy2. (2) This anisotropy suggests the idea that an important, but not the majority, of the emission of FHILs comes from the inner part of the obscuring torus. (3) We present diagnostic diagrams between FHILs lines which indicate clear correlations between the flux ratios. (4) It is observed that the ratio of Ne V/Fe VII is of the order of 3 to 10, while the ratios between iron lines (i.e., Fe VII, Fe X, Fe XI) are roughly around the unity. (5) At least in the optical spectra, the present study continues to support the general idea that LINERs are not energetic enough to present FHILs. A complete version of this study including the catalog with the objects of study, and diagnosis diagrams using only this kind of lines can be found in Vera & Portilla (in prep).

  12. The generalized sturmian method for calculating spectra of atoms and ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, James Emil; Avery, John Scales

    2003-01-01

    The properties of generalized Sturmian basis sets are reviewed, and functions of this type are used to perform direct configuration interaction calculations on the spectra of atoms and ions. Singlet excited states calculated in this way show good agreement with experimentally measured spectra. When...... the generalized Sturmian method is applied to atoms, the configurations are constructed from hydrogenlike atomic orbitals with an effective charge which is characteristic of the configuration. Thus, orthonormality between the orbitals of different configurations cannot be assumed, and the generalized Slater...

  13. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J Q; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-29

    Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence and can behave like artificial atoms. Recent technological advances have made it possible to implement atomic-physics and quantum-optics experiments on a chip using these artificial atoms. This Review presents a brief overview of the progress achieved so far in this rapidly advancing field. We not only discuss phenomena analogous to those in atomic physics and quantum optics with natural atoms, but also highlight those not occurring in natural atoms. In addition, we summarize several prospective directions in this emerging interdisciplinary field.

  14. Thermoluminescence emission spectra and optical bleaching of oligoclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.J.J.; Piters, T.M.; Ypma, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) spectra of oligoclase samples have been recorded in the temperature range from 300 to 700 K and the wavelength range from 300 to 850 nm. Like other feldspars, oligoclase produces blue (peaking at 460 nm) and red (peaking at 765 nm) emission bands. The maximum of the red emission occurs 20 K lower than that of the blue band. Optical bleaching was performed at wavelengths varying from 360 to 800 nm. Bleaching of artificially irradiated oligoclase causes a decrease of the TL signal. The bleaching efficiency increases with decreasing wavelength. Bleaching does not only influence the height of the glow curve but also the shape. An interesting observation is that the ratio of the blue and red band intensities is not affected by a bleaching procedure. No evidence has been found that bleaching influences the shape of the emission spectra. The correlation between the blue and red bands is discussed. (Author)

  15. Atom optical tools for antimatter experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeunig, Philippe H.M.

    2014-12-17

    The direct measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter in the earth's field, which represents a test of the weak equivalence principle, is in the focus of several ongoing experimental attempts. This thesis investigates tools and techniques known from the field of atom optics that can be utilised for such a measurement with antihydrogen atoms as envisioned by the AEgIS collaboration. A first experimental step is presented, in which a detection due to an electromagnetic force acting on antiprotons is measured with a Moire deflectometer. This device, which can be described with classical particle trajectories, consists of two gratings and a spatially resolving detector. Key elements of this measurement are the use of an emulsion detector with high spatial resolution and an absolute reference technique based on an interferometric fringe pattern of light, which is not deflected by forces. For future realisations, a new detection and evaluation scheme to measure gravity based on a three-grating system enclosed by a vertex-reconstructing detector is discussed. This allows the use of a grating periodicity that is smaller than the resolution of the detector while making efficient use of the particle flux. Smaller periodicities are favourable to increase the inertial sensitivity of the measurement apparatus but require to take effects of diffraction into account. To explore this near-field regime with antimatter, a Talbot-Lau interferometer for antiprotons is proposed and its possible experimental implementation is discussed.

  16. Optical absorption and scattering spectra of pathological stomach tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraev, K. M.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Lakhina, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Diffuse reflection spectra of biotissues in vivo and transmission and reflection coefficients for biotissues in vitro are measured over 300-800 nm. These data are used to determine the spectral absorption and scattering indices and the scattering anisotropy factor for stomach mucous membranes under normal and various pathological conditions (chronic atrophic and ulcerous defects, malignant neoplasms). The most importan tphysiological (hemodynamic and oxygenation levels) and structural-morphological (scatterer size and density) parameters are also determined. The results of a morphofunctional study correlate well with the optical properties and are consistent with data from a histomorphological analysis of the corresponding tissues.

  17. Nonlinear optical and electroabsorption spectra of polydiacetylene crystals and films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, D.; Soos, Z. G.

    1996-01-01

    Vibronic structure of nonlinear optical (NLO) coefficients is developed within the Condon approximation, displaced harmonic oscillators, and crude adiabatic states. The displacements of backbone modes of conjugated polymers are taken from vibrational data on the ground and 1B excited state. NLO resonances are modeled by three excitations and transition moments taken from Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) theory and optimized to polydiacetylene (PDA) spectra in crystals and films, with blue-shifted 1B exciton. The joint analysis of third-harmonic-generation, two-photon absorption, and nondegenerate four-wave-mixing spectra of PDA crystals and films shows weak two-photon absorption to 2A below 1B, leading to overlapping resonances in the THG spectrum, strong two-photon absorption to an nA state some 35% above 1B, and weak Raman resonances in nondegenerate FWM spectra. The full π-π* spectrum contributes to Stark shifts and field-induced transitions, as shown by PPP results for PDA oligomers. The Stark shift dominates high-resolution electroabsorption (EA) spectra of PDA crystals below 10 K. The close correspondence between EA and the first-derivative I'(ω) of the linear absorption above the 1B exciton in PDA crystals provides an experimental separation of vibrational and electronic contributions that limits any even-parity state in this 0.5 eV interval. An oscillator-strength sum rule is applied to the convergence of PDA oligomers with increasing length, N, and the crystal oscillator strengths are obtained without adjustable parameters. The sum rule for the 1B exciton implies large transition moments to higher-energy Ag states, whose locations in recent models are contrasted to PPP results. Joint analysis of NLO and EA spectra clarifies when a few electronic excitations are sufficient, distinguishes between vibrational and electronic contributions, and supports similar π-electron interactions in conjugated molecules and polymers.

  18. Contribution to coherent atom optics - Design of multiple wave devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impens, F.

    2008-03-01

    The theoretical work presented in this manuscript addresses two complementary issues in coherent atom optics. The first part addresses the perspectives offered by coherent atomic sources through the design of two experiment involving the levitation of a cold atomic sample in a periodic series of light pulses, and for which coherent atomic clouds are particularly well-suited. These systems appear as multiple wave atom interferometers. A striking feature of these experiments is that a unique system performs both the sample trapping and interrogation. To obtain a transverse confinement, a novel atomic lens is proposed, relying on the interaction between an atomic wave with a spherical light wave. The sensitivity of the sample trapping towards the gravitational acceleration and towards the pulse frequencies is exploited to perform the desired measurement. These devices constitute atomic wave resonators in momentum space, which is a novel concept in atom optics. A second part develops new theoretical tools - most of which inspired from optics - well-suited to describe the propagation of coherent atomic sources. A phase-space approach of the propagation, relying on the evolution of moments, is developed and applied to study the low-energy dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates. The ABCD method of propagation for atomic waves is extended beyond the linear regime to account perturbatively for mean-field atomic interactions in the atom-optical aberration-less approximation. A treatment of the atom laser extraction enabling one to describe aberrations in the atomic beam, developed in collaboration with the Atom Optics group at the Institute of Optics, is exposed. Last, a quality factor suitable for the characterization of diluted matter waves in a general propagation regime has been proposed. (author)

  19. Entanglement properties between two atoms in the binomial optical field interacting with two entangled atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tang-Kun; Zhang Kang-Long; Tao Yu; Shan Chuan-Jia; Liu Ji-Bing

    2016-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the degree of entanglement between two atoms in a system of the binomial optical field interacting with two arbitrary entangled atoms is investigated. The influence of the strength of the dipole–dipole interaction between two atoms, probabilities of the Bernoulli trial, and particle number of the binomial optical field on the temporal evolution of the atomic entanglement are discussed. The result shows that the two atoms are always in the entanglement state. Moreover, if and only if the two atoms are initially in the maximally entangled state, the entanglement evolution is not affected by the parameters, and the degree of entanglement is always kept as 1. (paper)

  20. Evolution of microstructure and related optical properties of ZnO grown by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adib Abou Chaaya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A study of transmittance and photoluminescence spectra on the growth of oxygen-rich ultra-thin ZnO films prepared by atomic layer deposition is reported. The structural transition from an amorphous to a polycrystalline state is observed upon increasing the thickness. The unusual behavior of the energy gap with thickness reflected by optical properties is attributed to the improvement of the crystalline structure resulting from a decreasing concentration of point defects at the growth of grains. The spectra of UV and visible photoluminescence emissions correspond to transitions near the band-edge and defect-related transitions. Additional emissions were observed from band-tail states near the edge. A high oxygen ratio and variable optical properties could be attractive for an application of atomic layer deposition (ALD deposited ultrathin ZnO films in optical sensors and biosensors.

  1. The Belgian repository of fundamental atomic data and stellar spectra (BRASS). I. Cross-matching atomic databases of astrophysical interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverick, M.; Lobel, A.; Merle, T.; Royer, P.; Martayan, C.; David, M.; Hensberge, H.; Thienpont, E.

    2018-04-01

    Context. Fundamental atomic parameters, such as oscillator strengths, play a key role in modelling and understanding the chemical composition of stars in the Universe. Despite the significant work underway to produce these parameters for many astrophysically important ions, uncertainties in these parameters remain large and can propagate throughout the entire field of astronomy. Aims: The Belgian repository of fundamental atomic data and stellar spectra (BRASS) aims to provide the largest systematic and homogeneous quality assessment of atomic data to date in terms of wavelength, atomic and stellar parameter coverage. To prepare for it, we first compiled multiple literature occurrences of many individual atomic transitions, from several atomic databases of astrophysical interest, and assessed their agreement. In a second step synthetic spectra will be compared against extremely high-quality observed spectra, for a large number of BAFGK spectral type stars, in order to critically evaluate the atomic data of a large number of important stellar lines. Methods: Several atomic repositories were searched and their data retrieved and formatted in a consistent manner. Data entries from all repositories were cross-matched against our initial BRASS atomic line list to find multiple occurrences of the same transition. Where possible we used a new non-parametric cross-match depending only on electronic configurations and total angular momentum values. We also checked for duplicate entries of the same physical transition, within each retrieved repository, using the non-parametric cross-match. Results: We report on the number of cross-matched transitions for each repository and compare their fundamental atomic parameters. We find differences in log(gf) values of up to 2 dex or more. We also find and report that 2% of our line list and Vienna atomic line database retrievals are composed of duplicate transitions. Finally we provide a number of examples of atomic spectral lines

  2. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Elusive Amorphous Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2015-01-01

    New and accurate laboratory results are reported for amorphous methane (CH4) ice near 10 K for the study of the interstellar medium (ISM) and the outer Solar System. Near- and mid-infrared (IR) data, including spectra, band strengths, absorption coefficients, and optical constants, are presented for the first time for this seldom-studied amorphous solid. The apparent IR band strength near 1300 cm(exp -1) (7.69 micrometer) for amorphous CH4 is found to be about 33% higher than the value long used by IR astronomers to convert spectral observations of interstellar CH4 into CH4 abundances. Although CH4 is most likely to be found in an amorphous phase in the ISM, a comparison of results from various laboratory groups shows that the earlier CH4 band strength at 1300 cm(exp -1) (7.69 micrometer) was derived from IR spectra of ices that were either partially or entirely crystalline CH4 Applications of the new amorphous-CH4 results are discussed, and all optical constants are made available in electronic form.

  3. Control and manipulation of cold atoms in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldoon, Cecilia; Brandt, Lukas; Dong Jian; Stuart, Dustin; Brainis, Edouard; Himsworth, Matthew; Kuhn, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped by laser light are among the most promising candidates for storing and processing information in a quantum computer or simulator. The application certainly calls for a scalable and flexible scheme for addressing and manipulating the atoms. We have now made this a reality by implementing a fast and versatile method to dynamically control the position of neutral atoms trapped in optical tweezers. The tweezers result from a spatial light modulator (SLM) controlling and shaping a large number of optical dipole-force traps. Trapped atoms adapt to any change in the potential landscape, such that one can rearrange and randomly access individual sites within atom-trap arrays. (paper)

  4. Laser optical pumping of sodium and lithium atom beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusma, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    The method of optical pumping with a continuous wave dye laser has been used to produce beams of polarized 23 Na atoms and polarized 6 Li atoms. Optical pumping of a 23 Na atom beam using either a multimode dye laser or a single frequency dye laser with a double passed acousto-optic modulator results in electron spin polarizations of 0.70-0.90 and nuclear spin polarizations of 0.75-0.90. Optical pumping of a 6 Li atom beam using a single frequency dye laser either with an acousto-optic modulator or with Doppler shift pumping results in electron spin polarizations of 0.77-0.95 and nuclear spin polarizations greater than 0.90. The polarization of the atom beam is measured using either the laser induced fluorescence in an intermediate magnetic field or a 6-pole magnet to determine the occupation probabilities of the ground hyperfine sublevels following optical pumping. The results of the laser optical pumping experiments agree with the results of a rate equation analysis of the optical pumping process which predicts that nearly all atoms are transferred into a single sublevel for our values of laser intensity and interaction time. The use of laser optical pumping in a polarized ion source for nuclear scattering experiments is discussed. The laser optical pumping method provides a means of constructing an intense source of polarized Li and Na ions

  5. CORRELATIONS OF QUASAR OPTICAL SPECTRA WITH RADIO MORPHOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimball, Amy E.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Wiita, Paul J.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2011-01-01

    Using the largest homogeneous quasar sample with high-quality optical spectra and robust radio morphology classifications assembled to date, we investigate relationships between radio and optical properties with unprecedented statistical power. The sample consists of 4714 radio quasars from FIRST with S 20 ≥ 2 mJy and with spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Radio morphology classes include core-only (core), core-lobe (lobe), core-jet (jet), lobe-core-lobe (triple), and double-lobe. Electronic tables of the quasar samples, along with spectral composites for individual morphology classes, are made available. We examine the optical colors of these subsamples and find that radio quasars with core emission unresolved by FIRST (on ∼5'' scale) have a redder color distribution than radio-quiet quasars (S 20 ∼ I ) are correlated, which supports the hypothesis that both parameters are indicative of line-of-sight orientation. We investigate spectral line equivalent widths (EWs) as a function of R and R I , including the O [III] narrow line doublet and the C IV λ1549 and Mg II λ2799 broad lines. We find that the rest EWs of the broad lines correlate positively with R I at the 4σ-8σ level. However, we find no strong dependence of EW on R, in contrast to previously published results. A possible interpretation of these results is that EWs of quasar emission lines increase as the line-of-sight angle to the radio-jet axis decreases. These results are in stark contrast to commonly accepted orientation-based theories, which suggest that continuum emission should increase as the angle to the radio-jet axis decreases, resulting in smaller EWs of emission lines (assumed isotropic). Finally, we observe the Baldwin effect in our sample and find that it does not depend strongly on quasar radio morphology.

  6. Energy spectra of primary knock-on atoms under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, M.R.; Marian, J.; Sublet, J.-Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Materials subjected to neutron irradiation will suffer from a build-up of damage caused by the displacement cascades initiated by nuclear reactions. Previously, the main “measure” of this damage accumulation has been through the displacements per atom (dpa) index, which has known limitations. This paper describes a rigorous methodology to calculate the primary atomic recoil events (often called the primary knock-on atoms or PKAs) that lead to cascade damage events as a function of energy and recoiling species. A new processing code SPECTRA-PKA combines a neutron irradiation spectrum with nuclear recoil data obtained from the latest nuclear data libraries to produce PKA spectra for any material composition. Via examples of fusion relevant materials, it is shown that these PKA spectra can be complex, involving many different recoiling species, potentially differing in both proton and neutron number from the original target nuclei, including high energy recoils of light emitted particles such as α-particles and protons. The variations in PKA spectra as a function of time, neutron field, and material are explored. The application of PKA spectra to the quantification of radiation damage is exemplified using two approaches: the binary collision approximation and stochastic cluster dynamics, and the results from these different models are discussed and compared. - Highlights: • Recoil cross-section matrices under neutron irradiation are generated. • Primary knock-on atoms (PKA) spectra are calculated for fusion relevant materials. • Variation in PKA spectra due to changes in geometry are considered. • Inventory simulations to consider time-evolution in PKA spectra. • Damage quantification using damage functions from different approximations.

  7. Lyapunov spectra and conjugate-pairing rule for confined atomic fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernadi, Stefano; Todd, B.D.; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation results for the Lyapunov spectra of atomic fluids confined in narrow channels of the order of a few atomic diameters. We show the effect that realistic walls have on the Lyapunov spectra. All the degrees of freedom of the confin...... evolved Lyapunov vectors projected into a reduced dimensional phase space. We finally observe that the phase-space compression due to the thermostat remains confined into the wall region and does not significantly affect the purely Newtonian fluid region....

  8. Quantitative photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption coefficients from acoustic spectra in the optical diffusive regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zijian; Favazza, Christopher; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) can image optical absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution in the optical diffusive regime. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAM requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. With the acoustic spectral method, the absorption coefficients of an oxygenated bovine blood phantom at 560, 565, 570, and 575 nm were quantified with errors of <3%. We also quantified the total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in a live mouse. Compared with the conventional amplitude method, the acoustic spectral method provides greater quantification accuracy in the optical diffusive regime. The limitations of the acoustic spectral method was also discussed.

  9. Physics through the 1990s: Atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report was prepared by the Panel on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics of the Physics Survey Committee in response to its charge to describe the field, to characterize the recent advances, and to identify the current frontiers of research. Some of the areas discussed are: atomic structure, atomic dynamics, accelerator-based atomic physics, molecular photoionization and electron-molecule scattering, astrophysics, laser spectroscopy, atmospheric physics, plasma physics, and applications

  10. Optical polarization modulation by competing atomic coherence effects in a degenerate four-level Yb atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Jong; Park, Chang Yong; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2005-01-01

    A scheme of optical polarization modulation of a linearly polarized infrared probe field is studied in a degenerate four-level Yb atomic system. We have observed an anomalous transmission spectra of two circular polarization components of the probe field exhibiting an enhanced two-photon absorption and a three-photon gain with comparable magnitude, leading to the lossless transmission and enhanced circular dichroism. We carried out a proof-of-principle experiment of fast optical polarization modulation in such a system by modulating the polarization state of the coupling field. The observed enhanced two-photon absorption and three-photon gain of the probe field are due to the result of competing atomic coherence effects

  11. Time evolution, Lamb shift, and emission spectra of spontaneous emission of two identical atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dawei; Li Zhenghong; Zheng Hang; Zhu Shiyao

    2010-01-01

    A unitary transformation method is used to investigate the dynamic evolution of two multilevel atoms, in the basis of symmetric and antisymmetric states, with one atom being initially prepared in the first excited state and the other in the ground state. The unitary transformation guarantees that our calculations are based on the ground state of the atom-field system and the self-energy is subtracted at the beginning. The total Lamb shifts of the symmetric and antisymmetric states are divided into transformed shift and dynamic shift. The transformed shift is due to emitting and reabsorbing of virtual photons, by a single atom (nondynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (quasi-static shift). The dynamic shift is due to the emitting and reabsorbing of real photons, by a single atom (dynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (dynamic interatomic shift). The emitting and reabsorbing of virtual and real photons between the two atoms result in the interatomic shift, which does not exist for the one-atom case. The spectra at the long-time limit are calculated. If the distance between the two atoms is shorter than or comparable to the wavelength, the strong coupling between the two atoms splits the spectrum into two peaks, one from the symmetric state and the other from the antisymmetric state. The origin of the red or blue shifts for the symmetric and antisymmetric states mainly lies in the negative or positive interaction energy between the two atoms. In the investigation of the short time evolution, we find the modification of the effective density of states by the interaction between two atoms can modulate the quantum Zeno and quantum anti-Zeno effects in the decays of the symmetric and antisymmetric states.

  12. Noise spectra in balanced optical detectors based on transimpedance amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalov, A. V.; Kuzhamuratov, A.; Lvovsky, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    We present a thorough theoretical analysis and experimental study of the shot and electronic noise spectra of a balanced optical detector based on an operational amplifier connected in a transimpedance scheme. We identify and quantify the primary parameters responsible for the limitations of the circuit, in particular, the bandwidth and shot-to-electronic noise clearance. We find that the shot noise spectrum can be made consistent with the second-order Butterworth filter, while the electronic noise grows linearly with the second power of the frequency. Good agreement between the theory and experiment is observed; however, the capacitances of the operational amplifier input and the photodiodes appear significantly higher than those specified in manufacturers' datasheets. This observation is confirmed by independent tests.

  13. Optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhizhin, GN

    1995-01-01

    The current volume is a single topic volume on the optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals. The book is divided into two parts. Part I covers both the theoretical and experimental investigations of organic crystals. Part II deals with the investigation of the structure, phase transitions and reorientational motion of molecules in organic crystals. In addition appendices are given which provide the parameters for the calculation of the lattice dynamics of molecular crystals, procedures for the calculation of frequency eigenvectors of utilizing computers, and the frequencies and eigenvectors of lattice modes for several organic crystals. Quite a large amount of Russian literature is cited, some of which has previously not been available to scientists in the West.

  14. Recent progress in the studies of atomic spectra and transition probabilities by beam-foil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinson, I.

    1982-01-01

    A review is given of recent studies of atomic structure (in particular atomic spectra, energy levels and transition probabilities) using fast beams from ion accelerators. Thanks to improved spectral resolution detailed and quite accurate studies of energy levels are now possible, a number of such results will be discussed. The non-autoionizing, multiply excited levels in atoms and ions (including negative ions) are being vigorously investigated at present, some new results will be reported. The accuracy in lifetime determinations continues to improve, and several new ways for reduction of cascading effects have been developed. Some selected examples of recent progress in lifetime measurements are also included. (orig.)

  15. Systematic comparisons between the 4d spectra of lanthanide atoms and solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, E R [Bonn Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Physikalisches Inst.

    1979-02-14

    It is shown that the lanthanides can be divided into two groups according to the occupation of the 4f subshell in the solid and in the atom. In the first group the 4d absorption spectrum in the atom and in the solid are similar. In the second group the atomic spectrum of the element with nuclear charge Z corresponds to the solid with nuclear charge (Z + 1). Predictions are made for the 4d spectra of those lanthanides which remain to be observed.

  16. Systematic comparisons between the 4d spectra of lanthanide atoms and solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, E.R.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that the lanthanides can be divided into two groups according to the occupation of the 4f subshell in the solid and in the atom. In the first group the 4d absorption spectrum in the atom and in the solid are similar. In the second group the atomic spectrum of the element with nuclear charge Z corresponds to the solid with nuclear charge (Z + 1). Predictions are made for the 4d spectra of those lanthanides which remain to be observed. (author)

  17. Fourier synthesis of asymmetrical optical potentials for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritt, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this work a dissipationless asymmetrical optical potential for cold atoms was produced. In a first step a new type of optical lattice was generated, whose spatial periodicity only corresponds to a quarter of the wavelength of the light used for the generation. This corresponds to the half of the periodicity of a conventional optical lattice, which is formed by the light of the same wavelength. The generation of this new type of optical lattice was reached by the use of two degenerated raman transitions. Virtual processes occur, in which four photons are involved. In conventional optical lattices however virtual two-photon processes occur. By spatially superimposing this optical lattice with a conventional optical lattice an asymmetrical optical potential could be formed. By diffraction of a Bose Einstein condensate of rubidium atoms at the transient activated asymmetrical potential the asymmetrical structure was proven. (orig.)

  18. Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of atomic rubidium: g- and h-states

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Ferus, Martin; Kubelík, Petr; Chernov, Vladislav E.; Zanozina, Ekaterina M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 17 (2012), s. 175002 ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00100903 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Fourier transform infrared emission spectra * atomic rubidium * physical chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.031, year: 2012

  19. Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer inside an optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Mingjie; Leong, Wuiseng; Chen, Zilong; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2017-04-01

    Precision measurement with light-pulse grating atom interferometry in free space have been used in the study of fundamental physics and applications in inertial sensing. Recent development of photonic band-gap fibers allows light for traveling in hollow region while preserving its fundamental Gaussian mode. The fibers could provide a very promising platform to transfer cold atoms. Optically guided matter waves inside a hollow-core photonic band-gap fiber can mitigate diffraction limit problem and has the potential to bring research in the field of atomic sensing and precision measurement to the next level of compactness and accuracy. Here, we will show our experimental progress towards an atom interferometer in optical fibers. We designed an atom trapping scheme inside a hollow-core photonic band-gap fiber to create an optical guided matter waves system, and studied the coherence properties of Rubidium atoms in this optical guided system. We also demonstrate a Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer in the optical waveguide. This interferometer is promising for precision measurements and designs of mobile atomic sensors.

  20. Hardware authentication using transmission spectra modified optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grubbs, Robert K.; Romero, Juan A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to authenticate the source and integrity of data is critical to the monitoring and inspection of special nuclear materials, including hardware related to weapons production. Current methods rely on electronic encryption/authentication codes housed in monitoring devices. This always invites the question of implementation and protection of authentication information in an electronic component necessitating EMI shielding, possibly an on board power source to maintain the information in memory. By using atomic layer deposition techniques (ALD) on photonic band gap (PBG) optical fibers we will explore the potential to randomly manipulate the output spectrum and intensity of an input light source. This randomization could produce unique signatures authenticating devices with the potential to authenticate data. An external light source projected through the fiber with a spectrometer at the exit would 'read' the unique signature. No internal power or computational resources would be required.

  1. Valter Ritz as a theoretical physicist and his research on atomic spectra theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El'yashevich, M.A.; Kemberovskaya, N.G.; Tomil'chik, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    The article presents a historic-methodological analysis of the scientific heritage of an outstanding Swiss physicist Walter Ritz (1878-1909); the analysis is based on the study of a complete collection of his works published in 1911. In addition to a general description of Ritz's works which comprise publications in spectroscopy, variational method and electrodynamics, the article deals in detail with this fundamental research into atomic spectra theory. Elastic and magnetic model of the atom proposed by Ritz for explaining atomic spectra within the framework of the classical approach are discussed. It is shown that the generalized formulas of Balmer and Rydbery, as well as the combination principle which served later as a basis for formalting Bohr's condition of frequencies, were derived by Ritz as regions corollaries of this models and were out of semiempiric nature, as was assumed. 124 refs

  2. Optically pumped polarized alkali atomic beams and targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1984-01-01

    The optical pumping of 23 Na and 6 Li atomic beams is discussed. Experiments on the optical pumping of 23 Na atomic beams using either a single mode dye laser followed by a double passed acousto-optic modulator or a multimode dye laser are reported. The optical pumping of a 23 Na vapor target for use in a polarized H - ion source is discussed. Results on the use of viton as a wall coating with a long relaxation time are reported. 31 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  3. The FTS atomic spectrum tool (FAST) for rapid analysis of line spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffoni, M. P.

    2013-07-01

    The FTS Atomic Spectrum Tool (FAST) is an interactive graphical program designed to simplify the analysis of atomic emission line spectra obtained from Fourier transform spectrometers. Calculated, predicted and/or known experimental line parameters are loaded alongside experimentally observed spectral line profiles for easy comparison between new experimental data and existing results. Many such line profiles, which could span numerous spectra, may be viewed simultaneously to help the user detect problems from line blending or self-absorption. Once the user has determined that their experimental line profile fits are good, a key feature of FAST is the ability to calculate atomic branching fractions, transition probabilities, and oscillator strengths-and their uncertainties-which is not provided by existing analysis packages. Program SummaryProgram title: FAST: The FTS Atomic Spectrum Tool Catalogue identifier: AEOW_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 293058 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13809509 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Intel x86-based systems. Operating system: Linux/Unix/Windows. RAM: 8 MB minimum. About 50-200 MB for a typical analysis. Classification: 2.2, 2.3, 21.2. Nature of problem: Visualisation of atomic line spectra including the comparison of theoretical line parameters with experimental atomic line profiles. Accurate intensity calibration of experimental spectra, and the determination of observed relative line intensities that are needed for calculating atomic branching fractions and oscillator strengths. Solution method: FAST is centred around a graphical interface, where a user may view sets of experimental line profiles and compare

  4. Linear optical absorption spectra of mesoscopic structures in intense THz fields: Free-particle properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kristinn; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    We theoretically study the effect of THz radiation on the linear optical absorption spectra of semiconductor structures. A general theoretical framework, based on nonequilibrium Green functions, is formulated and applied to the calculation of linear optical absorption spectrum for several...

  5. Optical resonance and two-level atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, L

    1987-01-01

    ""Coherent and lucid…a valuable summary of a subject to which [the authors] have made significant contributions by their own research."" - Contemporary PhysicsOffering an admirably clear account of the basic principles behind all quantum optical resonance phenomena, and hailed as a valuable contribution to the literature of nonlinear optics, this distinguished work provides graduate students and research physicists probing fields such as laser physics, quantum optics, nonlinear optics, quantum electronics, and resonance optics an ideal introduction to the study of the interaction of electroma

  6. Optical properties of organic semiconductor thin films. Static spectra and real-time growth studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemeyer, Ute

    2009-07-20

    The aim of this work was to establish the anisotropic dielectric function of organic thin films on silicon covered with native oxide and to study their optical properties during film growth. While the work focuses mainly on the optical properties of Diindenoperylene (DIP) films, also the optical response of Pentacene (PEN) films during growth is studied for comparison. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and differential reflectance spectroscopy are used to determine the dielectric function of the films ex-situ and in-situ, i.e. in air and in ultrahigh vacuum. Additionally, Raman- and fluorescence spectroscopy is utilized to characterize the DIP films serving also as a basis for spatially resolved optical measurements beyond the diffraction limit. Furthermore, X-ray reflectometry and atomic force microscopy are used to determine important structural and morphological film properties. The absorption spectrum of DIP in solution serves as a monomer reference. The observed vibronic progression of the HOMO-LUMO transition allows the determination of the Huang-Rhys parameter experimentally, which is a measure of the electronic vibrational coupling. The corresponding breathing modes are measured by Raman spectroscopy. The optical properties of DIP films on native oxide show significant differences compared to the monomer spectrum due to intermolecular interactions. First of all, the thin film spectra are highly anisotropic due to the structural order of the films. Furthermore the Frenkel exciton transfer is studied and the energy difference between Frenkel and charge transfer excitons is determined. Real-time measurements reveal optical differences between interfacial or surface molecules and bulk molecules that play an important role for device applications. They are not only performed for DIP films but also for PEN films. While for DIP films on glass the appearance of a new mode is visible, the spectra of PEN show a pronounced energy red-shift during growth. It is shown how the

  7. Optical coupling of cold atoms to a levitated nanosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Cris; Witherspoon, Apryl; Fausett, Jacob; Lim, Jason; Kitching, John; Geraci, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Cooling mechanical oscillators to their quantum ground state enables the study of quantum phenomena at macroscopic levels. In many cases, the temperature required to cool a mechanical mode to the ground state is below what current cryogenic systems can achieve. As an alternative to cooling via cryogenic systems, it has been shown theoretically that optically trapped nanospheres could reach the ground state by sympathetically cooling the spheres via cold atoms. Such cooled spheres can be used in quantum limited sensing and matter-wave interferometry, and could also enable new hybrid quantum systems where mechanical oscillators act as transducers. In our setup, optical fields are used to couple a sample of cold Rubidium atoms to a nanosphere. The sphere is optically levitated in a separate vacuum chamber, while the atoms are trapped in a 1-D optical lattice and cooled using optical molasses. This work is partially supported by NSF, Grant No. PHY-1506431.

  8. Heliospheric Neutral Atom Spectra Between 0.01 and 6 keV fom IBEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Allegrini, F.; Bzowski, M.; Funsten, H. O.; Ghielmetti, A. G.; Gloeckler, G.; Heirtzler, D.; Janzen, P.; Kubiak, M.; Kucharek, H.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Since 2008 December, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has been making detailed observations of neutrals from the boundaries of the heliosphere using two neutral atom cameras with overlapping energy ranges. The unexpected, yet defining feature discovered by IBEX is a Ribbon that extends over the energy range from about 0.2 to 6 keV. This Ribbon is superposed on a more uniform, globally distributed heliospheric neutral population. With some important exceptions, the focus of early IBEX studies has been on neutral atoms with energies greater than approx. 0.5 keV. With nearly three years of science observations, enough low-energy neutral atom measurements have been accumulated to extend IBEX observations to energies less than approx. 0.5 keV. Using the energy overlap of the sensors to identify and remove backgrounds, energy spectra over the entire IBEX energy range are produced. However, contributions by interstellar neutrals to the energy spectrum below 0.2 keV may not be completely removed. Compared with spectra at higher energies, neutral atom spectra at lower energies do not vary much from location to location in the sky, including in the direction of the IBEX Ribbon. Neutral fluxes are used to show that low energy ions contribute approximately the same thermal pressure as higher energy ions in the heliosheath. However, contributions to the dynamic pressure are very high unless there is, for example, turbulence in the heliosheath with fluctuations of the order of 50-100 km/s.

  9. R-Matrix Theory of Atomic Collisions Application to Atomic, Molecular and Optical Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Philip George

    2011-01-01

    Commencing with a self-contained overview of atomic collision theory, this monograph presents recent developments of R-matrix theory and its applications to a wide-range of atomic molecular and optical processes. These developments include electron and photon collisions with atoms, ions and molecules required in the analysis of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, multiphoton processes required in the analysis of superintense laser interactions with atoms and molecules and positron collisions with atoms and molecules required in antimatter studies of scientific and technologial importance. Basic mathematical results and general and widely used R-matrix computer programs are summarized in the appendices.

  10. Manipulation of single neutral atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuanwei; Das Sarma, S.; Rolston, S. L.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze a scheme to manipulate quantum states of neutral atoms at individual sites of optical lattices using focused laser beams. Spatial distributions of focused laser intensities induce position-dependent energy shifts of hyperfine states, which, combined with microwave radiation, allow selective manipulation of quantum states of individual target atoms. We show that various errors in the manipulation process are suppressed below 10 -4 with properly chosen microwave pulse sequences and laser parameters. A similar idea is also applied to measure quantum states of single atoms in optical lattices

  11. Atomic force microscope with integrated optical microscope for biological applications

    OpenAIRE

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Putman, C.A.J.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    Since atomic force microscopy (AFM) is capable of imaging nonconducting surfaces, the technique holds great promises for high‐resolution imaging of biological specimens. A disadvantage of most AFMs is the fact that the relatively large sample surface has to be scanned multiple times to pinpoint a specific biological object of interest. Here an AFM is presented which has an incorporated inverted optical microscope. The optical image from the optical microscope is not obscured by the cantilever...

  12. Subthermal linewidths in photoassociation spectra of cold alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machholm, Mette; Julienne, Paul S.; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2002-01-01

    Narrow s-wave features with subthermal widths are predicted for the 1 Π g photoassociation spectra of cold alkaline-earth-metal atoms. The phenomenon is explained by numerical and analytical calculations. These show that only a small subthermal range of collision energies near threshold contributes to the s-wave features that are excited when the atoms are very far apart. The resonances survive thermal averaging, and may be detectable for Ca cooled near the Doppler cooling temperature of the 4 1 P 1 S laser-cooling transition

  13. Reemission spectra and inelastic processes at interaction of attosecond and shorter duration electromagnetic pulses with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, D.N.; Matveev, V.I.

    2017-01-01

    Inelastic processes and the reemission of attosecond and shorter electromagnetic pulses by atoms have been considered within the analytical solution of the Schrödinger equation in the sudden perturbation approximation. A method of calculations with the exact inclusion of spatial inhomogeneity of the field of an ultrashort pulse and the momenta of photons in the reemission processes has been developed. The probabilities of inelastic processes and spectra of reemission of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses by one- and many-electron atoms have been calculated. The results have been presented in the form of analytical formulas.

  14. Photoelectron spectra as a probe of double-core resonsance in two-electron atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobe, R.; Haan, S.L.; Eberly, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    The authors calculate photoelectron spectra for a two-electron atom under the influence of two external driving fields, using an essential states formalism. They focus on the regime of so-called coherence transfer, in which electron-electron correlation transfers field-induced photo-coherence from one electron to the other. In the case studied here, two laser fields are resonant with coupled atomic transitions, in the manner familiar from three-level dark-state spectroscopy. Dynamical two electron effects are monitored via the photoelectron energy spectrum. The authors show that the distribution of the photoelectron energies can be singly, doubly or triply peaked depending on the relative laser intensities. The electron spectra are independent of the turn-on sequence of the fields

  15. Remote Generation of Entanglement for Individual Atoms via Optical Fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Qing, Guo; Hai-Yang, Zhong; Ying-Hui, Zhang; He-Shan, Song

    2008-01-01

    The generation of atomic entanglement is discussed in a system that atoms are trapped in separate cavities which are connected via optical fibres. Two distant atoms can be projected to Bell-state by synchronized turning off of the local laser fields and then performing a single quantum measurement by a distant controller. The distinct advantage of this scheme is that it works in a regime where Δ ≈ κ ≫ g, which makes the scheme insensitive to cavity strong leakage. Moreover, the fidelity is not affected by atomic spontaneous emission. (general)

  16. Editorial: Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Pfau, T.; Schmelcher, P.; Schleich, W.

    2010-06-01

    Atom optics employs the modern techniques of quantum optics and laser cooling to enable applications which often outperform current standard technologies. Atomic matter wave interferometers allow for ultra-precise sensors; metrology and clocks are pushed to an extraordinary accuracy of 17 digits using single atoms. Miniaturization and integration are driven forward for both atomic clocks and atom optical circuits. With the miniaturization of information-storage and -processing devices, the scale of single atoms is approached in solid state devices, where the laws of quantum physics lead to novel, advantageous features and functionalities. An upcoming branch of atom optics is the control of single atoms, potentially allowing solid state devices to be built atom by atom; some of which would be applicable in future quantum information processing devices. Selective manipulation of individual atoms also enables trace analysis of extremely rare isotopes. Additionally, sources of neutral atoms with high brightness are being developed and, if combined with photo ionization, even novel focused ion beam sources are within reach. Ultracold chemistry is fertilized by atomic techniques, when reactions of chemical constituents are investigated between ions, atoms, molecules, trapped or aligned in designed fields and cooled to ultra-low temperatures such that the reaction kinetics can be studied in a completely state-resolved manner. Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications Contents Sensitive gravity-gradiometry with atom interferometry: progress towards an improved determination of the gravitational constant F Sorrentino, Y-H Lien, G Rosi, L Cacciapuoti, M Prevedelli and G M Tino A single-atom detector integrated on an atom chip: fabrication, characterization and application D Heine, W Rohringer, D Fischer, M Wilzbach, T Raub, S Loziczky, XiYuan Liu, S Groth, B Hessmo and J Schmiedmayer Interaction of a propagating guided matter wave with a localized potential G L Gattobigio, A

  17. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X.; Le Targat, R.; Fouche, M.; Brusch, A.; Westergaard, Ph.G.; Lecallier, A.; Lodewyck, J.; Lemonde, P. [Observatoire de Paris, LNE-SYRTE, Systemes de Reference Temps Espace, 75 (France)

    2009-07-01

    Optical lattice clocks, which were first imagined in 2000, should allow one to achieve unprecedented performances in the domain of atomic clocks. We present here the Strontium lattice clock, developed at LNE-SYRTE. The principle, in particular trapping atoms in the Lamb-Dicke regime and the notion of magic wavelength, is first explained. We then present the results obtained for the {sup 87}Sr isotope, with a frequency accuracy of 2,6.10{sup -15}, and the {sup 88}Sr isotope, with. which we perform the first frequency measurement of an optical lattice clock with bosonic atoms. (authors)

  18. Atomic physics modeling of transmission spectra of Sc-doped aerogel foams to support OMEGA experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, H. M., E-mail: hjohns@lanl.gov; Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Fontes, C. J.; Perry, T. S.; Fryer, C. L.; Sherrill, M. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Brown, C. R. D.; Morton, J. W. [AWE Aldermaston, Berkshire, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Hager, J. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Lockheed-Martin, 497 Electronics Parkway, Syracuse, New York 13221 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We present synthetic transmission spectra generated with PrismSPECT utilizing both the ATBASE model and the Los Alamos opacity library (OPLIB) to evaluate whether an alternative choice in atomic data will impact modeling of experimental data from radiation transport experiments using Sc-doped aerogel foams (ScSi{sub 6}O{sub 12} at 75 mg/cm{sup 3} density). We have determined that in the 50-200 eV T{sub e} range there is a significant difference in the 1s-3p spectra, especially below 100 eV, and for T{sub e} = 200 eV above 5000 eV in photon energy. Examining synthetic spectra generated using OPLIB with 300 resolving power reveals spectral sensitivity to T{sub e} changes of ∼3 eV.

  19. Photoabsorption spectra in the perturbative regime for atoms in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marxer, H.; Moser, I.; O'Mahony, P.F.; Mota-Furtado, F.

