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Sample records for open retropubic prostatectomy

  1. Open radical retropubic prostatectomy 2007: the true minimally invasive surgery for localized prostate cancer?

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    Nosnik, Israel P; Gan, Tong J; Moul, Judd W

    2007-09-01

    The introduction of robotic laparoscopic assisted prostatectomy at our institution and nationwide has been a great advancement and has caused us to focus and fine-tune our goal for improvements in prostate cancer outcomes whether the patient elects for robotic laparoscopic assisted prostatectomy or open minimally invasive radical retropubic prostatectomy. While these authors favor the open technique performed by highly skilled urologic surgical oncologists, the lessons we have learned to date suggest that it is the skill of the surgeon that determines outcome, regardless of whether or not the operation is performed by an open or robotic laparoscopic technique. The concepts we have articulated here are related to resection and avoidance of positive margins, limited intraoperative blood loss and pain control, which allow equivalence in these outcome areas, regardless of technique.

  2. Characteristics of positive surgical margins in robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy, open retropubic radical prostatectomy, and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a comparative histopathologic study from a single academic center.

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    Albadine, Roula; Hyndman, Matthew E; Chaux, Alcides; Jeong, J Y; Saab, Shahrazad; Tavora, Fabio; Epstein, Jonathan I; Gonzalgo, Mark L; Pavlovich, Christian P; Netto, George J

    2012-02-01

    Studies detailing differences in positive surgical margin among open retropubic radical prostatectomy, laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, and robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy are lacking. A retrospective review of all prostatectomies with positive surgical margin performed at our center in 2007 disclosed 99 cases, 6 (5%) of which were reinterpreted cases as having negative margins. Ninety-three cases were, therefore, included, corresponding to 37 retropubic radical prostatectomies, 19 laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, and 37 robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomies. The relationship of positive surgical margin characteristics to clinicopathologic parameters and biochemical recurrence was assessed. The most commonly found positive surgical margin site was the apex/distal third in all groups (62% retropubic prostatectomies, 79% laparoscopic prostatectomies, 60% robotic-assisted prostatectomies). Total linear length of positive surgical margin sites was significantly correlated with preoperative prostate-specific antigen, preoperative prostate-specific antigen density, pT stage, and tumor volume (P ≤ .001). We found no significant differences among the 3 groups with respect to total linear length, number of foci, laterality, or location of positive surgical margin. The rate of biochemical recurrence was also comparable in the 3 groups. On univariate analyses, biochemical recurrence was significantly associated with preoperative prostate-specific antigen values, preoperative prostate-specific antigen density, Gleason score, number of positive surgical margins, and total linear length of positive surgical margin (P ≤ .02). Only preoperative prostate-specific antigen density and number of positive surgical margin foci were statistically significant (P ≤ .03) independent predictors of biochemical recurrence. We found no significant difference in positive surgical margin characteristics or biochemical recurrence among the 3

  3. Open suprapubic versus retropubic prostatectomy in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia during resident's learning curve: a randomized controlled trial

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    Arie Carneiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: This study compared the suprapubic (SP versus retropubic (RP prostatectomy for the treatment of large prostates and evaluated perioperative surgical morbidity and improvement of urinary symptoms. Materials and Methods: In this single centre, prospective, randomised study, 65 consecutive patients with LUTS and surgical indication with prostate volume greater than 75g underwent open prostatectomy to compare the RP (32 patients versus SP (33 patients technique. Results: The SP group exhibited a higher incidence of complications (p=0.002. Regarding voiding pattern analysis (IPSS and flowmetry, both were significantly effective compared to pre-treatment baseline. The RP group parameters were significantly better, with higher peak urinary flow (SP: 16.77 versus RP: 23.03mL/s, p=0.008 and a trend of lower IPSS score (SP: 6.67 versus RP 4.14, p=0.06. In a subgroup evaluation of patients with prostate volumes larger than 100g, blood loss was lower in those undergoing SP prostatectomy (p=0.003. Patients with prostates smaller than 100g in the SP group exhibited a higher incidence of low grade late complications (p=0.004. Conclusions: The SP technique was related to a higher incidence of minor complications in the late postoperative period. High volume prostates were associated with increased bleeding when the RP technique was utilized. The RP prostatectomy was associated with higher peak urinary flow and a trend of a lower IPSS Score.

  4. Comprehensive preoperative evaluation and repair of inguinal hernias at the time of open radical retropubic prostatectomy decreases risk of developing post-prostatectomy hernia.

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    Marien, Tracy; Taouli, Bachir; Telegrafi, Shpetim; Babb, James S; Lepor, Herbert

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Some studies have evaluated preoperative and intraoperative examination for inguinal hernias and their repair, noting a decrease in the rate of post-prostatectomy hernias. However, this did not eradicate post-prostatectomy hernias, indicating that this method probably missed subclinical hernias. Other studies looked at prophylactic procedures to prevent the formation of inguinal hernias at the time of prostatectomy and showed a decrease in the rate of postoperative hernias. To our knowledge this is the only series evaluating a multi-modal approach with magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and examination to identify all clinical and subclinical hernias and repair them at the time of prostatectomy. This approach only subjects those patients at risk for symptomatic hernias to an additional procedure and decreases the post-prostatectomy hernia rate to hernias and repair of these hernias at the time of open radical retropubic prostatectomy (ORRP) decreases the incidence of clinical inguinal hernias (IHs) after ORRP. • Between 1 July 2007 and 31 July 2010, 281 consecutive men underwent ORRP by a single surgeon. • Of these men, 207 (74%) underwent comprehensive preoperative screening for IH, which included physical examination, upstanding ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. • Between 12 and 24 months after ORRP, 178 (86%) of these men completed a questionnaire designed to capture development of clinical IHs. • Of the 178 evaluable patients, 92 (52%) were diagnosed preoperatively with IH by at least one diagnostic modality. • Forty-one and 51 of the men had bilateral or unilateral IHs, respectively for a total of 133 IHs. • No preoperative factor was significantly associated with the presence of an IH before prostatectomy. • No groin subjected to IH repair (IHR) at the time of ORRP developed a clinical IH compared with four of the 21 patients with postoperative IHs who did not

  5. Combined radical retropubic prostatectomy and rectal resection.

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    Klee, L W; Grmoljez, P

    1999-10-01

    To present our experience with a small series of men who underwent simultaneous radical retropubic prostatectomy and rectal resection. Three men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer were found to have concurrent rectal tumors requiring resection. All three men underwent non-nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy and abdominoperineal resection (APR) or low anterior resection (LAR) of the rectum at the same operation. In the 2 patients undergoing APR, the levators were approximated posterior to the urethra, and the bladder was secured to the pubis. The patient undergoing LAR had urinary diversion stents placed and a diverting transverse loop colostomy. All 3 patients had excellent return of urinary continence. One patient required reoperation in the early postoperative period for small bowel adhesiolysis and stoma revision. Another patient had a mild rectal anastomotic stricture and a bladder neck stricture; both were successfully treated with a single dilation. No other significant complications occurred in these patients. Radical retropubic prostatectomy can safely be performed with partial or complete rectal resection in a single operation. A few minor modifications of the standard radical retropubic prostatectomy in this setting are suggested.

  6. Complications of radical retropubic prostatectomy – our experience

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    Ovidiu Bratu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radical retropubic prostatectomy represents in its various forms (open, laparoscopic and robotic the "gold standard" treatment for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Unfortunately like al treatment solutions it has its shortcomings. Retropubic radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy are the curative options. Materials and Method: The experience of Clinic of Urology from Central Military Hospital representing more than 100 cases was analyzed . Classical open retropubic prostatectomy was performed in all cases. We focused in this paper on intraoperative complications and also precocious and late postoperative complications. Results: Our results are matching the other centers in terms of intraoperative complications (blood loss, early postoperative complications (hematuria, urinary tract infection, lymphatic drainage or late postoperative complications (erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. However none of these complications are to be underestimated Conclusions: The limits of this intervention can be pushed a litle bit further, in our opinion the age factor is a relative one, some of these patients having a longer than 10 years life expectancy. It provides good oncological outcome with manageable complications most of the times.

  7. Increased optical magnification from 2.5x to 4.3x with technical modification lowers the positive margin rate in open radical retropubic prostatectomy.

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    Magera, James S; Inman, Brant A; Slezak, Jeffrey M; Bagniewski, Stephanie M; Sebo, Thomas J; Myers, Robert P

    2008-01-01

    We compared the positive surgical margin rate of 2.5x and 4.3x optical loupe magnification with associated technical improvement during open radical retropubic prostatectomy. From January 2, 2004 to September 16, 2005, 511 consecutive patients underwent open radical retropubic prostatectomy, as performed by 1 surgeon. Because 10 patients refused authorization for a retrospective chart review, 501 were evaluable. For the first 265 patients 2.5x power loupes were used and for the subsequent 236 we used 4.3x power loupes. We used the chi-square test for univariate analysis, followed by multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for commonly recognized predictors of positive surgical margins in the 2 successive cohorts. Focusing on the apex, which was the most commonly reported site of positive surgical margins, we include operative video segments mimicking 4.3x magnification to demonstrate the surgical precision possible at 4.3x for managing the periurethral fascial bands of Walsh and urethral transection at the prostato-urethral junction. Positive surgical margins were identified in 39 of 265 patients (14.7%) at 2.5x and in 12 of 236 (5.1%) at 4.3x. Apical positive surgical margins were identified in 25 of 265 patients (9.4%) at 2.5x and in 5 of 236 (2.1%) at 4.3x. On multivariate analysis 4.3x magnification was independently associated with a 75% decrease in the odds of a positive surgical margin overall and in the apex alone (p technical refinements that are not possible or deemed safe at 2.5x resulted in a substantial decrease in the positive surgical margin rate.

  8. Bilateral nerve sparing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy is associated with faster continence recovery but not with erectile function recovery compared with retropubic open prostatectomy: the need for accurate selection of patients.

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    Ludovico, Giuseppe Mario; Dachille, Giuseppe; Pagliarulo, Giovanni; D'Elia, Carolina; Mondaini, Nicola; Gacci, Mauro; Detti, Beatrice; Malossini, Gianni; Bartoletti, Riccardo; Cai, Tommaso

    2013-06-01

    Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) shows measurable advantages, compared to conventional open surgery, even if some aspects are, still, under debate. The aim of this study was to compare the potency recovery rate of patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated by bilateral nerve-sparing (BNS) RARP or retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP), and secondarily, the urinary continence recovery evaluation and the oncological efficacy. All patients treated with BNS-RARP or BNS-RRP for clinically localised prostate cancer, performed by a single dedicated surgeon, between January 2004 and December 2008, were enrolled in this non-randomised prospective comparative study. The International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and erection hardness score (EHS), in the form of a questionnaire, were self-administered to each patient pre-operatively and after 12 months. The presence of surgical margins was considered as oncological outcome measure. Eighty-two patients underwent BNS-RARP while 48 underwent BNS-RRP. For BNS-RARP and BNS-RRP the median operative time was 221 and 103 min, respectively (Pfunction recovery compared to open radical prostatectomy; however, it significantly improves urinary continence and decreases the presence of positive surgical margins.

  9. Erectile Function and Oncologic Outcomes Following Open Retropubic and Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Results from the LAParoscopic Prostatectomy Robot Open Trial.

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    Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Pini, Giovannalberto; Nyberg, Tommy; Derogar, Maryam; Carlsson, Stefan; Stranne, Johan; Bjartell, Anders; Hugosson, Jonas; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, Peter N

    2017-09-04

    Whether surgeons perform better utilising a robot-assisted laparoscopic technique compared with an open approach during prostate cancer surgery is debatable. To report erectile function and early oncologic outcomes for both surgical modalities, stratified by prostate cancer risk grouping. In a prospective nonrandomised trial, we recruited 2545 men with prostate cancer from seven open (n=753) and seven robot-assisted (n=1792) Swedish centres (2008-2011). Clinometrically-validated questionnaire-based patient-reported erectile function was collected before, 3 mo, 12 mo, and 24 mo after surgery. Surgeon-reported degree of neurovascular-bundle preservation, pathologist-reported positive surgical margin (PSM) rates, and 2-yr prostate-specific antigen-relapse rates were measured. Among 1702 preoperatively potent men, we found enhanced erectile function recovery for low/intermediate-risk patients in the robot-assisted group at 3 mo. For patients with high-risk tumours, point estimates for erectile function recovery at 24 mo favoured the open surgery group. The degree of neurovascular bundle preservation and erectile function recovery were greater correlated for robot-assisted surgery. In pT2 tumours, 10% versus 17% PSM rates were observed for open and robot-assisted surgery, respectively; corresponding rates for pT3 tumours were 48% and 33%. These differences were associated with biochemical recurrence in pT3 but not pT2 disease. The study is limited by its nonrandomised design and relatively short follow-up. Earlier recovery of erectile function in the robot-assisted surgery group in lower-risk patients is counterbalanced by lower PSM rates for open surgeons in organ-confined disease; thus, both open and robotic surgeons need to consider this trade-off when determining the plane of surgical dissection. Robot-assisted surgery also facilitates easier identification of nerve preservation planes during radical prostatectomy as well as wider dissection for pT3 cases. For

  10. Pain and quality of life following radical retropubic prostatectomy.

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    Haythornthwaite, J A; Raja, S N; Fisher, B; Frank, S M; Brendler, C B; Shir, Y

    1998-11-01

    We assess pain and quality of life following radical retropubic prostatectomy and determine whether intraoperative anesthetic management has any long-term effects on outcomes. A total of 110 patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy were randomly assigned to receive epidural and/or general anesthesia. Patients responded to a questionnaire mailed 3 and 6 months following surgery that assessed prostate symptoms, pain related to surgery, quality of life and mood. No long-term effects of anesthesia were observed. Of the 103 respondents (94%) at 3 months 49% had some pain related to surgery. Although pain was not related to anesthesic technique, patients who had it at 3 months used significantly more pain medication on postoperative day 3. Pain at 3 months was mild, averaging 1.5 on a scale of 0 to 10, and associated with poor perceptions of overall health (p anesthesic technique were not apparent. Mild pain following radical retropubic prostatectomy was common and associated with reduced quality of life, particularly social functioning. Affective distress, particularly anxiety, before surgery and use of pain medications following surgery may be predictors of chronic pain following radical retropubic prostatectomy.

  11. Surgical complications of radical retropubic prostatectomy: A single institutional experience of seven years

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    Neeraj K Goyal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the surgical complications of open retropubic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: Fifty-nine cases of localized prostate cancer underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy in our department in the last seven years. Standard technique of open retropubic radical prostatectomy as described by Walsh was used. During follow-up cancer control and quality of life indices (potency and urinary continence were noted. Result: Postoperative recovery of all patients except one was excellent. This patient required cardio-respiratory support and nine units of blood transfusion. Forty-nine out of 52 patients were continent, two had stress incontinence and one was totally incontinent at one year. Bladder neck contracture was present in eight out of 52 patients at one year. Forty-five patients were impotent at one year with or without oral tablet sildenafil. Cancer control was present in 45 out of 52 cases. Seven cases had biochemical failure at one year. Conclusion: Though retropubic radical prostatectomy is the standard treatment for early prostate cancer it is not without complications. It has a steep learning curve. More number of cases and refinement in technique is required to achieve world-class results.

  12. Anatomic Considerations for Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy in an Achondroplastic Dwarf

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    Dennis Gyomber

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first report of a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP in an achondroplastic dwarf. We highlight the pelvic anatomy, precluding laparoscopic or robotic prostatectomy, and making open surgery extremely difficult. We review relevant literature regarding general, urological, and orthopedic abnormalities of achondroplasia (ACH and present a clinical case. No reports of RRP in achondroplastic dwarfs exist, with only one case of an abandoned RRP due to similar pelvic anatomy in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. Significant lumbar lordosis found in ACH results in a short anteroposterior dimension, severely limiting access to the prostate. We present a case of a 62-year-old achondroplastic dwarf who had Gleason 3+4 disease on transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy in four from 12 cores. Surgery was difficult due to narrow anteroposterior pelvic dimension, but achievable. Histological analysis revealed multifocal prostate cancer, with negative surgical margins and no extraprostatic extension. RRP in ACH patients, although possible, should be approached with caution due to the abnormal pelvic dimensions, and discussions regarding potential abandonment of surgery should be included during informed consent. This case highlights the preoperative use of computed tomography to assist in the surgical planning for patients with difficult pelvic anatomy.

  13. Learning curve for radical retropubic prostatectomy

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    Fernando J. A. Saito

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The learning curve is a period in which the surgical procedure is performed with difficulty and slowness, leading to a higher risk of complications and reduced effectiveness due the surgeon's inexperience. We sought to analyze the residents' learning curve for open radical prostatectomy (RP in a training program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective study from June 2006 to January 2008 in the academic environment of the University of São Paulo. Five residents operated on 184 patients during a four-month rotation in the urologic oncology division, mentored by the same physician assistants. We performed sequential analyses according to the number of surgeries, as follows: = 10, 11 to 19, 20 to 28, and = 29. RESULTS: The residents performed an average of 37 RP each. The average psa was 9.3 ng/mL and clinical stage T1c in 71% of the patients. The pathological stage was pT2 (73%, pT3 (23%, pT4 (4%, and 46% of the patients had a Gleason score 7 or higher. In all surgeries, the average operative time and estimated blood loss was 140 minutes and 488 mL. Overall, 7.2% of patients required blood transfusion, and 23% had positive surgical margins. CONCLUSION: During the initial RP learning curve, we found a significant reduction in the operative time; blood transfusion during the procedures and positive surgical margin rate were stable in our series.

  14. Evidence-Based Comparison of Robotic and Open Radical Prostatectomy

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    William T. Lowrance

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid adoption of robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP has occurred despite a lack of high-quality evidence demonstrating its oncologic advantages, safety, or cost effectiveness compared with open radical retropubic prostatectomy (ORP. This review examines the current literature comparing ORP and RALP, focusing on perioperative, oncologic, functional, and economic outcomes.

  15. Initial experience with robotic retropubic urethropexy compared to open retropubic urethropexy.

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    Patel, Pooja R; Borahay, Mostafa A; Puentes, Audrey R; Rodriguez, Ana M; Delaisse, Jessica; Kilic, Gokhan S

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective. To compare the clinical outcomes of robotic retropubic urethropexy versus open retropubic urethropexy. Design. Retrospective case-control study (II-2). Setting. University Hospital. Patients. All patients who underwent robotic retropubic urethropexy from 1/1/12 to 6/1/12 by a single gynecologic surgeon were included in the case series. The control cases consisted of the last five consecutive open retropubic urethropexies performed by the same surgeon. Main Results. A total of 10 patients (5 robotic cases and 5 open cases) were included in this study. Both groups were similar with respect to age, BMI, and obstetrical history. Mean hospital stay length and mean EBL were overall less for robotic cases than for open cases (1.2 days versus 2.6 days; 169 mL versus 300 mL). One of the 5 patients who underwent the open approach and 2 of the 5 patients who underwent the robotic approach sustained a minor intraoperative complication. All but one patient from each group experienced resolution of incontinence after the procedure. Two of the patients who underwent the open approach had postoperative complications. Conclusions. Robotic retropubic urethropexy may be a feasible alternative to open retropubic urethropexy. A larger study is necessary to support our observations.

  16. Impact of obesity on surgical outcomes following open radical prostatectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roermund, J.G. van; Basten, J.P. van; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Karthaus, H.F.M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The increasing incidence of both obesity and prostate cancer (PCa) detection will confront the urologist more often with obese men having PCa. It is unknown whether obesity affects the surgical and oncological outcomes following open radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). Knowledge

  17. Prognostic Factors for Anastomotic Urinary Leakage Following Retropubic Radical Prostatectomy and Correlation With Voiding Outcomes

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    Cormio, Luigi; Di Fino, Giuseppe; Scavone, Carmen; Maroscia, Domenico; Mancini, Vito; Ruocco, Nicola; Bellanti, Francesco; Selvaggio, Oscar; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the occurrence and grade of cystographically detected urinary leakage (UL) in a contemporary series of open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RP), whether patients’ clinical variables predict occurrence of UL, and whether occurrence of UL correlates with patients’ voiding outcomes in terms of urinary continence and anastomotic stricture (AS). Enrolled patients underwent cystography 7 days after retropubic RP; in case of UL, the catheter was left in situ and cystography repeated at 7 days intervals until demonstrating absence of UL. Leakage was classified as grade I = extraperitoneal leak 6 cm, grade III = leak freely extending in the small pelvis. Voiding was evaluated at 3, 6, and 12 months after RP using the 24-hour pad test and uroflowmetry; in cases of maximum flow rate cystogram showed UL in 52.6% of patients (grade I in 48.1%, grade II in 21.5%, and grade III in 30.4% of the cases). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that patients with UL had significantly greater prostate volume (64.5 vs 34.8 cc, P < 0.001), loss of serum hemoglobin (4.77 vs 4.19 g/dL, P < 0.001), lower postoperative serum total proteins (4.85 vs 5.4 g/dL, P < 0.001), and higher rate of AS (20.6% vs. 2.8%, p < 0.001) than those without UL. Continence rate at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively was 34.2%, 76%, and 90%, respectively, in patients with UL compared with 77.5%, 80.3%, and 93% in patients without UL; such difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001) only at 3 months follow-up. ROC curve analysis showed that prostate volume and postoperative serum total proteins had the best AUC (0.821 and 0.822, respectively) and when combined, their positive and negative predictive values for UL were 90% and 93%, respectively. In conclusion, half of the patients undergoing open retropubic RP may present, 7 days postoperatively, some degree of cystographically detected UL; prostate volume, loss of serum hemoglobin, and

  18. Blunt apical dissection during anatomic radical retropubic prostatectomy

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    Yacoub Saif

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meticulous apical dissection during a radical prostatectomy is imperative to achieve desirable pathologic and quality of life outcomes. Findings We describe a novel technique using careful blunt dissection to better delineate the apex of the prostate, providing a simple means to potentially lessen positive surgical margins at the apex and promote better continence and erectile function in men undergoing an anatomic radical prostatectomy. Median operative time and blood loss were 190 minutes and 675 mL, respectively. Only 10 percent of the patients with positive surgical margins were found to have apical positive surgical margins. Ninety-three percent of patients reported no urinary leakage. Conclusion We believe our technique of isolating the DVC with blunt dissection and then ligating and transecting the DVC to be feasible approach that requires larger studies to truly confirm its utility.

  19. Cystectomy with orthotopic reconstruction following radical retropubic prostatectomy

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    Ari Miotto Jr

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of infiltrative bladder carcinoma in patients previously treated with radical prostatectomy due to prostate adenocarcinoma represents a challenging perspective. Radical cystectomy remains the best option for invasive bladder cancer, however, there are few reports about the best approach to such individuals. Nevertheless, despite possible technical difficulties found during surgery, the orthotopic urinary shunt is a reasonable option in selected cases.

  20. Retropubic radical prostatectomy: Clinicopathological observations and outcome analysis of 428 consecutive patients

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    Jagdeesh N Kulkarni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : We report the outcome analysis of retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP performed in 428 patients in terms of pathological findings, complications, and survival. Materials and Methods : Systematically recorded case reports forms of consecutive 428 RRPs done over a 14-year period were analyzed using the SPSS 14 software. Secondary analysis was done to evaluate era specific (pre and post 2002 changes in clinical features and survivals. Results : Seven-year overall survival (OAS, cancer-specific survival (CSS, and event-free survival (EFS was 83.2%, 82.8%, and 69.8% respectively in our series. Era-specific survival showed higher CSS post 2002, and there was an increase in presentation with organ-confined disease. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed statistically significant impact on era specific outcome. With the improvement in techniques decrease in complications rate and increase in quality of life was noted. Conclusions : Our series spanning over decade demonstrates that RRP is viable option to offer cure to organ-confined carcinoma prostate. Further, there is evidence of stage migration and improvements in outcome in post 2002 patients. Although our series is modest in number, the success rates and outcome data matches those reported in the literature.

  1. RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMY: THE FIRST RUSSIAN EXPERIENCE OF 15-YEAR FOLLOW-UP AFTER SURGERY

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    E. I. Veliev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the maximum of more than 15 years of follow-up of Russia’s first large series of patients after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE were traced. The data of 1367 patients who had undergone RPE at the Clinic of Urology, S.P. Kirov Military Medical Academy, in 1997 to 2003 and at the Clinic of Urology, Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, in 2001 to 2010 were retrospectively studied. After excluding 626 patients who had an incomplete set of preoperative/postoperative characteristics, a postoperative follow-up of < 6 months, neoadjuvant hormonal or radiation therapy, the trial included 741 patients. Their median age at surgery was 64 years (interquartile range (IQR: 59-68; median prostatespecific antigen (PSA, 8.7 ng/ml (IQR: 6.2-14; median follow-up, 65 months (IQR: 50-87; the maximum follow-up period, 189 months. Out of the 741 patients, 30.2, 28.3, and 41.5% were referred to as D’Amico classification low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Five-, 10-, and 15-year relapse-free survival rates were 80.3, 74.7, and 66.7%; 5-, 10-, and 15-year cancer-specific survival rates were 98.3, 95.9, and 85.7%; and 5-, 10-, and 15-year overall survival rates were 92.5, 81.4, and 64.3%, respectively. The significant predictors of biochemical recurrence were a preoperative PSA level of 10.1–20 ng/ml (p = 0.041, > 20 ng/ml (p = 0.003; pathological stage pT3b–4N0 (p = 0.006 and any stage pT N1 (p = 0.003. Further investigations are needed to identify groups of patients who will have the most benefit from surgery.

  2. RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMY: THE FIRST RUSSIAN EXPERIENCE OF 15-YEAR FOLLOW-UP AFTER SURGERY

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    E. I. Veliev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the maximum of more than 15 years of follow-up of Russia’s first large series of patients after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE were traced. The data of 1367 patients who had undergone RPE at the Clinic of Urology, S.P. Kirov Military Medical Academy, in 1997 to 2003 and at the Clinic of Urology, Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, in 2001 to 2010 were retrospectively studied. After excluding 626 patients who had an incomplete set of preoperative/postoperative characteristics, a postoperative follow-up of < 6 months, neoadjuvant hormonal or radiation therapy, the trial included 741 patients. Their median age at surgery was 64 years (interquartile range (IQR: 59-68; median prostatespecific antigen (PSA, 8.7 ng/ml (IQR: 6.2-14; median follow-up, 65 months (IQR: 50-87; the maximum follow-up period, 189 months. Out of the 741 patients, 30.2, 28.3, and 41.5% were referred to as D’Amico classification low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Five-, 10-, and 15-year relapse-free survival rates were 80.3, 74.7, and 66.7%; 5-, 10-, and 15-year cancer-specific survival rates were 98.3, 95.9, and 85.7%; and 5-, 10-, and 15-year overall survival rates were 92.5, 81.4, and 64.3%, respectively. The significant predictors of biochemical recurrence were a preoperative PSA level of 10.1–20 ng/ml (p = 0.041, > 20 ng/ml (p = 0.003; pathological stage pT3b–4N0 (p = 0.006 and any stage pT N1 (p = 0.003. Further investigations are needed to identify groups of patients who will have the most benefit from surgery.

  3. Preservation of the smooth muscular internal (vesical) sphincter and of the proximal urethra during retropubic radical prostatectomy: A technical modification to improve the early recovery of continence

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    Eugenio Brunocilla; Riccardo Schiavina; Marco Borghesi; Cristian Pultrone; Matteo Cevenini; Valerio Vagnoni; Giuseppe Martorana

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We describe our technique for preservation of the smooth muscular internal (vesical) sphincter and proximal urethra during radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) and present our preliminary clinical results. Materials and methods: The first steps of the prostatectomy reflect the standard RRP, while for the final phases the procedure continues in an anterograde manner with incision of the fibers of the detrusor muscle at the insertion of the ventral surface of the base of the prosta...

  4. Inguinal hernia in stage M0 prostate cancer: a comparison of incidence in men treated with and without radical retropubic prostatectomy--an analysis of 1105 patients

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    Stranne, Johan; Hugosson, Jonas; Iversen, Peter;

    2005-01-01

    To analyze the incidence of inguinal hernia (IH) in a large group of patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer who were treated nonoperatively, and to compare it with the incidence in a subset of patients who had undergone radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). IH has been reported in 12% to 21...

  5. Inguinal hernia in stage M0 prostate cancer: a comparison of incidence in men treated with and without radical retropubic prostatectomy--an analysis of 1105 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranne, Johan; Hugosson, Jonas; Iversen, Peter;

    2005-01-01

    To analyze the incidence of inguinal hernia (IH) in a large group of patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer who were treated nonoperatively, and to compare it with the incidence in a subset of patients who had undergone radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). IH has been reported in 12% to 2...

  6. Comparison of oncological results and functional outcomes of radical prostatectomy techniques – retropubic, laparoscopic and robot-assisted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Prilepskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy (RP continues to be the «gold standard» in the treatment of localized prostate cancer (PC for patients with a life expectancy of 10 years.The purpose of this article is to review pertinent literature to the several surgical approaches for PC and compare both functional outcomes and oncological results of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP, laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP. We chose and systematically reviewed 44 articles published between 1999 and 2013. Comparison analysis showed that the mean blood loss during RRP, LRP and RARP was 935, 442 and 191 ml respectively. Intraoperative transfusion required 19,9; 6,3 and 4,6 % patients respectively. We’d like to outline in our functional outcomes that within the 6-months and 12-months period of follow-up acute urinary retention experienced 89,1 and 92,7 % patients undergoing RARP.However, lack of certain data and absence of standard assessment methods made objective evaluation of erectile function quite complex. Oncologic results revealed that positive surgical margin rates were higher for RARP in comparison to patients after RRP and LRP (the difference was statistically significant.Nevertheless, the absence of randomized approach in an overwhelming majority of cases, as well as the short follow-up period are serious deterrents limiting the number of such trials. Therefore it’s still impossible today to draw certain conclusions about the superiority of any surgical approach for RP

  7. A comparison of radical perineal, radical retropubic, and robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomies in a single surgeon series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Moben; Art, Kevin; Wineland, Logan; Tawfik, Ossama; Thrasher, J Brantley

    2011-01-01

    Objective. We sought to compare positive surgical margin rates (PSM), estimated blood loss (EBL), and quality of life outcomes (QOL) among perineal (RPP), retropubic (RRP), and robot-assisted laparoscopic (RALP) prostatectomies. Methods. Records from 463 consecutive men undergoing RPP (92), RRP (180), or RALP (191) for clinically localized prostate cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Age, percent tumor volume, Gleason score, stage, EBL, PSM, and QOL using the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC) were compared. Results. PSM were similar when adjusted for stage, grade, and volume. EBL was significantly less in the RALP (189 ml) group compared to both RPP (475 ml) and RRP (999 ml) groups. When corrected for nerve sparing, there were no differences in erectile function and sexual function amongst the three groups. Urinary summary and pad usage scores showed no significant differences. Conclusion. RPP, RRP, and RALP offer similar surgical and QOL outcomes. RALP and RPP demonstrate less EBL compared to RRP.

  8. SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR VERY HIGH-RISK LOCALLY RECURRENT PROSTATE CANCER AFTER RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMY: A CLINICAL CASE

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    E. I. Veliyev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Locally recurrent prostate cancer (PC in the bladder neck can substantially worsen quality of life in patients and hinder further treatment when castration-resistant PC develops. The paper describes a clinical case of very high-risk PC in a 55-year-old patient in whom radical cystectomy (RCE with removal of metastases in the bladder neck and the Bricker ileal conduit were performed for a local recurrence after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE. It gives the data of preoperative examination, the technical features of the primary operation RPE, the data of postoperative observation, the technical aspects and outcomes of еру surgery for a local recurrence, as well as the results of a 1.5-year follow-up after RCE. 

  9. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marchetti-Krantz (MMK) procedure; Laparoscopic retropubic colposuspension; Needle suspension; Burch colposuspension ... bladder. There are two ways to do retropubic suspension: open surgery or laparoscopic surgery. Either way, surgery ...

  10. Anastomotic complications after robot-assisted laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, André; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Iversen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anastomotic complications are well known after radical prostatectomy (RP). The vesicourethral anastomotic technique is handled differently between open and robotic RP. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the frequency of anastomotic leakages and strictures differed between...... patients undergoing retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and to identify risk factors associated with these complications. Materials and methods The study included 735 consecutive patients who underwent RRP (n = 499) or RARP (236) at the Department...... of Urology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, in a complete 3 year period from 2010 to 2012. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse associations between surgical procedure (RRP vs RARP) and anastomotic complications. Analyses included age, smoking status, diabetes, hypertension...

  11. Contemporary Radical Prostatectomy

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    Qiang Fu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer have more surgical treatment options than in the past. This paper focuses on the procedures' oncological or functional outcomes and perioperative morbidities of radical retropubic prostatectomy, radical perineal prostatectomy, and robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods. A MEDLINE/PubMed search of the literature on radical prostatectomy and other new management options was performed. Results. Compared to the open procedures, robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy has no confirmed significant difference in most literatures besides less blood loss and blood transfusion. Nerve sparing is a safe means of preserving potency on well-selected patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Positive surgical margin rates of radical prostatectomy affect the recurrence and survival of prostate cancer. The urinary and sexual function outcomes have been vastly improved. Neoadjuvant treatment only affects the rate of positive surgical margin. Adjuvant therapy can delay and reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of the high risk prostate cancer. Conclusions. For the majority of patients with organ-confined prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy remains a most effective approach. Radical perineal prostatectomy remains a viable approach for patients with morbid obesity, prior pelvic surgery, or prior pelvic radiation. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP has become popular among surgeons but has not yet become the firmly established standard of care. Long-term data have confirmed the efficacy of radical retropubic prostatectomy with disease control rates and cancer-specific survival rates.

  12. Evaluation of Lymphorrhea and Incidence of Lymphoceles: 4DryField® PH in Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsch, Johannes-J; Berthold, Martin; Breul, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate impact of polysaccharide hemostat 4DryField PH (4DF) applied on lymph node dissection area after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) on lymphorrhea and lymphocele (LC) formation. Methods. 104 consecutive patients underwent RRP, 51 without 4DF treatment (CT-group) and 53 with 4DF treatment (4DF-group). Groups were comparable (age, risk profile, and lymph node numbers). Postoperative drain loss (PDL) and development of early and late LC were analyzed (mean follow-up at 7 months: 100%). Results. PDL was 452.5 ± 634.2 mL without and 308.5 ± 214 mL with 4DF treatment. PDL > 1000 mL only occurred in CT-group (5/51). Overall, 45 LC (26 in CT- versus 19 in the 4DF-group) were diagnosed. At day 8, LC were equally distributed between groups. Incidence of late LC, however, was twice in controls (16/51) versus 4DF-patients (8/53). Symptomatic LC (4 in untreated patients, 2 in 4DF-patients) were treated with percutaneous drainage (duration: 45 days in untreated patients versus 12 days in 4DF-patients). Conclusion. Application of 4DF on lymph node dissection areas lessened total drain loss and significantly lowered high volume drain loss. Furthermore, 4DF reduced frequency of late lymphoceles and lymphoceles requiring treatment by half, as well as duration of percutaneous drainage by more than two-thirds.

  13. A Comparison of Radical Perineal, Radical Retropubic, and Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomies in a Single Surgeon Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moben Mirza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We sought to compare positive surgical margin rates (PSM, estimated blood loss (EBL, and quality of life outcomes (QOL among perineal (RPP, retropubic (RRP, and robot-assisted laparoscopic (RALP prostatectomies. Methods. Records from 463 consecutive men undergoing RPP (92, RRP (180, or RALP (191 for clinically localized prostate cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Age, percent tumor volume, Gleason score, stage, EBL, PSM, and QOL using the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC were compared. Results. PSM were similar when adjusted for stage, grade, and volume. EBL was significantly less in the RALP (189 ml group compared to both RPP (475 ml and RRP (999 ml groups. When corrected for nerve sparing, there were no differences in erectile function and sexual function amongst the three groups. Urinary summary and pad usage scores showed no significant differences. Conclusion. RPP, RRP, and RALP offer similar surgical and QOL outcomes. RALP and RPP demonstrate less EBL compared to RRP.

  14. Evaluation of Lymphorrhea and Incidence of Lymphoceles: 4DryField® PH in Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes-J. Karsch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate impact of polysaccharide hemostat 4DryField PH (4DF applied on lymph node dissection area after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP on lymphorrhea and lymphocele (LC formation. Methods. 104 consecutive patients underwent RRP, 51 without 4DF treatment (CT-group and 53 with 4DF treatment (4DF-group. Groups were comparable (age, risk profile, and lymph node numbers. Postoperative drain loss (PDL and development of early and late LC were analyzed (mean follow-up at 7 months: 100%. Results. PDL was 452.5 ± 634.2 mL without and 308.5 ± 214 mL with 4DF treatment. PDL > 1000 mL only occurred in CT-group (5/51. Overall, 45 LC (26 in CT- versus 19 in the 4DF-group were diagnosed. At day 8, LC were equally distributed between groups. Incidence of late LC, however, was twice in controls (16/51 versus 4DF-patients (8/53. Symptomatic LC (4 in untreated patients, 2 in 4DF-patients were treated with percutaneous drainage (duration: 45 days in untreated patients versus 12 days in 4DF-patients. Conclusion. Application of 4DF on lymph node dissection areas lessened total drain loss and significantly lowered high volume drain loss. Furthermore, 4DF reduced frequency of late lymphoceles and lymphoceles requiring treatment by half, as well as duration of percutaneous drainage by more than two-thirds.

  15. Penile vascular evaluation and sexual function before and after radical retropubic prostatectomy: 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbelman, Yvette D; Wildhagen, Mark F; Dohle, Gert R

    2008-09-01

    Sexual dysfunction is common after surgery for prostate cancer. The aetiology of changes in sexual potency after radical prostatectomy is probably multifactorial, including neurogenic, vascular and psychosexual factors. A prospective study was designed to investigate haemodynamic and psychosexual changes before and after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) for organ-confined prostate cancer. Penile haemodynamic evaluation and an assessment of sexual excitement were performed preoperatively and 3 months after RRP by colour Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) with visual erotic stimulation combined with a single intracavernous injection of a mixture of papaverine/phentolamine. Questionnaires on sexual function [International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)], general health and quality of life were sent to the patients preoperative, 3 months and 5 years after operation. Forty-eight men participated in the study. Mean age was 62.6 years (range 55-69). CDU did not show any significant reduction in mean peak systolic flow velocity and mean resistance index. From the men who preoperatively had normal arterial inflow 18% developed arteriogenic insufficiency. Some form of veno-occlusive insufficiency and low resistance indices were already present in the majority of normal potent men preoperatively. Surgical technique did not influence penile arterial blood flow after the operation. Three months and 5 years postoperatively, there was a highly significant reduction in erectile function, intercourse satisfaction, overall satisfaction, orgasmic function and sexual desire. However, with respect to the outcome at 3 months there was a significant improvement of orgasmic function 5 years after operation, especially after a bilateral nerve sparing procedure. Erections sufficient for vaginal penetration (questions 3 and 4 of the IIEF, score >or=8) improved from 2% to 11% 3 months and 5 years after RRP respectively. Total IIEF score was significantly better after a bilateral nerve

  16. Preservation of the smooth muscular internal (vesical sphincter and of the proximal urethra during retropubic radical prostatectomy: A technical modification to improve the early recovery of continence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Brunocilla

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We describe our technique for preservation of the smooth muscular internal (vesical sphincter and proximal urethra during radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP and present our preliminary clinical results. Materials and methods: The first steps of the prostatectomy reflect the standard RRP, while for the final phases the procedure continues in an anterograde manner with incision of the fibers of the detrusor muscle at the insertion of the ventral surface of the base of the prostate. At this level, the inner circular muscle of the bladder neck forms a sphincteric ring of smooth muscle that covers the longitudinally oriented smooth muscle component of the urethral musculature that extends distally to the verumontanum. These two proximal structures represent the internal sphincter that envelops and locks the proximal urethra. A blunt dissection is continued until the ring shaped vesical sphincter is separated from the prostate and the longitudinally oriented smooth muscle component of the urethral musculature is identified. The base of the prostate is then gently separated from the urethra and from the bladder until the maximal length of the urethral musculature is isolated and preserved. Results: After 30 initial set-up procedures, 40 consecutive patients with organ confined prostate cancer were submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy with the preservation of muscular internal sphincter and the proximal urethra and compared to 40 patients submitted to standard procedure who served as control group. The group of patients submitted to our technical modification had a faster recovery of early continence than control group at 3 and 7 days. Conclusions: The described technique is a feasible and safe method for preservation of the internal urethral sphincter and allows improving the early recovery of urinary continence. The technique does not increase the rate of positive margins and the duration of the procedure.

  17. Low central venous pressure versus acute normovolemic hemodilution versus conventional fluid management for reducing blood loss in radical retropubic prostatectomy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Ashraf S; Moul, Judd W; Polascik, Thomas J; Robertson, Cary N; Roche, Anthony M; White, William D; Hill, Stephen E; Nosnick, Israel; Gan, Tong J

    2014-05-01

    To compare acute normovolemic hemodilution versus low central venous pressure strategy versus conventional fluid management in reducing intraoperative estimated blood loss, hematocrit drop and need for blood transfusion in patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy under general anesthesia. Patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy under general anesthesia were randomized to conventional fluid management, acute normovolemic hemodilution or low central venous pressure (≤5 mmHg). Treatment effects on estimated blood loss and hematocrit change were tested in multivariable regression models accounting for surgeon, prostate size, and all two-way interactions. Ninety-two patients completed the study. Estimated blood loss (mean ± SD) was significantly lower with low central venous pressure (706 ± 362 ml) compared to acute normovolemic hemodilution (1103 ± 635 ml) and conventional (1051 ± 714 ml) groups (p = 0.0134). There was no difference between the groups in need for blood transfusion, or hematocrit drop from preoperative values. The multivariate model predicting estimated blood loss showed a significant effect of treatment (p = 0.0028) and prostate size (p = 0.0323), accounting for surgeon (p = 0.0013). In the model predicting hematocrit change, accounting for surgeon difference (p = 0.0037), the treatment effect depended on prostate size (p = 0.0007) with the slope of low central venous pressure differing from the other two groups. Hematocrit was predicted to drop more with increased prostate size in acute normovolemic hemodilution and conventional groups but not with low central venous pressure. Limitations include the inability to blind providers to group assignment, possible variability between providers in estimation of blood loss, and the relatively small sample size that was not powered to detect differences between the groups in need for blood transfusion. Maintaining low central venous

  18. Health-related quality of life using SF-8 and EPIC questionnaires after treatment with radical retropubic prostatectomy and permanent prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Kusuhara, Yoshito; Miura, Noriyoshi; Shirato, Akitomi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru; Kataoka, Masaaki

    2009-08-01

    The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after treatment of prostate cancer is examined using a new HRQOL tool. HRQOL, based on the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC) and SF-8 questionnaires, was prospectively compared after either a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) or a permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) at a single institute. Between October 2005 and June 2007, 96 patients were treated by an RRP and 88 patients were treated by a PPB. A HRQOL survey was completed at baseline, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, prospectively. The general HRQOL in the RRP and PPB groups was not different after 3 months. However, at baseline and 1 month after treatment, the mental component summary was significantly better in the PPB group than in the RRP group. Moreover, the disease-specific HRQOL was worse regarding urinary and sexual functions in the RRP group. Urinary irritative/obstructive was worse in the PPB group, but urinary incontinence was worse in the RRP group and had not recovered to baseline after 12 months. The bowel function and bother were worse in the PPB group than in the RRP group after 3 months. In the RRP group, the patients with nerve sparing demonstrated the same scores in sexual function as the PPB group. This prospective study revealed the differences in the HRQOL after an RRP and PPB. Disease-specific HRQOL is clarified by using EPIC survey. These results will be helpful for making treatment decisions.

  19. A prospective longitudinal study comparing a radical retropubic prostatectomy and permanent prostate brachytherapy regarding the health-related quality of life for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Kusuhara, Yoshito; Miura, Noriyoshi; Shirato, Akitomi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru; Kataoka, Masaaki

    2008-07-01

    The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) or a permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) was prospectively compared at a single institute. Between 2003 and 2005, 122 patients were treated by RRP and 82 patients were treated by PPB. A QOL survey was completed at baseline, and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, prospectively. The general HRQOL was not different between the RRP and PPB groups after 3 months. However, at 1 month after treatment, the general HRQOL scores, except for general health, were significantly better in the PPB group than that in the RRP group. Moreover, the disease-specific QOL was worse in urinary and sexual functions in the RRP group. Urinary function in the RRP group had not recovered to baseline after 12 months. Although the urinary function in the PPB group was better than that of the RRP group, urinary bother continued to worsen until 6 months and thereafter it recovered gradually. The bowel function was not worse in the PPB group but bowel bother was worse at 6 months in the PPB group. In the RRP group, the patients with nerve sparing demonstrated better in sexual function than those without nerve sparing, but the recovery did not reach the level of the PPB group. This prospective study revealed the differences in the QOL after RRP and PPB. These results will be helpful for making treatment decisions.

  20. Predictive value of PSA velocity over early clinical and pathological parameters in patients with localized prostate cancer who undergo radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Carlos A.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To analyze the behavior of the prostate specific antigen velocity (PSAV in localized prostate adenocarcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 500 men who had localized prostate adenocarcinoma, who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy between January 1986 and December 1999. The PSAV was calculated for each patient and subsequently, the values were correlated with 5 groups: age, initial PSA value, clinical stage, tumor volume and Gleason score. RESULTS: The behavior of PSAV presented statistic significance with an increment between 1.3 ng/mL and 9.6 ng/mL, ranging from 38.6% and 59.8% when compared with the initial PSA value (p < 0.0001, clinical stage (p = 0.0002, tumor volume (p < 0.0001 and Gleason score (p = 0.0009. CONCLUSION: PSAV up to 2.5 ng/mL/year is associated with factors of good prognosis, such as initial PSA below 10 mg/mL, clinical stage T1, tumor volume below 20% and Gleason score lower than 7.

  1. 2D and 3D T2-weighted MR sequences for the assessment of neurovascular bundle changes after nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy with erectile function correlation

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    Panebianco, Valeria; Osimani, Marcello; Lisi, Danilo; Passariello, Roberto [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' -Policlinico Umberto I, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Sciarra, Alessandro; Ciccariello, Mauro; Salciccia, Stefano; Gentile, Vincenzo; Di Silverio, Franco [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' -Policlinico Umberto I, Department of Urology, Rome (Italy)

    2009-01-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the capability of a 3D isotropic MRI T2-weighted sequence (3D T2 ISO) in the depiction of changes of neurovascular bundles (NVBs) after bilateral nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). Furthermore, our aim was also to introduce a new MRI classification score of the NVB alteration patterns using the International Index Erectile Function Five-Item (IIEF-5) score as standard of reference. Fifty-three consecutive patients were postoperatively submitted to two MR examinations, including both 2D TSE T2-weighted (2D T2) and 3D T2 ISO sequences. Image findings were scored using a relative five-point classification and correlated with the postoperative IIEF-5 score. Radiologists attributed 13.2% of patients to class 0, 11.3% to class I, 34% to class II, 24.5% to class III, and 16.9% to class IV. With 3D T2 ISO images, the same radiologists determined 43.3% class 0, 32% class I, 11.4% class II, 7.5% class III, and 5.7% class IV. In all cases, the correlation and regression analysis between the 3D T2 ISO and IIEF-5 score resulted in higher coefficients values. The 3D sequence correlated most closely with patients' grading of erectile function. (orig.)

  2. 2D and 3D T2-weighted MR sequences for the assessment of neurovascular bundle changes after nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy with erectile function correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Sciarra, Alessandro; Osimani, Marcello; Lisi, Danilo; Ciccariello, Mauro; Salciccia, Stefano; Gentile, Vincenzo; Di Silverio, Franco; Passariello, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the capability of a 3D isotropic MRI T2-weighted sequence (3D T2 ISO) in the depiction of changes of neurovascular bundles (NVBs) after bilateral nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). Furthermore, our aim was also to introduce a new MRI classification score of the NVB alteration patterns using the International Index Erectile Function Five-Item (IIEF-5) score as standard of reference. Fifty-three consecutive patients were postoperatively submitted to two MR examinations, including both 2D TSE T2-weighted (2D T2) and 3D T2 ISO sequences. Image findings were scored using a relative five-point classification and correlated with the postoperative IIEF-5 score. Radiologists attributed 13.2% of patients to class 0, 11.3% to class I, 34% to class II, 24.5% to class III, and 16.9% to class IV. With 3D T2 ISO images, the same radiologists determined 43.3% class 0, 32% class I, 11.4% class II, 7.5% class III, and 5.7% class IV. In all cases, the correlation and regression analysis between the 3D T2 ISO and IIEF-5 score resulted in higher coefficients values. The 3D sequence correlated most closely with patients' grading of erectile function.

  3. Evaluation of health-related quality of life in patients with prostate cancer after treatment with radical retropubic prostatectomy and permanent prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragićević, Svetomir; Naumović, Tamara; Soldatović, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and make the treatment decision less difficult. Between 2007 and 2009 radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) was performed in 96 patients and permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) in 88 patients at our hospital. The general and disease-specific HRQOL was measured using two instruments, the Medical Outcome Study 8-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-8) and the expanded prostate index composite (EPIC). Comparing RRP and PPB, there were significant differences in all scores except for general health in the 1st month after treatment which had the same score in both groups. The baseline quality of life scores in physical function (p group and were better in the PPB group than in the RRP group. The physical component summary score in the PPB group was better than in the RRP group in the 1st month (p group. The urinary bother and irritative/obstructive scores in the 1st month were worse from baseline in both groups (p PPB group than in the RRP group where these scores recovered within 3 months. The urinary incontinence score in the RRP group was still worse than in the PPB group up to 12 months (p group at 3 (p PPB group where bowel function at 12 months was worse than at baseline and in the RRP group. Sexual function (p PPB group and did not change until 12 months. The difference in disease-specific quality of life has become clearer using EPIC. As with other published studies, our results provide important information that will therefore be useful for selecting the optimal treatments for localized prostate cancer. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Comparison of biochemical failure rates between permanent prostate brachytherapy and radical retropubic prostatectomy as a function of posttherapy PSA nadir plus 'X'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kamran A; Davis, Brian J; Mynderse, Lance A; Slezak, Jeffrey M; Bergstralh, Eric J; Wilson, Torrence M; Choo, C Richard

    2014-07-29

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir + 2 ng/mL, also known as the Phoenix definition, is the definition most commonly used to establish biochemical failure (BF) after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer management. The purpose of this study is to compare BF rates between permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) and radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) as a function of PSA nadir plus varying values of X and examine the associated implications. We retrospectively searched for patients who underwent PPB or RRP at our institution between 1998 and 2004. Only primary patients not receiving androgen-deprivation therapy were included in the study. Three RRP patients were matched to each PPB patient on the basis of prognostic factors. BF rates were estimated for PSA nadirs + different values of X. A total of 1,164 patients were used for analysis: 873 in the RRP group and 291 in the PPB group. Patients were equally matched by clinical stage, biopsy Gleason sum, primary Gleason grade, and pretherapy PSA value. Median follow-up was 3.1 years for RRP patients and 3.6 years in the PPB group (P = .01). Using PSA nadir + 0.1 ng/mL for the definition of BF, the 5-year BF rate was 16.3% for PPB patients and 13.5% for RRP patients (P = .007), whereas at nadir + 2 ng/mL or greater, the BF rates were less than 3% and were indistinguishable between PPB and RRP patients. In a cohort of well-matched patients who had prostatectomy or brachytherapy, we examined BF as a function of nadir + X, where X was treated as a continuous variable. As X increases from 0.1 to 2.0 ng/mL, the BF curves converge, and above 2.0 ng/mL they are essentially indistinguishable. The data presented are of interest as BF definitions continue to evolve.

  5. Significant pathological findings in routine urethrocystoscopy before open prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehraban D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the years, Trans Urethral Resection of Prostate (TURP, as a treatment modality for obstructing benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, gained popularity throughout the world. It is considered the gold standard for the surgical management of BPH. However, there is not the same pattern in our country and open prostatectomy is more common. Specific evaluation should be done preoperatively. Cystoscopy is one of them that have special limited indications. The aim of this study was to define the rate of pathological findings in routine urethrocystoscopy before open prostatectomy.Methods: In a prospective study from 2003 to 2005 in Dr Shariati hospital 120 patients prepared for open prostatectomy underwent routine cystoscopy, without absolute indications for cystoscopy.Results: There was no special pathology observed in routine cystoscopy. The results of this study revealed that the mean of age in patients with meatal stricture was significantly lower than those without stricture (59.5±0.7 vs. 49.9±5.5 years, p=0.008. Also, the results of present study showed that in patients with meatal stricture serum creatinine level was significantly higher (2.2±1.34 vs. 1.2±0.42 mgr/dL, p=0.003. Furthermore, it was revealed that the mean of age in patients with bladder diverticulum was significantly higher compared with those without bladder diverticulum (76.3±3.1 vs. 68.4±4.9 years, p=0.001.Conclusion: Routine cystoscopy is not necessary before open prostatectomy

  6. Preservation of the smooth muscular internal (vesical) sphincter and of the proximal urethra for the early recovery of urinary continence after retropubic radical prostatectomy: a prospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunocilla, Eugenio; Schiavina, Riccardo; Pultrone, Cristian Vincenzo; Borghesi, Marco; Rossi, Martina; Cevenini, Matteo; Martorana, Giuseppe

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of preservation of the muscular internal sphincter and proximal urethra on continence recovery after radical prostatectomy. This was a prospective single-center, case-control study. A total of 40 consecutive patients with organ-confined prostate cancer were submitted to radical prostatectomy with the preservation of the muscular internal sphincter and the proximal urethra (group 1), and their outcomes were compared with those of 40 patients submitted to a standard procedure (group 2). Continence rates were assessed using a self-administrated questionnaire at 3, 7 and 30 days, and 3 and 12 months after removal of the catheter. Group 1 had a faster recovery of early continence than group 2 at day 3 (45% vs 22%; P = 0.029) and at day 7 (75% vs 50%; P = 0.018). Considering the number of pads, group 1 had a faster recovery of continence at 3, 7 and 30 days, and also had less incidence of severe incontinence. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of continence at 3 and 12 months among the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that surgical technique and young age were significantly associated with earlier time to continence at 3 and 7 days. The two groups had no significant differences in terms of surgical margins. Our modified technique of radical retropubic prostatectomy with preservation of the smooth muscular internal sphincter, as well as of the proximal urethra during bladder neck dissection, results in a significantly increased urinary continence at 3, 7 and 30 days after catheter removal, with a minor incidence of severe incontinence. The technique is also oncologically safe, and it does not increase the operative duration of the procedure. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. Comparison of Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy and Open Radical Prostatectomy Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Na Rae; Son, Soo Kyung; Kim, Dae Keun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To systematically update evidence on the clinical efficacy and safety of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) versus retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) in patients with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Electronic databases, including ovidMEDLINE, ovidEMBASE, the Cochrane Library, KoreaMed, KMbase, and others, were searched, collecting data from January 1980 to August 2013. The quality of selected systematic reviews was assessed using the revised assessment of multiple systematic reviews and the modified Cochrane Risk of Bias tool for non-randomized studies. Results A total of 61 studies were included, including 38 from two previous systematic reviews rated as best available evidence and 23 additional studies that were more recent. There were no randomized controlled trials. Regarding safety, the risk of complications was lower for RARP than for RRP. Among functional outcomes, the risk of urinary incontinence was lower and potency rate was significantly higher for RARP than for RRP. Regarding oncologic outcomes, positive margin rates were comparable between groups, and although biochemical recurrence (BCR) rates were lower for RARP than for RRP, recurrence-free survival was similar after long-term follow up. Conclusion RARP might be favorable to RRP in regards to post-operative complications, peri-operative outcomes, and functional outcomes. Positive margin and BCR rates were comparable between the two procedures. As most of studies were of low quality, the results presented should be interpreted with caution, and further high quality studies controlling for selection, confounding, and selective reporting biases with longer-term follow-up are needed to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of RARP. PMID:27401648

  8. Does the tertiary Gleason pattern influence the PSA progression-free interval after retropubic radical prostatectomy for organ-confined prostate cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, I.M. van; Schout, B.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Witjes, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Gleason sum is an important prognostic parameter for patients treated with radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. However, frequently more than two predominant Gleason patterns are present in one specimen. In this study we investigated the prognostic significance of t

  9. Analysis of urinary continence skills in 80 cases of retro-pubic radical prostatectomy%尿控技术用于经耻骨后前列腺癌根治术80例分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马合苏提; 靳宏勇; 白强

    2013-01-01

      目的探索保留尿道括约肌手术技巧在前列腺癌根治术中的应用效果.方法本组80例前列腺癌患者,年龄66岁(范围59~75岁);79例前列腺肿瘤限于T2b期以内,1例T3期;78例因PSA升高行术前经直肠超声波(TRUS)引导下的前列腺穿刺活检,Gleason分级3~7分,另2例为TURP后偶发癌;PSA平均8.5ng/ml(范围2.7~44.5 ng/ml).手术前均无尿失禁情况.手术技巧:处理阴茎背深静脉丛采用集束“8”字缝扎;处理前列腺尖部时紧贴前列腺表面分离,并保留前列腺部尿道0.5~1cm;保留膀胱颈部.结果手术后随访12~48个月,18例生化复发,6例尿失禁.结论尿道外括约肌的保留能够减少前列腺癌根治术后尿失禁的发生.%Objective To investigate the effects of sphincter-preserving technique in retro-pubic radical prostatectomy on post-operative urinary continence. Methods Total of 80 patients with prostate cancer were recruited in this study. Their average age was 66 (range from 59 to 75) years and their clinical stage were all within T2b except 1 case in T3. Seventy-eight patients with abnormal PSA values underwent TRUS biopsies, and their Gleason scores ranged from 3 to 7, other 2 patients with normal PSA value were diagnosed as PCa after TURP;Mean PSA value was 8.5ng/ml(range from 2.7 to 44.5 ng/ml).No urinary incontinence was found pre-operatively for all the patients. Operative skills:“Bunching technique”was used in management of dorsal vein complex;Careful dissection was done by sharp dissection closely to the surface of the apex of the prostate and about 0.5 to 1 cm of urethra within the apex was preserved; Preservation of the bladder neck. Results All the patients were followed up 12 to 48 months after prostatectomy. Biochemical recurrence was found in 18 patients and urinary incontinence in 6 patients. Conclusion External urinary sphincter preserving technique in radical retro-pubic prostatectomy can decrease the rate of post

  10. Radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare oncological and functional outcomes between robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) and retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) during the initial phase with RALP at a large university hospital. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patient and tumour...... surgery and at follow-up and they were asked to report their use of pads/diapers. Potency was defined as an IIEF-5 score of at least 17 with or without phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Patients using up to one pad daily for security reasons only were considered continent. Positive surgical margins, blood...... loss and functional outcomes were compared between groups. RESULTS: Overall, 453 patients were treated with RRP and 585 with RALP. On multivariate logistic regression analyses, the type of surgery did not affect surgical margins (p = 0.96) or potency at 12 months (p = 0.7). Patients who had undergone...

  11. Prostate cancer: 1HMRS-DCEMR at 3T versus [(18)F]choline PET/CT in the detection of local prostate cancer recurrence in men with biochemical progression after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Sciarra, Alessandro; Lisi, Danilo; Galati, Francesca; Buonocore, Valeria; Catalano, Carlo; Gentile, Vincenzo; Laghi, Andrea; Passariello, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    This study compares proton magnetic resonancespectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) combined techniques at 3T magnet versus [(18)F]choline PET/computed tomography (CT) in the detection of local prostate cancer recurrence in patients with biochemical progression after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). 84 consecutive patients at high risk of local recurrence underwent combined 1HMRSI-DCEMR and 18-Fcholine- PET/CT. MR scan protocol included turbo spin echo (TSE) T2-weighted sequences in the axial, sagittal and coronal planes; three-dimensional (3D) chemical shift imaging (CSI) sequences with spectral/spatial pulses optimized for quantitative detection of choline and citrate; dynamic contrast enhanced gradient-echo (GRE) T1-weighted sequence. The population was divided into two groups. Group A included 28 patients with a lesion size ranging between 5.00mm and 7.2mm and PSA reduction following radiation therapy. Group B included 56 patients with a lesion size between 7.6mm and 19.4mm. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and accuracy were evaluated and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed. In Group A combined 1H-MRSI and DCE-MRI showed a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 75% (PPV 96%) while PET-CT examination showed a sensitivity of 62% and a specificity of 50% (PPV 88%) in identifying local recurrence. The accuracy of MRI was 89% while PET-CT showed an accuracy of 60%. Areas under the ROC curve (AUC) values for MR and PET-CT were 0.833 and 0.562, respectively. In Group B combined 1H-MRSI and DCEMR showed a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 100% (PPV 100%) with accuracy of 94%. PET-CT had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 33% (PPV 98%) with accuracy of 91%. The AUCs for MR and PET-CT values were 0.971 and 0.837, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of combined 1HMRSI-DCEMR was higher than PET/CT to identify local prostate cancer recurrence

  12. Comparative Effectiveness of Cancer Control and Survival after Robot-Assisted versus Open Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jim C; O'Malley, Padraic; Chughtai, Bilal; Isaacs, Abby; Mao, Jialin; Wright, Jason D; Hershman, Dawn; Sedrakyan, Art

    2017-01-01

    Robot-assisted surgery has been rapidly adopted in the U.S. for prostate cancer. Its adoption has been driven by market forces and patient preference, and debate continues regarding whether it offers improved outcomes to justify the higher cost relative to open surgery. We examined the comparative effectiveness of robot-assisted vs open radical prostatectomy in cancer control and survival in a nationally representative population. This population based observational cohort study of patients with prostate cancer undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and open radical prostatectomy during 2003 to 2012 used data captured in the SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results)-Medicare linked database. Propensity score matching and time to event analysis were used to compare all cause mortality, prostate cancer specific mortality and use of additional treatment after surgery. A total of 6,430 robot-assisted radical prostatectomies and 9,161 open radical prostatectomies performed during 2003 to 2012 were identified. The use of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy increased from 13.6% in 2003 to 2004 to 72.6% in 2011 to 2012. After a median followup of 6.5 years (IQR 5.2-7.9) robot-assisted radical prostatectomy was associated with an equivalent risk of all cause mortality (HR 0.85, 0.72-1.01) and similar cancer specific mortality (HR 0.85, 0.50-1.43) vs open radical prostatectomy. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy was also associated with less use of additional treatment (HR 0.78, 0.70-0.86). Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy has comparable intermediate cancer control as evidenced by less use of additional postoperative cancer therapies and equivalent cancer specific and overall survival. Longer term followup is needed to assess for differences in prostate cancer specific survival, which was similar during intermediate followup. Our findings have significant quality and cost implications, and provide reassurance regarding the adoption of more

  13. Robotic Prostatectomy: Soon Number 1 in Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iselin CE

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1990, laparoscopic surgery has undergone a tremendous evolution, pushed forward by the minimally invasive trend driven by our patients. Complex laparoscopic procedures, such as laparoscopic prostatectomy, have nevertheless faced significant difficulties, rendering them difficult to enter standard practice. However, robotic radical prostatectomy is expanding rapidly since the year 2000 especially in the USA, where actually approximately 70 % of radical prostatectomies are performed laparoscopically with the da Vinci system. This development is related to the facilitation the robot has brought to perform the difficult steps of laparoscopic prostatectomy. The functional outcome of robotic prostatectomy appears similar to the gold standard retropubic radical prostatectomy. This is also the case oncologically, although long-term data are needed for its final validation. The main problem of robotic prostatectomy is its high material cost, significantly superior to that of the conventional laparoscopic or retropubic technique. The near future will tell how European health systems will react to the American robotic epidemy.

  14. Robotic-assisted prostatectomy and open radical retropubic prostatectomy for locally-advanced prostate cancer: multi-institution comparison of oncologic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup A. Vora

    2013-03-01

    Conclusions: Up to 2 out of 3 men undergoing RALP for locally-advanced PCa had positive margins during our initial experience. However, with increasing surgeon experience the overall positive margin rate decreased significantly and was comparable to the positive margin rate for patients with locally advanced disease undergoing ORRP over four academic institutions. We also noted a lower incidence of biochemical recurrence with increasing RALP experience, suggesting better oncologic outcomes with higher volume. Given this data, RALP has comparable oncologic outcomes compared to ORRP, especially with higher volume surgeons.

  15. Robotic and Open Radical Prostatectomy: The First Prospective Randomised Controlled Trial Fuels Debate Rather than Closing the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Nicola; Wiklund, Peter; Rochat, Charles-Henry; Montorsi, Francesco; Dasgupta, Prokar; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Canda, Abdullah E; Piechaud, Thierry; Artibani, Walter; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2017-03-01

    Despite the finally acquired level 1 evidence, the urologic debate on open versus robotic prostatectomy still persists. This trial from Brisbane will encourage future studies that will better inform this debate and define what robotic surgery offers.

  16. Experience in reducing intraoperative blood loss in radical retropubic prostatectomy%减少耻骨后根治性前列腺切除术中出血的体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘定益; 沈周俊; 周文龙; 唐崎; 夏维木; 王名伟; 王健; 周燕峰; 俞家顺; 楚晨龙; 张翀宇

    2012-01-01

    To search for an effective method of reducing intraoperative blood loss in radical retropubic prostatectomy ( RRP). Methods: We performed RRP for 100 patients with prostate cancer, 50 ( group A) with the Walsh or Poor method for handling the dorsal venous complex ( DVC ) , and the other 50 ( group B) through the following three additional procedures for hemostasis: first placing a #7 prophylactic suture in the distal position of DVC, then ligating the vascular bundle of the prostatic apex with continuous 4-0 Vicryl sutures, and lastly placing a 4-0 absorbable suture followed by freeing the neurovascular bundle (NVB) or freeing NVB before suturing the remained levator ani myofascia and the deep layer of Denovilliers'fascia above the rectal serosa with 4-0 Vicryl. We assessed the effects of the three hemostatic methods in RRP by comparing the volumes of intraoperative blood loss and transfusion, operation time and perioperative levels of hemoglobin. Results: There were no significant differences between groups A and B in age, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, prostate volume, operation time and perioperative hemoglobin levels (P>0. 05). The volumes of intraoperative blood loss and transfusion were markedly higher in group A ([1 103. 00 ±528. 03] ml and [482. 00 ± 364. 60] ml) than in B ([528.00 ±258.96] ml and [ 140.00 ±266.28] ml) (P<0.05). Conclusion: Intraoperative blood loss in RRP could be significantly decreased by placing a prophylactic hemostatic suture in the distal position of DVC, continuous suture of the vascular bundle of the prostatic apex after cutting off the urethra, and placing a fine absorbable suture above NVB or continuous suture of the remained levator ani myofascia and the deep layer of Denovilliers'fascia above the rectal serosa with absorbable sutures after freeing NVB.%目的:探讨减少开放耻骨后根治性前列腺切除术(RRP)出血的有效方法. 方法:对100例前列腺癌患者行RRP,前50例(A组)采用Walsh或poor方法

  17. Care of the patient undergoing robotic-assisted prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, Danielle N; Sims, Terran Warren

    2006-04-01

    Prostate cancer has many treatment options. In addition to open retropubic and perineal approaches to radical prostatectomy, laparoscopic robotic prostatectomy is available as a newer surgical option. Potential advantages of robotic surgery include reduced pain and trauma, less blood loss, reduced infection risk, shorter hospital stay, faster recovery, and less scarring (Intuitive Surgical, 2005). A variety of nursing care considerations involving pre-operative education and preparation, intra-operative and immediate postoperative care issues, and long-term followup must be understood to meet the needs of a robotic surgical patient. Patient selection is very important to optimize a positive surgical outcome. Just as certain criteria make a good surgical candidate, there are factors that could complicate the surgery or adversely affect recovery.

  18. Preliminary experience with extraperitoneal endoscopic radical prostatectomy through duplication of the open technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tobias-Machado

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe surgical and functional results with extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with duplication of the open technique, from the experience obtained in the treatment of 28 initial cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a 36-month period, we prospectively analyzed 28 patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer undergoing extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 280 min, with mean blood loss of 320 mL. As intraoperative complications, there were 2 rectal lesions repaired with laparoscopic suture in 2 planes. There was no conversion to open surgery. Median hospital stay was 3 days, with return to oral diet in the first post-operative day in patients. As post-operative complications, there were 3 cases of extraperitoneal urinary fistula. Two of these cases were resolved by maintaining a Foley catheter for 21 days, and the other one by late endoscopic reintervention for repositioning the catheter. Five out of 18 previously potent patients evolved with erectile dysfunction. The diagnosis of prostate cancer was confirmed in all patients, with focal positive margin occurring in 3 cases. During a mean follow-up of 18 months, 2 patients presented increased PSA, with no clinical evidence of disease. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a laborious and difficult procedure, with a long learning curve. Extraperitoneal access is feasible, and it is possible to practically duplicate the principles of open surgery. The present technique can possibly offer advantages in terms of decreased blood loss, preservation of erectile function and prevention of positive margins.

  19. Urethral catheter removal 7 or 14 days after radical retropubic prostatectomy: clinical implications and complications in a randomized study Sete ou quatorze dias para a retirada da sonda vesical de demora após prostatectomia radical retropúbica: implicações clínicas e complicações em um estudo randomizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ary Vargas Souto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the hypothesis that a 7-day period of indwelling catheter after radical retropubic prostatectomy is effective and safe without the need of performing cystography. METHODS: In the period from January of 2000 to July of 2002, 73 patients underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy, and these patients were prospectively randomized in 2 groups: Group 1-37 patients who had the urethral catheter removed 7 days after the procedure, and Group 2-36 patients who had the catheter removed 14 days after the surgery. The 2 groups were similar, the surgeons and the technique were the same, and no cystography was performed to evaluate the presence of leaks. RESULTS: Two patients in Group 1 had bleeding and clot retention after having the catheter taken out in the seventh postoperative day and were managed by putting the catheter back in for 7 more days. Two patients in Group 2 developed bladder neck stricture and were treated by bladder neck incision with success. The continence rate was the same, with 2 cases of incontinence in each group. About 2 pads a day were used by the patients with incontinence. The average follow-up was 17.5 months (12-36 months. No urinary fistula, urinoma, or pelvic abscesses developed after catheter removal. Two patients were excluded from the analysis of this series: 1 died with a pulmonary embolus in the third postoperative day, and 1 developed a urinary suprapubic fistula before catheter withdrawal, which was maintained for 16 days. CONCLUSION: Withdrawal of the urethral catheter 7 days after radical retropubic prostatectomy, without performing cystography, has a low rate of short-term complications that are equivalent to withdrawal 14 days after the surgery.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a hipótese de que um período de sete dias de sonda vesical de demora após prostatectomia radical retropúbica é efetivo e seguro, sem a necessidade da realização de cistografia. MÉTODOS: Entre janeiro de 2000 e julho de 2002

  20. Transurethral prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgrewe, H L

    1995-05-01

    In properly selected patients, TURP has the highest probability of symptom relief of any strategy of BPH management except open prostatectomy, the outcomes of which are but marginally better. However, open prostatectomy suffers from lack of patient acceptance, increased postoperative discomfort, and prolonged hospitalization, factors which over the past six decades relegated it to a minor role in the surgical management of BPH. Given the advanced age and compromised health status of most men undergoing TURP, the procedure's current mortality, morbidity, and long-term complication rates are remarkable. The ultimate role of the emerging alternative strategies of BPH management--hormonal, pharmacologic, thermal, and device discussed elsewhere in this issue, will be dependent upon their durability and their long-term outcomes, which remain to be fully defined. In the meantime, TURP remains the standard against which all new therapies must be measured. The resectoscope is being challenged but is not yet ready for the history books.

  1. Is an adjustment by transurethral surgery simultaneously needed during the suprapubic open prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yu Seob; Zhang, Li Tao; Zhao, Chen; You, Jae Hyung; Park, Jong Kwan

    2015-03-01

    To compare suprapubic open prostatectomy (SOP) and a novel SOP with transurethral adjustment of residual adenoma and bleeding (TURARAB) for large sized prostates. Between March 2010 and March 2014, 49 patients with symptomatic BPH (>100 g) were scheduled for SOP or SOP with TURARAB. The patients were subdivided into two groups. In Group I, each patient underwent SOP. In Group II, each patient underwent SOP with TURARAB. Additional transurethral resection of residual adenoma and bleeding control were done through the urethra after enucleation of the prostate adenoma by SOP. Prior to intervention, all patients were analyzed by preoperative complete blood count, blood chemistry, prostate specific antigen, International Prostate Symptom Scores, and transrectal ultrasound of the prostate and uroflowmetry. SOP was performed by a suprapubic transvesical approach via a midline incision. The bladder neck mucosa was circularly incised to expose the prostate adenoma, and the plane between the adenoma and surgical capsule was developed by finger dissection. In addition, in Group II TURARAB was performed using Urosol. Postoperative outcome data were compared in the 1st month and 3rd month. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. Group I required a longer operative time than Group II. Blood transfusion during the operation was unnecessary due to the short amount of time available to control arterial bleeding in the prostatic fossa leading to a marked decrease in perioperative bleeding in Group II. Postoperative voiding function improved significantly in both groups. Even for large prostate glands, our novel procedure appears to be an effective and safe operation to reduce operation time, bleeding, and complications.

  2. Clitoral Pain Following Retropubic Midurethral Sling Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Christofferson, DO

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Clitoral pain symptoms following placement of a retropubic midurethral sling should be evaluated and promptly addressed, given the potential negative impact on the patient's sexual function. Christofferson M, Barnard J, and Montoya TI. Clitoral pain following retropubic midurethral sling placement. Sex Med 2015;3:346–348.

  3. Salvage robotic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Kaffenberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of non-surgical primary treatment for localized prostate cancer is a common occurrence, with rates of disease recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. In a large proportion of patients, disease recurrence is clinically localized and therefore potentially curable. Unfortunately, due to the complex and potentially morbid nature of salvage treatment, radical salvage surgery is uncommonly performed. In an attempt to decrease the morbidity of salvage therapy without sacrificing oncologic efficacy, a number of experienced centers have utilized robotic assistance to perform minimally invasive salvage radical prostatectomy. Herein, we critically evaluate the existing literature on salvage robotic radical prostatectomy with a focus on patient selection, perioperative complications and functional and early oncologic outcomes. These results are compared with contemporary and historical open salvage radical prostatectomy series and supplemented with insights we have gained from our experience with salvage robotic radical prostatectomy. The body of evidence by which conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy can be drawn comprises fewer than 200 patients with limited follow-up. Preliminary results are promising and some outcomes have been favorable when compared with contemporary open salvage prostatectomy series. Advantages of the robotic platform in the performance of salvage radical prostatectomy include decreased blood loss, short length of stay and improved visualization. Greater experience is required to confirm the long-term oncologic efficacy and functional outcomes as well as the generalizability of results achieved at experienced centers.

  4. Prediction of biochemical failure in localized carcinoma of prostate after radical prostatectomy by neuro-fuzzy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar Goyal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To predict biochemical failure in localized prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy using preoperative variables. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients of early carcinoma of prostate underwent open retropubic radical prostatectomy from June 2002 to June 2006. Preoperative variables included age, family history, digital rectal examination, serum prostatic specific antigen (S. PSA, prostate biopsy Gleason score, MRI of pelvis variables like periprostatic extension, seminal vesical invasion, weight of gland and pathological stage. With application of neuro-fuzzy, these variables were fed into system as input and output, that is S. PSA at six months (predicted value was calculated. Neuro-fuzzy system is a system to combine fuzzy system with learning techniques derived from neural networks. Here, we applied Takagi Sugeno Kang model (TSK due to its close solution to our aim. All the patients were followed up for a minimum of six months. At six month S. PSA of all patients was done (observed value. Predicted and observed values were compared. Result: Predicted and observed values were plotted on 1:1 slop line. Coefficient of correlation was 0.9935. Conclusion: Coefficient of correlation is close to one. It indicates that the neuro-fuzzy is accurate in predicting biochemical failure in localized carcinoma of prostate after radical prostatectomy.

  5. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy Performed after Previous Suprapubic Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Johnson F.; Feuerstein, Michael; Jazayeri, Seyed Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Operative management of prostate cancer in a patient who has undergone previous open suprapubic simple prostatectomy poses a unique surgical challenge. Herein, we describe a case of intermediate risk prostate cancer in a man who had undergone simple prostatectomy ten years prior to presentation. The patient was found to have Gleason 7 prostate cancer on MRI fusion biopsy of the prostate for elevated PSA and underwent an uncomplicated robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. PMID:27882057

  6. Perioperative differences in open radical prostatectomy versus laparoscopic radical prostatectomy%开放和经腹腔镜前列腺癌根治术围手术期的临床差异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪梅; 季惠翔; 潘进洪; 方强; 周占松; 陈志文

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨经腹腔镜前列腺癌根治术较开放性前列腺癌根治术围手术期的优点.方法 回顾分析2006年1月至2012年2月我科收治的75例前列腺癌患者的临床资料,对比开放性前列腺癌根治术与经腹腔镜前列腺癌根治术两组患者围术期的临床特征及并发症等.结果 经腹腔镜前列腺癌根治术组的患者术中出血量和总输血量以及住院时间显著低于开放性前列腺癌根治术组(P<0.05).开放性前列腺癌根治术组与经腹腔镜前列腺癌根治术组的总并发症分别为38.7%和18.2% (P <0.05),其中重度并发症分别为6.5%和4.5%(P>0.05).结论 经腹腔镜前列腺癌根治术因创伤小,术中出血量和围手术期输血量显著减少,总并发症率显著减少,最终可能节约了医疗资源.%Objective To determine the perioperative advantages in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy compared with open radical prostatectomy.Methods The perioperative clinical characteristics in both groups of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and open radical prostatectomy were reviewed and statistically investigated.The complications related to operations were recorded and graded according to the severity grading system of surgical complications.Results The blood loss,transfusion and days of hospital stay were significantly less in the group of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy than in the group of open radical prostatectomy.The incidences of total complications were 38.7% vs 18.2%,and the incidences of severe complications were 6.5% vs 4.5% in the groups of open radical prostatectomy and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy,respectively.Conclusion The blood loss,transfusion,complications and days of hospital stay are decreased significantly in minimally invasive prostate cancer surgery.Thus the medical resource is saved eventually.

  7. The cost-utility of open prostatectomy compared with active surveillance in early localised prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an on-going debate about whether to perform surgery on early stage localised prostate cancer and risk the common long term side effects such as urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Alternatively these patients could be closely monitored and treated only in case of disease progression (active surveillance). The aim of this paper is to develop a decision-analytic model comparing the cost-utility of active surveillance (AS) and radical prostatectomy (PE) for a cohort of 65 year old men with newly diagnosed low risk prostate cancer. Methods A Markov model comparing PE and AS over a lifetime horizon was programmed in TreeAge from a German societal perspective. Comparative disease specific mortality was obtained from the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group trial. Direct costs were identified via national treatment guidelines and expert interviews covering in-patient, out-patient, medication, aids and remedies as well as out of pocket payments. Utility values were used as factor weights for age specific quality of life values of the German population. Uncertainty was assessed deterministically and probabilistically. Results With quality adjustment, AS was the dominant strategy compared with initial treatment. In the base case, it was associated with an additional 0.04 quality adjusted life years (7.60 QALYs vs. 7.56 QALYs) and a cost reduction of €6,883 per patient (2011 prices). Considering only life-years gained, PE was more effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €96,420/life year gained. Sensitivity analysis showed that the probability of developing metastases under AS and utility weights under AS are a major sources of uncertainty. A Monte Carlo simulation revealed that AS was more likely to be cost-effective even under very high willingness to pay thresholds. Conclusion AS is likely to be a cost-saving treatment strategy for some patients with early stage localised prostate cancer. However, cost-effectiveness is

  8. Does robotic prostatectomy meet its promise in the management of prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-How; Carter, Stacey C; Hu, Jim C

    2013-06-01

    Following Walsh's advances in pelvic anatomy and surgical technique to minimize intraoperative peri-prostatic trauma more than 30 years ago, open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) evolved to become the gold standard treatment of localized prostate cancer, with excellent long-term survival outcomes [1•]. However, RRP is performed with great heterogeneity, even among high volume surgeons, and subtle differences in surgical technique result in clinically significant differences in recovery of urinary and sexual function. Since the initial description of robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in 2000 [2], and U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval shortly thereafter, RARP has been rapidly adopted and has overtaken RRP as the most popular surgical approach in the management of prostate cancer in the United States [3]. However, the surgical management of prostate cancer remains controversial. This is confounded by the idolatry of new technologies and aggressive marketing versus conservatism in embracing tradition. Herein, we review the literature to compare RRP to RARP in terms of perioperative, oncologic, and quality-of-life outcomes as well as healthcare costs. This is a particularly relevant, given the absence of randomized trials and long-term (more than 10-year) follow-up for RARP biochemical recurrence-free survival.

  9. Update on Robotic Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett S. Matsunaga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The da Vinci surgical robot has been shown to help shorten the learning curve for laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP for both laparoscopically skilled and na surgeons[1,2]. This approach has shown equal or superior outcomes to conventional laparoscopic prostatectomy with regard to ease of learning, initial complication rates, conversion to open, blood loss, complications, continence, potency, and margin rates. Although the data are immature to compare oncologic and functional outcomes to open prostatectomy, preliminary data are promising.Herein, we review the technique and outcomes of robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP.

  10. Epidural analgesia during open radical prostatectomy does not improve long-term cancer-related outcome: a retrospective study in patients with advanced prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Y Wuethrich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A beneficial effect of regional anesthesia on cancer related outcome in various solid tumors has been proposed. The data on prostate cancer is conflicting and reports on long-term cancer specific survival are lacking. METHODS: In a retrospective, single-center study, outcomes of 148 consecutive patients with locally advanced prostate cancer pT3/4 who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP with general anesthesia combined with intra- and postoperative epidural analgesia (n=67 or with postoperative ketorolac-morphine analgesia (n=81 were reviewed. The median observation time was 14.00 years (range 10.87-17.75 yrs. Biochemical recurrence (BCR-free, local and distant recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier technique. Multivariate Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to analyze clinicopathologic variables associated with disease progression and death. RESULTS: The survival estimates for BCR-free, local and distant recurrence-free, cancer-specific survival and overall survival did not differ between the two groups (P=0.64, P=0.75, P=0.18, P=0.32 and P=0.07. For both groups, higher preoperative PSA (hazard ratio (HR 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.01-1.02, P<0.0001, increased specimen Gleason score (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.46, P=0.007 and positive nodal status (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.03-2.67, P=0.04 were associated with higher risk of BCR. Increased specimen Gleason score predicted death from prostate cancer (HR 2.46, 95% CI 1.65-3.68, P<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: General anaesthesia combined with epidural analgesia did not reduce the risk of cancer progression or improve survival after RRP for prostate cancer in this group of patients at high risk for disease progression with a median observation time of 14.00 yrs.

  11. [Radical prostatectomy - pro robotic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillitzer, R

    2012-05-01

    Anatomical radical prostatectomy was introduced in the early 1980s by Walsh and Donker. Elucidation of key anatomical structures led to a significant reduction in the morbidity of this procedure. The strive to achieve similar oncological and functional results to this gold standard open procedure but with further reduction of morbidity through a minimally invasive access led to the establishment of laparoscopic prostatectomy. However, this procedure is complex and difficult and is associated with a long learning curve. The technical advantages of robotically assisted surgery coupled with the intuitive handling of the device led to increased precision and shortening of the learning curve. These main advantages, together with a massive internet presence and aggressive marketing, have resulted in a rapid dissemination of robotic radical prostatectomy and an increasing patient demand. However, superiority of robotic radical prostatectomy in comparison to the other surgical therapeutic options has not yet been proven on a scientific basis. Currently robotic-assisted surgery is an established technique and future technical improvements will certainly further define its role in urological surgery. In the end this technical innovation will have to be balanced against the very high purchase and running costs, which remain the main limitation of this technology.

  12. Intracavernous injection in the treatment of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquim de Almeida Claro; José Elêrton de Aboim; Marcelo Maríngolo; Enrico Andrade; Wilson Aguiar; Marcos Nogueira; Archimedes Nardozza Júnior; Miguel Srougi

    2001-01-01

    CONTEXT: Despite the recent improvements in performing radical retropubic prostatectomy that have led to a considerable decrease in the complication rate, erectile dysfunction still represents a major problem. Moreover, less invasive treatment options that are emerging for erectile dysfunction have not shown satisfactory results in managing these patients. OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy and side effects of self-injection therapy in the treatment of men who had become impotent after undergoi...

  13. Gleason score and laterality concordance between prostate biopsy and prostatectomy specimens

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Prostate biopsy involvement and Gleason score guide treatment decisions in prostate cancer. We evaluated concordance in Gleason score and laterality between biopsy and radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) specimens and factors that influenced this relationship. Material and Methods: We reviewed 538 prostate cancer diagnoses at a Veterans Affairs medical center (2000-2005) to identify men with prostate biopsy and RRP specimens. During this time there was a move from limited (6 co...

  14. Comparative cost-effectiveness of robot-assisted and standard laparoscopic prostatectomy as alternatives to open radical prostatectomy for treatment of men with localised prostate cancer: a health technology assessment from the perspective of the UK National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Andrew; Robertson, Clare; Rushton, Stephen; Shirley, Mark; Vale, Luke; Ramsay, Craig; Pickard, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy is increasingly used compared with a standard laparoscopic technique, but it remains uncertain whether potential benefits offset higher costs. To determine the cost-effectiveness of robotic prostatectomy. We conducted a care pathway description and model-based cost-utility analysis. We studied men with localised prostate cancer able to undergo either robotic or laparoscopic prostatectomy for cure. We used data from a meta-analysis, other published literature, and costs from the UK National Health Service and commercial sources. Care received by men for 10 yr following radical prostatectomy was modelled. Clinical events, their effect on quality of life, and associated costs were synthesised assuming 200 procedures were performed annually. Over 10 yr, robotic prostatectomy was on average (95% confidence interval [CI]) £1412 (€1595) (£1304 [€1473] to £1516 [€1713]) more costly than laparoscopic prostatectomy but more effective with mean (95% CI) gain in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) of 0.08 (0.01-0.15). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was £18 329 (€20 708) with an 80% probability that robotic prostatectomy was cost effective at a threshold of £30 000 (€33 894)/QALY. The ICER was sensitive to the throughput of cases and the relative positive margin rate favouring robotic prostatectomy. Higher costs of robotic prostatectomy may be offset by modest health gain resulting from lower risk of early harms and positive margin, provided >150 cases are performed each year. Considerable uncertainty persists in the absence of directly comparative randomised data. Copyright © 2013 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Anatomical basis for carrying out a state-of-the-art radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Atsushi; Tewari, Ashutosh K

    2012-01-01

    Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy has consolidated the position of surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer in the USA. In a few years, it is expected to spread rapidly worldwide. However, surgical anatomy has trailed the advance in surgical techniques of robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. Therefore, we reviewed the recent literature, which sometimes refutes the established consensus on pelvic anatomy, for the state-of-the-art technique. We also describe the anatomical findings for each basic step during robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy, and show evidence-based surgical techniques. Of course, these findings will also be useful for radical retropubic, perineal and conventional laparoscopic prostatectomy. Surgical anatomy should always be developing and changing with advances in surgical approaches.

  16. Effect of the modified nerve-sparing technique in open antegrade radical prostatectomy for 30 patients with prostate cancer%改良的保留神经根治性前列腺癌切除术30例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱再生; 付强; 徐礼臻; 罗荣利; 张春霆; 刘全启; 陈良佑

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨改良的保留神经根治性前列腺癌切除术的临床疗效.方法 30例前列腺癌患者采用改良根治性保留神经的前列腺切除术.改良的关键点:采用注水分离前列腺周围筋膜的方法,将Veil保留神经技术应用于开放手术中(即改良Veil保留神经技术);扩大分区(9区5组)盆腔淋巴结清扫;完整保留膀胱颈;集束捆扎背深静脉复合体;跳针套叠技术行膀胱与尿道的吻合.术后行控尿及勃起功能国际问卷-5(IIEF-5)随访.结果 患者平均年龄62岁,前列腺特异性抗原(PSA)水平平均11.9 ng/ml,手术时间平均150 min(75~240 min),术中出血量平均350 ml(100~1 600 ml),术前IIEF-5评分平均为21分,病理分期pT18例、pT2a 15例、pT2b4例、pT3a 3例.Gleason评分5分2例、6分7例、7分20例、8分1例.手术切缘阳性4例,其中2例为T2期,占T2期的10.5%(2/19),2例为T3期.无围手术期严重并发症.平均随访19个月(6-48个月),术后1个月完全控尿27例(90%),3个月达100%.术后3个月和6个月IIEF-5评分分别为13、19分,分别恢复到术前水平的40%和70%.结论 对选择性的前列腺癌患者,改良的保留神经根治性前列腺切除术较完整保留了前列腺周围所有的筋膜神经,使术后控尿及性功能得到早期、快速恢复,切缘阳性发生率低,疗效可靠.%Objective To evaluate the clinical value of the modified nerve-sparing open antegrade retropubic radical prostatectomy (MNS-ORP).Methods MNS-ORPs were performed in 30 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer.The modified technique included: endopelvic fascia was not incised, the prostate capsule was freed laterally from surrounding fasciae and dorsally;using the method of separating the peripheral fascia of the prostate, the Veil technique was applied to the open operation, that is, the modified Veil perserving nerve technology;pelvic lymph node dissections (9 regions and 5 groups) were extended;bladder neck

  17. Robotic simple prostatectomy: A consideration for large prostate adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua B. Nething

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH has changed considerably over the last several decades. First line treatment of BPH and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS with medical therapy has created a population of men with much larger prostate glands, many of whom require surgical intervention. Patients with prostate glands greater than 80 to 100 grams may be better managed surgically with a retropubic prostatectomy. We explore our experience with robotic assisted simple prostatectomy and review the relevant literature. Database: The database reviewed includes our experience with seven patients undergoing robotic simple prostatectomy, and a comprehensive review of the previously published series of this procedure. In addition, the literature pertaining to a pure laparoscopic approach to simple prostatectomy is reviewed. Conclusion: Robotic experience and training has become a standard in resident training programs; while classic transurethral resection is being performed less for large prostate glands. The robotic approach to simple prostatectomy provides an excellent option for surgical treatment of very large prostate glands, providing patients acceptable results in terms of operative time, estimated blood loss, hospital stay and duration of Foley catheter.

  18. A new technique of bladder neck reconstruction during radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Tolkach

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:To evaluate continence after radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients, in whom a new method of the bladder neck reconstruction (BNR using deep dorsal stitch was implemented (deep single stitch through all bladder layers directly dorsal to the bladder opening after “tennis racket” reconstruction and to provide justification for its use by means of anatomical study in cadavers.Material and Methods:Open radical retropubic prostatectomy was performed in 84 patients: 39 patients with a new BNR method used to improve continence and control group of 45 patients with standard “tennis racket” BNR. Median follow-up was 14 months in control group and 12 months in study group. Continence recovery was accessed early postoperatively and every 3 months thereafter. Anatomical study was performed on 2 male fresh cadavers reproducing two different BNR techniques to clarify any underlying continence related mechanisms.Results:Patients with new BNR achieved full continence significantly faster (p=0.041, but the continence rates after 12 months were similar between groups. The severity of incontinence up to month 9 was significantly reduced in BNR group. The anastomotic stricture rate was not affected. Applying new BNR to the cadaver model revealed effects on early continence, namely presence of proximal passive closure mechanism in area of bladder neck.Conclusions:Continence in patients with the new BNR method using deep dorsal stitch recovered significantly faster. Moreover, a reduced grade of residual incontinence was documented. The effect was non-significant at month 12 of follow-up, meaning that only early effect was present.

  19. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic, hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large number of complications if compared with primary radical prostatectomy. The most frequent complications after salvage prostatectomy include incontinence, stricture formation of urethrovesical anastomosis, rectal injury, acute urinary retention and infectious complications.

  20. A Literature-Based Analysis of the Learning Curves of Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Good

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a trend for the increased adoption of minimally invasive techniques of radical prostatectomy (RP – laparoscopic (LRP and robotic assisted (RARP – from the traditional open radical retropubic prostatectomy (ORP, popularised by Partin et al. Recently there has been a dramatic expansion in the rates of RARP being performed, and there have been many early reports postulating that the learning curve for RARP is shorter than for LRP. The aim of this study was to review the literature and analyse the length of the LRP learning curves for the various outcome measures: perioperative, oncologic, and functional outcomes. A broad search of the literature was performed in November 2013 using the PubMed database. Only studies of real patients and those from 2004 until 2013 were included; those on simulators were excluded. In total, 239 studies were identified after which 13 were included. The learning curve is a heterogeneous entity, depending entirely on the criteria used to define it. There is evidence of multiple learning curves; however the length of these is dependent on the definitions used by the authors. Few studies use the more rigorous definition of plateauing of the curve. Perioperative learning curve takes approximately 150-200 cases to plateau, oncologic curve approximately 200 cases, and the functional learning curve up to 700 cases to plateau (700 for potency, 200 cases for continence. In this review, we have analysed the literature with respect to the learning curve for LRP. It is clear that the learning curve is long. This necessitates centralising LRP to high volume centres such that surgeons, trainees, and patients are able to utilise the benefits of LRP.