    1994-01-01

    We calculate photoabsorption spectra of atoms in crossed electric and magnetic fields using a truncated basis of Coulomb eigenfunctions. The method yields spectra in the regime where inter-n-mixing is not dominant and allows for the treatment of non-hydrogenic atoms via a simple recourse to quantum defects. We compare results for hydrogen to those obtained in second order perturbation theory where the residual degeneracy left in first order perturbation theory is completely lifted and we show that only a very small basis size is needed to achieve convergence to within the accuracy of second order perturbation theory. In the case of lithium the coupling of an incomplete hydrogen-like manifold to states with non-negligible quantum defects substantially modifies the spectra obtained in comparison to the purely hydrogenic spectra. In the inter-n-mixing regime we also compare our convoluted results directly with an experimental spectrum for hydrogen and find good agreement below the saddle point. (Author)

  20. Resonance fluorescence spectra of three-level atoms in a squeezed vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, M.R.; Ficek, Z.; Dalton, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The fluorescence field from one of the two allowed transitions in a three-level atom can sense squeezed fluctuations of a vacuum field coupled to the other transition. We examine the fluorescence spectra of strongly driven three-level atoms in Λ, V, and cascade configurations in which one of the two one-photon transitions is coupled to a finite-bandwidth squeezed vacuum field, when the bandwidth is much smaller than the difference in the atomic transition frequencies, though much larger than atomic decay rates and Rabi frequencies of the driving fields. The driving fields are on one-photon resonance, and the squeezed vacuum field is generated by a degenerate parameter oscillator. Details are only given for the Λ configuration. The extension to the V and cascade configurations is straightforward. We find that in all configurations the fluorescence spectra of the transition not coupled to the squeezed vacuum field are composed of five lines, one central and two pairs of sidebands, with intensities and widths strongly influenced by the squeezed vacuum field. However, only the central component and the outer sidebands exhibit a dependence on the squeezing phase. We also examine the fluorescence spectrum for the cascade configuration with a squeezed vacuum field on resonance with the two-photon transition between the ground and the most excited states and now generated by a nondegenerate parametric oscillator. In this case, where the squeezed vacuum field can be made coupled to both transitions, all spectral lines depend on the squeezing phase. The spectral features are explained in terms of the dressed-atom model of the system. We show that the coherent mixing of the atomic states by the strong driving fields modifies transition rates between the dressed states, which results in the selective phase dependence of the spectral features. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Committee on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special symposia are among the mechanisms used by the CAMOS to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of CAMOS activities from February 1, 1992 to January 31, 1993. This report also includes the status of activities associated with the CAMOS study on the field that is being conducted by the Panel on the Future of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (FAMOS)

  2. Feedback control of atomic motion in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, N.V.; Dutta, S.K.; Raithel, G.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate a real-time feedback scheme to manipulate wave-packet oscillations of atoms in an optical lattice. The average position of the atoms in the lattice wells is measured continuously and nondestructively. A feedback loop processes the position signal and translates the lattice potential. Depending on the feedback loop characteristics, we find amplification, damping, or an entire alteration of the wave-packet oscillations. Our results are well supported by simulations

  3. Designing neutral-atom nanotraps with integrated optical waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, James P. Jr.; Chu, S.-T.; Bryant, Garnett W.; Williams, C.J.; Julienne, P.S.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated optical structures offer the intriguing potential of compact, reproducible waveguide arrays, rings, Y junctions, etc., that could be used to design evanescent field traps to transport, store, and interact atoms in networks as complicated as any integrated optical waveguide circuit. We theoretically investigate three approaches to trapping atoms above linear integrated optical waveguides. A two-color scheme balances the decaying evanescent fields of red- and blue-detuned light to produce a potential minimum above the guide. A one-color surface trap proposal uses blue-detuned light and the attractive surface interaction to provide a potential minimum. A third proposal uses blue-detuned light in two guides positioned above and below one another. The atoms are confined to the 'dark' spot in the vacuum gap between the guides. We find that all three approaches can be used to trap atoms in two or three dimensions with approximately 100 mW of laser power. We show that the dark spot guide is robust to light scatter and provides the most viable approach for constructing integrated optical circuits that could be used to transport and manipulate atoms in a controlled manner

  4. Atom-loss-induced quantum optical bi-stability switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Bao-Jun; Cui Fu-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the nonlinear dynamics of a system composed of a cigar-shaped Bose—Einstein condensate and an optical cavity with the two sides coupled dispersively. By adopting discrete-mode approximation for the condensate, taking atom loss as a necessary part of the model to analyze the evolution of the system, while using trial and error method to find out steady states of the system as a reference, numerical simulation demonstrates that with a constant pump, atom loss will trigger a quantum optical bi-stability switch, which predicts a new interesting phenomenon for experiments to verify

  5. Optically pumped semiconductor lasers for atomic and molecular physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, S.; Leibfried, D.; Wilson, A. C.; Wineland, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    Experiments in atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) physics rely on lasers at many different wavelengths and with varying requirements on spectral linewidth, power and intensity stability. Optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSLs), when combined with nonlinear frequency conversion, can potentially replace many of the laser systems currently in use. We are developing a source for laser cooling and spectroscopy of Mg+ ions at 280 nm, based on a frequency quadrupled OPSL with the gain chip fabricated at the ORC at Tampere Univ. of Technology, Finland. This OPSL system could serve as a prototype for many other sources used in atomic and molecular physics.

  6. State-dependent fluorescence of neutral atoms in optical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Dorantes, M.; Alt, W.; Gallego, J.; Ghosh, S.; Ratschbacher, L.; Meschede, D.

    2018-02-01

    Recently we have demonstrated scalable, nondestructive, and high-fidelity detection of the internal state of 87Rb neutral atoms in optical dipole traps using state-dependent fluorescence imaging [M. Martinez-Dorantes, W. Alt, J. Gallego, S. Ghosh, L. Ratschbacher, Y. Völzke, and D. Meschede, Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 180503 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.180503]. In this paper we provide experimental procedures and interpretations to overcome the detrimental effects of heating-induced trap losses and state leakage. We present models for the dynamics of optically trapped atoms during state-dependent fluorescence imaging and verify our results by comparing Monte Carlo simulations with experimental data. Our systematic study of dipole force fluctuations heating in optical traps during near-resonant illumination shows that off-resonant light is preferable for state detection in tightly confining optical potentials.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BD+46 442 optical spectra (Bollen+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, D.; van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.

    2017-08-01

    Reduced high-resolution (R~85000) optical spectra of BD+46 442. These 104 spectra were obtained between July 2009 and January 2016 from the HERMES spectrograph, mounted on the 1.2m Flemish Mercator telescope at La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. The spectra cover a wavelength range from 3770 to 9000 angstrom in logscale. The flux is given in arbitrary units. The spectra are collected as FITS files. The numbering of the spectra corresponds to the numbering in Table B.1 in the article (e.g. spec_15.fits corresponds to N=15). (2 data files).

  8. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) for optical nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maula, Jarmo

    2010-02-01

    ALD is currently one of the most rapidly developing fields of thin film technology. Presentation gives an overview of ALD technology for optical film deposition, highlighting benefits, drawbacks and peculiarities of the ALD, especially compared to PVD. Viewpoint is practical, based on experience gained from tens of different applications over the last few decades. ALD is not competing, but enabling technology to provide coatings, which are difficult for traditional technologies. Examples of such cases are films inside of tubes; double side deposition on the substrate; large area accurate coatings; decorative coating for 3D parts; conformal coatings on high aspect ratio surfaces or inside porous structures. Novel materials can be easily engineered by making modifications on molecular level. ALD coats large surfaces effectively and fast. Opposite to common view, it actually provides high throughput (coated area/time), when used properly with a batch and/or in-line tools. It is possible to use ALD for many micrometers thick films or even produce thin parts with competitive cost. Besides optical films ALD provides large variety of features for nanofabrication. For example pin hole free films for passivation and barrier applications and best available films for conformal coatings like planarization or to improve surface smoothness. High deposition repeatability even with subnanometer film structures helps fabrication. ALD enters to production mostly through new products, not yet existing on the market and so the application IP field is reasonably open. ALD is an enabling, mature technology to fabricate novel optical materials and to open pathways for new applications.

  9. THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS WITH SOME OR ALL HYDROGEN ATOMS REMOVED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr. [Entry Systems and Technology Division, Mail Stop 230-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ricca, Alessandra, E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov, E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca-1@nasa.gov [Carl Sagan Center, SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    The loss of one hydrogen from C{sub 96}H{sub 24} does not significantly affect the infrared spectra of the neutral, cation, or anion. Excluding a very weak C-C stretching band at 5.1 μm, the loss of two adjacent duo hydrogens does not significantly affect the spectra compared with the parent. Removing all of the hydrogen atoms significantly increases the intensity of the new C-C stretching band, and, for the cation, shifts it to a longer (5.2 μm) wavelength. Observations show a feature near 5.25 μm, which has been attributed to overtone and combination bands from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This current work suggests that dehydrogenated PAHs might also contribute to this band, but its weakness implies that fully dehydrogenated cationic or dicationic species are very rare.

  10. THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS WITH SOME OR ALL HYDROGEN ATOMS REMOVED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr.; Ricca, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    The loss of one hydrogen from C 96 H 24 does not significantly affect the infrared spectra of the neutral, cation, or anion. Excluding a very weak C-C stretching band at 5.1 μm, the loss of two adjacent duo hydrogens does not significantly affect the spectra compared with the parent. Removing all of the hydrogen atoms significantly increases the intensity of the new C-C stretching band, and, for the cation, shifts it to a longer (5.2 μm) wavelength. Observations show a feature near 5.25 μm, which has been attributed to overtone and combination bands from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This current work suggests that dehydrogenated PAHs might also contribute to this band, but its weakness implies that fully dehydrogenated cationic or dicationic species are very rare

  11. Quantum chemical approach for positron annihilation spectra of atoms and molecules beyond plane-wave approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikabata, Yasuhiro; Aiba, Risa; Iwanade, Toru; Nishizawa, Hiroaki; Wang, Feng; Nakai, Hiromi

    2018-05-01

    We report theoretical calculations of positron-electron annihilation spectra of noble gas atoms and small molecules using the nuclear orbital plus molecular orbital method. Instead of a nuclear wavefunction, the positronic wavefunction is obtained as the solution of the coupled Hartree-Fock or Kohn-Sham equation for a positron and the electrons. The molecular field is included in the positronic Fock operator, which allows an appropriate treatment of the positron-molecule repulsion. The present treatment succeeds in reproducing the Doppler shift, i.e., full width at half maximum (FWHM) of experimentally measured annihilation (γ-ray) spectra for molecules with a mean absolute error less than 10%. The numerical results indicate that the interpretation of the FWHM in terms of a specific molecular orbital is not appropriate.

  12. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Targat, R.

    2007-07-01

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10 -16 . It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 → J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S 0 → 3P 0 transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 μK. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope 87 Sr, at a level of a few 10 -15 . (author)

  13. An automatic controlled apparatus of target chamber for atomic spectra and level lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Mengchun; Yang Zhihu

    1998-01-01

    An automatically controlled apparatus of target chamber was made to measure spectra of the excited atoms and lifetime of the excited levels. The hardware is composed of nine parts including a computer and a step-motor, while the software consists of three branch programs. The maximum movable distance of target position is 65 cm with a step-length of 8.3 μm and a precision of +- 18 μm per 2 mm. On account of simple structure and double protection, the apparatus exhibits flexibility and reliability in years service

  14. Rydberg-Stark states of Positronium for atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A M; Cooper, B S; Deller, A; Hogan, S D; Wall, T E; Cassidy, D B

    2015-01-01

    Positronium atoms were produced in Rydberg states by means of a two-step optical excitation process (1s→2p→nd/ns). The n = 11 Rydberg-Stark manifold has been studied using different laser polarizations providing greater control over the electric dipole moment. (paper)

  15. Nanometer-scale optical traps using atomic state localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, D. D.; Proite, N. A.; Green, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    We suggest a scheme where a laser beam forms an optical trap with a spatial size that is much smaller than the wavelength of light. The key idea is to combine a far-off-resonant dipole trap with a scheme that localizes an atomic excitation.

  16. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  17. Polarization measurement of atomic hydrogen beam spin-exchanged with optically oriented sodium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Akira; Ogura, Kouichi; Wakuta, Yoshihisa; Kumabe, Isao

    1988-01-01

    The spin-exchange reaction between hydrogen atoms and optically oriented sodium atoms was used to produce a polarized atomic hydrogen beam. The electron-spin polarization of the atomic hydrogen beam, which underwent the spin-exchange reaction with the optically oriented sodium atoms, was measured. A beam polarization of -(8.0±0.6)% was obtained when the thickness and polarization of the sodium target were (5.78±0.23)x10 13 atoms/cm 2 and -(39.6±1.6)%, respectively. The value of the spin-exchange cross section in the forward scattering direction, whose scattering angle in the laboratory system was less than 1.0 0 , was obtained from the experimental results as Δσ ex =(3.39±0.34)x10 -15 cm 2 . This value is almost seven times larger than the theoretical value calculated from the Na-H potential. The potential was computed quantum mechanically in the space of the appropriate wave functions of the hydrogen and the sodium atoms. (orig./HSI)

  18. Springer handbook of atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cassar, Mark M

    2006-01-01

    This Springer Handbook of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics comprises a comprehensive reference source that unifies the entire fields of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics, assembling the principal ideas, techniques and results of the field from atomic spectroscopy to applications in comets. Its 92 chapters are written by over 100 authors, all leaders in their respective disciplines. Carefully edited to ensure uniform coverage and style, with extensive cross references, and acting as a guide to the primary research literature, it is both a source of information and an inspiration for graduate students and other researchers new to the field. Relevant diagrams, graphs, and tables of data are provided throughout the text. Substantially updated and expanded since the 1996 edition and published in conjunction with the 2005 World Year of Physics (commemorating Einstein’s 1905 "miracle year"), it contains several entirely new chapters covering current areas of great research interest, such as Bose �...

  19. Quantum state preparation using multi-level-atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Th; Deasy, K; Chormaic, S Nic

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important characteristics for controlling processes on the quantum scale is the fidelity or robustness of the techniques being used. In the case of single atoms localized in micro-traps, it was recently shown that the use of time-dependent tunnelling interactions in a multi-trap setup can be viewed as analogous to the area of multi-level optics. The atom's centre-of-mass can then be controlled with a high fidelity, using a STIRAP-type process. Here, we review previous work that led to the development of multi-level atom optics and present two examples of our most recent work on quantum state preparation

  20. Laser- and gamma-induced transformations of optical spectra of indium-doped sodium borate glass

    CERN Document Server

    Kopyshinsky, O V; Zelensky, S E; Danilchenko, B A; Shakhov, O P

    2003-01-01

    The optical absorption and luminescence properties of indium-doped sodium borate glass irradiated by gamma-rays and by powerful UV lasers within the impurity-related absorption band are investigated experimentally. It is demonstrated that both the laser- and gamma-irradiation cause similar transformations of optical spectra in the UV and visible regions. The changes of the spectra observed are described with the use of a model which includes three types of impurity centres formed by differently charged indium ions.

  1. Spectral shaping for non-Gaussian source spectra in optical coherence tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tripathi, R; Nassif, N. A.; Nelson, JS; Park, B.H.; de Boer, JF

    2002-01-01

    We present a digital spectral shaping technique to reduce the sidelobes (ringing) of the axial point-spread function in optical coherence tomography for non-Gaussian-shaped source spectra. The spectra of two superluminescent diodes were combined to generate a spectrum with significant modulation.

  2. Spontaneous emission spectra and simulating multiple spontaneous generation coherence in a five-level atomic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiahua; Liu Jibing; Qi Chunchao; Chen Aixi

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the features of the spontaneous emission spectra in a coherently driven cold five-level atomic system by means of a radio frequency (rf) or microwave field driving a hyperfine transition within the ground state. It is shown that a few interesting phenomena such as spectral-line narrowing, spectral-line enhancement, spectral-line suppression, and spontaneous emission quenching can be realized by modulating the frequency and intensity of the rf-driving field in our system. In the dressed-state picture of the coupling and rf-driving fields, we find that this coherently driven atomic system has three close-lying levels so that multiple spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) arises. Our considered atomic model can be found in real atoms, such as rubidium or sodium, so a corresponding experiment can be done to observe the expected phenomena related to SGC reported by Fountoulakis et al. [Phys. Rev. A 73, 033811 (2006)], since no rigorous conditions are required

  3. Interplay of intra-atomic and interatomic effects: An investigation of the 2p core level spectra of atomic Fe and molecular FeCl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, T.; Wolff, T.; Zimmermann, P.; Godehusen, K.; Martins, M.

    2004-01-01

    The 2p photoabsorption and photoelectron spectra of atomic Fe and molecular FeCl 2 were studied by photoion and photoelectron spectroscopy using monochromatized synchrotron radiation and atomic or molecular beam technique. The atomic spectra were analyzed with configuration interaction calculations yielding excellent agreement between experiment and theory. For the analysis of the molecular photoelectron spectrum which shows pronounced interatomic effects, a charge transfer model was used, introducing an additional 3d 7 configuration. The resulting good agreement between the experimental and theoretical spectrum and the remarkable similarity of the molecular with the corresponding spectrum in the solid phase opens a way to a better understanding of the interplay of the interatomic and intra-atomic interactions in the 2p core level spectra of the 3d metal compounds

  4. Blind deconvolution of time-of-flight mass spectra from atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.J.S.; Thuvander, M.; Stiller, K.; Odén, M.; Hultman, L.

    2013-01-01

    A major source of uncertainty in compositional measurements in atom probe tomography stems from the uncertainties of assigning peaks or parts of peaks in the mass spectrum to their correct identities. In particular, peak overlap is a limiting factor, whereas an ideal mass spectrum would have peaks at their correct positions with zero broadening. Here, we report a method to deconvolute the experimental mass spectrum into such an ideal spectrum and a system function describing the peak broadening introduced by the field evaporation and detection of each ion. By making the assumption of a linear and time-invariant behavior, a system of equations is derived that describes the peak shape and peak intensities. The model is fitted to the observed spectrum by minimizing the squared residuals, regularized by the maximum entropy method. For synthetic data perfectly obeying the assumptions, the method recovered peak intensities to within ±0.33at%. The application of this model to experimental APT data is exemplified with Fe–Cr data. Knowledge of the peak shape opens up several new possibilities, not just for better overall compositional determination, but, e.g., for the estimation of errors of ranging due to peak overlap or peak separation constrained by isotope abundances. - Highlights: • A method for the deconvolution of atom probe mass spectra is proposed. • Applied to synthetic randomly generated spectra the accuracy was ±0.33 at. • Application of the method to an experimental Fe–Cr spectrum is demonstrated

  5. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X

    2008-01-15

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr{sup 87} using the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr{sup 87} atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10{sup -15} and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10{sup -15} level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr{sup 88} by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10{sup -14}. (author)

  6. Quantum degenerate atomic gases in controlled optical lattice potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemelke, Nathan D.

    2007-12-01

    Since the achievement of Bose Einstein condensation in cold atomic gases, mean-field treatments of the condensed phase have provided an excellent description for the static and dynamic properties observed in experiments. Recent experimental efforts have focused on studying deviations from mean-field behavior. I will describe work on two experiments which introduce controlled single particle degeneracies with time-dependent optical potentials, aiming to induce correlated motion and nontrivial statistics in the gas. In the first experiment, an optical lattice with locally rotating site potentials is produced to investigate fractional quantum Hall effects (FQHE) in rotating Bose gases. Here, the necessary gauge potential is provided by the rotating reference frame of the gas, which, in direct analogy to the electronic system, organizes single particle states into degenerate Landau levels. At low temperatures the repulsive interaction provided by elastic scattering is expected to produce ground states with structure nearly identical to those in the FQHE. I will discuss how these effects are made experimentally feasible by working at small particle numbers in the tight trapping potentials of an optical lattice, and present first results on the use of photoassociation to probe correlation in this system. In the second experiment, a vibrated optical lattice potential alters the single-particle dispersion underlying a condensed Bose gas and offers tailored phase-matching for nonlinear atom optical processes. I will demonstrate how this leads to parametric instability in the condensed gas, and draw analogy to an optical parametric oscillator operating above threshold.

  7. Atomic and Molecular Data for Optical Stellar Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Heiter, U.; Lind, K.; Asplund, M.; Barklem, P. S.; Bergemann, M.; Magrini, L.; Masseron, T.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2-...

  8. Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences is a standing committee under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy, Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications of the National Academy of Sciences -- National Research Council. The atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) sciences represent a broad and diverse field in which much of the research is carried out by small groups. These groups generally have not operated in concert with each other and, prior to the establishment of CAMOS, there was no single committee or organization that accepted the responsibility of monitoring the continuing development and assessing the general public health of the field as a whole. CAMOS has accepted this responsibility and currently provides a focus for the AMO community that is unique and essential. The membership of CAMOS is drawn from research laboratories in universities, industry, and government. Areas of expertise on the committee include atomic physics, molecular science, and optics. A special effort has been made to include a balanced representation from the three subfields. (A roster is attached.) CAMOS has conducted a number of studies related to the health of atomic and molecular science and is well prepared to response to requests for studies on specific issues. This report brief reviews the committee work of progress

  9. The physics of thin film optical spectra an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Stenzel, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    The book bridges the gap between fundamental physics courses (such as optics, electrodynamics, quantum mechanics and solid state physics) and highly specialized literature on the spectroscopy, design, and application of optical thin film coatings. Basic knowledge from the above-mentioned courses is therefore presumed. Starting from fundamental physics, the book enables the reader derive the theory of optical coatings and to apply it to practically important spectroscopic problems. Both classical and semiclassical approaches are included. Examples describe the full range of classical optical coatings in various spectral regions as well as highly specialized new topics such as rugate filters and resonant grating waveguide structures.The second edition has been updated and extended with respect to probing matter in different spectral regions, homogenous and inhomogeneous line broadening mechanisms and the Fresnel formula for the effect of planar interfaces.

  10. Weak Interaction Measurements with Optically Trapped Radioactive Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, D.J.; Crane, S.G.; Guckert, R.; Zhao, X.; Brice, S.J.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hime, A.; Tupa, D.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project is to apply the latest in magneto-optical and pure magnetic trapping technology to concentrate, cool, confine, and polarize radioactive atoms for precise electroweak interaction measurements. In particular, the authors have concentrated their efforts on the trapping of 82 Rb for a parity-violating, beta-asymmetry measurement. Progress has been made in successfully trapping of up to 6 million 82 Rb(t 1/2 =75s) atoms in a magneto-optical trap coupled to a mass separator. This represents a two order of magnitude improvement in the number trapped radioactive atoms over all previous work. They have also measured the atomic hyperfine structure of 82 Rb and demonstrated the MOT-to-MOT transfer and accumulation of atoms in a second trap. Finally, they have constructed and tested a time-orbiting-potential magnetic trap that will serve as a rotating beacon of spin-polarized nuclei and a beta-telescope detection system. Prototype experiments are now underway with the initial goal of making a 1% measurements of the beta-asymmetry parameter A which would match the world's best measurements

  11. FOREWORD: 4th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckrone, David S.; Sugar, Jack

    1993-01-01

    In 1983 the Atomic Spectroscopy Group at the University of Lund organized a conference at Lund the purpose of which was to establish a dialogue between scientists whose research made use of basic atomic data, and scientists whose research produced such data. The data in question include complete descriptions of atomic and ionic spectra, accurate transition wavelengths and relative intensities, energy levels, lifetimes, oscillator strengths, line shapes, and nuclear effects (hyperfine structure and isotope shifts). The "consumers" in urgent need of new or improved atomic data included astrophysicsts, laboratory plasma physicists, and spectrochemists. The synergism between these specialists and the theoretical and experimental atomic physicists resulted in a highly successful meeting, attended by approximately 70 people. The rapid advances foreseen at that time in all of these areas of observational, experimental and theoretical science stimulated planning for a second conference on this subject in 1986 at the University of Toledo, and subsequently a third meeting was held at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in Amsterdam in 1989. Again attendance at the latter two meetings totaled approximately 70 researchers. The participants in Amsterdam agreed to re-convene at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in 1992, maintaining the frequency of these conferences at one every three years. The present Topical Issue of Physica Scripta consists of 31 invited reviews given at the Gaithersburg meeting. Extended abstracts of 63 poster papers from the meeting are being published in NIST Special Publication SP850. Approximately 170 scientists attended the Gaithersburg conference, representing a substantial growth in the size of meetings in this series. One session of the conference was devoted to an informal workshop, at which any participant could give a brief oral statement about his or her most immediate data need

  12. STELLAR POPULATIONS IN MEDIUM REDSHIFT CLUSTERS .2. OPTICAL-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTRA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PICKLES, AJ; VANDERKRUIT, PC

    1991-01-01

    We present optical and infrared photometry (BV RI, J H K) and spectra of galaxies in 6 medium redshift clusters covering the redshift range 0.19 less-than-or-equal-to z less-than-or-equal-to 0.4. The array photometry is used to note the radial distribution of the cluster galaxies with optical and

  13. Fractional quantum Hall states of atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, Anders S.; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a method to create fractional quantum Hall states of atoms confined in optical lattices. We show that the dynamics of the atoms in the lattice is analogous to the motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field if an oscillating quadrupole potential is applied together with a periodic modulation of the tunneling between lattice sites. In a suitable parameter regime the ground state in the lattice is of the fractional quantum Hall type, and we show how these states can be reached by melting a Mott-insulator state in a superlattice potential. Finally, we discuss techniques to observe these strongly correlated states

  14. Optical bistability using quantum interference in V-type atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M A; Calderon, Oscar G

    2002-01-01

    The behaviour of a V-type three-level atomic system in a ring cavity driven by a coherent field is studied. We consider a V configuration under conditions such that interference between decay channels is important. We find that when quantum interference is taken into account, optical bistability can be realized with a considerable decrease in the threshold intensity and the cooperative parameter. On the other hand, we also include the finite bandwidth of the driving field and study its role in the optical bistable response. It is found that at certain linewidths of the driving field optical bistability is obtained even if the system satisfies the trapping condition and the threshold intensity can be controlled. Furthermore, a change from the optical bistability due to quantum interference to the usual bistable behaviour based on saturation occurs as the driving field linewidth increases

  15. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, M.J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J.E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J.P.; Jarvis, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity

  16. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M. J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J. E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J. P.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity.

  17. Comparison of optical and electron spectra in an infra-red free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, A.M.; Gillespie, W.A.; Martin, P.F. [Univ. of Abertay, Dundee (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Time-resolved electron and optical spectra recently acquired at the FELIX facility are presented, showing the evolution of the respective macropulses. A comparison is made between the optical power output during the macropulse and the measured power extracted from the electron beam using a simple model of the cavity losses. Data are available for a wide range of operating conditions: the wavelength range is from 9 {mu}m to 28 {mu}m and detuning are between 1/4{lambda} and 2{lambda}. The effect of rapid electron beam energy changes on the optical and electron spectra will also be discussed.

  18. Enhancing optical nonreciprocity by an atomic ensemble in two coupled cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, L. N.; Wang, Z. H.; Li, Yong

    2018-05-01

    We study the optical nonreciprocal propagation in an optical molecule of two coupled cavities with one of them interacting with a two-level atomic ensemble. The effect of increasing the number of atoms on the optical isolation ratio of the system is studied. We demonstrate that the significant nonlinearity supplied by the coupling of the atomic ensemble with the cavity leads to the realization of greatly-enhanced optical nonreciprocity compared with the case of single atom.

  19. Optical-potential model for electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaway, J.; Oza, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    It is proposed that the addition of a matrix optical potential to a close-coupling calculation should lead to improved results in studies of electron-atom scattering. This procedure is described with use of a pseudostate expansion to evaluate the optical potential. The integro-differential equations are solved by a linear-algebraic method. As a test case, applications are made to electron-hydrogen scattering, and the results are compared with those obtained by other calculational procedures, and with experiment

  20. Towards deterministic optical quantum computation with coherently driven atomic ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosyan, David

    2005-01-01

    Scalable and efficient quantum computation with photonic qubits requires (i) deterministic sources of single photons, (ii) giant nonlinearities capable of entangling pairs of photons, and (iii) reliable single-photon detectors. In addition, an optical quantum computer would need a robust reversible photon storage device. Here we discuss several related techniques, based on the coherent manipulation of atomic ensembles in the regime of electromagnetically induced transparency, that are capable of implementing all of the above prerequisites for deterministic optical quantum computation with single photons

  1. Collisional shifts in optical-lattice atom clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, Y. B.; Vardi, A.

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically study the effects of elastic collisions on the determination of frequency standards via Ramsey-fringe spectroscopy in optical-lattice atom clocks. Interparticle interactions of bosonic atoms in multiply occupied lattice sites can cause a linear frequency shift, as well as generate asymmetric Ramsey-fringe patterns and reduce fringe visibility due to interparticle entanglement. We propose a method of reducing these collisional effects in an optical lattice by introducing a phase difference of π between the Ramsey driving fields in adjacent sites. This configuration suppresses site-to-site hopping due to interference of two tunneling pathways, without degrading fringe visibility. Consequently, the probability of double occupancy is reduced, leading to cancellation of collisional shifts

  2. Propagation and storing of light in optically modified atomic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaremba, Jaroslaw

    2010-01-01

    Coherent interactions of laser light with atomic ensembles allow one to modify dispersive properties of a medium and lead to new optical phenomena. Studies of the controlled light propagation and storing in such media have recently become a dynamically developing field of research motivated both by the fundamental character of the processes and by potential applications. This article briefly reviews basic theoretical approach to the dynamics of the propagation of laser pulses in optically modified media. The method and the physical processes are discussed that allow one to slow down the group velocity of laser pulse to zero (stopping of light), to transfer the state of a light pulse to atomic coherences and to restore the pulse. The interpretation of these phenomena in the formalism of dark-state polaritons is presented. Examples of possible coherent manipulations on a stored light are also discussed.

  3. Propagation and storing of light in optically modified atomic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaremba, Jaroslaw, E-mail: zaremba@fizyka.iomk.p [Institute of Physics Nicolaus Copernicus University ul. Grudziadzka 5/7 87 100 Torun (Poland)

    2010-03-01

    Coherent interactions of laser light with atomic ensembles allow one to modify dispersive properties of a medium and lead to new optical phenomena. Studies of the controlled light propagation and storing in such media have recently become a dynamically developing field of research motivated both by the fundamental character of the processes and by potential applications. This article briefly reviews basic theoretical approach to the dynamics of the propagation of laser pulses in optically modified media. The method and the physical processes are discussed that allow one to slow down the group velocity of laser pulse to zero (stopping of light), to transfer the state of a light pulse to atomic coherences and to restore the pulse. The interpretation of these phenomena in the formalism of dark-state polaritons is presented. Examples of possible coherent manipulations on a stored light are also discussed.

  4. Optical Microcavity: Sensing down to Single Molecules and Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yu Su

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments, microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  5. Study of absorption spectra for alkali and alkaline earth metal salts in flameless atomic absorption spectrometry using a carbon tube atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Seiji; Kakiyama, Hitoo

    1975-01-01

    Absorption spectra of various salts such as alkali metal salts, alkaline earth dichlorides, and ammonium halides were investigated and absorptions of some molecular species produced in the carbon tube were identified. The aqueous solution (20 μl) containing 1.0 mg/ml of each salt was placed in the carbon tube atomizer and heated in a similar manner to usual flameless atomic absorption method. D 2 -lamp was used as a continuous light source and argon gas was employed as an inert sheath gas. The spectra were obtained over the range of wavelength 200 to 350 nm. When alkali halides were feeded, the absorption spectra agreed with those of alkali halide vapors. Therefore, in such cases vapors of the alkali halides were probably produced by the sublimation or vaporization in the atomizer. The spectra of alkali perchlorates were considered to be those of alkali chlorides produced by the pyrolysis of the perchlorates in the atomizer. The absorptions of alkaline earth chlorides below 250 nm were probably due to their gaseous states. Sulfur dioxide was found to be produced by the pyrolysis of alkali sulfates, bisulfates and sulfites in the atomizer, Alkali phosphates and pyrophosphates gave almost identical spectra below 300 nm. Gamma band spectrum of nitrogen monoxide was observed from 200 to 240 nm during ashing at bout 330 0 C for alkali nitrates and nitrites. Ammonia vapor was produced from ammonium halides during drying at about 170 0 C. Although the absorptions of alkali carbonates and hydroxides were almost undetectable, the same spectra as those of alkali halides were observed by the addition of ammonium halides to the solutions of alkali compounds. This shows that alkali halides are produced in the atomizer by the addition of halide ions. (auth.)

  6. Measurement of fluorescence emission spectrum of few strongly driven atoms using an optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manoj; Shirasaki, A; Nayak, K P; Morinaga, M; Le Kien, Fam; Hakuta, K

    2010-08-02

    We show that the fluorescence emission spectrum of few atoms can be measured by using an optical nanofiber combined with the optical heterodyne and photon correlation spectroscopy. The observed fluorescence spectrum of the atoms near the nanofiber shows negligible effects of the atom-surface interaction and agrees well with the Mollow triplet spectrum of free-space atoms at high excitation intensity.

  7. Optical-model analysis of exotic atom data. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    Data for kaonic atoms are fitted using a simple optical model with a potential proportional to the nuclear density. Very satisfactory fits to strong interaction shift and width values are obtained but difficulties in fitting yield values indicate that the model is not completely satisfactory. The potential strength can be related to the free kaon-nucleon scattering lengths using a model due to Deloff. A good overall representation of the data is obtained with a black-sphere model. (orig.)

  8. Hanbury Brown and Twiss and other atom-atom correlations: advances in quantum atom optics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Fifty years ago, two astronomers, R. Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss, invented a new method to measure the angular diameter of stars, in spite of the atmospheric fluctuations. Their proposal prompted a hot debate among physicists : how might two particles (photons), emitted independently (at opposite extremities of a star) , behave in a correlated way when detected ? It was only after the development of R Glauber's full quantum analysis that the effect was understood as a two particle quantum interference effect. From a modern perspective, it can be viewed as an early example of the amazing properties of pairs of entangled particles. The effect has now been observed with bosonic and fermionic atoms, stressing its fully quantum character. After putting these experiments in a historical perspective, I will present recent results, and comment on their significance. I will also show how our single atom detection scheme has allowed us to demonstrate the creation of atom pairs by non linear mixing of matter wa...

  9. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, M. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT (Australia); Marmitt, G. G. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT (Australia); Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Finkelstein, Y. [Nuclear Research Center — Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Moreh, R. [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2015-09-14

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2}) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5–40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO{sub 2}, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E − E{sub gap}){sup 1.5}. For CaCO{sub 3}, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  10. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, M.; Marmitt, G. G.; Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.

    2015-01-01

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO 3 , Li 2 CO 3 , and SiO 2 ) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5–40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO 2 , good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E − E gap ) 1.5 . For CaCO 3 , the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li 2 CO 3 (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate

  11. Explicit versus Implicit Solvent Modeling of Raman Optical Activity Spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hopmann, K. H.; Ruud, K.; Pecul, M.; Kudelski, A.; Dračínský, Martin; Bouř, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 14 (2011), s. 4128-4137 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033; GA ČR GAP208/11/0105 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200550902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : raman optical activity * lactamide * solvent models Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  12. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-06-05

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  13. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  14. Optical spectra of phthalocyanines and related compounds a guide for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    Isago, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    This book displays how optical (absorption, emission, and magnetic circular dichroism) spectra of phthalocyanines and related macrocyclic dyes can be varied from their prototypical ones depending on conditions. As these compounds can be involved in colorful chemistry (which might be driven by impurities in solvents), their spectra behave like the sea-god Proteus in their mutability. Therefore, those who have been engaged with phthalocyanines for the first time, including even educated professional researchers and engineers, may have been embarrassed by the deceptive behavior of their compounds and could have, in the worst cases, given up their projects. This book is aimed not merely at reviewing the optical spectra, but also at helping such people, particularly beginners, to figure them out by showing some examples of their prototypical spectra and their variations in several situations. For the purpose of better understanding, the book also provides an introduction to their theoretical backgrounds as graphic...

  15. Analysis of aggregate optical spectra using moments. Application to the purple membrane of halobacterium halobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemenger, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of extracting structural information from the optical spectra of aggregates of molecules interacting through their electronic transitions is studied. One serious difficulty common to all approaches to this problem is that of properly taking into account the effects of molecular vibrations. A series of exact relations derived previously which are correct with regard to molecular vibrations provide a number of independent, explicit connections between aggregate geometrical parameters and moments of experimental spectra. It is shown that, by applying these moment relations to the optical absorption and circular dichroism spectra of simple aggregates, a complete set of equations can be found, i.e., enough equations can be found to solve for all of the geometrical parameters which enter into the expressions for absorption and circular dichroism spectra. This procedure is applied in some detail to the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium. The results are completely consistent with what is known about its structure

  16. Atomic substitution in selected high-temperature superconductors: Elucidating the nature of Raman spectra excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Kevin Cecil

    2000-10-01

    In this thesis, the effects of atomic substitution on the vibrational and electronic excitations found in the Raman spectra of selected high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are studied. In particular, atomic and isotopic substitution methods have been used to determine the character of features observed in the Raman spectra of Bi2Sr2Ca n-1CunO2 n+4+delta (n = 1 - Bi2201, n = 2 - Bi2212) and YBa2Cu3O7-delta (Y123). In Bi2201, Pb substitution for Bi (and Sr) has led to the reduction and eventual removal of the structural modulation, characteristic of all members of the Bi-family of HTS. The high quality single crystals and our sensitive triple spectrometer enabled identification of a pair of low frequency modes. The modes are determined to arise from shear and compressional rigid-layer vibrations. The normal state of underdoped cuprates is characterized by a pseudogap of unknown origin. In crystals of underdoped Bi2212 a spectral peak found at 590 cm-1, previously attributed to the pairing of quasiparticles (above Tc) and hence to the formation of a normal state pseudogap, has been found to soften by 3.8% with oxygen isotope exchange. In addition, the feature is absent in fully oxygenated and yttrium underdoped crystals. In this study, the first of its kind on underdoped and isotope substituted Bi2212, the feature has been assigned to stretching vibrations of oxygen in the a-b plane. Bi2212 crystals with varying hole concentrations (0.07 Raman scattering experiments that sample the diagonal (B 2g) and principal axes (B1 g) of the BZ have led us to conclude that the superconducting gap possesses dx2-y2 symmetry, in the underdoped and overdoped regimes. It is found that the magnitude of the superconducting gap (Delta(k)) is sensitive to changes in p. Studies of the pair-breaking peak found in the B1g spectra allow us to conclude that the magnitude of the maximum gap (Deltamax) decreases monotonically with increasing hole doping, for p > 0.13. The pair

  17. Nonlinear atom optics and bright-gap-soliton generation in finite optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carusotto, Iacopo; Embriaco, Davide; La Rocca, Giuseppe C.

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the transmission dynamics of coherent matter wave pulses across finite optical lattices in both the linear and the nonlinear regimes. The shape and the intensity of the transmitted pulse are found to strongly depend on the parameters of the incident pulse, in particular its velocity and density: a clear physical picture of the main features observed in the numerical simulations is given in terms of the atomic band dispersion in the periodic potential of the optical lattice. Signatures of nonlinear effects due to the atom-atom interaction are discussed in detail, such as atom-optical limiting and atom-optical bistability. For positive scattering lengths, matter waves propagating close to the top of the valence band are shown to be subject to modulational instability. A scheme for the experimental generation of narrow bright gap solitons from a wide Bose-Einstein condensate is proposed: the modulational instability is seeded starting from the strongly modulated density profile of a standing matter wave and the solitonic nature of the generated pulses is checked from their shape and their collisional properties

  18. Single-resonance optical pumping spectroscopy and application in dressed-state measurement with atomic vapor cell at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qiangbing; Yang, Baodong; Zhang, Tiancai; Wang, Junmin

    2010-06-21

    By monitoring the transmission of probe laser beam (also served as coupling laser beam) which is locked to a cycling hyperfine transition of cesium D(2) line, while pumping laser is scanned across cesium D(1) or D(2) lines, the single-resonance optical pumping (SROP) spectra are obtained with atomic vapor cell. The SROP spectra indicate the variation of the zero-velocity atoms population of one hyperfine fold of ground state, which is optically pumped into another hyperfine fold of ground state by pumping laser. With the virtue of Doppler-free linewidth, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), flat background and elimination of crossover resonance lines (CRLs), the SROP spectra with atomic vapor cell around room temperature can be employed to measure dressed-state splitting of ground state, which is normally detected with laser-cooled atomic sample only, even if the dressed-state splitting is much smaller than the Doppler-broaden linewidth at room temperature.

  19. Optical absorption and magnetic circular dichroism spectra of thiouracils: a quantum mechanical study in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Fernández, L.; Fahleson, Tobias; Norman, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The excited electronic states of 2-thiouracil, 4-thiouracil and 2,4-dithiouracil, the analogues of uracil where the carbonyl oxygens are substituted by sulphur atoms, have been investigated by computing the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and one-photon absorption (OPA) spectra at the time-depe...

  20. Optical Measurements of Strong Radio-Frequency Fields Using Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephanie Anne

    There has recently been an initiative toward establishing atomic measurement standards for field quantities, including radio-frequency, millimeter-wave, and micro-wave electric fields. Current measurement standards are obtained using dipole antennas, which are fundamentally limited in frequency bandwidth (set by the physical size of the antenna) and accuracy (due to the metal perturbing the field during the measurement). Establishing an atomic standard rectifies these problems. My thesis work contributes to an ongoing effort towards establishing the viability of using Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) to perform atom-based measurements of radio-frequency (RF) fields over a wide range of frequencies and field strengths, focusing on strong-field measurements. Rydberg atoms are atoms with an electron excited to a high principal quantum number, resulting in a high sensitivity to an applied field. A model based on Floquet theory is implemented to accurately describe the observed atomic energy level shifts from which information about the field is extracted. Additionally, the effects due to the different electric field domains within the measurement volume are accurately modeled. Absolute atomic measurements of fields up to 296 V/m within a +/-0.35% relative uncertainty are demonstrated. This is the strongest field measured at the time of data publication. Moreover, the uncertainty is over an order of magnitude better than that of current standards. A vacuum chamber setup that I implemented during my graduate studies is presented and its unique components are detailed. In this chamber, cold-atom samples are generated and Rydberg atoms are optically excited within the ground-state sample. The Rydberg ion detection and imaging procedure are discussed, particularly the high magnification that the system provides. By analyzing the position of the ions, the spatial correlation g(2) (r) of Rydberg-atom distributions can be extracted. Aside from ion

  1. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum. [atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, S. R.; Happer, W.

    1974-01-01

    The report discusses completed and proposed research in atomic and molecular physics conducted at the Columbia Radiation Laboratory from July 1972 to June 1973. Central topics described include the atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals and helium, molecular microwave spectroscopy, the resonance physics of photon echoes in some solid state systems (including Raman echoes, superradiance, and two photon absorption), and liquid helium superfluidity.

  2. Effects of quantum chemistry models for bound electrons on positron annihilation spectra for atoms and small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Feng; Ma Xiaoguang; Selvam, Lalitha; Gribakin, Gleb; Surko, Clifford M

    2012-01-01

    The Doppler-shift spectra of the γ-rays from positron annihilation in molecules were determined by using the momentum distribution of the annihilation electron–positron pair. The effect of the positron wavefunction on spectra was analysed in a recent paper (Green et al 2012 New J. Phys. 14 035021). In this companion paper, we focus on the dominant contribution to the spectra, which arises from the momenta of the bound electrons. In particular, we use computational quantum chemistry models (Hartree–Fock with two basis sets and density functional theory (DFT)) to calculate the wavefunctions of the bound electrons. Numerical results are presented for noble gases and small molecules such as H 2 , N 2 , O 2 , CH 4 and CF 4 . The calculations reveal relatively small effects on the Doppler-shift spectra from the level of inclusion of electron correlation energy in the models. For atoms, the difference in the full-width at half-maximum of the spectra obtained using the Hartree–Fock and DFT models does not exceed 2%. For molecules the difference can be much larger, reaching 8% for some molecular orbitals. These results indicate that the predicted positron annihilation spectra for molecules are generally more sensitive to inclusion of electron correlation energies in the quantum chemistry model than the spectra for atoms are. (paper)

  3. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  4. Low atomic number coating for XEUS silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumb, D.H.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Krumrey, M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a set of measurements on coated silicon substrates that are representative of the material to be used for the XEUS High Performance Pore Optics (HPO) technology. X-ray angular reflectance measurements at 2.8 and 8 keV, and energy scans of reflectance at a fixed angle representative...... of XEUS graze angles are presented. Reflectance is significantly enhanced for low energies when a low atomic number over-coating is applied. Modeling of the layer thicknesses and roughness is used to investigate the dependence on the layer thicknesses, metal and over coat material choices. We compare...

  5. Precise optical Lamb shift measurements in atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitz, M.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Haensch, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    The 1S ground-state Lamb shift in atomic hydrogen has been measured to an accuracy of 1.3 parts in 10 5 by directly comparing the optical frequencies of the 1S-2S and the 2S-4S,4D two-photon transitions. The result, 8172.82(11) MHz, agrees with the theoretical prediction of 8172.94(9) MHz and rivals measurements of the 2S Lamb shift as a test of QED for a bound system. A comparison of the 2S-4S and 2S-4D intervals yields a 4S Lamb shift of 131.66(4) MHz

  6. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy.

  7. Line Identification of Atomic and Ionic Spectra of Holmium in the Near-UV. Part I. Spectrum of Ho i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Labady, N.; Özdalgiç, B. [Graduate School of Engineering and Sciences, Istanbul University, TR-34452 Beyazıt, Istanbul (Turkey); Er, A.; Güzelçimen, F.; Öztürk, I. K.; Başar, Gö. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Istanbul University, TR-34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey); Kröger, S. [Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft Berlin, Wilhelminenhofstr. 75A, D-12459 Berlin (Germany); Kruzins, A.; Tamanis, M.; Ferber, R., E-mail: ikanat@istanbul.edu.tr [Laser Centre, The University of Latvia, Rainis Boulevard 19, LV-1586 Riga (Latvia)

    2017-02-01

    The Fourier Transform spectra of a Holmium hollow cathode discharge lamp have been investigated in the UV spectral range from 25,000 up to 31,530 cm{sup −1} (317 to 400 nm). Two Ho spectra have been measured with neon and argon as buffer gases. Based on the intensity ratios from these two spectra, a distinction was made between atomic and ionic lines (ionic lines are discussed in an accompanying paper). Using the known Ho i energy levels, 71 lines could be classified as transitions of atomic Ho, 34 of which have not been published previously. Another 32 lines, which could not be classified, are listed in the literature and assigned as atomic Ho. An additional 370 spectral lines have been assigned to atomic Ho based on the signal-to-noise ratio in the two spectra measured under different discharge conditions, namely with buffer gases argon and neon, respectively. These 370 lines have not been previously listed in the literature.

  8. Electronic transient processes and optical spectra in quantum dots for quantum computing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Zdeněk, Petr; Khás, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2004), s. 17-25 ISSN 1536-125X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : depopulation * electronic relaxation * optical spectra * quantum dots * self-assembled quantum dots * upconversion Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.176, year: 2004

  9. A first-principles investigation of the optical spectra of oxidized graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Nirpendra

    2013-01-14

    The electronic and optical properties of mono, di, tri, and tetravacancies in graphene are studied in comparison to each other, using density functional theory. In addition, oxidized monovacancies are considered for different oxygen concentrations. Pristine graphene is found to be more absorptive than any defect configuration at low energy. We demonstrate characteristic differences in the optical spectra of the various defects for energies up to 3 eV. This makes it possible to quantify by optical spectroscopy the ratios of the defect species present in a sample.

  10. A first-principles investigation of the optical spectra of oxidized graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Nirpendra; Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    The electronic and optical properties of mono, di, tri, and tetravacancies in graphene are studied in comparison to each other, using density functional theory. In addition, oxidized monovacancies are considered for different oxygen concentrations. Pristine graphene is found to be more absorptive than any defect configuration at low energy. We demonstrate characteristic differences in the optical spectra of the various defects for energies up to 3 eV. This makes it possible to quantify by optical spectroscopy the ratios of the defect species present in a sample.

  11. Alkali-Responsive Absorption Spectra and Third-Order Optical Nonlinearities of Imino Squaramides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhong-Yu; Xu Song; Zhou Xin-Yu; Zhang Fu-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Third-order optical nonlinearities and dynamic responses of two imino squaramides under neutral and base conditions were studied using the femtosecond degenerate four-wave mixing technique at 800 nm. Ultrafast optical responses have been observed and the magnitude of the second-order hyperpolarizabilities of the squaramides has been measured to be as large as 10 −31 esu. The absorption spectra, color of solution, and third-order optical nonlinearities of two imino squaramides change with the addition of sodium hydroxide. The γ value under the base condition for each dye is approximately 1.25 times larger than that under neutral conditions. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  12. Fourier synthesis of asymmetrical optical potentials for atoms; Fourier-Synthese von asymmetrischen optischen Potentialen fuer Atome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritt, G.

    2007-07-13

    In this work a dissipationless asymmetrical optical potential for cold atoms was produced. In a first step a new type of optical lattice was generated, whose spatial periodicity only corresponds to a quarter of the wavelength of the light used for the generation. This corresponds to the half of the periodicity of a conventional optical lattice, which is formed by the light of the same wavelength. The generation of this new type of optical lattice was reached by the use of two degenerated raman transitions. Virtual processes occur, in which four photons are involved. In conventional optical lattices however virtual two-photon processes occur. By spatially superimposing this optical lattice with a conventional optical lattice an asymmetrical optical potential could be formed. By diffraction of a Bose Einstein condensate of rubidium atoms at the transient activated asymmetrical potential the asymmetrical structure was proven. (orig.)

  13. Optical--microwave pumping of alkali atoms and population capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, E.B.; Vershovskii, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The steady-state distribution of the populations of the hyperfine sublevels of the ground state of alkali atoms is calculated for the case in which the atoms are subjected to a spectrally selective optical pumping on 2 S 1 /sub // 2 -- 2 P/sub 1/2,3/2/ transitions and a simultaneous pumping by microwave fields which are at resonance with transitions in the hyperfine structure of the ground state, F = 2, M/sub F/ = +- 2, +- 1bold-arrow-left-rightF = 1, M/sub F/ = +- 1. The addition of the microwave pumping is shown to substantially increase the population difference for the O--O transition in the hyperfine structure. During selective optical pumping of the F = 1 level, the population inversion which can be achieved for the O--O transition is limited by the effect of population capture. This capture can be eliminated by using incoherent microwave fields. The quality factor of the O--O resonance is calculated as a function of the parameters of the pump. The outlook for the use of composite pumping in frequency-stabilization systems is discussed

  14. Optical spectroscopy of rubidium Rydberg atoms with a 297 nm frequency doubled dye laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Th.; Germann, Th.; Thoumany, P.; Stania, G.; Urbonas, L.; Haensch, T.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Rydberg atoms have played an important role in atomic physics and optical spectroscopy since many years. Due to their long lifetime and the big dipole matrix element between neighbouring Rydberg levels they are an essential tool in microwave cavity-qed experiments. Ultracold Rydberg gases are a promising candidate for realizing controlled quantum gates in atomic ensembles. In most experiments Rydberg atoms are detected destructively, where the optically excited atoms are first ionized followed by an electronic detection of the ionization products. A Doppler-free purely optical detection was reported in a room temperature cell and in an atomic beam apparatus using the technique of electromagnetically induced transparency. In all these experiments the Rydberg atoms are excited with two lasers in a two-step ladder configuration. Here we show that Doppler-free purely optical spectroscopy is also possible with a one step excitation scheme involving a UV laser at 297 nm. We excite the 85 Rb isotope from the 5S 1/2 ground state to the 63P 3/2 state with a frequency doubled dye laser in a room temperature gas cell without buffer gas. Rydberg transitions are detected by monitoring the absorption of 780 nm laser light which is superimposed on the UV light and resonant with one hyperfine component of the Rubidium D2 line. With these two lasers we realize a V-scheme and utilize the quantum amplification effect due to the different natural lifetimes of the upper levels of the two transitions: an excitation into the 63P level hinders many absorption-emission cycles of the D2 transition and leads to a reduced absorption on that line. We discuss the shape of the observed spectra in the context of electron shelving and EIT experiments. By applying a frequency modulation to the UV laser, we can obtain dispersive signals which can be used to stabilize the laser to a specific Rydberg transition. By shifting the frequency of the 780 nm laser to crossover resonances in the

  15. Study of optical and electronic properties of nickel from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Yang, L. H.; Da, B.; Tóth, J.; Tőkési, K.; Ding, Z. J.

    2017-09-01

    We use the classical Monte Carlo transport model of electrons moving near the surface and inside solids to reproduce the measured reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectra. With the combination of the classical transport model and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of oscillator parameters the so-called reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method was developed, and used to obtain optical constants of Ni in this work. A systematic study of the electronic and optical properties of Ni has been performed in an energy loss range of 0-200 eV from the measured REELS spectra at primary energies of 1000 eV, 2000 eV and 3000 eV. The reliability of our method was tested by comparing our results with the previous data. Moreover, the accuracy of our optical data has been confirmed by applying oscillator strength-sum rule and perfect-screening-sum rule.

  16. The Radio-optical Spectra of BL Lacs and Possible Relatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett-Thorpe, J.

    I consider the suggestion that, in a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio sources with available optical spectra (Marcha et al 1996), the strong emission line objects, or those with passive elliptical spectra are close relatives of the BL Lacs. New observations at four frequencies from 8 to 43GHz are presented, together with evidence for radio variability. Combined with other radio and optical data from the literature, we are able to construct the non-thermal SEDs and use these to address the questions: are the optically passive objects potentially `unrecognised' BL Lacs (either intrinsically weak and/or hidden by starlight)? What is the relationship between the surprising number of strong emission-line objects and the BL Lacs?

  17. Quasiparticle energies, excitons, and optical spectra of few-layer black phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Vy; Fei, Ruixiang; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    We report first-principles GW–Bethe–Salpeter-equation (BSE) studies of excited-state properties of few-layer black phosphorus (BP) (phosphorene). With improved GW computational methods, we obtained converged quasiparticle band gaps and optical absorption spectra by the single-shot (G 0 W 0 ) procedure. Moreover, we reveal fine structures of anisotropic excitons, including the series of one-dimensional like wave functions, spin singlet–triplet splitting, and electron–hole binding energy spectra by solving BSE. An effective-mass model is employed to describe these electron–hole pairs, shedding light on estimating the exciton binding energy of anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors without expensive ab initio simulations. Finally, the anisotropic optical response of BP is explained by using optical selection rules based on the projected single-particle density of states at band edges. (paper)

  18. Laser resonant ionization spectroscopy and laser-induced resonant fluorescence spectra of samarium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Changtai

    1995-01-01

    We have measured new high-lying levels of Sm atom by two-colour resonant photoionisation spectroscopy; we have observed the isotope shifts of Sm atom by laser-induced resonant fluorescence spectroscopy; the lifetime of eight low-lying levels of Sm atom were measured by using pulsed laser-Boxcar technique in atomic beam.

  19. Microscopic description and simulation of ultracold atoms in optical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedenzu, W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical resonators are an ideal system to investigate the full quantum regime of light-matter interaction. Microscopic insight into the underlying processes can nowadays easily be obtained from numerical calculations, e.g. with Monte Carlo wave function simulations. In the first part we discuss cold atoms in ring resonators, where the modified boundary conditions significantly alter the dynamics as compared to the standing-wave case. Quantum jumps induce momentum correlations and entanglement between the particles. We observe strong non-classical motional correlations, cooling and entanglement heralded by single photon measurements. For deeply trapped particles the complex system Hamiltonian can be mapped onto a generic optomechanical model, allowing for analytical microscopic insight into the dynamics. The rates of cavity-mediated correlated heating and cooling processes are obtained by adiabatically eliminating the cavity field from the dynamics and can be directly related to the steady-state momentum correlation coefficient. The second part is devoted to cooling and self-organisation of a cold gas in a transversally pumped standing-wave resonator, in which the atoms are directly illuminated by a laser beam. Above a certain critical laser intensity the atoms order in a specific pattern, maximising light scattering into the cavity. The particles thus create and sustain their own trap. We derive a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation for the one-particle distribution function describing the gas dynamics below and above threshold. This kinetic theory predicts dissipation-induced self-organisation and q-Gaussian velocity distributions in steady state. (author)

  20. Ionization potential depression and optical spectra in a Debye plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chengliang; Röpke, Gerd; Reinholz, Heidi; Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich

    2017-11-01

    We show how optical spectra in dense plasmas are determined by the shift of energy levels as well as the broadening owing to collisions with the plasma particles. In lowest approximation, the interaction with the plasma particles is described by the RPA dielectric function, leading to the Debye shift of the continuum edge. The bound states remain nearly un-shifted, their broadening is calculated in Born approximation. The role of ionization potential depression as well as the Inglis-Teller effect are shown. The model calculations have to be improved going beyond the lowest (RPA) approximation when applying to WDM spectra.

  1. INFRARED SPECTRA AND OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF NITRILE ICES RELEVANT TO TITAN's ATMOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, Reggie; Ferrante, Robert F.; James Moore, W.

    2010-01-01

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrile ices known or suspected to be in Titan's atmosphere are presented from 2.0 to 333.3 μm (∼5000-30 cm -1 ). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan's winter pole. Ices studied are: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C 2 N 2 , cyanogen; CH 3 CN, acetonitrile; C 2 H 5 CN, propionitrile; and HC 3 N, cyanoacetylene. For each of these molecules, we also report new cryogenic measurements of the real refractive index, n, determined in both the amorphous and crystalline phases at 670 nm. These new values have been incorporated into our optical constant calculations. Spectra were measured and optical constants were calculated for each nitrile at a variety of temperatures, including, but not limited to, 20, 35, 50, 75, 95, and 110 K, in both the amorphous phase and the crystalline phase. This laboratory effort used a dedicated FTIR spectrometer to record transmission spectra of thin-film ice samples. Laser interference was used to measure film thickness during condensation onto a transparent cold window attached to the tail section of a closed-cycle helium cryostat. Optical constants, real (n) and imaginary (k) refractive indices, were determined using Kramers-Kronig analysis. Our calculation reproduces the complete spectrum, including all interference effects.

  2. Understanding Atomic Structure: Is There a More Direct and Compelling Connection between Atomic Line Spectra and the Quantization of an Atom's Energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The "atoms first" philosophy, adopted by a growing number of General Chemistry textbook authors, places greater emphasis on atomic structure as a key to a deeper understanding of the field of chemistry. A pivotal concept needed to understand the behavior of atoms is the restriction of an atom's energy to specific allowed values. However,…

  3. Competition between Final-State and Pairing-Gap Effects in the Radio-Frequency Spectra of Ultracold Fermi Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perali, A.; Pieri, P.; Strinati, G. C.

    2008-01-01

    The radio-frequency spectra of ultracold Fermi atoms are calculated by including final-state interactions affecting the excited level of the transition and compared with the experimental data. A competition is revealed between pairing-gap effects which tend to push the oscillator strength toward high frequencies away from threshold and final-state effects which tend instead to pull the oscillator strength toward threshold. As a result of this competition, the position of the peak of the spectra cannot be simply related to the value of the pairing gap, whose extraction thus requires support from theoretical calculations

  4. Mixtures of bosonic and fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albus, Alexander; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Eisert, Jens

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the theory of mixtures of bosonic and fermionic atoms in periodic potentials at zero temperature. We derive a general Bose-Fermi Hubbard Hamiltonian in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a superimposed harmonic trapping potential. We study the conditions for linear stability of the mixture and derive a mean-field criterion for the onset of a bosonic superfluid transition. We investigate the ground-state properties of the mixture in the Gutzwiller formulation of mean-field theory, and present numerical studies of finite systems. The bosonic and fermionic density distributions and the onset of quantum phase transitions to demixing and to a bosonic Mott-insulator are studied as a function of the lattice potential strength. The existence is predicted of a disordered phase for mixtures loaded in very deep lattices. Such a disordered phase possessing many degenerate or quasidegenerate ground states is related to a breaking of the mirror symmetry in the lattice

  5. Low atomic number coating for XEUS silicon pore optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, D. H.; Jensen, C. P.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Christensen, F.; Collon, M.; Bavdaz, M.

    2008-07-01

    We describe a set of measurements on coated silicon substrates that are representative of the material to be used for the XEUS High Performance Pore Optics (HPO) technology. X-ray angular reflectance measurements at 2.8 and 8 keV, and energy scans of reflectance at a fixed angle representative of XEUS graze angles are presented. Reflectance is significantly enhanced for low energies when a low atomic number over-coating is applied. Modeling of the layer thicknesses and roughness is used to investigate the dependence on the layer thicknesses, metal and over coat material choices. We compare the low energy effective area increase that could be achieved with an optimized coating design.

  6. Microscopic kaonic-atom optical potential in finite nuclei with Λ(1405) and Σ(1385) resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Masaki; Hirenzaki, Satoru; Toki, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    We derive kaonic-atom optical potentials in finite nuclei microscopically by taking into account the K - NΛ(1405) and K - NΣ(1385) interactions. Using the microscopic optical potentials we solve kaonic atoms with the Klein-Gordon equation in momentum space and obtain the kaonic-atom level shifts and the widths. The experimental data are reproduced well. We discuss also phenomenological optical potentials and compare them with the microscopic ones. In addition, we derive optical potentials in the local-density approximation with the use of the finite-matter kaon self-energy. We find a similarity with the microscopic optical potential derived with finite geometry. (orig.)

  7. Optically trapped atomic resonant devices for narrow linewidth spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lipeng

    This thesis focuses on the development of atomic resonant devices for spectroscopic applications. The primary emphasis is on the imaging properties of optically thick atomic resonant fluorescent filters and their applications. In addition, this thesis presents a new concept for producing very narrow linewidth light as from an atomic vapor lamp pumped by a nanosecond pulse system. This research was motivated by application for missile warning system, and presents an innovative approach to a wide angle, ultra narrow linewidth imaging filter using a potassium vapor cell. The approach is to image onto and collect the fluorescent photons emitted from the surface of an optically thick potassium vapor cell, generating a 2 GHz pass-band imaging filter. This linewidth is narrow enough to fall within a Fraunhefer dark zone in the solar spectrum, thus make the detection solar blind. Experiments are conducted to measure the absorption line shape of the potassium resonant filter, the quantum efficiency of the fluorescent behavior, and the resolution of the fluorescent image. Fluorescent images with different spatial frequency components are analyzed by using a discrete Fourier transform, and the imaging capability of the fluorescent filter is described by its Modulation Transfer Function. For the detection of radiation that is spectrally broader than the linewidth of the potassium imaging filter, the fluorescent image is seen to be blurred by diffuse fluorescence from the slightly off resonant photons. To correct this, an ultra-thin potassium imaging filter is developed and characterized. The imaging property of the ultra-thin potassium imaging cell is tested with a potassium seeded flame, yielding a resolution image of ˜ 20 lines per mm. The physics behind the atomic resonant fluorescent filter is radiation trapping. The diffusion process of the resonant photons trapped in the atomic vapor is theoretically described in this thesis. A Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the

  8. Modification of Optical Properties of Seawater Exposed to Oil Contaminants Based on Excitation-Emission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2015-10-01

    The optical behaviour of seawater exposed to a residual amount of oil pollution is presented and a comparison of the fluorescence spectra of oil dissolved in both n-hexane and seawater is discussed based on excitation-emission spectra. Crude oil extracted from the southern part of the Baltic Sea was used to characterise petroleum properties after contact with seawater. The wavelength-independent fluorescence maximum for natural seawater and seawater artificially polluted with oil were determined. Moreover, the specific excitation-emission peaks for natural seawater and polluted water were analysed to identify the natural organic matter composition. It was found that fluorescence spectra identification is a promising method to detect even an extremely low concentration of petroleum residues directly in the seawater. In addition, alien substances disturbing the fluorescence signatures of natural organic substances in a marine environment is also discussed.

  9. Optical spectra of vanadium (5, 4) compounds during extraction by di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbatova, L.D.; Medvedeva, N.I.

    2000-01-01

    Optical spectra of vanadium (5, 4) complexes with HDEHP are studied using literature data on quantum-chemical calculations of vanadium (5) and vanadium (4) oxides. Extraction of vanadium is conducted by undiluted HDEHP from sulfuric acid solutions. Absorption electron spectra (AES) of vanadium (5), vanadium (4) and vanadium (5, 4) compounds are presented. In AES of vanadium (5, 4) four absorption bands at 24000, 17000, 14500 and 13500 cm -1 appear. Comparison with spectra of vanadium (5) and vanadium (4) shows that band 17000 cm -1 which appears only during mutual extraction of vanadium (5) and vanadium (4) is caused by transitions appearing between filled and empty levels of d-zone broadened by vanadium (5) and vanadium (4) interaction [ru

  10. Electron and nuclear spin interactions in the optical spectra of single GaAs quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, D; Efros, A L; Kennedy, T A; Rosen, M; Katzer, D S; Park, D; Brown, S W; Korenev, V L; Merkulov, I A

    2001-05-28

    Fine and hyperfine splittings arising from electron, hole, and nuclear spin interactions in the magneto-optical spectra of individual localized excitons are studied. We explain the magnetic field dependence of the energy splitting through competition between Zeeman, exchange, and hyperfine interactions. An unexpectedly small hyperfine contribution to the splitting close to zero applied field is described well by the interplay between fluctuations of the hyperfine field experienced by the nuclear spin and nuclear dipole/dipole interactions.

  11. An atlas of optical spectra of DZ white dwarfs and related objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sion, E.M.; Kenyon, S.J.; Aannestad, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    An atlas of optical spectra and equivalent width measurements for DZ stars and several related objects is described. These data should improve abundance measurements for Ca/He, Mg/He, and Fe/He in these stars and provide tests for calculations of accretion, diffusion, and radiative transfer in white-dwarf atmospheres. Also reported is the possible detection of He I (3888-A) in three DZ white dwarfs, 0246 + 735, 1705 + 030, and 2215 + 388. 25 refs

  12. Optical properties and energy spectra of donors in Gasub(x)Insub(1-x)P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, V.; Kopylov, A.A.; Pikhtin, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    Impurity optical absorption is studied in n-Gasub(x)Insub(1-x)P for compositions with indirect band structure. For the first time the photoionization bands of shallow donor centers have been observed in semiconductor solid solutions. Analysis of spectra has shown the electron transitions to excited states of donor to contribute considerably to absorption. A simple theoretical model is presented to explain the shift of ionization energy of silicon donor and the variation in shape of the impurity absorption band

  13. Ordering-induced changes in the optical spectra of semiconductor alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.E.; Wei, S.; Wood, D.M.; Zunger, A.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown how the recently predicted and subsequently observed spontaneous long-range ordering of pseudobinary A/sub 0.5/B/sub 0.5/C isovalent semiconductor alloys into the (AC) 1 (BC) 1 superlattice structure (a CuAuI-type crystal) gives rise to characteristic changes in the optical and photoemission spectra. We predict new direct transitions and substantial splittings of transitions absent in the disordered alloy

  14. Determination by vibrational spectra of the strength and the bond length of atoms U and O in uranyl complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez S, A.; Martinez Q, E.

    1996-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of different uranyl compounds were studied. The wave number was related to the harmonic oscillator model and to the mathematical expression of Badger as modified by Jones, to determine the strength and the bond length of atoms U and O in UO 2 2+ . A mathematical simplification develop by us is proposed and its results compared with values obtained by other methods. (Author)

  15. Infrared Spectra, Index of Refraction, and Optical Constants of Nitrile Ices Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Marla; Ferrante, Robert; Moore, William; Hudson, Reggie

    2010-01-01

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrite ices known or suspected to be in Titan's atmosphere are presented from 2.5 to 200 microns (4000 to 50 per cm ). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan's winter pole. Ices studied include: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C2N2, cyanogen; CH3CN, acetonitrile; C 2H5CN, propionitrile; and HC3N, cyanoacetylene. For each of these molecules we report new measurements of the index of refraction, n, determined in both the amorphous- and crystallinephase at 670 nm. Spectra were measured and optical constants were calculated for each nitrite at a variety of temperatures including 20, 35, 50, 75, 95, and 110 K, in the amorphous- and crystalline-phase. This laboratory effort uses a dedicated FTIR spectrometer to record transmission spectra of thin-film ice samples. Laser interference is used to measure film thickness during condensation onto a transparent cold window attached to the tail section of a closed-cycle helium cryostat. Optical constants, real (n) and imaginary (k) refractive indices, are determined using Kramers-Kronig (K-K) analysis. Our calculation reproduces the complete spectrum, including all interference effects. Index of refraction measurements are made in a separate dedicated FTIR spectrometer where interference deposit fringes are measured using two 670 nm lasers at different angles to the ice substrate. A survey of these new measurements will be presented along with a discussion of their validation, errors, and application to Titan data.

  16. New Equations for Calculating Principal and Fine-Structure Atomic Spectra for Single and Multi-Electron Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surdoval, Wayne A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Berry, David A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Shultz, Travis R. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2018-03-09

    A set of equations are presented for calculating atomic principal spectral lines and fine-structure energy splits for single and multi-electron atoms. Calculated results are presented and compared to the National Institute of Science and Technology database demonstrating very good accuracy. The equations do not require fitted parameters. The only experimental parameter required is the Ionization energy for the electron of interest. The equations have comparable accuracy and broader applicability than the single electron Dirac equation. Three Appendices discuss the origin of the new equations and present calculated results. New insights into the special relativistic nature of the Dirac equation and its relationship to the new equations are presented.

  17. Optical spectra of 73 stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modjaz, M.; Bianco, F. B.; Liu, Y. Q. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Blondin, S. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Kirshner, R. P.; Challis, P.; Hicken, M.; Marion, G. H. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Matheson, T. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Berlind, P.; Calkins, M. L. [F. L. Whipple Observatory, 670 Mt. Hopkins Road, P.O. Box 97, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Garnavich, P. [Department of Physics, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Jha, S., E-mail: mmodjaz@nyu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We present 645 optical spectra of 73 supernovae (SNe) of Types IIb, Ib, Ic, and broad-lined Ic. All of these types are attributed to the core collapse of massive stars, with varying degrees of intact H and He envelopes before explosion. The SNe in our sample have a mean redshift (cz) = 4200 km s{sup –1}. Most of these spectra were gathered at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) between 2004 and 2009. For 53 SNe, these are the first published spectra. The data coverage ranges from mere identification (1-3 spectra) for a few SNe to extensive series of observations (10-30 spectra) that trace the spectral evolution for others, with an average of 9 spectra per SN. For 44 SNe of the 73 SNe presented here, we have well-determined dates of maximum light to determine the phase of each spectrum. Our sample constitutes the most extensive spectral library of stripped-envelope SNe to date. We provide very early coverage (as early as 30 days before V-band max) for photospheric spectra, as well as late-time nebular coverage when the innermost regions of the SN are visible (as late as 2 yr after explosion, while for SN 1993J, we have data as late as 11.6 yr). This data set has homogeneous observations and reductions that allow us to study the spectroscopic diversity of these classes of stripped SNe and to compare these to SNe-gamma-ray bursts. We undertake these matters in follow-up papers.

  18. The temporal evolution process from fluorescence bleaching to clean Raman spectra of single solid particles optically trapped in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhiyong; Pan, Yong-Le; Videen, Gorden; Wang, Chuji

    2017-12-01

    We observe the entire temporal evolution process of fluorescence and Raman spectra of single solid particles optically trapped in air. The spectra initially contain strong fluorescence with weak Raman peaks, then the fluorescence was bleached within seconds, and finally only the clean Raman peaks remain. We construct an optical trap using two counter-propagating hollow beams, which is able to stably trap both absorbing and non-absorbing particles in air, for observing such temporal processes. This technique offers a new method to study dynamic changes in the fluorescence and Raman spectra from a single optically trapped particle in air.

  19. Dynamics of moving interacting atoms in a laser radiation field and optical size resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadomskii, O.N.; Glukhov, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    The forces acting on interacting moving atoms exposed to resonant laser radiation are calculated. It is shown that the forces acting on the atoms include the radiation pressure forces as well as the external and internal bias forces. The dependences of the forces on the atomic spacing, polarization, and laser radiation frequency are given. It is found that the internal bias force associated with the interaction of atomic dipoles via the reemitted field may play an important role in the dynamics of dense atomic ensembles in a light field. It is shown that optical size resonances appear in the system of interacting atoms at frequencies differing substantially from transition frequencies in the spectrum of atoms. It is noted that optical size resonances as well as the Doppler frequency shift in the spectrum of interacting atoms play a significant role in the processes of laser-radiation-controlled motion of the atoms

  20. Ab-initio modeling of an iron laser-induced plasma: Comparison between theoretical and experimental atomic emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, J.; Judge, E.J.; Kilcrease, D.P.; Barefield, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    We report on efforts to model the Fe emission spectrum generated from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements on samples of pure iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 ). Our modeling efforts consist of several components. We begin with ab-initio atomic structure calculations performed by solving the Hartree–Fock equations for the neutral and singly ionized stages of Fe. Our energy levels are then adjusted to their experimentally known values. The atomic transition probabilities and atomic collision quantities are also computed in an ab-initio manner. We perform LTE or non-LTE calculations that generate level populations and, subsequently, an emission spectrum for the iron plasma for a range of electron temperatures and electron densities. Such calculations are then compared to the experimental spectrum. We regard our work as a preliminary modeling effort that ultimately strives towards the modeling of emission spectra from even more complex samples where less atomic data are available. - Highlights: • LIBS plasma of iron oxide • Ab-initio theoretical Modeling • Discussion of LTE versus non-LTE criteria and assessment • Boltzmann plots for Fe—determination of when LTE is a valid assumption • Emission spectra for Fe—comparison of theoretical modeling and measurement: good agreement obtained

  1. Strongly-correlated ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Tung-Lam

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the theoretical study of strongly correlated quantum states of ultra-cold fermionic atoms trapped in optical lattices. This field has grown considerably in recent years, following the experimental progress made in cooling and controlling atomic gases, which has led to the observation of the first Bose-Einstein condensation (in 1995). The trapping of these gases in optical lattices has opened a new field of research at the interface between atomic physics and condensed matter physics. The observation of the transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator for bosonic atoms paved the way for the study of strongly correlated phases and quantum phase transitions in these systems. Very recently, the investigation of the Mott insulator state of fermionic atoms provides additional motivation to conduct such theoretical studies. This thesis can be divided broadly into two types of work: - On the one hand, we have proposed a new type of spectroscopy to measure single-particle correlators and associated physical observables in these strongly correlated states. - On the other hand, we have studied the ground state of the fermionic Hubbard model under different conditions (mass imbalance, population imbalance) by using analytical techniques and numerical simulations. In a collaboration with J. Dalibard and C. Salomon (LKB at the ENS Paris) and I. Carusotto (Trento, Italy), we have proposed and studied a novel spectroscopic method for the measurement and characterization of single particle excitations (in particular, the low energy excitations, namely the quasiparticles) in systems of cold fermionic atoms, with energy and momentum resolution. This type of spectroscopy is an analogue of angular-resolved photoemission in solid state physics (ARPES). We have shown, via simple models, that this method of measurement can characterize quasiparticles not only in the 'conventional' phases such as the weakly interacting gas in the lattice or in Fermi

  2. Wavelength-selective bleaching of the optical spectra of trapped electrons in organic glasses. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraszczak, J.; Willard, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Further resolution of the inhomogeneous optical spectra of trapped electrons (e - /sub t/) in organic glasses has been obtained from wavelength selective bleaching and thermal decay studies on 3-methylpentane-d 14 (3MP-d 14 ) and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF) following γ irradiation in the temperature region of 20 K, and limits on the degree of resolution achievable have been indicated. Exposure of 3MP-d 14 to light of wavelengths >2100 nm (from a tunable laser) reduces the optical densities at the bleaching wavelength and longer to zero, while ''peeling off'' a portion of the O.D. at all shorter wavelengths but leaving the remainder of the spectrum unaffected. The fraction of the integrated optical spectrum, ∫OD d (eV), removed by bleaching at each wavelength tested, and also by thermal decay, is equivalent to the fraction of the total e - /sub t/ spins removed and measured by ESR. 1064 nm light bleaches the spectrum nearly uniformly, confirming that the spectra of all of the e - /sub t/ have blue tails with similar ease of bleaching. Heretofore unobserved low temperature thermal decay of e - /sub t/ occurs at 20 and 40 K (20% of the spin concentration in 30 min, 35% in 3h). The rate of decay of the optical spectrum decreases with decreasing wavelength of observation (2.5, 2.2, 1.8, and 1.5 μ), but at each wavelength is the same at 40 K as at 20 K, consistent

  3. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K; Orozco, Luis A; Rolston, S L

    2017-06-15

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  4. Hexapole-compensated magneto-optical trap on a mesoscopic atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jöllenbeck, S.; Mahnke, J.; Randoll, R.

    2011-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps on atom chips are usually restricted to small atomic samples due to a limited capture volume caused primarily by distorted field configurations. Here we present a magneto-optical trap based on a millimeter-sized wire structure which generates a magnetic field with minimized...... distortions. Together with the loading from a high-flux two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, we achieve a loading rate of 8.4×1010 atoms/s and maximum number of 8.7×109 captured atoms. The wire structure is placed outside of the vacuum to enable a further adaptation to new scientific objectives. Since all...

  5. Deep cooling of optically trapped atoms implemented by magnetic levitation without transverse confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Zhou, Tianwei; Zhai, Yueyang; Xiang, Jinggang; Luan, Tian; Huang, Qi; Yang, Shifeng; Xiong, Wei; Chen, Xuzong

    2017-05-01

    We report a setup for the deep cooling of atoms in an optical trap. The deep cooling is implemented by eliminating the influence of gravity using specially constructed magnetic coils. Compared to the conventional method of generating a magnetic levitating force, the lower trap frequency achieved in our setup provides a lower limit of temperature and more freedoms to Bose gases with a simpler solution. A final temperature as low as ˜ 6 nK is achieved in the optical trap, and the atomic density is decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude during the second stage of evaporative cooling. This deep cooling of optically trapped atoms holds promise for many applications, such as atomic interferometers, atomic gyroscopes, and magnetometers, as well as many basic scientific research directions, such as quantum simulations and atom optics.

  6. Exciton scattering approach for optical spectra calculations in branched conjugated macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hao; Wu, Chao; Malinin, Sergey V.; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.

    2016-01-01

    The exciton scattering (ES) technique is a multiscale approach based on the concept of a particle in a box and developed for efficient calculations of excited-state electronic structure and optical spectra in low-dimensional conjugated macromolecules. Within the ES method, electronic excitations in molecular structure are attributed to standing waves representing quantum quasi-particles (excitons), which reside on the graph whose edges and nodes stand for the molecular linear segments and vertices, respectively. Exciton propagation on the linear segments is characterized by the exciton dispersion, whereas exciton scattering at the branching centers is determined by the energy-dependent scattering matrices. Using these ES energetic parameters, the excitation energies are then found by solving a set of generalized “particle in a box” problems on the graph that represents the molecule. Similarly, unique energy-dependent ES dipolar parameters permit calculations of the corresponding oscillator strengths, thus, completing optical spectra modeling. Both the energetic and dipolar parameters can be extracted from quantum-chemical computations in small molecular fragments and tabulated in the ES library for further applications. Subsequently, spectroscopic modeling for any macrostructure within a considered molecular family could be performed with negligible numerical effort. We demonstrate the ES method application to molecular families of branched conjugated phenylacetylenes and ladder poly-para-phenylenes, as well as structures with electron donor and acceptor chemical substituents. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used as a reference model for electronic structure. The ES calculations accurately reproduce the optical spectra compared to the reference quantum chemistry results, and make possible to predict spectra of complex macromolecules, where conventional electronic structure calculations are unfeasible.

  7. Exciton scattering approach for optical spectra calculations in branched conjugated macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Wu, Chao; Malinin, Sergey V.; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.

    2016-12-01

    The exciton scattering (ES) technique is a multiscale approach based on the concept of a particle in a box and developed for efficient calculations of excited-state electronic structure and optical spectra in low-dimensional conjugated macromolecules. Within the ES method, electronic excitations in molecular structure are attributed to standing waves representing quantum quasi-particles (excitons), which reside on the graph whose edges and nodes stand for the molecular linear segments and vertices, respectively. Exciton propagation on the linear segments is characterized by the exciton dispersion, whereas exciton scattering at the branching centers is determined by the energy-dependent scattering matrices. Using these ES energetic parameters, the excitation energies are then found by solving a set of generalized "particle in a box" problems on the graph that represents the molecule. Similarly, unique energy-dependent ES dipolar parameters permit calculations of the corresponding oscillator strengths, thus, completing optical spectra modeling. Both the energetic and dipolar parameters can be extracted from quantum-chemical computations in small molecular fragments and tabulated in the ES library for further applications. Subsequently, spectroscopic modeling for any macrostructure within a considered molecular family could be performed with negligible numerical effort. We demonstrate the ES method application to molecular families of branched conjugated phenylacetylenes and ladder poly-para-phenylenes, as well as structures with electron donor and acceptor chemical substituents. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used as a reference model for electronic structure. The ES calculations accurately reproduce the optical spectra compared to the reference quantum chemistry results, and make possible to predict spectra of complex macromolecules, where conventional electronic structure calculations are unfeasible.

  8. Exciton scattering approach for optical spectra calculations in branched conjugated macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hao [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Wu, Chao [Electronic Structure Lab, Center of Microscopic Theory and Simulation, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xian Jiaotong University, Xian 710054 (China); Malinin, Sergey V. [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, 5101 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Tretiak, Sergei, E-mail: serg@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chernyak, Vladimir Y., E-mail: chernyak@chem.wayne.edu [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, 5101 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The exciton scattering (ES) technique is a multiscale approach based on the concept of a particle in a box and developed for efficient calculations of excited-state electronic structure and optical spectra in low-dimensional conjugated macromolecules. Within the ES method, electronic excitations in molecular structure are attributed to standing waves representing quantum quasi-particles (excitons), which reside on the graph whose edges and nodes stand for the molecular linear segments and vertices, respectively. Exciton propagation on the linear segments is characterized by the exciton dispersion, whereas exciton scattering at the branching centers is determined by the energy-dependent scattering matrices. Using these ES energetic parameters, the excitation energies are then found by solving a set of generalized “particle in a box” problems on the graph that represents the molecule. Similarly, unique energy-dependent ES dipolar parameters permit calculations of the corresponding oscillator strengths, thus, completing optical spectra modeling. Both the energetic and dipolar parameters can be extracted from quantum-chemical computations in small molecular fragments and tabulated in the ES library for further applications. Subsequently, spectroscopic modeling for any macrostructure within a considered molecular family could be performed with negligible numerical effort. We demonstrate the ES method application to molecular families of branched conjugated phenylacetylenes and ladder poly-para-phenylenes, as well as structures with electron donor and acceptor chemical substituents. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used as a reference model for electronic structure. The ES calculations accurately reproduce the optical spectra compared to the reference quantum chemistry results, and make possible to predict spectra of complex macromolecules, where conventional electronic structure calculations are unfeasible.

  9. Switching of light with light using cold atoms inside a hollow optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajcsy, Michal; Hofferberth, S.; Peyronel, Thibault

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a fiber-optical switch that operates with a few hundred photons per switching pulse. The light-light interaction is mediated by laser-cooled atoms. The required strong interaction between atoms and light is achieved by simultaneously confining photons and atoms inside the microscopic...... hollow core of a single-mode photonic-crystal fiber....

  10. Hybrid optical pumping of K and Rb atoms in a paraffin coated vapor cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhao; Peng, Xiang; Budker, Dmitry; Wickenbrock, Arne; Pang, Bo; Zhang, Rui; Guo, Hong

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic hybrid optical pumping effects with a radio-frequency-field-driven nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (RF NMOR) scheme are studied in a dual-species paraffin coated vapor cell. By pumping K atoms and probing $^{87}$Rb atoms, we achieve an intrinsic magnetic resonance linewidth of 3 Hz and the observed resonance is immune to power broadening and light-shift effects. Such operation scheme shows favorable prospects for atomic magnetometry applications.

  11. Simulation and detection of massive Dirac fermions with cold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Yafei, E-mail: yfyuks@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Shan Chuanjia [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Science, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China); Mei Feng; Zhang Zhiming [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-09-15

    We propose a simple but feasible experimental scheme to simulate and detect Dirac fermions with cold atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattice. In our scheme, through tuning the laser intensity, the one-dimensional optical lattice can have two sites in each unit cell and the atoms around the low energy behave as massive Dirac fermions. Furthermore, we show that these relativistic quasiparticles can be detected experimentally by using atomic density profile measurements and Bragg scattering.

  12. Optical emission spectra of a copper plasma produced by a metal vapour vacuum arc plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yotsombat, B.; Poolcharuansin, P.; Vilaithong, T.; Davydov, S.; Brown, I.G.

    2001-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy in the range 200-800 nm was applied for investigation of the copper plasma produced by a metal vapour vacuum arc plasma source. The experiments were conducted for the cases when the plasma was guided by straight and Ω-shaped curved solenoids as well as without solenoids, and also for different vacuum conditions. It was found that, besides singly- and doubly-charged ions, a relatively high concentration of excited neutral copper atoms was present in the plasma. The relative fraction of excited atoms was much higher in the region close to the cathode surface than in the plasma column inside the solenoid. The concentration of excited neutral, singly- and doubly-ionized atoms increased proportionally when the arc current was increased to 400 A. Some weak lines were attributed to more highly ionized copper species and impurities in the cathode material. (author)

  13. Dependence of EIA spectra on mutual coherence between coupling and probe fields in Cs atomic vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Mi Rang; Kim, Kyoung Dae; Park, Hyun Deok; Kim, Jung Bog [Korea National University of Education, Chungwon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Han Seb [Korea Research Institute of the Standards and Science, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    We observed the dependence of EIA spectra on the mutual coherence between the coupling and the probe fields in the D{sub 2}F{sub 9} = 4 {r_reversible} F{sub e} = 5 transition of Cs vapors at room temperature where the coupling and the probe fields were made from one laser source or two independent laser sources. By using one source having a high mutual coherence, we found EIA spectra linewidths much narrower than 0.1 {gamma} on the weak coupling field and the transparent spectra with linewidths narrower than 1 MHz within subnatural absorption on the strong coupling field. On the other hand, where the two sources which were nearly incoherent with each other were used, the absorption profiles showed the same dependence on the coupling power as the spectra for the one source, but their linewidths were broad, on the order of the natural linewidth.

  14. Production and analysis of some atomic emission spectra in the vacuum ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, F.G.