  1. Intracavernous injection in the treatment of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim de Almeida Claro

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Despite the recent improvements in performing radical retropubic prostatectomy that have led to a considerable decrease in the complication rate, erectile dysfunction still represents a major problem. Moreover, less invasive treatment options that are emerging for erectile dysfunction have not shown satisfactory results in managing these patients. OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy and side effects of self-injection therapy in the treatment of men who had become impotent after undergoing radical prostatectomy due to prostate cancer, over a study period of 96 months. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: University Referral Center. PARTICIPANTS: 168 patients with erectile dysfunction, aged 43 to 78 years old, who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy due to localized prostate cancer. PROCEDURES: The patients were treated with self-injection therapy using papaverine, phentolamine and prostaglandin E1, at home. RESULTS: This study showed an acceptable 94.6% success rate, with no life-threatening complications. In addition to this, our series presented a 13.1% cure rate with this therapy. CONCLUSION: Self-injection therapy with papaverine, phentolamine and prostaglandin E1 is effective and safe in the treatment of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy.

  2. The normal post-surgical anatomy of the male pelvis following radical prostatectomy as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Steven D.; Sohaib, S.A. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Imaging, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Thompson, Alan [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Surgery, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of recurrent prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy have been documented in the radiology literature; however little has been written on the range of normal post-operative appearances. Common routes of surgical access for radical prostatectomy include retropubic and transperineal, although newer minimally invasive methods are gaining increasing acceptance. Specifically the range of appearances of the anastomotic site, the prostatic bed, the position of the bladder base, periurethral tissue, levator sling, rectum and residual seminal vesicles (if present) are demonstrated. A non-enhancing low signal nodule is frequently seen at the vesicourethral anastomosis or within the seminal vesicle remnant and usually represents fibrosis. Appearances following different surgical accesses do not differ tremendously, although the retropubic fat pad is reduced or absent following a retropubic approach. Anterior rectal-wall scarring may be present following a transperineal approach. Other post-surgical findings that may mimic disease include a lymphocoele and injected bladder-neck bulking agent. Many patients referred for MRI following radical prostatectomy will have a pathological study showing disease recurrence, although in non-pathological studies the radiological features can differ significantly. It is important for the radiologist to be aware of the spectrum of normal post-surgical appearances so not to confuse these with locally recurrent disease. (orig.)

  3. Robotic prostatectomy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, Danielle N; Sims, Terran Warren

    2006-04-01

    Despite the minimally invasive nature of the robotic prostatectomy procedure, there are still many cultural, environmental, and social issues that must be addressed. The following case study emphasizes that patient education is key to successful outcomes following robotic prostatectomy.

  4. Robotic-Assisted Simple Prostatectomy: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Marc; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of medical therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia, a need remains for robust surgical therapy in select patients. Robotic-assisted simple prostatectomy (RASP) is an efficacious and safe therapy for patients with bladder outlet obstruction owing to large volume prostates. Data from 13 published cohorts suggest functional outcomes equivalent to open simple prostatectomy with substantially decreased length of hospital stay and risk of transfusion. However, there are few longer term data.

  5. ROBOT-ASSISTED LAPAROSCOPIC PROSTATECTOMY: OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Nesterov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Retropubic radical prostatectomy (RPE is now the gold standard of treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer (PC. However, robot-assisted RPE procedures using the da Vinci system are finding increasing acceptance.Materials and methods. The authors conducted a prospective study of 60 robot-assisted prostatectomies made at the Clinic of Urology, N.I. Pirogov National Medical Surgical Center, in the period January 2009 to December 2010.Results. The duration of an operation averaged 230 min; the average amount of blood loss was 200 ml. The mean duration of postoperative analgesia was 2,7 days. That of urinary catheterization was 8.5 days. A normal postoperative course was noted in most cases (88,4 %. Seven patients were found to have 8 (13,3 % mild and moderate complications. A pathohistological study revealed a positive surgical margin of resection in 21,7 % of the patients, extracapsular tumor growth in 21,7 %, and seminal vesicle invasion in 23,3 %. Tumor-affected regional lymph nodes were detected in 1 (1,7 % patient. In our observed series, 82 and 93 % of the subjects completely retained urine after 6 and 12 moths, respectively. Throughout the follow-up, erectile function recovered in 7 of the 15 patients undergoing a nerve-sparing surgical procedure.Conclusion. Postoperative results in our series of interventions are comparable to those obtained in the studies by Russian and foreign colleagues at the early stage of mastering this procedure. By considering a few observations, it is today difficult to say that our study is valid in the context of evidence-based medicine. Estimation of the benefits of robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy calls for long-term multicenter randomized trials.

  6. ROBOT-ASSISTED LAPAROSCOPIC PROSTATECTOMY: OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Nesterov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Retropubic radical prostatectomy (RPE is now the gold standard of treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer (PC. However, robot-assisted RPE procedures using the da Vinci system are finding increasing acceptance.Materials and methods. The authors conducted a prospective study of 60 robot-assisted prostatectomies made at the Clinic of Urology, N.I. Pirogov National Medical Surgical Center, in the period January 2009 to December 2010.Results. The duration of an operation averaged 230 min; the average amount of blood loss was 200 ml. The mean duration of postoperative analgesia was 2,7 days. That of urinary catheterization was 8.5 days. A normal postoperative course was noted in most cases (88,4 %. Seven patients were found to have 8 (13,3 % mild and moderate complications. A pathohistological study revealed a positive surgical margin of resection in 21,7 % of the patients, extracapsular tumor growth in 21,7 %, and seminal vesicle invasion in 23,3 %. Tumor-affected regional lymph nodes were detected in 1 (1,7 % patient. In our observed series, 82 and 93 % of the subjects completely retained urine after 6 and 12 moths, respectively. Throughout the follow-up, erectile function recovered in 7 of the 15 patients undergoing a nerve-sparing surgical procedure.Conclusion. Postoperative results in our series of interventions are comparable to those obtained in the studies by Russian and foreign colleagues at the early stage of mastering this procedure. By considering a few observations, it is today difficult to say that our study is valid in the context of evidence-based medicine. Estimation of the benefits of robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy calls for long-term multicenter randomized trials.

  7. [Comparative analysis of photoselective vaporization of the prostate with the Greenlight laser and open prostatectomy for high volume prostate hypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimbault, M; Watt, S; Bourgoin, H; Brichart, N; Bruyère, F

    2014-06-01

    Comparative medical economic study between total prostatectomy and laser in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients whose prostate is more than 80g. This study compared data registered retrospectively for the group AVH and prospective data for PVP patients. The patients whose prostate weighed more than 80g by echography were selected. The adopted point of view was the one of the hospital and the temporal horizon was of one year after the surgical operation. Direct costs per- and post-surgery were taken into account including specific surgical care and secondary surgical revision. The medical data per- and postoperative were also compared. Primary outcome measure was incremental cost per procedure. Forty-one patients in the AVH group and 53 in the PVP group. The mean length of stay (LOS) is significantly shorter in the PVP group (3.0±1.0 days vs 10.4±4.0; P<0.001). Re-operation rate was significantly lower in the PVP group (1.9% vs 19.5% P<0.001). The cost analysis shows a mean additional cost of 1450 euros for the AVH group. PVP was cost-effective because it was more economic and it lead to lower re-operation rate until one year of follow-up than in the AVH group. Nevertheless, these data deserve to be nuanced by unfavorable results of the AVH in comparison with those of the literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimal pain management for radical prostatectomy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Grish P; Jaschinski, Thomas; Bonnet, Francis;

    2015-01-01

    of evidence to develop an optimal pain management protocol in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Most studies assessed unimodal analgesic approaches rather than a multimodal technique. There is a need for more procedure-specific studies comparing pain and analgesic requirements for open and minimally......BACKGROUND: Increase in the diagnosis of prostate cancer has increased the incidence of radical prostatectomy. However, the literature assessing pain therapy for this procedure has not been systematically evaluated. Thus, optimal pain therapy for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy remains...... invasive surgical procedures. Finally, while we wait for appropriate procedure specific evidence from publication of adequate studies assessing optimal pain management after radical prostatectomy, we propose a basic analgesic guideline....

  9. Clinical analysis of DA-Vinci robotic prestatectomy and open prostatectomy surgery%达·芬奇机器人手术与开放性手术根除前列腺癌的临床对照

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晶; 关晓海; 李占清; 邬鹏宇; 李晓强; 陈国生

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the dinieal techniques of DA-Vinci robotic prostatectomy and traditional open prostatectomy surgery.Methods The data of 46 prostate cancer patients were collected from June to August 2006 prostatectomy surgeries in this investigation,including 17 open and 29 DA-vinci prostatectomies.Results Compared with open manner,DA-Vinci surgery showed less blood loss,less pain,shorter hospital stay,less risk of infection,faster recovery and less scarring.Conclusion DA-Vinci robotic prostatectomy surgery system is a minimally invasive ahemativo for treating and removing prostate cancer and has potential future.%目的 探讨前列腺癌治疗新技术达·芬奇(DA-Vinci)手术机器人的临床应用效果及与开放性手术的效果比较.方法 对2006年6~8月德国海德堡大学外科医院收治的46例前列腺癌手术治疗患者临床资料进行分析,其中行常规开放性手术17例,达·芬奇机器人手术29例.结果 达·芬奇机器人手术治疗较开放性手术出血少,患者疼痛轻微.手术和住院时间缩短,术中和术后感染的机会少,恢复迅速并且腹部瘢痕小.结论 达·芬奇机器人根除前列腺癌手术治疗作为一种微创、准确、智能化的新的手术操作系统.具有开放性手术无可比拟的优势,为外粹医师提供了新的技术平台.

  10. First Danish single-institution experience with radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, Marie-Louise; Røder, Martin Andreas; Vainer, Ben

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the impact of positive surgical margins (PSMs), stratified by location and extension, on biochemical outcome after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included data from 605 consecutive patients treated with RRP...... for localized prostate cancer. Patients with node-positive disease were excluded. Biochemical recurrence-free survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to assess risk factors. RESULTS: The overall PSM rate was 35.4%. Eighty-three per cent (82.......7%) of these had a single PSM, whereas 17.3% of patients had two or more PSMs. Apical PSMs were present in 42.5% and non-apical in 57.5%. The presence of any PSM had a significant impact on the risk of biochemical recurrence (BR) [hazard ratio (HR) = 3.3, p

  11. Orgasm after radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeman, M; VanDriel, MF; Schultz, WCMW; Mensink, HJA

    1996-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the ability to obtain and the quality of orgasm after radical prostatectomy, Patients and methods The orgasms experienced after undergoing radical prostatectomy were evaluated in 20 men (median age 65 years, range 56-76) using a semi-structured interview and a self-administered

  12. [Current status and future prospect of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Although radical retropubic prostatectomy had long been the mainstay as the surgical treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer, robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) has recently been achieving increasing acceptance, resulting in the leading option for treating such patients in the United States, and it has been progressively expanding in other countries, including Japan. To date, however, there have been limited data concerning prospective studies or randomized trials showing the superiority of RARP over other surgical approaches. In this review, we attempted to summarize the current status of RARP based on available evidence as well as the experience at our institution, and to discuss the future prospect of this novel system as a major surgical technique for localized prostate cancer.

  13. Longitudinal urethral sling with prepubic and retropubic fixation for male urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H. Schaal

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Description and early results of a new urethral sling technique for treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence, which combines efficacy, low cost and technical simplicity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From May 2003 to April 2004, 30 patients with moderate or total urinary incontinence, following radical prostatectomy or endoscopic resection of the prostate, underwent the new technique. The technique is based on the placement of a longitudinal-shaped sling in the bulbar urethra, measuring 4 cm in length by 1.8 cm in width, made of Dacron or polypropylene mesh, fixed by 4 sutures on each side, with 2 sutures passed with Stamey-Pereira needle by retropubic approach and 2 by prepubic approach, which are then tied over the pubis. Pressure control was determined by interrupting the loss of infused water through a suprapubic cystostomy 60 cm from the pubis level. RESULTS: Pre-operative assessment excluded vesical instability, urethral stenosis and urinary infection. Suprapubic cystostomy was removed when the patient was able to satisfactorily void with urinary residue lower than 100 mL, which occurred in 29 of the 30 cases. In 2 cases, there was infection of the prosthesis, requiring its removal. In 3 cases, there was the need to adjust the sling (increasing the tension, due to failure of the urinary continence. Overall, 20 of 30 (66.7% operated patients became totally continent, and did not require any kind of pads. Four of 30 (13.3% patients achieved partial improvement, requiring 1 to 2 pads daily and 6 of 30 (20% patients had minimal or no improvement. There was no case of urethral erosion. CONCLUSION: This new sling technique has shown highly encouraging preliminary results. Its major advantage over other surgical techniques for treatment of moderate or severe stress urinary incontinence is the simplicity for its execution and low cost. A long-term assessment, addressing maintenance of continence, detrusor function and preservation

  14. Sexuality Following Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Serefoglu, Ege C; Albersen, Maarten;

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radical prostatectomies can result in urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Traditionally, these issues have been studied separately, and the sexual problem that has received the most focus has been erectile dysfunction. AIM: To summarize the literature on sexually related side...... effects and their consequences after radical prostatectomy and focus on the occurrence and management of problems beyond erectile dysfunction. METHODS: The literature on sexuality after radical prostatectomy was reviewed through a Medline search. Original research using quantitative and qualitative...... methodologies was considered. Priority was given to studies exploring aspects of sexuality other than erectile function. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The prevalence, predictive factors, and management of post-prostatectomy sexual problems beyond erectile dysfunction. RESULTS: Most patients will develop urinary...

  15. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 6 months. You will learn exercises (called Kegel exercises) that strengthen the muscles in your pelvis. ... Radical prostatectomy Retrograde ejaculation Urinary incontinence Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Suprapubic catheter care Urinary catheters - ...

  16. Iatrogenic Rectal Injury During Radical Prostatectomy: Is Colostomy Inevitable End?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Topaktas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Radical prostatectomy (RP is the gold standard treatment method for localized prostate cancer, because of its high oncological success. Iatrogenic rectal injury (IRI during RP is rarely seen, but it may causes serious complications because of the close anatomic relationship between the prostate and rectum. Aim is to present our series about management of IRI without colostomy. Material and Method: Between June 1999 and June 2013, radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP was performed to 372 patients by a single surgeon. 10 cases (%2,6 were complicated by a rectal injury during RRP. Instant rectal closure was performed in 3 layers without a diverting colostomy, at the time of surgery. Omental vascular flap was placed between rectum and vesicourethral anastomosis. Results: The clinical stages of IRI cases were T1c, T2a and T2c in 2, 3 and 5 patients, respectively. Their preoperative Gleason scores were 6, 7 and 8 in 3, 5 and 2 patient, respectively. None of the 10 had undergone previous prostatic or rectal surgery, or received preoperative radiotherapy or hormonal therapy. Discussion: Instant diagnosis and rectal wall closures by three layers are essential for successful repair. Our technique seems as a safe, minimal invasive and highly effective option for the management of IRI.

  17. Transvaginal retropubic sling systems: efficacy and patient acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldovan CP

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Christina P Moldovan,1 Michelle E Marinone,2 Andrea Staack3 1Department of Psychology, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States of America; 2School of Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States of America; 3Department of Urology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California, United States of America Abstract: Stress urinary incontinence is a common, disabling, and costly medical problem that affects approximately 50% of women with urinary incontinence. Suburethral retropubic slings have been developed as a minimally invasive and effective surgical option, and they have been used as a first-line treatment for stress urinary incontinence since 1995. However, complications including vaginal extrusion, erosion, pain, bleeding, infections, lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary retention, and incontinence have been reported with use of the slings. Several companies manufacture sling kits, and the sling kits vary with regard to the composition of the mesh and introducer needle. The aim of this review was to determine which sling kit was most effective for patients, had minimal reported side effects, and was best accepted by patients and surgeons. In a review of the literature, it was found that a total of 38 studies were published between 1995 and 2014 that reported on eight tension-free retropubic sling kits: SPARC, RetroArc, Align, Advantage, Lynx, Desara, Supris, and Gynecare TVT. The Gynecare TVT was the most cited sling kit; the second most cited was the SPARC. This review provides a summary of the studies that have examined positive and negative outcomes of the retropubic tension-free suburethral sling procedure using various sling kits. Overall, the results of the literature review indicated that data from comparisons of the available sling kits are insufficient to make an evidenced-based recommendation. Therefore, the decision regarding which sling kit is appropriate to use in

  18. [Radical prostatectomy--100 years of evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofrit, Ofer N; Shalhav, Arieh L

    2008-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignant disease in men. The incidence of prostate cancer has been rising since the early 1990s. Not all men inflicted by prostate cancer will develop clinical disease. Therefore, sorting these cases is a great clinical challenge. Radical prostatectomy has undergone evolution in the last 100 years. Better understanding of the pelvic anatomy has led to a decrease in the blood loss during surgery and in the rate of urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction following surgery. The introduction of laparoscopy in the late 1990s to this surgery provided the surgeon with a magnified multi-angle field of view and facilitated accurate dissection and suturing. Decreased damage to neighboring tissue made recovery hastier. Nevertheless, laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a technically challenging surgery and did not become popular. The last step in the evolution of radical prostatectomy is the introduction of robotic systems for assistance in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. A master-slave robotic system is composed of console and mechanical arms. The surgeon is provided with a magnified three dimensional view of the operative field and with two mechanical arms that accurately replicate its fingers movements. The initial results of robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy seem promising, however, long-term follow-up and comparison to open surgeries are lacking. Robotic systems were rapidly implemented in the American market and in the year 2006, 40% of all radical prostatectomies were robotic assisted. Future systems may reveal deep structures to the visualized surface by superimposing MRI images on the surgical field.

  19. Prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer to prepare for renal transplantation in end-stage renal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillou, Xavier; Chahwan, Charles; Le Gal, Sophie; Bensadoun, Henri; Doerfler, Arnaud

    2014-11-06

    Surgical difficulties of renal transplantation related to prostate cancer (PC) treatment and the results of renal transplantation after radical prostatectomy are currently poorly known, as well as oncological follow-up before and after renal transplantation. We performed a retrospective study including all patients diagnosed with PC before renal transplantation in our department. Nineteen patients were included between August 2003 and December 2013. The mean age at diagnosis of PC was 61.7 years (range 51.4-71.1). PSA mean level at diagnosis was 8.5 ng/ml (range 4.8-20). Fourteen had a retro-pubic and 5 a laparoscopic prostatectomy. Three patients underwent radiotherapy for positive surgical margins or extra-capsular extension. Fourteen patients were transplanted. The mean time lapse between prostatectomy and kidney transplantation was 32.8 months (range 14-71). Seven recipients (50%) were transplanted less than 24 months after prostatectomy. Post-transplantation surgical complications were not significantly related to dissection difficulties (p=0.2). No recurrence of PC was observed after renal transplantation, with a mean follow-up of 38 months (range 6-77.9). Prostate cancer discovered before renal transplantation should be treated by radical prostatectomy to assess recurrence risk. If the PC is at low risk of recurrence, it seems possible to shorten the 2-year period of oncologic follow-up before transplantation called for in current recommendations.

  20. Robotic Surgical System for Radical Prostatectomy: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Myra; Xie, Xuanqian; Wells, David; Higgins, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the second most common type of cancer in Canadian men. Radical prostatectomy is one of the treatment options available, and involves removing the prostate gland and surrounding tissues. In recent years, surgeons have begun to use robot-assisted radical prostatectomy more frequently. We aimed to determine the clinical benefits and harms of the robotic surgical system for radical prostatectomy (robot-assisted radical prostatectomy) compared with the open and laparoscopic surgical methods. We also assessed the cost-effectiveness of robot-assisted versus open radical prostatectomy in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer in Ontario. Methods We performed a literature search and included prospective comparative studies that examined robot-assisted versus open or laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. The outcomes of interest were perioperative, functional, and oncological. The quality of the body of evidence was examined according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. We also conducted a cost–utility analysis with a 1-year time horizon. The potential long-term benefits of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy for functional and oncological outcomes were also evaluated in a 10-year Markov model in scenario analyses. In addition, we conducted a budget impact analysis to estimate the additional costs to the provincial budget if the adoption of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy were to increase in the next 5 years. A needs assessment determined that the published literature on patient perspectives was relatively well developed, and that direct patient engagement would add relatively little new information. Results Compared with the open approach, we found robot-assisted radical prostatectomy reduced length of stay and blood loss (moderate quality evidence) but had no difference or inconclusive results for functional and oncological outcomes

  1. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipke Michael

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Millions of men are diagnosed annually with prostate cancer worldwide. With the advent of PSA screening, there has been a shift in the detection of early prostate cancer, and there are increased numbers of men with asymptomatic, organ confined disease. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is the latest, well accepted treatment that patients can select. We review the surgical technique, and oncologic and functional outcomes of the most current, large series of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy published in English. Positive margin rates range from 2.1-6.9% for pT2a, 9.9-20.6% for pT2b, 24.5-42.3% for pT3a, and 22.6-54.5% for pT3b. Potency rates after bilateral nerve sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy range from 47.1 to 67%. Continence rates at 12 months range from 83.6 to 92%.

  2. Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy in the ERA of Robot-Assisted Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iason Kyriazis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work the outcomes of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP with regard to perioperative morbidity, oncological effectiveness, as well as postoperative continence and potency preservation are being reviewed and compared with the gold standard open radical prostatectomy. In addition, the limitations of LRP are being presented in contrast to the advancement offered by the emerging robotic assisted radical prostatectomy in an attempt to reveal whether laparoscopic approach still has a role in the era of robot-assisted technology.

  3. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy: a costs and break-even point analysis for decision-making in a university hospital and a regional healthcare system in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Fabbro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy (RALP is one of the most expensive urological innovations. Prices of the “Da Vinci System” range from € 761.105 to € 1.902.762 for each unit, without taking into account the cost of maintenance and the use of additional devices. We evaluated outcomes, and costs retrospectively, comparing RALP to open retro-pubic radical prostatectomy (RRP performed in our hospital between December 2009 and December 2010.METHODS: We compared 53 RALP, and 50 RRP in terms of costs, and clinical outcomes. We also implemented a Break Even Analysis in order to evaluate if the public reimbursement covered the total cost of RALP.RESULTS: According to our analysis, RALP showed lower hospitalization (p < 0,0001, higher early continence rate  (p < 0,0001, better potency rate in nerve sparing procedures  (p < 0,0142, and required no transfusions. Excluding the cost of purchasing and maintenance, single case costs were € 6.046,08 for RALP and € 4.834,11 for RRP, respectively. Considering the affordability of the technology, the point where the total revenue is sufficient to cover the total costs is an average of 60 cases performed per year, only in presence of additional reimbursement.CONCLUSIONS: Although our clinical analysis shows better results in favour of RALP, the economical analysis shows that RALP's costs are consistently higher than RRP. Considering also the purchasing costs, we demonstrate that the health gain of the technology does not necessarily offset the higher costs, even in a large, university hospital (1.000 beds. 

  4. Does the size matter?: Prostate weight does not predict PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Darrell D; Koch, Michael O; Lin, Haiqun; Jones, Timothy D; Biermann, Katharina; Cheng, Liang

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies suggest that low prostate weight is a significant negative prognostic factor for prostate cancer. In the current study, the data for 431 men who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy between 1990 and 1998 were analyzed for association between prostate weight and various clinical and pathologic parameters. These included age, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, PSA recurrence, pathologic stage, Gleason grade, extraprostatic extension, positive surgical margins, tumor volume, associated high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, perineural invasion, and lymph node metastasis. Potential associations were probed by using Cox regression model analysis. A significant positive correlation was found between prostate weight and increasing patient age or increasing preoperative PSA level. There was no significant independent association between prostate weight and any of the other variables examined. No association was found between prostate weight and PSA recurrence. Although increasing prostate weight correlates with increased patient age and higher preoperative PSA level, it does not independently predict postoperative cancer recurrence.

  5. Construction of a nomogram predicting the risk of peri-operative complications after open radical prostatectomy%预测前列腺癌根治术后并发症风险列线图的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万方宁; 周家权; 朱耀; 叶定伟; 姚旭东; 张世林; 戴波; 张海梁

    2012-01-01

    目的 采用标准化的评分系统分析前列腺癌根治术围手术期并发症的危险因素及构建预测模型. 方法 选取2007年6月至2011年6月行前列腺癌根治术的患者240例,年龄50~82岁,平均70岁.术前均经活检病理诊断为前列腺癌.Gleason评分:<7分95例,≥7分145例.临床分期:T1期1例(0.4%),T2a期5例(2.1%),T2b期7例(2.9%),T2c期162例(67.5%),T3a期26例(10.8%),T3b期39例(16.3%).患者围手术期(术后30 d内)并发症情况依据Clavien-Dindo 标准按严重程度分级,Ⅱ度以上并发症归为有临床意义的并发症,其中直肠损伤4例(1.6%),伤口感染5例(2.0%),深静脉血栓3例(1.2%),尿漏12例(5.0%),淋巴痿11例(4.5%),心肌梗死14例(5.8%),二次手术4例(1.6%).采用倒退法多元Logistic回归筛选危险因素,建立预测围手术期H度及以上并发症的列线图. 结果 围手术期并发症的预测因子中,体质指数(body mass index,BMI)是独立的预后因素(OR值为0.804,P<0.05).通过变量筛选最终的模型包括BMI、N分期、术中出血>200 ml.模型的内部验证显示分辨度C-index为0.633,符合度平均绝对差为0.028.最终根据多因素分析结果绘制了便于临床应用的列线图. 结论 基于标准化的并发症评估数据,我们建立了预测前列腺癌围手术期临床显著并发症的列线图,该列线图在内部验证中显示了良好的效力,有助于前列腺癌个体化的手术治疗.%Objective To construct and evaluate a nomogram for predicting the risk of peri-operative complications after radical retro-pubic prostatectomy (RRP) with standard classification criteria.Methods The peri-operative complications and clinicopathological data of 240 patients (50-82 years old) who had undergone RRP for prostate cancer from June 2006 to June 2011 were retrospectively collected.Gleason score:95 cases < 7; 145 patients ≥ 7;Clinical staging:cT1 is 1 case (0.4%),T2a 5 cases (2.1%),T2b 7 cases

  6. Evaluating the oncologic outcomes in 152 patients undergoing extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xun-gang; QU Fa-jun; WANG Jun-kai; CHEN Ming; CHEN Jie; CHEN Lu; WANG Kai; ZHANG Dong-xu; CUI Xin-gang; XU Dan-feng; HONG Yi; LI Yao; GAO Yi; LIU Yu-shan; YIN Lei

    2012-01-01

    Background Although many midterm oncologic data have been reported for extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (ELRP) in westem countries,few oncologic data of the extraperitoneal procedure was published in China.The aim of the study was to evaluate the oncologic outcomes of patients treated with ELRP in China.Methods From January 2005 to March 2010,a total of 152 consecutive patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer were included in this study and treated with ELRP.The patients were staged according to the TNM (tumor,nodes,metastases) system.Median and mean postoperative follow-up were 28.1 months and 27.0 months,respectively.The patients were retrospectively analyzed for progression-free survival.Results One hundred and twelve cases (73.7%) were postoperatively diagnosed as pT2 in,and 40 cases (26.3%) as pT3.Positive lymph nodes were shown in 5 patients (3.3%).Gleason score was <7 in 49 men (32.2%),7 in 69 men (45.4%),and >7 in 34 men (22.4%).Positive surgical margins (PSM) were observed in 15 patients (9.9%),which included 32.0% of all pT3a cases and 46.7% of all pT3b cases,respectively.The overall prostate-specific antigen recurrence-free survival rate was 86% in all patients.The recurrence-free survival rates were 91.8% and 62.2% in pT2N0 patients and pT3N0 patients,respectively.Preoperative prostate-specific antigen,surgical margins,tumor stage,and lymph nodal status were identified as independent predictors of biochemical recurrence-free survival using multivariate Cox proportional hazard model.Conclusions ELRP is a precise,safe and effective procedure at this particular Chinese institution.The prognostic power of prostate-specific antigen relapse after ELRP is not identical to that described previously with transperitoneal or open retropubic approaches.

  7. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: tumor volume and Gleason score predicts cancer outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Roca, Ricardo L.R. Felts de, E-mail: Ricardo@delarocaurologia.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Francisco Paula da, E-mail: fpf@uol.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Urologia. Dept. de Cirurgia Pelvica; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Bezerra, Stephania Martins, E-mail: iwerneck@gmail.com, E-mail: stephaniab@gmail.com [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Patologia

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: positive surgical margins (PSMs) are common adverse factors to predict the outcome of a patient submitted to radical prostatectomy (PR). However, not all of these men will follow with biochemical (BCR) or clinical (CR) recurrence. Relationship between PSMs with these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinicopathological findings in order to recognize more aggressive tumors in order to recommend complementary treatment to these selected patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 228 patients submitted to open retropubic RP between March 1991 and June 2008, where 161 had and 67 did not have PSMs. Minimum follow-up time was considered 2 years after surgery. BCR was considered when PSA {>=} 0.2 ng/ml. CR was determined when clinical evidence of tumor appeared. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. The estimated 5-year risk of BCR and CR in presence of PSMs was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to log-rank tests. Results: from the total of 228 patients, 161 (71%) had PSMs, while 67 (29%) had negative surgical margins (NSMs). Prostatic circumferential margin was the most common (43.4%) site. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) associations between the presence of PSMs and BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.06). Among 161 patients with PSMs, 61 (37.8%) presented BCR, while 100 (62.8%) did not. Predicting progression-free survival for 5 years, BCR was correlated with pathological stage; Gleason score; pre-treatment PSA; tumor volume in specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. RC correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analyses the clinicopathological factors predicting BCR for 5 years, results statistically significant links with prostate weight; pre-treatment PSA; Gleason score; pathological stage; tumor volume; PSMs; capsular and perineural

  8. The current status of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prokar Dasgupta; Roger S.Kirby

    2009-01-01

    Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) is a rapidly evolving technique for the treatment of localized prostate cancer.In the United States,over 65% of radical prostatectomies are robot-assisted,although the acceptance of this technology in Europe and the rest of the world has been somewhat slower.This article reviews the current literature on RARP with regard to oncological,continence and potency outcomes-the so-called 'trifecta'.Preliminary data appear to show an advantage of RARP over open prostatectomy,with reduced blood loss,decreased pain,early mobilization,shorter hospital stay and lower margin rates.Most studies show good postoperative continence and potency with RARP;however,this needs to be viewed in the context of the paucity of randomized data available in the literature.There is no definitive evidence to show an advantage over standard laparoscopy,but the fact that this technique has reached parity with laparoscopy within 5 years is encouraging.Finally,evolving techniques of single-port robotic prostatectomy,laserguided robotics,catheter-free prostatectomy and image-guided robotics are discussed.

  9. Histopathologic Outcomes of Robotic Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul R. Patel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotically assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a minimally invasive alternative for the treatment of prostate cancer. We report the histopathologic and shortterm PSA outcomes of 500 robotic radical prostatectomies. Five hundred patients underwent robotic radical prostatectomy. The procedure was performed via a six trocar transperitoneal technique. Prostatectomy specimens were analyzed for TNM stage, Gleason’s grade, tumor location, volume, specimen weight, seminal vesicle involvement, and margin status. A positive margin was reported if cancer cells were found at the inked specimen margin. PSA data were collected every 3 months for the first year, then every 6 months for a year, then yearly. The average preoperative PSA was 6.9 (1–90 with Gleason’s score of 5 (2%, 6 (52%, 7 (40%, 8 (4%, and 9 (2%; postoperatively, histopathologic analysis showed Gleason's 6 (44%, 7 (42%, 8 (10%, and 9 (4%; 10, 5, 63, 15, 5, and 2% had pathologic stage T2a, T2b, T2c, T3a, T3b, and T4, respectively. Positive margin rate was 9.4% for the entire series. The positive margin rate per 100 cases was: 13% (1–100, 8% (101–200, 13% (201–300, 5% (301–400, and 8% (401–500. By stage, it was 2, 4, and 2.5% for T2a, T2b, T2c tumors; 23% (T3a, 46% (T3b, and 53% (T4a. For organ-confined disease (T2, the margin rate was 2.5% and it was 31% for nonorgan-confined disease. There were a total of 47 positive margins, 26 (56% posterolateral, 4 (8.5% apical, 4 (8.5% bladder neck, 2 (4% seminal vesicle, and 11 (23% multifocal. Ninety-five percent of patients (n = 500 have undetectable PSA (<0.1 at average follow-up of 9.7 months. Recurrence has only been seen with nonorgan-confined tumors. Of those patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year (average 15.7 months, 95% have undetectable PSA (<0.1. Our initial experience with robotic radical prostatectomy is promising. Histopathologic outcomes are acceptable with a low overall, positive margin rate. Shortterm

  10. Thoracic epidural analgesia inhibits the neuro-hormonal but not the acute inflammatory stress response after radical retropubic prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fant, F.; Tina, E.; Sandblom, D.; Andersson, S. -O.; Magnuson, A.; Hultgren-Hornkvist, E.; Axelsson, K.; Gupta, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia has been shown to suppress the neurohormonal stress response, but its role in the inflammatory response is unclear. The primary aim was to assess whether the choice of analgesic technique influences these processes in patients undergoing radical retropu

  11. Effectiveness of epidural versus alternate analgesia for pain relief after radical prostatectomy and correlation with biochemical recurrence in men with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir MC

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria C Mir,1 Binoy Joseph,1 Rona Zhao,1 Damien M Bolton,1 Dennis Gyomber,1 Nathan Lawrentschuk1,21University of Melbourne, Department of Surgery, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaObjectives: Our objectives were to analyze the effectiveness of epidural anesthesia in patients who underwent open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP at our institution over the past decade, and to examine subsequent oncologic outcomes, comparing those receiving with those not receiving epidural anesthesia.Methods: A comprehensive database of all patients undergoing RRP from November 1996 to December 2006 was analyzed; 354 patients underwent RRP at our institution and were divided into those receiving or not receiving an epidural. An independent pain management team scoring technical success found epidural technique to be consistent. Oncological outcome was an endpoint of our study, comparing both analysis groups. We classed prostate-specific antigen (PSA recurrence after RRP as a serum PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/mL at any stage of postoperative follow-up. Complications were recorded to 30 days using the modified Clavien system, and full statistical analyses were undertaken.Results: Records were available for 239 men; we observed a decreased trend in the use of epidural for pain management, along with a decrease in average hospital stay and an overall epidural success rate of 64%. When dividing data into RRP with and without epidural, we found a median hospital stay of 7 days for patients receiving an epidural compared with 6 days for those not receiving an epidural. The differences were statistically significant (P < 0.048 and remained so after adjusting for complications (P < 0.0001. Regarding oncological outcome, PSA recurrence was further analyzed in this cohort. Percentage of recurrence was higher (14.8% for patients receiving an epidural than for the non-epidural group (4.8%. The

  12. COMPLICATIONS OF EXTRAPERITONEOSCOPIC RADICAL PROSTATECTOMIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chernyshev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radical prostatectomy (RPE is today the gold standard treatment option for locally advanced prostate cancer (PC. These operations are performed both openly and using video-assisted endosurgery. Since 2009, the Research Institute of Urology has been made 70 extraperitoneoscopic RPEs (ERPE.Objective: to assess the complications of ERPE with the validated Clavien complication scale.Materials and methods. The authors retrospectively analyzed the case histories of 70 patients with locally advanced PC who had undergone ERPE. The complications were allocated to 3 groups: intraoperative, early (within 1 month and late (over 1 month postoperative ones. All found complications were stratified using Clavien classification scale.Results. The total number of ERPE complications accounted for 35.7%. The most common complications, such as anastomotic incompetence and blood loss that required hemotransfusion, were 9.8 and 11.3%, respectively. Rectal damage was intraoperatively found in 2 cases. Obturator nerve damage was also recognized intraoperatively and did not result in the occurrence of neurological symptoms. The severest complication (Clavien scale grade V was pulmonary embolism causing death.Conclusion. Postoperative complications of ERPE were observed in a small percentage of the patients and posed no serious threat to their life. The analysis of the complications of ERPE suggests that this treatment for locally advanced PC is a current safe and low-traumatic method.

  13. COMPLICATIONS OF EXTRAPERITONEOSCOPIC RADICAL PROSTATECTOMIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chernyshev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radical prostatectomy (RPE is today the gold standard treatment option for locally advanced prostate cancer (PC. These operations are performed both openly and using video-assisted endosurgery. Since 2009, the Research Institute of Urology has been made 70 extraperitoneoscopic RPEs (ERPE.Objective: to assess the complications of ERPE with the validated Clavien complication scale.Materials and methods. The authors retrospectively analyzed the case histories of 70 patients with locally advanced PC who had undergone ERPE. The complications were allocated to 3 groups: intraoperative, early (within 1 month and late (over 1 month postoperative ones. All found complications were stratified using Clavien classification scale.Results. The total number of ERPE complications accounted for 35.7%. The most common complications, such as anastomotic incompetence and blood loss that required hemotransfusion, were 9.8 and 11.3%, respectively. Rectal damage was intraoperatively found in 2 cases. Obturator nerve damage was also recognized intraoperatively and did not result in the occurrence of neurological symptoms. The severest complication (Clavien scale grade V was pulmonary embolism causing death.Conclusion. Postoperative complications of ERPE were observed in a small percentage of the patients and posed no serious threat to their life. The analysis of the complications of ERPE suggests that this treatment for locally advanced PC is a current safe and low-traumatic method.

  14. Postoperative radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy: a randomized controlled trial (E.O.R.T.C. trial 22911)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolla, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire A Michallon, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, 38 - Grenoble (France); Van Poppel, H. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Gasthuisberg, Dept. of Urology, Leuven (Belgium); Collette, L.; Haustermans, K. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Gasthuisberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Collette, L. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) data Center, Brussels (Belgium); Van Cangh, P. [Hopital Saint Luc, Dept. of Urology, Brussels (Belgium); Vekemans, K. [Virga Jesse Ziekenhuis, Dept. of Urology, Hasselt (Belgium); Da Pozzo, L. [Ospedale San Rafaele, Dept. of Urology, Milano (Italy); Reijke, T.M. de [Academisch Medisch Centrum, Dept. of Urology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbaeys, A. [University Hospital, Dept. of Urology, Gent (Belgium); Bosset, J.F. [Hopital Jean Minjoz, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, 25 - Besancon (France); Van Velthoven, R. [Institut Jules Bordet, Dept. Urology, Brussels (Belgium); Marechal, J.M. [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Dept. of Urology, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2008-01-15

    Background - Local failure after prostatectomy can arise in patients with cancer extending beyond the capsule. We did a randomized controlled trial to compare radical prostatectomy followed by immediate external irradiation with prostatectomy alone for patients with positive surgical margin or pT3 prostate cancer. Methods - After undergoing radical retro-pubic prostatectomy, 503 patients were randomly assigned to a wait-and-see policy, and 502 to immediate postoperative radiotherapy (60 Gy conventional irradiation delivered over 6 weeks). Eligible patients had pNOMO tumours and one or more pathological risk factors: capsule perforation, positive surgical margins, invasion of seminal vesicles. Our revised primary endpoint was biochemical progression-free survival. Analysis was by intention to treat. bindings - The median age was 65 years (1QR 61-69). After a median follow-up of 5 years, biochemical progression-free survival was significantly improved in the irradiated group (74.0%, 98% CI 68.7-79.3 vs 52.6%, 46.6-58.5: p0.0001). Clinical progression-free survival was also significantly improved (p=0.0009). The cumulative rate of locoregional failure was significantly lower in the irradiated group (p<0.0001). Grade 2 or 3 late effects were significantly more frequent in the postoperative irradiation group (p=0.0005), but severe toxic toxicity (grade 3 or higher) were rare, with a 5-year rate of 2.6% in the wait-and-see group and 4.2% in the postoperative irradiation group (p=00726). Interpretation: Immediate external irradiation after radical prostatectomy improves biochemical progression-free survival and local control in patients with positive surgical margins or pT3 prostate cancer who are at high risk of progression. Further follow-up is needed to assess the effect on overall survival. (authors)

  15. Outcome and complications of retropubic and transobturator midurethral slings translated into surgical therapeutic indices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Houwert; J.P.W.R. Roovers; P.L. Venema; H.W. Bruinse; M.G.W. Dijkgraaf; H.A.M. Vervest

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine and compare surgical therapeutic indices (STIs) of the retropubic tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) and 2 kinds of transobturator tape (TOT), Monarc (American Medical Systems, Minneapolis, MN), and tension-free vaginal tape obturator. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospe

  16. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  17. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  18. Gleason score and laterality concordance between prostate biopsy and prostatectomy specimens

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    Kenneth G. Nepple

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Prostate biopsy involvement and Gleason score guide treatment decisions in prostate cancer. We evaluated concordance in Gleason score and laterality between biopsy and radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP specimens and factors that influenced this relationship. Material and Methods: We reviewed 538 prostate cancer diagnoses at a Veterans Affairs medical center (2000-2005 to identify men with prostate biopsy and RRP specimens. During this time there was a move from limited (6 core to extended (12 core biopsy schemes. Discordance in Gleason score was defined as any change in Gleason score. Results: 152 men underwent RRP with biopsy showing Gleason 7 in 8%. Biopsy involvement was unilateral in 59% and bilateral in 41%. Compared to the biopsy, RRP Gleason score was concordant in 76 (50%, higher in 51 (34%, and lower in 25 (16%. Bilateral involvement was concordant in 97%, while unilateral involvement was concordant in only 20%. Both Gleason score and laterality were concordant in only 26%. Gleason concordance was higher in those with 8 or more cores compared to < 8 cores taken (54% vs. 34%, p = 0.046, but concordance was not affected by age, PSA, prostate volume, or length of time from biopsy to RRP. During later years, concordance did not improve despite taking more cores. Conclusions: Prostate biopsy underestimated prostatectomy Gleason score in 34% of men and bilateral involvement in 80% of those with unilateral disease on biopsy. Taking at least eight cores improves the accuracy of the prostate biopsy.

  19. Does index tumor predominant location influence prognostic factors in radical prostatectomies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billis, Athanase; Freitas, Leandro L. L.; Costa, Larissa B. E.; de Angelis, Camila M.; Carvalho, Kelson R.; Magna, Luis A.; Ferreira, Ubirajara

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To find any influence on prognostic factors of index tumor according to predominant location. Materials and Methods Prostate surgical specimens from 499 patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy were step-sectioned. Each transverse section was subdivided into 2 anterolateral and 2 posterolateral quadrants. Tumor extent was evaluated by a semi-quantitative point-count method. The index tumor (dominant nodule) was recorded as the maximal number of positive points of the most extensive tumor area from the quadrants and the predominant location was considered anterior (anterolateral quadrants), posterior (posterolateral quadrants), basal (quadrants in upper half of the prostate), apical (quadrants in lower half of the prostate), left (left quadrants) or right (right quadrants). Time to biochemical recurrence was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier product-limit analysis and prediction of shorter time to biochemical recurrence using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Results Index tumors with predominant posterior location were significantly associated with higher total tumor extent, needle and radical prostatectomy Gleason score, positive lymph nodes and preoperative prostate-specific antigen. Index tumors with predominant basal location were significantly associated with higher preoperative prostate-specific antigen, pathological stage higher than pT2, extra-prostatic extension, and seminal vesicle invasion. Index tumors with predominant basal location were significantly associated with time to biochemical recurrence in Kaplan-Meier estimates and significantly predicted shorter time to biochemical recurrence on univariate analysis but not on multivariate analysis. Conclusions The study suggests that index tumor predominant location is associated with prognosis in radical prostatectomies, however, in multivariate analysis do not offer advantage over other well-established prognostic factors. PMID:28379672

  20. A comparison of bladder neck preservation and bladder neck reconstruction for urinary incontinence after radical retro pubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Izadpanahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and will include about 30% of all malignancies in men. Since the initial report of the anatomic radical prostatectomy, refinements in the surgical technique have been made. Several studies show that bladder neck preservation (BNP during radical prostatectomy makes improve early return of urinary continence, erectile function or both. However, some clinical trials have suggested little difference between the return of continence while using modifications. In this study, we compared outcomes of BNP and bladder neck reconstruction (BNR during radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 60 patients at a referral university hospital from March 2010 to March 2012. Study population was all patients candidate for RRP (RRP in this period. All patients divided into two groups, A and B (30 patients in each group. Group A (n = 30 who preserved bladder neck (BNP and Group B (n = 30 who had BNR. Prostate specific antigen (PSA before and at 2, 6, 9, 12 and18 months after surgery, anastomotic stricture symptoms, positive bladder neck margin, Gleason score and urine incontinence were compared between two groups. Also, we compared bladder neck contracture, urinary continence and positive surgical margin rates after BNP and BNR while retropubic prostatectomy in 24 months period follow-up. Results: The mean age of the patients was 61.81 ± 7.15 years (range, 50-74 years. After a follow-up period of 24 months, the PSA rising was not different between the two groups. After 2 months, 19 (63.33% of patients in A group and the same number in B group were continent (P = 0.78. Stricture of the bladder neck at the anastomosis site requiring transurethral dilation occurred in 7 (23.33% and 3 (10.0% patients in groups A and B, respectively (P = 0.04. Conclusion: Although there was no difference in prevalence and duration of return of urinary

  1. Single port radical prostatectomy: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Oscar Darío; Azhar, Raed A; Clavijo, Rafael; Gidelman, Camilo; Medina, Luis; Troche, Nelson Ramirez; Brunacci, Leonardo; Sotelo, René

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the current literature on single port radical prostatectomy (LESS-RP). Single port radical prostatectomy laparoendoscopic (LESS-RP) has established itself as a challenge for urological community, starting with the proposal of different approaches: extraperitoneal, transperitoneal and transvesical, initially described for laparoscopy and then laparoscopy robot-assisted. In order to improve the LESS-RP, new instruments, optical devices, trocars and retraction mechanisms have been developed. Advantages and disadvantages of LESS-RP are controversial, while some claim that it is a non-trustable approach, regarding the low cases number and technical difficulties, others acclaim that despite this facts some advantages have been shown and that previous described difficulties are being overcome, proving this is novel proposal of robotics platform, the Da Vinci SP, integrating the system into "Y". The LESS-RP approach gives us a new horizon and opens the door for rapid standardization of this technique. The few studies and short series available can be result of a low interest in the application of LESS-RP in prostate, probably because of the technical complexity that it requires. The new robotic platform, the da Vinci SP, shows that it is clear that the long awaited evolution of robotic technologies for laparoscopy has begun, and we must not lose this momentum.