    1979-01-01

    The development of technical facilities for spectra analysis are described including the design, construction and adjustment of a grazing incidence spectrograph for the extreme ultraviolet and the improvements in light sources. The investigations of the fifth and fourth spectra of tantalum, the analysis of the sixth spectrum of tungsten, the extension of the analysis of the fourth spectrum of hafnium and a start of the analysis of the seventh spectrum of rhenium are presented. (C.F.)

  15. Fine hematite particles of Martian interest: absorption spectra and optical constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, A C; Blanco, A; Fonti, S; Jurewicz, A; Orofino, V

    2005-01-01

    Hematite is an iron oxide very important for the study of climatic evolution of Mars. It can occur in two forms: red and grey, mainly depending on the granulometry of the samples. Spectra of bright regions of Mars suggest the presence of red hematite particles. Moreover the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), on board the Mars Global Surveyor mission, has discovered a deposit of crystalline grey hematite in Sinus Meridiani. TES spectra of that Martian region exhibit features at about 18, 23 and 33 μm that are consistent with hematite. Coarse grey hematite is considered strong evidence for longstanding water, while it is unknown whether the formation of fine-grained red hematite requires abundant water. Studies are needed in order to further characterize the spectral properties of the two kinds of hematite. For this reason we have analyzed a sample of submicron hematite particles in the 6.25-50 μm range in order to study the influence of particles size and shape on the infrared spectra. The optical constants of a particulate sample have been derived and compared with published data concerning bulk samples of hematite. Our results seem to indicate that particle shape is an important factor to take into account for optical constants derivation

  16. Measurement of thermal neutron spectra using LINAC in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    The exact grasp of thermal neutron spectra in a core region is very important for obtaining accurate thermal neutron group constants in the calculation for the nuclear design of a reactor core. For the accurate grasp of thermal neutron spectra, the capability of thermal neutron spectra to describe the moderator cross-sections for thermal neutron scattering is a key factor. Accordingly, 0 deg angular thermal neutron spectra were measured by the time of flight (TOF) method using the JAERI LINAC as a pulsed neutron source, for light water system added with Cd and In, high temperature graphite system added with boron, and light water-natural uranium heterogeneous multiplication system among the reactor moderators of light water or graphite systems. First, the equations to give the time of flight and neutron flux by TOF method were analyzed, and several corrections were investigated, such as those for detector efficiency, background, the transmission coefficient of air and the Al window of a flight tube, mean emission time of neutrons, and the distortion effect of re-entrant hole on thermal neutron spectra. Then, the experimental system, results and calculation were reported for the experiments on the above three moderator systems. Finally, the measurement of fast neutron spectra in natural uranium system and that of the efficiency of a 6 Li glass scintillator detector are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Effect of ladder diagrams on optical absorption spectra in a quasiparticle self-consistent GW framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Brian; Grüning, Myrta; Azarhoosh, Pooya; Pashov, Dimitar; van Schilfgaarde, Mark

    2018-03-01

    We present an approach to calculate the optical absorption spectra that combines the quasiparticle self-consistent GW method [Phys. Rev. B 76, 165106 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevB.76.165106] for the electronic structure with the solution of the ladder approximation to the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the macroscopic dielectric function. The solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation has been implemented within an all-electron framework, using a linear muffin-tin orbital basis set, with the contribution from the nonlocal self-energy to the transition dipole moments (in the optical limit) evaluated explicitly. This approach addresses those systems whose electronic structure is poorly described within the standard perturbative GW approaches with density-functional theory calculations as a starting point. The merits of this approach have been exemplified by calculating optical absorption spectra of a strongly correlated transition metal oxide, NiO, and a narrow gap semiconductor, Ge. In both cases, the calculated spectrum is in good agreement with the experiment. It is also shown that for systems whose electronic structure is well-described within the standard perturbative GW , such as Si, LiF, and h -BN , the performance of the present approach is in general comparable to the standard GW plus Bethe-Salpeter equation. It is argued that both vertex corrections to the electronic screening and the electron-phonon interaction are responsible for the observed systematic overestimation of the fundamental band gap and spectrum onset.

  18. Localization of Cold Atoms in State-Dependent Optical Lattices via a Rabi Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstmann, Birger; Duerr, Stephan; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel realization of Anderson localization in nonequilibrium states of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A Rabi pulse transfers part of the population to a different internal state with infinite effective mass. These frozen atoms create a quantum superposition of different disorder potentials, localizing the mobile atoms. For weakly interacting mobile atoms, Anderson localization is obtained. The localization length increases with increasing disorder and decreasing interaction strength, contrary to the expectation for equilibrium localization.

  19. Media effects on the optical absorption spectra of silver clusters embedded in rara gas matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedrigo, S.; Harbich, W.; Buttet, J.

    1993-01-01

    The optical absorption of small mass selected Ag n -clusters (n=7, 11, 15, 21) embedded in solid Ar, Kr and Xe has been measured. The absorption spectra show 1 to 3 major peaks between 3 and 4.5 eV, depending on the cluster size. Changing the matrix gas Ar→Kr→Xe induces a redshift which is comparable for all sizes studied and does not affect the main structure of the absorption spectra. We propose a scheme to estimate the gas phase value of the absorption energies which is in fair agreement with an estimation obtained by a simple model based on a Drude metal. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs

  20. Zn-VI quasiparticle gaps and optical spectra from many-body calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riefer, A; Weber, N; Mund, J; Yakovlev, D R; Bayer, M; Schindlmayr, Arno; Meier, C; Schmidt, W G

    2017-06-01

    The electronic band structures of hexagonal ZnO and cubic ZnS, ZnSe, and ZnTe compounds are determined within hybrid-density-functional theory and quasiparticle calculations. It is found that the band-edge energies calculated on the [Formula: see text] (Zn chalcogenides) or GW (ZnO) level of theory agree well with experiment, while fully self-consistent QSGW calculations are required for the correct description of the Zn 3d bands. The quasiparticle band structures are used to calculate the linear response and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) spectra of the Zn-VI compounds. Excitonic effects in the optical absorption are accounted for within the Bethe-Salpeter approach. The calculated spectra are discussed in the context of previous experimental data and present SHG measurements for ZnO.

  1. Interference spectra induced by a bichromatic field in the excited state of a three-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroyannis, C.

    1998-01-01

    The interference spectra for the excited state of a three-level atom have been considered, where the strong and the weak atomic transitions leading to an electric dipole allowed excited state and to a metastable excited state are driven by resonant and nonresonant laser fields, respectively. In the low intensity limit of the strong laser field, there are two short lifetime excitations, the spontaneous one described by the weak signal field and the one induced by the strong laser field, both of which appear at the same frequency, and a long lifetime excitation induced by the weak laser field. The maximum intensities (heights) of the two peaks describing the short lifetime excitations take equal positive and negative values and, therefore, cancel each other out completely, while the long lifetime excitation dominates. This indicates the disappearance of the short lifetime excitations describing the strong atomic transition for a period equal to the lifetime of the long lifetime excitation, which is roughly equal to half of the lifetime of the metastable state. The computed spectra have been graphically presented and discussed at resonance and for finite detunings. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. Optical model theory of elastic electron- and positron-atom scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachain, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that the basic idea of the optical model theory is to enable analysis of the elastic scattering of a particle from a complex target by replacing the complicated interactions between the beam and the target by an optical potential, or pseudopotential, in which the incident particle moves. Once the optical potential is determined the original many-body elastic scattering problem reduces to a one-body situation. The resulting optical potential is, however, a very complicated operator, and the formal expressions obtained from first principles for the optical potential can only be evaluated approximately in a few simple cases, such as high energy elastic hadron-nucleus scattering, for the the optical potential can be expressed in terms of two-body hadron-nucleon amplitudes, and the non-relativistic elastic scattering of fast charged particles by atoms. The elastic scattering of an electron or positron by a neutral atom at intermediate energies is here considered. Exchange effects between the projectile and the atomic electrons are considered; also absorption and polarisation effects. Applications of the full-wave optical model have so far only been made to the elastic scattering of fast electrons and positrons by atomic H, He, Ne, and Ar. Agreements of the optical model results with absolute measurements of differential cross sections for electron scattering are very good, an agreement that improves as the energy increases, but deteriorates quickly as the incident energy becomes lower than 50 eV for atomic H or 100 eV for He. For more complex atoms the optical model calculations also appear very encouraging. With regard to positron-atom elastic scattering the optical model results for positron-He scattering differ markedly at small angles from the corresponding electron-He values. It would be interesting to have experimental angular distributions of positron-atom elastic scattering in order to check predictions of the optical model theory. (U.K.)

  3. Extracting Optical Fiber Background from Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Spectra Based on Bi-Objective Optimization Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Zhu, Wei; Liao, Guanglan; Li, Xiaoping; Gong, Bo; Zhou, Tengyuan

    2017-08-01

    We propose a bi-objective optimization model for extracting optical fiber background from the measured surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectrum of the target sample in the application of fiber optic SERS. The model is built using curve fitting to resolve the SERS spectrum into several individual bands, and simultaneously matching some resolved bands with the measured background spectrum. The Pearson correlation coefficient is selected as the similarity index and its maximum value is pursued during the spectral matching process. An algorithm is proposed, programmed, and demonstrated successfully in extracting optical fiber background or fluorescence background from the measured SERS spectra of rhodamine 6G (R6G) and crystal violet (CV). The proposed model not only can be applied to remove optical fiber background or fluorescence background for SERS spectra, but also can be transferred to conventional Raman spectra recorded using fiber optic instrumentation.

  4. Comparison of optical spectra recorded during DPF-1000U plasma experiments with gas-puffing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaloga Dobromil R.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The results are presented of the optical spectra measurements for free plasma streams generated with the use of the modified DPF-1000U machine. This facility was recently equipped with a gas injection system (the so-called gas-puff placed on the symmetry axis behind the central opening in the inner electrode. The DPF-1000U experimental chamber was filled up with pure deuterium at the initial pressure of 1.6 or 2.4 mbar. Additionally, when the use was made of the gas-puff system about 1 cm3 of pure deuterium was injected at the pressure of 2 bars. The gas injection was initiated 1.5 or 2 ms before the triggering of the main discharge. The investigated plasma discharges were powered from a condenser bank charged initially to 23 kV (corresponding to the energy of 352 kJ, and the maximum discharge current amounted to about 1.8 MA. In order to investigate properties of a dense plasma column formed during DPF-1000U discharges the use was made of the optical emission spectroscopy. The optical spectra were recorded along the line of sight perpendicular to the vacuum chamber, using a Mechelle®900 spectrometer. The recent analysis of all the recorded spectra made it possible to compare the temporal changes in the electron density of a freely propagating plasma stream for discharges without and with the gas-puffing. Using this data an appropriate mode of operation of the DPF-1000U facility could be determined.

  5. Optical absorption spectra of semiconductors and insulators: ab initio calculation of many-body effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, Stefan

    1999-01-01

    A method for the inclusion of self-energy and excitonic effects in first-principle calculations of absorption spectra, within the state-of-the-art plane wave pseudopotential approach, is presented. Starting from a ground state calculation, using density functional theory (DFT) in the local density approximation (LDA), we correct the exchange-correlation potential of DFT-LDA with the self-energy applying Hedin's GW approximation to obtain the physical quasiparticles states. The electron-hole interaction is treated solving an effective two-particle equation, which we derive from Hedin's coupled integral equations, leading to the fundamental Bethe-Salpeter equation in an intermediate step. The interaction kernel contains the screened electron-hole Coulomb interaction and the electron-hole exchange effects, which reflect the microscopic structure of the system and are thus also called local-field effects. We obtain the excitonic eigenstates through diagonalization. This allows us a detailed analysis of the optical properties. The application of symmetry properties enables us to reduce the size of the two-particle Hamiltonian matrix, thus minimizing the computational effort. We apply our method to silicon, diamond, lithium oxide and the sodium tetramer. Good agreement with experiment is obtained for the absorption spectra of Si and diamond, the static dielectric constant of diamond, and for the onset of optical absorption of Li 2 O due to discrete bound excitons. We discuss various approximations of our method and show the strong mixing of independent particle transitions to a bound excitonic state in the Na 4 cluster. The influence of ground state calculations on optical spectra is investigated under particular consideration of the pseudopotential generation and we discuss the use of different Brillouin zone point sampling schemes for spectral calculations. (author) [fr

  6. Distribution of radiation lifetime and oscillator strengths in atomic and ion spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabanova, L.N.; Gruzdev, P.F.; Verolajnen, Ya.F. (Leningradskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Fizicheskij Inst.)

    1984-04-01

    Analysis of present experimental and theoretical data on determination of radiation life time and forces of oscillators for disclosing general regularities inherent in radiation constants inside the atom, homologous atoms inside subgroups of atoms and ions of isoelectronic subsequences is conducted. Another purpose is to chose most reliable values of constants and to obtain extrapolation formulae for their determination on the base of the corresponding statistical processing data and revealed regularities. A hydrogen atom, isoelectronic series NaI-Ni18, isoelectronic series Ne, He, ZnI, CdI are considered. Systematics of radiation life time depending on the basic quantum number is presented. The force of oscillators f is considered on the example of an atomic system with one valent electron outside the locked shell - Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs. Distribution of force density of the oscillator df/dE is considered, here continuous spectrum near the threshold of ionization is regarded simultaneously with discrete spectrum. An interpolation formula for the number f for high members of atom series (n>=10) of alkaline metals is presented. Values of coefficients included in this formula are tabulated.

  7. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Astronomical Ices: II. Ethane and Ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Moore, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic observations have established the presence of hydrocarbon ices on Pluto and other TNOs, but the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate optical constants (n, k) and reference spectra. In this paper we present our recent measurements of near- and mid-infrared optical constants for ethane (C2H6) and ethylene (C2H4) in multiple ice phases and at multiple temperatures. As in our recent work on acetylene (C2H2), we also report new measurements of the index of refraction of each ice at 670 nm. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible, and electronic versions of our new results are made available.

  8. Temperature dependence of the optical absorption spectra of InP/ZnS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, S. S.; Vokhmintsev, A. S.; Weinstein, I. A.

    2017-03-01

    The optical-absorption spectra of InP/ZnS (core/shell) quantum dots have been studied in a broad temperature range of T = 6.5-296 K. Using the second-order derivative spectrophotometry technique, the energies of optical transitions at room temperature were found to be E 1 = 2.60 ± 0.02 eV (for the first peak of excitonic absorption in the InP core) and E 2 = 4.70 ± 0.02 eV (for processes in the ZnS shell). The experimental curve of E 1( T) has been approximated for the first time in the framework of a linear model and in terms of the Fan's formula. It is established that the temperature dependence of E 1 is determined by the interaction of excitons and longitudinal acoustic phonons with hω = 15 meV.

  9. Meeting the Cool Neighbors. XII. An Optically Anchored Analysis of the Near-infrared Spectra of L Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Kelle L.; Núñez, Alejandro; Burgasser, Adam J.; Abrahams, Ellianna; Rice, Emily L.; Reid, I. Neill; Looper, Dagny

    2018-01-01

    Discrepancies between competing optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectral typing systems for L dwarfs have motivated us to search for a classification scheme that ties the optical and NIR schemes together, and addresses complexities in the spectral morphology. We use new and extant optical and NIR spectra to compile a sample of 171 L dwarfs, including 27 low-gravity β and γ objects, with spectral coverage from 0.6–2.4 μm. We present 155 new low-resolution NIR spectra and 19 new optical spectra. We utilize a method for analyzing NIR spectra that partially removes the broad-band spectral slope and reveals similarities in the absorption features between objects of the same optical spectral type. Using the optical spectra as an anchor, we generate near-infrared spectral average templates for L0–L8, L0–L4γ, and L0–L1β type dwarfs. These templates reveal that NIR spectral morphologies are correlated with the optical types. They also show the range of spectral morphologies spanned by each spectral type. We compare low-gravity and field-gravity templates to provide recommendations on the minimum required observations for credibly classifying low-gravity spectra using low-resolution NIR data. We use the templates to evaluate the existing NIR spectral standards and propose new ones where appropriate. Finally, we build on the work of Kirkpatrick et al. to provide a spectral typing method that is tied to the optical and can be used when only H or K band data are available. The methods we present here provide resolutions to several long-standing issues with classifying L dwarf spectra and could also be the foundation for a spectral classification scheme for cloudy exoplanets.

  10. Laser Cooling without Repumping: A Magneto-Optical Trap for Erbium Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland, J.J.; Hanssen, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel mechanism that allows for strong laser cooling of atoms that do not have a closed cycling transition. This mechanism is observed in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for erbium, an atom with a very complex energy level structure with multiple pathways for optical-pumping losses. We observe surprisingly high trap populations of over 10 6 atoms and densities of over 10 11 atoms cm -3 , despite the many potential loss channels. A model based on recycling of metastable and ground state atoms held in the quadrupole magnetic field of the trap explains the high trap population, and agrees well with time-dependent measurements of MOT fluorescence. The demonstration of trapping of a rare-earth atom such as erbium opens a wide range of new possibilities for practical applications and fundamental studies with cold atoms

  11. Atomic contributions to the valence band photoelectron spectra of metal-free, iron and manganese phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidermane, I., E-mail: ieva.bidermane@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box-516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS UMR 7588, F-75005 Paris (France); Brumboiu, I.E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box-516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Totani, R. [Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio, Coppito, I-67010 L’Aquila (Italy); Grazioli, C. [CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, ss. 14 km. 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Departement of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste (Italy); Shariati-Nilsson, M.N.; Herper, H.C.; Eriksson, O.; Sanyal, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box-516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Ressel, B. [University of Nova Gorica, Vipavska Cesta 11c, 5270 Ajdovščina (Slovenia); Simone, M. de [CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, ss. 14 km. 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Lozzi, L. [Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio, Coppito, I-67010 L’Aquila (Italy); Brena, B.; Puglia, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box-516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • In detail comparison between the valence band structure of H{sub 2}Pc, FePc and MnPc. • Comparison between the gas phase samples and thin evaporated films on Au (1 1 1). • Detailed analysis of the atomic orbital contributions to the valence band features. • DFT/HSE06 study of the valence band electronic structure of H{sub 2}Pc, FePc and MnPc. - Abstract: The present work reports a photoelectron spectroscopy study of the low-energy region of the valence band of metal-free phthalocyanine (H{sub 2}Pc) compared with those of iron phthalocyanine (FePc) and manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc). We have analysed in detail the atomic orbital composition of the valence band both experimentally, by making use of the variation in photoionization cross-sections with photon energy, and theoretically, by means of density functional theory. The atomic character of the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO), reflected on the outermost valence band binding energy region, is different for MnPc as compared to the other two molecules. The peaks related to the C 2p contributions, result in the HOMO for H{sub 2}Pc and FePc and in the HOMO-1 for MnPc as described by the theoretical predictions, in very good agreement with the experimental results. The DFT simulations, discerning the atomic contribution to the density of states, indicate how the central metal atom interacts with the C and N atoms of the molecule, giving rise to different partial and total density of states for these three Pc molecules.

  12. Real-time Fourier transformation of lightwave spectra and application in optical reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacarne, Antonio; Park, Yongwoo; Li, Ming; LaRochelle, Sophie; Azaña, José

    2015-12-14

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a fiber-optics scheme for real-time analog Fourier transform (FT) of a lightwave energy spectrum, such that the output signal maps the FT of the spectrum of interest along the time axis. This scheme avoids the need for analog-to-digital conversion and subsequent digital signal post-processing of the photo-detected spectrum, thus being capable of providing the desired FT processing directly in the optical domain at megahertz update rates. The proposed concept is particularly attractive for applications requiring FT analysis of optical spectra, such as in many optical Fourier-domain reflectrometry (OFDR), interferometry, spectroscopy and sensing systems. Examples are reported to illustrate the use of the method for real-time OFDR, where the target axial-line profile is directly observed in a single-shot oscilloscope trace, similarly to a time-of-flight measurement, but with a resolution and depth of range dictated by the underlying interferometry scheme.

  13. Optical bistability induced by quantum coherence in a negative index atomic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong-Jun; Sun Hui; Li Jin-Ping; Yin Bao-Yin; Guo Hong-Ju

    2013-01-01

    Bistability behaviors in an optical ring cavity filled with a dense V-type four-level atomic medium are theoretically investigated. It is found that the optical bistability can appear in the negative refraction frequency band, while both the bistability and multi-stability can occur in the positive refraction frequency bands. Therefore, optical bistability can be realized from conventional material to negative index material due to quantum coherence in our scheme. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  14. Van der Waals enhancement of optical atom potentials via resonant coupling to surface polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerckhoff, Joseph; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2009-08-17

    Contemporary experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) with gas-phase neutral atoms rely increasingly on laser cooling and optical, magneto-optical or magnetostatic trapping methods to provide atomic localization with sub-micron uncertainty. Difficult to achieve in free space, this goal is further frustrated by atom-surface interactions if the desired atomic placement approaches within several hundred nanometers of a solid surface, as can be the case in setups incorporating monolithic dielectric optical resonators such as microspheres, microtoroids, microdisks or photonic crystal defect cavities. Typically in such scenarios, the smallest atom-surface separation at which the van der Waals interaction can be neglected is taken to be the optimal localization point for associated trapping schemes, but this sort of conservative strategy generally compromises the achievable cavity QED coupling strength. Here we suggest a new approach to the design of optical dipole traps for atom confinement near surfaces that exploits strong surface interactions, rather than avoiding them, and present the results of a numerical study based on (39)K atoms and indium tin oxide (ITO). Our theoretical framework points to the possibility of utilizing nanopatterning methods to engineer novel modifications of atom-surface interactions. (c) 2009 Optical Society of America

  15. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Nitrile Ices Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carrie; Ferrante, Robert F.; Moore, W. James; Hudson, Reggie; Moore, Marla H.

    2011-01-01

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrile ices known or suspected to be in Titan?s atmosphere have been determined from 2.0 to 333.3 microns (approx.5000 to 30/cm). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan?s winter pole. Ices studied were: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C2N2, cyanogen; CH3CN, acetonitrile; C2H5CN, propionitrile; and HC3N, cyanoacetylene. Optical constants were calculated, using Kramers-Kronig analysis, for each nitrile ice?s spectrum measured at a variety of temperatures, in both the amorphous- and crystalline phases. Spectra were also measured for many of the nitriles after quenching at the annealing temperature and compared with those of annealed ices. For each of these molecules we also measured the real component, n, of the refractive index for amorphous and crystalline phases at 670 nm. Several examples of the information contained in these new data sets and their usefulness in modeling Titan?s observed features will be presented (e.g., the broad emission feature at 160/cm; Anderson and Samuelson, 2011).

  16. Optical spectra of composite silver-porous silicon (Ag-pSi) nanostructure based periodical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedome Min-Dianey, Kossi Aniya; Zhang, Hao-Chun; Brohi, Ali Anwar; Yu, Haiyan; Xia, Xinlin

    2018-03-01

    Numerical finite differential time domain (FDTD) tools were used in this study for predicting the optical characteristics through the nanostructure of composite silver-porous silicon (Ag-pSi) based periodical lattice. This is aimed at providing an interpretation of the optical spectra at known porosity in improvement of the light manipulating efficiency through a proposed structure. With boundary conditions correctly chosen, the numerical simulation was achieved using FDTD Lumerical solutions. This was used to investigate the effect of porosity and the number of layers on the reflection, transmission and absorption characteristics through a proposed structure in a visible wavelength range of 400-750 nm. The results revealed that the higher the number of layers, the lower the reflection. Also, the reflection increases with porosity increase. The transmission characteristics were the inverse to those found in the case of reflection spectra and optimum transmission was attained at high number of layers. Also, increase in porosity results in reduced transmission. Increase in porosity as well as in the number of layers led to an increase in absorption. Therefore, absorption into such structure can be enhanced by elevating the number of layers and the degree of porosity.

  17. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  18. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O2 and N2 insertion reactions with atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R.D.; Toth, L.M.; Yustein, J.T.; Andrews, L.

    1993-01-01

    Laser ablation of refractory metals can be an effective source of vapor for matrix isolation IR studies. This combination of techniques was used for the first time to study the mechanisms of U vapor reactions with atmospheric components. U atoms and O 2 were codeposited with excess Ar at 12 K. The dominant codeposition products were UO 2 and UO 3 . In contrast, the UO yield was always small because UO 2 is formed by an insertion mechanism. This mechanism was verified in the 16 O 2 / 18 O 2 experiments which failed to produce 16 OU 18 O. The effects of UV photolysis and matrix annealings were also examined. The U atoms and O 2 reaction requires little or no activation energy since UO 2 was formed from cold reagents. New charge-transfer species, (UO 2+ 2 )(O 2- 2 ) and (UO + 2 )(O - 2 ), and a weak complex, UO 3 --O 2 , were primarily produced under conditions which favored further O 2 reactions. Similar U atom and N 2 experiments produced only linear NUN which is also produced by an insertion mechanism. This U reaction represents the first time that atom was observed breaking and inserting into the triple bond of N 2 . Photolysis dramatically increased the NUN yield by 3-fold. Matrix annealings produced weak UN 2 --N 2 and UN 2 --2N 2 complexes

  19. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O2 and N2 insertion reactions with atomic uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Rodney D.; Toth, L. Mac; Yustein, Jason T.; Andrews, Lester

    1993-10-01

    Laser ablation of refractory metals can be an effective source of vapor for matrix isolation IR studies. This combination of techniques was used for the first time to study the mechanisms of U vapor reactions with atmospheric components. U atoms and O2 were codeposited with excess Ar at 12 K. The dominant codeposition products were UO2 and UO3. In contrast, the UO yield was always small because UO2 is formed by an insertion mechanism. This mechanism was verified in the 16O2/18O2 experiments which failed to produce 16OU18O. The effects of UV photolysis and matrix annealings were also examined. The U atoms and O2 reaction requires little or no activation energy since UO2 was formed from cold reagents. New charge-transfer species, (UO2+2)(O2-2) and (UO+2)(O-2), and a weak complex, UO3-O2, were primarily produced under conditions which favored further O2 reactions. Similar U atom and N2 experiments produced only linear NUN which is also produced by an insertion mechanism. This U reaction represents the first time that atom was observed breaking and inserting into the triple bond of N2. Photolysis dramatically increased the NUN yield by 3-fold. Matrix annealings produced weak UN2-N2 and UN2-2N2 complexes.

  20. Resonance fluorescence spectra of a three-level atom driven by two strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jinsheng.

    1986-12-01

    The resonance fluorescence of a three-level atom interacted with two high-power laser fields is investigated in strong field approximation. The fluorescence distribution is obtained by means of the theory of dressing transformation. (author). 15 refs, 2 figs

  1. Controlling steady-state and dynamical properties of atomic optical bistability

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Amitabh

    2012-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the theoretical and experimental studies of atomic optical bistability and multistability, and their dynamical properties in systems with two- and three-level inhomogeneously-broadened atoms inside an optical cavity. By making use of the modified linear absorption and dispersion, as well as the greatly enhanced nonlinearity in the three-level electromagnetically induced transparency system, the optical bistablity and efficient all-optical switching can be achieved at relatively low laser powers, which can be well controlled and manipulated. Un

  2. Diffraction structures in delta electron spectra emitted in heavy-ion atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.; Bhalla, C.; Shingal, R.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Shinpaugh, J.; Wolf, W.; Wolf, H.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured doubly differential cross sections DDCS for projectiles between F and Au and find evidence for strong diffraction structure in the Binary Encounter region of the emitted electron spectra for Au(Z=79), I(Z=53) and Cu(Z=29) projectiles, however not for F projectiles in the collision energy range between 0.2 and 0.5 MeV/u. (orig.)

  3. Bremsstrahlung spectra for Al, Cs, and Au atoms in high-temperature, high-density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, L.; Pratt, R.H.; Tseng, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented from a numerical calculation for the bremsstrahlung spectrum and Gaunt factors of Al, Cs, and Au atoms in high-temperature (-T), high-density (-rho) plasmas. Plasma temperatures kT = 0.1 and 1.0 keV and plasma densities rho = rho 0 (the normal solid density) and rho = 100rho 0 are considered. This allows us to determine the generality and identify the origins of features which we had previously identified in calculations for Cs. We also now present results for the total energy loss of an electron in such a plasma. We use a relativistic multipole code which treats the bremsstrahlung process as a single-electron transition in a static screened central potential. We take for the static potential corresponding to an atom in a hot dense plasma the finite-temperature, finite-density Thomas-Fermi model. This approach corresponds to an average atom in local thermodynamic equilibrium. In comparison to isolated-neutral-atom results we observe general suppression of cross sections and a particular suppression in the tip region of the spectrum. Within this model, both superscreening and shape resonances are found in the circumstances of extreme density. At more normal densities and except for the soft-photon end, the spectrum at these energies for an atom in a hot plasma (characterized by an average degree of ionization) can be well represented by the spectrum of the corresponding isolated ion, which has a similar potential shape at the distances which characterize the process

  4. Electronic structure and optical absorption spectra of Y2 and Zr2 dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsev, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    The electron structure, ionization potentials from valent levels and energies of optic transitions of Y 2 and Zr 2 dimers are calculated within the framework of discrete-variatin X α -method. It is shown that the symmetry state 1 Σ g + is the main state of Y 2 and Zr 2 dimers, and the atoms in dimers have high-spin 4d n+1 5s 1 configuration. The chemical binding in Y 2 has the dominating 5s-5s nature which is revealed in a considerable interatomic distance; binding of 4d-electrons brings about a significant decrease in the bond length in Zr 2 dimer. The theoretical spectrum of optical absorption of Zr 2 agrees well with the obtained experimental spectrum of this molecule isolated in the organ matrix

  5. The Intrinsically X-Ray-weak Quasar PHL 1811. II. Optical and UV Spectra and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighly, Karen M.; Halpern, Jules P.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Casebeer, Darrin

    2007-11-01

    This is the second of two papers reporting observations and analysis of the unusually bright (mb=14.4), luminous (MB=-25.5), nearby (z=0.192) narrow-line quasar PHL 1811. The first paper reported that PHL 1811 is intrinsically X-ray-weak and presented a spectral energy distribution (SED). Here we present HST STIS optical and UV spectra, and ground-based optical spectra. The optical and UV line emission is very unusual. There is no evidence for forbidden or semiforbidden lines. The near-UV spectrum is dominated by very strong Fe II and Fe III, and unusual low-ionization lines such as Na I D and Ca II H and K are observed. High-ionization lines are very weak; C IV has an equivalent width of 6.6 Å, a factor of ~5 smaller than measured from quasar composite spectra. An unusual feature near 1200 Å can be deblended in terms of Lyα, N V, Si II, and C III* using the blueshifted C IV profile as a template. Photoionization modeling shows that the unusual line emission can be explained qualitatively by the unusually soft SED. Principally, a low gas temperature results in inefficient emission of collisionally excited lines, including the semiforbidden lines generally used as density diagnostics. The emission resembles that of high-density gas; in both cases this is a consequence of inefficient cooling. PHL 1811 is very unusual, but we note that quasar surveys may be biased against finding similar objects. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with proposal 9181. Based on observations obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, a division of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  6. Sub-Doppler temperature measurements of laser-cooled atoms using optical nanofibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, Laura; Daly, Mark J; Chormaic, Síle Nic; Deasy, Kieran; Morrissey, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the average temperature of a cloud of cold 85 Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap using an optical nanofibre. A periodic spatial variation is applied to the magnetic fields generated by the trapping coils and this causes the trap centre to oscillate, which, in turn, causes the cloud of cold atoms to oscillate. The optical nanofibre is used to collect the fluorescence emitted by the cold atoms, and the frequency response between the motion of the centre of the oscillating trap and the cloud of atoms is determined. This allows us to make measurements of cloud temperature both above and below the Doppler limit, thereby paving the way for nanofibres to be integrated with ultracold atoms for hybrid quantum devices

  7. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2014-11-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, the organic carbon concentration is measured using thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) from quartz fiber filters. Here, methods are presented whereby Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters are used to accurately predict TOR OC. Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filters. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites sampled during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to artifact-corrected TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date which leads to precise and accurate OC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, all μg m-3 values based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by OC mass and by OM / OC which reflects the organic composition of the particulate matter and is obtained from organic functional group composition; this division also leads to precise and accurate OC predictions. Low OC concentrations have higher bias and normalized error due to TOR analytical errors and artifact correction errors, not due to the range of OC mass of the samples in the calibration set. However, samples with low OC mass can be used to predict samples with high OC mass indicating that the

  8. Coherent Addressing of Individual Neutral Atoms in a 3D Optical Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xianli; Corcovilos, Theodore A; Kumar, Aishwarya; Weiss, David S

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate arbitrary coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a 5×5×5 array formed by an optical lattice. Addressing is accomplished using rapidly reconfigurable crossed laser beams to selectively ac Stark shift target atoms, so that only target atoms are resonant with state-changing microwaves. The effect of these targeted single qubit gates on the quantum information stored in nontargeted atoms is smaller than 3×10^{-3} in state fidelity. This is an important step along the path of converting the scalability promise of neutral atoms into reality.

  9. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Pursimo, T. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope Apartado 474E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Jauncey, David L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Maslennikov, K. [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo, Pulkovskoye Shosse, 65/1, 196140, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Boldycheva, A., E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  10. Investigation of radio objects with continuos optical spectra. The results of four-color electrophotometric observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beskin, G.M.; Lyutyj, V.M.; Neizvestnyj, S.I.; Pustil'nik, S.I.; Shvartsman, V.F.

    1985-01-01

    The results of UBVR photometry of 30 radio objects with continuous optical spectra (ROCOSes) are reported. The observations were performed using five telescopes during the years 1979-1982; 54 values have been obtained of U, B, V magnitudes and 26 ones of R magnitude. Colours for 16 ROCOSes have been obtained for the first time. The analysis of the data results in the following conclusions. 1) Practically all colours of ROCOSes have proved to be in the region of localization of BL Lac objects' colours on UBV and BVR diagrams. This fact (altogether with the other data) indicates on the proximity of the objects of the two classes. 2) In half of all cases, instantaneous colours of ROCOSes corresponded to purely power-law optical continua F(ν) varies as νsup(α) with α approximately= -(1-2.5). 3) In the remaining cases, optical continua differed significantly from the power-law ones. 4) 6 ROCOSes appeared to be in the phases of deep minimum of brightness at the moment of observations (namely, about 3sup(m)-5sup(m) fainter than in the brightest phase known from the literature). The UBVR colours of none of them give indication on the presence of an elliptical galaxy which, according to conventional concepts, must encompass a variable nonthermal source. 5) Two blue objects, 0548+165 and 0713+199, which are situated at low galactic latitudes (b 2 =-5 deg and +14 deg respectively) have shown colours unusual for lacertids. Appendices contain the results of theoretical calculations of (U-B), (B-V) and (V-R) colours for purely power-law spectra F(ν)=constxνsup(α) with α in the range (-6.5-+2.5) and the results of UBV photometry of the BL Lac object OJ 287 during the years 1976-1982 (24 measurements)

  11. Parametric feedback cooling of a single atom inside on optical cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatjana Wilk

    2014-01-01

    An optical cavity can be used as a kind of intensifier to study radiation features of an atom, which are hard to detect in free space, like squeezing. Such experiments make use of strong coupling between atom and cavity mode, which experimentally requires the atom to be well localized in the cavity mode. This can be achieved using feedback on the atomic motion: from intensity variations of a probe beam transmitted through the cavity information about the atomic motion is gained, which is used to synchronously modulate the trapping potential holding the atom, leading to cooling and better localization. Here, we report on efficient parametric feedback cooling of a single atom held in an intra-cavity standing wave dipole trap. In contrast to previous feedback strategies, this scheme cools the fast axial oscillation of the atom as well as the slower radial motion. (author)

  12. Continuous imaging of a single neutral atom in a variant magneto-optical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Tian; Zhou Shuyu; Chen Peng; Li Lin; Hong Tao; Wang Yuzhu

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous imaging of a single 87 Rb atom confined in a steep magneto-optical trap with an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and realize a one-dimensional micro-optical trap array with a Dammann grating. We adopt several methods to reduce the noise in the fluorescence signal we obtain with the EMCCD. Step jumping characteristics of the fluorescence demonstrate capturing and losing of individual atoms. (authors)

  13. EUV Spectra of High Z Impurities from Large Helical Device and Atomic Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, T.; Suzuki, C.; Funaba, H.; Sato, K.; Murakami, I.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H.; O’Sullivan, G.; Harte, C.; White, J.; D’Arcy, R.; Tanuma, H.; Nakamura, N.

    2017-01-01

    The results of experiments on high Z impurity injection in the Large Helical Device at the National Institute for Fusion Science are described. Spectra from Xe, Sn and W ions were recorded in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. Two different situations were observed in the case of Xe and Sn, depending on whether or not the plasma underwent radiative collapse. If the plasma was stable, the spectrum consisted of a number of strong lines and in both cases the strongest contribution was from 4p - 4d transitions of Cu-like ions. If the plasma underwent radiative collapse in each case it was dominated by an intense unresolved transition array with some strong lines overlapping it resulting from 4p 6 4d m - 4p 5 4d m+1 + 4p 6 4d m-1 4f transitions. For tungsten, radiative collapse was not observed though the spectrum here was dominated by the same array which lies between 4.5 and 7 nm with some additional contribution at the same wavelength from 4d 10 4f m - 4d 9 4f m+1 and 4d 10 4f m - 4d 10 4f m-1 5d transitions in lower stages also. From observation and comparison with other sources, it is shown that the spectra are dominated by resonance transitions to the ground state of the emitting ions, in marked contrast to results from charge exchange spectra that had been recorded to assist with ion stage separation. In the case of tungsten, no sharp lines are seen though the profile of the unresolved array structure changes with plasma temperature and the origin of these changes can be traced to differences in the populations of contributing ions. New assignments for lines of Xe XVIII, Sn XIX and Sn XVII of 4p - 4d transitions are listed in Tables. Strong lines of W, Xe and Sn ions in EUV range are also tabulated. (author)

  14. Quadratic Zeeman spectra for the hydrogen atom by means of semiclassical quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Adachi, Satoshi

    1988-01-01

    The elliptic cylindrical coordinates of type I adapted to the Fock hypersphere in momentum space of the Kepler motion and their canonical momenta are used to construct an analytic form of the classical action integrals which yield an adequate parametrization of the KAM (Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser) tori of the Kepler trajectories weakly perturbed by a uniform magnetic field. The semiclassical quantization formula so provided presents a prototype of the exact EBK (Einstein-Brillouin-Keller) quantization scheme, and the resulting quantized energies vs the magnetic field strength correspond to the quadratic Zeeman spectra of each Rydberg multiplet lifted by the perturbation. (author)

  15. Three Dimensional Imaging of Cold Atoms in a Magneto Optical Trap with a Light Field Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    with a Light Field Microscope Gordon E. Lott Follow this and additional works at: https://scholar.afit.edu/etd Part of the Atomic, Molecular and......https://scholar.afit.edu/etd/774 THREE-DIMENSIONAL IMAGING OF COLD ATOMS IN A MAGNETO-OPTICAL TRAP WITH A LIGHT FIELD MICROSCOPE DISSERTATION Gordon E

  16. Analyzing quantum jumps of one and two atoms strongly coupled to an optical cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reick, Sebastian; Mølmer, Klaus; Alt, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We induce quantum jumps between the hyperfine ground states of one and two cesium atoms, strongly coupled to the mode of a high-finesse optical resonator, and analyze the resulting random telegraph signals. We identify experimental parameters to deduce the atomic spin state nondestructively from ...

  17. Electronic structure and optical spectra of semiconducting carbon nanotubes functionalized by diazonium salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jessica; Mayo, Michael L.; Kilina, Svetlana; Tretiak, Sergei

    2013-02-01

    We report density functional (DFT) calculations on finite-length semiconducting carbon nanotubes covalently and non-covalently functionalized by aryl diazonium moieties and their chlorinated derivatives. For these systems, we investigate (i) an accuracy of different functionals and basis sets, (ii) a solvent effect, and (iii) the impact of the chemical functionalization on optical properties of nanotubes. In contrast to B3LYP, only long-range-corrected functionals, such as CAM-B3LYP and wB97XD, properly describe the ground and excited state properties of physisorbed molecules. We found that physisorbed cation insignificantly perturbs the optical spectra of nanotubes. In contrast, covalently bound complexes demonstrate strong redshifts and brightening of the lowest exciton that is optically dark in pristine nanotubes. However, the energy and oscillator strength of the lowest state are dictated by the position of the molecule on the nanotube. Thus, if controllable and selective chemical functionalization is realized, the PL of nanotubes could be improved.

  18. A Realization of a Quasi-Random Walk for Atoms in Time-Dependent Optical Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hinkel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the time dependent dynamics of an atom in a two-color pumped cavity, longitudinally through a side mirror and transversally via direct driving of the atomic dipole. The beating of the two driving frequencies leads to a time dependent effective optical potential that forces the atom into a non-trivial motion, strongly resembling a discrete random walk behavior between lattice sites. We provide both numerical and analytical analysis of such a quasi-random walk behavior.

  19. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  20. Optical and Near-infrared Spectra of σ Orionis Isolated Planetary-mass Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapatero Osorio, M. R. [Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Crta. Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Béjar, V. J. S. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/. Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ramírez, K. Peña, E-mail: mosorio@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: vbejar@iac.es, E-mail: karla.pena@uantof.cl [Unidad de Astronomía de la Universidad de Antofagasta, Av. U. de Antofagasta. 02800 Antofagasta (Chile)

    2017-06-10

    We have obtained low-resolution optical (0.7–0.98 μ m) and near-infrared (1.11–1.34 μ m and 0.8–2.5 μ m) spectra of 12 isolated planetary-mass candidates ( J = 18.2–19.9 mag) of the 3 Myr σ Orionis star cluster with the aim of determining the spectroscopic properties of very young, substellar dwarfs and assembling a complete cluster mass function. We have classified our targets by visual comparison with high- and low-gravity standards and by measuring newly defined spectroscopic indices. We derived L0–L4.5 and M9–L2.5 using high- and low-gravity standards, respectively. Our targets reveal clear signposts of youth, thus corroborating their cluster membership and planetary masses (6–13 M {sub Jup}). These observations complete the σ Orionis mass function by spectroscopically confirming the planetary-mass domain to a confidence level of ∼75%. The comparison of our spectra with BT-Settl solar metallicity model atmospheres yields a temperature scale of 2350–1800 K and a low surface gravity of log g ≈ 4.0 [cm s{sup −2}], as would be expected for young planetary-mass objects. We discuss the properties of the cluster’s least-massive population as a function of spectral type. We have also obtained the first optical spectrum of S Ori 70, a T dwarf in the direction of σ Orionis. Our data provide reference optical and near-infrared spectra of very young L dwarfs and a mass function that may be used as templates for future studies of low-mass substellar objects and exoplanets. The extrapolation of the σ Orionis mass function to the solar neighborhood may indicate that isolated planetary-mass objects with temperatures of ∼200–300 K and masses in the interval 6–13 M {sub Jup} may be as numerous as very low-mass stars.

  1. Effect of optical pumping on absorption spectra for the doppler broadened rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seo Ro; Noh, Heung Ryoul

    2008-01-01

    The absorption of a laser beam in the Doppler broadened atomic vapor cell is one of the simplest problems in atomic physics. Although many reports on theoretical and experimental studies of linear absorption have been reported, the effect of optical pumping on the absorption coefficient has not been studied in detail. In this presentation, we present a theoretical and experimental study on linear absorption for the Doppler broadened rubidium vapor cell. The absorption coefficient of a σ"+"(or π)polarized laser beam was calculated as a function of the laser frequency for the various laser intensities. The calculated results were compared with the experimental results. Figure 1(a) shows the calculated absorption coefficient of the π polarized laser beam for the transition F"g"=1→F"e"=0,1,2 of the "87"Rb atom. The diameter of the laser beam was 3mm and the intensity was I=0 and I=0.1I"8"(I"8"=16.2W/m"2"). The peak values for various intensities are shown in Fig. 1(b). We found that the absorption coefficient for the transition from the lower hyperfine state decreased with the increased laser intensity, whereas that for the transition from the upper hyperfine state increased(decreased)for the σ"+"(π)polarized laser beam

  2. Fingerprints of exceptional points in the survival probability of resonances in atomic spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartarius, Holger; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2011-01-01

    The unique time signature of the survival probability exactly at the exceptional point parameters is studied here for the hydrogen atom in strong static magnetic and electric fields. We show that indeed the survival probability S(t)=| | 2 decays exactly as |1-at| 2 e -Γ EP t/(ℎ/2π) , where Γ EP is associated with the decay rate at the exceptional point and a is a complex constant depending solely on the initial wave packet that populates exclusively the two almost degenerate states of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. This may open the possibility for a first experimental detection of exceptional points in a quantum system.

  3. Fingerprints of exceptional points in the survival probability of resonances in atomic spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartarius, Holger; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2011-07-01

    The unique time signature of the survival probability exactly at the exceptional point parameters is studied here for the hydrogen atom in strong static magnetic and electric fields. We show that indeed the survival probability S(t)=||2 decays exactly as |1-at|2e-ΓEPt/ℏ, where ΓEP is associated with the decay rate at the exceptional point and a is a complex constant depending solely on the initial wave packet that populates exclusively the two almost degenerate states of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. This may open the possibility for a first experimental detection of exceptional points in a quantum system.

  4. Classical Monopoles: Newton, NUT-space, gravomagnetic lensing and atomic spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Lynden-Bell, Donald; Nouri-Zonoz, Mohammad

    1996-01-01

    Stimulated by a scholium in Newton's Principia we find some beautiful results in classical mechanics which can be interpreted in terms of the orbits in the field of a mass endowed with a gravomagnetic monopole. All the orbits lie on cones! When the cones are slit open and flattened the orbits are exactly the ellipses and hyperbolae that one would have obtained without the gravomagnetic monopole. The beauty and simplicity of these results has led us to explore the similar problems in Atomic Ph...

  5. Coherent matter wave optics on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2006-01-01

    Coherent manipulation of matter waves in microscopic trapping potentials facilitates both fundamental and technological applications. Here we focus on experiments with a microscopic integrated interferometer that demonstrate coherent operation on an atom chip.......Coherent manipulation of matter waves in microscopic trapping potentials facilitates both fundamental and technological applications. Here we focus on experiments with a microscopic integrated interferometer that demonstrate coherent operation on an atom chip....

  6. Remote atomic clock synchronization via satellites and optical fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Piester, D.; Rost, M.; Fujieda, M.; Feldmann, T.; Bauch, A.

    2011-01-01

    In the global network of institutions engaged with the realization of International Atomic Time (TAI), atomic clocks and time scales are compared by means of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and by employing telecommunication satellites for two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT). The frequencies of the state-of-the-art primary caesium fountain clocks can be compared at the level of 10−15 (relative, 1 day averaging) and time scales can be synchronized...

  7. Spin Accumulation of Spinor Atoms in Optical Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Jiang Zhanfeng

    2007-01-01

    We obtain an effective spin correlation Hamiltonian describing the interaction of light with a two-level atom, then we investigate the classical trajectory of the two-level atom system by numerical integration of the Heisenberg equation of motion. Our results show that the spin accumulation is a very popular phenomenon as long as the spin character cannot be ignored in the Hamiltonian. We propose experimental protocol to observe this new phenomenon in further experiments.

  8. Tensor decompositions for the analysis of atomic resolution electron energy loss spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegelberg, Jakob; Rusz, Ján [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Pelckmans, Kristiaan [Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, Box 337, S-751 05 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2017-04-15

    A selection of tensor decomposition techniques is presented for the detection of weak signals in electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data. The focus of the analysis lies on the correct representation of the simulated spatial structure. An analysis scheme for EEL spectra combining two-dimensional and n-way decomposition methods is proposed. In particular, the performance of robust principal component analysis (ROBPCA), Tucker Decompositions using orthogonality constraints (Multilinear Singular Value Decomposition (MLSVD)) and Tucker decomposition without imposed constraints, canonical polyadic decomposition (CPD) and block term decompositions (BTD) on synthetic as well as experimental data is examined. - Highlights: • A scheme for compression and analysis of EELS or EDX data is proposed. • Several tensor decomposition techniques are presented for BSS on hyperspectral data. • Robust PCA and MLSVD are discussed for denoising of raw data.

  9. Atomic Emission Spectra Diagnosis and Electron Density Measurement of Semiconductor Bridge (SCB) Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Hongyan; Zhu Shunguan; Zhang Lin; Wan Xiaoxia; Li Yan; Shen Ruiqi

    2010-01-01

    Emission spectra of a semiconductor bridge (SCB) plasma in a visible range was studied in air. The electron density was measured in a conventional way from the broadening of the A1 I 394.4 nm Stark width. Based on the Saha equation, a system for recording the intensity of Si I 390.5 nm and Si II 413.1 nm was designed. With this technique, the SCB plasma electron density was measured well and accurately. Moreover, the electron density distribution Vs time was acquired from one SCB discharge. The individual result from the broadening of the Al I 394.4 nm Stark width and Saha equation was all in the range of 10 15 cm -3 to 10 16 cm -3 . Finally the presumption of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) condition was validated.

  10. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Astronomical Ices: I. Amorphous and Crystalline Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R. L.; Ferrante, R. F.; Moore, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report recent measurements on acetylene (C2H2) ices at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System and the interstellar medium. New near- and mid-infrared data, including optical constants (n, k), absorption coefficients (alpha), and absolute band strengths (A), are presented for both amorphous and crystalline phases of C2H2 that exist below 70 K. Comparisons are made to earlier work. Electronic versions of the data are made available, as is a computer routine to use our reported n and k values to simulate the observed IR spectra. Suggestions are given for the use of the data and a comparison to a spectrum of Makemake is made.

  11. Band resolution of optical spectra of solvated electrons in water, alcohols, and tetrahydrofuran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jou, F.-Y.; Freeman, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of solvated electrons in water, alcohols, and tetrahydrofuran are empirically resolved into two Gaussian bands and a continuum tail. The first Gaussian band covers most of the low energy side of the spectrum. The second Gaussian band lies at an energy slightly above that of the absorption maximum of the total spectrum. With the exception of tert-butyl alcohol, in water and alcohols the following were observed: (a) the first Gaussian bands have the same half-width, but the oscillator strength in water is about double that in an alcohol; (b) the second Gaussian bands have similar half-widths and oscillator strengths; (c) the continuum tails have similar half-widths, yet that in water possesses only about one third as much oscillator strength as the one in alcohol. In tert-butyl alcohol and tetrahydrofuran the first Gaussian band and the continuum tail each carry nearly half of the total oscillator strength. (author)

  12. Spectral scalability and optical spectra of fractal multilayer structures: FDTD analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Sevket; Palaz, Selami; Mamedov, Amirullah M.; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2017-01-01

    An investigation of the optical properties and band structures for the conventional and Fibonacci photonic crystals (PCs) based on SrTiO3 and Sb2Te3 is made in the present research. Here, we use one-dimensional SrTiO3- and Sb2Te3-based layers. We have theoretically calculated the photonic band structure and transmission spectra of SrTiO3- and Sb2Te3-based PC superlattices. The position of minima in the transmission spectrum correlates with the gaps obtained in the calculation. The intensity of the transmission depths is more intense in the case of higher refractive index contrast between the layers.

  13. Achieving nonlinear optical modulation via four-wave mixing in a four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Chao; Ge, Guo-Qin; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2018-05-01

    We propose an accessible scheme for implementing tunable nonlinear optical amplification and attenuation via a synergetic mechanism of four-wave mixing (FWM) and optical interference in a four-level ladder-type atomic system. By constructing a cyclic atom-field interaction, we show that two reverse FWM processes can coexist via optical transitions in different branches. In the suitable input-field conditions, strong interference effects between the input fields and the generated FWM fields can be induced and result in large amplification and deep attenuation of the output fields. Moreover, such an optical modulation from enhancement to suppression can be controlled by tuning the relative phase. The quantum system can be served as a switchable optical modulator with potential applications in quantum nonlinear optics.

  14. Optical spectra of radio planetary nebulae in the large Magellanic Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present 11 spectra from 12 candidate radio sources co-identified with known planetary nebulae (PNe in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC. Originally found in Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA LMC surveys at 1.4, 4.8 and 8.64 GHz and confirmed by new high resolution ATCA images at 6 and 3 cm (4' /2' , these complement data recently presented for candidate radio PNe in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC. Their spectra were obtained using the Radcliff 1.9-meter telescope in Sutherland (South Africa. All of the optical PNe and radio candidates are within 2' and may represent a population of selected radio bright sample only. Nebular ionized masses of these objects are estimated to be as high as 1.8 Mfi, supporting the idea that massive PNe progenitor central stars lose much of their mass in the asymptotic giant branch (AGB phase or prior. We also identify a sub-population (33% of radio PNe candidates with prominent ionized iron emission lines.

  15. Optical Spectra of Radio Planetary Nebulae in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We present 11 spectra from 12 candidate radio sources co-identified with known planetary nebulae (PNe in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC. Originally found in Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA LMC surveys at 1.4, 4.8 and 8.64~GHz and confirmed by new high resolution ATCA images at 6 and 3~cm (4arcsec/2arcsec, these complement data recently presented for candidate radio PNe in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC. Their spectra were obtained using the Radcliffe 1.9-meter telescope in Sutherland (South Africa. All of the optical PNe and radio candidates are within 2arcsec and may represent a population of selected radio bright sample only. Nebular ionized masses of these objects are estimated to be as high as 1.8~$M_odot$, supporting the idea that massive PNe progenitor central stars lose much of their mass in the asymptotic giant branch (AGB phase or prior. We also identify a sub-population (33\\% of radio PNe candidates with prominent ionized iron emission lines.

  16. High-speed atomic force microscopy combined with inverted optical microscopy for studying cellular events.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Yuki; Sakai, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Aiko; Uekusa, Yoshitsugu; Yagi, Akira; Imaoka, Yuka; Ito, Shuichi; Karaki, Koichi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopy (AFM)-optical fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating cellular morphologies and events. However, the slow data acquisition rates of the conventional AFM unit of the hybrid system limit the visualization of structural changes during cellular events. Therefore, high-speed AFM units equipped with an optical/fluorescence detection device have been a long-standing wish. Here we describe the implementation of high-speed AFM coupled with an optic...

  17. Collimation of a thulium atomic beam by two-dimensional optical molasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukachev, D D; Kalganova, E S; Sokolov, A V; Savchenkov, A V; Vishnyakova, G A; Golovizin, A A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2013-04-30

    The number of laser cooled and trapped thulium atoms in a magneto-optical trap is increased by a factor of 3 using a two-dimensional optical molasses which collimated the atomic beam before entering a Zeeman slower. A diode laser operating at 410.6 nm was employed to form optical molasses: The laser was heated to 70 Degree-Sign C by a two-step temperature stabilisation system. The laser system consisting of a master oscillator and an injection-locked amplifier emitted more than 100 mW at 410 nm and had a spectral linewidth of 0.6 MHz. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  18. Radiation Pressure in a Rubidium Optical Lattice: An Atomic Analog to the Photorefractive Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibal, S.; Mennerat-Robilliard, C.; Larousserie, D.; Triche, C.; Courtois, J.; Grynberg, G.

    1997-01-01

    Probe gain in a rubidium optical lattice is observed when the probe and lattice beams have identical frequencies. This effect is shown to arise from the radiation pressure that shifts the atomic density distribution with respect to the optical potential. This effect is compared with two-beam coupling in photorefractive materials. The experimental results obtained by changing the parameters of the optical lattice (intensity, detuning, periodicity) are in reasonable agreement with numerical simulations based on the model case of a 1/2→3/2 atomic transition. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. FOREWORD: The 5th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchang-Brillet, Wad Lydia; Wyart, Jean-François; Zeippen, Claude

    1996-01-01

    The 5th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas was held in Meudon, France, from August 28 to 31 1995. It was the fifth in a series started by the Atomic Spectroscopic Group at the University of Lund, Sweden, in 1983. Then followed the meetings in Toledo, USA, Amsterdam, The Nether- lands and Gaithersburg, USA, with a three year period. The original title of the series ended with "... for Astrophysics and Fusion Research" and became more general with the 4th colloquium in Gaithersburg. The purpose of the present meeting was, in line with tradition, to bring together "producers" and "users" of atomic data so as to ensure optimal coordination. Atomic physicists who study the structure of atoms and their radiative and collisional properties were invited to explain the development of their work, emphasizing the possibilities of producing precise transition wavelengths and relative line intensities. Astrophysicists and laboratory plasma physicists were invited to review their present research interests and the context in which atomic data are needed. The number of participants was about 70 for the first three meetings, then exploded to 170 at Gaithersburg. About 140 participants, coming from 13 countries, attended the colloquium in Meudon. This large gathering was partly due to a number of participants from Eastern Europe larger than in the past, and it certainly showed a steady interest for interdisciplinary exchanges between different communities of scientists. This volume includes all the invited papers given at the conference and, in the appendix, practical information on access to some databases. All invited speakers presented their talks aiming at good communication between scientists from different backgrounds. A separate bound volume containing extended abstracts of the poster papers has been published by the Publications de l'Observatoire de Paris, (Meudon 1996), under the responsibility of

  20. Mechanical torques generated by optically pumped atomic spin relaxation at surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    It is argued that a valuable method of observing certain types of surface-atom interactions may lie in mechanical torques generated through the spin-orbit relaxation of valence electronic spins of optically pumped atoms at surfaces. The unusual feature of this phenomenon is that the less probable spin-orbit relaxation becomes highly visible as compared with the much more rapid paramagnetic relaxation, because of an enhancement, typically by as much as a factor 10 9 , in the torques delivered to mechanical structures, by virtue of a very large effective moment arm. Spin-orbit relaxation operates through an exchange of translational momentum which, in turn, can be identified with the delivery of a gigantic angular momentum (in units of h) relative to a distant axis about which mechanical motion is referred. The spin-orbit relaxation strongly depends upon the atomic number of the surface atoms and the strength of interaction with the optically pumped atoms. Being dominated by high-atomic-number surface atoms, spin-orbit relaxation rates may not be too strongly influenced by minor surface contamination of lighter-weight optically active atoms

  1. Mechanical torques generated by optically pumped atomic spin relaxation at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, R. M.

    1982-03-01

    It is argued that a valuable method of observing certain types of surface-atom interactions may lie in mechanical torques generated through the spin-orbit relaxation of valence electronic spins of optically pumped atoms at surfaces. The unusual feature of this phenomenon is that the less probable spin-orbit relaxation becomes highly visible as compared with the much more rapid paramagnetic relaxation, because of an enhancement, typically by as much as a factor 109, in the torques delivered to mechanical structures, by virtue of a very large effective moment arm. Spin-orbit relaxation operates through an exchange of translational momentum which, in turn, can be identified with the delivery of a gigantic angular momentum (in units of ℏ) relative to a distant axis about which mechanical motion is referred. The spin-orbit relaxation strongly depends upon the atomic number of the surface atoms and the strength of interaction with the optically pumped atoms. Being dominated by high-atomic-number surface atoms, spin-orbit-relaxation rates may not be too strongly influenced by minor surface contamination of lighter-weight optically active atoms.

  2. Limit on Excitation and Stabilization of Atoms in Intense Optical Laser Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, H; Meise, S; Khujakulov, A; Magaña, A; Saenz, A; Eichmann, U

    2018-03-23

    Atomic excitation in strong optical laser fields has been found to take place even at intensities exceeding saturation. The concomitant acceleration of the atom in the focused laser field has been considered a strong link to, if not proof of, the existence of the so-called Kramers-Henneberger (KH) atom, a bound atomic system in an intense laser field. Recent findings have moved the importance of the KH atom from being purely of theoretical interest toward real world applications; for instance, in the context of laser filamentation. Considering this increasing importance, we explore the limits of strong-field excitation in optical fields, which are basically imposed by ionization through the spatial field envelope and the field propagation.

  3. An atomic beam source for fast loading of a magneto-optical trap under high vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, P.D.; Hilliard, Andrew; Grünzweig, T.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a directional atomic beam created using an alkali metal dispenser and a nozzle. By applying a high current (15 A) pulse to the dispenser at room temperature we can rapidly heat it to a temperature at which it starts dispensing, avoiding the need for preheating. The atomic beam produced...... is capable of loading 90 of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) in less than 7 s while maintaining a low vacuum pressure of 10 -11 Torr. The transverse velocity components of the atomic beam are measured to be within typical capture velocities of a rubidium MOT. Finally, we show that the atomic beam can be turned...

  4. All-optical 3D atomic loops generated with Bessel light fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volke-Sepulveda, Karen; Jauregui, RocIo

    2009-01-01

    The propagation invariance of Bessel beams as well as their transversal structure is used to perform a comparative analysis of their effect on cold atoms for four different configurations and combinations thereof. We show that, even at temperatures for which the classical description of the atom's centre-of-mass motion is valid, the interchange of momentum, energy and orbital angular momentum between light and atoms yields efficient tools for all-optical trapping, transporting and, in general, manipulating the state of motion of cold atoms.

  5. Radio-over-fiber using an optical antenna based on Rydberg states of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, A. B.; Kjærgaard, N.

    2018-05-01

    We provide an experimental demonstration of a direct fiber-optic link for RF transmission ("radio-over-fiber") using a sensitive optical antenna based on a rubidium vapor cell. The scheme relies on measuring the transmission of laser light at an electromagnetically induced transparency resonance that involves highly excited Rydberg states. By dressing pairs of Rydberg states using microwave fields that act as local oscillators, we encoded RF signals in the optical frequency domain. The light carrying the information is linked via a virtually lossless optical fiber to a photodetector where the signal is retrieved. We demonstrate a signal bandwidth in excess of 1 MHz limited by the available coupling laser power and atomic optical density. Our sensitive, non-metallic and readily scalable optical antenna for microwaves allows extremely low-levels of optical power (˜1 μW) throughput in the fiber-optic link. It offers a promising future platform for emerging wireless network infrastructures.

  6. Nanophotonic Optical Isolator Controlled by the Internal State of Cold Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Sayrin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The realization of nanophotonic optical isolators with high optical isolation even at ultralow light levels and low optical losses is an open problem. Here, we employ the link between the local polarization of strongly confined light and its direction of propagation to realize low-loss nonreciprocal transmission through a silica nanofiber at the single-photon level. The direction of the resulting optical isolator is controlled by the spin state of cold atoms. We perform our experiment in two qualitatively different regimes, i.e., with an ensemble of cold atoms where each atom is weakly coupled to the waveguide and with a single atom strongly coupled to the waveguide mode. In both cases, we observe simultaneously high isolation and high forward transmission. The isolator concept constitutes a nanoscale quantum optical analog of microwave ferrite resonance isolators, can be implemented with all kinds of optical waveguides and emitters, and might enable novel integrated optical devices for fiber-based classical and quantum networks.

  7. An atomic orbital based real-time time-dependent density functional theory for computing electronic circular dichroism band spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong, E-mail: xsli@uw.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2016-06-21

    One of the challenges of interpreting electronic circular dichroism (ECD) band spectra is that different states may have different rotatory strength signs, determined by their absolute configuration. If the states are closely spaced and opposite in sign, observed transitions may be washed out by nearby states, unlike absorption spectra where transitions are always positive additive. To accurately compute ECD bands, it is necessary to compute a large number of excited states, which may be prohibitively costly if one uses the linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. Here we implement a real-time, atomic-orbital based TDDFT method for computing the entire ECD spectrum simultaneously. The method is advantageous for large systems with a high density of states. In contrast to previous implementations based on real-space grids, the method is variational, independent of nuclear orientation, and does not rely on pseudopotential approximations, making it suitable for computation of chiroptical properties well into the X-ray regime.

  8. Spontaneous emergence of free-space optical and atomic patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous formation of patterns in dynamical systems is a rich phenomenon that transcends scientific boundaries. Here, we report our observation of coupled optical–atomic pattern formation, which results in the creation of self-organized, multimode structures in free-space laser-driven cold atoms. We show that this process gives rise to spontaneous three-dimensional Sisyphus cooling even at very low light intensities and the emergence of self-organized structures on both sub- and super-wavelength scales. (paper)

  9. Quantum dynamics of atoms in a resonator-generated optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschler, C.; Ritsch, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We investigate the quantum motion of coherently driven ultracold atoms in the field of a damped high-Q optical cavity mode. The laser field is chosen far detuned from the atomic transition but close to a cavity resonance, so that spontaneous emission is strongly suppressed but a coherent field builds up in the resonator by stimulated scattering. On one hand the shape of the atomic wave function determines the field dynamics via the magnitude of the scattering and the effective refractive index the atoms create for the mode. The mode intensity on the other hand determines the optical dipole force on the atoms.The system shows rich atom-field dynamics including self organization, self-trapping, cooling or heating. In the limit of deep trapping we are able to derive a system of closed, coupled equations for a finite set of atomic expectation values and the field. This allows us to determine the self-consistent ground state of the system as well as the eigenfrequencies and damping rates for excitations. To treat several atoms in more detail we introduce the Bose-Hubbard model. This allows us to investigate several aspects of the quantum motion of the atoms inside the cavity. (author)

  10. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-10-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive and nondestructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FT-IR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed: one developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a uniform distribution of Low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the Low EC calibration to Low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produce predictions for Low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), no bias (0.00 μg m-3, a

  11. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also

  12. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-06-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure tested and developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed, one which is developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a~uniform distribution of low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the low EC calibration to low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produces predictions for low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), no

  13. Atomic force microscope with integrated optical microscope for biological applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Putman, C.A.J.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    Since atomic force microscopy (AFM) is capable of imaging nonconducting surfaces, the technique holds great promises for high‐resolution imaging of biological specimens. A disadvantage of most AFMs is the fact that the relatively large sample surface has to be scanned multiple times to pinpoint a

  14. Quantum Phonon Optics: Squeezing Quantum Noise in the Atomic Displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Nori, F.

    1996-03-01

    We have investigated(X. Hu and F. Nori, Physical Review B, in press; preprints.) coherent and squeezed quantum states of phonons. Squeezed states are interesting because they allow the possibility of modulating the quantum fluctuations of atomic displacements below the zero-point quantum noise level of phonon vacuum states. We have studiedfootnotemark[1] the possibility of squeezing quantum noise in the atomic displacement using a polariton-based approach and also a method based on the three-phonon anharmonic interaction. Our focus here is on the first approach. We have diagonalized the polariton Hamiltonian and calculated the corresponding expectation values and fluctuations of both the atomic displacement and the lattice amplitude operators (the later is the phonon analog of the electric field operator for photons). Our results shows that squeezing of quantum fluctuations in the atomic displacements can be achieved with appropriate initial states of both photon and phonon fields. The degree of squeezing is directly related to the crystal susceptibility, which is indicative of the interaction strength between the incident light and the crystal.

  15. Dynamics of atomic clusters in intense optical fields of ultrashort ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Chem. Sci. Vol. 124, No. 1, January 2012, pp. 75–81. c Indian Academy of Sciences. ... Consequently, exposure of atoms and molecules to such intense pulses inevitably leads to single and multiple ... Coulomb explosion, giving rise to ejection of fast Ar-ions. .... intense laser pulses of only a few femtoseconds dura-.

  16. Atomic force microscope featuring an integrated optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to image the surface of both conductors and nonconductors. Biological specimens constitute a large group of nonconductors. A disadvantage of most AFM's is the fact that relatively large areas of the sample surface have to be scanned to pinpoint a biological

  17. Simulation of a 3D MOT-Optical Molasses Hybrid for Potassium-41 Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, W. A.; Wrubel, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    We report a design and numerical model for a 3D magneto-optical trap (MOT)-optical molasses hybrid for potassium-41 atoms. In this arrangement, the usual quadrupole magnetic field is replaced by an octupole field. The octupole field has a central region of very low magnetic field where our simulations show that the atoms experience an optical molasses, resulting in sub-doppler cooling not possible in a quadrupole MOT. The simulations also show that the presence of the magneto-optical trapping force at the edge of the cooling beams provides a restoring force which cycles atoms through the molasses region. We plan to use this hybrid trap to directly load a far off-resonance optical dipole trap. Because the atoms are recycled for multiple passes through the molasses, we expect a higher phase-space density of atoms loaded into the dipole trap. Similar hybrid cooling schemes should be relevant for lithium-6 and lithium-7, which also have poorly resolved D2 hyperfine structure. Research Corporation for Science Advancement, Cottrell College Science Award.

  18. The Electromagnetic Counterpart of the Binary Neutron Star Merger LIGO/Virgo GW170817. III. Optical and UV Spectra of a Blue Kilonova from Fast Polar Ejecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholl, M.; Berger, E.; Kasen, D.; Metzger, B. D.; Elias, J.; Briceño, C.; Alexander, K. D.; Blanchard, P. K.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Eftekhari, T.; Fong, W.; Margutti, R.; Villar, V. A.; Williams, P. K. G.; Brown, W.; Annis, J.; Bahramian, A.; Brout, D.; Brown, D. A.; Chen, H. -Y.; Clemens, J. C.; Dennihy, E.; Dunlap, B.; Holz, D. E.; Marchesini, E.; Massaro, F.; Moskowitz, N.; Pelisoli, I.; Rest, A.; Ricci, F.; Sako, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Strader, J.

    2017-10-16

    We present optical and ultraviolet spectra of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave (GW) source, the binary neutron star merger GW170817. Spectra were obtained nightly between 1.5 and 9.5 days post-merger, using the SOAR and Magellan telescopes; the UV spectrum was obtained with the \\textit{Hubble Space Telescope} at 5.5 days. Our data reveal a rapidly-fading blue component ($T\\approx5500$ K at 1.5 days) that quickly reddens; spectra later than $\\gtrsim 4.5$ days peak beyond the optical regime. The spectra are mostly featureless, although we identify a possible weak emission line at $\\sim 7900$ \\AA\\ at $t\\lesssim 4.5$ days. The colours, rapid evolution and featureless spectrum are consistent with a "blue" kilonova from polar ejecta comprised mainly of light $r$-process nuclei with atomic mass number $A\\lesssim 140$. This indicates a sight-line within $\\theta_{\\rm obs}\\lesssim 45^{\\circ}$ of the orbital axis. Comparison to models suggests $\\sim0.03$ M$_\\odot$ of blue ejecta, with a velocity of $\\sim 0.3c$. The required lanthanide fraction is $\\sim 10^{-4}$, but this drops to $<10^{-5}$ in the outermost ejecta. The large velocities point to a dynamical origin, rather than a disk wind, for this blue component, suggesting that both binary constituents are neutron stars (as opposed to a binary consisting of a neutron star and a black hole). For dynamical ejecta, the high mass favors a small neutron star radius of $\\lesssim 12$ km. This mass also supports the idea that neutron star mergers are a major contributor to $r$-process nucleosynthesis.

  19. Localization of metastable atom beams with optical standing waves: nanolithography at the heisenberg limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson; Thywissen; Dekker; Berggren; Chu; Younkin; Prentiss

    1998-06-05

    The spatially dependent de-excitation of a beam of metastable argon atoms, traveling through an optical standing wave, produced a periodic array of localized metastable atoms with position and momentum spreads approaching the limit stated by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Silicon and silicon dioxide substrates placed in the path of the atom beam were patterned by the metastable atoms. The de-excitation of metastable atoms upon collision with the surface promoted the deposition of a carbonaceous film from a vapor-phase hydrocarbon precursor. The resulting patterns were imaged both directly and after chemical etching. Thus, quantum-mechanical steady-state atom distributions can be used for sub-0.1-micrometer lithography.

  20. A circularly polarized optical dipole trap and other developments in laser trapping of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Kristan Lee

    Several innovations in laser trapping and cooling of alkali atoms are described. These topics share a common motivation to develop techniques for efficiently manipulating cold atoms. Such advances facilitate sensitive precision measurements such as parity non- conservation and 8-decay asymmetry in large trapped samples, even when only small quantities of the desired species are available. First, a cold, bright beam of Rb atoms is extracted from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) using a very simple technique. This beam has a flux of 5 × 109 atoms/s and a velocity of 14 m/s, and up to 70% of the atoms in the MOT were transferred to the atomic beam. Next, a highly efficient MOT for radioactive atoms is described, in which more than 50% of 221Fr atoms contained in a vapor cell are loaded into a MOT. Measurements were also made of the 221Fr 7 2P1/2 and 7 2P3/2 energies and hyperfine constants. To perform these experiments, two schemes for stabilizing the frequency of the light from a diode laser were developed and are described in detail. Finally, a new type of trap is described and a powerful cooling technique is demonstrated. The circularly polarized optical dipole trap provides large samples of highly spin-polarized atoms, suitable for many applications. Physical processes that govern the transfer of large numbers of atoms into the trap are described, and spin-polarization is measured to be 98(1)%. In addition, the trap breaks the degeneracy of the atomic spin states much like a magnetic trap does. This allows for RF and microwave cooling via both forced evaporation and a Sisyphus mechanism. Preliminary application of these techniques to the atoms in the circularly polarized dipole trap has successfully decreased the temperature by a factor of 4 while simultaneously increasing phase space density.

  1. Calculation of optical and K pre-edge absorption spectra for ferrous iron of distorted sites in oxide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercamer, Vincent; Hunault, Myrtille O. J. Y.; Lelong, Gérald; Haverkort, Maurits W.; Calas, Georges; Arai, Yusuke; Hijiya, Hiroyuki; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Brouder, Christian; Arrio, Marie-Anne; Juhin, Amélie

    2016-12-01

    Advanced semiempirical calculations have been performed to compute simultaneously optical absorption and K pre-edge x-ray absorption spectra of Fe2 + in four distinct site symmetries found in minerals. The four symmetries, i.e., a distorted octahedron, a distorted tetrahedron, a square planar site, and a trigonal bipyramidal site, are representative of the Fe2 + sites found in crystals and glasses. A particular attention has been paid to the definition of the p -d hybridization Hamiltonian which occurs for noncentrosymmetric symmetries in order to account for electric dipole transitions. For the different sites under study, an excellent agreement between calculations and experiments was found for both optical and x-ray absorption spectra, in particular in terms of relative intensities and energy positions of electronic transitions. To our knowledge, these are the first calculations of optical absorption spectra on Fe2 + placed in such diverse site symmetries, including centrosymmetric sites. The proposed theoretical model should help to interpret the features of both the optical absorption and the K pre-edge absorption spectra of 3 d transition metal ions and to go beyond the usual fingerprint interpretation.

  2. Analysis of the Vignale-Kohn current functional in the calculation of the optical spectra of semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, J. A.; de Boeij, P. L.; van Leeuwen, R.

    In this work, we investigate the Vignale-Kohn current functional when applied to the calculation of optical spectra of semiconductors. We discuss our results for silicon. We found qualitatively similar results for other semiconductors. These results show that there are serious limitations to the

  3. MID-INFRARED ATOMIC FINE-STRUCTURE EMISSION-LINE SPECTRA OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: SPITZER/IRS SPECTRA OF THE GOALS SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inami, H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Armus, L.; Stierwalt, S.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Howell, J.; Marshall, J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, CA 91125 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Groves, B. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kewley, L. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Petric, A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 320-47, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rich, J. [The Observatories, Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Haan, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield, NSW 2122 (Australia); Evans, A. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Mazzarella, J.; Lord, S. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Appleton, P. [NASA Herschel Science Center, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Spoon, H. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Frayer, D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Matsuhara, H., E-mail: inami@noao.edu [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); and others

    2013-11-10

    We present the data and our analysis of mid-infrared atomic fine-structure emission lines detected in Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph high-resolution spectra of 202 local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). We readily detect emission lines of [S IV], [Ne II], [Ne V], [Ne III], [S III]{sub 18.7{sub μm}}, [O IV], [Fe II], [S III]{sub 33.5{sub μm}}, and [Si II]. More than 75% of these galaxies are classified as starburst-dominated sources in the mid-infrared, based on the [Ne V]/[Ne II] line flux ratios and equivalent width of the 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature. We compare ratios of the emission-line fluxes to those predicted from stellar photo-ionization and shock-ionization models to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the gas in the starburst LIRG nuclei. Comparing the [S IV]/[Ne II] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] line ratios to the Starburst99-Mappings III models with an instantaneous burst history, the emission-line ratios suggest that the nuclear starbursts in our LIRGs have ages of 1-4.5 Myr, metallicities of 1-2 Z{sub ☉}, and ionization parameters of 2-8 × 10{sup 7} cm s{sup –1}. Based on the [S III]{sub 33.5{sub μm}}/[S III]{sub 18.7{sub μm}} ratios, the electron density in LIRG nuclei is typically one to a few hundred cm{sup –3}, with a median electron density of ∼300 cm{sup –3}, for those sources above the low density limit for these lines. We also find that strong shocks are likely present in 10 starburst-dominated sources of our sample. A significant fraction of the GOALS sources (80) have resolved neon emission-line profiles (FWHM ≥600 km s{sup –1}) and five show clear differences in the velocities of the [Ne III] or [Ne V] emission lines, relative to [Ne II], of more than 200 km s{sup –1}. Furthermore, six starburst and five active galactic nucleus dominated LIRGs show a clear trend of increasing line width with ionization potential

  4. Anharmonic effects in IR, Raman, and Raman optical activity spectra of alanine and proline zwitterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danecek, Petr; Kapitán, Josef; Baumruk, Vladimír; Bednárová, Lucie; Kopecký, Vladimír; Bour, Petr

    2007-06-14

    The difference spectroscopy of the Raman optical activity (ROA) provides extended information about molecular structure. However, interpretation of the spectra is based on complex and often inaccurate simulations. Previously, the authors attempted to make the calculations more robust by including the solvent and exploring the role of molecular flexibility for alanine and proline zwitterions. In the current study, they analyze the IR, Raman, and ROA spectra of these molecules with the emphasis on the force field modeling. Vibrational harmonic frequencies obtained with 25 ab initio methods are compared to experimental band positions. The role of anharmonic terms in the potential and intensity tensors is also systematically explored using the vibrational self-consistent field, vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), and degeneracy-corrected perturbation calculations. The harmonic approach appeared satisfactory for most of the lower-wavelength (200-1800 cm(-1)) vibrations. Modern generalized gradient approximation and hybrid density functionals, such as the common B3LYP method, provided a very good statistical agreement with the experiment. Although the inclusion of the anharmonic corrections still did not lead to complete agreement between the simulations and the experiment, occasional enhancements were achieved across the entire region of wave numbers. Not only the transitional frequencies of the C-H stretching modes were significantly improved but also Raman and ROA spectral profiles including N-H and C-H lower-frequency bending modes were more realistic after application of the VCI correction. A limited Boltzmann averaging for the lowest-frequency modes that could not be included directly in the anharmonic calculus provided a realistic inhomogeneous band broadening. The anharmonic parts of the intensity tensors (second dipole and polarizability derivatives) were found less important for the entire spectral profiles than the force field anharmonicities (third

  5. Computational challenges in atomic, molecular and optical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kenneth T

    2002-06-15

    Six challenges are discussed. These are the laser-driven helium atom; the laser-driven hydrogen molecule and hydrogen molecular ion; electron scattering (with ionization) from one-electron atoms; the vibrational and rotational structure of molecules such as H(3)(+) and water at their dissociation limits; laser-heated clusters; and quantum degeneracy and Bose-Einstein condensation. The first four concern fundamental few-body systems where use of high-performance computing (HPC) is currently making possible accurate modelling from first principles. This leads to reliable predictions and support for laboratory experiment as well as true understanding of the dynamics. Important aspects of these challenges addressable only via a terascale facility are set out. Such a facility makes the last two challenges in the above list meaningfully accessible for the first time, and the scientific interest together with the prospective role for HPC in these is emphasized.

  6. Preparation of a single atom in an optical microtrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, Alicia V; Fung, Yin H; Sompet, Pimonpan; Hilliard, Andrew J; Andersen, Mikkel F; Walker, Thad G

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the use of light assisted collisions for the deterministic preparation of individual atoms in a microtrap. Blue detuned light is used in order to ensure that only one of the collision partners is lost from the trap. We obtain a 91% loading efficiency of single 85 Rb atoms. This can be achieved within a total preparation time of 542 ms. A numerical model of the process quantitatively agrees with the experiment giving an in-depth understanding of the dynamics of the process and allowing us to identify the factors that still limit the loading efficiency. The fast loading time in combination with the high efficiency may be sufficient for loading quantum registers at the size required for competitive quantum computing. (letter)

  7. Superexchange-mediated magnetization dynamics with ultracold alkaline-earth atoms in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shaobing; Qian Jun; Wang Yuzhu

    2017-01-01

    Superexchange and inter-orbital spin-exchange interactions are key ingredients for understanding (orbital) quantum magnetism in strongly correlated systems and have been realized in ultracold atomic gases. Here we study the spin dynamics of ultracold alkaline-earth atoms in an optical lattice when the two exchange interactions coexist. In the superexchange interaction dominating regime, we find that the time-resolved spin imbalance shows a remarkable modulated oscillation, which can be attributed to the interplay between local and nonlocal quantum mechanical exchange mechanisms. Moreover, the filling of the long-lived excited atoms affects the collapse and revival of the magnetization dynamics. These observations can be realized in state-dependent optical lattices combined with the state-of-the-art advances in optical lattice clock spectroscopy. (paper)

  8. Nonlinear effects in optical pumping of a cold and slow atomic beam

    KAUST Repository

    Porfido, N.

    2015-10-12

    By photoionizing hyperfine (HF) levels of the Cs state 62P3/2 in a slow and cold atom beam, we find how their population depends on the excitation laser power. The long time (around 180μs) spent by the slow atoms inside the resonant laser beam is large enough to enable exploration of a unique atom-light interaction regime heavily affected by time-dependent optical pumping. We demonstrate that, under such conditions, the onset of nonlinear effects in the population dynamics and optical pumping occurs at excitation laser intensities much smaller than the conventional respective saturation values. The evolution of population within the HF structure is calculated by numerical integration of the multilevel optical Bloch equations. The agreement between numerical results and experiment outcomes is excellent. All main features in the experimental findings are explained by the occurrence of “dark” and “bright” resonances leading to power-dependent branching coefficients.

  9. Perfect pattern formation of neutral atoms in an addressable optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vala, J.; Whaley, K.B.; Thapliyal, A.V.; Vazirani, U.; Myrgren, S.; Weiss, D.S.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a physical scheme for formation of an arbitrary pattern of neutral atoms in an addressable optical lattice. We focus specifically on the generation of a perfect optical lattice of simple orthorhombic structure with unit occupancy, as required for initialization of a neutral atom quantum computer. The scheme employs a compacting process that is accomplished by sequential application of two types of operations: a flip operator that changes the internal state of the atoms, and a shift operator that selectively moves the atoms in one internal state along the lattice principal axis. Realizations of these elementary operations and their physical limitations are analyzed. The complexity of the compacting scheme is analyzed and we show that this scales linearly with the number of lattice sites per row of the lattice

  10. Controlling the optical bistability and transmission coefficient in a four-level atomic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein; Eslami-Majd, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    A novel four level atomic configuration is proposed for controlling the optical bistability and transmission coefficient with application on all-optical switching. Two circularly polarized components from a weak linearly-polarized probe beam are interacted separately by two transitions of this medium. A coherent coupling field has derived another atomic transition. It is demonstrated that the transmission coefficient of two orthogonally polarized beams at different frequencies can be achieved by adjusting the magnitude of the external magnetic field. It is found that the threshold of the optical bistability can be controlled by magnitude of the external magnetic field. Also, it is shown that optical bistability can be converted to optical multistability by switching the two orthogonally polarized beams. - Highlights: ► An inverted Y-type four level atomic system is proposed. ► Transmission coefficient can be controlled by a novel interesting parameter. ► Optical bistability and multistability can be achieved via external magnetic field. ► It is shown that our proposed model is suitable for all optical switching application.

  11. Vibronic effects and destruction of exciton coherence in optical spectra of J-aggregates: A variational polaron transformation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloemsma, E.A.; Silvis, M.H.; Stradomska, A.; Knoester, J., E-mail: j.knoester@rug.nl

    2016-12-20

    Using a symmetry adapted polaron transformation of the Holstein Hamiltonian, we study the interplay of electronic excitation-vibration couplings, resonance excitation transfer interactions, and temperature in the linear absorption spectra of molecular J-aggregates. Semi-analytical expressions for the spectra are derived and compared with results obtained from direct numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian in the two-particle basis set representation. At zero temperature, we show that our polaron transformation reproduces both the collective (exciton) and single-molecule (vibrational) optical response associated with the appropriate standard perturbation limits. Specifically, for the molecular dimer excellent agreement with the spectra from the two-particle approach for the entire range of model parameters is obtained. This is in marked contrast to commonly used polaron transformations. Upon increasing the temperature, the spectra show a transition from the collective to the individual molecular features, which results from the thermal destruction of the exciton coherence.

  12. Position and Momentum Entanglement of Dipole-Dipole Interacting Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatrný, T.; Kolář, M.; Kurizki, G.

    We consider a possible realization of the position- and momentum-correlated atomic pairs that are confined to adjacent sites of two mutually shifted optical lattices and are entangled via laser-induced dipole-dipole interactions. The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) "paradox" [Einstein 1935] with translational variables is then modified by lattice-diffraction effects. We study a possible mechanism of creating such diatom entangled states by varying the effective mass of the atoms.