  2. Stricture prophylaxis in transurethral prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, R I; Jensen, A R; Stage, P

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective study 317 patients with prostatic hypertrophy, admitted for transurethral prostatectomy (TUR P), were randomized into three different groups: (1) urethral dilation and TUR P; (2) urethrotomy according to Otis and TUR P, and (3) TUR P alone. The number of postoperative urethral...

  3. Penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Ralph, David

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy (RP) is believed to include neuropraxia, which leads to temporarily reduced oxygenation and subsequent structural changes in penile tissue. This results in veno-occlusive dysfunction, therefore, penile rehabilitation programmes...... rehabilitation improves erectile function after RP so many times that it becomes a truth even without the proper scientific backing....

  4. Tubular cystourethroneostomy after total prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, H

    1975-01-01

    After radical prostatectomy cystourethroneostomy is done as a tubular cystourethroplasty. In the last 13 months 14 patients have been operated on in this manner. In 12 patients continence was achieved; 2 patients had a temporary stress incontinence. The stress incontinence could be treated successfully by temporary electrostimulation of the pelvic floor by an anal plug stimulator.

  5. Experience with open prostatectomy in Bingham University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors' place of practice has practiced this method of managing BPH since ... The number of those embarking on medical tourism is also on the increase to ... at the cost effectiveness, surgical complications and quality of life thereafter.

  6. Outcomes after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Declan G.Murphy; Benjamin J.Challacombe; Anthony J.Costello

    2009-01-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) using the da Vinci surgical system is now in widespread use in many countries where economic conditions allow the installation of this expensive technology.Controversy has surrounded the procedure since it was first performed in 2000,with many critics highlighting the lack of evidence to support its use.However,despite the lack of level I evidence,many large studies of patients have confirmed that the procedure is feasible and safe,with low morbidity.Available longer-term oncological data seem to show that outcomes from the robotic approach at least match those of traditional open radical prostatectomy.Functional outcomes also seem satisfactory,although randomized controlled trials are lacking.This paper reviews the current status of RALRP with respect to perioperative data and complications and oncologic and functional outcomes.

  7. Radical perineal prostatectomy - the contemporary resurgence of a genuinely minimally invasive procedure: Procedure outline. Comparison of the advantages, disadvantages, and outcomes of different surgical techniques of treating organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa). A literature review with special focus on perineal prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroński, Stanisław

    2012-01-01

    Surgery plays a central role in the management of organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa). Four types of prostatectomy are currently practiced: perineal, retropubic, laparoscopic, and robot-assisted. The qualification criteria for all types are similar. Radical perineal prostatectomy (RPP) was the first method introduced into clinical practice, however, it has been neglected in favor of other procedures. Its resurgence has been facilitated by a multitude of advantages. Unfortunately, nowadays most urologists are not familiar with the perineal approach though many centers have begun to implement it. This manuscript presents the technique of RPP used in the author's institution. It also reviews a vast body of literature on the four techniques of prostatectomy including their advantages and outcomes. The data was collected from the literature and medical databases. RPP proves to be a very efficacious, cost-effective treatment option for localized PCa. The outcomes of RPP, as defined by continence, potency, and complication rate, are equivalent to those accomplished by other methods.

  8. Preoperative predictors of blood loss at the time of radical prostatectomy: results from the SEARCH database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, J C; Bañez, L L; Aronson, W J; Terris, M K; Presti, J C; Amling, C L; Kane, C J; Freedland, S J

    2009-01-01

    The literature contains conflicting data on preoperative predictors of estimated blood loss (EBL) at radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). We sought to examine preoperative predictors of EBL at the time of RRP among patients from the SEARCH database to lend clarity to this issue. A total of 1154 patients were identified in the SEARCH database who underwent RRP between 1988 and 2008 and had EBL data available. We examined multiple preoperative factors for their ability to predict EBL using multivariate linear regression analysis. Median EBL was 900 ml (s.d. 1032). The 25th and 75th percentile for EBL were 600 and 1500 ml, respectively. EBL increased significantly with increasing body mass index (BMI) and increasing prostate size and decreased with more recent year of RRP (all PEBL in normal-weight men (BMIor=35 kg/m(2)). Predicted EBL for men with the smallest prostates (or=100 g. Finally, statistically significant differences between centers were observed, with mean-adjusted EBL ranging from 844 to 1094 ml. Both BMI and prostate size are predictors of increased EBL. Prostate size is of particular note, as a nearly twofold increased EBL was seen from the smallest (or=100 g). Over time, average EBL significantly decreased. Finally, significant differences in EBL were observed between centers. Patients with multiple risk factors should be forewarned they are at increased risk for higher EBL, which may translate into a greater need for blood transfusion.

  9. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate and retropubic prostatic adenomectomy: morbidity analysis and anesthesia considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Mesa, D; Amorín-Díaz, M; Pérez-Arviza, L; Fernández-Pello Montes, S; Martín-Huéscar, A

    2015-11-01

    Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an alternative to prostatic adenomectomy for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy. We analyzed our learning curve for this technique, and we compared it in a secondary manner with prostatic adenomectomy. A retrospective comparative study was conducted that included the first 100 cases of HoLEP performed in our center and the latest 50 cases of retropubic adenomectomy. We collected data on the patients, the surgery, the anesthesia, the perioperative variables, the anesthesia complications and the postoperative variables, with a 6-month follow-up. We analyzed the learning curve without mentors for HoLEP and compared the characteristics of HoLEP in 2 separate phases (learning and stabilization phases) with the latest retropubic prostatic adenomectomies performed. Intradural anesthesia was the most common technique. The transfusion needs, length of stay (PLocal anesthesia is a good choice for the anesthesia technique. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. THE LONG-TERM ONCOLOGICAL RESULTS OF RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY IN PATIENTS WITH A MAXIMUM FOLLOW-UP OF UP TO 15 YEARS, WHO MEET THE ERSPC (PRIAS CRITERIA FOR ACTIVE SURVEILLANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available No consensus on how to select patients is one of the factors restricting the wide acceptance of active surveillance (AS. The frequency of unfavorable histological findings and long-term overall and relapse-free survival rates were studied in 152 patients who met the ERSPC [European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer] (PRIAS criteria for AS and had undergone retropubic prostatectomy (RPE in the period 1997 to 2010. Negative histological characteristics were found in more than 10 % of the patients, with the median postoperative followup of 67 months biochemical recurrence developed in 3 (2 % patients. Five- and ten-year relapse-free survival rates were 97 and 88.2 %, respectively. Histological and long-term oncological results after RPE are suboptimal in the patients meeting the PRIAS criteria. There is a need for additional studies of the safety and efficiency of AS under conditions of Russian public health.

  11. The role of water-jet dissection in improving erectile function and urinary continence after nerve-sparing prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glybochko, Peter V; Rapoport, Leonid M; Bezrukov, Eugene A; Sirota, Eugene S; Martirosyan, Gurgen A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess erectile function (EF) and urinary continence (UC) recovery after nerve-sparing retropubic radical prostatectomy (NS-RRPE) and nerve-sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (NS-LRPE) depending on the neurovascular bundle (NVB) dissection technique used. Twenty-four hour pad test was used to assess the degree of postoperative UC 1, 6 and 12 months after the surgery. For the purpose of EF assessment, International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) questionnaire was used. In addition, EF recovery assessment included the time needed to achieve a successful sexual intercourse with or without Inhibitors Phosphodiesterase 5 (IPDE5). A successful sexual intercourse was defined as an ability to achieve a strong erection enough for penetration and maintain erection for a long time, throughout the intercourse. Assessment was performed before the surgery and 8 and 6 months after the surgery. In the patient group with BNS + water jet dissection (WJD), the IIEF-5 score was considerably higher 8 weeks after the surgery (by 2.8 points) (р = 0.02). In 6 months, the difference between the group become more significant and reached 3.5 points (p = 0.01). Three months after urethral catheter removal, majority (95%) of patients in the NS-RPE + WJD group had no urinary incontinence (UI). For standard NS-RPE, that figure was 87%. Mild stress UI was observed in 5% of patients after NS-RPE + WJD and in 13% of patients after NS-RPE. Six months after urethral catheter removal, no significant differences in UC assessment were observed in the two groups. The implementation of WJD of NVB in clinical practice has made it possible to considerably improve the quality of life for postoperative patients due to good outcomes in terms of early UC and EF recovery.

  12. Modified Madigan Prostatectomy: A Procedure Preserved Prostatic Urethra Intact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jun; YE Zhangqun; HU Weilie

    2005-01-01

    Summary: A total of 92 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were subjected to modified Madigan prostatectomy (MPC) for a much satisfactory effect in open prostatectomy surgery. Exposing anterior prostatic urethra near the bladder neck and conjunct cystotomy modified the MPC procedure. This modified procedure preserved prostatic urethra intact and could also deal with intracystic lesions at the same time. The intact of prostatic urethra was kept completely or largely in 86 cases. The amount of blood loss during modified procedure was less. The mean operative time was 105 min. Seventy patients had been followed up for 3-24 months. The postoperative average Qmax was 19.2 ml/s. The cystourethrography revealed that the urethra and bladder neck were intact in 10 patients postoperatively. Furthermore, the prostatic urethra was obviously wider after modified MPC. The modified MPC can reduce the occurrence of urethra injury and enlarge the MPC indications. The modified technique is easy to perform with less complications and much satisfactory clinical result.

  13. Clinical and biochemical outcomes of men undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, David; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Safdieh, Joseph; Weiner, Joseph; Rotman, Marvin; Schwartz, David [Veterans Affairs, New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn (United States); Rineer, Justin [University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We analyzed outcomes of patients with prostate cancer undergoing either radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) +/- salvage radiation or definitive radiation therapy (RT) +/- androgen deprivation. From 2003-2010 there were 251 patients who underwent RRP and 469 patients who received RT (> or =7,560 cGy) for prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed with the log-rank test to compare biochemical control (bCR), distant metastatic-free survival (DMPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) between the two groups. The median follow-up was 70 months and 61.3% of the men were African American. For low risk disease the 6-year bCR were 90.3% for RT and 85.6% for RRP (p = 0.23) and the 6-year post-salvage bCR were 90.3% vs. 90.9%, respectively (p = 0.84). For intermediate risk disease the 6-year bCR were 82.6% for RT and 59.7% for RRP (p < 0.001) and 82.6% vs. 74.0%, respectively, after including those salvaged with RT (p = 0.06). For high risk disease, the 6-year bCR were 67.4% for RT and 41.3% for RRP (p < 0.001) and after including those salvaged with RT was 67.4% vs. 43.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to DMPFS or PCSS. Treatment approaches utilizing RRP +/- salvage radiation or RT +/- androgen deprivation yielded equivalent DMPFS and PCSS outcomes. Biochemical control rates, using their respective definitions, appeared equivalent or better in those who received treatment with RT.

  14. Upgrading and upstaging in prostate cancer: From prostate biopsy to radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Carolina; Cerruto, Maria Angela; Cioffi, Antonio; Novella, Giovanni; Cavalleri, Stefano; Artibani, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common malignancy in men and the second cause of cancer-related mortality after lung cancer. Several studies have evaluated the correlation between bioptic and pathological Gleason score (GS), documenting a correlation ranging between 30 and 60%. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the association between bioptic and pathological GS in a series of patients undergoing prostate needle biopsy and subsequent radical prostatectomy. We also aimed to evaluate the possible prognostic factors of upgrading and upstaging. We prospectively collected and retrospectively reviewed data from 300 consecutive patients who underwent radical retropubic or robot-assisted prostatectomy at our Institution. Patients who underwent prostate needle biopsy, transrectal or transperineal, with a minimum of 5 samples, were included in this study. Upgrading and downgrading were defined as increase or decrease, respectively, from one prognostic grade group to another, similar to up- or downstaging. The mean age of the patients was 62.97 years and the mean prostate-spesific antigen (PSA) level was 7.83 ng/ml. A total of 51.3% of the population underwent a transperineal prostate biopsy. The most frequently represented bioptic GS was 3+3 (64.0%) followed by 3+4=7 (15.6%); the most frequent pathological Gleason score was 3+4 (44.3%), followed by 3+3 (31.0%). With reagard to the bioptic GS 4-5-6 group, approximately half of the specimens (46.7%) were subsequently upgraded to GS 3+4, and 5.3% to 4+3. With regards to the bioptic GS 3+4 group, 57.4% was confirmed in the surgical specimen. In the 4+3 group, 23.5% of the cases was downgraded to 3+4 and 35.3% was confirmed. With regards to stage, ~39.7% of the patients received an upstaging on the pathological specimen. We evaluated the correlations between preoperative serum PSA level, prostate volume, digital rectal examination and biopsy type and none of the variables considered exhibited a correlation with any

  15. Radical prostatectomy. Results and indications; Indications et resultats de la prostatectomie radicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacqmin, D. [Hopitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1997-12-31

    Radical prostatectomy is the surgical curative treatment of localized prostate cancer. The survival is good in young patients (<70) with T2 N0M0 tumors and more than 10 year`s life expectancy. Side-effects are urinary incontinence, impotence and anastomosis stricture. Quality of life should be considered as an important factor for the choice of the patient between radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy and follow-up. (author)

  16. Comparison of the rate of complications after TUEB and cystic prostatectomy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Bachurin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Topicality. The most common disease of the men’s urogenital system is Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. Causation of disease - not fully understood. There are several theories of emergence benign prostatic hyperplasia, major importance given to age-related disorders of hormonal metabolism. According to the World Health Organization (WHO information BPH is found in 11.3% in men aged 40-49 years, and in 81,4% at the age of 80 years. Currently, the main treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia is operational. Each method of surgical treatment of BPH has its indications and contraindications. The indications for open prostatectomy is the presence of bladder stones, bladder tumors and bladder diverticulum, a large volume of a gland (80 cm3 or more. Endoscopic intervention (without opening of the bladder is performed if there is a serious general comorbidities, which does not allow to carry out major surgery if prostate volume does not exceed 80 cubic centimeters. It can be done in a relatively young age and if patient has desirability of sexual function preserving. Postoperative results of treatment of patients in both groups, overall survival, duration of the postoperative period, the number of postoperative complications and rehabilitation of patients in the postoperative period are based on the method of surgical treatment. The aim of our research was to make a comparative analysis of the effectiveness of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP and open prostatectomy in patients with BPH. Matherials and methods: The work is based on a retrospective analysis of medical records and experience in the treatment of 40 patients with BPH (mean age - 67 ± 2,4 years, that in the period of 2012 were performed surgical treatment: 20 patients - transurethral resection (TUR and 20 patients - open prostatectomy (20. Results and Discussion. It was found that each method has its advantages. So at the TURP bleeding was less. It was diagnosed in 1%, while in

  17. Urinary infection before and after prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourmand Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of pre and post prostatectomy related urinary tract in-fection and its correlation with peri-operative events, we studied 120 patients who underwent pros-tatectomy due to benign prostatic hypertrophy from September 2005 to September 2006. Urine cultures were performed before the operations, after a week, and three months later. Data including prostate volume, prostatic specific antigen (PSA, post voiding residue (PVR and histopathological reports as well as the duration of urinary leak, bladder irrigation, hospitalization, and catheterization were studied. The mean age of the studied patients was 70.5 ± 8 years. Significant preoperative bac-teriuria was revealed in 18 (15% patients of whom 14(77% patients developed negative cultures following the operation. Postoperative bacteriuria was detected in 9(7.5% patients who negative urine cultures preoperatively. Pre and post operative micro-organisms were different in the majority of the cases. The mean PSA was higher in patients with a positive history of infection. Following prostatectomy, patients with positive urine cultures had significantly longer urinary leakage, cathe-terization, and hospital stays compared with those who remained culture negative. We conclude that the incidence of positive urine culture pri-prostatectomy for BPH can be improved by appropriate antibiotic therapy, and the risk factors for postoperative urinary infection include preoperative infec-tion, prolonged urinary leakage, catheterization, and hospital stay. The elevated PSA may be a risk factor.

  18. Influence of focal and diffuse extraprostatic extension and positive surgical margins on biochemical progression following radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanase Billis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The amount of extraprostatic extension and positive surgical margin correlates in most studies with biochemical recurrence following radical prostatectomy. We studied the influence of focal and diffuse extraprostatic extension and positive surgical margins on biochemical progression using a simple method for quantification. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 360 prostates were step-sectioned and totally processed from 175 patients with stage T1c and 185 patients with clinical stage T2 submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy. Extraprostatic extension was stratified into 2 groups: present up to 1 quadrant and/or section from the bladder neck or apex (Group 1, focal and in more than 1 quadrant or section (Group 2, diffuse; and, positive surgical margin present up to 2 quadrants and/or sections (Group 1, focal and in more than 2 quadrants or sections (Group 2, diffuse. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit analysis was used for the time to biochemical recurrence, and an univariate and multivariate Cox stepwise logistic regression model to identify significant predictors. RESULTS: Extraprostatic extension was found in 129/360 (35.8% patients, 39/129 (30.2% in Group 1 and 90/129 (69.8% in Group 2. In univariate analysis but not in multivariate analysis, patients showing diffuse extraprostatic extension (Group 2 had a significant higher risk to develop biochemical recurrence in a shorter time. Positive surgical margin was present in 160/360 (44.4% patients, 81/160 (50.6% patients in Group 1 and 79/160 (49.4% patients in Group 2. Patients with diffuse positive surgical margins (Group 2 had a significant higher risk in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Diffuse positive surgical margin was the strongest predictor on both analyses and an independent predictor on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Diffuse extraprostatic extension in univariate analysis and positive surgical margins on both univariate and multivariate analyses are significant

  19. The "halo effect" in Korea: change in practice patterns since the introduction of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ee-Rah; Jeong, Wooju; Park, Sung Yul; Ham, Won Sik; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho

    2009-03-01

    Acquisition of the da Vinci surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, Mountain View, USA) has enabled robot-assisted surgery to become an acceptable alternative to open radical prostatectomy (ORP). Implementation of robotics at a single institution in Korea induced a gradual increase in the number of performances of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) to surgically treat localized prostate cancer. We analyzed the impact of robotic instrumentation on practice patterns among urologists and explain the change in value in ORP and RALP-the standard treatment and the new approach or innovation of robotic technology. The overall number of prostatectomies has increased over time because the number of RALPs has grown drastically whereas the number of OPRs did not decrease during the period of evaluation. Our experience emphasizes the potential of RALP to become the gold standard in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in various parts of the world.

  20. Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimos Alivizatos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy remains the treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer in age-appropriate and health-appropriate men. Although cancer control is the most important aspect of a radical prostatectomy, minimization of postoperative morbidity, especially urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, is becoming a greater concern. We reviewed recent data available on Medline regarding the incidence, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of incontinence and sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy. Health-related quality of life issues have been specifically addressed. Although low incidences of incontinence and erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy have been reported in the hands of experienced surgeons, the literature review revealed a great variety, with incontinence rates ranging from 0.3–65.6% and potency rates ranging from 11–87%. Several factors contribute to this wide difference, the most important being the application of a meticulous surgical technique. General and cancer-specific health-related quality of life is not being affected after radical prostatectomy. The incidence of incontinence and erectile dysfunction is higher after radical prostatectomy when compared to the incidence observed when other therapies for localized prostate cancer are applied. However, the majority of the patients undergoing radical prostatectomy would vote for the operation again. Today, avoidance of major complications after radical prostatectomy depends mostly on a high-quality surgical technique. When incontinence or erectile dysfunction persists after radical prostatectomy, the majority of the treated patients can be managed effectively by various methods.

  1. Teflon injections in post-prostatectomy incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Røhl, H F

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five males with post-prostatectomy incontinence due to sphincter damage underwent transperineal or transurethral Teflon injections. The results were classified into three grades: good, moderate, and poor. Good or moderate results were obtained in 24%. No major immediate complications...... or longterm side-effects were observed. This intervention is associated with a minimum of discomfort for the patient and hospitalization can be limited to 48-72 hours. The results are not so good as those obtained in female incontinence, and the procedure cannot be recommended as first choice treatment...... in patients with post-prostatectomy incontinence, but because of the simplicity of the procedure, it is considered to be a valuable alternative in patients not suitable for prosthetic surgery....

  2. The Role of Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srougi, Victor; Tourinho-Barbosa, Rafael R; Nunes-Silva, Igor; Baghdadi, Mohammed; Garcia-Barreras, Silvia; Rembeyo, Gregory; Eiffel, Sophie S; Barret, Eric; Rozet, Francois; Galiano, Marc; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is stratified into different risk categories based on the patient's prognosis. High-risk disease was formerly characterized by an increased risk of metastasis and lethality, requiring complex treatments. Surgery was recently highlighted to have a pivotal role for the treatment of such cases, even as monotherapy. In the past, open radical prostatectomy was performed for most patients with high-risk PCa; however, robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) emerged as a reasonable option because it provided optimal outcomes for low- and intermediate-risk PCa. Robust studies are lacking to properly assess the role of RARP for high-risk PCa. We summarize this knowledge and present a literature review on the perioperative recovery and functional and oncologic outcomes of RARP for the treatment of patients with high-risk PCa.

  3. Transient Occlusion of Bilateral Internal Iliac Arteries Facilitates Bloodless Operative Field in Subcapsular Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Takeuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transurethral resection of the prostate is the gold standard of surgical treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Nevertheless, open subcapsular prostatectomy is still performed for large BPH. While enucleation of prostatic adenoma is being performed, unneglectable bleeding can occur and surgeons need to rush to remove adenomas, often using fingers and in a blinded fashion. The blood supply to the prostatic capsule and adenoma can be reduced to a marked extent in subcapsular prostatectomy if the bilateral internal iliac arteries are transiently occluded. Thus, a bloodless operative field is reasonably acquired during enucleation of adenoma, which would, otherwise, be a cause for concern to surgeons due to bleeding. It is not always applicable, but it could be an option if the estimated volume of BPH is more than 100 mL. In two cases, bilateral internal iliac arteries were occluded with Bulldog clamps, and then adenomas of 159 and 97 g were enucleated.

  4. Clinical results of radical prostatectomy for patients with prostate cancer in Macau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Incidence of prostate cancer has been increasing in recent decades.In the year 2005,prostate cancer became the second most common cancer in males in Macau.The purpose of this report was to review and summarize the clinical features and prognosis of the 54 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy in Macau Special Administrative Region(SAR),China.Methods From November 2000 to November 2006,retropubic radical prostatectomy were performed in 54 cases for the treatment of prostate cancer.The mean age of patients was 69.8 years(range from 54 to 79).The preoperative prostate specific antigen(PSA)level,postoperative pathologic stage and Gleason's score,operation duration,intraoperative bleeding and intraoperative and postoperative complications were reported.The follow-up duration was 3months to 6.25 years with a mean of 2.1 years.Postoperative parameters including PSA alteration,biochemical recurrence,local recurrence,distant metastasis and mortality were observed.Results Most of the patients in our study were diagnosed as localized prostate cancer.The patients'preoperative serum PSA was 0-4.0 ng/ml(16.7%),4.0-10.0 ng/ml(51.8%),10.1-20.0ng/ml(24.1%) and above 20.0 ng/ml(7.4%).The TNM stage T1a+T1b comprised 7.6%of patients,stage T2a+T2b comprised 20.3%,stage T2c 38.9%,stage T3a20.3%and over T3a only 12.9%.There were 9.5% cases with Gleason scores of 2-4,41.5% with scores of 5-6,30.2% with scores of 7 and 18.8%with scores of 8-10.The average operative duration was 216 minutes and the average intraoperative bleeding was 760 ml.Intraoperative complications included one massive hemorrhage(1.9%),one rectal injury(1.9%)and one obturator nerve injury(1.9%).Early postoperative complications consisted of urinary incontinence (14 cases,25.9%),bladder neck stricture(5 cases,9.3%),acute urinary retention(4 cases,7.4%),pelvic effusion(2cases,3.8%),lymphocele(1 case,1.9%)and vesicorectal fistula(only 1 case,1.9%).For late postoperative complications,total incontinence or

  5. The percent of cores positive for cancer in prostate needle biopsy specimens is strongly predictive of tumor stage and volume at radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebo, T J; Bock, B J; Cheville, J C; Lohse, C; Wollan, P; Zincke, H

    2000-01-01

    Pretreatment clinical staging of prostatic adenocarcinoma is important due to the increasing use of nonsurgical treatment options. Using multivariate analysis we assessed the predictive value of biopsy cores positive for cancer as a percent of all cores obtained as well as the percent surface area of needle cores involved with tumor for determining tumor volume and pathological stage at radical prostatectomy. Candidate variables for the multivariate model included patient age, clinical disease stage, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) and Gleason score of cancer in the needle biopsy. We reviewed prostate needle biopsy findings in 207 consecutive patients who subsequently underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy. Each biopsy specimen was assessed for tumor involvement by calculating the percent of cores positive for cancer, percent surface area involved in all cores and Gleason score. Initial serum PSA and preoperative clinical disease stage were incorporated with biopsy results into a multivariate model to determine the parameters most predictive of pathological stage and tumor volume at radical retropubic prostatectomy. Of the 207 patients 152 (73.4%) had organ confined cancer and 55 (26.6%) had extraprostatic extension (pathological stages T2 and T3 or greater, respectively). Preoperative clinical staging information was available in 195 cases, in which disease was clinically confined and not confined in 184 (94.4%) and 11 (5.6%), respectively. Needle biopsy revealed a surface area of cancer ranging from less than 5% in 69 patients (33.3%) to 90% (mean 16, median 10). Univariate analysis demonstrated that the risk of extraprostatic extension was predicted by preoperative serum PSA (p = 0.027), the percent of cores and percent of surface area positive for cancer (p <0.0001), and Gleason score (p = 0.0009). Clinical stage approached significance (p = 0.071). Multivariate analysis showed that the percent of positive cores (p = 0.0003), initial serum PSA (p = 0

  6. 保留部分前列腺部尿道和耻骨前列腺韧带在前列腺癌根治术中的应用%Preserving partial prostatic urethra and puboprostatic ligament in radical retropublic prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车建平; 郑军华; 王光春; 彭波; 黄建华; 朱巍; 王波; 周婷婷; 康黎; 许云飞

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨保留部分前列腺部尿道和耻骨前列腺韧带在减少前列腺癌根治术后尿失禁中的作用.方法 将60例局限性前列腺癌患者随机分为两组,每组30例.Ⅰ组患者行传统耻骨后前列腺癌根治术,Ⅱ组患者采用保留部分前列腺部尿道和耻骨前列腺韧带的方法行耻骨后前列腺癌根治术,分别于术后1、3、6和12个月随访尿失禁情况.结果 两组间年龄、前列腺特异抗原(PSA)、Gleason评分和临床分期构成比的差异均无统计学意义(P值均>0.05),两组前列腺尖端切缘均无肿瘤残留,前列腺侧缘阳性率类似.Ⅱ组在术后1、3、6个月的完全尿控率均显著高于Ⅰ组(P值均<0.05).结论 在前列腺癌根治术中保留部分前列腺部尿道和耻骨前列腺韧带可显著提高近期尿控的效果.%Objective To investigate the effects of preserving partial prostatic urethra and puboprostatic ligament on reducing the postoperative urinary incontinence in radical retropubic prostatectomy. Methods A total of 60 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomly divided into 2 groups. Conventional radical retropubic prostatectomy was performed in 30 patients in the group 1. And 30 patients in the group 2 underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy preserving puboprostatic ligament and partial prostatic urethra. The urinary incontinence was evaluated on 1st, 3rd, 6th and 12th months after operation. Results There were no significant differences in age, prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score and clinical stage between the two groups (all P>0.05). No residual tumor at cutting edge of the prostate apex was found, and the positive ratios of residual tumor on the lateral prostate were similar between two groups. The urinary continence in the group 2 was better than that in group 1 on the 1st, 3rd and 6th months after operation (all P<0.05). Conclusion The preservation of partial prostatic urethra and puboprostatic ligament in

  7. Perforación duodenal espontánea en paciente intervenido de prostatectomía radical Spontaneous duodenal perforation in a radical prostatectomy patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tienza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La prostatectomía radical es una cirugía para el cáncer localizado de próstata, muy conocida y con escaso número de complicaciones precoces postoperatorias. Presentamos el caso de un paciente de 54 años con PSA de 8 ng/ml y biopsia informada como adenocarcinoma de próstata Gleason 3+3=6 intervenido quirúrgicamente mediante prostatectomía radical retropúbica, que presentó una perforación espontánea de duodeno. Se manejó de forma conservadora ante el buen estado del paciente, resolviéndose a los 30 días. Ante un paciente intervenido es importante pensar en todas posibles complicaciones realizando las mínimas pruebas necesarias que permitan un diagnostico certero. El tratamiento habitualmente es quirúrgico, pudiéndose optar por el conservador en casos concretos.Radical prostatectomy is a well known treatment for prostate cancer, with a low incidence of early postoperative complications. Our case is a 54 year old patient diagnosed with prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason score 3+3=6 with 8 ng/ml of PSA, treated by retropubic prostatectomy, who suffered spontaneous perforation of the duodenum. We chose a conservative management, resolved in 30 days. When dealing with a surgical patient all kinds of complications must be taken into account by performing the minimum tests that will enable a sure diagnosis to be achieved. The usual treatment is surgery or conservative management, depending on the case and the patient.

  8. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is a safe procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Hvarness, Helle

    2013-01-01

    We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients.......We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients....

  9. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is a safe procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Hvarness, Helle

    2013-01-01

    We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients.......We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients....

  10. Improvement of recurrence-free survival after radical prostatectomy for locally advanced prostate cancer in relation to the time of surgical intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to comparatively estimate the frequency of a positive surgical margin and 5-year biochemical recurrent-free survival (BRFS rates in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer in relation to the time of radical retropubic prostatectomy.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 274 patients with prostate cancer (pT3-4N0-1M0 who were divided into 2 groups of 68 and 20 patients operated on in 1997 to 2006 and 2007 to 2012, respectively. Two surgeons made surgical interventions by the standardized procedure. The 5-year BRFS rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. A biochemical recurrence was defined as a prostatespecific antigen level of t 0.2 ng / ml in 2 consecutive measurements or as the initiation of adjuvant therapy.Results. The detection rate of a positive surgical margin decreased from 55.9 % in 1997–2006 to 37.9 % in 2007–2012 (p = 0.01; the 5-year recurrence-free survival rates were 38.8 % versus 66.2 % (p < 0.001.Conclusion. These changes would probably be a result of surgeons» better experience and improved surgical techniques in the course of time.

  11. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy%机器人辅助腹腔镜前列腺癌根治术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈周俊; 王先进

    2010-01-01

    @@ 前列腺癌是老年男性最常见的泌尿生殖系统恶性肿瘤之一,严重威胁着患者的生命健康和生活质量.前列腺癌的治疗方法包括随访观察、经尿道前列腺切除术(TURP)、根治性前列腺切除术、放射治疗、冷冻治疗、内分泌治疗、综合治疗等.根治性前列腺切除术目前仍然是治疗前列腺癌的最佳方法,主要包括开放性耻骨后前列腺癌根治术(retropubic radical pro-statectomy,RRP)、腹腔镜前列腺癌根治术(laparos-copic radical prostatectomy,LRP)、机器人辅助腹腔镜前列腺癌根治术(Robot-assisted laparoscopic radicalprostatectomy,RLRP)等.

  12. The potential value of power Doppler ultrasound imaging compared with grey-scale ultrasound findings in the diagnosis of local recurrence after radical prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamsel, S. [Department of Radiology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Killi, R. [Department of Radiology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Apaydin, E. [Department of Urology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Hekimgil, M. [Department of Pathology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Demirpolat, G. [Department of Radiology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2006-04-15

    AIM: To determine the value of power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) imaging during transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) in detecting local recurrence after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen patients were evaluated in whom local recurrence of prostate cancer was suspected on the basis of elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels (above 0.4 ng/ml) after RRP with no evidence of metastatic disease. Grey-scale TRUS and PDUS-guided biopsies of the vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA) and perianastomotic soft tissues were obtained after TRUS examinations of the prostatic fossa. The ability to detect locally recurrent prostate cancer using grey-scale TRUS alone was compared with TRUS combined with PDUS. RESULTS: Fifteen of the 18 patients (83%) had positive biopsies for local recurrent tumour at histological examination. TRUS alone detected grey-scale abnormalities in 15 of 18 patients (83%), of whom 14 (77%) had positive TRUS-guided biopsies. PDUS during TRUS showed hypervascularity in 14 of 18 patients (77%). Biopsies of these hypervascular regions were positive in all patients (100%). The sensitivity and specificity of TRUS alone in detecting recurrent tumour were 93 and 67%, respectively, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 93% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 67%. TRUS combined with PDUS had a sensitivity and specificity of 93 and 100%, respectively, with a PPV and a NPV of 100 and 75%, respectively.

  13. Application of Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy for High-risk Prostate Cancer%腹腔镜技术在高危前列腺癌根治术中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程晓冬; 吴岩; 马贵; 徐新宇; 于得水; 李琛

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and clinical efficacy of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods From January 2012 to December 2014, 48 patients with high-risk prostate cancer underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy ( LRP) when pathological results of pelvic lymphadenectomy were negative.Firstly we incised prevesical space and pelvic floor fascia next to the prostate capsule.Then the puboprostatic ligament amputation and bladder neck transaction were conducted, and the retropubic dorsal vein complex was sutured with absorbable sutures.The Denonvillier ligament and prostate lateral ligament were incised to expose the urethra.After the incision of urethra, the reconstructed bladder neck was anastomosed with the urethra. Results Of all the 48 patients, 47 patients underwent radical prostatectomy successfully, and 1 patient received a conversion to open operation because of ureteral injury.The catheters were removed within 9-14 days after the operation.Thirty-five patients had normal urination, while 12 patients suffered from temporary urinary incontinence which became normal after expectant treatment in 30-90 days after the operation.The postoperative pathological results of all patients confirmed prostate cancer, 13 of which had positive margin and underwent adjuvant endocrine therapy.The TPSA levels fell to 0-2.77μg/L, and none of the patients had local recurrence or distant metastasis in follow-ups for 6-38 months. Conclusion Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for high-risk prostate cancer is feasible and effective.%目的:探讨腹腔镜技术在高危前列腺癌根治术中应用的可行性和临床疗效。方法2012年1月~2014年12月腹腔镜下对高危前列腺癌行根治性切除术48例,先行双侧盆腔淋巴结清扫活检,病理检查报告阴性后行前列腺癌根治术。打开膀胱前间隙,靠近前列腺包膜切开盆底筋膜,离断耻骨前列腺韧带,“8”字贯穿缝扎阴

  14. Estimated blood loss as a predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy: results from the SEARCH database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jessica C; Bañez, Lionel L; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Presti, Joseph C; Amling, Christopher L; Kane, Christopher J; Freedland, Stephen J

    2010-02-01

    Diagnosis (exploratory cohort). 2b. To clarify the relationship between estimated blood loss (EBL) and biochemical recurrence, assessed by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, as blood loss is a long-standing concern associated with radical prostatectomy (RP), and no studies to date have examined the association between blood loss and cancer control. In all, 1077 patients were identified in the Shared Equal-Access Regional Cancer Hospital database who underwent retropubic RP (between 1998 and 2008) and had EBL and follow-up data available. We examined the relationship between EBL and recurrence using multivariate Cox regression analyses. Increased EBL was correlated with PSA recurrence in a multivariate-adjusted model (P = 0.01). When analysed by 500-mL EBL categories, those with an EBL of EBL of 1500-3499 mL, before decreasing again for patients with an EBL of > or =3500 mL. Men with an EBL of 2500-3499 mL had more than twice the risk of recurrence than men with an EBL of EBL was not associated with adverse tumour stage, grade or margin status. There was a significant correlation between EBL at the time of RP and biochemical recurrence. We hypothesized that this association might be due to transfusion-related immunosuppression, excessive blood obscuring the operative field, EBL being a marker of aggressive disease, or EBL being a marker of poor surgical technique. However, our data did not completely fit any one of these hypotheses, and thus the ultimate cause for the increased risk of recurrence remains unclear and requires further study.

  15. [URINARY DISCOMFORTS IN PATIENTS AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'-Shukri, S Kh; Ananiĭ, I A; Amdiĭ, R E; Kuz'min, I V

    2015-01-01

    The authors showed the result of complication treatment of lower urinary tracts in 128 patients with localized prostate cancer. The patients underwent radical prostatectomy. Urinary discomforts included enuresis, urinary incontinence in postoperative period. Abnormalities of urine outflow due to urethral stricture were revealed in 6 (4,6%) patients by the 6 month after operation. These complications required surgical treatment. Urinary incontinence was noted in 20 (15,6%) patients in this period. It was stressful urinary incontinence in 16 (12,6%) and urgent - in 4 (3%). Patents with stressful urinary difficulty were advised to use the conservative treatment (pelvic floor muscle training and electrostimulation), but in case of inefficiency - surgical treatment.

  16. Rehabilitation of erectile function following radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew R. McCullough

    2008-01-01

    The concept of muscle rehabilitation after nerve injury is not a novel idea and is practiced in many branches of medicine, including urology. Bladder rehabilitation after spinal cord injury is universally practiced. The erectile dysfunction (ED) experienced after radical prostatectomy (RP) is increasingly recognized as being primarily neurogenic followed by secondary penile smooth muscle (SM) changes. There is unfortunately no standard approach to penile rehabilitation after RP because controlled prospective human studies are not available. This article reviews the epidemiology, experimental pathophysiological models, rationale for penile rehabilitation, and currently published rehabilitation strategies.

  17. An Unusual Trocar Site Hernia after Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan K. Schmocker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trocar site hernias are rare complications after laparoscopic surgery but most commonly occur at larger trocar sites placed at the umbilicus. With increased utilization of the laparoscopic approach the incidence of trocar site hernia is increasing. We report a case of a trocar site hernia following an otherwise uncomplicated robotic prostatectomy at a 12 mm right lower quadrant port. The vermiform appendix was incarcerated within the trocar site hernia. Subsequent appendectomy and primary repair of the hernia were performed without complication.

  18. Complication rates of open transvesical prostatectomy according to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-05-11

    May 11, 2011 ... the early postoperative period, with bleeding requiring several units of blood transfusion accounting for the commonest ... first 30 days after surgery; and late when beyond 30 days .... in 21 (3.7%), bladder neck or posterior urethral stricture in ... not share similar characteristics in terms of comorbidities,.

  19. Risk factors of positive surgical margin and biochemical recurrence of patients treated with radical prostatectomy:a single-center 10-year report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kin; LI Hong; YANG Yong; Ian Lap-hong; Pun Wai-hong; Ho Son-fat

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies have shown that positive surgical margin and biochemical recurrence could impact the life of patients with prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy. With more and more patients with prostate cancer appeared in recent 20 years in China,it is necessary to investigate the risk of positive surgical margin and biochemical recurrence,and their possible impact on the prognosis of patients treated with radical prostatectomy. In this study,we analyzed the characteristics of patients with prostate cancer who had undergone radical prostatectomy in Macau area and tried to find any risk factor of positive surgical margin and biochemical recurrence and their relationship with the prognosis of these patients.Methods From 2000 to 2009,149 patients with prostate cancer received radical prostatectomy and were followed up.Among these patients,111 received retropubic radical prostatectomies,38 received laparoscopic radical prostatectomies.All patients were followed-up on in the 3rd month,6th month and from that point on every 6 months after operation. At each follow-up a detailed record of any complaint,serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA),full biochemical test and uroflowmetry was acquired.Results The average age was (69.0±6.1) years,preoperative average serum PSA was (10.1 ±12.1) ng/ml and average Gleason score was 6.4±1.3. The incidence of total complications was about 47.7%,the incidence of the most common complication,bladder outlet obstruction,was about 26.8%,and that of the second most common complication,urinary stress incontinence,was about 16.1% (mild 9.4% and severe 6.7%). The incidence of positive surgical margin was about 38.3%. The preoperative serum PSA ((13.4±17.6) ng/ml),average Gleason score (7.1±1.3) and pathological T stage score (7.0±1.4) were higher in patients with positive surgical margins than those with negative margins ((8.0±5.8) ng/ml,6.0±1.2 and 5.4±1.4,respectively) (P=0.004,P=0.001 and P=0.001,respectively). A

  20. Treatment of post-prostatectomy rectourethral fistula with fibrin sealant (Quixil™) injection: a novel application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verriello, V; Altomare, M; Masiello, G; Curatolo, C; Balacco, G; Altomare, D F

    2010-12-01

    Rectourethral fistulas in adults is a rare but potentially devastating postoperative condition requiring complex and demanding surgery. Fibrin glue treatment has been used with some success in anal and rectovaginal fistulas, and in the case we present here this indication has been extended to a postoperative rectourethral fistula following radical prostatectomy. For the first time, to our knowledge, a fibrin sealant (Quixil) was injected into the fistula tract, and a rectal mucosal flap was used to close the internal opening. The fistula healed in few weeks, and the patient is symptom free after 1 year of follow-up.

  1. FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF ENDOSCOPIC EXTRAPERITONEAL RADICAL INTRAFASCIAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endoscopic radical prostatectomy is a highly effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Intrafascial prostate dissection ensures early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. This article sums up our own experience of performing intrafascial endoscopic prostatectomy.Materials and methods. 25 patients have undergone this procedure. 12 months after surgery 88.2 % of the patients were fully continent, 11.7 % had symptoms of minimal stress urinary incontinence. We encountered no cases of positive surgical margins and one case of bio-chemical recurrence of the disease.Conclusion. Oncologically, intrafascial endoscopic radical prostatectomy is as effective as other modifications of radical prostatectomy and has the benefits of early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. 

  2. Robotic Salvage Lymph Node Dissection After Radical Prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Torricelli,Fabio C. M.; Arnaldo Cividanes; Guglielmetti,Giuliano B.; Coelho,Rafael F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction and objective: Radical prostatectomy is a first-line treatment for localized prostate cancer. However, in some cases, biochemical recurrence associated with imaging-detected nodal metastases may happen. Herein, we aim to present the surgical technique for salvage lymph node dissection after radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: A 70 year-old asymptomatic man presented with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 7.45ng/ mL. Digital rectal examination was normal and ...

  3. Robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: a different treatment for prostate cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Julio,Alexandre Den; Ahlering,Thomas Edward; Korkes, Fernando; Lopes Neto,Antonio Correa; Tobias-Machado,Marcos; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima; Wroclawski,Eric Roger

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACTConsidering the Health Care System in Brazil, a developing country, and public healthcare policies, robotic surgery is a reality to very few citizens. Therefore, robotic assisted radical prostatectomy is far removed from the daily practice of the vast majority of Brazilian urologists. Scientific evidence of the superiority of robotic assisted radical prostatectomy does not presently justify public investments for widespread development of robotic centers. Maybe over time and with redu...

  4. Neglected Side Effects After Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anders Ullmann; Sønksen, Jens; Fode, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A series of previously neglected sexually related side effects to radical prostatectomy (RP) has been identified over the recent years. These include orgasm-associated incontinence (OAI), urinary incontinence in relation to sexual stimulation (UISS), altered perception of orgasm....... Alterations of orgasmic function are experienced by approximately 80% after RP. Erectile dysfunction seems to play an important role in waning orgasmic function. OAP is only experienced by a subset of the patients with reported rates varying between 3% and 19%. Sparing of the tips of the seminal vesicles has...... been shown to double the risk of OAP. PS occurs in 15-68% of RP patients. Nerve sparing and preservation of erectile function may help preserve penile length. With regard to all side effects, studies indicate that they are reduced over time. CONCLUSIONS: The sexually related side effects summarized...

  5. Segmental testicular infarction following cysto-prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam I Alleemudder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Segmental (partial testicular infarction is a very rare condition of unknown cause in more than 70% of cases. Several predisposing conditions have been described, but to our knowledge, this is the first documented case and often overlooked complication occurring as a result of cysto-prostatectomy. It usually presents in an acute manner resembling testicular torsion or epididymo-orchitis and is confirmed using ultrasonography. In some cases, it may present insidiously with no pain and may be confused with a testicular tumor due to the hypo-echoic features on imaging. In unclear situations, Doppler sonography shows vascularity and a magnetic resonance scan can be useful to distinguish between the two conditions.

  6. Natural orifice transendoluminal surgery and laparoendoscopic single-site surgery: the future of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Eric; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Ercolani, Matthew C; Rozet, Francois; Galiano, Marc; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2011-03-01

    Techniques for minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (RP) have been carefully reviewed by surgical teams worldwide in order to identify possible weaknesses and facilitate further improvement in their overall performance. The initial plan of action has been to carefully study the best-practice techniques for open RP in order to reproduce and standardize performance from the laparoscopic perspective. Similar to open surgery, the learning curve of minimally invasive RP has been well documented in terms of objective evaluation of outcomes for cancer control and functional results. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) have recently gained momentum as feasible techniques for minimal access urological surgery. NOTES-LESS drastically limit the surgeon's ability to choose the site of entry for operative instruments; therefore, the advantages of NOTES-LESS are gained with the understanding that the surgical procedure is more technically challenging. There are several key elements in RP techniques (in particular, dorsal vein control, apex exposure and cavernosal nerve sparing) that can have significant implications on oncologic and functional results. These steps are hard to perform in a limited working field. LESS radical prostatectomy can clearly be facilitated by using robotic technology.

  7. Robot-assisted versus other types of radical prostatectomy: population-based safety and cost comparison in Japan, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Toru; Yasunaga, Hideo; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Matsui, Hiroki; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Kume, Haruki; Changhong, Yu; Kattan, Michael W; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Homma, Yukio

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, Japanese national insurance started covering robot-assisted surgery. We carried out a population-based comparison between robot-assisted and three other types of radical prostatectomy to evaluate the safety of robot-assisted prostatectomy during its initial year. We abstracted data for 7202 open, 2483 laparoscopic, 1181 minimal incision endoscopic, and 2126 robot-assisted radical prostatectomies for oncological stage T3 or less from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database (April 2012-March 2013). Complication rate, transfusion rate, anesthesia time, postoperative length of stay, and cost were evaluated by pairwise one-to-one propensity-score matching and multivariable analyses with covariants of age, comorbidity, oncological stage, hospital volume, and hospital academic status. The proportion of robot-assisted radical prostatectomies dramatically increased from 8.6% to 24.1% during the first year. Compared with open, laparoscopic, and minimal incision endoscopic surgery, robot-assisted surgery was generally associated with a significantly lower complication rate (odds ratios, 0.25, 0.20, 0.33, respectively), autologous transfusion rate (0.04, 0.31, 0.10), homologous transfusion rate (0.16, 0.48, 0.14), lower cost excluding operation (differences, -5.1%, -1.8% [not significant], -10.8%) and shorter postoperative length of stay (-9.1%, +0.9% [not significant], -18.5%, respectively). However, robot-assisted surgery also resulted in a + 42.6% increase in anesthesia time and +52.4% increase in total cost compared with open surgery (all P robotic surgery led to a dynamic change in prostate cancer surgery. Even in its initial year, robot-assisted radical prostatectomy was carried out with several favorable safety aspects compared to the conventional surgeries despite its having the longest anesthesia time and the highest cost.