  13. Optical contrast spectra studies for determining thickness of stage-1 graphene-FeCl{sub 3} intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Wen-Peng, E-mail: han-wenpeng@163.com, E-mail: yunze.long@163.com; Yan, Xu; Zhao, Hui [College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Li, Qiao-Qiao; Lu, Yan [State Key Laboratory for Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Long, Yun-Ze, E-mail: han-wenpeng@163.com, E-mail: yunze.long@163.com [College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Optoelectronic Devices, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Because of novel features in their structural, electronic, magnetic and optical properties, especially potential applications in nanoelectronics, the few-layer graphene intercalation compounds (FLGICs) have been intensively studied recently. In this work, the dielectric constant of the doped graphene of stage-1 FeCl{sub 3}-GIC is obtained by fitting the optical contrast spectra. And fully intercalated stage-1 FeCl{sub 3}-FLGICs were prepared by micromechanical cleavage method from graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) for the first time. Finally, we demonstrated that the thickness of stage-1 FeCl{sub 3}-GICs by micromechanical cleavage can be determined by optical contrast spectra. This method also can be used to other FLGICs, such as SbCl{sub 5}-FLGICs and AuCl{sub 5}-FLGICs, etc.

  14. Low-Entropy States of Neutral Atoms in Polarization-Synthesized Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robens, Carsten; Zopes, Jonathan; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Meschede, Dieter; Alberti, Andrea

    2017-02-10

    We create low-entropy states of neutral atoms by utilizing a conceptually new optical-lattice technique that relies on a high-precision, high-bandwidth synthesis of light polarization. Polarization-synthesized optical lattices provide two fully controllable optical lattice potentials, each of them confining only atoms in either one of the two long-lived hyperfine states. By employing one lattice as the storage register and the other one as the shift register, we provide a proof of concept using four atoms that selected regions of the periodic potential can be filled with one particle per site. We expect that our results can be scaled up to thousands of atoms by employing an atom-sorting algorithm with logarithmic complexity, which is enabled by polarization-synthesized optical lattices. Vibrational entropy is subsequently removed by sideband cooling methods. Our results pave the way for a bottom-up approach to creating ultralow-entropy states of a many-body system.

  15. Dual-Mode Operation of an Optical Lattice Clock Using Strontium and Ytterbium Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takumi; Hisai, Yusuke; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Yasuda, Masami; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2018-06-01

    We have developed an optical lattice clock that can operate in dual modes: a strontium (Sr) clock mode and an ytterbium (Yb) clock mode. Dual-mode operation of the Sr-Yb optical lattice clock is achieved by alternately cooling and trapping 87 Sr and 171 Yb atoms inside the vacuum chamber of the clock. Optical lattices for Sr and Yb atoms were arranged with horizontal and vertical configurations, respectively, resulting in a small distance of the order of between the trapped Sr and Yb atoms. The 1 S 0 - 3 P 0 clock transitions in the trapped atoms were interrogated in turn and the clock lasers were stabilized to the transitions. We demonstrated the frequency ratio measurement of the Sr and Yb clock transitions by using the dual-mode operation of the Sr-Yb optical lattice clock. The dual-mode operation can reduce the uncertainty of the blackbody radiation shift in the frequency ratio measurement, because both Sr and Yb atoms share the same blackbody radiation.

  16. The dressed atom as binary phase modulator: towards attojoule/edge optical phase-shift keying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerckhoff, Joseph; Armen, Michael A; Pavlichin, Dmitri S; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2011-03-28

    We use a single 133Cs atom strongly coupled to an optical resonator to induce random binary phase modulation of a near infra-red, ∼ 500 pW laser beam, with each modulation edge caused by the dissipation of a single photon (≈ 0.23 aJ) by the atom. While our ability to deterministically induce phase edges with an additional optical control beam is limited thus far, theoretical analysis of an analogous, solid-state system indicates that efficient external control should be achievable in demonstrated nanophotonic systems.

  17. Concurrence Measurement for the Two-Qubit Optical and Atomic States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Concurrence provides us an effective approach to quantify entanglement, which is quite important in quantum information processing applications. In the paper, we mainly review some direct concurrence measurement protocols of the two-qubit optical or atomic system. We first introduce the concept of concurrence for a two-qubit system. Second, we explain the approaches of the concurrence measurement in both a linear and a nonlinear optical system. Third, we introduce some protocols for measuring the concurrence of the atomic entanglement system.

  18. Electronic structure, photoemission spectra, and vacuum-ultraviolet optical spectra of CsPbCl3 and CsPbBr3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, K.; Schäfer, W.; Schreiber, M.; Söchtig, J.; Trendel, G.; Treusch, J.; Grandke, T.; Stolz, H. J.

    1981-11-01

    Optical spectra of CsPbCl3 and CsPbBr3 have been measured in the range from 2 to 10 eV and have been combined with ultraviolet-photoemission-spectroscopy (UPS)-measurements at 21.1 and 40.8 eV. A quantitative band calculation is presented, which takes into account anion-anion interaction as well as electronic states of the Cs+ ion. The prominent features of earlier band models and measurements are reestablished through our measurements and calculations, namely that the valence band consists of anionic p functions and Pb 6s functions, the lowest conduction band being Pb 6p type, and the lowest gap occuring at the R point of the Brillouin zone. Inclusion of a further (Cs 6s-type) conduction band, however, is necessary to bring the calculated joint density of states into agreement with vacuum-ultraviolet optical spectra. The calculated densities of states of the valence bands are in quantitative agreement with those deduced from our UPS measurements.

  19. Optical coupling between atomically thin black phosphorus and a two dimensional photonic crystal nanocavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Yasutomo; Moriya, Rai; Yabuki, Naoto; Arai, Miho; Kakuda, Masahiro; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Machida, Tomoki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) is an emerging two dimensional (2D) material exhibiting bright photoluminescence in the near infrared region. Coupling its radiation to photonic nanostructures will be an important step toward the realization of 2D material based nanophotonic devices that operate efficiently in the near infrared region, which includes the technologically important optical telecommunication wavelength bands. In this letter, we demonstrate the optical coupling between atomically thin BP and a 2D photonic crystal nanocavity. We employed a home-build dry transfer apparatus for placing a thin BP flake on the surface of the nanocavity. Their optical coupling was analyzed through measuring cavity mode emission under optical carrier injection at room temperature.

  20. Modelling telluric line spectra in the optical and infrared with an application to VLT/X-Shooter spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, N.; Günther, H. M.; Schneider, P. C.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Earth's atmosphere imprints a large number of telluric absorption and emission lines on astronomical spectra, especially in the near infrared, that need to be removed before analysing the affected wavelength regions. Aims: These lines are typically removed by comparison to A- or B-type stars used as telluric standards that themselves have strong hydrogen lines, which complicates the removal of telluric lines. We have developed a method to circumvent that problem. Methods: For our IDL software package tellrem we used a recent approach to model telluric absorption features with the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM). The broad wavelength coverage of the X-Shooter at VLT allows us to expand their technique by determining the abundances of the most important telluric molecules H2O, O2, CO2, and CH4 from sufficiently isolated line groups. For individual observations we construct a telluric absorption model for most of the spectral range that is used to remove the telluric absorption from the object spectrum. Results: We remove telluric absorption from both continuum regions and emission lines without systematic residuals for most of the processable spectral range; however, our method increases the statistical errors. The errors of the corrected spectrum typically increase by 10% for S/N ~ 10 and by a factor of two for high-quality data (S/N ~ 100), I.e. the method is accurate on the percent level. Conclusions: Modelling telluric absorption can be an alternative to the observation of standard stars for removing telluric contamination. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, 085.C-0764(A) and 60.A-9022(C).The tellrem package is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/585/A113

  1. Single-atom trapping and transport in DMD-controlled optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Dustin; Kuhn, Axel

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the trapping and manipulation of single neutral atoms in reconfigurable arrays of optical tweezers. Our approach offers unparalleled speed by using a Texas instruments digital micro-mirror device as a holographic amplitude modulator with a frame rate of 20 000 per second. We show the trapping of static arrays of up to 20 atoms, as well as transport of individually selected atoms over a distance of 25 μm with laser cooling and 4 μm without. We discuss the limitations of the technique and the scope for technical improvements.

  2. Phase-stepping optical profilometry of atom mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLaren, D A; Goldrein, H T; Holst, B; Allison, W

    2003-01-01

    Electrically deformed single crystal mirrors will be a vital part of a first generation of scanning helium microscope (SHeM). Optimized mirrors will be used to focus thermal energy helium atoms into a surface-sensitive, low-energy probe, with a resolution that depends upon the precise mirror shape. Here, we present surface profilometry measurements of a prototype atom mirror. A temporal phase-stepping Mach-Zender fibre interferometer is used to profile the mirror surface with an accuracy of a few tens of nanometres. Results are compared with the theory of small deflections of an elastic thin plate. Our experiments suggest that relatively simple apparatus can induce the mirror profiles required to demagnify a conventional helium source into a microprobe suitable for a SHeM. Use of elliptical boundary conditions in the clamping mechanism afford biaxial bending in the crystal whilst a simple double-electrode design is demonstrated to be capable of asymmetric control of the mirror deformation

  3. Analogies between dark solitons in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proukakis, N P; Parker, N G; Frantzeskakis, D J; Adams, C S

    2004-01-01

    Dark solitons have been observed in optical systems (optical fibres, dielectric guides and bulk media), and, more recently, in harmonically confined atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. This paper presents an overview of some of the common features and analogies experienced by these two intrinsically nonlinear systems, with emphasis on the stability of dark solitons in such systems and their decay via emission of radiation. The closely related issue of vortex dynamics in such systems is also briefly discussed

  4. Optically trapped atom interferometry using the clock transition of large 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altin, P A; McDonald, G; Doering, D; Debs, J E; Barter, T H; Close, J D; Robins, N P; Haine, S A; Hanna, T M; Anderson, R P

    2011-01-01

    We present a Ramsey-type atom interferometer operating with an optically trapped sample of 10 6 Bose-condensed 87 Rb atoms. We investigate this interferometer experimentally and theoretically with an eye to the construction of future high precision atomic sensors. Our results indicate that, with further experimental refinements, it will be possible to produce and measure the output of a sub-shot-noise-limited, large atom number BEC-based interferometer. The optical trap allows us to couple the |F=1, m F =0)→|F=2, m F =0) clock states using a single photon 6.8 GHz microwave transition, while state selective readout is achieved with absorption imaging. We analyse the process of absorption imaging and show that it is possible to observe atom number variance directly, with a signal-to-noise ratio ten times better than the atomic projection noise limit on 10 6 condensate atoms. We discuss the technical and fundamental noise sources that limit our current system, and present theoretical and experimental results on interferometer contrast, de-phasing and miscibility.

  5. Precision polarization measurements of atoms in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, F.; Vieira, D. J.; Zhao, X.

    2011-01-01

    Precision measurement of atomic and nuclear polarization is an essential step for beta-asymmetry measurement of radioactive atoms. In this paper, we report the polarization measurement of Rb atoms in an yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) far-off-resonance optical dipole trap. We have prepared a cold cloud of polarized Rb atoms in the YAG dipole trap by optical pumping and achieved an initial nuclear polarization of up to 97.2(5)%. The initial atom distribution in different Zeeman levels is measured by using a combination of microwave excitation, laser pushing, and atomic retrap techniques. The nuclear-spin polarization is further purified to 99.2(2)% in 10 s and maintained above 99% because the two-body collision loss rate between atoms in mixed spin states is greater than the one-body trap loss rate. Systematic effects on the nuclear polarization, including the off-resonance Raman scattering, magnetic field gradient, and background gas collisions, are discussed.

  6. Dispersive shock waves in nonlinear and atomic optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamchatnov Anatoly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief review is given of dispersive shock waves observed in nonlinear optics and dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates. The theory of dispersive shock waves is developed on the basis of Whitham modulation theory for various situations taking place in these two fields. In particular, the full classification is established for types of wave structures evolving from initial discontinuities for propagation of long light pulses in fibers with account of steepening effect and for dynamics of the polarization mode in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates.

  7. Optically Controlled Distributed Quantum Computing Using Atomic Ensembles As Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-23

    of lambda - type atoms. In Section 3, we summarize the model we had de- veloped previously for light shift blockade (LSB) of collective ex- citation...plane of | 〉a c1 2 and | 〉c a1 2 , so that the rotation matrix can be written as ⎡ ⎣ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎤ ⎦ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ = − R 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 2...the Hamiltonian in the basis of states a a1 2 , a c1 2 , c a1 2 and c c1 2 is = ⊗ + ⊗H H I I H1 2 1 2 where Ii is the identity matrix and Hi is the

  8. Dynamical Disentangling and Cooling of Atoms in Bilayer Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantian, A.; Langer, S.; Daley, A. J.

    2018-02-01

    We show how experimentally available bilayer lattice systems can be used to prepare quantum many-body states with exceptionally low entropy in one layer, by dynamically disentangling the two layers. This disentangling operation moves one layer—subsystem A —into a regime where excitations in A develop a single-particle gap. As a result, this operation maps directly to cooling for subsystem A , with entropy being shuttled to the other layer. For both bosonic and fermionic atoms, we study the corresponding dynamics showing that disentangling can be realized cleanly in ongoing experiments. The corresponding entanglement entropies are directly measurable with quantum gas microscopes, and, as a tool for producing lower-entropy states, this technique opens a range of applications beginning with simplifying production of magnetically ordered states of bosons and fermions.

  9. Raman Spectra of ZrS2 and ZrSe2 from Bulk to Atomically Thin Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Mañas-Valero

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the race towards two-dimensional electronic and optoelectronic devices, semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs from group VIB have been intensively studied in recent years due to the indirect to direct band-gap transition from bulk to the monolayer. However, new materials still need to be explored. For example, semiconducting TMDCs from group IVB have been predicted to have larger mobilities than their counterparts from group VIB in the monolayer limit. In this work we report the mechanical exfoliation of ZrX2 (X = S, Se from bulk down to the monolayer and we study the dimensionality dependence of the Raman spectra in ambient conditions. We observe Raman signal from bulk to few layers and no shift in the peak positions is found when decreasing the dimensionality. While a Raman signal can be observed from bulk to a bilayer for ZrS2, we could only detect signal down to five layers for flakes of ZrSe2. These results show the possibility of obtaining atomically thin layers of ZrX2 by mechanical exfoliation and represent one of the first steps towards the investigation of the properties of these materials, still unexplored in the two-dimensional limit.

  10. Nebular and auroral emission lines of [Cl III] in the optical spectra of planetary nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, F P; Aller, L H; Ramsbottom, C A; Bell, K L; Crawford, F L; Hyung, S

    2000-04-25

    Electron impact excitation rates in Cl III, recently determined with the R-matrix code, are used to calculate electron temperature (T(e)) and density (N(e)) emission line ratios involving both the nebular (5517.7, 5537.9 A) and auroral (8433.9, 8480.9, 8500.0 A) transitions. A comparison of these results with observational data for a sample of planetary nebulae, obtained with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope, reveals that the R(1) = I(5518 A)/I(5538 A) intensity ratio provides estimates of N(e) in excellent agreement with the values derived from other line ratios in the echelle spectra. This agreement indicates that R(1) is a reliable density diagnostic for planetary nebulae, and it also provides observational support for the accuracy of the atomic data adopted in the line ratio calculations. However the [Cl iii] 8433.9 A line is found to be frequently blended with a weak telluric emission feature, although in those instances when the [Cl iii] intensity may be reliably measured, it provides accurate determinations of T(e) when ratioed against the sum of the 5518 and 5538 A line fluxes. Similarly, the 8500.0 A line, previously believed to be free of contamination by the Earth's atmosphere, is also shown to be generally blended with a weak telluric emission feature. The [Cl iii] transition at 8480.9 A is found to be blended with the He i 8480.7 A line, except in planetary nebulae that show a relatively weak He i spectrum, where it also provides reliable estimates of T(e) when ratioed against the nebular lines. Finally, the diagnostic potential of the near-UV [Cl iii] lines at 3344 and 3354 A is briefly discussed.

  11. Accurate atom-solid kinetic energy shifts from the simultaneous measurement of the KLL Auger spectra for Na, Mg, Al and Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksela, S; Turunen, P; Kantia, T; Aksela, H

    2011-01-01

    KLL Auger-energy shifts between free atoms and their solid surfaces were determined from spectra measured simultaneously in identical experimental conditions. Essentially, the shift values obtained for Na, Mg, Al and Si were more accurate than those achieved by combining the results from separate vapour and solid measurements. Using atomic Auger energies and determined shifts, reliable absolute solid state Auger energies with respect to the vacuum level were also obtained. Experimental shift values were also compared with calculations obtained with the excited atom model. 2s and 2p binding energy shifts were estimated from recent high resolution and due to open shell strongly split vapour phase spectra and corresponding published solid state results. Also, the question of the extent to which the 2s and 2p shifts deviate has been discussed here. (paper)

  12. Emission lines of [K V] in the optical spectra of gaseous nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Francis P; Aller, Lawrence H; Espey, Brian R; Exter, Katrina M; Hyung, Siek; Keenan, Michael T C; Pollacco, Don L; Ryans, Robert S I

    2002-04-02

    Recent R-matrix calculations of electron impact excitation rates in K v are used to derive the nebular emission line ratio R = I(4122.6 A)/I(4163.3 A) as a function of electron density (N(e)). This ratio is found to be very sensitive to changes in N(e) over the density range 10(3) to 10(6) cm(-3), but does not vary significantly with electron temperature, and hence in principle should provide an excellent optical N(e) diagnostic for the high-excitation zones of nebulae. The observed value of R for the planetary nebula NGC 7027, measured from a spectrum obtained with the Hamilton Echelle spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope, implies a density in excellent agreement with that derived from [Ne iv], formed in the same region of the nebula as [K v]. This observation provides observational support for the accuracy of the theoretical [K v] line ratios, and hence the atomic data on which they are based. However, the analysis of a high-resolution spectrum of the symbiotic star RR Telescopii, obtained with the University College London Echelle Spectrograph on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope, reveals that the [K v] 4122.6 A line in this object is badly blended with Fe ii 4122.6 A. Hence, the [K v] diagnostic may not be used for astrophysical sources that show a strong Fe ii emission line spectrum.

  13. Detector Sampling of Optical/IR Spectra: How Many Pixels per FWHM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J. Gordon

    2017-08-01

    Most optical and IR spectra are now acquired using detectors with finite-width pixels in a square array. Each pixel records the received intensity integrated over its own area, and pixels are separated by the array pitch. This paper examines the effects of such pixellation, using computed simulations to illustrate the effects which most concern the astronomer end-user. It is shown that coarse sampling increases the random noise errors in wavelength by typically 10-20 % at 2 pixels per Full Width at Half Maximum, but with wide variation depending on the functional form of the instrumental Line Spread Function (i.e. the instrumental response to a monochromatic input) and on the pixel phase. If line widths are determined, they are even more strongly affected at low sampling frequencies. However, the noise in fitted peak amplitudes is minimally affected by pixellation, with increases less than about 5%. Pixellation has a substantial but complex effect on the ability to see a relative minimum between two closely spaced peaks (or relative maximum between two absorption lines). The consistent scale of resolving power presented by Robertson to overcome the inadequacy of the Full Width at Half Maximum as a resolution measure is here extended to cover pixellated spectra. The systematic bias errors in wavelength introduced by pixellation, independent of signal/noise ratio, are examined. While they may be negligible for smooth well-sampled symmetric Line Spread Functions, they are very sensitive to asymmetry and high spatial frequency sub-structure. The Modulation Transfer Function for sampled data is shown to give a useful indication of the extent of improperly sampled signal in an Line Spread Function. The common maxim that 2 pixels per Full Width at Half Maximum is the Nyquist limit is incorrect and most Line Spread Functions will exhibit some aliasing at this sample frequency. While 2 pixels per Full Width at Half Maximum is nevertheless often an acceptable minimum for

  14. Fiber optic transmission system delivered to Fusion Research Center of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Mutsuo; Hiramoto, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Kunihiro

    1983-01-01

    In general there are many electromagnetically induced noises in the premises of factories, power plants and substations. Under such electrically bad environments, for the computer data transmission that needs high speed processing and high reliability, the optical fiber cable is superion to the coaxial cable or the flat-type cable in aspects of the inductionlessness and a wide bandwidth. Showa Electric Wire and Cable Co., Ltd. has delivered and installed a computer data transmission system consisting of optical modems and optical fiber cables for connecting every experiment building in the premises of Fusion Research Center of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This paper describes the outline of this system. (author)

  15. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  16. Optical and magnetic properties of a transparent garnet film for atomic physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Saito

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the optical and magnetic properties of a transparent magnetic garnet with a particular focus on its applications to atomic physics experiments. The garnet film used in this study was a magnetically soft material that was originally designed for a Faraday rotator at optical communication wavelengths in the near infrared region. The film had a thickness of 2.1 μm and a small optical loss at a wavelength of λ=780 nm resonant with Rb atoms. The Faraday effect was also small and, thus, barely affected the polarization of light at λ=780 nm. In contrast, large Faraday rotation angles at shorter wavelengths enabled us to visualize magnetic domains, which were perpendicularly magnetized in alternate directions with a period of 3.6 μm. We confirmed the generation of an evanescent wave on the garnet film, which can be used for the optical observation and manipulation of atoms on the surface of the film. Finally, we demonstrated a magnetic mirror for laser-cooled Rb atoms using the garnet film.

  17. Atomic force and scanning near-field optical microscopy study of carbocyanine dye J-aggregates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokhorov, V.V.; Petrova, M.G.; Kovaleva, Natalia; Demikhov, E.I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2014), s. 700-704 ISSN 1573-4137 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbocyanine dye * elementary fibri * high-resolution atomic force microscopy * J-aggregate * probe microscopy * scanning near-field optical microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.096, year: 2014

  18. Maximally entangled mixed states of two atoms trapped inside an optical cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shangbin; Xu Jingbo

    2009-01-01

    In some off-resonant cases, the reduced density matrix of two atoms symmetrically coupled with an optical cavity can very approximately approach maximally entangled mixed states or maximal Bell violation mixed states in their evolution. The influence of a phase decoherence on the generation of a maximally entangled mixed state is also discussed

  19. Orientation of Ar(3P2) atoms by laser optical pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giberson, K.W.; Hart, M.W.; Hammond, M.S.; Dunning, F.B.; Walters, G.K.

    1984-01-01

    A beam of argon metastable atoms with a high degree of electron-spin polarization has been produced by optical pumping using an Oxazine 750 dye laser. The beam is suitable for the study of electron spin and orbital orientation dependences in a variety of collision processes

  20. Optical potential study of positron scattering by hydrogenic-type atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuru Ratnavelu; Nithyanandan Natchimuthu; Kalai Kumar Rajgopal

    1999-01-01

    An optical potential method based on the close-coupling formalism has been implemented to study positron scattering by hydrogenic-type atoms. The present work will be reviewed in the context of other theories. Preliminary results will be presented and compared with experimental results. (author)

  1. Rydberg atoms in circular polarization: Classical stabilization in optical frequency fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chism, Will; Reichl, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the classical dynamics of the Rydberg atom in circularly polarized laser fields, restricted to the two-dimensional plane of polarization. We use a Poincare surface of section to study nonlinear resonance structures for optical frequency driving fields. We demonstrate the existence and morphology of these structures as the laser intensity transitions from moderate to intense

  2. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  3. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy with optical-frequency-comb-referenced IR coherent sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancio, P.; Bartalini, S.; De Rosa, M.; Giusfredi, G.; Mazzotti, D.; Maddaloni, P.; Vitiello, M. S.; De Natale, P.

    2013-01-01

    We provide a review of progress in the development of metrological-grade measurements in atomic and molecular systems through the extension, in the mid-infrared and far-infrared range, of optical frequency combs (OFCs) and the introduction of new techniques and highly coherent sources. (authors)

  4. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  5. Atomic Energy Levels. As Derived From the Analyses of Optical Spectra. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1958-05-01

    Quimica (Madrid) [Al 46, 328 (1952). (I P) K. 0. Kessler and R. E. Trees, Phys. Rev. (2) 32, 303 (1953). (hfs) H. E. Walchii, A Tab/ of Nuclear .omena Data...I and 11. ________ 6. Reference 111 H. E. Walchli, A Tabl of Nuclear Momenti Data, Oak Ridge [101 R. T. Birge, Rev. Mod. Phys. 13, No. 4, 237 (1941...to (141 M. A. Catalin y R. Velasco, An. Real Soc. Foip. Fillica y Ac, in press (1958). Quimica (Madrid) [A] 48, 247 (1952). 161 C. E. Moore

  6. Double tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometer based on an acousto-optic tunable filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jora, M.Z.; Nóbrega, J.A.; Rohwedder, J.J.R.; Pasquini, C.

    2015-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometer based on a quartz acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) monochromator operating in the 271–453 nm range, is described. The instrument was tailored to study the formation and evolution of electrothermal atomic cloud induced either by one or two tungsten coils. The spectrometer also includes a fast response programmable photomultiplier module for data acquisition, and a power supply capable of driving two parallel tungsten coils independently. The atomization cell herein described was manufactured in PTFE and presents a new design with reduced size. Synchronization between the instant of power delivering to start the atomization process and the detection was achieved, allowing for monitoring the atomization and thermal events synchronously and in real time. Absorption signals can be sampled at a rate of a few milliseconds, compatible with the fast phenomena that occur with electrothermal metallic atomizers. The instrument performance was preliminarily evaluated by monitoring the absorption of radiation of atomic clouds produced by standard solutions containing chromium or lead. Its quantitative performance was evaluated by using Cr aqueous solutions, resulting in detection limits as low as 0.24 μg L −1 , and a relative standard deviation of 3%. - Highlights: • The use of an Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) as monochromator element in WC AAS is presented for the first time. • The system includes the possibility of using one or two parallel coils. • We propose a new atomization cell design, manufactured on PTFE with reduced size. • The temperature of the coils and the atomic clouds of Pb and Cr were observed synchronously with high temporal resolution

  7. A comparison of pulsed and continuous atom transfer between two magneto-optical traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, S. P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Mishra, S. R.

    2010-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a comparison between pulsed and continuous transfer of cold 87 Rb atoms between a vapor chamber magneto-optical trap (VC-MOT) and an ultra-high vacuum magneto-optical trap (UHV-MOT) when using a resonant push beam. We find that employing repetitive cycles of a pulsed and unfocused push beam on an unsaturated VC-MOT cloud results in a significantly higher number of atoms transferred to the UHV-MOT than the number obtained with a continuous push beam focused on a continuous VC-MOT. In pulsed transfer, we find that both the VC-MOT loading duration and the push beam duration play important roles in the transfer process and govern the number of atoms transferred to the UHV-MOT. The parameters and processes affecting the transfer have been investigated and are discussed.

  8. Controllable optical bistability in a three-mode optomechanical system with atom-cavity-mirror couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Yan, Jia-Kai; Zhu, Xiao-Fei; Jiang, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the optical bistable behavior in a three-mode optomechanical system with atom-cavity-mirror couplings. The effects of the cavity-pump detuning and the pump power on the bistable behavior are discussed detailedly, the impacts of the atom-pump detuning and the atom-cavity coupling strength on the bistability of the system are also explored, and the influences of the cavity-resonator coupling strength and the cavity decay rate are also taken into consideration. The numerical results demonstrate that by tuning these parameters the bistable behavior of the system can be freely switched on or off, and the threshold of the pump power for the bistability as well as the bistable region width can also be effectively controlled. These results can find potential applications in optical bistable switch in the quantum information processing.

  9. Optical meta-atom for localization of light with quantized energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannebère, Sylvain; Silveirinha, Mário G

    2015-10-30

    The capacity to confine light into a small region of space is of paramount importance in many areas of modern science. Here we suggest a mechanism to store a quantized 'bit' of light--with a very precise amount of energy--in an open core-shell plasmonic structure ('meta-atom') with a nonlinear optical response. Notwithstanding the trapped light state is embedded in the radiation continuum, its lifetime is not limited by the radiation loss. Interestingly, it is shown that the interplay between the nonlinear response and volume plasmons enables breaking fundamental reciprocity restrictions, and coupling very efficiently an external light source to the meta-atom. The collision of an incident optical pulse with the meta-atom may be used to release the trapped light 'bit'.

  10. Rest-Frame Optical Spectra of Three Strongly Lensed Galaxies at z ~ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Kevin N.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kornei, Katherine A.; Pettini, Max; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Allam, Sahar S.; Tucker, Douglas L.

    2009-08-01

    We present Keck II NIRSPEC rest-frame optical spectra for three recently discovered lensed galaxies: the Cosmic Horseshoe (z = 2.38), the Clone (z = 2.00), and SDSS J090122.37+181432.3 (z = 2.26). The boost in signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) from gravitational lensing provides an unusually detailed view of the physical conditions in these objects. A full complement of high S/N rest-frame optical emission lines is measured, spanning from rest frame 3600 to 6800 Å, including robust detections of fainter lines such as Hγ, [S II]λ6717,6732, and in one instance [Ne III]λ3869. SDSS J090122.37+181432.3 shows evidence for active galactic nucleus activity, and therefore we focus our analysis on star-forming regions in the Cosmic Horseshoe and the Clone. For these two objects, we estimate a wide range of physical properties. Current lensing models for the Cosmic Horseshoe and the Clone allow us to correct the measured Hα luminosity and calculated star formation rate. Metallicities have been estimated with a variety of indicators, which span a range of values of 12+ log(O/H) = 8.3-8.8, between ~0.4 and ~1.5 of the solar oxygen abundance. Dynamical masses were computed from the Hα velocity dispersions and measured half-light radii of the reconstructed sources. A comparison of the Balmer lines enabled measurement of dust reddening coefficients. Variations in the line ratios between the different lensed images are also observed, indicating that the spectra are probing different regions of the lensed galaxies. In all respects, the lensed objects appear fairly typical of ultraviolet-selected star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2. The Clone occupies a position on the emission-line diagnostic diagram of [O III]/Hβ versus [N II]/Hα that is offset from the locations of z ~ 0 galaxies. Our new NIRSPEC measurements may provide quantitative insights into why high-redshift objects display such properties. From the [S II] line ratio, high electron densities (~1000 cm-3) are inferred compared

  11. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  12. Asymmetric diffraction by atomic gratings with optical PT symmetry in the Raman-Nath regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Tao; Yang, Wen-Xing; Liu, Shaopeng; Li, Ling; Zhu, Zhonghu

    2018-03-01

    We propose and analyze an efficient scheme for the lopsided Raman-Nath diffraction of one-dimensional (1 D ) and two-dimensional (2 D ) atomic gratings with periodic parity-time (PT )-symmetric refractive index. The atomic grating is constructed by the cold-atomic vapor with two isotopes of rubidium, which is driven by weak probe field and space-dependent control field. Using experimentally achievable parameters, we identify the conditions under which PT -symmetric refractive index allows us to observe the lopsided Raman-Nath diffraction phenomenon and improve the diffraction efficiencies beyond what is achievable in a conventional atomic grating. The nontrivial atomic grating is a superposition of an amplitude grating and a phase grating. It is found that the lopsided Raman-Nath diffraction at the exceptional point (EP) of PT -symmetric grating originates from constructive and destructive interferences between the amplitude and phase gratings. Furthermore, we show that the PT -phase transition from unbroken to broken PT -symmetric regimes can modify the asymmetric distribution of the diffraction spectrum and that the diffraction efficiencies in the non-negative diffraction orders can be significantly enhanced when the atomic grating is pushed into a broken PT -symmetric phase. In addition, we also analyze the influence of the grating thickness on the diffraction spectrum. Our scheme may provide the possibility to design a gain-beam splitter with tunable splitting ratio and other optical components in integrated optics.

  13. Continuous parametric feedback cooling of a single atom in an optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sames, C.; Hamsen, C.; Chibani, H.; Altin, P. A.; Wilk, T.; Rempe, G.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate a feedback algorithm to cool a single neutral atom trapped inside a standing-wave optical cavity. The algorithm is based on parametric modulation of the confining potential at twice the natural oscillation frequency of the atom, in combination with fast and repetitive atomic position measurements. The latter serve to continuously adjust the modulation phase to a value for which parametric excitation of the atomic motion is avoided. Cooling is limited by the measurement backaction which decoheres the atomic motion after only a few oscillations. Nonetheless, applying this feedback scheme to an ˜5 -kHz oscillation mode increases the average storage time of a single atom in the cavity by a factor of 60 to more than 2 s. In contrast to previous feedback schemes, our algorithm is also capable of cooling a much faster ˜500 -kHz oscillation mode within just microseconds. This demonstrates that parametric cooling is a powerful technique that can be applied in all experiments where optical access is limited.

  14. Optical properties of an atomic ensemble coupled to a band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Ewan; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Chang, Darrick E.

    2017-08-01

    We study the optical properties of an ensemble of two-level atoms coupled to a 1D photonic crystal waveguide (PCW), which mediates long-range coherent dipole-dipole interactions between the atoms. We show that the long-range interactions can dramatically alter the linear and nonlinear optical behavior, as compared to a typical atomic ensemble. In particular, in the linear regime, we find that the transmission spectrum contains multiple transmission dips, whose properties we characterize. Moreover, we show how the linear spectrum may be used to infer the number of atoms present in the system, constituting an important experimental tool in a regime where techniques for conventional ensembles break down. We also show that some of the transmission dips are associated with an effective ‘two-level’ resonance that forms due to the long-range interactions. In particular, under strong global driving and appropriate conditions, we find that the atomic ensemble is only capable of absorbing and emitting single collective excitations at a time. Our results are of direct relevance to atom-PCW experiments that should soon be realizable.

  15. Confocal absorption spectral imaging of MoS2: optical transitions depending on the atomic thickness of intrinsic and chemically doped MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Krishna P; Duong, Dinh Loc; Lee, Jubok; Nam, Honggi; Kim, Minsu; Kan, Min; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jeongyong

    2014-11-07

    We performed a nanoscale confocal absorption spectral imaging to obtain the full absorption spectra (over the range 1.5-3.2 eV) within regions having different numbers of layers and studied the variation of optical transition depending on the atomic thickness of the MoS2 film. Three distinct absorption bands corresponding to A and B excitons and a high-energy background (BG) peak at 2.84 eV displayed a gradual redshift as the MoS2 film thickness increased from the monolayer, to the bilayer, to the bulk MoS2 and this shift was attributed to the reduction of the gap energy in the Brillouin zone at the K-point as the atomic thickness increased. We also performed n-type chemical doping of MoS2 films using reduced benzyl viologen (BV) and the confocal absorption spectra modified by the doping showed a strong dependence on the atomic thickness: A and B exciton peaks were greatly quenched in the monolayer MoS2 while much less effect was shown in larger thickness and the BG peak either showed very small quenching for 1 L MoS2 or remained constant for larger thicknesses. Our results indicate that confocal absorption spectral imaging can provide comprehensive information on optical transitions of microscopic size intrinsic and doped two-dimensional layered materials.

  16. A compact CCD-monitored atomic force microscope with optical vision and improved performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyue, Liu; Haijun, Zhang; Dongxian, Zhang

    2013-09-01

    A novel CCD-monitored atomic force microscope (AFM) with optical vision and improved performances has been developed. Compact optical paths are specifically devised for both tip-sample microscopic monitoring and cantilever's deflection detecting with minimized volume and optimal light-amplifying ratio. The ingeniously designed AFM probe with such optical paths enables quick and safe tip-sample approaching, convenient and effective tip-sample positioning, and high quality image scanning. An image stitching method is also developed to build a wider-range AFM image under monitoring. Experiments show that this AFM system can offer real-time optical vision for tip-sample monitoring with wide visual field and/or high lateral optical resolution by simply switching the objective; meanwhile, it has the elegant performances of nanometer resolution, high stability, and high scan speed. Furthermore, it is capable of conducting wider-range image measurement while keeping nanometer resolution. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Scheme for generating the singlet state of three atoms trapped in distant cavities coupled by optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dong-Yang [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Wen, Jing-Ji [College of Foundation Science, Harbin University of Commerce, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150028 (China); Bai, Cheng-Hua; Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Wang, Hong-Fu, E-mail: hfwang@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Zhu, Ai-Dong [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Zhang, Shou, E-mail: szhang@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China)

    2015-09-15

    An effective scheme is proposed to generate the singlet state with three four-level atoms trapped in three distant cavities connected with each other by three optical fibers, respectively. After a series of appropriate atom–cavity interactions, which can be arbitrarily controlled via the selective pairing of Raman transitions and corresponding optical switches, a three-atom singlet state can be successfully generated. The influence of atomic spontaneous decay, photon leakage of cavities and optical fibers on the fidelity of the state is numerically simulated showing that the three-atom singlet state can be generated with high fidelity by choosing the experimental parameters appropriately.

  18. Bottom-up production of meta-atoms for optical magnetism in visible and NIR light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barois, Philippe; Ponsinet, Virginie; Baron, Alexandre; Richetti, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    Many unusual optical properties of metamaterials arise from the magnetic response of engineered structures of sub-wavelength size (meta-atoms) exposed to light. The top-down approach whereby engineered nanostructure of well-defined morphology are engraved on a surface proved to be successful for the generation of strong optical magnetism. It faces however the limitations of high cost and small active area in visible light where nanometre resolution is needed. The bottom-up approach whereby the fabrication metamaterials of large volume or large area results from the combination of nanochemitry and self-assembly techniques may constitute a cost-effective alternative. This approach nevertheless requires the large-scale production of functional building-blocks (meta-atoms) bearing a strong magnetic optical response. We propose in this paper a few tracks that lead to the large scale synthesis of magnetic metamaterials operating in visible or near IR light.

  19. A novel measuring method for arbitrary optical vortex by three spiral spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Bo [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guo, Lana [School of Electronics and Information, Guangdong Polytechnic Normal University, Guangzhou 510665 (China); Yue, Chengfeng [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, Zhilie, E-mail: tangzhl@scnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2017-02-26

    In this letter, the topological charge of non-integer vortices determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra is theoretically demonstrated for the first time. Based on the conclusion, a novel method to measure non-integer vortices is presented. This method is applicable not only to arbitrary non-integer vortex but also to arbitrary integer vortex. - Highlights: • Different non-integer vortices cannot have three spiral spectra is demonstrated. • Relationship between the non-integer topological charge and the spiral spectra is presented. • Topological charge of non-integer vortices can be determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra.

  20. Longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and their manifestation in interference microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakin, D V; Ryabukho, V P

    2013-01-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of the longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and manifestations of these properties in interference microscopy are presented. The joint and competitive influence of the angular and frequency spectra of the object-probing field on the longitudinal resolution and on the amplitude of the interference microscope signals from the interfaces between the media inside a multilayer object is demonstrated. The method of compensating the so-called defocusing effect that arises in the interference microscopy using objectives with a large numerical aperture is experimentally demonstrated, which consists in using as a light source in the interference microscope an illuminating interferometer with a frequency-broadband light source. This method of compensation may be used as the basis of simultaneous determination of geometric thickness and refractive index of media forming a multilayer object. (optical fields)

  1. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra and density functional computations of the vibrational spectra, molecular geometry and atomic charges of the biomolecule: 5-bromouracil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rastogi, V.K.; Palafox, M. A.; Mittal, L.; Peica, N.; Keifer, W.; Lang, Kamil; Ojha, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 10 (2007), s. 1227-1241 ISSN 0377-0486 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : FTIR and FT-Raman spectra * density functional computations * molecular geometry Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.514, year: 2007

  2. Tensile strain induced changes in the optical spectra of SrTiO.sub.3./sub. epitaxial thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejneka, Alexandr; Tyunina, M.; Narkilahti, J.; Levoska, J.; Chvostová, Dagmar; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Trepakov, Vladimír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 10 (2010), 2082-2089 ISSN 1063-7834 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/1009; GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : SrTiO 3 epitaxial thin films * effect of biaxial tensile strains on optical spectra Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.727, year: 2010

  3. Analysis of x-ray spectra emitted from highly ionized atoms in the vacuum spark and laser-produced high power plasma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelbaum, P.

    1987-05-01

    The interest in atomic spectroscopy has greatly been reinforced in the last ten years. This gain of interest is directly related to the developments in different fields of research where hot plasmas are created. These fields include in particular controlled thermonuclear fusion research by means of inertial or magnetic confinement approaches and also the most recent efforts to achieve lasers in the XUV region. The present work is based on the specific contribution of the atomic spectroscopy group at the Hebrew University. The recent development of both theoretical and experimental tools allowed us to progress in the understanding of the highly ionized states of heavy elements. In this work the low-inductance vacuum-spark developed at the Hebrew University was used as the hot plasma source. The spectra were recorded in the 7-300 A range by means of a high-resolution extreme-grazing-incidence spectrometer developed at the Racah Institute by Profs. J.L. Schwob and B.S. Fraenkel. To the extend the spectroscopic studies to higher-Z atoms, the laser-produced plasma facility at Soreq Nuclear Center was used. In this work the spectra of the sixth row elements were recorded in the x-rays by means of a crystal spectrometer. All these experimental systems are briefly described in chapter one. Chapter two deals with the theoretical methods used in the present work for the atomic calculations. Chapter three deals with the spectra of elements of the fifth row emitted from the vacuum-spark in the 30-150 A range. These spectra as experimental data were used in order to test ab-initio computations along the NiI sequence 3d-nl transitions. The results of this work are presented in chapter four. Chapter five is devoted to the measurement and analysis of spectra emitted from the vacuum-spark by rare-earth elements. (author)

  4. Nonlinear optical spectra having characteristics of Fano interferences in coherently coupled lowest exciton biexciton states in semiconductor quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Gotoh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical nonlinear effects are examined using a two-color micro-photoluminescence (micro-PL method in a coherently coupled exciton-biexciton system in a single quantum dot (QD. PL and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (PLE are employed to measure the absorption spectra of the exciton and biexciton states. PLE for Stokes and anti-Stokes PL enables us to clarify the nonlinear optical absorption properties in the lowest exciton and biexciton states. The nonlinear absorption spectra for excitons exhibit asymmetric shapes with peak and dip structures, and provide a distinct contrast to the symmetric dip structures of conventional nonlinear spectra. Theoretical analyses with a density matrix method indicate that the nonlinear spectra are caused not by a simple coherent interaction between the exciton and biexciton states but by coupling effects among exciton, biexciton and continuum states. These results indicate that Fano quantum interference effects appear in exciton-biexciton systems at QDs and offer important insights into their physics.

  5. Laser cooling of quasi-free atoms in a nondissipative optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveeva, N. A.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Tumaikin, A. M.; Yudin, V. I.

    2007-01-01

    A quasi-classical theory of laser cooling is applied to the analysis of cooling of unbound atoms with the angular momenta 1/2 in the ground and excited states in a one-dimensional nondissipative optical lattice. In the low-saturation limit with respect to the pumping field, the mechanisms of cooling can be interpreted within the framework of an effective two-level system of ground-state sublevels. In the limit of weak Raman transitions, the mechanism of cooling of unbound atoms is similar to the Doppler mechanism known in the theory of a two-level atom; in the limit of strong transitions, the mechanism of cooling is analogous to the well-known Sisyphys mechanism. In the slow-atom approximation, analytical expressions are obtained for the friction (drag) coefficient and the induced and spontaneous diffusion, and the kinetic temperature is estimated

  6. A portable magneto-optical trap with prospects for atom interferometry in civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, A.; Perea-Ortiz, M.; Winch, J.; Briggs, J.; Freer, S.; Moustoukas, D.; Powell-Gill, S.; Squire, C.; Lamb, A.; Rammeloo, C.; Stray, B.; Voulazeris, G.; Zhu, L.; Kaushik, A.; Lien, Y.-H.; Niggebaum, A.; Rodgers, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Boddice, D.; Plant, S. R.; Tuckwell, G. W.; Bongs, K.; Metje, N.; Holynski, M.

    2017-06-01

    The high precision and scalable technology offered by atom interferometry has the opportunity to profoundly affect gravity surveys, enabling the detection of features of either smaller size or greater depth. While such systems are already starting to enter into the commercial market, significant reductions are required in order to reach the size, weight and power of conventional devices. In this article, the potential for atom interferometry based gravimetry is assessed, suggesting that the key opportunity resides within the development of gravity gradiometry sensors to enable drastic improvements in measurement time. To push forward in realizing more compact systems, techniques have been pursued to realize a highly portable magneto-optical trap system, which represents the core package of an atom interferometry system. This can create clouds of 107 atoms within a system package of 20 l and 10 kg, consuming 80 W of power. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  7. Optical properties of an atom in the presence of a two-nanosphere cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, Vasilii V; Guzatov, D V

    2007-01-01

    The optical properties of an atom located near a cluster of two arbitrarily arranged nanospheres of an arbitrary composition are studied. Changes in the spontaneous decay rates of excited states and emission frequency shifts are considered for different orientations of the dipole moment and different positions of the atom with respect to the cluster. It is shown that a two-nanosphere cluster can be used to control efficiently the spontaneous decay rates of excited states of the atom by changing the distance between spheres. It is found that spontaneous decay rates of the excited states of an atom located between silver nanospheres and having the dipole moment directed along the axis connecting the centres of spheres can increase by a factor of 10 5 and more when nanospheres are brought closer together. (invited paper)

  8. Deflection of slow light by magneto-optically controlled atomic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, D. L.; Wang, R. Q.; Zhou, Lan; Yi, S.; Sun, C. P.

    2007-01-01

    We present a semiclassical theory for light deflection by a coherent Λ-type three-level atomic medium in an inhomogeneous magnetic field or an inhomogeneous control laser. When the atomic energy levels (or the Rabi coupling by the control laser) are position-dependent due to the Zeeman effect caused by the inhomogeneous magnetic field (or due to inhomogeneity of the control field profile), the spatial dependence of the refraction index of the atomic medium will result in an observable deflection of slow signal light when the electromagnetically induced transparency cancels medium absorption. Our theoretical approach based on Fermat's principle in geometrical optics not only provides a consistent explanation for the most recent experiment in a straightforward way, but also predicts the two-photon detuning dependent behaviors and larger deflection angles by three orders of magnitude for the slow signal light deflection by the atomic media in an inhomogeneous off-resonant control laser field

  9. Optical absorption spectra of linear and cyclic thiophenes--selection rules manifestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednarz, Mariusz; Reineker, Peter; Mena-Osteritz, Elena; Baeuerle, Peter

    2004-01-01

    We theoretically study the size-dependent relation between absorption spectra of thiophene-based oligomers and the corresponding cyclothiophenes. In our approach based on a Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian, we demonstrate that the geometry and selection rules determine the observed relations between the spectra

  10. OPTICAL CONSTANTS AND LAB SPECTRA OF WATER ICE V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Transmission spectra of amorphous and crystalline H2O-ice at temperatures from 20-150 K for a wavelength range from 1.11 to 2.63 microns. These spectra have not been...

  11. OPTICAL CONSTANTS AND LAB SPECTRA OF WATER ICE V1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Transmission spectra of amorphous and crystalline H2O-ice at temperatures from 20-150 K for a wavelength range from 1.11 to 2.63 microns. These spectra have not been...

  12. Enantiomeric resolution and X-ray optical activity of a tricobalt extended metal atom chain† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Bond distances and angles for 2 and 3, thermal ellipsoid plots, packing diagrams, PXRD data, magnetization curves, thermogravimetric analysis, and additional XNCD and XMCD plots and CD spectra. CCDC 1574514–1574516 and 1588703. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c7sc04131d

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Anandi; Cortijo, Miguel; Bulicanu, Vladimir; Naim, Ahmad; Clérac, Rodolphe; Rogalev, Andrei; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Rosa, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    A simple procedure based on anion exchange was employed for the enantiomeric resolution of the extended metal atom chain (EMAC) [Co3(dpa)4(MeCN)2]2+. Use of the chiral salt (NBu4)2[As2(tartrate)2], (Λ-1 or Δ-1), resulted in the selective crystallization of the EMAC enantiomers as [Δ-Co3(dpa)4(MeCN)2](NBu4)2[Λ-As2(tartarte)2]2, (Δ-2) and [Λ-Co3(dpa)4(MeCN)2](NBu4)2[Δ-As2(tartrate)2]2 (Λ-2), respectively, in the P4212 space group, whereas a racemic mixture of 1 yielded [Co3(dpa)4(MeCN)2][As2(tartrate)2]·2MeCN (rac-3), which crystallized in the C2/c space group. The local electronic and magnetic structure of the EMAC enantiomers was studied, exploiting a variety of dichroisms in single crystals. A strong linear dichroism at the Co K-edge was observed in the orthoaxial configuration, whereas it vanished in the axial orientation, thus spectroscopically confirming the D4 crystal symmetry. Compounds Δ-2 and Λ-2 are shown to be enantiopure materials as evidenced by mirror-image natural circular dichroism spectra in the UV/vis in solution and in the X-ray range at the Co K-edge in single crystals. The surprising absence of detectable X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or X-ray magnetochiral dichroism signals at the Co K-edge, even at low temperature (3 K) and a high magnetic field (17 T), is ascribed to a strongly delocalized spin density on the tricobalt core. PMID:29675158

  13. Explicit Hilbert-space representations of atomic and molecular photoabsorption spectra: Computational studies of Stieltjes-Tchebycheff functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, M.R.; Langhoff, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    Explicit Hilbert-space techniques are reported for construction of the discrete and continuum Schroedinger states required in atomic and molecular photoexcitation and/or photoionization studies. These developments extend and clarify previously described moment-theory methods for determinations of photoabsorption cross sections from discrete basis-set calculations to include explicit construction of underlying wave functions. The appropriate Stieltjes-Tchebycheff excitation and ionization functions of nth order are defined as Radau-type eigenstates of an appropriate operator in an n-term Cauchy-Lanczos basis. The energies of these states are the Radau quadrature points of the photoabsorption cross section, and their (reciprocal) norms provide the corresponding quadrature weights. Although finite-order Stieltjes-Tchebycheff functions are L 2 integrable, and do not have asymptotic spatial tails in the continuous spectrum, the Radau quadrature weights nevertheless provide information for normalization in the conventional Dirac delta-function sense. Since one Radau point can be placed anywhere in the spectrum, appropriately normalized convergent approximations to any of the discrete or continuum Schroedinger states are obtained from the development. Connections with matrix partitioning methods are established, demonstrating that nth-order Stieltjes-Tchebycheff functions are optical-potential solutions of the matrix Schroedinger equation in the full Cauchy-Lanczos basis

  14. Three-dimensional rearrangement of single atoms using actively controlled optical microtraps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woojun; Kim, Hyosub; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-05-02

    We propose and demonstrate three-dimensional rearrangements of single atoms. In experiments performed with single 87Rb atoms in optical microtraps actively controlled by a spatial light modulator, we demonstrate various dynamic rearrangements of up to N = 9 atoms including rotation, 2D vacancy filling, guiding, compactification, and 3D shuffling. With the capability of a phase-only Fourier mask to generate arbitrary shapes of the holographic microtraps, it was possible to place single atoms at arbitrary geometries of a few μm size and even continuously reconfigure them by conveying each atom. For this purpose, we loaded a series of computer-generated phase masks in the full frame rate of 60 Hz of the spatial light modulator, so the animation of phase mask transformed the holographic microtraps in real time, driving each atom along the assigned trajectory. Possible applications of this method of transformation of single atoms include preparation of scalable quantum platforms for quantum computation, quantum simulation, and quantum many-body physics.

  15. Two photon spectroscopy of rubidium atoms in a magneto-optic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fretel, E.

    1997-01-01

    Two photon transitions without doppler effect can be used as an atomic reference. The aim of this work is to study two photon transitions of rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap. The chosen transition is from the level 5 2 S 1/2 toward the level 5 2 D 5/2 . The magneto-optical trap is achieved by using 3 pairs of perpendicular laser beams and by setting a magnetic field gradient. About 10 18 atoms are trapped and cooled in a 1 mm 3 volume. In a first stage we have realized an optical double resonance experiment from the level 5 2 S 1/2 toward the level 5 2 D 5/2 by populating the intermediate level 5 2 P 3/2 . Then we have studied the two photon transition in this cluster of cold atoms. A particular setting of the experiment allows to reduce the effect of ray broadening and shifting due to the magnetic field of the trap

  16. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection in Noble Gas Solids for Measurements of Rare Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep; Bailey, Kevin G.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas P.; Xu, Chen-Yu; Tang, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    Optical detection of single atoms captured in solid noble gas matrices provides an alternative technique to study rare nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics. I will describe the prospects of applying this approach for cross section measurements of the ^22Ne,,),25Mg reaction, which is the crucial neutron source for the weak s process inside of massive stars. Noble gas solids are a promising medium for the capture, detection, and manipulation of atoms and nuclear spins. They provide stable and chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of guest species. Because noble gas solids are transparent at optical wavelengths, the guest atoms can be probed using lasers. We have observed that ytterbium in solid neon exhibits intersystem crossing (ISC) which results in a strong green fluorescence (546 nm) under excitation with blue light (389 nm). Several groups have observed ISC in many other guest-host pairs, notably magnesium in krypton. Because of the large wavelength separation of the excitation light and fluorescence light, optical detection of individual embedded guest atoms is feasible. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  17. Temperature Sensitivity of an Atomic Vapor Cell-Based Dispersion-Enhanced Optical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, K.; Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.; Luckay, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of the response of an optical cavity to a change in optical path length, through the use of an intracavity fast-light medium, has previously been demonstrated experimentally and described theoretically for an atomic vapor cell as the intracavity resonant absorber. This phenomenon may be used to enhance both the scale factor and sensitivity of an optical cavity mode to the change in path length, e.g. in gyroscopic applications. We study the temperature sensitivity of the on-resonant scale factor enhancement, S(sub o), due to the thermal sensitivity of the lower-level atom density in an atomic vapor cell, specifically for the case of the Rb-87 D(sub 2) transition. A semi-empirical model of the temperature-dependence of the absorption profile, characterized by two parameters, a(sub o)(T) and gamma(sub a)(T) allows the temperature-dependence of the cavity response, S(sub o)(T) and dS(sub o)/dT to be predicted over a range of temperature. We compare the predictions to experiment. Our model will be useful in determining the useful range for S(sub o), given the practical constraints on temperature stability for an atomic vapor cell.

  18. Characteristics of single-atom trapping in a magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seokchan; Choi, Youngwoon; Park, Sangbum; Ji, Wangxi; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap with a single or a few atoms is presented. A very small number of 85 Rb atoms were trapped in a micron-size magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient. In order to find the optimum condition for a single-atom trap, we have investigated how the number of atoms and the size of atomic cloud change as various experimental parameters, such as a magnetic-field gradient and the trapping laser intensity and detuning. The averaged number of atoms was measured very accurately with a calibration procedure based on the single-atom saturation curve of resonance fluorescence. In addition, the number of atoms in a trap could be controlled by suppressing stochastic loading events by means of a real-time active feedback on the magnetic-field gradient

  19. All-optical atom trap as a target for MOTRIMS-like collision experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S.; Acharya, B. P.; De Silva, A. H. N. C.; Parris, N. W.; Ramsey, B. J.; Romans, K. L.; Dorn, A.; de Jesus, V. L. B.; Fischer, D.

    2018-04-01

    Momentum-resolved scattering experiments with laser-cooled atomic targets have been performed since almost two decades with magneto-optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (MOTRIMS) setups. Compared to experiments with gas-jet targets, MOTRIMS features significantly lower target temperatures allowing for an excellent recoil ion momentum resolution. However, the coincident and momentum-resolved detection of electrons was long rendered impossible due to incompatible magnetic field requirements. Here we report on an experimental approach which is based on an all-optical 6Li atom trap that—in contrast to magneto-optical traps—does not require magnetic field gradients in the trapping region. Atom temperatures of about 2 mK and number densities up to 109 cm-3 make this trap ideally suited for momentum-resolved electron-ion coincidence experiments. The overall configuration of the trap is very similar to conventional magneto-optical traps. It mainly requires small modifications of laser beam geometries and polarization which makes it easily implementable in other existing MOTRIMS experiments.

  20. Excitation of hydrogen atom by ultrashort laser pulses in optically dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calisti, A. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, Marseille (France); Astapenko, V.A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudnyi (Russian Federation); Lisitsa, V.S. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudnyi (Russian Federation); Russian Research Center ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-15

    The features of excitation of a hydrogen atom by ultrashort laser pulses (USP) with a Gaussian envelope in optically dense plasma at a Lyman-beta transition are studied theoretically. The problem is of interest for diagnostics of optically dense media. USP have two doubtless advantages over conventional laser excitation: (a) the USP carrier frequency is shifted to the region of short wavelengths allowing exciting atoms from the ground state and (b) the wide spectrum of USP allows them to penetrate into optically dense media to much longer distances as compared with monochromatic radiation. As actual realistic cases, two examples are considered: hot rarefied plasma (the coronal limit) and dense cold plasma (the Boltzmann equilibrium). Universal expressions for the total probability of excitation of the transition under consideration are obtained in view of absorption of radiation in a medium. As initial data for the spectral form of a line, the results of calculations by methods of molecular dynamics are used. The probability of excitation of an atom is analysed for different values of problem parameters: the pulse duration, the optical thickness of a medium, and the detuning of the pulse carrier frequency from the eigenfrequency of an electron transition. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. ''Atomic Optics'': Nonimaging Optics on the Nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland Winston Joseph O' Gallagher

    2005-01-15

    This is the final report for a one year close out extension of our basic research program that was established at the University of Chicago more than sixteen years ago to explore and develop the optical sub-discipline that has come to be known as ''nonimaging optics''. This program has been extremely fruitful, having both broadened the range of formalism available for workers in this field and led to the discovery of many new families of optical devices. These devices and techniques have applications wherever the efficient transport and transformation of light distributions are important, in particular in illumination, fiber optics, collection and concentration of sunlight, and the detection of faint light signals in physics and astrophysics. Over the past thirty years, Nonimaging Optics (Welford and Winston, 1989) has brought a fresh approach to the analysis of many problems in classical macro-scale optics. Through the application of phase-space concepts, statistical methods, thermodynamic arguments, etc., many previously established performance limits were able to be broken and many technical surprises with exciting practical applications were discovered. The most recent three-year phase of our long-term continuing program ended in late 2002 and emphasized extending our work in geometrical optics and expanding it to include some interesting questions in physical optics as well as in the new field of statistical optics. This report presents a survey of the basic history and concepts of nonimaging optics and reviews highlights and significant accomplishments over the past fifteen years. This is followed by a more detailed summary of recent research directions and accomplishments during the last three years. This most recent phase was marked by the broadening in scope to include a separate project involving a collaboration with an industrial partner, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This effort was proposed and approved in

  2. Optical and morphological characterization by atomic force microscopy of luminescent 2-styrylpyridine derivative compounds with Poly(N-vinylcarbazole) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Gutierrez, E.; Percino, M.J.; Chapela, V.M.; Maldonado, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    The present work addresses the optical and morphological properties of organic films based on low molecular weight dyes styrylpyridine derivatives 2-styrylpyridine (A), 4-chlorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (B) and 4-fluorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (C), embedded in a polymeric matrix poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK). The films were prepared by a spin-coating technique from solutions with dye:PVK ratios of 0.25:1, 0.5:1 and 1:1. Solvents were chloroform and toluene. The molar absorption coefficient (ε) spectra for a dye:PVK mixture in solution were a combination of the absorptions of both components separately, but for the deposited films, the shape of the spectrum showed that the poly(N-vinylcarbazole) absorption dominated. However, when the same films were dissolved again in CHCl 3 , their spectra showed an absorption shape similar to that of the solution mixture before the deposition. Solution viscosity measurements were carried out with an Ubbelohde glass capillary viscometer to corroborate the results that showed a better mixture of the dye with the host in chloroform. The morphology of the prepared films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy and exhibited a solvent effect, with a pinhole-free, smooth surface when toluene was used and a wavy surface with chloroform. The ratio dye:matrix was the principal parameter for obtaining optical quality films; for 0.25:1 and 0.5:1 ratios, the films were of good quality, but for 1:1, the dye was expelled from the PVK and a crystallization was present over the surface of the films. Film thickness was also measured and films deposited from toluene solutions gave an average thickness of 54 nm while films from chloroform solutions had an average thickness greater than 160 nm that increased depending on chromophore concentration.

  3. Optical and morphological characterization by atomic force microscopy of luminescent 2-styrylpyridine derivative compounds with Poly(N-vinylcarbazole) films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Gutierrez, E., E-mail: cuper_enrique@msn.com [Centro de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Complejo de Ciencias, ICUAP, Edif. 103-F, 22 Sur y San Claudio, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Percino, M.J.; Chapela, V.M. [Centro de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Complejo de Ciencias, ICUAP, Edif. 103-F, 22 Sur y San Claudio, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Maldonado, J.L. [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica A.C. (CIO), Lomas del Bosque 115, Col. Lomas del Campestre, C.P. 37150, Leon Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    The present work addresses the optical and morphological properties of organic films based on low molecular weight dyes styrylpyridine derivatives 2-styrylpyridine (A), 4-chlorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (B) and 4-fluorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (C), embedded in a polymeric matrix poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK). The films were prepared by a spin-coating technique from solutions with dye:PVK ratios of 0.25:1, 0.5:1 and 1:1. Solvents were chloroform and toluene. The molar absorption coefficient ({epsilon}) spectra for a dye:PVK mixture in solution were a combination of the absorptions of both components separately, but for the deposited films, the shape of the spectrum showed that the poly(N-vinylcarbazole) absorption dominated. However, when the same films were dissolved again in CHCl{sub 3}, their spectra showed an absorption shape similar to that of the solution mixture before the deposition. Solution viscosity measurements were carried out with an Ubbelohde glass capillary viscometer to corroborate the results that showed a better mixture of the dye with the host in chloroform. The morphology of the prepared films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy and exhibited a solvent effect, with a pinhole-free, smooth surface when toluene was used and a wavy surface with chloroform. The ratio dye:matrix was the principal parameter for obtaining optical quality films; for 0.25:1 and 0.5:1 ratios, the films were of good quality, but for 1:1, the dye was expelled from the PVK and a crystallization was present over the surface of the films. Film thickness was also measured and films deposited from toluene solutions gave an average thickness of 54 nm while films from chloroform solutions had an average thickness greater than 160 nm that increased depending on chromophore concentration.

  4. Searches for spatial anisotropy and a permanent atomic electric dipole moment using optically-pumped mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamoreaux, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance frequencies of 201 Hg (l = 3/2) and 199 Hg (l = 1.2) were compared in driven optically-pumped atomic light-absorption oscillators to see if the relative frequencies depend on the orientation of the quantization axis in space. The null result obtained (δnu 199 Hg nuclear magnetic resonance frequency in the presence of a reversible electric field of 9 kV/cm. The null result obtained (d/sub A/ < 5e cm) reduces previous limits on possible time-reversal violating interactions in atoms by an order of magnitude

  5. SHORT COMMUNICATION: Comparison between two mobile absolute gravimeters: optical versus atomic interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlet, S.; Bodart, Q.; Malossi, N.; Landragin, A.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Gitlein, O.; Timmen, L.

    2010-08-01

    We report a comparison between two absolute gravimeters: the LNE-SYRTE cold atom gravimeter and FG5#220 of Leibniz Universität of Hannover. They rely on different principles of operation: atomic and optical interferometry. Both are movable which enabled them to participate in the last International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters (ICAG'09) at BIPM. Immediately after, their bilateral comparison took place in the LNE watt balance laboratory and showed an agreement of (4.3 ± 6.4) µGal.

  6. High-speed atomic force microscopy combined with inverted optical microscopy for studying cellular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuki; Sakai, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Aiko; Uekusa, Yoshitsugu; Yagi, Akira; Imaoka, Yuka; Ito, Shuichi; Karaki, Koichi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopy (AFM)-optical fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating cellular morphologies and events. However, the slow data acquisition rates of the conventional AFM unit of the hybrid system limit the visualization of structural changes during cellular events. Therefore, high-speed AFM units equipped with an optical/fluorescence detection device have been a long-standing wish. Here we describe the implementation of high-speed AFM coupled with an optical fluorescence microscope. This was accomplished by developing a tip-scanning system, instead of a sample-scanning system, which operates on an inverted optical microscope. This novel device enabled the acquisition of high-speed AFM images of morphological changes in individual cells. Using this instrument, we conducted structural studies of living HeLa and 3T3 fibroblast cell surfaces. The improved time resolution allowed us to image dynamic cellular events.

  7. Observation and measurement of interaction-induced dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, V.; Bimbard, E.; Stanojevic, J.

    2012-01-01

    We observe and measure dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental results are in agreement with a simple model where the optical nonlinearities are due to the progressive appearance of a Rydberg blockaded volume within...

  8. Optical Spectra of Candidate International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Flat-spectrum Radio Sources. III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Pursimo, T. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope Apartado 474E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Jauncey, David L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF and Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Zenere, Katrina A., E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2017-04-01

    In extending our spectroscopic program, which targets sources drawn from the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Catalog, we have obtained spectra for ∼160 compact, flat-spectrum radio sources and determined redshifts for 112 quasars and radio galaxies. A further 14 sources with featureless spectra have been classified as BL Lac objects. Spectra were obtained at three telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, and the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes in Hawaii and Chile. While most of the sources are powerful quasars, a significant fraction of radio galaxies is also included from the list of non-defining ICRF radio sources.

  9. Study of X-Ray and $\\gamma$-Ray Spectra from Antiprotonic Atoms at the Slowly Extracted Antiproton Beam of LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will study the X-ray spectra of antiprotonic atoms and the $\\gamma$ spectra of residual nuclei after the antiproton absorption. We intend to begin with measurements on selected isotopically pure targets. Strong interaction effects, the antiproton absorption and the atomic cascade are analysed through the measurement of energies, lineshapes, relative and absolute intensities of all observable lines. The experiments are continued to determine st in resolved fine structure levels and in different isotopes of the same element. Coincidence techniques may be applied. All components of the experimental set-up are already existing from previous experiments and we could begin the measurements with any slowly extracted beam of low energy at LEAR.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: A library of high-S/N optical spectra of FGKM stars (Yee+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, S. W.; Petigura, E. A.; von Braun, K.

    2017-09-01

    Classification of stars, by comparing their optical spectra to a few dozen spectral standards, has been a workhorse of observational astronomy for more than a century. Here, we extend this technique by compiling a library of optical spectra of 404 touchstone stars observed with Keck/HIRES by the California Planet Search. The spectra have high resolution (R~60000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N~150/pixel), and are registered onto a common wavelength scale. The library stars have properties derived from interferometry, asteroseismology, LTE spectral synthesis, and spectrophotometry. To address a lack of well-characterized late-K dwarfs in the literature, we measure stellar radii and temperatures for 23 nearby K dwarfs, using modeling of the spectral energy distribution and Gaia parallaxes. This library represents a uniform data set spanning the spectral types ~M5-F1 (Teff~3000-7000K, R*~0.1-16R{Sun}). We also present "Empirical SpecMatch" (SpecMatch-Emp), a tool for parameterizing unknown spectra by comparing them against our spectral library. For FGKM stars, SpecMatch-Emp achieves accuracies of 100K in effective temperature (Teff), 15% in stellar radius (R*), and 0.09dex in metallicity ([Fe/H]). Because the code relies on empirical spectra it performs particularly well for stars ~K4 and later, which are challenging to model with existing spectral synthesizers, reaching accuracies of 70K in Teff, 10% in R*, and 0.12dex in [Fe/H]. We also validate the performance of SpecMatch-Emp, finding it to be robust at lower spectral resolution and S/N, enabling the characterization of faint late-type stars. Both the library and stellar characterization code are publicly available. (2 data files).

  11. Built-in electric field effect on optical absorption spectra of strained (In,Ga)N–GaN nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ghazi, Haddou, E-mail: hadghazi@gmail.com [LPS, Faculty of Science, Dhar EL Mehrez, BP 1796 Fes-Atlas (Morocco); Special Mathematics, CPGE Rabat, Rabat (Morocco); John Peter, A. [Department of Physics, Govt. Arts and Science College, Melur, 625106 Madurai (India)

    2015-08-15

    Based on the effective-mass and the one band parabolic approximations, first order linear, third-order nonlinear and total optical properties related to 1s–1p intra-conduction band transition in wurtzite strained (In,Ga)N–GaN spherical QDs are calculated. The built-in electric field effect, due to the spontaneous and piezoelectric components, is investigated variationally under finite confinement potential. The results reveal that size and internal composition of the dot have a great influence on in-built electric field which affects strongly the optical absorption spectra. It is also found that the modulation of the absorption coefficient, which is suitable for the better performance of optical device applications, can be easily obtained by adjusting geometrical size and internal composition.

  12. Vibrational analysis of various irotopes of L-alanyl-L-alanine in aqueous solution: Vibrational Absorption (VA), Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD), Raman and Raman Optical Activity (ROA) Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Nieminen, R.M.; Knapp-Mohammady, M.

    2003-01-01

    . DFT Becke3LYP/6-31G* theory has been used to determine the geometry, Hessian, atomic polar tensors (APT), and atomic axial tensors (AAT), and the electric dipole-electric dipole polarizability derivatives (EDEDPD), which are required for us to simulate the VA, VCD, and Raman spectra. The electric...

  13. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant, E-mail: vasant@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2016-08-26

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on. - Highlights: • Getter-source loaded magneto-optic trap (MOT). • Cold atomic beam generated by deflection from the MOT. • Use of two inclined beams for deflection.

  14. Mesoscale cavities in hollow-core waveguides for quantum optics with atomic ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haapamaki C.M.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-mode hollow-core waveguides loaded with atomic ensembles offer an excellent platform for light–matter interactions and nonlinear optics at low photon levels. We review and discuss possible approaches for incorporating mirrors, cavities, and Bragg gratings into these waveguides without obstructing their hollow cores. With these additional features controlling the light propagation in the hollow-core waveguides, one could potentially achieve optical nonlinearities controllable by single photons in systems with small footprints that can be integrated on a chip. We propose possible applications such as single-photon transistors and superradiant lasers that could be implemented in these enhanced hollow-core waveguides.

  15. Phylogenetic Distribution of Leaf Spectra and Optically Derived Functional Traits in the American Oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender-Bares, J.; Meireles, J. E.; Couture, J. J.; Kaproth, M.; Townsend, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Detecting functional traits of species, genotypes and phylogenetic lineages is critical in monitoring functional biodiversity remotely. We examined the phylogenetic distribution of leaf spectra across the American Oaks for 35 species under greenhouse conditions as well as genetic variation in leaf spectra across Central American populations of a single species grown in common gardens in Honduras. We found significant phylogenetic signal in the leaf spectra (Blomberg's K > 1.0), indicating similarity in spectra among close relatives. Across species, full range leaf spectra were used in a Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) that allowed species calibration (kappa statistic = 0.55). Validation of the model used to detect species (kappa statistic = 0.4) indicated reasonably good detection of individual species within the same the genus. Among four populations from Belize, Costa Rica, Honduras, and Mexico within a single species (Quercus oleoides), leaf spectra were also able to differentiate populations. Ordination of population-level data using dissimilarities of predicted foliar traits, including leaf mass per area (LMA), lignin content, fiber content, chlorophyll a+b, and C:N ratio in genotypes in either watered or unwatered conditions showed significant differentiation among populations and treatments. These results provide promise for remote detection and differentiation of plant functional traits among plant phylogenetic lineages and genotypes, even among closely related populations and species.

  16. An open source digital servo for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibrandt, D. R., E-mail: david.leibrandt@nist.gov; Heidecker, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We describe a general purpose digital servo optimized for feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. The servo is capable of feedback bandwidths up to roughly 1 MHz (limited by the 320 ns total latency); loop filter shapes up to fifth order; multiple-input, multiple-output control; and automatic lock acquisition. The configuration of the servo is controlled via a graphical user interface, which also provides a rudimentary software oscilloscope and tools for measurement of system transfer functions. We illustrate the functionality of the digital servo by describing its use in two example scenarios: frequency control of the laser used to probe the narrow clock transition of {sup 27}Al{sup +} in an optical atomic clock, and length control of a cavity used for resonant frequency doubling of a laser.

  17. Compact Optical Atomic Clock Based on a Two-Photon Transition in Rubidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kyle W.; Phelps, Gretchen; Lemke, Nathan D.; Bigelow, Matthew S.; Stuhl, Benjamin; Wojcik, Michael; Holt, Michael; Coddington, Ian; Bishop, Michael W.; Burke, John H.

    2018-01-01

    Extralaboratory atomic clocks are necessary for a wide array of applications (e.g., satellite-based navigation and communication). Building upon existing vapor-cell and laser technologies, we describe an optical atomic clock, designed around a simple and manufacturable architecture, that utilizes the 778-nm two-photon transition in rubidium and yields fractional-frequency instabilities of 4 ×10-13/√{τ (s ) } for τ from 1 to 10 000 s. We present a complete stability budget for this system and explore the required conditions under which a fractional-frequency instability of 1 ×10-15 can be maintained on long time scales. We provide a precise characterization of the leading sensitivities to external processes, including magnetic fields and fluctuations of the vapor-cell temperature and 778-nm laser power. The system is constructed primarily from commercially available components, an attractive feature from the standpoint of the commercialization and deployment of optical frequency standards.

  18. The Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, Ken R. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Bucher, Maximilian; Bozek, John D.; Carron, Sebastian; Castagna, Jean-Charles [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Coffee, Ryan [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Pulse Institute, Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Curiel, G. Ivan; Holmes, Michael; Krzywinski, Jacek; Messerschmidt, Marc; Minitti, Michael; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Noonan, Peter; Osipov, Timur; Schorb, Sebastian; Swiggers, Michele; Wallace, Alexander; Yin, Jing [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Bostedt, Christoph, E-mail: bostedt@slac.stanford.edu [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Pulse Institute, Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-17

    A description of the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences (AMO) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source is presented. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the imaging, time-resolved spectroscopy and high-power density capabilities of the AMO instrument. The Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) provides a tight soft X-ray focus into one of three experimental endstations. The flexible instrument design is optimized for studying a wide variety of phenomena requiring peak intensity. There is a suite of spectrometers and two photon area detectors available. An optional mirror-based split-and-delay unit can be used for X-ray pump–probe experiments. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the imaging, time-resolved spectroscopy and high-power density capabilities of the AMO instrument.

  19. An open source digital servo for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibrandt, D. R.; Heidecker, J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a general purpose digital servo optimized for feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. The servo is capable of feedback bandwidths up to roughly 1 MHz (limited by the 320 ns total latency); loop filter shapes up to fifth order; multiple-input, multiple-output control; and automatic lock acquisition. The configuration of the servo is controlled via a graphical user interface, which also provides a rudimentary software oscilloscope and tools for measurement of system transfer functions. We illustrate the functionality of the digital servo by describing its use in two example scenarios: frequency control of the laser used to probe the narrow clock transition of 27Al+ in an optical atomic clock, and length control of a cavity used for resonant frequency doubling of a laser.

  20. An open source digital servo for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibrandt, D. R.; Heidecker, J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a general purpose digital servo optimized for feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. The servo is capable of feedback bandwidths up to roughly 1 MHz (limited by the 320 ns total latency); loop filter shapes up to fifth order; multiple-input, multiple-output control; and automatic lock acquisition. The configuration of the servo is controlled via a graphical user interface, which also provides a rudimentary software oscilloscope and tools for measurement of system transfer functions. We illustrate the functionality of the digital servo by describing its use in two example scenarios: frequency control of the laser used to probe the narrow clock transition of 27 Al + in an optical atomic clock, and length control of a cavity used for resonant frequency doubling of a laser

  1. Quantum Optics 6 - Quantum Engineering of Atoms and Photons - Conference Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The conference organized by Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics and Warsaw University, sponsored by European Science Foundation, was held in Krynica (120 km south-east of Cracow), Poland, June 13-18 2005. This was the sixth conference of the cycle, the previous one was held in Koscielisko, Poland in 2001. This time the main subject of the conference was: Quantum Engineering of Atoms and Photons. The meeting was focused on the physics of ultracold quantum gases, which without doubts determines the frontiers of the modern atomic, molecular and optical physics. Special attention was also be given to quantum information processing, both from theoretical and experimental point of view, including possible realizations in ultracold quantum gases. The conference consisted of invited lectures and a poster session. Competition for the best poster was held, sponsored by Journal of Optics B and Journal of Physics B - for more on this, including the results of the competition visit. (author)

  2. An integrated instrumental setup for the combination of atomic force microscopy with optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, R J; Heyes, C D; Knebel, D; Röcker, C; Nienhaus, G U

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, the study of single biomolecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques has resulted in a plethora of new information regarding the physics underlying these complex biological systems. It is especially advantageous to be able to measure the optical, topographical, and mechanical properties of single molecules simultaneously. Here an AFM is used that is especially designed for integration with an inverted optical microscope and that has a near-infrared light source (850 nm) to eliminate interference between the optical experiment and the AFM operation. The Tip Assisted Optics (TAO) system consists of an additional 100 x 100-microm(2) X-Y scanner for the sample, which can be independently and simultaneously used with the AFM scanner. This allows the offset to be removed between the confocal optical image obtained with the sample scanner and the simultaneously acquired AFM topography image. The tip can be positioned exactly into the optical focus while the user can still navigate within the AFM image for imaging or manipulation of the sample. Thus the tip-enhancement effect can be maximized and it becomes possible to perform single molecule manipulation experiments within the focus of a confocal optical image. Here this is applied to simultaneous measurement of single quantum dot fluorescence and topography with high spatial resolution. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Microfluidic Imaging Flow Cytometry by Asymmetric-detection Time-stretch Optical Microscopy (ATOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Anson H L; Lai, Queenie T K; Chung, Bob M F; Lee, Kelvin C M; Mok, Aaron T Y; Yip, G K; Shum, Anderson H C; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2017-06-28

    Scaling the number of measurable parameters, which allows for multidimensional data analysis and thus higher-confidence statistical results, has been the main trend in the advanced development of flow cytometry. Notably, adding high-resolution imaging capabilities allows for the complex morphological analysis of cellular/sub-cellular structures. This is not possible with standard flow cytometers. However, it is valuable for advancing our knowledge of cellular functions and can benefit life science research, clinical diagnostics, and environmental monitoring. Incorporating imaging capabilities into flow cytometry compromises the assay throughput, primarily due to the limitations on speed and sensitivity in the camera technologies. To overcome this speed or throughput challenge facing imaging flow cytometry while preserving the image quality, asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) has been demonstrated to enable high-contrast, single-cell imaging with sub-cellular resolution, at an imaging throughput as high as 100,000 cells/s. Based on the imaging concept of conventional time-stretch imaging, which relies on all-optical image encoding and retrieval through the use of ultrafast broadband laser pulses, ATOM further advances imaging performance by enhancing the image contrast of unlabeled/unstained cells. This is achieved by accessing the phase-gradient information of the cells, which is spectrally encoded into single-shot broadband pulses. Hence, ATOM is particularly advantageous in high-throughput measurements of single-cell morphology and texture - information indicative of cell types, states, and even functions. Ultimately, this could become a powerful imaging flow cytometry platform for the biophysical phenotyping of cells, complementing the current state-of-the-art biochemical-marker-based cellular assay. This work describes a protocol to establish the key modules of an ATOM system (from optical frontend to data processing and visualization

  4. Translational Entanglement of Dipole-Dipole Interacting Atoms in Optical Lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Opatrny, T.; Deb, B.; Kurizki, G.

    2003-01-01

    We propose and investigate a realization of the position- and momentum-correlated Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) states [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)] that have hitherto eluded detection. The realization involves atom pairs that are confined to adjacent sites of two mutually shifted optical lattices and are entangled via laser-induced dipole-dipole interactions. The EPR "paradox" with translational variables is then modified by lattice-diffraction effects, and can be verified to a high degree of ...

  5. An Optical Characterization of Atomization in Non-Evaporating Diesel Sprays

    OpenAIRE

    Lockett, R. D.; Jeshani, M.; Makri, K.; Price, R.

    2016-01-01

    High-speed planar laser Mie scattering and Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) was employed for the determination of Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) distribution in non-evaporating diesel sprays. The effect of rail pressure, distillation profile, and consequent fuel viscosity on the drop size distribution developing during primary and secondary atomization was investigated. Samples of conventional crude-oil derived middle-distillate diesel and light distillate kerosene were delivered into an optical...

  6. Nano-fabrication of diffractive optics for soft X-ray and atom beam focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehbein, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nano-structuring processes are described for manufacturing diffractive optics for the condenser-monochromator set-up of the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) and for the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the BESSY II electron storage ring in Berlin. Furthermore, a process for manufacturing free-standing nickel zone plates for helium atom beam focusing experiments is presented. (author)

  7. Spatial discrimination against background with different optical systems for collection of fluorescence in laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with a graphite tube electrothermal atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzefovsky, A I; Lonardo, R F; Michel, R G

    1995-07-01

    A single 90 degrees off-axis ellipsoidal mirror fragment was used in a dispersive detection system for electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The performance of the new optical arrangement was compared with those of optical arrangements that employed a plane mirror in combination with biconvex or plano-convex lenses. All the optical arrangements collected fluorescence in a scheme called front surface illustration. BEAM-4, an optical ray tracing program, was used for calculations of spatial ray distributions and optical collection efficiency for the various optical configurations. Experimentally, the best collection efficiency was obtained by use of the ellipsoidal mirror, in qualitative agreement with simulations done by use of the BEAM-4 software. The best detection limit for cobalt with the new optical arrangement was 20 fg, which was a factor of 5 better than that obtained with conventional optical arrangements with otherwise the same instrumentation. The signal-to-background ratio and the fluorescence collection efficiency were also studied as a function of position of the optical components for the various optical arrangements. For both cobalt and phosphorus, the signal-to-background ratio with the new optical arrangement remained stable within 10-20% during +/- 8 mm shifts in the position of the detection system from the focal plane of the optics. Overall, the new optical arrangement offered high collection efficiency, excellent sensitivity, and facile optical alignment due to efficient spatial separation between the fluorescence signal and the background radiation. The advantages of the new optical arrangement were particularly important during measurements in the presence of high levels of blackbody radiation.

  8. Microwave-to-optical frequency conversion using a cesium atom coupled to a superconducting resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Bryan T.; Jacobs, Kurt; McDermott, R.; Saffman, M.

    2017-07-01

    A candidate for converting quantum information from microwave to optical frequencies is the use of a single atom that interacts with a superconducting microwave resonator on one hand and an optical cavity on the other. The large electric dipole moments and microwave transition frequencies possessed by Rydberg states allow them to couple strongly to superconducting devices. Lasers can then be used to connect a Rydberg transition to an optical transition to realize the conversion. Since the fundamental source of noise in this process is spontaneous emission from the atomic levels, the resulting control problem involves choosing the pulse shapes of the driving lasers so as to maximize the transfer rate while minimizing this loss. Here we consider the concrete example of a cesium atom, along with two specific choices for the levels to be used in the conversion cycle. Under the assumption that spontaneous emission is the only significant source of errors, we use numerical optimization to determine the likely rates for reliable quantum communication that could be achieved with this device. These rates are on the order of a few megaqubits per second.

  9. Fast, High-Precision Optical Polarization Synthesizer for Ultracold-Atom Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robens, Carsten; Brakhane, Stefan; Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Zopes, Jonathan; Alberti, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    We present a technique for the precision synthesis of arbitrary polarization states of light with a high modulation bandwidth. Our approach consists of superimposing two laser light fields with the same wavelength, but with opposite circular polarizations, where the phase and the amplitude of each light field are individually controlled. We find that the polarization-synthesized beam reaches a degree of polarization of 99.99%, which is mainly limited by static spatial variations of the polarization state over the beam profile. We also find that the depolarization caused by temporal fluctuations of the polarization state is about 2 orders of magnitude smaller. In a recent work, Robens et al. [Low-Entropy States of Neutral Atoms in Polarization-Synthesized Optical Lattices, Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 065302 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.065302] demonstrated an application of the polarization synthesizer to create two independently controllable optical lattices which trap atoms depending on their internal spin state. We use ultracold atoms in polarization-synthesized optical lattices to give an independent, in situ demonstration of the performance of the polarization synthesizer.

  10. Can a one-layer optical skin model including melanin and inhomogeneously distributed blood explain spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectra?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hanna; Pettersson, Anders; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2011-02-01

    Model based analysis of calibrated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can be used for determining oxygenation and concentration of skin chromophores. This study aimed at assessing the effect of including melanin in addition to hemoglobin (Hb) as chromophores and compensating for inhomogeneously distributed blood (vessel packaging), in a single-layer skin model. Spectra from four humans were collected during different provocations using a twochannel fiber optic probe with source-detector separations 0.4 and 1.2 mm. Absolute calibrated spectra using data from either a single distance or both distances were analyzed using inverse Monte Carlo for light transport and Levenberg-Marquardt for non-linear fitting. The model fitting was excellent using a single distance. However, the estimated model failed to explain spectra from the other distance. The two-distance model did not fit the data well at either distance. Model fitting was significantly improved including melanin and vessel packaging. The most prominent effect when fitting data from the larger separation compared to the smaller separation was a different light scattering decay with wavelength, while the tissue fraction of Hb and saturation were similar. For modeling spectra at both distances, we propose using either a multi-layer skin model or a more advanced model for the scattering phase function.

  11. Photon-Mediated Quantum Gate between Two Neutral Atoms in an Optical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welte, Stephan; Hacker, Bastian; Daiss, Severin; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2018-02-01

    Quantum logic gates are fundamental building blocks of quantum computers. Their integration into quantum networks requires strong qubit coupling to network channels, as can be realized with neutral atoms and optical photons in cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we demonstrate that the long-range interaction mediated by a flying photon performs a gate between two stationary atoms inside an optical cavity from which the photon is reflected. This single step executes the gate in 2 μ s . We show an entangling operation between the two atoms by generating a Bell state with 76(2)% fidelity. The gate also operates as a cnot. We demonstrate 74.1(1.6)% overlap between the observed and the ideal gate output, limited by the state preparation fidelity of 80.2(0.8)%. As the atoms are efficiently connected to a photonic channel, our gate paves the way towards quantum networking with multiqubit nodes and the distribution of entanglement in repeater-based long-distance quantum networks.