  8. Neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Gao; Tie Zhou; Yuan-Jie Tang; Xin Lu; Ying-Hao Sun

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of radical prostatectomy combined with preoperative neoadjuvant hormonal ablation therapy for prostate cancer (PCa).In this study,a total of 31 patients with local PCa underwent radical prostatectomy;of these,12 patients underwent preoperative hormonal deprivation with a combination of goserelin and flutamide for a period of 5.6 months.Data regarding clinical characteristics were compared between the neoadjuvant therapy and radical prostatectomy groups.A total of 31 patients received pelvic lymph node clearance,and the rate of positive lymph nodes was 12.9% (4/31).Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was 8.9±1.2μg L-1 after the neoadjuvant therapy and 0.4±0.3μg L-1 one month after the radical prostatectomy.There were significant differences in the positive surgical margins,seminal vesicle invasion and lymph node metastasis between the neoadjuvant therapy group (n=12) and the radical prostatectomy group (n=19,P<0.01).The resulsts indicates that preoperative hormonal deprivation induced by goserelin and flutamide can decrease clinical and pathological staging,but assessment of its influence on long-term prognosis requires further study.

  9. Surgical Management of Post-Prostatectomy Incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthi Satyanarayan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI is a common and significant issue that can affect the quality of life in men who are undergoing treatment for prostate cancer. While some patients opt for conservative management of their incontinence, many elect to undergo surgical treatment as a result of the significant impact to quality of life. The most commonly employed surgical techniques to address PPI are placement of a male sling or artificial urinary sphincter (AUS. Currently, the AUS continues to serve as the gold standard for management, with robust data concerning longitudinal outcomes available. However, in recent years, the various methods to place the male sling have emerged as viable, less complex alternatives that avoid the need for pump manipulation. In the present review, we discuss these main surgical treatment modalities for PPI, and focus on the selection criteria that may influence appropriate operative stratification of PPI patients. Indeed, an individualised, comprehensive assessment of baseline urinary function, age, radiation, prior surgeries, functional status, and other comorbidities must be considered in the context of shared decision-making between the treatment provider and the patient in determining the optimal approach to managing PPI.

  10. REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Pavlov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the data obtained by Russian and foreign investigators, the major complication after radical prostatectomy (RPE is urinaryincontinence that is recorded in 20-30% of cases.Objective. To improve the results of surgical treatment in patients with prostate cancer, by developing and introducing a well-rounded post-operative rehabilitation program.Subjects and methods. Seventy-four patients who were treated at the urology clinic, Bashkir State Medical University, and underwent RPEin 2005 to 2007 have been examined; 27 of them were diagnosed as having urinary incontinence (UI. After discharge from the clinic, acontrol group received rehabilitative treatment at the sanatorium “Krasnousolsk” of the Republic of Bashkortostan. Results and discussion. Therapeutic exercises and pelvic floor electrostimulation halve the number of day urinations and paddings used inpatients with UI, by increasing the bladder capacity from 138.2±12.7 to 196±11.2 ml and improving the trophism of the bladder neck andurethra in the sphincteral area. 

  11. Radical prostatectomy in oligometastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Philipp; Steuber, Thomas; Graefen, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Although cytoreductive surgery is accompanied with prolonged survival in many other malignancies in a metastatic stage, its role in oligometastatic prostate cancer is unclear. Radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer seems to be feasible. Perioperative complication rates vary between 20 and 50% (Clavien 1-3) and are comparable to patients with locally advanced tumors. Postoperative functional outcomes (urinary continence and erectile function) can be slightly worse than in patients with locally advanced tumor. In literature, an oncological benefit of surgery is so far only described for retrospective multiinstitutional databases and a case-control study but not for prospective studies. Still, men undergoing RP clearly seem to develop severe local complications less frequently than patients receiving best systemic therapy (up to more than 50% versus less than10%). Patients should be counseled about the potential significant reduction of local complications whenever undergoing RP for oligometastatic prostate cancer. Nevertheless, as complication rates are relatively high, functional outcome can be slightly worse compared with RP with curative intent and especially as oncological benefit so far is shown using retrospective but not prospective data, patients should only undergo surgery within the ongoing prospective, randomized trials.

  12. REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Pavlov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the data obtained by Russian and foreign investigators, the major complication after radical prostatectomy (RPE is urinaryincontinence that is recorded in 20-30% of cases.Objective. To improve the results of surgical treatment in patients with prostate cancer, by developing and introducing a well-rounded post-operative rehabilitation program.Subjects and methods. Seventy-four patients who were treated at the urology clinic, Bashkir State Medical University, and underwent RPEin 2005 to 2007 have been examined; 27 of them were diagnosed as having urinary incontinence (UI. After discharge from the clinic, acontrol group received rehabilitative treatment at the sanatorium “Krasnousolsk” of the Republic of Bashkortostan. Results and discussion. Therapeutic exercises and pelvic floor electrostimulation halve the number of day urinations and paddings used inpatients with UI, by increasing the bladder capacity from 138.2±12.7 to 196±11.2 ml and improving the trophism of the bladder neck andurethra in the sphincteral area. 

  13. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: The Ohio State University technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vipul R; Shah, Ketul K; Thaly, Rahul K; Lavery, Hugh

    2007-03-01

    Robotic radical prostatectomy is a new innovation in the surgical treatment of prostate cancer. The technique is continuously evolving. In this article we demonstrate The Ohio State University technique for robotic radical prostatectomy. Robotic radical prostatectomy is performed using the da Vinci surgical system. The video demonstrates each step of the surgical procedure. Preliminary results with robotic prostatectomy demonstrate the benefits of minimally invasive surgery while also showing encouraging short-term outcomes in terms of continence, potency and cancer control. Robotic radical prostatectomy is an evolving technique that provides a minimally invasive alternative for the treatment of prostate cancer. Our experience with the procedure now stands at over 1,300 cases.

  14. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: initial 15 cases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, K; Hatano, T; Nakagami, Y; Ozu, C; Horiguchi, Y; Yonou, H; Tachibana, M; Coughlin, G; Patel, V R

    2008-07-01

    Recently, we have introduced robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) in Japan. This article describes the details of a training program to shorten the learning curve in the absence of an urologist with expertise in robotic surgery. Five months after a 2-day training course of robotic surgery, RALP was first performed in Japan, and a total of 15 cases were performed in the subsequent 4 months. Our training program consisted of: (1) image training using surgical operation videos, (2) dry lab training using a sham pelvic cavity model, and (3) intraoperative mentoring. The operative procedure was divided into five consecutive stages, and time required to complete each stage was recorded. Robotic radical prostatectomy was completed in all patients without conversion to open surgery, except for the first patient in whom a restriction to a 2-h operation had been imposed by the ethics committee. The mean console time and the mean intraoperative blood loss (including urine) reduced from 264.2 min and 459.4 ml, respectively, in the first 11 cases, to 151 min and 133.3 ml, respectively, in the last three cases. With direct intraoperative guidance by the mentor during cases 13 and 14, the operation time was reduced at all five stages of the operative procedure. Our training program proved remarkably effective in reducing the learning curve of RALP in Japan, where there is no person with expertise in robotic surgery.

  15. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: omitting a pelvic drain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Canes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Our goal was to assess outcomes of a selective drain placement strategy during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP with a running urethrovesical anastomosis (RUVA using cystographic imaging in all patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients undergoing LRP between January 2003 and December 2004. The anastomosis was performed using a modified van Velthoven technique. A drain was placed at the discretion of the senior surgeon when a urinary leak was demonstrated with bladder irrigation, clinical suspicion for a urinary leak was high, or a complex bladder neck reconstruction was performed. Routine postoperative cystograms were obtained. RESULTS: 208 patients underwent LRP with a RUVA. Data including cystogram was available for 206 patients. The overall rate of cystographic urine leak was 5.8%. A drain was placed in 51 patients. Of these, 8 (15.6% had a postoperative leak on cystogram. Of the 157 undrained patients, urine leak was radiographically visible in 4 (2.5%. The higher leak rate in the drained vs. undrained cohort was statistically significant (p = 0.002. Twenty-four patients underwent pelvic lymph node dissection (8 drained, 16 undrained. Three undrained patients developed lymphoceles, which presented clinically on average 3 weeks postoperatively. There were no urinomas or hematomas in either group. CONCLUSIONS: Routine placement of a pelvic drain after LRP with a RUVA is not necessary, unless the anastomotic integrity is suboptimal intraoperatively. Experienced clinical judgment is essential and accurate in identifying patients at risk for postoperative leakage. When suspicion is low, omitting a drain does not increase morbidity.

  16. Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy: How I Do It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemil Uygur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe surgical technique for robot assisted radical prostatectomy using the four-arm da Vinci robotic surgical system (SI, Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA. We have continually refined our technique to improve patient outcomes.

  17. ProACT for stress urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, F.M.J.; Lampe, M.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stress urinary incontinence is a bothersome complication of radical prostatectomy. Surgical treatment consists of the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS), the male sling and bulk injections. This study presents the results of the first series of implantations of ProACT in the Netherland

  18. Early Experience with Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gee Sim

    2004-10-01

    Conclusions: rLRP is feasible in a practice with a low volume of radical prostatectomies. Significant improvement in perioperative parameters occurs after the first eight cases. This technique confers the benefits of enhanced precision and dexterity for complex laparoscopic work in the pelvic cavity.

  19. ProACT for stress urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, F.M.J.; Lampe, M.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stress urinary incontinence is a bothersome complication of radical prostatectomy. Surgical treatment consists of the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS), the male sling and bulk injections. This study presents the results of the first series of implantations of ProACT in the Netherland

  20. Age as a prognostic variable in patients undergoing transurethral prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, J; Jensen, J S; Iversen, H G;

    1993-01-01

    In a retrospective study the outcome of transurethral prostatectomy (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in patients more than 80 years old was compared to a control group of patients with a mean age ten years younger. The elderly had significantly more tissue resected and presented...

  1. Hemodynamic changes during robotic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanlal Darlong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effect on hemodynamic changes and experience of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP in steep Trendelenburg position (45° with high-pressure CO 2 pneumoperitoneum is very limited. Therefore, we planned this prospective clinical trial to study the effect of steep Tredelenburg position with high-pressure CO 2 pneumoperitoneum on hemodynamic parameters in a patient undergoing RALRP using FloTrac/Vigileo™1.10. Methods: After ethical approval and informed consent, 15 patients scheduled for RALRP were included in the study. In the operation room, after attaching standard monitors, the radial artery was cannulated. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl (2 μg/kg and thiopentone (4-7 mg/kg, and tracheal intubation was facilitated by vecuronium bromide (0.1 mg/kg. The patient′s right internal jugular vein was cannulated and the Pre Sep™ central venous oximetry catheter was connected to it. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and nitrous oxide and intermittent boluses of vecuronium. Intermittent positive-pressure ventilation was provided to maintain normocapnea. After CO 2 pneumoperitoneum, position of the patient was gradually changed to 45° Trendelenburg over 5 min. The robot was then docked and the robot-assisted surgery started. Intraoperative monitoring included central venous pressure (CVP, stroke volume (SV, stroke volume variation (SVV, cardiac output (CO, cardiac index (CI and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO 2 . Results: After induction of anesthesia, heart rate (HR, SV, CO and CI were decreased significantly from the baseline value (P>0.05. SV, CO and CI further decreased significantly after creating pneumoperitoneum (P>0.05. At the 45° Trendelenburg position, HR, SV, CO and CI were significantly decreased compared with baseline. Thereafter, CO and CI were persistently low throughout the 45° Trendelenburg position (P=0.001. HR at 20 min and 1 h, SV and mean arterial blood pressure

  2. Initial consecutive 125 cases of robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy performed in Ireland's first robotic radical prostatectomy centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bouchier-Hayes, D M

    2012-03-01

    We examined the patient characteristics, operative proceedings and the outcomes of the initial series of 125 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) in an independent hospital in Ireland, performed by two surgeons using the da Vinci(®) surgical system.

  3. Robotics and telesurgery--an update on their position in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassweiler, J; Safi, K C; Subotic, S; Teber, D; Frede, T

    2005-01-01

    , more than 3000 laparoscopic radical prostatectomies have been performed worldwide at 92 centres with this system. The main advantage of the system represents the translation of open surgical skills to laparoscopy. Despite recent development of basic tools (e.g. bipolar forceps) for the da Vinci robot, investment and maintenance costs still represent the major problem of the device. Additionally, the device does not provide any haptic sense (i.e. tactile feedback). Robotic surgery represents a turning point of surgical research. However, broad use of robotic systems is limited mainly because of the high investment and running costs. Interestingly, more than in the field of cardiac surgery, there seems to be a need for telemanipulators in urology, mainly to reduce the learning curve of standard laparoscopy. However, new training concepts used in combination with mono-tasking computerized robots (AESOP) have proved their efficacy associated with a significant cost reduction.

  4. Role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the management of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Sood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP in the management of high-risk prostate cancer (PCa, with a focus on oncological, functional and perioperative outcomes. Further, we also aimed to briefly describe our novel modification to conventional RARP that allows immediate organ retrieval and examination for intra-operative surgical margin assessment. A literature search of PubMed was performed for articles on the management of high-risk PCa. Papers written in English and concerning clinical outcomes following RARP for locally advanced and high-risk PCa were selected. Outcomes data from our own center were also included. A total of 10 contemporary series were evaluated. Biopsy Gleason score ≥ 8 was the most common cause for classification of patients into the high-risk PCa group. Biochemical failure rate, in the few series that looked at long-term follow-up, varied from 9% to 26% at 1 year. The positive surgical margin rate varied from 12% to 53.3%. Urinary continence rates varied from 78% to 92% at 1 year. The overall complication rates varied from 2.4% to 30%, with anastomotic leak and lymphocele being the most common complications. Long-term data on oncological control following RARP in high-risk patients is lacking. Short-term oncological outcomes and functional outcomes are equivalent to open radical prostatectomy (RP. Safety outcomes are better in patients undergoing RARP when compared with open RP. Improved tools for predicting the presence of organ-confined disease (OCD are available. High-risk patients with OCD would be ideal candidates for RARP and would benefit most from surgery alone.

  5. Incidence, Risk Factors, Management, and Complications of Rectal Injuries During Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Philipp; Linnemannstöns, Anna; Chun, Felix; Schlomm, Thorsten; Pompe, Raisa; Budäus, Lars; Rosenbaum, Clemens; Ludwig, Tim; Dahlem, Roland; Fisch, Margit; Graefen, Markus; Huland, Hartwig; Tilki, Derya; Steuber, Thomas

    2017-02-07

    Rectal injury (RI) during radical prostatectomy (RP) is a severe complication. So far, only limited data describing the incidence, risk factors, management, and complications of RI are available. In an analysis of data for 24178 patients, we identified 113/24076 patients (0.47%) undergoing open or robotic RP and 7/102 patients (6.86%) after salvage RP who experienced an RI. Besides salvage RP, local tumor stage, Gleason grade, lymph node status, and surgical experience, but not surgical approach (robotic vs open), could be identified as risk factors for RI in univariate and multivariate analysis. Intraoperative management of RI comprised closure with two to three layers. In 13/109 patients (11.9%), a diverting colostomy/ileostomy was carried out. Some 12% of men with closure of an RI developed a recto-anastomosis fistula, and 57% of those who had an additional diverting enterostomy. Thus, the overall incidence of recto-anastomosis fistula after RP was <0.1%. The extent of rectal laceration, prior radiation, and intraoperative signs of rectal infiltration were associated with the development of a subsequent recto-anastomosis fistula. Some 83% of patients with a recto-anastomosis fistula needed further intervention. We analyzed the incidence, risk factors, management, and complications of rectal injury during radical prostatectomy. Overall, the incidence of rectal injury and subsequent development of recto-anastomosis fistulas is low unless the patient has significant risk factors. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Overactive bladder is a negative predictor of achieving continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuta; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Toru; Miyazaki, Hideyo; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kume, Haruki; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Homma, Yukio

    2017-10-01

    To investigate predictors of continence outcomes after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Clinical records of 272 patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy were investigated. Preoperative Overactive Bladder Symptom Score, International Prostate Symptom Score and clinicopathological factors were investigated, and relationships between factors and recovery of continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy were assessed. The presence of overactive bladder was defined as having urgency for more than once a week and having ≥3 points according to the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score. Age (≤66 years) was significantly associated with continence within 6 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (P = 0.033). The absence of overactive bladder and lower Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, Kaplan-Meier curves showed earlier recovery in "age ≤66 years," "prostate weight ≤40 g" and "overactive bladder symptom score robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. [First 24 Japanese cases of robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy using the daVinci Surgical System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Kunihiko; Hatano, Tadashi; Nakagami, Yoshihiro; Ozu, Choichiro; Horiguchi, Yutaka; Sakamoto, Noboru; Yonov, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Yoshio; Ohori, Makoto; Tachibana, Masaaki; Patel, Vipul R

    2008-05-01

    In Japan, as of September 2007, prostatectomy is conducted with open surgical procedures in more than 90% of the cases. Following the first reported robotic prostatectomy by Binder, et al. in 2000, a robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) using the daVinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, California, USA) has been extensively used as a standard procedure with gratifying results in the United States. In the Asian region, in contrast, RALP is still in an introductory phase. Recently, we introduced RALP in Japan. A total of 24 patients received robotic surgery within a year since August 2006. RALP was completed in all patients without conversion to open surgery, except for the first patient in whom a restriction to a 2-hour operation had been imposed by the Ethical Committee. The mean operative time using the daVinci device and the mean estimated blood loss were 232.0 (range; 136-405) minutes and 313.0 (range; 10-1,000) ml, respectively. The training program we recently developed proved remarkably effective in reducing the learning curve of robotic surgery in Japan, where there is no person with expertise in this operating procedure. In particular, the intraoperative guidance given by the expert was useful after relevant problematic points were delineated by operators who received comprehensive video-based image training and actually performed robot surgery in several cases. With direct intraoperative guidance by the mentor during cases 13 and 14, both the operation time and estimated blood loss was markedly reduced.

  8. Treatment of the positive surgical margin following radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective With increased incidence of prostate cancer and an increased number of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy in China,it will be necessary to elaborate the diagnosis,clinical significance and treatment of patients whose tumors have positive surgical margins following radical prostatectomy.Data sources Positive surgical margin,prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy were used as subject words and the medical literature in recent decades was searched using the PubMed database and the results are summarized.Study selection Using positive surgical margin,prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy as subject words the PubMed medical database produced 275 papers of pertinent literature.By further screening 28 papers were selected and they represent relatively large-scale clinical randomized and controlled clinical trials.Results A pertinent literature of 275 papers was identified and 28 papers on large clinical studies were obtained.Analysis of results indicated that the positive rate of surgical margin after radical prostatectomy is 20%-40%,and although most patients with positive surgical margins are stable for a considerable period,the data available now suggested that the presence of a positive surgical margin will have an impact on the patient's prognosis.The risk factors of positive surgical margin include preoperative prostate specific antigen level,Gleason's score and pelvic lymph node metastasis.The most common site with positive surgical margin is in apical areas of the prostate;therefore surgical technique is also a factor resulting in positive surgical margins.From data available now it appears that as long as the surgical technique is skilled,different surgical modes do not affect the rate of surgical margin.Adjuvant radiotherapy is mainly used to treat patients with positive surgical margin after radical prostatectomy,but combination with androgen deprivation therapy may increase the curative effect.Conclusion The current data indicated that

  9. Single plus one port laparoscopic radical prostatectomy:a report of 8 cases in one center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yi; XU Dan-feng; LIU Yu-shan; CUI Xin-gang; CHE Jian-ping; YAO Ya-cheng; YIN Lei

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is considered the first treatment of choice for local prostate cancer due to its minimal invasion advantage. To further achieve the goal of minimal invasion, single port laparoscopic radical prostatectomy has been developed to minimize the complications associated with puncture tracks. The aim of this study was to illustrate the technique for single port laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and evaluate its efficacy and safety. We reported 8 cases of radical prostatectomy with excellent early outcome carried out in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital from June 2009 to August 2009 using a home-made multiple instrument access port and adding an additional small incision at McBumey point.

  10. Accessibility to surgical robot technology and prostate-cancer patient behavior for prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Toru; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Nagao, Go; Ishikawa, Akira; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Ohori, Makoto; Homma, Yukio

    2017-07-01

    To examine how surgical robot emergence affects prostate-cancer patient behavior in seeking radical prostatectomy focusing on geographical accessibility. In Japan, robotic surgery was approved in April 2012. Based on data in the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database between April 2012 and March 2014, distance to nearest surgical robot and interval days to radical prostatectomy (divided by mean interval in 2011: % interval days to radical prostatectomy) were calculated for individual radical prostatectomy cases at non-robotic hospitals. Caseload changes regarding distance to nearest surgical robot and robot introduction were investigated. Change in % interval days to radical prostatectomy was evaluated by multivariate analysis including distance to nearest surgical robot, age, comorbidity, hospital volume, operation type, hospital academic status, bed volume and temporal progress. % Interval days to radical prostatectomy became wider for distance to nearest surgical robot robot emerged within 30 and 10 km, the prostatectomy caseload in non-robot hospitals reduced by 13 and 18% within 6 months, respectively, while the robot hospitals gained +101% caseload (P robotic minimally invasive radical prostatectomies in 483 non-robot hospitals revealed a significant inverse association between distance to nearest surgical robot and % interval days to radical prostatectomy (B = -17.3% for distance to nearest surgical robot ≥30 km and -11.7% for 10-30 km versus distance to nearest surgical robot Robotic surgery accessibility within 30 km would make patients less likely select conventional surgery. The nearer a robot was, the faster the caseload reduction was.

  11. Evolution of endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE): technique and outcome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jens-Uwe Stolzenburg; Odysseas Andrikopoulos; Panagiotis Kallidonis; Iason Kyriazis; Minh Do; Evangelos Liatsikos

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE) is a well-established and standardized technique for treating patients with localized prostate cancer.Nevertheless,the procedure is continuously being refined with the expansion of anatomical knowledge.The development of a nerve-sparing approach and improvements in currently used equipment are expected to yield better results in cosmesis and convalescence without sacrificing the procedure's established benefits in terms of potency,continence and oncological management.In this study,the technique and its evolution are presented in detail,along with an analysis of its clinical efficacy.We also consult the literature to compare EERPE to transperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy,and we also discuss new technical advancements regarding the use of robotic assistance during EERPE.

  12. HYDRODISSECTION FOR PRESERVATION OF NEUROVASCULAR BUNDLE DURING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Gevorgyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy is one of the high-tech operations in urology, and the challenge of the surgeon is not only to remove the prostate tumor, but also to provide a high quality of life. The fact that most questions devoted from patients in a conversation with the surgeon before the operation are devoted to this issue, shows the importance and relevance. At present, the diagnostic methods allow significantly more likely to detect early  prostate cancer, making finding and treatment of these patients more affordable and allows to apply this operation.Lately, it seems urgent to explore the possibility of water jet dissection in the field of urology, in particular, for nerve-sparing prostatectomy. Preservation of erectile function depends largely on the quality of separating the neurovascular bundle. Standard use of electrocautery is associated with damage to the neurovascular bundle.  When performing operations using water-jet mobilization of prostate the selective dissection of tissue is performed. This avoids injury of neurovascular bundle and further postoperative complications. The use of this technique may allow the surgeon to provide a more accurate mobilization prostate and selectively controlled intersection vessels heading to the prostate from the neurovascular bundle, reduce intraoperative blood loss,  maintaining continence, erectile function.This literature review is considered by the experience of using nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy using a water-jet dissector, estimated intraoperative parameters using this method.However, we have the lack of extensive research capabilities of this technique when performing nerve-preserving radical prostatectomy, that does not allow to make a comprehensive presentation on the benefits of this technique and its effects on erectile function and quality of urination, further study of this issue in such a difficult category of patients.

  13. Robotic Salvage Lymph Node Dissection After Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Fabio C M; Cividanes, Arnaldo; Guglielmetti, Giuliano B; Coelho, Rafael F

    2015-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy is a first-line treatment for localized prostate cancer. However, in some cases, biochemical recurrence associated with imaging-detected nodal metastases may happen. Herein, we aim to present the surgical technique for salvage lymph node dissection after radical prostatectomy. A 70 year-old asymptomatic man presented with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 7.45 ng/mL. Digital rectal examination was normal and trans-rectal prostate biopsy revealed a prostate adenocarcinoma Gleason 7 (3+4). Pre-operative computed tomography scan and bone scintigraphy showed no metastatic disease. In other service, the patient underwent a robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy plus obturador lymphadenectomy. Pathologic examination showed a pT3aN0 tumor. After 6 months of follow-up, serum PSA was 1.45 ng/mL. Further investigation with 11C--Choline PET/CT revealed only a 2-cm lymph node close to the left internal iliac artery. The patient was counseled for salvage lymph node dissection. Salvage lymph node dissection was uneventfully performed. Operative time was 1.5 hour, blood loss was minimal, and there were no intra- or postoperative complications. The patient was discharged from hospital in the 1st postoperative day. After 12 months of follow-up, his PSA was undetectable with no other adjuvant therapy. Robotic salvage pelvic lymph node dissection is an effective option for treatment of patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy and only pelvic lymph node metastasis detected by C11-Choline PET/CT.

  14. Robotic Salvage Lymph Node Dissection After Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio C. M. Torricelli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction and objective:Radical prostatectomy is a first-line treatment for localized prostate cancer. However, in some cases, biochemical recurrence associated with imaging-detected nodal metastases may happen. Herein, we aim to present the surgical technique for salvage lymph node dissection after radical prostatectomy.Materials and Methods:A 70 year-old asymptomatic man presented with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA of 7.45ng/ mL. Digital rectal examination was normal and trans-rectal prostate biopsy revealed a prostate adenocarcinoma Gleason 7 (3+4. Pre-operative computed tomography scan and bone scintigraphy showed no metastatic disease. In other service, the patient underwent a robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy plus obturador lymphadenectomy. Pathologic examination showed a pT3aN0 tumor. After 6 months of follow-up, serum PSA was 1.45ng/mL. Further investigation with 11C–Choline PET/CT revealed only a 2-cm lymph node close to the left internal iliac artery. The patient was counseled for salvage lymph node dissection.Results:Salvage lymph node dissection was uneventfully performed. Operative time was 1.5 hour, blood loss was minimal, and there were no intra- or postoperative complications. The patient was discharged from hospital in the 1st postoperative day. After 12 months of follow-up, his PSA was undetectable with no other adjuvant therapy.Conclusion:Robotic salvage pelvic lymph node dissection is an effective option for treatment of patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy and only pelvic lymph node metastasis detected by C11-Choline PET/CT.

  15. Athermal bladder neck dissection during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio Dal Moro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction With improved understanding of the precise anatomy, surgical techniques during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) have been refined, with the aim of improving functional outcomes without compromising oncological adequacy and results. Nevertheless, postoperative urinary incontinence remains a frustrating side-effect. Anatomically, bladder neck (BN) serves as an internal sphincter. The longitudinal fibres of BN may be identified and isolated with a meticulous dissection at...

  16. Justice and Surgical Innovation: The Case of Robotic Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Katrina; Johnson, Jane; Carter, Drew

    2016-09-01

    Surgical innovation promises improvements in healthcare, but it also raises ethical issues including risks of harm to patients, conflicts of interest and increased injustice in access to health care. In this article, we focus on risks of injustice, and use a case study of robotic prostatectomy to identify features of surgical innovation that risk introducing or exacerbating injustices. Interpreting justice as encompassing matters of both efficiency and equity, we first examine questions relating to government decisions about whether to publicly fund access to innovative treatments. Here the case of robotic prostatectomy exemplifies the difficulty of accommodating healthcare priorities such as improving the health of marginalized groups. It also illustrates challenges with estimating the likely long-term costs and benefits of a new intervention, the difficulty of comparing outcomes of an innovative treatment to those of established treatments, and the further complexity associated with patient and surgeon preferences. Once the decision has been made to fund a new procedure, separate issues of justice arise at the level of providing care to individual patients. Here, the case of robotic prostatectomy exemplifies how features of surgical innovation, such as surgeon learning curves and the need for an adequate volume of cases at a treatment centre, can exacerbate injustices associated with treatment cost and the logistics of travelling for treatment. Drawing on our analysis, we conclude by making a number of recommendations for the just introduction of surgical innovations.

  17. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Roberto Colombo Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the initial experience on robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil. Methods: From March 2008 to March 2009, a hundred patients were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Patient’s demographic data, as well as perioperative results of the procedures, are described in this study. Rresults: Patients’ mean age and mean PSA were 58 years and 7.58 ng/ml, respectively. All procedures were performed through transperitoneal approach, with a mean bleeding of 480 mL and surgical time of 298 minutes. A surgical margin affected by cancer was present in 16% of the cases. There were four complications: bleeding requiring transfusion (two cases, rectal perforation corrected on the spot and inadequate functioning of the robot. There was no conversion to another access or obit occurrences in this caseload. Cconclusions: Robot-assisted prostatectomy is a reality in Brazil and the results herein presented demonstrate that this procedure can be safely performed. Long-term follow-up is still necessary to assess the oncological and functional outcomes.

  18. Management of erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alan Saleh, Hamid Abboudi, MB Ghazal-Aswad, Erik K Mayer, Justin A Vale Division of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Radical prostatectomy is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. One of the long-term complications is erectile dysfunction. There is little consensus on the optimal management; however, it is agreed that treatment must be prompt to prevent fibrosis and increase oxygenation of penile tissue. It is vital that patient expectations are discussed, a realistic time frame of treatment provided, and treatment started as close to the prostatectomy as possible. Current treatment regimens rely on phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors as a first-line therapy, with vacuum erection devices and intraurethral suppositories of alprostadil as possible treatment combination options. With nonresponders to these therapies, intracavernosal injections are resorted to. As a final measure, patients undergo the highly invasive penile prosthesis implantation. There is no uniform, objective treatment program for erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy. Management plans are based on poorly conducted and often underpowered studies in combination with physician and patient preferences. They involve the aforementioned drugs and treatment methods in different sequences and doses. Prospective treatments include dietary supplements and gene therapy, which have shown promise with there proposed mechanisms of improving erectile function but are yet to be applied successfully in human patients. Keywords: erectile dysfunction, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, vacuum erection devices, intraurethral suppositories, intracavernosal injections

  19. Level of education and mortality after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehner, Michael; Koch, Rainer; Propping, Stefan; Liebeheim, Dorothea; Hübler, Matthias; Baretton, Gustavo B; Hakenberg, Oliver W; Wirth, Manfred P

    2017-01-01

    Estimating the risk of competing mortality is of importance in men with early prostate cancer to choose the most appropriate way of management and to avoid over- or under-treatment. In this study, we investigated the impact of the level of education in this context. The study sample consisted of 2630 patients with complete data on level of education (college, university degree, master craftsmen, comparable profession, or others), histopathological tumor stage (organ confined or extracapsular), lymph node status (negative or positive), and prostatectomy specimen Gleason score (education was independently associated with decreased overall mortality after radical prostatectomy (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.75, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.62-0.91, P = 0.0037). The mortality difference was attributable to decreased second cancer mortality (HR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.40-0.85, P = 0.0052) and noncancer mortality (HR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.55-0.98, P = 0.0345) but not to differences in prostate cancer-specific mortality (HR: 1.16, 95% CI: 0.79-1.69, P = 0.4536 in the full model). In conclusion, the level of education might serve as an independent prognostic parameter supplementary to age, comorbidity, and smoking status to estimate the risk of competing mortality and to choose optimal treatment for men with early prostate cancer who are candidates for radical prostatectomy.

  20. Pathologic outcomes during the learning curve for robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amul Shah

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We report our initial experience with 62 patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP, focusing on the primary parameter of positive surgical margins. The authors demonstrate that excellent oncologic outcomes can be attained with a less steep learning curve than previously hypothesized. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The first 62 patients undergoing RALP by a single physician (DPD at our institution between November 2005 and August 2007 were retrospectively assessed. Surgical pathology records were reviewed for Gleason score, pathologic tumor stage, nodal status, location of prostate cancer within the specimen, extracapsular extension, surgical margin status, presence of perineural invasion, tumor volume, and weight of the surgical specimen. Margin status was determined using surgical specimens only, and not intraoperative frozen sections. All cases in this series were completed using the four-arm da Vinci Robotic System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, California. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients had prostate cancer on their final surgical pathology specimens. Pathologic stage T2 and stage T3 patients were 88.7% and 9.7% of all cases, respectively. The pathologic Gleason score was 7 or greater in 62.3%. Our overall positive surgical margin rate was 3.3%. Patients with pathologic T2 and T3 disease had a positive surgical margin rate of 1.8% and 16.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that RALP can have equal if not better pathologic outcomes compared to open radical prostatectomy even during the initial series of cases. We argue that the learning curve for RALP is shorter than previously thought with respect to oncologic outcomes, and concerns asserting that lack of tactile feedback leads to poor oncologic outcomes are unfounded.

  1. Perioperative outcome of initial 190 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - A single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P N Dogra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the perioperative outcome of the first 190 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy performed at our center from July 2006 to December 2010. Materials and Methods: Operative and recovery data for men with localized prostate cancer undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy at our center were reviewed. All surgeries were performed using the 4-arm da Vinci-S surgical robot. Preoperative data included age, body mass index (BMI, prostate specific antigen (PSA level, prostate weight, biopsy Gleason score and TNM staging, while operative and recovery data included total operative time, estimated blood loss, complications, hospital stay and catheter time. These parameters were evaluated for the safety and efficacy of this procedure in our center. Results: The mean age of our patients was 65 ± 1.2 years. The mean BMI was 25.20 ± 2.88 and the median PSA was 14.8 ng/ml. Majority of our patients belonged to clinical stage T2 (51.58%. The mean total operative time was 166.44 ± 11.5 min. Six patients required conversion to open procedure and there was one rectal injury. The median estimated blood loss was 302 ± 14.45 ml and the median duration of hospital stay was 4 days. The overall margin positivity rate was 12.63%. Conclusion: Despite our limited robotic surgery experience, our perioperative outcome and complication rate is comparable to most contemporary series. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP is easy to learn and provides the patient with the benefits of minimally invasive surgery with minimal perioperative morbidity.

  2. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle and endopelvic fascia sparing

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque, George Augusto Monteiro Lins; Guglielmetti, Giuliano Betoni; Cordeiro, Maurício Dener; Nahas, William Carlos; Coelho, Rafael Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RAP) is the dominant minimally invasive surgical treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. The introduction of robotic assistance has the potential to improve surgical outcomes and reduce the steep learning curve associated with conventional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle without open the endopelvic fascia during RAP. Materials and Methods A 51-year old male, presenting histological diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6 (3+3), in 4 cores of 12, with an initial PSA=3.41ng/dl and the digital rectal examination demonstrating a prostate with hardened nodule in the right lobe of the prostate base (clinical stage T2a). Surgical treatment with the robot-assisted technique was offered as initial therapeutic option and the critical technical point was the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle with endopelvic fascia preservation, during radical prostatectomy. Results The operative time was of 89 minutes, blood loss was 100ml. No drain was left in the peritoneal cavity. The patient was discharged within 24 hours. There were no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications. The pathological evaluation revealed prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6, with free surgical margins and seminal vesicles free of neoplastic involvement (pathologic stage T2a). At 3-month-follow-up, the patient lies with undetectable PSA, continent and potent. Conclusion This is a feasible technique combining the benefits of retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle, the preservation of the pubo-prostatic collar and the preservation of the antero-lateral cavernous nerves. PMID:27802002

  3. Target volume for adjuvant radiotherapy after prostatectomy; Volume cible de la radiotherapie adjuvante apres prostatectomie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, A. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2007-11-15

    Although radical prostatectomy is an effective treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer, it fails in up to 20 to 40% of the cases. Local failure represents one of the possible patterns of relapse and is announced by detectable serum P.S.A. levels. Patients at high risk for local relapse have extra prostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration at pathology. Three recently published phase III randomized clinical trials have clearly shown that, for these patients, immediate adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of progression. For patients undergoing postoperative irradiation the standardisation of the target volume definition and delineation is required because no general consensus exists on prostate bed definition. The Genito-Urinary Working Party of the Radiation Oncology Group of the European Organization for the Research and treatment of cancer (R.O.G. O.R.T.C.) has developed a set of Guidelines to assist radiotherapists in the contouring of target volumes for postoperative irradiation: a consensus has been reached on a set of recommendations that are proposed to the radiation oncologist community. Emphasis has been put on the optimal cooperation between the surgeon, the pathologist and the radiotherapist in the frame of a multidisciplinary approach. Data on the presence and on the localization of extra prostatic extension and on positive surgical margins must be used. Placement of metallic clips in the tumor bed is of great help in localizing fixed anatomical sites as the anastomosis. The goal of such a document is to reduce inter-observer variability in target delineation in the framework of future clinical trials. (author)

  4. Penile vibratory stimulation in the treatment of post-prostatectomy incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To examine penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in the treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (UI). METHODS: Patients with post-prostatectomy UI were included in a 12-week trial. A 24-hr pad test and a 72-hr voiding diary were collected at baseline. Participants were randomized ...

  5. Clinical map document based on XML (cMDX: document architecture with mapping feature for reporting and analysing prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettendorf Olaf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathology report of radical prostatectomy specimens plays an important role in clinical decisions and the prognostic evaluation in Prostate Cancer (PCa. The anatomical schema is a helpful tool to document PCa extension for clinical and research purposes. To achieve electronic documentation and analysis, an appropriate documentation model for anatomical schemas is needed. For this purpose we developed cMDX. Methods The document architecture of cMDX was designed according to Open Packaging Conventions by separating the whole data into template data and patient data. Analogue custom XML elements were considered to harmonize the graphical representation (e.g. tumour extension with the textual data (e.g. histological patterns. The graphical documentation was based on the four-layer visualization model that forms the interaction between different custom XML elements. Sensible personal data were encrypted with a 256-bit cryptographic algorithm to avoid misuse. In order to assess the clinical value, we retrospectively analysed the tumour extension in 255 patients after radical prostatectomy. Results The pathology report with cMDX can represent pathological findings of the prostate in schematic styles. Such reports can be integrated into the hospital information system. "cMDX" documents can be converted into different data formats like text, graphics and PDF. Supplementary tools like cMDX Editor and an analyser tool were implemented. The graphical analysis of 255 prostatectomy specimens showed that PCa were mostly localized in the peripheral zone (Mean: 73% ± 25. 54% of PCa showed a multifocal growth pattern. Conclusions cMDX can be used for routine histopathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens and provide data for scientific analysis.

  6. TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR EARLY CONTINENCE RECOVERY

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    V. A. Perepechay

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the technical characteristics of radical prostatectomy (RPE for early continence recovery in patients with prostate cancer. Restoration of the fascial structures of the small pelvis after RPE has been found to promote early urinary continence recovery. A method for total restoration of the fascial structures of the small pelvis (an operation after A. Tewari and a procedure for performing posterior suspension of urethrocystic neoanastomosis in Denonvilliers’ fascia length deficit are considered, which show the similar results in the time of continence recovery.

  7. Radical prostatectomy in clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The optimal therapeutic strategy for high-risk localized prostate cancer (PCa) is controversial. Supported by randomized trials, the combination of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and endocrine therapy (ET) is advocated by many, while radical prostatectomy (RP) is regar......Abstract Objective. The optimal therapeutic strategy for high-risk localized prostate cancer (PCa) is controversial. Supported by randomized trials, the combination of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and endocrine therapy (ET) is advocated by many, while radical prostatectomy (RP......) is regarded as primary therapy by others. This study examined the outcome for high-risk localized PCa patients treated with RP. Material and methods. Of 1300 patients who underwent RP, 231 were identified as high-risk. Patients were followed for biochemical recurrence (BCR) (defined as prostate......-specific antigen ≥ 0.2 ng/ml), metastatic disease and survival. Excluding node-positive patients, none of the patients received adjuvant therapy before BCR was confirmed. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard models. Results. Median follow-up was 4.4 years...

  8. Augmented Reality Image Guidance in Minimally Invasive Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Daniel; Mayer, Erik; Chen, Dongbin; Anstee, Ann; Vale, Justin; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Edwards, Philip'eddie'

    This paper presents our work aimed at providing augmented reality (AR) guidance of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALP) using the da Vinci system. There is a good clinical case for guidance due to the significant rate of complications and steep learning curve for this procedure. Patients who were due to undergo robotic prostatectomy for organ-confined prostate cancer underwent preoperative 3T MRI scans of the pelvis. These were segmented and reconstructed to form 3D images of pelvic anatomy. The reconstructed image was successfully overlaid onto screenshots of the recorded surgery post-procedure. Surgeons who perform minimally-invasive prostatectomy took part in a user-needs analysis to determine the potential benefits of an image guidance system after viewing the overlaid images. All surgeons stated that the development would be useful at key stages of the surgery and could help to improve the learning curve of the procedure and improve functional and oncological outcomes. Establishing the clinical need in this way is a vital early step in development of an AR guidance system. We have also identified relevant anatomy from preoperative MRI. Further work will be aimed at automated registration to account for tissue deformation during the procedure, using a combination of transrectal ultrasound and stereoendoscopic video.

  9. Evaluation for Madigan's prostatectomy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Min LIAO; Bing-Yi SHI; Chun-Quan LIANG; Werner SCH(..)AFER

    2001-01-01

    To comparatively evaluate the efficacy and post-operative complications of the Madigan's prostatectomy (MPC) and suprapubic prostatectomy (SPPC). Methods: A total of 43 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were divided into two groups: 21 underwent MPC and 22, SPPC. In all the patients, the international prostate symptom score (IPSS) and urinary pressure-flow studies were assessed before and 6 months after operation. The International Continence Society (ICS) nomogram, Abrams-Griffiths (AG) number and linear passive urethral resistance relation analysis (L-PURR) were used to diagnose and grade bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). The IPSS and the urodynamic parameters before and after operation, as well as the advantages and post-operative complications were recorded and compared. Results: Patients of both the MPC and SPPC groups had a significant improvement in IPSS and urodynamic parameters. Obstruction was relieved in 81.0% of MPC and 86.4 % of SPPC patients. MPC has the advantages of the absence of postoperative hematuria and post-catheter stricture, a shorter period of hospitalization, and lower incidence of retrograde ejaculation and erectile dysfunction. Conclusion: Both MPC and SPPC can effectively relieve BOO. MPC has certain advantages and a lower incidence of complications as compared with SPPC.

  10. The new era of minimally invasive interventions for prostate cancer: robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and focal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schatloff O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Schatloff1, Alyssa S Louis2, Uri Lindner21Global Robotics Institute, Florida Hospital Celebration Health, Celebration, FL, USA; 2Division of Urology, Department of Surgical Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Prostate cancer remains a common but highly treatable disease. Innovations in prostate cancer treatment have allowed a transition toward minimally invasive approaches in an attempt to avoid treatment-related morbidities. In the middle of the treatment spectrum between radical open surgeries and active surveillance lies robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP and focal therapy (FT. This review sets out the most current information on RALP and FT (including laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and irreversible electroporation.Keywords: PCa, RALP, FT, laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, irreversible electroporation

  11. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy in Men with Proctocolectomy and Restorative Ileal Pouch-Anal Anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Leapman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a retrospective chart review of robotic prostatectomies done by a single surgeon between 2003 and 2012. During that time period, we identified two patients within the year 2012, with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPPA who also underwent robotic prostatectomies. The demographics and postoperative characteristics of the two patients were assessed. In both patients, prostatectomy, bilateral nerve sparing, and pelvic lymphadenectomy were successfully performed and the integrity of ileal pouch was maintained. There was a mean surgical time of 144.5 minutes, and an average estimated blood loss was 125 mL. Both patients were discharged on the second day postoperatively. In both patients there was a Gleason upgrade to 3 + 4, with negative margins, and preservation of fecal and urinary continence by their six-month followup. Owing to surgical modifications, these two surgeries represent the first successful robotic prostatectomies in patients with a J-pouch.

  12. Evaluating and managing urinary incontinence after prostatectomy: beyond pads and diapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiemo, Humphrey O; Moy, Louis; Vasavada, Sandip; Rackley, Raymond

    2007-01-01

    Men who become persistently incontinent after undergoing prostatectomy have a variety of options for regaining control, ranging from behavioral changes to surgery. To determine the best therapy, one should define the problem with a thorough urologic evaluation.

  13. Learning Curve of Robotic-assisted Radical Prostatectomy With 60 Initial Cases by a Single Surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chuan Ou

    2011-04-01

    Conclusion: After gaining experience by performing an initial 30 robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, the subsequent 30 surgeries established proficiency as determined by vesicourethral anastomosis time and early continence rate.

  14. Transurethral prostatectomy: practice aspects of the dominant operation in American urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgrewe, H L; Mebust, W K; Dowd, J B; Cockett, A T; Peters, P C; Proctor, C

    1989-02-01

    In a national survey of all American urologists transurethral prostatectomy accounted for 38 per cent of the major surgical procedures performed by the respondents. They regarded the operation as complex and they believe achievement of proficiency requires that more be performed during residency training than any other urological operation. Furthermore, they assigned transurethral prostatectomy a significantly higher relative value than have medical economists doing research in the field of physician reimbursement. The effect of recent legislated congressional reductions in the allowable Medicare fees for transurethral prostatectomy is discussed along with the impact of these reductions on urological patient care and the American urologist. Practice patterns and geographic variations in the costs of transurethral prostatectomy also are considered.

  15. Impact of obesity on early erectile function recovery after robotic radical prostatectomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uffort, Ekong E; Jensen, James C

    2011-01-01

    .... International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-6) scores were prospectively collected with institutional review board approval, for patients who underwent robotic radical prostatectomy with bilateral nerve sparing from February 2007 to October 2009...