  12. Harmonic detection of magnetic resonance for sensitivity improvement of optical atomic magnetometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjbaran, M. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehranchi, M.M., E-mail: teranchi@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hamidi, S.M. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalkhali, S.M.H. [Physics Department, Kharazmi University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Highly sensitive atomic magnetometers use optically detected magnetic resonance of atomic spins to measure extremely weak magnetic field changes. The magnetometer sensitivity is directly proportional to the ratio of intensity to line-shape of the resonance signal. To obtain narrower resonance signal, we implemented harmonic detection of magnetic resonance method in M{sub x} configuration. The nonlinear spin polarization dynamics in detection of the higher harmonics were employed in phenomenological Bloch equations. The measured and simulated harmonic components of the resonance signals in frequency domain yielded significantly narrower line-width accompanying much improved sensitivity. Our results confirm the sensitivity improvement by a factor of two in optical atomic magnetometer via second harmonic signal which can open a new insight in the weak magnetic field measurement system design. - Highlights: • Highly sensitive atomic magnetometers have been used to measure weak magentic filed. • To obtain narrower resonance signal, we impalnted harmonic detection of magnetic resonance. • The nonlinear spin polarization dynamics in detetion of the higher harmonics were imployed.

  13. Photon-Mediated Quantum Gate between Two Neutral Atoms in an Optical Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Welte

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantum logic gates are fundamental building blocks of quantum computers. Their integration into quantum networks requires strong qubit coupling to network channels, as can be realized with neutral atoms and optical photons in cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we demonstrate that the long-range interaction mediated by a flying photon performs a gate between two stationary atoms inside an optical cavity from which the photon is reflected. This single step executes the gate in 2  μs. We show an entangling operation between the two atoms by generating a Bell state with 76(2% fidelity. The gate also operates as a cnot. We demonstrate 74.1(1.6% overlap between the observed and the ideal gate output, limited by the state preparation fidelity of 80.2(0.8%. As the atoms are efficiently connected to a photonic channel, our gate paves the way towards quantum networking with multiqubit nodes and the distribution of entanglement in repeater-based long-distance quantum networks.

  14. Slow-light solitons in atomic media and doped optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolkova, N.; Sinclair, G.F.; Leonhardt, U.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We show how to generate optical solitons in atomic media that can be slowed down or accelerated at will. Such slow-light soliton is a polarization structure propagating with a speed that is proportional to the total intensity of the incident light. Ultimately, this method will allow the storage, retrieval and possibly the manipulation of the quantum information in atomic media. Solitons with controllable speed are constructed generalizing the theory of slow-light propagation to an integrable regime of nonlinear dynamics. For the first time, the inverse scattering method for slow-light solitons is developed. In contrast to the pioneering experimental demonstrations of slow light, we consider strong spin modulations where the non-linear dynamics of light and atoms creates polarization solitons. We also analyze how this scheme can be implemented in optical fibers doped with Lambda-atoms. In quantum-information applications, such slow-light solitons could complement the use of quantum solitons in fibres with the advantage of storing quantum information in media and complement methods for quantum memory with the advantages of non-linear dynamics, in particular the intrinsic stability of solitons. (author)

  15. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  16. Multiplexing 32,000 spectra onto 8 detectors: the HARMONI field splitting, image slicing, and wavelength selecting optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Clarke, Fraser; Freeman, David; Kosmalski, Johan

    2012-09-01

    HARMONI, the High Angular Resolution Monolithic Optical & Near-infrared Integral field spectrograph is one of two first-light instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Over a 256x128 pixel field-of-view HARMONI will simultaneously measure approximately 32,000 spectra. Each spectrum is about 4000 spectral pixels long, and covers a selectable part of the 0.47-2.45 μm wavelength range at resolving powers of either R≍4000, 10000, or 20000. All 32,000 spectra are imaged onto eight HAWAII4RG detectors using a multiplexing scheme that divides the input field into four sub-fields, each imaged onto one image slicer that in turn re-arranges a single sub-field into two long exit slits feeding one spectrograph each. In total we require eight spectrographs, each with one HAWAII4RG detector. A system of articulated and exchangeable fold-mirrors and VPH gratings allows one to select different spectral resolving powers and wavelength ranges of interest while keeping a fixed geometry between the spectrograph collimator and camera avoiding the need for an articulated grating and camera. In this paper we describe both the field splitting and image slicing optics as well as the optics that will be used to select both spectral resolving power and wavelength range.

  17. Optical-absorption spectra associated with shallow donor impurities in GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum-dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Valencia, J.

    1995-08-01

    The binding energy of a hydrogenic donor impurity and the optical-absorption spectra associated with transitions between the n=1 valence level and the donor-impurity band were calculated for infinite barrier-well spherical GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum-dots of different radii, using the effective mass approximation within a variational scheme. An absorption peak associated with transitions involving impurities at the center of the well and a peak related with impurities at the edge of the dot were the main features observed for the different radii of the dots considered in the calculations. Also as a result of the higher electronic confinement in a quantum- dot, we found a much wider energy range of the absorption spectra when compared to infinite GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum-wells and quantum-well wires of width and diameter comparable to the diameter of the quantum dot. (author). 13 refs, 3 figs

  18. Continuous registration of optical absorption spectra of periodically produced solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, P.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption spectra of unstable intermediates, such as solvated electrons, were usually taken point by point, recording the time-dependent light absorption after their production by a flash. The experimental arrangement for continuous recording of the spectra consists of a conventional one beam spectral photometer with a stabilized white light source, a monochromator, and a light detector. By periodic production of light absorbing intermediates such as solvated electrons, e.g., by ac uv light, a small ac signal is modulated on the light detector output which after amplification can be continuously recorded as a function of wavelength. This method allows the detection of absorption spectra when disturbances from the outside provide a signal-to-noise ratio smaller than 1

  19. Optical gain in an optically driven three-level ? system in atomic Rb vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmann, C. W.; Yakovlev, V. V.

    2018-06-01

    In this work, we report experimentally achieved optical gain of a weak probe beam in a three-level ? system in a low density Rubidium vapor cell driven by a single pump beam. The maximum measured gain of the probe beam was about 0.12%. This work could lead to new approaches for enhancing molecular spectroscopy applications.

  20. Ultracold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattices approaching the Tonks-Girardeau regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollet, L.; Rombouts, S.M.A.; Denteneer, P.J. H.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments on ultracold atomic alkali gases in a one-dimensional optical lattice have demonstrated the transition from a gas of soft-core bosons to a Tonks-Girardeau gas in the hard-core limit, where one-dimensional bosons behave like fermions in many respects. We have studied the underlying many-body physics through numerical simulations which accommodate both the soft-core and hard-core limits in one single framework. We find that the Tonks-Girardeau gas is reached only at the strongest optical lattice potentials. Results for slightly higher densities, where the gas develops a Mott-like phase already at weaker optical lattice potentials, show that these Mott-like short-range correlations do not enhance the convergence to the hard-core limit

  1. Dislocations in AlGaN: Core Structure, Atom Segregation, and Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massabuau, Fabien C-P; Rhode, Sneha L; Horton, Matthew K; O'Hanlon, Thomas J; Kovács, András; Zielinski, Marcin S; Kappers, Menno J; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Humphreys, Colin J; Oliver, Rachel A

    2017-08-09

    We conducted a comprehensive investigation of dislocations in Al 0.46 Ga 0.54 N. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the atomic structure and atom distribution at the dislocation core have been examined. We report that the core configuration of dislocations in AlGaN is consistent with that of other materials in the III-Nitride system. However, we observed that the dissociation of mixed-type dislocations is impeded by alloying GaN with AlN, which is confirmed by our experimental observation of Ga and Al atom segregation in the tensile and compressive parts of the dislocations, respectively. Investigation of the optical properties of the dislocations shows that the atom segregation at dislocations has no significant effect on the intensity recorded by cathodoluminescence in the vicinity of the dislocations. These results are in contrast with the case of dislocations in In 0.09 Ga 0.91 N where segregation of In and Ga atoms also occurs but results in carrier localization limiting non-radiative recombination at the dislocation. This study therefore sheds light on why InGaN-based devices are generally more resilient to dislocations than their AlGaN-based counterparts.

  2. General Method for Calculating the Response and Noise Spectra of Active Fabry-Perot Semiconductor Waveguides With External Optical Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaaberg, Søren; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical method for calculating small-signal modulation responses and noise spectra of active Fabry-Perot semiconductor waveguides with external light injection. Small-signal responses due to either a modulation of the pump current or due to an optical amplitude or phase modulatio...... amplifiers and an injection-locked laser. We also demonstrate the applicability of the method to analyze slow and fast light effects in semiconductor waveguides. Finite reflectivities of the facets are found to influence the phase changes of the injected microwave-modulated light....

  3. Many-body dynamics with cold atoms and molecules in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachenmayer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Systems of cold atoms or molecules, trapped in a periodic potential formed from standing waves of laser light, provide an experimental possibility to study strongly correlated many-body lattice models, which are traditionally used in condensed matter physics. Due to the relatively weak energy scales in these ''optical lattices'' (next-neighbor tunneling energies are typically on the order of tens of Hertz), the time-scales of the dynamics in these systems is relatively slow and can be observed in experiments. Furthermore, the microscopic parameters of the models can be very well controlled by lattice laser intensities and external fields. Thus, optical lattices provide an excellent framework to study many-body quantum non-equilibrium dynamics, which on the theoretical level is the topic of this thesis. This thesis contains a study of many-body dynamics in optical lattices for both idealized isolated models and realistic models with imperfections. It is centered around four main topics: The first two topics are studies of coherent many-body dynamics. This contains explicitly: (i) an analysis of the possibility to dynamically prepare crystalline states of Rydberg atoms or polar molecules by adiabatically tuning laser parameters; and (ii) a study of the collapses and revivals of the momentum-distribution of a Bose-Einstein condensate with a fixed number of atoms, which is suddenly loaded into a deep optical lattice. The third main topic is entanglement and specifically the dynamical growth of entanglement between portions of an optical lattice in quench experiments. A method to create and measure large-scale entanglement is presented in this thesis. The fourth main topic addresses classical noise. Specifically, a system of atoms in an optical lattice, which is created from lasers with intensity fluctuations, is analyzed in this work. The noisy evolution of many-body correlation functions is studied and a method to cancel this noise in a realistic experimental setup is

  4. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    OpenAIRE

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in ...

  5. Application of magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to the optical spectra of natural and irradiated diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, I.N.; Ruciman, W.A.; Australian National Univ., Canberra. Research School of Physical Sciences)

    1977-01-01

    The MCD spectra of natural type Ia and electron-irradiated type Ia and type IIa diamonds have been measured. The information obtained from MCD spectroscopy complements that obtained from absorption spectroscopy and can be helpful in the assignment of electronic transitions. (orig.) [de

  6. Effect of Er doping on optical transmission and EL spectra of (Zn, Cd)S:Cu phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, P.K.; Nandgave, J.K.; Lawangar Pawar, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Powder phosphors((Znsub(0.4)Cdsub(0.6))S)doped with Cu and Er have been prepared under the inert atmosphere of argon. The optical transmission spectra of Cu doped phosphors have been investigated and explained on the basis of copper associated defect states. The improvement of optical transmission of the phosphors due to Er doping has been reported and explained. The EL emission spectrum of (Znsub(0.4)Cdsub(0.6))S:Cu:Er phosphors exhibits two broad bands characteristic of Cu. The absence of characteristic Er bands has been explained as an effect of thermal quenching of Er donor levels. (author). 9 refs., 2 figs

  7. Coherent optical transients observed in rubidium atomic line filtered Doppler velocimetry experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, Mario E., E-mail: mario.fajardo@eglin.af.mil; Molek, Christopher D.; Vesely, Annamaria L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, Ordnance Division, Energetic Materials Branch, AFRL/RWME, 2306 Perimeter Road, Eglin AFB, Florida 32542-5910 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    We report the first successful results from our novel Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered (RALF) Doppler velocimetry apparatus, along with unanticipated oscillatory signals due to coherent optical transients generated within pure Rb vapor cells. RALF is a high-velocity and high-acceleration extension of the well-known Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) technique for constructing multi-dimensional flow velocity vector maps in aerodynamics experiments [H. Komine, U.S. Patent No. 4,919,536 (24 April 1990)]. RALF exploits the frequency dependence of pressure-broadened Rb atom optical absorptions in a heated Rb/N{sub 2} gas cell to encode the Doppler shift of reflected near-resonant (λ{sub 0} ≈ 780.24 nm) laser light onto the intensity transmitted by the cell. The present RALF apparatus combines fiber optic and free-space components and was built to determine suitable operating conditions and performance parameters for the Rb/N{sub 2} gas cells. It yields single-spot velocities of thin laser-driven-flyer test surfaces and incorporates a simultaneous Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) channel [Strand et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 083108 (2006)] for validation of the RALF results, which we demonstrate here over the v = 0 to 1 km/s range. Both RALF and DGV presume the vapor cells to be simple Beer's Law optical absorbers, so we were quite surprised to observe oscillatory signals in experiments employing low pressure pure Rb vapor cells. We interpret these oscillations as interference between the Doppler shifted reflected light and the Free Induction Decay (FID) coherent optical transient produced within the pure Rb cells at the original laser frequency; this is confirmed by direct comparison of the PDV and FID signals. We attribute the different behaviors of the Rb/N{sub 2} vs. Rb gas cells to efficient dephasing of the atomic/optical coherences by Rb-N{sub 2} collisions. The minimum necessary N{sub 2} buffer gas density ≈0.3 amagat translates into a

  8. CPAC moisture study: Phase 1 report on the study of optical spectra calibration for moisture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltkamp, D.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses work done to investigate the feasibility of using optical spectroscopic methods, combined with multivariate Partial Least Squares (PLS) calibration modeling, to quantitatively predict the moisture content of the crust material in Hanford's waste tank materials. Experiments were conducted with BY-104 simulant material for the 400--1100 nm (VIS), 1100--2500 (NIR), and 400-4000 cm -1 (IR) optical regions. The test data indicated that the NIR optical region, with a single PLS calibration factor, provided the highest accuracy response (better than 0.5 wt %) over a 0--25 wt % moisture range. Issues relating to the preparation of moisture samples with the BY-104 materials and the potential implementation within hot cell and waste tanks are also discussed. The investigation of potential material interferences, including physical and chemical properties, and the scaled demonstration of fiber optic and camera types of applications with simulated waste tanks are outlined as future work tasks

  9. Procedure for 40K isotope separation from beam of potassium atoms using optical orientation of atoms and radio-frequency excitation of target isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, A.I.; Velichko, A.M.; Vnukov, A.V.; Mal'tsev, K.K.; Nabiev, Sh.Sh.

    1999-01-01

    The procedure for potassium isotope separation, which is liable to reduce of the prise of the product as compared with the up-to-date prise of the 40 K isotope obtained by means of electromagnetic procedure for isotope separation, is proposed. The scheme assumes the increasing flow of the wanted isotope at the sacrifice of the increasing intensity of atomic beam and the increase of the selectivity of need isotope atoms at the sacrifice of the the reduction in the square of collector profile. The objective is achieved that provide of polarized state of the potassium atoms is produced by optic orientation with circular-polarized light [ru

  10. Narrow Line Cooling of 88Sr Atoms in the Magneto-optical Trap for Precision Frequency Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelkin, S. A.; Galyshev, A. A.; Berdasov, O. I.; Gribov, A. Yu.; Sutyrin, D. V.; Khabarova, K. Yu.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Slyusarev, S. N.

    We report on our progress toward the realization of a Strontium optical lattice clock, which is under development at VNIIFTRI as a part of GLONASS program. We've prepared the narrow line width laser system for secondary cooling of 88Sr atoms which allows us to reach atom cloud temperature below 3 μK after second cooling stage.

  11. All-optical atom trap trace analysis for rare krypton isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woelk, Pablo; Kohler, Markus; Sieveke, Carsten; Hebel, Simon; Sahling, Peter [Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker Centre for Science and Peace Research, University of Hamburg (Germany); Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus [Institut fuer Laser-Physik, University of Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The isotope Krypton-85 is an excellent indicator for the detection of nuclear reprocessing activities. However, for the analysis of atmospheric air samples, sensitive measuring methods down to the single atom level are required because of the small concentrations. Furthermore, for a practical and effective detection of clandestine reprocessing, small sample sizes and a high sample throughput rate are desirable. Established methods using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) allow high sensitivity but have a limited throughput of about 200 samples per year, since the vacuum chambers have to be flushed for several hours after each measurement to avoid cross contamination due to the RF-driven excitation of metastable states. Here we present an enhanced ATTA apparatus, which in contrast to the established methods, produces metastable Kr all-optically. This avoids cross contamination, therefore allowing a much higher throughput rate. The apparatus is based on a self-made VUV-lamp and a 2D-3D magneto-optical trap setup. In the 2D trap metastable krypton is produced and a beam of atoms is formed by Doppler-cooling simultaneously.

  12. Improved atom number with a dual color magneto—optical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qiang; Luo Xin-Yu; Gao Kui-Yi; Wang Xiao-Rui; Wang Ru-Quan; Chen Dong-Min

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel dual color magneto—optical trap (MOT), which uses two sets of overlapping laser beams to cool and trap 87 Rb atoms. The volume of cold cloud in the dual color MOT is strongly dependent on the frequency difference of the laser beams and can be significantly larger than that in the normal MOT with single frequency MOT beams. Our experiment shows that the dual color MOT has the same loading rate as the normal MOT, but much longer loading time, leading to threefold increase in the number of trapped atoms. This indicates that the larger number is caused by reduced light induced loss. The dual color MOT is very useful in experiments where both high vacuum level and large atom number are required, such as single chamber quantum memory and Bose—Einstein condensation (BEC) experiments. Compared to the popular dark spontaneous-force optical trap (dark SPOT) technique, our approach is technically simpler and more suitable to low power laser systems. (rapid communication)

  13. Multi-quantum excitation in optically pumped alkali atom: rare gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbally-Kinney, K. L.; Rawlins, W. T.; Davis, S. J.

    2014-03-01

    Diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) technology offers a means of achieving high-energy gas laser output through optical pumping of the D-lines of Cs, Rb, and K. The exciplex effect, based on weak attractive forces between alkali atoms and polarizable rare gas atoms (Ar, Kr, Xe), provides an alternative approach via broadband excitation of exciplex precursors (XPAL). In XPAL configurations, we have observed multi-quantum excitation within the alkali manifolds which result in infrared emission lines between 1 and 4 μm. The observed excited states include the 42FJ states of both Cs and Rb, which are well above the two-photon energy of the excitation laser in each case. We have observed fluorescence from multi-quantum states for excitation wavelengths throughout the exciplex absorption bands of Cs-Ar, Cs-Kr, and Cs-Xe. The intensity scaling is roughly first-order or less in both pump power and alkali concentration, suggesting a collisional energy pooling excitation mechanism. Collisional up-pumping appears to present a parasitic loss term for optically pumped atomic systems at high intensities, however there may also be excitation of other lasing transitions at infrared wavelengths.

  14. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  15. Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, Richard Alexander

    a final value of Qm = 5.8(1.1) x 105, representing more than an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional limits of SiO2 for a pendulum geometry. Our technique may enable new opportunities for mechanical sensing and facilitate observations of quantum behavior in this class of mechanical systems. We then give a detailed overview of the techniques used to produce high-aspect-ratio nanostructures with applications in a wide range of quantum optics experiments. The ability to fabricate such nanodevices with high precision opens the door to a vast array of experiments which integrate macroscopic optical setups with lithographically engineered nanodevices. Coupled with atom-trapping experiments in the Kimble Lab, we use these techniques to realize a new waveguide chip designed to address ultra-cold atoms along lithographically patterned nanobeams which have large atom-photon coupling and near 4pi Steradian optical access for cooling and trapping atoms. We describe a fully integrated and scalable design where cold atoms are spatially overlapped with the nanostring cavities in order to observe a resonant optical depth of d0 ≈ 0.15. The nanodevice illuminates new possibilities for integrating atoms into photonic circuits and engineering quantum states of atoms and light on a microscopic scale. We then describe our work with superconducting microwave resonators coupled to a phononic cavity towards the goal of building an integrated device for quantum-limited microwave-to-optical wavelength conversion. We give an overview of our characterizations of several types of substrates for fabricating a low-loss high-frequency electromechanical system. We describe our electromechanical system fabricated on a SiN membrane which consists of a 12 GHz superconducting LC resonator coupled capacitively to the high frequency localized modes of a phononic nanobeam. Using our suspended membrane geometry we isolate our system from substrates with significant loss tangents

  16. Modeling Optical Spectra of Large Organic Systems Using Real-Time Propagation of Semiempirical Effective Hamiltonians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Andersen, Amity; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2017-09-12

    We present an implementation of a time-dependent semiempirical method (INDO/S) in NWChem using real-time (RT) propagation to address, in principle, the entire spectrum of valence electronic excitations. Adopting this model, we study the UV/vis spectra of medium-sized systems such as P3B2 and f-coronene, and in addition much larger systems such as ubiquitin in the gas phase and the betanin chromophore in the presence of two explicit solvents (water and methanol). RT-INDO/S provides qualitatively and often quantitatively accurate results when compared with RT- TDDFT or experimental spectra. Even though we only consider the INDO/S Hamiltonian in this work, our implementation provides a framework for performing electron dynamics in large systems using semiempirical Hartree-Fock Hamiltonians in general.

  17. The importance of nuclear quantum effects in spectral line broadening of optical spectra and electrostatic properties in aromatic chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Y. K.; Hassanali, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we examine the importance of nuclear quantum effects on capturing the line broadening and vibronic structure of optical spectra. We determine the absorption spectra of three aromatic molecules indole, pyridine, and benzene using time dependent density functional theory with several molecular dynamics sampling protocols: force-field based empirical potentials, ab initio simulations, and finally path-integrals for the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects. We show that the absorption spectrum for all these chromophores are similarly broadened in the presence of nuclear quantum effects regardless of the presence of hydrogen bond donor or acceptor groups. We also show that simulations incorporating nuclear quantum effects are able to reproduce the heterogeneous broadening of the absorption spectra even with empirical force fields. The spectral broadening associated with nuclear quantum effects can be accounted for by the broadened distribution of chromophore size as revealed by a particle in the box model. We also highlight the role that nuclear quantum effects have on the underlying electronic structure of aromatic molecules as probed by various electrostatic properties.

  18. Donor-related optical absorption spectra in GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum wells: hydrostatic pressure effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, S.Y.; Duque, C.A.; Porras-Montenegro, N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Donor-related optical-absorption spectra for GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum wells under hydrostatic pressure are investigated. A variational procedure in the e effective-mass approximation is used in order to obtain binding energies and wave functions. As a general feature, we observe that the binding energy increases with the pressure and with the decreasing of the width of the well. The pressure-related Γ-X crossover has been taken into account in the whole calculation. For the low-pressure regime we observe a linear binding energy behavior, whereas for high pressure the main effect associated with the height of the barrier is the bending of the binding energy curves towards smaller values. Two special structures in the density of impurity states and in the donor-related optical-absorption spectra are observed: an edge associated with transitions involving impurities at the center of the well and a peak associated with transitions related to impurities at the edges of the quantum well. Also, we observe shifts to higher energies of the density of impurity states as a function of the binding energy, as well as changes in the intensity with a red shift of the absorption effect with the hydrostatic pressure. (author)

  19. Establishing the link between fibril formation and Raman optical activity spectra of insulin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kessler, Jiří; Yamamoto, S.; Bouř, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 21 (2017), s. 13614-13621 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05935S; GA ČR GA15-09072S Grant - others:COST(XE) CA15214 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics clusters * absolute configuration * vibrational spectra Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  20. Anharmonic effects in IR, Raman, and Raman optical activity spectra of alanine and proline zwitterions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daněček, Petr; Kapitán, Josef; Baumruk, V.; Bednárová, Lucie; Kopecký, V.; Bouř, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 22 (2007), s. 224513-1 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/0420; GA ČR GA202/07/0732; GA AV ČR IAA400550702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : IR * Raman * ROA spectra * Anharmonic effects Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.044, year: 2007

  1. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.; Martins, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate

  2. Optical potential approach to the electron-atom impact ionization threshold problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, A.; Hahn, Y.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of the threshold law for electron-atom impact ionization is reconsidered as an extrapolation of inelastic cross sections through the ionization threshold. The cross sections are evaluated from a distorted wave matrix element, the final state of which describes the scattering from the Nth excited state of the target atom. The actual calculation is carried for the e-H system, and a model is introduced which is shown to preserve the essential properties of the problem while at the same time reducing the dimensionability of the Schrodinger equation. Nevertheless, the scattering equation is still very complex. It is dominated by the optical potential which is expanded in terms of eigen-spectrum of QHQ. It is shown by actual calculation that the lower eigenvalues of this spectrum descend below the relevant inelastic thresholds; it follows rigorously that the optical potential contains repulsive terms. Analytical solutions of the final state wave function are obtained with several approximations of the optical potential.

  3. Controllable optical bistability in photonic-crystal one-atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaoyong; Lue Shuchen

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the property of optical bistability in a photonic-crystal one-atom laser when nonlinear microcavity is present. The physical system consists of a coherently driven two-level light emitter strongly coupled to a high-quality microcavity which is embedded within a photonic crystal and another coherent probing field which has incident into the microcavity. In our case, the microcavity is fabricated by nonlinear material and placed as an impurity in photonic crystal. This study reveals that such a system can exhibit optical bistability. The dependence of threshold value and hysteresis loop on the photonic band gap of the photonic crystal, driving field Rabi frequency and dephasing processes, are studied. Our results clearly illustrate the ability to control optical bistability through suitable photonic-crystal architectures and external coherent driving field, and this study suggests that in a photonic-crystal nonlinear microcavity, the one-atom laser acts as an effective controllable bistable device in the design of all-light digital computing systems in the near future.

  4. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A., E-mail: pieter.de-beule@inl.int [Applied Nano-Optics Laboratory, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre José Veiga, s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Martins, Marco [Nano-ICs Group, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre José Veiga, s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal)

    2015-09-15

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  5. Optical properties of Lactuca and Taraxacum seed and fruit coats: Their role as light filters [phytochrome, photoblasty, fiber optics, transmission, spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widell, K.-O.; Vogelmann, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    The optical properties of seed and fruit coats were examined from several varieties of light-sensitive achenes. Taraxacum vulgare L. and Lactuca sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids achenes with dark fruit coats and L. sativa cvs Huvudsallat and Issallat with white fruit coats were examined. Transmission spectra varied among the different achenes: white fruit coats of Lactuca acted as neutral density filters between 450 and 780 nm, whereas Taraxacum transmitted 2–36% in this region. The ribbed fruit coat structure greatly affected transmission so that at different locations in the same coat, transmission varied between 20 to 80% at 660 and 730 nm. Fruit coats of Grand Rapids lettuce and Taraxacum transmitted more far-red than red light with T 660 /T 730 ratios of 0.8 and 0.4, respectively. The relationship between the optical properties of fruit coats and light-stimulated germination is discussed. (author)

  6. All-optical spinor Bose-Einstein condensation and the spinor dynamics-driven atom laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Nathan Eric

    Optical trapping as a viable means of exploring the physics of ultracold dilute atomic gases has revealed a new spectrum of physical phenomena. In particular, macroscopic and sudden occupation of the ground state below a critical temperature---a phenomenon known as Bose-Einstein condensation---has become an even richer system for the study of quantum mechanics, ultracold collisions, and many-body physics in general. Optical trapping liberates the spin degree of the BEC, making the order parameter vectorial ('spinor BEC'), as opposed to the scalar order of traditional magnetically trapped condensates. The work described within is divided into two main efforts. The first encompasses the all-optical creation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in rubidium vapor. An all-optical path to spinor BEC (as opposed to transfer to an optical trap from a magnetic trap condensate) was desired both for the simplicity of the experimental setup and also for the potential gains in speed of creation; evaporative cooling, the only known path to dilute-gas condensation, works only as efficiently as the rate of elastic collisions in the gas, a rate that starts out much higher in optical traps. The first all-optical BEC was formed elsewhere in 2001; the years following saw many groups worldwide seeking to create their own version. Our own all-optical spinor BEC, made with a single-beam dipole trap formed by a focused CO2 laser, is described here, with particular attention paid to trap loading, measurement of trap parameters, and the use of a novel 780 nm high-power laser system. The second part describes initial experiments performed with the nascent condensate. The spinor properties of the condensate are documented, and a measurement is made of the density-dependent rate of spin mixing in the condensate. In addition, we demonstrate a novel dual-beam atom laser formed by outcoupling oppositely polarized components of the condensate, whose populations have been coherently evolved through spin

  7. Molecule condensate production from an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate via Feshbach scattering in an optical lattice: Gap solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasgal, Richard S.; Menabde, G.; Band, Y. B.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for making a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of molecules from a BEC of atoms in a strongly confining two-dimensional optical lattice and a weak one-dimensional optical lattice in the third dimension. The stable solutions obtained for the order parameters take the form of a different type of gap soliton, with both atomic and molecular BECs, and also standard gap solitons with only a molecular BEC. The strongly confining dimensions of the lattice stabilize the BEC against inelastic energy transfer in atom-molecule collisions. The solitons with atoms and molecules may be obtained by starting with an atomic BEC, and gradually tuning the resonance by changing the external magnetic-field strength until the desired atom-molecule soliton is obtained. A gap soliton of a BEC of only molecules may be obtained nonadiabatically by starting from an atom-only gap soliton, far from a Feshbach resonance and adjusting the magnetic field to near Feshbach resonance. After a period of time in which the dimer field grows, change the magnetic field such that the detuning is large and negative and Feshbach effects wash out, turn off the optical lattice in phase with the atomic BEC, and turn on an optical lattice in phase with the molecules. The atoms disperse, leaving a gap soliton composed of a molecular BEC. Regarding instabilities in the dimension of the weak optical lattice, the solitons which are comprised of both atoms and molecules are sometimes stable and sometimes unstable--we present numerically obtained results. Gap solitons comprised of only molecules have the same stability properties as the standard gap solitons: stable from frequencies slightly below the middle of the band gap to the top, and unstable below that point. Instabilities are only weakly affected by the soliton velocities, and all instabilities are oscillatory

  8. Optically pumped semiconductor lasers: Conception and characterization of a single mode source for Cesium atoms manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocquelin, B.

    2009-02-01

    Lasers currently used in atomic clocks or inertial sensors are suffering from a lack of power, narrow linewidth or compactness for future spatial missions. Optically pumped semiconductor lasers, which combine the approach of classical solid state lasers and the engineering of semiconductor laser, are considered here as a candidate to a metrological laser source dedicated to the manipulation of Cesium atoms in these instruments. These lasers have demonstrated high power laser emission in a circular single transverse mode, as well as single longitudinal mode emission, favoured by the semiconductor structure and the external cavity design. We study the definition and the characterization of a proper semiconductor structure for the cooling and the detection of Cesium atoms at 852 nm. A compact and robust prototype tunable on the Cesium D2 hyperfine structure is built. The laser frequency is locked to an atomic transition thanks to a saturated absorption setup. The emission spectral properties are investigated, with a particular attention to the laser frequency noise and the laser linewidth. Finally, we describe and model the thermal properties of the semiconductor structure, which enables the simulation of the laser power characteristic. The experimental parameters are optimised to obtain the maximum output power with our structure. Thanks to our analysis, we propose several ways to overcome these limitations, by reducing the structure heating. (authors)

  9. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images based on wave atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yongzhao; Liu, Gangjun; Feng, Guoying; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique, which is based on low-coherence interferometry. OCT images suffer from speckle noise, which reduces image contrast. A shrinkage filter based on wave atoms transform is proposed for speckle reduction in OCT images. Wave atoms transform is a new multiscale geometric analysis tool that offers sparser expansion and better representation for images containing oscillatory patterns and textures than other traditional transforms, such as wavelet and curvelet transforms. Cycle spinning-based technology is introduced to avoid visual artifacts, such as Gibbs-like phenomenon, and to develop a translation invariant wave atoms denoising scheme. The speckle suppression degree in the denoised images is controlled by an adjustable parameter that determines the threshold in the wave atoms domain. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively remove the speckle noise and improve the OCT image quality. The signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, average equivalent number of looks, and cross-correlation (XCOR) values are obtained, and the results are also compared with the wavelet and curvelet thresholding techniques. PMID:24825507

  10. Collective excitations and supersolid behavior of bosonic atoms inside two crossed optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J.; Piazza, F.; Zwerger, W.

    2017-12-01

    We discuss the nature of symmetry breaking and the associated collective excitations for a system of bosons coupled to the electromagnetic field of two optical cavities. For the specific configuration realized in a recent experiment at ETH [1, 2], we show that, in absence of direct intercavity scattering and for parameters chosen such that the atoms couple symmetrically to both cavities, the system possesses an approximate U(1) symmetry which holds asymptotically for vanishing cavity field intensity. It corresponds to the invariance with respect to redistributing the total intensity I={I}1+{I}2 between the two cavities. The spontaneous breaking of this symmetry gives rise to a broken continuous translation-invariance for the atoms, creating a supersolid-like order in the presence of a Bose-Einstein condensate. In particular, we show that atom-mediated scattering between the two cavities, which favors the state with equal light intensities {I}1={I}2 and reduces the symmetry to {{Z}}2\\otimes {{Z}}2, gives rise to a finite value ˜ \\sqrt{I} of the effective Goldstone mass. For strong atom driving, this low energy mode is clearly separated from an effective Higgs excitation associated with changes of the total intensity I. In addition, we compute the spectral distribution of the cavity light field and show that both the Higgs and Goldstone mode acquire a finite lifetime due to Landau damping at non-zero temperature.

  11. A portable magneto-optical trap with prospects for atom interferometry in civil engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, A; Perea-Ortiz, M; Winch, J; Briggs, J; Freer, S; Moustoukas, D; Powell-Gill, S; Squire, C; Lamb, A; Rammeloo, C; Stray, B; Voulazeris, G; Zhu, L; Kaushik, A; Lien, Y-H; Niggebaum, A; Rodgers, A; Stabrawa, A; Boddice, D; Plant, S R; Tuckwell, G W; Bongs, K; Metje, N; Holynski, M

    2017-08-06

    The high precision and scalable technology offered by atom interferometry has the opportunity to profoundly affect gravity surveys, enabling the detection of features of either smaller size or greater depth. While such systems are already starting to enter into the commercial market, significant reductions are required in order to reach the size, weight and power of conventional devices. In this article, the potential for atom interferometry based gravimetry is assessed, suggesting that the key opportunity resides within the development of gravity gradiometry sensors to enable drastic improvements in measurement time. To push forward in realizing more compact systems, techniques have been pursued to realize a highly portable magneto-optical trap system, which represents the core package of an atom interferometry system. This can create clouds of 10 7 atoms within a system package of 20 l and 10 kg, consuming 80 W of power.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-04-15

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  13. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  14. Microwave-to-optical frequency conversion with a Rydberg atom coupled to a coplanar waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Bryan; Jacobs, Kurt; McDermott, Robert; Saffman, Mark

    2017-04-01

    A primary candidate for converting quantum information from microwave to optical frequencies is the use of Rydberg states of a single atom trapped near a surface. The fact that the Rydberg states possess both large electric dipole moments and microwave transition frequencies allows them to interact with superconducting mesoscopic circuits. By considering a concrete example, that of a Cesium atom, and using numerical search methods to optimize the control protocols, we determine the fidelities and transmission rates that could be achievable with such a device. We show that while protocols that exploit the adiabatic STIRAP mechanism provide the best raw transfer fidelities, the fastest communication speeds can be obtained by using heralding, which allows one to remove the adiabatic constraint. Support from Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

  15. Dicke superradiance as nondestructive probe for the state of atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brinke, Nicolai; Schützhold, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    We present a proposal for a probing scheme utilizing Dicke superradiance to obtain information about ultracold atoms in optical lattices. A probe photon is absorbed collectively by an ensemble of lattice atoms generating a Dicke state. The lattice dynamics (e.g., tunneling) affects the coherence properties of that Dicke state and thus alters the superradiant emission characteristics - which in turn provides insight into the lattice (dynamics). Comparing the Bose-Hubbard and the Fermi-Hubbard model, we find similar superradiance in the strongly interacting Mott insulator regime, but crucial differences in the weakly interacting (superfluid or metallic) phase. Furthermore, we study the possibility to detect whether a quantum phase transition between the two regimes can be considered adiabatic or a quantum quench.

  16. Ultrafast optical manipulation of atomic motion in multilayer Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fons P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase change random access memory devices have evolved dramatically with the recent development of superlattice structure of Ge-Sb-Te material (GST-SL in terms of its low power consumption. The phase change in GST-SL is mainly characterized by the displacement of Ge atoms. Here we examine a new phase change method, that is the manipulation of Ge-Te bonds using linearly-polarized femtosecond near-infrared optical pulses. As a result, we found that the p-polarized pump pulse is more effective in inducing the reversible and irreversible displacement of Ge atoms along [111] direction in the local structure. This structural change would be induced by the anisotropic carrier-phonon interaction along the [111] direction created by the p-polarized pulse.

  17. Analysis of imperfections in the coherent optical excitation of single atoms to Rydberg states

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Léséleuc, Sylvain; Barredo, Daniel; Lienhard, Vincent; Browaeys, Antoine; Lahaye, Thierry

    2018-05-01

    We study experimentally various physical limitations and technical imperfections that lead to damping and finite contrast of optically driven Rabi oscillations between ground and Rydberg states of a single atom. Finite contrast is due to preparation and detection errors, and we show how to model and measure them accurately. Part of these errors originates from the finite lifetime of Rydberg states, and we observe its n3 scaling with the principal quantum number n . To explain the damping of Rabi oscillations, we use simple numerical models taking into account independently measured experimental imperfections and show that the observed damping actually results from the accumulation of several small effects, each at the level of a few percent. We discuss prospects for improving the coherence of ground-Rydberg Rabi oscillations in view of applications in quantum simulation and quantum information processing with arrays of single Rydberg atoms.

  18. Comments on the optical lineshape function: Application to transient hole-burned spectra of bacterial reaction centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reppert, Mike; Kell, Adam; Pruitt, Thomas; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational spectral density is an important physical parameter needed to describe both linear and non-linear spectra of multi-chromophore systems such as photosynthetic complexes. Low-temperature techniques such as hole burning (HB) and fluorescence line narrowing are commonly used to extract the spectral density for a given electronic transition from experimental data. We report here that the lineshape function formula reported by Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)] in the mean-phonon approximation and frequently applied to analyzing HB data contains inconsistencies in notation, leading to essentially incorrect expressions in cases of moderate and strong electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling strengths. A corrected lineshape function L(ω) is given that retains the computational and intuitive advantages of the expression of Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)]. Although the corrected lineshape function could be used in modeling studies of various optical spectra, we suggest that it is better to calculate the lineshape function numerically, without introducing the mean-phonon approximation. New theoretical fits of the P870 and P960 absorption bands and frequency-dependent resonant HB spectra of Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis reaction centers are provided as examples to demonstrate the importance of correct lineshape expressions. Comparison with the previously determined el-ph coupling parameters [Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 94, 5849 (1990); Lyle et al., ibid. 97, 6924 (1993); Reddy et al., ibid. 97, 6934 (1993)] is also provided. The new fits lead to modified el-ph coupling strengths and different frequencies of the special pair marker mode, ω sp , for Rb. sphaeroides that could be used in the future for more advanced calculations of absorption and HB spectra obtained for various bacterial reaction centers

  19. Comments on the optical lineshape function: Application to transient hole-burned spectra of bacterial reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reppert, Mike; Kell, Adam; Pruitt, Thomas [Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Jankowiak, Ryszard, E-mail: ryszard@ksu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    The vibrational spectral density is an important physical parameter needed to describe both linear and non-linear spectra of multi-chromophore systems such as photosynthetic complexes. Low-temperature techniques such as hole burning (HB) and fluorescence line narrowing are commonly used to extract the spectral density for a given electronic transition from experimental data. We report here that the lineshape function formula reported by Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)] in the mean-phonon approximation and frequently applied to analyzing HB data contains inconsistencies in notation, leading to essentially incorrect expressions in cases of moderate and strong electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling strengths. A corrected lineshape function L(ω) is given that retains the computational and intuitive advantages of the expression of Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)]. Although the corrected lineshape function could be used in modeling studies of various optical spectra, we suggest that it is better to calculate the lineshape function numerically, without introducing the mean-phonon approximation. New theoretical fits of the P870 and P960 absorption bands and frequency-dependent resonant HB spectra of Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis reaction centers are provided as examples to demonstrate the importance of correct lineshape expressions. Comparison with the previously determined el-ph coupling parameters [Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 94, 5849 (1990); Lyle et al., ibid. 97, 6924 (1993); Reddy et al., ibid. 97, 6934 (1993)] is also provided. The new fits lead to modified el-ph coupling strengths and different frequencies of the special pair marker mode, ω{sub sp}, for Rb. sphaeroides that could be used in the future for more advanced calculations of absorption and HB spectra obtained for various bacterial reaction centers.

  20. Observation of Lorentzian lineshapes in the room temperature optical spectra of strongly coupled Jaggregate/metal hybrid nanostructures by linear two-dimensional optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Sommer, Ephraim; De Sio, Antonietta; Gross, Petra; Vogelgesang, Ralf; Lienau, Christoph; Vasa, Parinda

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the linear optical reflectivity spectra of a prototypical, strongly coupled metal/molecular hybrid nanostructure by means of a new experimental approach, linear two-dimensional optical spectroscopy. White-light, broadband spectral interferometry is used to measure amplitude and spectral phase of the sample reflectivity or transmission with high precision and to reconstruct the time structure of the electric field emitted by the sample upon impulsive excitation. A numerical analysis of this time-domain signal provides a two-dimensional representation of the coherent optical response of the sample as a function of excitation and detection frequency. The approach is used to study a nanostructure formed by depositing a thin J-aggregated dye layer on a gold grating. In this structure, strong coupling between excitons and surface plasmon polaritons results in the formation of hybrid polariton modes. In the strong coupling regime, Lorentzian lineshape profiles of different polariton modes are observed at room temperature. This is taken as an indication that the investigated strongly coupled polariton excitations are predominantly homogeneously broadened at room temperature. This new approach presents a versatile, simple and highly precise addition to nonlinear optical spectroscopic techniques for the analysis of line broadening phenomena. (paper)