  16. The Da Vinci Xi and robotic radical prostatectomy-an evolution in learning and technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, S S; Cahill, D

    2016-08-19

    The da Vinci Xi robot has been introduced as the successor to the Si platform. The promise of the Xi is to open the door to new surgical procedures. For robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP)/pelvic surgery, the potential is better vision and longer instruments. How has the Xi impacted on operative and pathological parameters as indicators of surgical performance? This is a comparison of an initial series of 42 RARPs with the Xi system in 2015 with a series using the Si system immediately before Xi uptake in the same calendar year, and an Si series by the same surgeon synchronously as the Xi series using operative time, blood loss, and positive margins as surrogates of surgical performance. Subjectively and objectively, there is a learning curve to Xi uptake in longer operative times but no impact on T2 positive margins which are the most reflective single measure of RARP outcomes. Subjectively, the vision of the Xi is inferior to the Si system, and the integrated diathermy system and automated setup are quirky. All require experience to overcome. There is a learning curve to progress from the Si to Xi da Vinci surgical platforms, but this does not negatively impact the outcome.

  17. Surgeon and Hospital Level Variation in the Costs of Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Alexander P; Leow, Jeffrey J; Chang, Steven L; Chung, Benjamin I; Meyer, Christian P; Kibel, Adam S; Menon, Mani; Nguyen, Paul L; Choueiri, Toni K; Reznor, Gally; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Sammon, Jesse D; Sun, Maxine; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2016-10-01

    We assessed surgeon and hospital level variation in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy costs and predictors of high and low cost surgery. The study population consisted of a weighted sample of 291,015 men who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer by 667 surgeons at 197 U.S. hospitals from 2003 to 2013. We evaluated 90-day direct hospital costs (2014 USD) in the Premier Hospital Database. High costs per robot-assisted radical prostatectomy were those above the 90th percentile and low costs were those below the 10th percentile. Mean hospital cost per robot-assisted radical prostatectomy was $11,878 (95% CI $11,804-$11,952). Mean cost was $2,837 (95% CI $2,805-$2,869) in the low cost group vs $25,906 (95% CI $24,702-$25,490) in the high cost group. Nearly a third of the variation in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy cost was attributable to hospital characteristics and more than a fifth was attributable to surgeon characteristics (R-squared 30.43% and 21.25%, respectively). High volume surgeons and hospitals (90th percentile or greater) had decreased odds of high cost surgery (surgeons: OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.11-0.54; hospitals: OR 0.105, 95% CI 0.02-0.46). The performance of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy at a high volume hospital was associated with increased odds of low cost robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (OR 839, 95% CI 122-greater than 999). This study provides insight into the role of surgeons and hospitals in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy costs. Given the substantial variability, identifying and remedying the root cause of outlier costs may yield substantial benefits. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compérat, Eva; Camparo, Philippe; Srigley, John; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars

    2013-06-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) consensus conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens issued recommendations for standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. The conference addressed specimen handling, T2 substaging, prostate cancer volume, extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node metastases and surgical margins. This review summarizes the conclusions and recommendations resulting from the consensus process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Robotic prostatectomy: the anesthetist's view for robotic urological surgeries, a prospective study,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menekse Oksar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Although many features of robotic prostatectomy are similar to those of conventional laparoscopic urological procedures (such as laparoscopic prostatectomy, the procedure is associated with some drawbacks, which include limited intravenous access, relatively long operating time, deep Trendelenburg position, and high intra-abdominal pressure. The primary aim was to describe respiratory and hemodynamic challenges and the complications related to high intra-abdominal pressure and the deep Trendelenburg position in robotic prostatectomy patients. The secondary aim was to reveal safe discharge criteria from the operating room. Methods: Fifty-three patients who underwent robotic prostatectomy between December 2009 and January 2011 were prospectively enrolled. Main outcome measures were non-invasive monitoring, invasive monitoring and blood gas analysis performed at supine (T0, Trendelenburg (T1, Trendelenburg + pneumoperitoneum (T2, Trendelenburg-before desufflation (T3, Trendelenburg (after desufflation (T4, and supine (T5 positions. Results: Fifty-three robotic prostatectomy patients were included in the study. The main clinical challenge in our study group was the choice of ventilation strategy to manage respiratory acidosis, which is detected through end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure and blood gas analysis. Furthermore, the mean arterial pressure remained unchanged, the heart rate decreased significantly and required intervention. The central venous pressure values were also above the normal limits. Conclusion: Respiratory acidosis and "upper airway obstruction-like" clinical symptoms were the main challenges associated with robotic prostatectomy procedures during this study.

  20. [Risk factors of ISUP Modified Gleason score upgrading after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-dong; Qu, Gen-yi; Xu, Ning; Xue, Xue-yi; Wei, Yong; Zheng, Qing-shui; Li, Jun-feng; Cai, Hai; Lin, Yun-zhi

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the factors upgrading the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Gleason score using the specimens from preoperative prostatic biopsy and radical prostatectomy. A total of 164 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer by biopsy underwent radical prostatectomy. We retrospectively analyzed their age, prostate volume, preoperative PSA level, PSA density (PSAD) , the time interval between biopsy and surgery, the number of positive punctures, positive surgical margin, seminal vesicle invasion, lymphatic invasion, and Gleason scores from biopsy and prostatectomy. We also determined the predictors of Gleason score upgrading by logistic regression analysis. Of the 164 cases analyzed, 95 (57.93% ) showed a consistency between the Gleason score of preoperative prostatic biopsy and that after radical prostatectomy, 55 (33.54% ) increased and 14 (8.52%) decreased after prostatectomy as compared with preoperative biopsy. The prostate volume (P 60 ml group (P < 0.05). Low Gleason score of biopsy (≤ 6) and small prostate volume (≤ 40 ml) may be the predictors of Gleason score upgrading after radical prostatectomy.

  1. Advances in Robotic-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma F. P. Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP, robotics has become increasingly more commonplace in the armamentarium of the urologic surgeon. Robotic utilization has exploded across surgical disciplines well beyond the fields of urology and prostate surgery. The literature detailing technical steps, comparison of large surgical series, and even robotically focused randomized control trials are available for review. RALP, the first robot-assisted surgical procedure to achieve widespread use, has recently become the primary approach for the surgical management of localized prostate cancer. As a result, surgeons are constantly trying to refine and improve upon current technical aspects of the operation. Recent areas of published modifications include bladder neck anastomosis and reconstruction, bladder drainage, nerve sparing approaches and techniques, and perioperative and postoperative management including penile rehabilitation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in perioperative management and surgical technique for RALP.

  2. Survival after radical prostatectomy for clinically localised prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    hazard of all-cause and prostate cancer-specific mortality after 10 years was 15.4% (95% confide3nce interval [CI] 13.2-17.7) and 6.6% (95% CI 4.9-8.2) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We present the first survival analysis of a complete, nationwide cohort of men undergoing RP for localised prostate cancer......OBJECTIVES: To describe survival and cause of death in a nationwide cohort of Danish patients with prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). To describe risk factors associated with prostate cancer mortality. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Observational study of 6489 men with localised prostate...... cancer treated with RP at six different hospitals in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. Survival was described using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Causes of death were obtained from the national registry and cross-checked with patient files. Cumulative incidence of death, any cause and prostate cancer...

  3. The Metabolic Syndrome and Biochemical Recurrence following Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Post

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome refers to a set of conditions that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and has been associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, particularly among African American men. This study aimed to estimate the association of metabolic syndrome with biochemical recurrence (BCR in a racially diverse population. Among 383 radical prostatectomy patients, 67 patients had documented biochemical recurrence. Hypertension was significantly, positively associated with the rate of BCR (hazard ratio (HR = 2.1; 95%  CI = 1.1, 3.8. There were distinct racial differences in the prevalence of individual metabolic syndrome components; however, the observed associations with BCR did not differ appreciably by race. We conclude that hypertension may contribute to a poorer prognosis in surgically treated prostate cancer patients. Our findings suggest that targeting components of the metabolic syndrome which are potentially modifiable through lifestyle interventions may be a viable strategy to reduce risk of BCR in prostate cancer.

  4. A new nomogram to predict pathologic outcome following radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Crippa

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop a preoperative nomogram to predict pathologic outcome in patients submitted to radical prostatectomy for clinical localized prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine hundred and sixty patients with clinical stage T1 and T2 prostate cancer were evaluated following radical prostatectomy, and 898 were included in the study. Following a multivariate analysis, nomograms were developed incorporating serum PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and percentage of positive biopsy cores in order to predict the risks of extraprostatic tumor extension, and seminal vesicle involvement. RESULTS: In univariate analysis there was a significant association between percentage of positive biopsy cores (p < 0.001, serum PSA (p = 0.001 and biopsy Gleason score (p < 0.001 with extraprostatic tumor extension. A similar pathologic outcome was seen among tumors with Gleason score 7, and Gleason score 8 to 10. In multivariate analysis, the 3 preoperative variables showed independent significance to predict tumor extension. This allowed the development of nomogram-1 (using Gleason scores in 3 categories - 2 to 6, 7 and 8 to 10 and nomogram-2 (using Gleason scores in 2 categories - 2 to 6 and 7 to 10 to predict disease extension based on these 3 parameters. In the validation analysis, 87% and 91.1% of the time the nomograms-1 and 2, correctly predicted the probability of a pathological stage to within 10% respectively. CONCLUSION: Incorporating percent of positive biopsy cores to a nomogram that includes preoperative serum PSA and biopsy Gleason score, can accurately predict the presence of extraprostatic disease extension in patients with clinical localized prostate cancer.

  5. Virtual reality simulator for training urologists on transurethral prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU He; ZHANG Yi; LIU Jin-shun; WANG Gang; YU Cheng-fan; NA Yan-qun

    2013-01-01

    Background A virtual reality simulator provides a novel training model for improving surgical skills in a variety of fields.They can simulate a variety of surgical scenarios to improve the overall skills required for endoscopic operations,and also record the operative process of trainees in real-time and allow for objective evaluation.At present,some simulators for transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) are available.The utility of virtual reality simulators in training of transurethral prostatectomy was investigated.Methods Thirty-eight urologists were randomly selected to take part in a simulation based training of TURP using the TURPSimTM system.Pre and post-training global rate scale (GRS) scores and objective parameters recorded by the simulator were assessed.Then,questionnaires were filled out.Results Compared with baseline levels,the GRS scores of trainees increased (18.0±4.0 vs.12.4±4.2,P<0.001),while the rate of capsule resection (26.3%±0.6% vs.21.2%±0.4%,P <0.001),amount of blood loss ((125.8±86.3) ml vs.(83.7±41.6) ml,P <0.001),external sphincter injury (3.6±2.9 vs.2.0±2.0,P <0.001)decreased significantly after training.Most trainees were satisfied with the simulator based training and believed that the simulator accurately mimicked actual surgical procedures and could help improve their surgical skills.Conclusions As a new method of training on transurethral prostatectomy skills,training of TURP using a virtual simulator can help urologists improve their surgical skills and safety.Therefore,the application of the TURPSimTM system in education and training of urologic surgery is warranted.

  6. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 3: extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magi-Galluzzi, C.; Evans, A.J.; Delahunt, B.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Egevad, L.L.; Humphrey, P.A.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to extraprostatic extension (pT3a

  7. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 1: specimen handling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samaratunga, H.; Montironi, R.; True, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the handling and processing of radical prostatectomy specimens were coordinated by wo

  8. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 3: extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magi-Galluzzi, C.; Evans, A.J.; Delahunt, B.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Egevad, L.L.; Humphrey, P.A.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to extraprostatic extension (pT3a

  9. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 1: specimen handling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samaratunga, H.; Montironi, R.; True, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the handling and processing of radical prostatectomy specimens were coordinated by wo

  10. Does a history of previous surgery or radiation to the prostate affect outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Aaron D; Desai, Premal J; Nunez, Rafael N; Martin, George L; Andrews, Paul E; Ferrigni, Robert G; Swanson, Scott K; Pacelli, Anna; Castle, Erik P

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate retrospectively whether or not previous treatment to the prostate alters the perioperative outcomes from robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) after the initial 'learning curve', as there are conflicting data on outcomes of RP in patients with previous treatment to the prostate. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients who had RARP between March 2005 and August 2007, and analysed demographic, perioperative variables and pathological data. In all, 510 patient charts were reviewed, identifying 24 patients with a history of previous treatment to the prostate including transurethral resection or incision of the prostate, transurethral microwave therapy, transurethral needle ablation, photoselective vaporization, simple prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and open bladder neck reconstruction (group 1) and 486 with no previous treatment (group 2). There was no significant difference between the groups in body mass index, clinical stage, grade or prostate volume, but the patients in group 1 were older (70 vs 65 years, P = 0.001). Outcome analysis comparing groups 1 and 2 showed an estimated blood loss of 155 vs 137 mL, length of hospital stay of 2.2 vs 1.5 days, operative duration of 200 vs 186 min and catheter time of 12 vs 8 days, respectively; only the last was statistically significant (P = 0.03). There was an 8.3% and 6.8% complication rate in groups 1 and 2, respectively, and the respective overall positive margin rate was 20.8% and 22.6%. A history of previous treatment of the prostate does not appear to compromise the perioperative outcomes of RARP.

  11. Use of partial prostatectomy for treatment of prostatic abscesses and cysts in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, C A; Mahaffey, M B; Barsanti, J A; Quandt, J E; Oliver, J E; Crowell, W A; Downs, M O; Stampley, A R; Allen, S W

    1997-10-01

    To determine whether dogs had prostatic disease, urinary incontinence, or urinary tract infection 1 year after partial prostatectomy to treat prostatic abscesses and cysts. Prospective study. 20 male dogs with prostatic abscesses or cysts. Fifteen dogs had evidence of urinary tract infection. Only 8 dogs urinated normally; the remainder dribbled, had obstructions, or required medical treatment. Partial prostatectomy was performed on each dog. Sexually intact dogs (n = 12) also were castrated. None of the dogs had return of prostatic cystic enlargement or clinical signs of prostatic disease during the first year after surgery. Two dogs were euthanatized within 1 year after surgery, with 1 dog having prostatic enlargement and adenocarcinoma and 1 dog having unrelated lymphosarcoma. Fifteen dogs were continent. The remaining 5 dogs urinated normally but had intermittent and minor incontinence. Eleven dogs had no signs of infection 1 year after surgery, 5 had pyuria or positive urine bacteriologic culture results, 2 did not have urinalysis performed, and 2 were euthanatized. Dogs with severe prostatic abscesses or cysts and infections can be successfully treated by partial prostatectomy with an ultrasonic surgical aspirator and castration, resulting in long-term disease resolution. Although most dogs with severe prostatic disease do not urinate normally before surgery, nearly all dogs resume normal micturition after partial prostatectomy. Postoperative results of partial prostatectomy appear to be better than those of previous drainage techniques for treatment of prostatic cavitary disease.

  12. Intra-operative prostate motion tracking using surface markers for robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteghamatian, Mehdi; Sarkar, Kripasindhu; Pautler, Stephen E.; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Radical prostatectomy surgery (RP) is the gold standard for treatment of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Recently, emergence of minimally invasive techniques such as Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy (LRP) and Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy (RARP) has improved the outcomes for prostatectomy. However, it remains difficult for the surgeons to make informed decisions regarding resection margins and nerve sparing since the location of the tumor within the organ is not usually visible in a laparoscopic view. While MRI enables visualization of the salient structures and cancer foci, its efficacy in LRP is reduced unless it is fused into a stereoscopic view such that homologous structures overlap. Registration of the MRI image and peri-operative ultrasound image using a tracked probe can potentially be exploited to bring the pre-operative information into alignment with the patient coordinate system during the procedure. While doing so, prostate motion needs to be compensated in real-time to synchronize the stereoscopic view with the pre-operative MRI during the prostatectomy procedure. In this study, a point-based stereoscopic tracking technique is investigated to compensate for rigid prostate motion so that the same motion can be applied to the pre-operative images. This method benefits from stereoscopic tracking of the surface markers implanted over the surface of the prostate phantom. The average target registration error using this approach was 3.25+/-1.43mm.

  13. Novel technique to enhance bladder neck dissection with traction of Foley catheter during extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Y. Lin

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Improved bladder neck enhancement provides a clearer vision during bladder neck dissection. Similar functional results and cancer control rates were also encountered during modified extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy. This novel technique is a feasible method for performing endoscopic radical prostatectomy using four ports instead of five.

  14. "Sling" retropúbico e transobturatório no tratamento da incontinênca urinária de esforço Retropubic and transobturator sling in treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lopes Salzedas Tanuri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar resultados das técnicas de "sling" retropúbico e transobturador para o tratamento de mulheres com incontinência urinária de esforço (IUE. MÉTODOS: Foram randomizadas 30 pacientes, sendo que 20 se submeteram ao sling retropúbico e 10 ao transobturador. As pacientes foram avaliadas antes e após o tratamento com um, seis e 12 meses, por meio de história clínica, exame físico, questionário de qualidade de vida ("King's Health Questionnaire", teste do absorvente e avaliação urodinâmica. Os grupos foram homogêneos no pré-operatório. RESULTADOS: Houve melhora significante na avaliação da qualidade de vida em ambos os grupos após a terapêutica, sem diferença entre os grupos. Houve diminuição no peso do absorvente para os dois grupos. As taxas de cura pela avaliação urodinâmica em 12 meses foram de 84,2% para o grupo transobturador e 88,8% para o retropúbico. Da mesma forma, a cura subjetiva foi de 85% e 88,8%, respectivamente. Não observamos diferenças entre os grupos consoante as complicações. CONCLUSÃO: As cirurgias deste sling, pelas vias retropúbica e transobturadora, foram eficazes para o tratamento de mulheres com IUE, no seguimento de 12 meses. Observamos elevada taxa de cura e melhora da qualidade de vida com baixos índices de complicações.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare results of retropubic and transobturator sling for surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI. METHODS: Thirty randomized patients with SUI were divided in two groups, twenty who underwent the transobturator sling and ten the retropubic sling procedure. .Patients were assessed before and after one, six and twelve months of treatment by clinical history, physical examination, quality of life questionnaire (King's Health Questionnaire, pad test and urodynamic parameters. At preoperative both groups were homogenous. RESULTS: One year after surgery, incontinence and quality of life

  15. Gluteal compartment syndrome after prostatectomy caused by incorrect positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Jens; Ladurner, R; Ozimek, A; Vogel, T; Hallfeldt, K K; Mussack, T

    2006-04-28

    Gluteal compartment syndrome is an uncommon and rare disease. Most reasonable causes for the development of this disease are trauma, drug induced coma, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, sickle cell associated muscle infarction, incorrect positioning during surgical procedures and prolonged pressure in patients with altered consciousness levels. The diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, especially in postoperative patient where sedation or peridural anaesthesia can confound the neurological examination. Early signs include gluteal tenderness, decrease in vibratory sensation during clinical examination and increasing CK in laboratory findings. We present a case of a 52 year-old patient, who developed gluteal compartment syndrome after radical prostatectomy in lithotomic position. After operation, diuresis decreased [pain in the gluteal region and both thighs. His thighs and the gluteal region were swollen. Passive stretch of the thighs caused enormous pain. The compartment pressure was 92 mmHg. Therefore, emergency fasciotomy was performed successfully. The gluteal compartment syndrome was most likely caused by elevated pressure on the gluteal muscle during operation. We suggest heightened awareness of positioning the patient on the operating table is important especially in obese patients with lengthy operating procedures.

  16. Extended lymph node dissection in robotic radical prostatectomy: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role and extent of extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND during radical prostatectomy (RP for prostate cancer patients remains unclear. Materials and Methods: A PubMed literature search was performed for studies reporting on treatment regimens and outcomes in patients with prostate cancer treated by RP and extended lymph node dissection between 1999 and 2013. Results: Studies have shown that RP can improve progression-free and overall survival in patients with lymph node-positive prostate cancer. While this finding requires further validation, it does allow urologists to question the former treatment paradigm of aborting surgery when lymph node invasion from prostate cancer occurred, especially in patients with limited lymph node tumor infiltration. Studies show that intermediate- and high-risk patients should undergo ePLND up to the common iliac arteries in order to improve nodal staging. Conclusions: Evidence from the literature suggests that RP with ePLND improves survival in lymph node-positive prostate cancer. While studies have shown promising results, further improvements and understanding of the surgical technique and post-operative treatment are required to improve treatment for prostate cancer patients with lymph node involvement.

  17. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy: Implications for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda G Herrera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the pathological findings, up to 60% of prostate cancer patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP will develop biochemical relapse and require further local treatment. Radiotherapy (RT immediately after RP may potentially eradicate any residual localized microscopic disease in the prostate bed, and it is associated with improved biochemical, clinical progression free survival, and overall survival in patients with high-risk pathological features according to published randomized trials. Offering immediate adjuvant RT to all men with high-risk pathological factors we are over-treating around 50% of patients who would anyway be cancer-free, exposing them to unnecessary toxicity and adding costs to the health care system. The current dilemma is, thus, whether to deliver adjuvant immediate RT solely on the basis of high-risk pathology, but in the absence of measurable prostate-specific antigen, or whether early salvage radiotherapy would yield equivalent outcomes. Randomized trials are ongoing to definitely answer this question. Retrospective analyses suggest that there is a dose–response favoring doses >70 Gy to the prostate bed. The evidence regarding the role of androgen deprivation therapy is emerging, and ongoing randomized trials are underway.

  18. Radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Immediate or early delayed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottke, D.; Bartkowiak, D.; Schrader, M.; Wiegel, T. [University Hospital Ulm (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Background: Biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP) is associated with risk indicators, including Gleason score, preoperative PSA level, tumor stage, seminal vesicle invasion, and positive surgical margins. The 5-year biochemical progression rate among predisposed patients is as high as 50-70%. Post-RP treatment options include adjuvant radiotherapy (ART, for men with undetectable PSA) or salvage radiotherapy (SRT, for PSA persisting or re-rising above detection threshold). Presently, there are no published randomized trials evaluating ART vs. SRT directly. Methods: Published data on ART and SRT were reviewed to allow a comparison of the two treatment approaches. Results: Three randomized phase III trials demonstrated an almost 20% absolute benefit for biochemical progression-free survival after ART (60-64 Gy) compared to a 'wait and see' policy. The greatest benefit was achieved in patients with positive margins and pT3 tumors. SRT can be offered to patients with elevated PSA after RP. In 30-70% of SRT patients, PSA will decrease to an undetectable level, thus giving a second curative chance. The rate of side effects for both treatments is comparably low. The role of irradiation of pelvic lymph nodes and the additional use of hormone therapy and radiation dose are discussed. Conclusion: It remains unclear whether early SRT initiated after PSA failure is equivalent to ART. Where SRT is indicated, it should be started as early as possible. (orig.)

  19. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF PROSTATE CANCER BEFORE AND AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess a correlation between the preoperative prognostic characteristics and the pathologic stage and to determine whether a positive surgical margin is present after radical prostatectomy (RPE.Materials and methods. The materials of 224 patients with prostate cancer (PC who had undergone RPE at the Clinic of Urology and Surgical Andrology, Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, were analyzed.Results. The patients’ median age was 62 (43–78 years. Sixty-seven (29.9 %, 46 (20.5%, and 111 (49.6 % patients were referred to as low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. A positive surgical margin was observed in 11.9, 28.3, and 38.7 % of the patients in the low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively (р = 0.0003. The predictors of a positive surgical margin were the percent of involved biopsy specimens (R = 0.34 and Gleason score (R = 0.31 and perineural invasion. According to multivariate analysis, neither the preoperative level of prostate-specific antigen, nor the clinical stage showed any correlation with the positive surgical margin and the pathologic stage after RPE.

  20. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF PROSTATE CANCER BEFORE AND AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    E. I. Veliev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess a correlation between the preoperative prognostic characteristics and the pathologic stage and to determine whether a positive surgical margin is present after radical prostatectomy (RPE.Materials and methods. The materials of 224 patients with prostate cancer (PC who had undergone RPE at the Clinic of Urology and Surgical Andrology, Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, were analyzed.Results. The patients’ median age was 62 (43–78 years. Sixty-seven (29.9 %, 46 (20.5%, and 111 (49.6 % patients were referred to as low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. A positive surgical margin was observed in 11.9, 28.3, and 38.7 % of the patients in the low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively (р = 0.0003. The predictors of a positive surgical margin were the percent of involved biopsy specimens (R = 0.34 and Gleason score (R = 0.31 and perineural invasion. According to multivariate analysis, neither the preoperative level of prostate-specific antigen, nor the clinical stage showed any correlation with the positive surgical margin and the pathologic stage after RPE.

  1. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Failure

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    Leon Telis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men. As new focal therapies become more popular in treatment of prostate cancer, failure cases requiring salvage therapy with either surgical or other techniques are being reported. Objective. To report the options in treatment of prostate cancer after recurrence or failure of the primary treatment modality. Methods. We report a salvage robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP for prostate cancer recurrence following high intensity focused ultrasound treatment (HIFU in the United States. Results. A 67-year-old man who underwent HIFU treatment for prostate adenocarcinoma 2 years prior was presented with a rising prostate specific antigen of 6.1 ng/mL to our clinic. A biopsy proven recurrent disease in the area of previous treatment documented the failure of treatment. The patient elected to undergo a salvage RALP. The operation time was 159 minutes. The patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 1 with no complications. The catheter was removed on post-op day 10. The patient reserved sexual function and urinary continence. The PSA levels on 6 months’ follow-up are undetectable. Conclusions. Salvage RALP is an effective and safe treatment choice for recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following failed HIFU treatment if operated by an experienced surgeon.

  2. Laparoscopic simple prostatectomy: A reasonable option for large prostatic adenomas

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    Abdulrahman Al-Aown

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: In this work, surgical technique followed by two academic departments on laparoscopic simple prostatectomy (LSP of large prostatic adenomas is being described. Materials and Methods: The initial cumulative experience from 11 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia origin subjected to LSP is being presented. Results: All cases had prostatic adenomas greater than 80 ml. Mean operation time was 99.5 min (values from 70 to 150 min and mean blood loss was 205 ml (values from 100 to 300 ml. Blood transfusion was deemed necessary in one case. Bladder catheter was removed successfully on postoperative day 5 in all cases. No significant postoperative complication was noted. At a 3 months follow-up a significant decrease in International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS was evident in all patients (mean IPSS 27.7 vs. 15.3 preoperative vs. postoperative accordingly. Conclusions: According to our data and similarly to the rest of the LSP literature, laparoscopic excision of voluminous prostatic adenomas is a feasible and safe procedure. Nevertheless, further investigation including a larger number of patients and long-term follow-up is deemed necessary before making definite conclusions regarding the approach.

  3. Avoiding and managing vascular injury during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, René; Nunez Bragayrac, Luciano A; Machuca, Victor; Garza Cortes, Roberto; Azhar, Raed A

    2015-02-01

    There has been an increase in the number of urologic procedures performed robotically assisted; this is the case for radical prostatectomy. Currently, in the USA, 67% of prostatectomies are performed robotically assisted. With this increase in robotic urologic surgery it is clear that there are more surgeons in their learning curve, where most of the complications occur. Among the complications that can occur are vascular injuries. These can occur in the initial stages of surgery, such as in accessing the abdominal cavity, as well as in the intraoperative or postoperative setting. We present the most common vascular injuries in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, as well as their management and prevention. We believe that it is of vital importance to be able to recognize these injuries so that they can be prevented.

  4. Editor’s Pick: Recent Developments in Minimally Invasive Radical Prostatectomy

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    Jarno Riikonen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive surgery has gained a dominant status in prostate cancer surgery during the last decade. The benefits of minimally invasive prostatectomy were demonstrated by pioneers of conventional laparoscopic prostatectomy, however, the real domination of laparoscopy in radical prostatectomy (RP started after the dissemination of robotic surgery. Robot-assisted surgery still remains the most widespread method to perform minimally invasive RP, although the recent evolution of laparoscopic technology and instruments has evoked interest in conventional laparoscopy again. The recent developments in the technique of RP are focused on decreasing invasiveness and complications. The recent methods to improve postoperative functional outcome of RP can be utilised without compromising the oncological results.

  5. Impact of metabolic syndrome on early recovery of continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Masatomo; Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Kurahashi, Toshifumi

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. The present study included a total of 302 consecutive Japanese patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. In this study, postoperative urinary continence was defined as no leak or the use of a security pad. The continence status was assessed by interviews before and 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Metabolic syndrome was defined as follows: body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2) and two or more of the following: hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia. The effect of the presence of metabolic syndrome on the continence status of these patients was retrospectively examined. A total of 116 (38.4%) and 203 (67.2%) of the 302 patients were continent at 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, respectively. A total of 31 (10.3%) patients were judged to have metabolic syndrome. Despite the operative time being longer in patients with metabolic syndrome, no significant differences were observed in the remaining preoperative, intraoperative or postoperative variables between patients with or without metabolic syndrome. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, metabolic syndrome and the duration of hospitalization were significantly correlated with the 1-month continence status. Similarly, metabolic syndrome and estimated blood loss during surgery were independent predictors of continence rates at 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that the presence of metabolic syndrome could have a significant impact on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. Management of pelvic lymphoceles following robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

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    Omer A Raheem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic lymphocele is a potential complication of radical prostatectomy. Although lymphoceles often regress spontaneously, many may progress, precipitate clinical symptoms, and ultimately require intervention. To date, the best treatment of pelvic lymphoceles has not yet been fully defined. However, laparoscopic marsupialization is a definitive and efficacious surgical alternative to percutaneous drainage. It is effective, results in minimal patient morbidity, and allows for rapid recovery. We report our experience with management of clinically symptomatic pelvic lymphoceles following robotic-assisted prostatectomy using laparoscopic marsupialization.

  7. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a better survival than the background population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas Røder, Martin; Brasso, Klaus; Drimer Berg, Kasper;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to investigate standardised relative survival and mortality ratio for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer at our institution. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between 1995 and 2010, a total of 1,350 consecutive patients underw...... better than expected in the age-matched background population. This finding is likely explained by selection bias. Although the results indicate an excellent outcome in terms of cancer control, the efficacy of prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer remains at debate....

  8. Lessons learned from a case of calf compartment syndrome after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosevear, Henry M; Lightfoot, Andrew J; Zahs, Marta; Waxman, Steve W; Winfield, Howard N

    2010-10-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy is rapidly gaining favor as a minimally invasive method to surgically address prostate cancer. The sophisticated equipment and unique positioning requirements of this technology require exceptional preparation and attention to detail to minimize the chance of surgical complications. We present the case of a 57-year-old man who developed left calf compartment syndrome after (robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy) requiring fasciotomies. We use this example to highlight specific areas of risk unique to the da Vinci Surgical System® using intraoperative photos to show danger areas as well as review basic positioning requirements common to all prolonged pelvic surgeries performed in Trendelenburg position.

  9. Counseling patients about sexual health when considering post-prostatectomy radiation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, D; Montie, J E; Hamstra, D A; Sandler, H; Wood, D P

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in men in the United States. Many men with clinically localized prostate cancer survive for 15 years or more. Although early detection and successful definitive treatments are increasingly common, a debate regarding how aggressively to treat prostate cancer is ongoing because of the effect of aggressive treatment on the quality of life, including sexual functioning. We examined current research on the effect of post-prostatectomy radiation treatment on sexual functioning, and suggest a way in which patient desired outcomes might be taken into consideration while making decisions with regard to the timing of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. PMID:19609297

  10. Hypertension, obesity and prostate cancer biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmar, R; Beebe-Dimmer, J L; Korgavkar, K; Keele, G R; Cooney, K A

    2013-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) comprises a constellation of risk factors associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Components of MetS have emerged as putative risk factors for prostate carcinoma. In this study, we examine the association between three features of the MetS (obesity, hypertension and diabetes) and the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). We examined data from 1428 men in the University of Michigan Prostate Cancer Data Bank who elected to have RP as their primary treatment. We calculated body mass index from patients' weight and height measured at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis. We used the University of Michigan's Electronic Medical Record Search Engine to identify subjects with hypertension and/or diabetes before their prostate cancer diagnosis. Of 1428 men who underwent RP, 107 (8%) subsequently developed BCR with a median length of follow-up post-surgery of 3.6 years. Obesity and hypertension were each associated with an increased risk of BCR (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.37; 95% CI 0.92-2.09 and aHR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.01-2.26), whereas no association was observed between diabetes and BCR (aHR = 0.73; 95% CI 0.40-1.33). Obesity and hypertension were each associated with an increased risk for BCR of prostate cancer after RP, independent of age at diagnosis and tumor pathological features. Given the increasing rates of obesity, hypertension and prostate cancer, a better understanding of the relationship between these entities is of significant public health importance. Elucidation of the involved pathogenic mechanisms will be needed to establish causality.

  11. Athermal bladder neck dissection during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

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    Fabrizio Dal Moro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction With improved understanding of the precise anatomy, surgical techniques during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP have been refined, with the aim of improving functional outcomes without compromising oncological adequacy and results. Nevertheless, postoperative urinary incontinence remains a frustrating side-effect. Anatomically, bladder neck (BN serves as an internal sphincter. The longitudinal fibres of BN may be identified and isolated with a meticulous dissection at the prostato-vesical junction, contributing to earlier return of urinary continence. The purpose of this video is to show an anatomical athermal dissection of BN during RARP.Materials and Methods After incision of endopelvic fascia and anterior defatting, the morphology of prostate not only laterally, but also at the level of bladder-prostatic junction is well visualized. With an athermal dissection of the plane between prostate and bladder we can minimize the traumatic effects on the longitudinal fibres of BN. A cold section of the preserved BN permits the complete preservation of integrity of this sphincteric structure.Results With this technique we preserve the longitudinal fibres of BN, allowing the sparing of the sphincteric mechanism of BN. The finding of a difficult athermal dissection of these plans may make you suspect the presence of an infiltration, suggesting to sacrifice BN in order to avoid a positive surgical margin. In our series no increase of PSM has been recorded using this technique.Conclusions This surgical technique preserving the natural BN mechanism appears to improve urinary continence, allowing at the same time an easy identification of a neoplastic infiltration.

  12. Radiotherapy for PSA failure after prostatectomy: which volumes?; Radiotherapie pelvienne pour recidive biochimique isolee apres prostatectomie pour cancer de prostate: quels volumes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosset, M.; Maingon, P. [Centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, Service de Radiotherapie, 21 - Dijon (France); Bosset, J.F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Jean Minjoz, Service de Radiotherapie, 25 - Besancon (France)

    2006-05-15

    After prostatectomy, radiotherapy is a potential curable treatment. From the surgery series, it is possible to identify all the localization at risk in case of biochemical relapse after prostatectomy. The target volume of irradiation has to be defined according to the pathological findings. The CTV is limited to the pelvic fascia laterally, to the anterior wall of the rectum behind. The inferior limit includes the anastomosis, and the superior is easier to define with the length of the prostatic gland. The inclusion of area of seminal vesicles and pelvic node areas should be discussed. The use of surgical clips on the anastomosis and image fusion techniques including the preoperative imaging would help physicians to define the CTV's limits. (authors)

  13. The long-term influence of body mass index on the success rate of mid-urethral sling surgery among women with stress urinary incontinence or stress-predominant mixed incontinence: comparisons between retropubic and transobturator approaches.

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    Seong Jin Jeong

    Full Text Available Mid-urethral sling (MUS surgery for the treatment of urinary incontinence has been widespread since the introduction of tension-free vaginal tape in the mid-1990s. The majority of studies with short-term follow-up <2 years found no differences in the surgical outcomes according to body mass index (BMI. However, considering the chronic influence of obesity on pelvic floor musculature, it is cautiously speculated that higher BMI could increase stress on pelvic floor and sub-urethral tape, possibly decreasing the long-term success rate in the obese population. We aimed to compare the long-term effects of BMI on the outcomes of MUS between women with retropubic and transobturator approaches.We performed a retrospective analysis on 243 consecutive women who received MUS and were followed up for ≥36 months. The influence of BMI on the success rates was separately estimated and the factors for treatment failure were examined using logistic regression in either approach.The mean follow-up was 58.4 months, and 30.5% were normal weight, 51.0% overweight, and 18.5% obese. Patients received either the retropubic (30.5% or transobturator (69.5% approach. The success rates (% under the transobturator approach differed according to the BMI groups (94.3, 88.6, and 78.6, respectively; P = 0.037 while those under the retropubic approach were not different according to the BMI groups. However, in multivariate models, only the presence of preoperative mixed urinary incontinence (MUI was proven to be the risk factor for treatment failure in the transobturator approach (OR 6.39, P = 0.003. The percent of subjects with MUI was higher in obese women than in non-obese women with the transobturator approach.BMI was not independently associated with failures in either approach. Higher success rates in women with lower BMI in the transobturator approach were attributed to the lower percent of preoperative MUI in those with lower BMI.

  14. [Organisation and early outcome after radical prostatectomy in Denmark 2004-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, M.; Iversen, P.; Bendixen, A.

    2008-01-01

    .2%. CONCLUSION: There is an increasing rate of radical prostatectomies in Denmark. It is proposed that a national database be established to monitor early and long-term outcomes, including the role of surgical technique (nerve sparing, laparoscopic/robotic surgery, etc.) in order to ensure optimal organisation...

  15. Future Directions of Robotic Surgery: A Case Study of the Cornell Athermal Robotic Technique of Prostatectomy

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    Robert A. Leung

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic radical prostatectomy (RRP has become an effective modality in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. We detail the experience at our institution and provide a perspective for future considerations of RRP with respect to improved preoperative imaging and surgical instrumentation.

  16. [Organisation and early outcome after radical prostatectomy in Denmark 2004-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, M.; Iversen, P.; Bendixen, A.

    2008-01-01

    .2%. CONCLUSION: There is an increasing rate of radical prostatectomies in Denmark. It is proposed that a national database be established to monitor early and long-term outcomes, including the role of surgical technique (nerve sparing, laparoscopic/robotic surgery, etc.) in order to ensure optimal organisation...

  17. Total cysto-prostatectomy: Technique description and results in 2 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Nicholas; Souza, Carlos H de M; Franz, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    We describe a novel technique for total cysto-prostatectomy, followed by uretero-urethral anastomosis in 2 dogs. The technique was successful and was performed without pubic osteotomy. Post-operative urinary tract infections may be a potentially serious event.

  18. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    Yu. L. Demidko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  19. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    Yu. L. Demidko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  20. Quantification of extraprostatic extension in prostate cancer: different parameters correlated to biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veggel, B.A. van; Oort, I.M. van; Witjes, J.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: Different methods to substage extraprostatic extension (EPE) were correlated with biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and results: A total of 157 consecutive RP specimens with EPE were completely embedded. Twenty-three patients with adjuvant therapy or detect

  1. Prognostic relevance of number and bilaterality of positive surgical margins after radical prostatectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somford, D.M.; Oort, I.M. van; Cosyns, J.P.; Witjes, J.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Tombal, B.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Positive surgical margin (PSM) status following radical prostatectomy (RP) is a well-established prognostic factor. The aim of the present study is to evaluate whether number of PSMs or bilaterality of PSMs might have prognostic significance for biochemical recurrence (BCR) in the populatio

  2. Identifying the Best Candidate for Radical Prostatectomy Among Patients with High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briganti, Alberto; Joniau, Steven; Gontero, Paolo; Abdollah, Firas; Passoni, Niccolo M.; Tombal, Bertrand; Marchioro, Giansilvio; Kneitz, Burkhard; Walz, Jochen; Frohneberg, Detlef; Bangma, Chris H.; Graefen, Markus; Tizzani, Alessandro; Frea, Bruno; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Montorsi, Francesco; Van Poppel, Hein; Spahn, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: The current role of radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with high-risk disease remains controversial. Objective: To identify which high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) patients might have favorable pathologic outcomes when surgically treated. Design, setting, and participants: We evaluated

  3. Variation of prostate-specific antigen expression in different tumour growth patterns present in prostatectomy specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.W. Gallee; E. Visser-de Jong (E.); J.A.G.M. van der Korput (J. A G M); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); F.J.W. ten Kate (Fiebo); F.H. Schröder (Fritz); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA series of 55 randomly chosen radical prostatectomy specimens was analyzed for expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) by immunohistochemical techniques. Tissue sections were selected in such a manner that in addition to glandular benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), one or more di

  4. Combined radical prostatectomy and abdominoperineal resection for locally invasive rectal cancer

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    Daniel Fernández-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: En bloc radical prostatectomy and proctosigmoidectomy is feasible in selected patients with rectal cancer and invasion limited to the prostate or seminal vesicles because it provides good local tumor control and significantly improves the patient's quality of life in comparison to total pelvic exenteration.

  5. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Remains Constant during Robot Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonck, Philip; Kalmar, Alain F.; Suy, Koen; Geeraerts, Thomas; Vercauteren, Marcel; Mottrie, Alex; De Wolf, Andre M.; Hendrickx, Jan F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: During robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP), a CO2 pneumoperitoneum (CO2PP) is applied and the patient is placed in a head-down position. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is expected to acutely increase under these conditions. A non-invasive method, the optic nerve sheath

  6. Impact of obesity on early erectile function recovery after robotic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uffort, Ekong E; Jensen, James C

    2011-01-01

    Studies are limited regarding the impact of obesity on early erectile functional outcomes after robotic radical prostatectomy. Our goal was to determine this impact using patient-reported validated questionnaires. International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-6) scores were prospectively collected with institutional review board approval, for patients who underwent robotic radical prostatectomy with bilateral nerve sparing from February 2007 to October 2009. The data were categorized into nonobese and obese groups and subsequently into 2 subgroups based on risk for postprostatectomy erectile dysfunction. Low risk is preoperative IIEF-6 ≥19 and high risk is IIEF-6 function recovery rates between the groups (P=0.755). In both groups, patients with low risk of postoperative erectile dysfunction had statistically similar postoperative mean IIEF-6 scores at 6 and 12 months (P=0.580 and P=0.389, respectively), and no difference in erectile function recovery rates existed at 12 months (P=0.735). Obesity has no major contribution to the rate of early erectile function recovery after robotic radical prostatectomy. Preoperative erectile function remains the determining factor in postradical prostatectomy erectile dysfunction.

  7. The value of cystography in the prediction of early urinary continence after radical prostatectomy

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    Yi-Huei Chang

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Postoperative cystography can provide information on VUAL and bladder neck condition which can predict recovery of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy. A higher VUAL and bladder neck closure were associated with a higher rate of early recovery of urinary continence.

  8. Risk of haemorrhage from transurethral prostatectomy in acetylsalicylic acid and NSAID-treated patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierød, F S; Frandsen, N J; Jacobsen, J D

    1998-01-01

    Postoperative bleeding in patients who regularly ingest acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) has been reported after several types of surgery. However, data on the influence of ASA on the risk of haemorrhage from transurethral prostatectomy (TUR-P) have been conflicting. We have studied retrospectively...

  9. Evaluation of Clinical and MRI Staging for Prostate Cancer before Radical Prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONGChenyang; ZOUEnze; CHENMin; WANGWenchao; ZHAOWeifeng; WANBen; DENGShuming; YANGJianye

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of clinical staging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging for prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy. Methods: Thirty-two patients with organ confined prostate cancer were reviewed to assess the accuracy of clinical staging and MRI staging to correlate with pathological staging results after radical prostatectomy. Results: 33.3% (10/30) prostate cancer patients with staging C and 3.3% (1/30) prostate cancer patients with staging D were diagnosed by pathology after radical prostatectomy in 30 patients with prostate cancer with clinical staging B, and 36.7% (11/30) under staging; Only one patient was over staging in clinical staging C. 19.1% (4/21) prostate cancer patients with staging C were diagnosed in 21 patients with prostate cancer and under staging with MRI staging B; 11.1% (1/9) was over staging with MRI staging C. The clinical staging and MRI staging had more correlation with pathological staging results (P=0.002), and PPV of the organ confined prostate cancer by clinical staging and MRI staging were 63.3% and 80.9% respectively, and NPV of nonorgan confined prostate cancer by clinical staging and MRI staging were 50% and 88.9% respectively. MRI staging was more specificity and accuracy than that of clinical staging to predict pathological staging results before radical prostatectomy (P=0.023). Conclusion: The MRI staging was more accuracy than that of clinical staging to predict pathological staging results in organ confined and nonorgan confined prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy.

  10. Influence of steep Trendelenburg position and CO(2) pneumoperitoneum on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory homeostasis during robotic prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmar, A. F.; Foubert, L.; Hendrickx, J. F. A.; Mottrie, A.; Absalom, A.; Mortier, E. P.; Struys, M. M. R. F.

    2010-01-01

    The steep (40 degrees) Trendelenburg position optimizes surgical exposure during robotic prostatectomy. The goal of the current study was to investigate the combined effect of this position and CO(2) pneumoperitoneum on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory homeostasis during these proced

  11. Transperitoneal versus extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy during the learning curve: does the surgical approach affect the complication rate?

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    Tiberio M. Siqueira Jr.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the perioperative complication rate obtained with the transperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (TLRP and with the extraperitoneal LRP (ELRP during the learning curve (LC. Materials and Methods: Data of the initial 40 TLRP (Group 1 were retrospectively compared with the initial 40 ELRP (Group 2. Each Group of patients was operated by two different surgeons. Results: The overall surgical time (175 min x 267.6 min; p < 0.001 and estimated blood loss (177.5 mL x 292.4 mL; p < 0.001 were statistically better in the Group 1. Two intraoperative complications were observed in Group 1 (5% represented by one case of bleeding and one case of rectal injury, whereas four complications (10% were observed in Group 2, represented by two cases of bleeding, one bladder and one rectal injuries (p = 0.675. Open conversion occurred once in each Group (2.5%. Overall postoperative complications were similar (52.5% x 35%; p = 0.365. Major early postoperative complications occurred in three and in one case in Group 1 and 2, respectively. Group 1 had two peritonitis (fecal and urinary, leading to one death in this group. Conclusions: No statistical differences in overall complication rates were observed. The transperitoneal approach presented more serious complications during the early postoperative time and this fact is attributed to the potential chance of intraperitoneal peritonitis not observed with the extraperitoneal route.

  12. Holmium laser enucleation versus simple prostatectomy for treating large prostates: Results of a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patrick; Alzweri, Laith; Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Somani, Bhaskar K.; Bates, Chris; Aboumarzouk, Omar M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare and evaluate the safety and efficacy of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) and simple prostatectomy for large prostate burdens, as discussion and debate continue about the optimal surgical intervention for this common pathology. Materials and methods A systematic search was conducted for studies comparing HoLEP with simple prostatectomy [open (OP), robot-assisted, laparoscopic] using a sensitive strategy and in accordance with Cochrane collaboration guidelines. Primary parameters of interest were objective measurements including maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) and post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and subjective outcomes including International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and quality of life (QoL). Secondary outcomes of interest included volume of tissue retrieved, catheterisation time, hospital stay, blood loss and serum sodium decrease. Data on baseline characteristics and complications were also collected. Where possible, comparable data were combined and meta-analysis was conducted. Results In all, 310 articles were identified and after screening abstracts (114) and full manuscripts (14), three randomised studies (263 patients) were included, which met our pre-defined inclusion criteria. All these compared HoLEP with OP. The mean transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) volume was 113.9 mL in the HoLEP group and 119.4 mL in the OP group. There was no statistically significant difference in Qmax, PVR, IPSS and QoL at 12 and 24 months between the two interventions. OP was associated with a significantly shorter operative time (P = 0.01) and greater tissue retrieved (P < 0.001). However, with HoLEP there was significantly less blood loss (P < 0.001), patients had a shorter hospital stay (P = 0.03), and were catheterised for significantly fewer hours (P = 0.01). There were no significant differences in the total number of complications recorded amongst HoLEP and OP (P = 0.80). Conclusion The results of the meta

  13. MRI-derived Restriction Spectrum Imaging Cellularity Index is Associated with High Grade Prostate Cancer on Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Andre Liss; White, Nathan S.; J. Kellogg Parsons; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M.; Rebecca eRakow-Penner; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Hauke eBartsch; Choi, Hyung W.; Mattrey, Robert F.; Bradley, William G.; Ahmed eShabaik; Jiaoti eHuang; Daniel J. A. Margolis; Raman, Steven S.; Marks, Leonard S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluate a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique to improve detection of aggressive prostate cancer. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of presurgical prostate MRI scans using an advanced diffusion weighted imaging technique called Restriction Spectrum Imaging (RSI), which can be presented as a normalized z-score statistic (RSI z-score). Scans were acquired prior to radical prostatectomy. Prostatectomy specimens were processed using whole mount sectioning...

  14. MRI-Derived Restriction Spectrum Imaging Cellularity Index is Associated with High Grade Prostate Cancer on Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Liss, Michael A.; White, Nathan S.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M.; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Bartsch, Hauke; Choi, Hyung W.; Mattrey, Robert F.; Bradley, William G.; Shabaik, Ahmed; Huang, Jiaoti; Daniel J. A. Margolis; Raman, Steven S.; Marks, Leonard S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluate a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique to improve detection of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of pre-surgical prostate MRI scans using an advanced diffusion-weighted imaging technique called restriction spectrum imaging (RSI), which can be presented as a normalized z-score statistic. Scans were acquired prior to radical prostatectomy. Prostatectomy specimens were processed using whole-mount sec...

  15. The role of radical prostatectomy as an initial approach for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaunarena, J H; Villamil, W; Martínez, P F; Gueglio, G; Giudice, C R

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of high-risk prostate cancer requires a multimodal approach to improve control of the disease. There is still no consensus as to the initial strategy of choice. The aim of this study is to review the results of radical prostatectomy as first step in management of patients with high-risk disease. A search was conducted on PubMed of English and Spanish texts. We included those studies that reported the results of radical prostatectomy in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, as well as those that compared radical prostatectomy with other treatment alternatives. The last search was conducted in November 2015. The advantages of radical prostatectomy include a better pathological analysis, more accurate staging, better local control of the disease and better follow-up and adjuvant therapy strategies. When compared with external radiation therapy plus hormonal blockade, the patients who underwent prostatectomy had greater chances of healing and longer cancer-specific survival. The patients who most benefit from this approach are younger, have fewer comorbidities and no evidence of organ metastases. The available scientific evidence to date is not without bias and confounders; however, they appear to favour radical prostatectomy as the initial approach of choice for high-risk prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. A pilot randomized trial of conventional versus advanced pelvic floor exercises to treat urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Santa Mina, Daniel; Au, Darren; Alibhai, Shabbir M.H.; Jamnicky, Leah; Faghani, Nelly; Hilton, William J.; Stefanyk, Leslie E.; Ritvo, Paul; Jones, Jennifer; Elterman, Dean; Neil E. Fleshner; Finelli, Antonio; Singal, Rajiv K.; Trachtenberg, John; Matthew, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Radical prostatectomy is the most common and effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Unfortunately, radical prostatectomy is associated with urinary incontinence and has a significant negative impact on quality of life. Pelvic floor exercises are the most common non-invasive management strategy for urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy; however, studies provide inconsistent findings regarding their efficacy. One potential reason for sub-optimal efficacy of...

  17. Extraperitoneal Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy (Report of 151 Cases)%经腹膜外腹腔镜下前列腺癌根治术(附151例报告)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勋钢; 崔心刚; 徐丹枫; 李尧; 贺仕芳

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To probe into the skill and effect of extraperitoneal laparoseopic radical prostatectomy (ELRP)on patients with prostate cancer. Methods: From January 2006 to January 2011, extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was performed on 151 men,mean aged 69 (range 53 to 78) years,who were appropriate candidates for radical retropubic prostatectomy. Patient characteristics, surgical statistics, and pathologic results were prospectively collected. CT, MRI and ECT revealed there was no lymph node or seminal vesicle involvement and there was no bone metastasis. Results:The mean preoperative prostate-specific antigen level was 16.40 ng · ml-1 (range 3.27 to 165.00). The preoperative Gleason sum was less than 7 in 63 patients (41.7%),7 in 58 (38. 4%) ,and more than 7 in 30 patients (19.9%). The mean operating time was 178 minutes (range 60 to 390).The estimated blood loss averaged 260 ml (range 20 to 1 000),and 5 patients (3.3 %) required blood transfusions.One (0.67 %) was compilicated by rectal injury. Positive surgical margins were reported in 14 specimens (9.3 %).5 (3.3%) case was found having obturator lymph node metastasis. The mean catheterization time was 13.5(range 6 to 69) d,The mean length of hospital stay was 14.4(range 4 to 74) d. There was 2(1.3%)complication of urethra stricture during mean 27(range 4 to 62) months follow-up and was underwent surgery,2 (1.3%) unilateral Inguinal hernia, 31 (20. 5 % ) incontinence and 15 (9.9 % ) biochemical recurrence. Conclusions: Extraperitoneal laparoscopie radical prostatectomy is an effective and safe approach for localized prostate cancer. Control of hemorrhage and laparoscopic suture technique are the keys to successful operation.%目的:探讨经腹膜外腹腔镜下前列腺癌根治术(ELRP)的手术技巧和疗效.方法:回顾分析2006年1月~2011年1月,行ELRP 151例患者的临床资料.术前均经病理检查确诊,患者平均年龄69(53~78)岁,盆腔CT、MRI和

  18. Salvage external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy: current status and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raldow, Ann; Hamstra, Daniel A; Kim, Sung; Yu, James B

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in American men. What to do when prostate cancer recurs months or years after a patient undergoes radical prostatectomy is an area of active research. Patients who underwent radical prostatectomy without immediate adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) but subsequently have evidence of recurrent disease are candidates for Salvage Radiation Therapy (SRT). Though there are three prospective randomized trials illustrating the efficacy of post-operative ART for selected patients, similarly strong evidence is lacking for SRT. In this article, we define the biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer, distinguish SRT from ART, outline the evidence for SRT, and make recommendations with regard to radiotherapy volume and dose. We discuss the known side effects from SRT, weigh the cost and benefit of SRT, and discuss possible tools that may improve the cost/benefit ratio for SRT by helping to select patients whom SRT may be more likely to benefit.

  19. Zero positive surgical margins after radical prostatectomy: is the end in sight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarecky, Douglas W; Brenner, Mattew; Rajan, Sudhir; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Narula, Navneet; Melgoza, Frank; Ahlering, Thomas E

    2008-11-01

    Positive surgical margins represents incomplete resection by the surgeon, and the elimination of positive margins represents the only clinical feature during radical prostatectomy that can lead directly to improved cancer outcomes. The introduction of new robot-assisted technology and technical refinements has led to declines of positive surgical margins. Although margins induced by incomplete cancer resection by the surgeon have been reduced for organ-confined disease, the 'Holy Grail' of zero margins is not yet attainable in prostatectomy, and is more problematic in cancer that has penetrated beyond the prostate. Intraoperative frozen biopsies are imprecise. The union of real-time optical coherence tomography technology of the da Vinci robotic platform for identification of positive margin sites, and technical advances with wider excisions during surgery may provide promise for further reduction of surgical margins to zero.

  20. VERIFICATION OF A TUMOR LESION OF INTRAPELVIC LYMPH NODES AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY. THE FIRST EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kapustin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the possibilities of transrectal ultrasound scan (TRUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in identifying and verifying a tumor lesion of intrapelvic lymph nodes (LN in patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.Subjects and methods. Metastatic tumor lesion of intrapelvic LNs was verified in 4 patients by transrectal ultrasound (US-guided needle biopsies. All the patients underwent multi-parametric MRI studies and TRUS.Results. The application of current MRI technologies (for qualitative and quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted images and for postcontrast sequences could detect and judge with confidence the metastatic lesion of intrapelvic LNs. TRUS permits clearly visualizing pathologically altered LNs, by taking into account their MRI pattern and verifying their tumor lesion by US-guided core needle biopsy.Conclusion. The combined use of multi-parametric MRI and TRUS provides a means for diagnosing and verifying the tumor lesion of pelvic LNs in patients after prostatectomy.

  1. VERIFICATION OF A TUMOR LESION OF INTRAPELVIC LYMPH NODES AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY. THE FIRST EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kapustin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the possibilities of transrectal ultrasound scan (TRUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in identifying and verifying a tumor lesion of intrapelvic lymph nodes (LN in patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.Subjects and methods. Metastatic tumor lesion of intrapelvic LNs was verified in 4 patients by transrectal ultrasound (US-guided needle biopsies. All the patients underwent multi-parametric MRI studies and TRUS.Results. The application of current MRI technologies (for qualitative and quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted images and for postcontrast sequences could detect and judge with confidence the metastatic lesion of intrapelvic LNs. TRUS permits clearly visualizing pathologically altered LNs, by taking into account their MRI pattern and verifying their tumor lesion by US-guided core needle biopsy.Conclusion. The combined use of multi-parametric MRI and TRUS provides a means for diagnosing and verifying the tumor lesion of pelvic LNs in patients after prostatectomy.

  2. Radical prostatectomy in the presence of ongoing refractory ESBL Escherichia coli bacterial prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Louise Catherine; McDermott, T E D; Thornhill, John Alan

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old Indian national with a prostate-specific antigen of 5.4 ng/mL underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies. Following this, he had three hospital admissions with severe urosepsis secondary to extended spectrum β lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli. He had recurrent sepsis immediately after discontinuation of intravenous meropenem to which the ESBL was sensitive. He proceeded to radical prostatectomy for intermediate-high risk Gleason 7 prostate cancer, while still on intravenous meropenem, 2 months after his biopsy. His prostatectomy involved a difficult dissection due to inflammatory changes and fibrosis after multiple septic episodes. He had complete resolution of infection after surgery with discontinuation of antibiotics on the third postoperative day, without any recurrence of sepsis. PMID:25315803

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging to detect vesico-symphyseal fistula following robotic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Hutchinson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pubic complications following radical prostatectomy are rare. Osteitis pubis typically presents with symptoms related to irritation of the pubic rami including pain with ambulation and adduction of the leg. A 60-year-old male with prostatic adenocarcinoma underwent uneventful robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. The patient noted the onset of severe pubic pain exacerbated by ambulation approximately one month post-surgery. An abdominal/pelvic CT scan was negative for acute pathology. Due to continued discomfort, a multiplanar MRI of the pelvis was performed with and without intravenous contrast material (20 ml Omniscan. The MRI demonstrated irregularity of the bladder base and proximal urethra with a fistulous tract extending anteriorly in direct communication with the pubic symphysis joint space. Vague periarticular marrow edema-like signal and enhancement at the pubic symphysis was thought to represent osteitis pubis. The patient's symptoms resolved after one month of urethral catheter drainage, intravenous antibiotics, and anti-inflammatory therapy.

  4. Erectile function post robotic radical prostatectomy: technical tips to improve outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, S S; Persad, R; Gillatt, D

    2016-09-01

    Robotic surgery is becoming more and more commonplace. At the same time, so are complications, especially related to erectile function. The population being diagnosed with cancer is younger, with more aggressive cancers and higher expectations for good erectile function postoperatively. We conduct a retrospective analysis of literature over 20 years for Embase and Medline. Search terms used include (Robotic) AND (prostatectomy) AND (erectile function). There are a variety of multifactorial causes, resulting in worsening ED post-robotic radical prostatectomy; however, there are a number of treatments that can support this. There is much we can do to help prevent patients getting postoperative erectile dysfunction post-radical surgery. However, part of this is management of realistic patient expectations.

  5. Selective indication for check cystogram before catheter removal following robot assisted radical prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Rajiv Yadav; Somendra Bansal; Narmada P Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: With the improvement in anastomotic technique, it is rare to find anastomotic site leak after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). It may not always be necessary to do regular check cystogram before catheter removal. We evaluated our 230 consecutive RARP patients and their cystograms to determine the indications for selective use of cystogram before catheter removal. Materials and Methods: We reviewed our prospectively collected RARP database of 230 consecutive patie...

  6. RESULTS OF PREOPERATIVE DETECTION OF LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. N. Shavladze

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The values of the diagnostic efficiency and consistency of preoperative evaluations of locally advanced prostate cancer (PC by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with a matrix coil were estimated in 37 patients with PC who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The accuracy of differentiation of T3 and T2 stages in prospective and retrospective assessments was 59 and 73 %; the sensitivity was 7 and 40 %, and the specificity was 96 and 9 %, respectively; with the moderate consistency of evaluations.

  7. RESULTS OF PREOPERATIVE DETECTION OF LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. N. Shavladze

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The values of the diagnostic efficiency and consistency of preoperative evaluations of locally advanced prostate cancer (PC by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with a matrix coil were estimated in 37 patients with PC who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The accuracy of differentiation of T3 and T2 stages in prospective and retrospective assessments was 59 and 73 %; the sensitivity was 7 and 40 %, and the specificity was 96 and 9 %, respectively; with the moderate consistency of evaluations.

  8. Nerve-sparing techniques and results in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Tavukçu, Hasan Hüseyin; Aytac, Omer; Atug, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Nerve-sparing techniques in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) have advanced with the developments defining the prostate anatomy and robotic surgery in recent years. In this review we discussed the surgical anatomy, current nerve-sparing techniques and results of these operations. It is important to define the right and key anatomic landmarks for nerve-sparing in RARP which can demonstrate individual variations. The patients' risk assessment before the operation and intraoperative an...

  9. Robotic Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Previous Prostate Surgery and Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Acar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we will review the available literature about robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in patients who have undergone prostate surgery or radiotherapy. Current data about this topic consists of small case series with limited follow-up. Despite being technically demanding, robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP can be considered feasible in either setting. Prostate surgery or prostatic irradiation should not be considered as a contraindication for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Nevertheless, patient counseling about the possible complications and the need for reintervention is of extreme importance in this patient population. Early oncologic and functional results of RARP performed in case of radiorecurrent prostate cancer look promising. Regarding postprostate surgery RARP, some series have reported comparable results, while some have demonstrated more inferior outcomes than those of naive cases. In order to assess the exact functional and oncologic outcome of RARP in patients with previous prostate surgery and radiotherapy, studies enrolling higher number of patients and providing longer follow-up data are needed.

  10. Urinary Bother as a Predictor of Postsurgical Changes in Urinary Function After Robotic Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gregory; Haddock, Peter; Doak, Hoyt; Jackson, Max; Dorin, Ryan; Meraney, Anoop; Kesler, Stuart; Staff, Ilene; Wagner, Joseph R

    2015-10-01

    To characterize changes in indices of urinary function in prostatectomy patients with presurgical voiding symptoms. A retrospective analysis of our prostate cancer database identified robot-assisted radical prostatectomy patients between April 2007 and December 2011 who completed pre- and postsurgical (24 months) Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-26 surveys. Gleason score, margins, D'Amico risk, prostate-specific antigen, radiotherapy, and nerve-sparing status were tabulated. Survey questions addressed urinary irritation/obstruction, incontinence, and overall bother. Responses were averaged to calculate a urinary sum (US) score. Patients were stratified according to the severity of their baseline urinary bother (UB), and changes in urinary indices determined at 24 months. A total of 737 patients were included. Postsurgical improvement in urinary obstruction, bother, and sum score was related to baseline UB (P function. These data are helpful when counseling a subset of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy patients with severe preoperative urinary symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anatomic and technical considerations for optimizing recovery of sexual function during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Stacey; Le, Jesse D; Hu, Jim C

    2013-01-01

    Although cure of prostate cancer is the primary goal of radical prostatectomy, preserving erectile function is also tantamount, given the indolent clinical course of most prostate cancers, particularly low-risk disease. In order to optimize postprostatectomy erectile function during a robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy, there must be a detailed understanding of pelvic anatomy to recognize the optimal nerve-sparing plane and technical finesse to minimize stretch injury to the neurovascular bundle. The magnified, well illuminated robotic-operative field coupled with less blood loss has paralleled greater understanding of the periprostatic 'fascial' planes, leading to differentiation of intrafascial versus interfascial nerve-sparing approaches. However, refinement of tissue handling during nerve-sparing to minimize lateral displacement of the neurovascular bundle and attenuate neurapraxia enables earlier and better recovery of erectile function. The critical maneuvers to preserving erectile function are atraumatic dissection of the prostate away from the optimal nerve-sparing plane to maximally preserve nerve fibers while minimizing neurapraxia. Therefore, attaining these principles involves a conceptual paradigm shift from 'radical' prostatectomy to neurosurgery of the prostate.

  12. Reality of nerve sparing and surgical margins in surgeons' early experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsugami, Katsunori; Yoshioka, Kunihiko; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Eto, Masatoshi; Yoshino, Yasushi; Tozawa, Keiichi; Fukasawa, Satoshi; Fujisawa, Masato; Takenaka, Atsushi; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kashiwagi, Akira; Gotoh, Momokazu; Terachi, Toshiro

    2017-03-01

    To analyze nerve sparing performance at an early stage of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, and the correlation between the surgeons' experience and the risk of a positive surgical margin in patients treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Patients' records from January 2009 to March 2013 were retrospectively reviewed, and 3469 patients with localized prostate cancer were identified at 45 institutions. Individual surgeon's experience with nerve sparing was recorded as the number of nerve sparing cases among total robot-assisted radical prostatectomies beginning with the first case during which nerve sparing was carried out. Patients were selected by propensity score matching for nerve sparing, and predictive factors of positive surgical margins were analyzed in patients with and without positive surgical margins. A total of 152 surgeons were studied, and the median number of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy cases for all surgeons was 21 (range 1-511). In all, 54 surgeons (35.5%) undertook nerve sparing during their first robot-assisted radical prostatectomy case. For 2388 patients selected with (1194) and without (1194) nerve sparing, predictive factors for positive surgical margin were high initial prostate-specific antigen level (P 100 cases (P = 0.0058). Thus, nerve sparing was not associated with positive surgical margins. The surgeon's experience influences the occurrence of positive surgical margins, although a considerable number of surgeons carried out nerve sparing during their early robot-assisted radical prostatectomy cases. Surgeons should consider their own experience and prostate cancer characteristics before carrying out a nerve sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Long-term decision regret after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Chin, Stephen; Manuel, Lucy; Wen, Shelly; Hoffman, Matthew; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2017-02-01

    Decision regret (DR) may occur when a patient believes their outcome would have been better if they had decided differently about their management. Although some studies investigate DR after treatment for localised prostate cancer, none report DR in patients undergoing surgery and post-prostatectomy radiotherapy. We evaluated DR in this group of patients overall, and for specific components of therapy. We surveyed 83 patients, with minimum 5 years follow-up, treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) and post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) to 64-66 Gy following www.EviQ.org.au protocols. A validated questionnaire identified DR if men either indicated that they would have been better off had they chosen another treatment, or they wished they could change their mind about treatment. There was an 85.5% response rate, with median follow-up post-IMRT 78 months. Adjuvant IG-IMRT was used in 28% of patients, salvage in 72% and ADT in 48%. A total of 70% of patients remained disease-free. Overall, 16.9% of patients expressed DR for treatment, with fourfold more regret for the RP component of treatment compared to radiotherapy (16.9% vs 4.2%, P = 0.01). DR for androgen deprivation was 14.3%. Patients were regretful of surgery due to toxicity, not being adequately informed about radiotherapy as an alternative, positive margins and surgery costs (83%, 33%, 25% and 8% of regretful patients respectively). Toxicity caused DR in the three radiotherapy-regretful and four ADT-regretful patients. Patients were twice as regretful overall, and of surgery, for salvage vs adjuvant approaches (both 19.6% vs 10.0%). Decision regret after RP and post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT is uncommon, although patients regret RP more than post-operative IG-IMRT. This should reassure urologists referring patients for post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT, particularly in the immediate adjuvant setting. Other implications include appropriate patient selection for RP (and

  14. Monotherapy of androgen deprivation therapy versus radical prostatectomy among veterans with localized prostate cancer: comparative effectiveness analysis of retrospective cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Jinan Liu1,2, Lizheng Shi1,2,3, Oliver Sartor31Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 2Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, Tulane University, 3School of Medicine and Tulane Cancer Center, New Orleans, LA, USABackground: This retrospective cohort study aimed to examine the comparative effectiveness of monotherapy of primary androgen deprivation therapy or radical prostatectomy.Methods: Male patients with localized prostate cancer (T1-T2, N0, M0 were identified in the Veterans Affairs Veterans Integrated Service Network 16 data warehouse (January 2003 to June 2006, with one-year baseline and at least three-year follow-up data (until June 2009. Patients were required to be 18–75 years old and without other recorded cancer history. The initiation of primary androgen deprivation therapy or monotherapy of radical prostatectomy within six months after the first diagnosis of prostate cancer was used as the index date. Primary androgen deprivation therapy patients were matched to the radical prostatectomy patients via propensity score, which was predicted from a logistic regression of treatment selection (primary androgen deprivation therapy versus radical prostatectomy on age, race, marital status, insurance type, cancer stage, Charlson comorbidity index, and alcohol and tobacco use. The overall survival from initiation of index treatment was then analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards model.Results: The two cohorts were well matched at baseline (all P > 0.05. During a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the cumulative incidence of death was 13 (10.57% among 123 primary androgen deprivation therapy patients and four (3.25% among 123 radical prostatectomy patients (P < 0.05. The overall three-year survival rate was 92.68% for primary androgen deprivation therapy and 98.37% for radical prostatectomy (P < 0.05. Patients who received primary androgen deprivation therapy had almost three times as

  15. Is There a Concordance Between the Gleason Scores of Needle Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Prostatic Carsinoma?

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    Faruk Özgör

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the concordance between the Gleason Scores (GS of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens. Methods: Prostate biopsy was performed in 1135 patients with the suspicion of prostate cancer in our clinic between 2008 and 2012. A total of 366 patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Radical prostatectomy was performed in 73 of these patients and GS of pathology specimens were included in this study for comparison. The patients were divided into three groups (low intermediate- and high-risk patients according to the D’amico risk classification for prostate cancer. Results: The median age of the patients was 64.2±6.1 years (54- 73. The mean prostate specific antigen level was 20.34 ng/mL and the mean biopsy core number was 12±0.58. A statistically significant concordance was detected between the GS of biopsy specimens and radical prostatectomy materials in 65.7% of patients (p<0.01. There were 40 patients in the low-risk group, however, 8 (20% of them were identified to be intermediate-risk patients and one (2.5% was found to be a high-risk patient after radical prostatectomy. Conclusion: Concordance between the GS of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy materials are important for selection of the appropriate treatment

  16. [Incontinence after radical prostatectomy and cystectomy: are combined training with mechanical devices and whole body vibration effective?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, M

    2011-04-01

    In spite of improvements in nerve-sparing operation techniques in radical prostatectomies, a disturbance of (early) continence is subjectively perceived by a number of patients as burdensome, which can last for several months. Skilled physiotherapy is appreciated as causal therapy in the hands of the qualified therapist. In an open randomised controlled trial the efficacy of a standardised rehabilitation therapy with pelvic floor re-education instructed by a physiotherapist (n=25) as the control group in comparison to a group with additional combined electrostimulation and biofeedback device (Myo 420™; n=25) or whole body vibration therapy (FitVibe medical™; n=25). Pre- and post-therapeutic evaluation of the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the enclosed question about quality of life (IPSS-QL), pad test, pelvic floor strength, maximum uroflow, micturition volume, serum testosterone and blood glucose was done. Within the treatment duration of 3-4 weeks in all treatment groups a statistically significant improvement of IPSS and IPSS-QL was seen. Due to whole body vibration the reduction of urine loss (pad test), increase of voided volume and maximum uroflow were statistically significant. Whereas for isolated physiotherapy during the short therapy duration merely a trend for the improvement of pelvic floor muscle strength was seen, the difference was significant in the Myo 420 and the whole body vibration groups, respectively. It was shown that a continuous improvement in continence depends on the consistent continuation of the training also under domestic conditions. The controlled trial conditions also confirm the efficacy, acceptance and tolerance of a standardised pelvic floor re-education under the conditions of urological inpatient rehabilitation treatment. By additional use of a combined electro- and multichannel biofeedback device or a whole body vibration device, the treatment results could be further improved. Due to the different causal

  17. Recent neuroanatomical studies on the neurovascular bundle of the prostate and cavernosal nerves: clinical reflections on radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selcuk Yucel; Tibet Erdogru; Mehmet Baykara

    2005-01-01

    The neurovascular bundle of the prostate and cavernosal nerves have been used to describe the same structure ever since the publication of the first studies on the neuroanatomy of the lower urogenital tract of men, studies that were prompted by postoperative complications arising from radical prostatectomy. In urological surgery every effort is made to preserve or restore the neurovascular bundle of the prostate to avoid erectile dysfunction (ED). However,the postoperative potency rates are yet to be satisfactory despite all advancements in radical prostatectomy technique.As the technology associated with urological surgery develops and topographical studies on neuroanatomy are cultivated,new observations seriously challenge the classical teachings on the topography of the neurovascular bundle of the prostate and the cavernosal nerves. The present review revisits the classical and most recent data on the topographical anatomy of the neurovascular bundle of the prostate and cavernosal nerves and their implications on radical prostatectomy techniques.

  18. Total pelvic floor reconstruction during non-nerve-sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: impact on early recovery of urinary continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Akio; Nitta, Masahiro; Shimizu, Yuuki; Higure, Taro; Kawakami, Masayoshi; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Hanai, Kazuya; Nomoto, Takeshi; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2014-11-01

    To develop a modified technique of "total pelvic floor reconstruction" during non-nerve-sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, and to determine its effect on postoperative urinary outcomes. A total of 128 patients who underwent non-nerve-sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were evaluated, including 81 with total pelvic floor reconstruction and 47 with non-total pelvic floor reconstruction. Nerve-sparing cases were excluded. Urinary outcomes were assessed with self-administrated questionnaires (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The total pelvic floor reconstruction technique included two concepts involving posterior and anterior reconstructions. In posterior reconstruction, Denonvilliers' fascia was approximated to the bladder neck and the median dorsal raphe by slipknot. The anterior surface of the bladder-neck was approximated to the anterior detrusor apron and the puboprostatic ligament collar for anterior reconstruction. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the patients' characteristics, and in perioperative and oncological outcomes. In the total pelvic floor reconstruction group, the continence rates at 3, 6 and 12 months after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were 45.7%, 71.4%, and 84.6%, respectively. In the non-total pelvic floor reconstruction group, the continence rates were 26.1%, 46.8% and 60.9%, respectively. The total pelvic floor reconstruction technique resulted in significantly higher continence rates at 3, 6 and 12 months after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, respectively (all P floor reconstruction group (mean 7.7 months) than in the non-total pelvic floor reconstruction group (mean 9.8 months; P = 0.0003). The total pelvic floor reconstruction technique allows preservation of the blood supply to the urethra and physical reinforcement of the pelvic floor. Therefore, this technique is likely to improve urinary continence

  19. Toxicity after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using Australian guidelines.

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    Chin, Stephen; Aherne, Noel J; Last, Andrew; Assareh, Hassan; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2017-06-17

    We evaluated single institution toxicity outcomes after post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with implanted fiducial markers following national eviQ guidelines, for which late toxicity outcomes have not been published. Prospectively collected toxicity data were retrospectively reviewed for 293 men who underwent 64-66 Gy IG-IMRT to the prostate bed between 2007 and 2015. Median follow-up after PPRT was 39 months. Baseline grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI) and sexual toxicities were 20.5%, 2.7% and 43.7%, respectively, reflecting ongoing toxicity after radical prostatectomy. Incidence of new (compared to baseline) acute grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was 5.8% and 10.6%, respectively. New late grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicity occurred in 19.1%, 4.7% and 20.2%, respectively. However, many patients also experienced improvements in toxicities. For this reason, prevalence of grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicities 4 years after PPRT was similar to or lower than baseline (21.7%, 2.6% and 17.4%, respectively). There were no grade ≥4 toxicities. Post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT using Australian contouring guidelines appears to have tolerable acute and late toxicity. The 4-year prevalence of grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was virtually unchanged compared to baseline, and sexual toxicity improved over baseline. This should reassure radiation oncologists following these guidelines. Late toxicity rates of surgery and PPRT are higher than following definitive IG-IMRT, and this should be taken into account if patients are considering surgery and likely to require PPRT. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015

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    Augusto Cesar Soares dos Santos Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5. The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years, was 44% (n=40. The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years. Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7% resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3% additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1% underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%. Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%. In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices.

  1. Outcome of postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy: a single institutional experience

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    Lee, Sea Won; Chung, Mi Joo; Jeong, Song Mi; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Tae Kon; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Jang, Hong Seok [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sei Chul [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This single institutional study is aimed to observe the outcome of patients who received postoperative radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. A total of 59 men with histologically identified prostate adenocarcinoma who had received postoperative radiation after radical prostatectomy from August 2005 to July 2011 in Seoul St. Mary's Hospital of the Catholic University of Korea, was included. They received 45-50 Gy to the pelvis and boost on the prostate bed was given up to total dose of 63-72 Gy (median, 64.8 Gy) in conventional fractionation. The proportion of patients given hormonal therapy and the pattern in which it was given were analyzed. Primary endpoint was biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) after radiotherapy completion. Secondary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Biochemical relapse was defined as a prostate-specific antigen level above 0.2 ng/mL. After median follow-up of 53 months (range, 0 to 104 months), the 5-year bRFS of all patients was estimated 80.4%. The 5-year OS was estimated 96.6%. Patients who were given androgen deprivation therapy had a 5-year bRFS of 95.1% while the ones who were not given any had that of 40.0% (p < 0.01). However, the statistical significance in survival difference did not persist in multivariate analysis. The 3-year actuarial grade 3 chronic toxicity was 1.7% and no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The biochemical and toxicity outcome of post-radical prostatectomy radiotherapy in our institution is favorable and comparable to those of other studies.

  2. A motorized ultrasound system for MRI-ultrasound fusion guided prostatectomy

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    Seifabadi, Reza; Xu, Sheng; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford J.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: This study presents MoTRUS, a motorized transrectal ultrasound system, to enable remote navigation of a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe during da Vinci assisted prostatectomy. MoTRUS not only provides a stable platform to the ultrasound probe, but also allows the physician to navigate it remotely while sitting on the da Vinci console. This study also presents phantom feasibility study with the goal being intraoperative MRI-US image fusion capability to bring preoperative MR images to the operating room for the best visualization of the gland, boundaries, nerves, etc. Method: A two degree-of-freedom probe holder is developed to insert and rotate a bi-plane transrectal ultrasound transducer. A custom joystick is made to enable remote navigation of MoTRUS. Safety features have been considered to avoid inadvertent risks (if any) to the patient. Custom design software has been developed to fuse pre-operative MR images to intraoperative ultrasound images acquired by MoTRUS. Results: Remote TRUS probe navigation was evaluated on a patient after taking required consents during prostatectomy using MoTRUS. It took 10 min to setup the system in OR. MoTRUS provided similar capability in addition to remote navigation and stable imaging. No complications were observed. Image fusion was evaluated on a commercial prostate phantom. Electromagnetic tracking was used for the fusion. Conclusions: Motorized navigation of the TRUS probe during prostatectomy is safe and feasible. Remote navigation provides physician with a more precise and easier control of the ultrasound image while removing the burden of manual manipulation of the probe. Image fusion improved visualization of the prostate and boundaries in a phantom study.

  3. The Comparison of Sevoflurane-Remifentanyl and Propofol-Remifentanyl in Robotic Prostatectomies

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    Mehtap Özdemir

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Robotic surgery is an effective and common surgery technique in radical prostatectomies. There isn’t any standart anesthesia technique for robotic surgery so both inhalation and intravenous anesthetics are used . In this study we aimed that compared the clinical effects of balanced general anesthesia and total intravenous anesthesia. Material and Method: After Ethical Commitee and patient approval, 42 consecutive patients undergoing robotic radical prostatectomy were included in this randomised-controlled study. Patients were divided in two equal group. We used sevoflurane (%1-2 MAC - remifentanyl (0.04-0.2 µgkg-1min-1 in Group S (n=21 and propofol (4-8mgkg-1h-1 - remifentanyl (0.04-0.2µgkg-1min-1 in Group P(n=21 and O2-Air (%40-%60 in two groups. Haemorespiratuar dynamics (HR, MAP, SPO2, ETCO2, Aldrete Recovery Score (ARS, nausea-vomiting score and patient satisfaction were evaluated. Result: Heart Rate(HR and Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP decreased in the two groups (p0.05. pH was lower in Group P than Group S (p<0.01. PCO2 values significantly increased in group P than group S in 2nd h and in group S than group P in 4th h (p<0.05. pH significantly decreased (p<0.01 and PCO2 increased for both two intra-groups comparison (p<0.05. ARS was higher in group P for 1st, 2nd, 3rd h and nausea-vomiting was lower for group P in first two hours. Patient satisfaction was higher and wasn’t different in two groups. Discussion: TIVA for robotic prostatectomy supply early and better recovery and side-effects (nausea-vomiting are less than balanced general anesthesia. But trendelenburg position and CO2 insuflation increases the risk of asidosis . In this issue there is need more studies.

  4. Radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy: treatment recommendations differ between urologists and radiation oncologists.

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    Luke T Lavallée

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There is no consensus on optimal use of radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy. The purpose of this study was to describe opinions of urologists and radiation oncologists regarding adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy. METHODS: Urologists and genitourinary radiation oncologists were solicited to participate in an online survey. Respondent characteristics included demographics, training, practice setting, patient volume/experience, and access to radiotherapy. Participant practice patterns and attitudes towards use of adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy in standardized clinical scenarios were assessed. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-six staff physicians participated in the survey (104 urologists and 42 genitourinary radiation oncologists. Overall, high Gleason score (Gleason 7 vs. 6, RR 1.37 95% CI 1.19-1.56, p<0.0001 and Gleason 8-10 vs. 6, RR 1.56 95% CI 1.37-1.78, p<0.0001, positive surgical margin (RR 1.43 95% CI 1.26-1.62, p<0.0001, and extraprostatic tumour extension (RR 1.16 95% CI 1.05-1.28, p<0.002 conferred an increased probability of recommending adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation oncologists were more likely to recommend adjuvant radiotherapy across all clinical scenarios (RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.39, 1.60, p <0.001. Major differences were found for patients with Gleason 6 and isolated positive surgical margin (radiotherapy selected by 21% of urologists vs. 70% of radiation oncologists, and patients with extraprostatic extension and negative surgical margins (radiotherapy selected by 18% of urologist vs. 57% of radiation oncologists. CONCLUSIONS: Urologists and radiation oncologists frequently disagree about recommendation for post-prostatectomy adjuvant radiotherapy. Since clinical equipoise exists between adjuvant versus early salvage post-operative radiotherapy, support of clinical trials comparing these approaches is strongly encouraged.

  5. Cancer/Testis antigens as potential predictors of biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy

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    Trock Bruce

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cancer/Testis Antigens (CTAs are an important group of proteins that are typically restricted to the testis in the normal adult but are aberrantly expressed in several types of cancers. As a result of their restricted expression patterns, the CTAs could serve as unique biomarkers for cancer diagnosis/prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify promising CTAs that are associated with prostate cancer (PCa recurrence following radical prostatectomy (RP. Methods The expression of 5 CTAs was measured by quantitative multiplex real-time PCR using prostate tissue samples obtained from 72 patients with apparently clinically localized PCa with a median of two years follow-up (range, 1 to 14 years. Results The expression of CTAs namely, CEP55, NUF2, PBK and TTK were significantly higher while PAGE4 was significantly lower in patients with recurrent disease. All CTAs with the exception of TTK were significantly correlated with the prostatectomy Gleason score, but none were correlated with age, stage, or preoperative PSA levels. In univariate proportional hazards models, CEP55 (HR = 3.59, 95% CI: 1.50-8.60, p = 0.004; NUF2 (HR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.11-4.67, p = 0.024; and PAGE4 (HR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.21-0.93, p = 0.031 were significantly associated with the risk of PCa recurrence. However, the results were no longer significant after adjustment for prostatectomy Gleason score. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify CTAs as biomarkers that can differentiate patients with recurrent and non-recurrent disease following RP and underscores its potential impact on PCa prognosis and treatment.

  6. Oncological results at 2 years after robotic radical prostatectomy – the Romanian experience

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    Andras, Iulia; Coman, Radu-Tudor; Logigan, Horia; Epure, Flavia; Stanca, Dan Vasile; Coman, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To assess the oncological outcomes of robotic radical prostatectomy in a country where there are no on-going national screening programs for prostate cancer. Material and methods Between November 2009 and November 2014, 220 robotic radical prostatectomies were performed at our Robotic Surgery Center. We already have the complete data for the 2-year follow-up of the first 105 patients, who were therefore included in the study group. Pre-operative (age, prostate-specific antigen, body-mass index, prostate volume, clinical staging, biopsy characteristics), post-operative (surgical technique, surgical margin status, lymph node status, pathological stage, Gleason score) and follow-up parameters (biochemical recurrence) were assessed. Results The global rate of positive surgical margins was 34.3%, with rates of 17.2% in stage pT2 and 55.3% in stage pT3. The most frequent localization for positive surgical margins was at the base and apex of the prostate. The positive surgical margins rate was correlated with the pre-operative prostate-specific antigen, clinical and pathological Gleason score, lymph node status and the number of positive biopsy cores. The rate of biochemical recurrence at the 2-year follow-up was 11.8%. The most important predictors for the biochemical recurrence were the positive surgical margins, pathological staging and Gleason score on the prostatectomy specimen. Conclusions Robotic surgery is validated by the oncological results at medium follow-up (2 years) for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer, even in countries where there is no on-going national screening program. PMID:27123326

  7. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015

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    dos Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Azevedo, Daniela Castelo; Carvalho, Lélia Maria de Almeida; Fernandes, Mariana Ribeiro; Avelar, Sandra de Oliveira Sapori; Horta, Maria da Glória Cruvinel; Kelles, Silvana Márcia Bruschi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5). The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years), was 44% (n=40). The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years). Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7%) resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3%) additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1%) underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%). Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%). In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices.

  8. Abdominal obesity, hypertension, antihypertensive medication use and biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.

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    Ohwaki, Kazuhiro; Endo, Fumiyasu; Hattori, Kazunori

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether abdominal obesity, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT) measured by computed tomography and blood pressure (BP) were associated with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after prostatectomy. We investigated 283 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer retrospectively. We obtained information on body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), VAT, BP, antihypertensive drug use, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen levels, pathological Gleason scores and postoperative surgical margin status. Hypertension was defined as systolic BP (SBP)⩾130mmHg or diastolic BP⩾85mmHg. Among 283 patients, 41 (14%) developed biochemical recurrence subsequently. We performed a Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to assess the association of each obesity measurement and SBP with biochemical recurrence using clinical predictors as potential confounders. No association was observed between any obesity measurement assessed and biochemical recurrence. Adjusting for each of BMI, WC and VAT, a higher SBP was associated significantly with biochemical recurrence (hazard ratio [HR], adjusted for VAT=1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.02-1.07). Adjusting for obesity (BMI⩾25kg/m(2)), hypertension was also associated significantly with biochemical recurrence (HR=2.08; 95% CI=1.09-3.97). Compared with normotensive patients, those with untreated and uncontrolled hypertension had a significantly increased risk of biochemical recurrence (HR=2.45; 95% CI=1.06-5.66). A higher BP and untreated, uncontrolled hypertension were independent risk factors for biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy. Control of hypertension could be an important treatment strategy for preventing biochemical recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Sulforaphane in Men with Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy.

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    Cipolla, Bernard G; Mandron, Eric; Lefort, Jean Marc; Coadou, Yves; Della Negra, Emmanuel; Corbel, Luc; Le Scodan, Ronan; Azzouzi, Abdel Rahmene; Mottet, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    Increases in serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) occur commonly in prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy and are designated "biochemical recurrence." Because the phytochemical sulforaphane has been studied extensively as an anticancer agent, we performed a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled multicenter trial with sulforaphane in 78 patients (mean age, 69 ± 6 years) with increasing PSA levels after radical prostatectomy. Treatment comprised daily oral administration of 60 mg of a stabilized free sulforaphane for 6 months (M0-M6) followed by 2 months without treatment (M6-M8). The study was designed to detect a 0.012 log (ng/mL)/month decrease in the log PSA slope in the sulforaphane group from M0 to M6. The primary endpoint was not reached. For secondary endpoints, median log PSA slopes were consistently lower in sulforaphane-treated men. Mean changes in PSA levels between M6 and M0 were significantly lower in the sulforaphane group (+0.099 ± 0.341 ng/mL) than in placebo (+0.620 ± 1.417 ng/mL; P = 0.0433). PSA doubling time was 86% longer in the sulforaphane than in the placebo group (28.9 and 15.5 months, respectively). PSA increases >20% at M6 were significantly greater in the placebo group (71.8%) than in the sulforaphane group (44.4%); P = 0.0163. Compliance and tolerance were very good. Sulforaphane effects were prominent after 3 months of intervention (M3-M6). After treatment, PSA slopes from M6 to M8 remained the same in the 2 arms. Daily administration of free sulforaphane shows promise in managing biochemical recurrences in prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszak, Alexander W; Pearlman, Amy M; Lai, Win Shun; Godoy, Guilherme; Sathyamoorthy, Kumaran; Liu, Joceline S; Miles, Brian J; Lipshultz, Larry I; Khera, Mohit

    2013-08-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy in men with prostate cancer is controversial, with concern that testosterone can stimulate cancer growth. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of testosterone in hypogonadal men with prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy. We performed a review of 103 hypogonadal men with prostate cancer treated with testosterone after prostatectomy (treatment group) and 49 nonhypogonadal men with cancer treated with prostatectomy (reference group). There were 77 men with low/intermediate (nonhigh) risk cancer and 26 with high risk cancer included in the analysis. All men were treated with transdermal testosterone, and serum hormone, hemoglobin, hematocrit and prostate specific antigen were evaluated for more than 36 months. Median (IQR) patient age in the treatment group was 61.0 years (55.0-67.0), and initial laboratory results included testosterone 261.0 ng/dl (213.0-302.0), prostate specific antigen 0.004 ng/ml (0.002-0.007), hemoglobin 14.7 gm/dl (13.3-15.5) and hematocrit 45.2% (40.4-46.1). Median followup was 27.5 months, at which time a significant increase in testosterone was observed in the treatment group. A significant increase in prostate specific antigen was observed in the high risk and nonhigh risk treatment groups with no increase in the reference group. Overall 4 and 8 cases of cancer recurrence were observed in treatment and reference groups, respectively. Thus, testosterone therapy is effective and, while followed by an increase in prostate specific antigen, does not appear to increase cancer recurrence rates, even in men with high risk prostate cancer. However, given the retrospective nature of this and prior studies, testosterone therapy in men with history of prostate cancer should be performed with a vigorous surveillance protocol. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Delaying Renal Transplant after Radical Prostatectomy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer.

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    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Karakayalı, Feza; Moray, Gökhan; Demirağ, Alp

    2015-11-01

    To minimize the recurrence of a previously treated neoplasm in organ recipients, a period of 2 to 5 years without recurrence is advocated for most malignancies. However, prostate cancer is different because of its biological properties, diagnosis, and treatment. Most prostate cancers are detected at a low stage and demonstrate slow growth after detection. Definitive treatment with radical prostatectomy affords excellent results. Renal transplant candidates with early-stage prostate cancer have a higher risk of dying on dialysis than dying from prostate cancer; therefore, renal transplant candidates with organ-confined prostate cancer should be immediately considered for transplant.

  12. Changes in pathologic outcomes and operative trends with robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

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    Aaron Bernie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We hypothesized that there is a reverse stage migration, or a shift toward operating on higher-risk prostate cancer, in patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP. We therefore evaluated the stage of disease at the time of surgery for patients with prostate cancer at a large tertiary academic medical center. Materials and Methods: After institutional review board approval, we reviewed all patients that had undergone robotic prostatectomy. These patients were separated into three categories: An early era of 2005-2008, intermediate era of 2009-2010, and a current era of 2011-2012. Results: A total of 3451 patients underwent robotic prostatectomy from 2005 to 2012. The proportion men with clinical T1 tumors declined from 88.3% in the early era to 72.2% in the current era (P < 0.0001. Men with preoperative biopsy Gleason 6 disease decreased from the early to the current era (P < 0.0001, while men with preoperative biopsy Gleason ≥ 8 showed the opposite trend, increasing from the early to the current era (P = 0.0002. From the early to the current era, the proportion of patients with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN low risk prostate cancer decreased, while those with NCCN intermediate and high-risk disease increased. The proportion of pathologic T3 disease increased from 15.5% in the early to 30.6% in the current era (P < 0.0001. On the other hand, the proportion of pathologic T2/+ SMS (surgical margin status decreased from 6.6% in the early era to 3.1% in the current era (P = 0.0002. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a reverse stage migration in men undergoing robotic prostatectomy. Despite the increasing proportion of men with extra-capsular disease undergoing RALP, the surgical margin status has remained similar. This could reflect both the changing dynamics of the population opting for surgery as well as the learning curve of the surgeons.

  13. DNA methylation signatures for prediction of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy of clinically localized prostate cancer

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    Haldrup, Christa; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Vestergaard, Else Marie;

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Diagnostic and prognostic tools for prostate cancer (PC) are suboptimal, causing overtreatment of indolent PC and risk of delayed treatment of aggressive PC. Here, we identify six novel candidate DNA methylation markers for PC with promising diagnostic and prognostic potential. Methods...... Microarray-based screening and bisulfite sequencing of 20 nonmalignant and 29 PC tissue specimens were used to identify new candidate DNA hypermethylation markers for PC. Diagnostic and prognostic potential was evaluated in 35 nonmalignant prostate tissue samples, 293 radical prostatectomy (RP) samples...

  14. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF BIOCHEMICAL RECURRENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR LOCALIZED AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

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    V. A. Chernyaev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To reveal prognostic factors of PSA-failure following radical prostatectomy in patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer.Materials and methods. Medical data of 386 consecutive patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 1997 to 2011 were analyzed. Median age was 61.0 years. Median PSA before surgery – 10.3 ng/ml. Plasma levels of VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1, CD105, IL-6 were measured using Enzyme Linked-Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA before radical prostatectomy in 77 patients. Postoperatively the tumours were categorized as pT2 in 288 (59.1 %, pT3 – in 144 (37.3 %, pT4 – in 14 (3.6; pN+ – in 34 (8.8 % cases. Gleason score < 7 was present in 254 (65.8 %,  7 – in 132 (34.2 % specimens. Perineural invasion was identified in 188 (48.7 %, angiolymphatic invasion – in 126 (32.6 cases.Results. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 64 (16.6 % out of 386 patients at a median follow-up of 30.5 (12−164 months. Independent predictors of biochemical recurrence were PSA (HR 0.161 (95% CI:0.058−0.449; р = 0.001, Gleason sum in surgical specimens (HR 0.496 (95 % CI:0.268−0.917; p = 0.025, pN (HR 0.415 (95 % CI:0.181−0.955; p = 0.039. The patients were divided into 3 prognostic groups: good (0 factor, intermediate (1 factor, poor (2 factors and very poor (3 factors (AUC – 0.720 (95% CI: 0.656−0.784. High preoperative levels VEGF ( 67 pg/ml (р = 0.005, VEGFR2 ( 3149 pg/ml (р = 0.036, VEGFR3 ( 2268 pg/ml (р = 0.001, TGF-β1 ( 14473 pg/ml (р = 0.052 were identified as unfavorable prognostic factors for survival without PSA-failure. Conclusion. Independent prognostic factors of biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy were PSA, Gleason sum and pN. Joint effect of the factors allows to predict PSA-relapse with accuracy 0.720. Preoperative serum levels VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1 potentially are perspective markers for PSA-failure after

  15. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF BIOCHEMICAL RECURRENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR LOCALIZED AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

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    V. A. Chernyaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To reveal prognostic factors of PSA-failure following radical prostatectomy in patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer.Materials and methods. Medical data of 386 consecutive patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 1997 to 2011 were analyzed. Median age was 61.0 years. Median PSA before surgery – 10.3 ng/ml. Plasma levels of VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1, CD105, IL-6 were measured using Enzyme Linked-Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA before radical prostatectomy in 77 patients. Postoperatively the tumours were categorized as pT2 in 288 (59.1 %, pT3 – in 144 (37.3 %, pT4 – in 14 (3.6; pN+ – in 34 (8.8 % cases. Gleason score < 7 was present in 254 (65.8 %,  7 – in 132 (34.2 % specimens. Perineural invasion was identified in 188 (48.7 %, angiolymphatic invasion – in 126 (32.6 cases.Results. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 64 (16.6 % out of 386 patients at a median follow-up of 30.5 (12−164 months. Independent predictors of biochemical recurrence were PSA (HR 0.161 (95% CI:0.058−0.449; р = 0.001, Gleason sum in surgical specimens (HR 0.496 (95 % CI:0.268−0.917; p = 0.025, pN (HR 0.415 (95 % CI:0.181−0.955; p = 0.039. The patients were divided into 3 prognostic groups: good (0 factor, intermediate (1 factor, poor (2 factors and very poor (3 factors (AUC – 0.720 (95% CI: 0.656−0.784. High preoperative levels VEGF ( 67 pg/ml (р = 0.005, VEGFR2 ( 3149 pg/ml (р = 0.036, VEGFR3 ( 2268 pg/ml (р = 0.001, TGF-β1 ( 14473 pg/ml (р = 0.052 were identified as unfavorable prognostic factors for survival without PSA-failure. Conclusion. Independent prognostic factors of biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy were PSA, Gleason sum and pN. Joint effect of the factors allows to predict PSA-relapse with accuracy 0.720. Preoperative serum levels VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1 potentially are perspective markers for PSA-failure after

  16. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a better survival than the background population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas Røder, Martin; Brasso, Klaus; Drimer Berg, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    -matched Danish population using the methods and macros described by Dickmann. The country-specific population mortality rates used for calculation of the expected survival were based on data from The Human Mortality Database. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 3.4 years (range: 0-14.3 years). A total of 59 (4...... better than expected in the age-matched background population. This finding is likely explained by selection bias. Although the results indicate an excellent outcome in terms of cancer control, the efficacy of prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer remains at debate....

  17. Post-prostatectomy erectile dysfunction: contemporary approaches from a US perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Z

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Zachary Hamilton,1 Moben Mirza,2 1Department of Urology, 2Division of Urologic Oncology, Department of Urology, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS, USA Abstract: Success of cancer surgery often leads to life-changing side effects, and surgical treatment for malignant urologic disease often results in erectile dysfunction (ED. Patients that undergo surgical prostatectomy or cystoprostatectomy will often experience impairment of erections due to disruption of blood and nerve supply. Surgical technique, nerve sparing status, patient age, comorbid conditions, and pretreatment potency status all have an effect on post-surgical ED. Regardless of surgical technique, prostatectomy results in disruption of normal anatomy and nerve supply to the penis, which governs the functional aspects of erection. A variety of different treatment options are available for men who develop ED after prostatectomy, including vacuum erection device, oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5I, intracorporal injections, and penile prosthesis. The vacuum erection device creates an artificial erection by forming a vacuum via suction of air to draw blood into the penis. The majority of men using the vacuum erection device daily after prostatectomy, regardless of nerve-sparing status, have erections sufficient for intercourse. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors remain a common treatment option for post-surgical ED and are the mainstay of therapy. They work through cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanine monophosphate pathways and are recommended in all forms of ED. Intracorporal injections or intraurethral use of vasoactive substances may be a good second-line therapy in men who do not experience improvement with oral medications. Surgical placement of a penile prosthesis is typically the treatment strategy of choice after other options have failed. Semi-rigid and inflatable devices are available with high satisfaction rates. With careful patient counseling and proper

  18. Ability to Reach Orgasm in Patients with Prostate Cancer Treated with Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby-Deglum, Marie; Axcrona, K; Brennhovd, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To study the ability to reach orgasm after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) in relation to demographic, cancer-related, and surgical variables, and the use of erectile aids. Methods In this cross-sectional study at a mean of 3 years after RALP at Oslo University Hospital...... used erectile aids had significantly better orgasmic ability than the nonusers. Conclusion In our sample, 27% had good ability to reach orgasm at a mean of 3 years after RALP. Poor orgasmic ability was associated with being older, poor erectile function, and a reduced physical quality of life. Using...

  19. Preservation of penile length after radical prostatectomy: early intervention with a vacuum erection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkin, B L; Christopher, B A

    2007-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy has been shown to have a potential negative impact on penile health. Stretched penile length (SPL), which most closely correlates with erect penile length, was significantly reduced in almost half of men undergoing surgery in several studies. The purpose of this study was to test whether early intervention after surgery with a vacuum erection device could prevent the changes in penile health, as defined by SPL, found in prior studies. Forty-two men with good preoperative sexual function undergoing nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy underwent measurement of SPL preoperative and at 3 months postoperative by a single investigator. Daily use of a vacuum erection device (VED) was begun the day after catheter removal, and continued for 90 days. Men kept a log of their compliance with daily VED use. A decrease in SPL of > or = 1.0 cm was considered significant. Out of 42 men, 39 completed the study. In men who used the VED >50% of possible days, only 1/36 (3%) had a decrease in SPL of > or = 1.0 cm. Of the three men with poor VED compliance, two (67%) had a reduction in SPL of > or = 1.0 cm. When compared to prior studies where 48% of men after surgery had a significant reduction in SPL, early intervention with the daily use of a VED resulted in a significantly lower risk of loss of penile length (PVED should be strongly recommended.

  20. Vacuum erection devices to treat erectile dysfunction and early penile rehabilitation following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippe, Craig D; Pahlajani, Geetu

    2008-11-01

    Vacuum erection devices (VED) are becoming first-line therapies for erectile dysfunction and preservation (rehabilitation) of erectile function following treatment for prostate cancer. Currently, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors have limited efficacy in elderly patients or patients with moderate to severe diabetes, hypertension, and coronary artery disease. Alternative therapies, such as VED, have emerged as a primary option for patients refractory to oral therapy. VED has also been successfully used in combination treatment with oral therapy and penile injections. More recently, there has been interest in the use of VED in early intervention protocols to encourage corporeal rehabilitation and prevention of post-radical prostatectomy venoocclusive dysfunction. This is evident by the preservation of penile length and girth seen with the early use of the VED following radical prostatectomy. There are ongoing studies to help preserve penile length and girth with early use of VED following prostate brachytherapy and external beam radiation for prostate cancer. Recently, there has also been interest in VED to help maintain penile length following surgical correction of Peyronie's disease and to increase penile size before implantation of the penile prosthesis.

  1. Radical prostatectomy outcome when performed with PSA above 20 ng/ml.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, S S

    2012-02-01

    Many centres currently do not offer radical prostatectomy (RP) to men with high-risk localised prostate cancer due to concerns regarding poor outcome, despite evidence to the contrary. We identified 18 men undergoing RP with serum PSA >20 ng\\/ml (high-risk by National Comprehensive Cancer Network definition) and minimum follow-up of 12 years (mean 13.5). Mean preoperative PSA was 37.0 ng\\/ml (Range 21.1-94.0). Prostatectomy pathology reported extracapsular disease in 16 (88.9%), positive surgical margins in 15 (83%) and positive pelvic lymph nodes in 5 (27.8%). Overall and cancer-specific survival at 5 and 10-years was 83.3%, 88.2%, 72% and 76.5% respectively. With complete follow-up 11 (61.1%) are alive, and 5 (27.8%) avoided any adjuvant therapy. Complete continence (defined as no involuntary urine leakage and no use of pads) was achieved in 60%, with partial continence in the remainder. We conclude that surgery for this aggressive variant of localised prostate cancer can result in satisfactory outcome.

  2. Early localization of recurrent prostate cancer after prostatectomy by endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Brian J; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A; Tollefson, Matthew K; Karnes, Jeffrey; Davis, Brian J; Rangel, Laureano J; King, Bernard F; Mynderse, Lance A

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the ability of endorectal coil (e-coil) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify early prostatic fossa recurrence after radical prostatectomy. We identified 187 patients from 2005-2011 who underwent e-coil MRI with dynamic gadolinium-contrast enhancement followed by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostatic fossa biopsy for possible local prostate cancer recurrence. For analysis, local recurrence was defined as a negative evaluation for distant metastatic disease with a positive prostatic fossa biopsy, decreased prostate-specific antigen (PSA) following salvage radiation therapy, or increased lesion size on serial imaging. Local recurrence was identified in 132 patients, with 124 (94%) detected on e-coil MRI. The median PSA was 0.59 ng/mL (range coil MRI was 86%. When a lesion was identified on MRI, the positive biopsy rate was 65% and lesion size was a significant predictor of positive biopsies. The positive biopsy rates were 51%, 74%, and 88% when the lesion was 2 cm, respectively (p = 0.0006). E-coil MRI has a high level of sensitivity in identifying local recurrence of prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy, even at low PSA levels. E-coil MRI should be considered as the first imaging evaluation for biochemical recurrence for identifying patients suitable for localized salvage therapy.

  3. High Chance of Late Recovery of Urinary and Erectile Function Beyond 12 Months After Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Philipp; Preisser, Felix; Graefen, Markus; Steuber, Thomas; Salomon, Georg; Haese, Alexander; Michl, Uwe; Huland, Hartwig; Tilki, Derya

    2017-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) and erectile dysfunction (ED) after radical prostatectomy (RP) can impose a strong burden. While most studies focus on certain time points after RP when analyzing functional outcome, there is paucity of evidence on late functional recovery in patients with UI or ED at 12 mo after RP. Using longitudinal patient data from a large European single-center, we show that the chance of regaining continence among patients (n=974) with UI (≥1 pad/24h) at 12 mo after RP was 38.6% after 24 mo and 49.7% after 36 mo. The corresponding rates for patients (n=1115) with ED (defined as International Index of Erectile Function-5 score <18) at 12 mo after RP were 30.8% at 24 mo and 36.5% at 36 mo after RP. Patients with postoperative UI or ED 12 mo after RP should be counseled about their good chance of achieving continence or potency in the course of time. We analyzed the probability of functional recovery among patients with urinary incontinence (UI) and erectile dysfunction (ED) 12 mo after radical prostatectomy. We found that up to 49.7% (36.5%) of patients with UI (ED) regain function within the next 24 mo and should be informed about these encouraging numbers. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Radical prostatectomy in patients aged 75 years or older: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Philipp; Chandrasekar, Thenappan; Chun, Felix K; Huland, Hartwig; Tilki, Derya

    2017-09-26

    Given the demographic trends toward a considerably longer life expectancy, the percentage of elderly patients with prostate cancer will increase further in the upcoming decades. Therefore, the question arises, should patients ≥75 years old be offered radical prostatectomy and under which circumstances? For treatment decision-making, life expectancy is more important than biological age. As a result, a patient's health and mental status has to be determined and radical treatment should only be offered to those who are fit. As perioperative morbidity and mortality in these patients is increased relative to younger patients, patient selection according to comorbidities is a key issue that needs to be addressed. It is known from the literature that elderly men show notably worse tumor characteristics, leading to worse oncologic outcomes after treatment. Moreover, elderly patients also demonstrate worse postoperative recovery of continence and erectile function. As the absolute rates of both oncological and functional outcomes are still very reasonable in patients ≥75 years, a radical prostatectomy can be offered to highly selected and healthy elderly patients. Nevertheless, patients clearly need to be informed about the worse outcomes and higher perioperative risks compared to younger patients.

  5. [Positive surgical margin status after minimally invasive radical prostatectomy: a multicenter study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafa, Ardit; Grasso, Angelica; Antonelli, Alessandro; Bove, Pierluigi; Celia, Antonio; Ceruti, Carlo; Crivellaro, Simone; Falsaperla, Mario; Minervini, Andrea; Parma, Paolo; Porreca, Angelo; Zaramella, Stefano; De Lorenzis, Elisa; Cozzi, Gabriele; Rocco, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The aim of our study is to evaluate the status of positive margins (PSMs) comparing their incidence between aparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) and robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in centers with medium case-load (50-150 cases/year). We also analyzed the correlations between surgical technique, nerve-sparing approach (NS), and incidence of PSMs, stratifying our results by pathological stage. We analyzed 1992 patients who underwent RP in various urologic centers. We evaluated the incidence of PSMs, and then we compared the stage-related incidence of PSMs, for both the techniques. We did not find a statistically significant difference between the two surgical modalities in the study regarding the overall incidence of PSMs. In our retrospective study, we did not find any difference in terms of PSMs in RARP versus LRP. Our PSMs were not negligible, particularly in pT3 stages, compared with high-volume centers; surgical experience and patients' selection can be a possible explanation.

  6. Undergrading and understaging in patients with clinically insignificant prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irai S. Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of our study is to evaluate the undergrading and understaging rates in patients with clinically localized insignificant prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between July 2005 and July 2008, 406 patients underwent radical prostatectomy for clinical localized prostate cancer in our hospital. Based on preoperative data, 93 of these patients fulfilled our criteria of non-significance: Gleason score < 7, stage T1c, PSA < 10 ng/mL and percentage of affected fragments less than 25%. The pathologic stage and Gleason score were compared to preoperative data to evaluate the rate of understaging and undergrading. The biochemical recurrence free survival of these operated insignificant cancers were also evaluated. RESULTS: On surgical specimen analysis 74.7% of patients had Gleason score of 6 or less and 25.3% had Gleason 7 or greater. Furthermore 8.3% of cases showed extracapsular extension. After 36 months of follow-up 3.4% had biochemical recurrence, defined by a PSA above 0.4 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the limited number of cases, we have found considerable rates of undergrading and understaging in patients with prostate cancer whose current definitions classified them as candidates for active surveillance. According to our results the current definition seems inadequate as up to a third of patients had higher grade or cancer outside the prostate.

  7. Prediction of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. New tool for selecting candidates for adjuvant radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz-Amo, F; Molina-Escudero, R; Ogaya-Pinies, G; Ramírez-Martín, D; Verdú-Tartajo, F; Hernández-Fernández, C

    2016-03-01

    To design a risk summation to select patients for adjuvant radiation therapy after prostatectomy. A retrospective study was conducted on 629 patients with localised prostate cancer (pN0-pNx) who were treated with prostatectomy and with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value 0.4ng/mL. A multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed. A score (0-2) was assigned according to the hazard ratio of the significant variables. The score summation defined the risk summation. A total of 19.7% of the patients were pT3, 24.2% had a Gleason score ≥ 8, and 26.3% had positive surgical margins. The median follow-up was 82 months. Some 26.6% of the patients experienced biochemical recurrence. The identified prognostic variables independent of biochemical recurrence were a Gleason score =7 (4+3) (HR, 2.01; P=.008), a Gleason score ≥ 8 (HR, 3.07; P 50% survival free of biochemical recurrence at 5 and 8 years. In contrast, the patients with a risk summation ≥ 3 had <44% survival free of biochemical recurrence. The patients with a risk summation ≤ 2 did not benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy, while the patients with a risk summation ≥ 3 might benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Integrating geriatric assessment into decision-making after prostatectomy: adjuvant radiotherapy, salvage radiotherapy, or none?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore eGoineau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite current advancements in the field, management of older prostate cancer patients still remains a big challenge for Geriatric Oncology. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (ISGO has recently updated its recommendations in this area, and these have been widely adopted, notably by the European Association of Urology. This article outlines the principles which should be observed in the management of elderly patients who have recently undergone prostatectomy for malignancy or with a biochemical relapse following prostatectomy. Further therapeutic intervention should not be considered in those patients who are classified as frail in the geriatric assessment. In patients presenting better health conditions, salvage radiotherapy is to be preferred to adjuvant radiotherapy, which is only indicated in certain exceptional cases. Radiotherapy of the operative bed presents a higher risk to the elderly. Additionally, hormone therapy clearly shows higher side effects in older patients and therefore it should not be administered to asymptomatic patients. We propose a decision tree based on the ISGO recommendations, with specific modifications for patients in biochemical relapse.

  9. Anatomic and technical considerations for optimizing recovery of urinary function during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Anup A; Dajani, Daoud; Lynch, John H; Kowalczyk, Keith J

    2013-01-01

    The advent of robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy purported fewer complications including postprostatectomy incontinence (PPI). PPI is associated with worse quality of life. We evaluate recently reported robot-assisted radical prostatectomy surgical techniques aimed at limiting PPI, describe their anatomic basis and summarize their outcomes. RARP techniques to reduce PPI include bladder neck preservation, bladder neck reconstruction, urethral length preservation, periurethral suspension stitch, posterior reconstruction, combined anterior and posterior reconstruction, preservation of the endopelvic fascia, complete anterior preservation, selective suturing of dorsal venous complex and nerve sparing approach. Outcomes of reconstructive techniques seem to be conflicting, whereas outcomes of techniques aiming to preserve the native urinary continence system seem to hasten urinary function recovery. However, few of these techniques have been shown to affect long-term urinary continence. Surgical techniques preserving the natural urinary continence mechanism appear to improve short-term urinary continence, whereas techniques reconstructing pelvic anatomy have mixed results. The search for the ideal technique to minimize PPI remains hampered by the lack of prospective multi-institutional studies and the long-term follow up. Although reconstructive techniques are safe with few drawbacks, meticulous surgical technique and preservation of the natural continence mechanism should remain the mainstay of PPI prevention.

  10. Prophylactic belladonna suppositories on anesthetic recovery after robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavonetto, Federica; Lamborn, David R; McCaffrey, Joan M; Schroeder, Darrell R; Gettman, Mattew T; Sprung, Juraj; Weingarten, Toby N

    2013-06-01

    Two prospective trials have demonstrated prophylactic antimuscarinics following prostatectomy reduce pain from bladder spasms. Our practice adopted the routine administration of prophylactic belladonna and opium (B&O) suppositories to patients undergoing robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP). The aim of this study is to determine if this change in clinical practice was associated with improvement of postoperative outcomes. The medical records of 202 patients that underwent RALP surgery who were or were not administered prophylactic B&O suppositories in the immediate postoperative period were abstracted for duration of anesthesia recovery, pain and analgesic use. Patient and surgical characteristics between groups were similar except B&O group were slightly older (p = 0.04) and administered less opioid analgesics (p = 0.05). There was no difference between groups in the duration of phase I recovery from anesthesia (p = 0.96). Multivariable adjustments for age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, and surgical duration were made, and again it was found that suppository administration had no association with phase I recovery times (p = 0.94). The use of antimuscarinic medication for bladder spams in the B&O group was less during phase I recovery (p suppositories at the immediate conclusion of RALP surgery was not associated with improvements of the postoperative course.

  11. Comparison between needle biopsy and radical prostatectomy samples in assessing Gleason score and modified Gleason score in prostatic adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu DOĞAN GÜN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Histologic grading is an important predictor of prostatic disease stage and prognosis. We aimed to assess the degree of concordance between pathologic characteristics of the specimens obtained from biopsy and radical prostatectomy materials.Gleason scores and modified Gleason scores calculated for 25 cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma from both needle biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens were analyzed.Mean Gleason scores for biopsy and radical specimens were 6.4 (SD:±0.7 and 6.64 (SD:±1.3; and corresponding modified Gleason scores were 7.32 (SD:±1.43 and 7.32 (SD:±0.98, respectively. The Gleason scores of biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens were identical in 48% (12/25 of the cases, while 32% (8/25 of the biopsy specimens were over-and 20% (5/25 of them were undergraded. While assessing modified Gleason scores, the exact degree of concordance of biopsy specimens with radical prostatectomy materials was 56% (14/25 and of the 11 (44% cases not correlated exactly, 6 (24% were over- and 5 (20% were undergraded. When the exact, over- and underestimated scores of Gleason and modified Gleason grading systems were compared statistically, no difference between two groups was seen (p>0.05. Overgrading errors were found to be more than undergrading errors for both of the scoring systems. Using either the modified Gleason or traditional Gleason scoring

  12. Impact of age on the biochemical failure and androgen suppression after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer in chilean men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel P Murray

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: After radical prostatectomy, the older men with pathological features of Gleason score ≥ 8, pT3 tumors, and positive extracapsular extension had higher frequency of biochemical failure and the presence of CPCs. The treatment of androgen blockade was less successful to suppress the disease relapse in the older men than that in the younger man.

  13. Body mass index as a prognostic marker for biochemical recurrence in Dutch men treated with radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roermund, van J.G.H.; Kok, D.E.G.; Wildhagen, M.F.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Struik, F.; Sloot, S.; Oort, van I.M.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Leenders, van G.J.L.H.; Bangma, C.H.; Witjes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether body mass index (BMI) is a prognostic factor for biochemical recurrence (BCR) in Dutch men after radical prostatectomy (RP), as although epidemiological studies of obesity in relation to prostate cancer have provided conflicting results, recent studies from the USA

  14. Body mass index as a prognostic marker for biochemical recurrence in Dutch men treated with radical prostatectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roermund, J.G. van; Kok, D.E.; Wildhagen, M.F.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Struik, F.; Sloot, S.; Oort, I.M. van; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Leenders, G.J.L.H. van; Bangma, C.H.; Witjes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether body mass index (BMI) is a prognostic factor for biochemical recurrence (BCR) in Dutch men after radical prostatectomy (RP), as although epidemiological studies of obesity in relation to prostate cancer have provided conflicting results, recent studies from the USA

  15. Body mass index is not a predictor of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in Dutch men diagnosed with prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.; Roermond, van J.G.; Aben, K.K.; Luijtgaarden, van de M.W.; Karthaus, H.F.; Vierssen Trip, van O.B.; Kampman, E.; Witjes, A.J.; Kiemeney, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the eVect of body mass index (BMI) on clinical and pathological characteristics at time of diagnosis and on risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy among Dutch men diagnosed with prostate cancer. Methods In total, 1,116 prostate cancer patients with known BMI,

  16. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  17. Biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy in intermediate-risk group men increases with the number of risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuki Furubayashi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The number of intermediate risk factors is significantly associated with the PSA failure-free survival rate after radical prostatectomy in the intermediate-risk group. Patients classified into the intermediate-risk group based on all three intermediate risk factors are less likely to achieve a complete cure through surgery alone.

  18. Open access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Open access week Van 19 tot en met 25 oktober 2015 vond wereldwijd de Open Access Week plaats. Tijdens deze week werden er over de hele wereld evenementen georganiseerd waar open access een rol speelt. Ook in Nederland zijn er diverse symposia, workshops en debatten georganiseerd zoals het debat in

  19. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 4: seminal vesicles and lymph nodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berney, D.M.; Wheeler, T.M.; Grignon, D.J.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Montironi, R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the infiltration of tumor into the seminal vesicles and regional lymph nodes were coo

  20. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 5: surgical margins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, P.H.; Cheng, L.; Srigley, J.R.; Griffiths, D.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston, made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to surgical margin assessment were coordinated by working group 5. Pathologists agreed

  1. The dosimetric significance of using 10 MV photons for volumetric modulated arc therapy for post-prostatectomy irradiation of the prostate bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleiner Henry

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyse the dosimetric differences when using 10 MV instead of 6 MV for VMAT treatment plans for post-prostatectomy irradiation of the prostate bed.

  2. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 5: surgical margins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, P.H.; Cheng, L.; Srigley, J.R.; Griffiths, D.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston, made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to surgical margin assessment were coordinated by working group 5. Pathologists agreed

  3. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 4: seminal vesicles and lymph nodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berney, D.M.; Wheeler, T.M.; Grignon, D.J.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Montironi, R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the infiltration of tumor into the seminal vesicles and regional lymph nodes were coo

  4. Erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy: hemodynamic profiles and their correlation with the recovery of erectile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhall, John P; Slovick, Ron; Hotaling, James; Aviv, Nadid; Valenzuela, Rolando; Waters, W Bedford; Flanigan, Robert C

    2002-03-01

    Despite the advent of nerve sparing radical prostatectomy some men experience erectile dysfunction. Many of these men have vasculogenic erectile impairment in the form of arterial insufficiency or venous leakage. Recent data imply that early postoperative injection therapy may decrease the rate of erectile dysfunction. We defined hemodynamic patterns in patients who underwent bilateral nerve sparing radical prostatectomy to assess the chronology of venous leakage development and explore the correlation of hemodynamic profiles with the return of functional erection 12 months postoperatively. Patients with excellent preoperative erectile function who underwent bilateral nerve sparing surgery and had no pharmacological support for erectile dysfunction in the initial 12 months after surgery received vascular evaluation at presentation. Vascular evaluation involved cavernosometry or penile ultrasonography. Patients were then interviewed again at least 12 months postoperatively to assess the ability to achieve sexual intercourse. Our study group comprised 96 men with a mean age plus or minus standard deviation of 54 +/- 12 years who met all inclusion criteria. All patients had pathologically proved organ confined disease. Mean time to the initial postoperative presentation was 6 +/- 5 months. Patients were divided into 4 groups according to the time of vascular studies postoperatively, namely less than 4 to 8, 9 to 12 and greater than 12 months. Normal vascular status, arterial insufficiency and venous leakage were diagnosed in 35%, 59% and 26% of the group, respectively. No difference in the incidence of arterial insufficiency was noted in the 4 time groups. Time postoperatively was significantly associated with the incidence of venous leakage (14% at less than 4 months and 35% at between 9 and 12). In regard to the correlation of the vascular diagnosis with the return to functional erection 47% of the normal, 31% of the arteriogenic and 9% of the venous leakage group

  5. Localised adenocarcinoma of prostate: the role of pelvis radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy; Adenocarcinome prostatique localise: place de la radiotherapie pelvienne apres prostatectomie radicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazeron, J.J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Bolla, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-12-31

    Radical prostatectomy after pelvic lymphadenectomy is an effective treatment or patients with T1-2 pN0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate. However, pathologic analysis of resected tissue reveals that in 20 to 40 % of clinical stage B lesions, the tumour has extended locally beyond the prostate. This infra-clinical disease may be the origin of local relapse. Radiation oncologists are often asked to deliver post-operative irradiation. There is sufficient evidence in the literature that postoperative radiation therapy can improve local control rate for patients with pT3 pN0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate; however, the effect of this radiotherapy on survival in this category of patients remains unclear. It is the reason why randomized clinical trials have been implemented for investigating the role of pelvic external irradiation with respect to the effects on local control, acute and late morbidity, overall survival and cancer-related survival, and for better defining the selective indications of radiotherapy, regarding pathological data. (author)

  6. Radical prostatectomy versus expectant treatment for early carcinoma of the prostate. Twenty-three year follow-up of a prospective randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Madsen, P O; Corle, D K

    1995-01-01

    In a study by the Veterans Administration Cooperative Urological Research Group (VACURG), 142 patients with localized prostate cancer, VACURG stage I and II, were randomized between radical prostatectomy plus placebo versus placebo alone as initial treatment. 111 patients were evaluable for treat......In a study by the Veterans Administration Cooperative Urological Research Group (VACURG), 142 patients with localized prostate cancer, VACURG stage I and II, were randomized between radical prostatectomy plus placebo versus placebo alone as initial treatment. 111 patients were evaluable...

  7. Late urinary morbidity and quality of life after radical prostatectomy and salvage radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ervandian, Maria; Høyer, Morten; Petersen, Stine Elleberg

    2017-01-01

    -2007, respectively. RESULTS: Weak stream, straining, frequency and nocturia were significantly more prevalent in patients treated with RP + SRT than in patients treated with RP alone. Patients treated with RP + SRT generally suffered from more severe urinary symptoms. The QoL scores of the two treatment groups were......OBJECTIVE: There is a paucity of knowledge of long-term urinary morbidity in patients treated for prostate cancer (PCa) with radical prostatectomy (RP) and salvage radiotherapy (SRT). Improved long-term survival calls for heightened awareness of late effects from radiotherapy after RP. The purpose...... of this study was to assess late urinary morbidity and its potential impact on quality of life (QoL) in patients treated with RP plus SRT compared with patients treated with RP alone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Long-term morbidity and QoL were evaluated using a cross-sectional design with validated questionnaires...

  8. Early biochemical recurrence, urinary continence and potency outcomes following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Hvarness, Helle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe recovery of urinary continence and potency and report oncological and functional outcomes using the survival, continence and potency (SCP) system for patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 2009...... with preoperative ESI, 77.6% (67.9-86.1) and 34.4% (24.1-47.5) maintained ESI 12 months postoperatively after bilateral and unilateral nerve-sparing surgery (NS), respectively. NS (p .... Using the SCP system and defining potency as ESI, functional and oncological success 12 months after surgery was achieved in 69 out of 135 (51.1%) preoperative continent and potent patients who underwent unilateral or bilateral NS, and did not require adjuvant treatment; when defining potency as IIEF...

  9. Risk factors associated with positive surgical margins following radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of preoperative and surgical parameters, including nerve-sparing technique, on the risk of positive surgical margins (PSM) following radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective...... consecutive single-institution Danish cohort of 1148 patients undergoing RP between 1995 and 2011 was investigated. To analyse the impact of covariates on risk of PSM, a multivariate logistic regression model was used, including cT category, biopsy Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), percentage...... positive biopsies for cancer (PPB), surgeon and surgical technique. RESULTS: The overall rate of PSM was 31.4%. The risk of PSM depended (p value for Wald χ(2)) on PSA (p PSM...

  10. In incontinence developing after radical prostatectomy the role of nurses on implementing behavioral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Aydın Sayılan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Developing after radical prostatectomy urinary incontinence (UI is a major health problem affecting the quality of life of men. Urinary incontinence patients in their care and treatment purpose is to provide continence. In the treatment of urinary incontinence surgery, medication and behavioral treatments are used. For the purposes of behavioral therapy; increasing the capacity of the bladder function and is aimed at promoting bladder control. Behavioral treatments for incontinence; diet, exercise bladder training and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT is located.  Diet is regulated by the bladder diary. PFME is first identified in 1948 by Arnold Kegel, which is aimed pelvic to strengthen the muscles of the base and are expressed in improving the urethral sphincter function. In the literature, in the treatment of incontinence; with drug therapy or surgery, it should be emphasized also behavioral therapy.

  11. Nerve-sparing techniques and results in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, Omer; Atug, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Nerve-sparing techniques in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) have advanced with the developments defining the prostate anatomy and robotic surgery in recent years. In this review we discussed the surgical anatomy, current nerve-sparing techniques and results of these operations. It is important to define the right and key anatomic landmarks for nerve-sparing in RARP which can demonstrate individual variations. The patients' risk assessment before the operation and intraoperative anatomic variations may affect the nerve-sparing technique, nerve-sparing degree and the approach. There is lack of randomized control trials for different nerve-sparing techniques and approaches in RARP, therefore accurate preoperative and intraoperative assessment of the patient is crucial. Current data shows that, performing the maximum possible nerve-sparing using athermal techniques have better functional outcomes. PMID:27995221

  12. Nerve sparing can preserve orgasmic function in most men after robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Ashutosh; Grover, Sonal; Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Srivastava, Abhishek; Rao, Sandhya; Gupta, Amit; Gray, Robert; Leung, Robert; Paduch, Darius A

    2012-02-01

    •  To investigate orgasmic outcomes in patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) and the effects of age and nerve sparing on these outcomes. •  Between January 2005 and June 2007, 708 patients underwent RALP at our institution. •  We analysed postoperative potency and orgasmic outcomes in the 408 men, of the 708, who were potent, able to achieve orgasm preoperatively and available for follow-up. •  Of men aged ≤60 years, 88.4% (198/224) were able to achieve orgasm postoperatively in comparison to 82.6% (152/184) of older men (P function after RALP. •  Men ≤60 years old and those who undergo BNS are most likely to maintain normal sexual function. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  13. The Role of Radical Prostatectomy in the Treatment of Patients with High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış Kuzgunbay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available High-risk prostate cancer (PCa, which is defined as PSA >20 ng/mL or Gleason Score (GS >7 or ≥cT3a, accounts for up to 40% of newly diagnosed cases and carries a significant risk of progression and death. However, the best management approach for patients with high-risk PCa is still under debate. Recently, radical prostatectomy (RP with extended lymphadenectomy (LND has become popular for the treatment of high-risk PCa with good prognosis in selected patients in the context of multimodal approach. However, decision should be made after all treatments have been discussed by a multidisciplinary team and the patient should be informed about the likelihood of a multimodal approach. On the other hand, necessity of sufficient surgical expertise for RP to keep the level of morbidity acceptable in high-risk PCa patients should be kept in mind.

  14. Concordance between biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen Gleason score in internal and external pathology facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Angelica A C; Cozzi, Gabriele; Palumbo, Carlotta; Albo, Giancarlo; Rocco, Bernardo

    2014-10-01

    Biopsy Gleason score (bGS) is an important tool for staging and decision making in patients with prostate cancer. Therefore, the data from biopsy should be both reproducible across different pathologists and predictive of the true underlying tumour. We evaluated the agreement between bGS with prostatectomy Gleason score (pGS) comparing patients who underwent prostate biopsy at our hospital with those who did it at an outside facility. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy at our Hospital in 2011 and 2012. Patients were divided depending on the site of prostate biopsy. We calculated a weighted κ statistic to evaluate the concordance from bGS and pGS in the two groups and to evaluate the Gleason score (GS) concordance comparing the proportion of positive cores at biopsy. A total of 124 patients with completed data were identified (70 patients performed biopsy at our institution and 54 at an outside facility). The weighted κ score for GS agreement was 0.40 for our Institution and 0.27 for other facilities. The weighted κ score stratified by biopsy hospital for patients with at least 30% of positive cores was 0.46 for our hospital and 0.42 for other facilities. Internal prostate biopsy predicted better pGS than outside facility biopsy reports. When the percentage of biopsy-positive cores increases, the agreement between bGS and pGS is similar between the two groups. For certain cases in which an outside laboratory biopsy results in equivocal clinical decision, biopsy re-evaluation by internal pathologists can help reveal the true underlying tumor architecture and extension. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. The Timing of Salvage Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy: A Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) after radical prostatectomy can potentially eradicate residual microscopic disease. Defining the optimal patient and treatment factors is essential and is particularly relevant within the context of adjuvant vs early vs delayed postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A systematic review of all published SRT studies was performed to identify the pathologic, clinical, and treatment factors associated with relapse-free survival (RFS) after SRT. A total of 41 studies encompassing 5597 patients satisfied the study entry criteria. Radiobiologic interpretation of biochemical tumor control was used to provide the framework for the observed relationships. Results: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level before SRT (P<.0001) and RT dose (P=.0052) had a significant and independent association with RFS. There was an average 2.6% loss of RFS for each incremental 0.1 ng/mL PSA at the time of SRT (95% CI, {approx}2.2-3.1). With a PSA level of 0.2 ng/mL or less before SRT, the RFS approached 64%. The dose for salvage RT in the range of 60-70 Gy seemed to be on the steep part of the sigmoidal dose-response curve, with a dose of 70 Gy achieving 54% RFS compared with only 34% for 60 Gy. There was a 2% improvement in RFS for each additional Gy (95% CI, {approx}0.9-3.2). The observed dose-response was less robust on sensitivity analysis. Conclusions: This study provides Level 2a evidence for initiating SRT at the lowest possible PSA. Dose escalation is also suggested by the data. Progressively better tumor control rates with SRT after radical prostatectomy are achieved with a lower PSA at initiation and with a higher RT dose. Early salvage RT may be an equivalent strategy to adjuvant RT.

  16. Difference between actual vs. pathology prostate weight in TURP and radical robotic-assisted prostatectomy specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szilveszter Lukacs

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction To investigate and highlight the effect of formaldehyde induced weight reduction in transurethral resection of prostate (TURP and radical robotically-assisted prostatectomy (RALP specimen as a result of standard chemical fixation. Materials and Methods 51 patients were recruited from January 2013 to June 2013 who either underwent a TURP (n=26 or RALP (n=25. Data was collected prospectively by the operating surgeon who measured the native, unfixed histology specimen directly after operation. The specimens were fixed in 10% Formaldehyde Solution BP and sent to the pathology laboratory where after sufficient fixation period was re-weighed. Results Overall mean age 64.78 years, TURP mean age 68.31 years RALP mean age 61.12years. We found that the overall prostatic specimen (n=51 weight loss after fixation was a mean of 11.20% (3.78 grams (p≤0.0001. Subgroup analysis of the native TURP chips mean weight was 16.15 grams and formalin treated mean weight was 14.00 grams (p≤0.0001. Therefore, TURP chips had a mean of 13.32 % (2.15 grams weight loss during chemical fixation. RALP subgroup unfixed specimen mean weight was 52.08 grams and formalin treated mean weight was 42.60 grams (p≤0.0001, a 19.32 % (9.48grams mean weight reduction. Conclusion It has not been known that prostatic chips and whole human radical prostatectomy specimen undergo a significant weight reduction. The practical significance of the accurate prostate weight in patient management may be limited, however, it is agreed that this should be recorded correctly, as data is potential interest for research purposes and vital for precise documentation.

  17. Technical Note: Method to correlate whole-specimen histopathology of radical prostatectomy with diagnostic MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Deirdre M., E-mail: d.mcgrath@sheffield.ac.uk; Lee, Jenny; Foltz, Warren D. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Samavati, Navid [Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada); Jewett, Michael A. S. [Departments of Surgery (Urology) and Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Kwast, Theo van der [Pathology Department, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 (Canada); Chung, Peter [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Ménard, Cynthia [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, 1058 Rue Saint-Denis, Montréal, Québec H2X 3J4 (Canada); Brock, Kristy K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Validation of MRI-guided tumor boundary delineation for targeted prostate cancer therapy is achieved via correlation with gold-standard histopathology of radical prostatectomy specimens. Challenges to accurate correlation include matching the pathology sectioning plane with the in vivo imaging slice plane and correction for the deformation that occurs between in vivo imaging and histology. A methodology is presented for matching of the histological sectioning angle and position to the in vivo imaging slices. Methods: Patients (n = 4) with biochemical failure following external beam radiotherapy underwent diagnostic MRI to confirm localized recurrence of prostate cancer, followed by salvage radical prostatectomy. High-resolution 3-D MRI of the ex vivo specimens was acquired to determine the pathology sectioning angle that best matched the in vivo imaging slice plane, using matching anatomical features and implanted fiducials. A novel sectioning device was developed to guide sectioning at the correct angle, and to assist the insertion of reference dye marks to aid in histopathology reconstruction. Results: The percentage difference in the positioning of the urethra in the ex vivo pathology sections compared to the positioning in in vivo images was reduced from 34% to 7% through slicing at the best match angle. Reference dye marks were generated, which were visible in ex vivo imaging, in the tissue sections before and after processing, and in histology sections. Conclusions: The method achieved an almost fivefold reduction in the slice-matching error and is readily implementable in combination with standard MRI technology. The technique will be employed to generate datasets for correlation of whole-specimen prostate histopathology with in vivo diagnostic MRI using 3-D deformable registration, allowing assessment of the sensitivity and specificity of MRI parameters for prostate cancer. Although developed specifically for prostate, the method is readily

  18. Influence of pathologist experience on positive surgical margins following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Jacob E; Packiam, Vignesh T; Wroblewski, Kristen E; Paner, Gladell P; Eggener, Scott E

    2017-07-01

    A positive surgical margin (PSM) following radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer is associated with increased risk of biochemical recurrence. We sought to examine whether the pathologist is an independent predictor of PSMs. We performed a retrospective review of 3,557 men who underwent RP for localized prostate cancer at our institution from 2003 to 2015. We evaluated 29 separate pathologists. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to test variables previously shown to influence PSM rates. Overall rate of PSM was 18.9%. Compared with patients without PSM, patients with PSM had higher body mass index (mean: 28.8 vs. 28.3), Gleason score≥7 (84% vs. 66%), extracapsular extension (51% vs. 20%), and median prostate-specific antigen (5.9 vs. 5.1ng/ml) (all Pexperience, pathologist experience, and pathologist genitourinary fellowship training were all predictors of PSMs (all Pexperience, increased pathologist experience, higher pathologic Gleason score, higher pathologic stage, and higher prostate-specific antigen were significant predictors of PSMs. Increasing surgeon experience was associated with decreased odds of PSM (odds ratio = 0.79 per 1 standard deviation increase, 95% CI [0.70-0.89]). In contrast, increasing pathologist experience was associated with increased odds of PSM (odds ratio = 1.11 per 1 standard deviation increase, 95% CI [1.03-1.19]). The relationship between pathologist experience and PSM appeared to be nonlinear (Fig. 2). Greater pathologist experience appears to be associated with greater odds of PSMs following radical prostatectomy, even after controlling for case mix, pathologist fellowship training, and surgeon experience. Based on these findings, pathologists with less experience reviewing RP specimens may consider requesting rereview by a dedicated genitourinary pathologist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radical Prostatectomy is a Valuable Treatment Alternative in Patients with High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naşide Mangır

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To review the high-risk prostate cancer (PCa patient database with special emphasis on the role of radical prostatectomy (RP in comparison to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Materials and Methods A total of 102 patients with complete and long-term follow-up data were included. High-risk PCa was defined as: a pre-treatment PSA level of ≥20 ng/mL and/or a primary Gleason score of ≥4 and/or clinical stage ≥T3N0M0 disease. A total of 45 (42.5% patients underwent radical RP with extended pelvic lymphadenectomy for-high risk PCa and a total of 57 (53.8% patients received EBRT. Results The mean overall survival (mean survival 95.2 vs. 129.2 months, log rank p=0.73 and cancer-specific survival (mean survival 104 vs. 151.4 months, log rank p=0.35 were not significantly different between RP and EBRT groups. Univariate analysis of variables that may affect overall survival showed no significant effect of pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage or type of therapy. The only factor which reached statistical significance was patient age (p=0.002. Multivariate analysis of variables also showed no significant effect of pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage or type of therapy and, again, the only factor which reached statistical significance was patient age (p=0.012. Conclusion Radical prostatectomy appears to be an effective and a non-inferior treatment option in patients with high-risk localized PCa with acceptable overall and cancer-specific survival compared to RT. Therefore, as the guidelines suggest, it should be provided as an option during patient consultation for a proper informed decision-making.

  20. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koontz, Bridget F., E-mail: Bridget.Koontz@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Quaranta, Brian P. [21st Century Oncology, Asheville, North Carolina (United States); Pura, John A. [Division of Biostatistics, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Haake, Michael [Southeast Radiation Oncology, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W. [Department of Surgery, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve men enrolled and completed a phase 1 single-institution trial between 2006 and 2010. Eligibility required a previously untreated diagnosis of localized but high-risk prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 14-74 months). Radiation therapy was dose-escalated in a 3 × 3 design with dose levels of 39.6, 45, 50.4, and 54 Gy. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated up to 45 Gy with any additional dose given to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Radical prostatectomy was performed 4-8 weeks after RT completion. Primary outcome measure was intraoperative and postoperative day-30 morbidity. Secondary measures included late morbidity and oncologic outcomes. Results: No intraoperative morbidity was seen. Chronic urinary grade 2+ toxicity occurred in 42%; 2 patients (17%) developed a symptomatic urethral stricture requiring dilation. Two-year actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 67% (95% confidence interval 34%-86%). Patients with pT3 or positive surgical margin treated with neoadjuvant RT had a trend for improved biochemical recurrence-free survival compared with a historical cohort with similar adverse factors. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT is feasible with moderate urinary morbidity. However, oncologic outcomes do not seem to be substantially different from those with selective postoperative RT. If this multimodal approach is further evaluated in a phase 2 setting, 54 Gy should be used in combination with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to improve biochemical outcomes.

  1. Prostate Cancer Biochemical Recurrence Rates After Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Serge; Nevers, Thomas; Staff, Ilene; Tortora, Joseph; Champagne, Alison; Kesler, Stuart S.; Laudone, Vincent P.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To determine prostate cancer biochemical recurrence rates with respect to surgical margin (SM) status for patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP). Methods: IRB-approved radical prostatectomy database was queried. Patients were stratified as low, intermediate, and high risk according to D’Amico's risk classification. Postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values were obtained every 3 mo for the first year, then biannually and annually thereafter. Biochemical recurrence was defined as ≥0.2ng/mL. Patients receiving adjuvant or salvage treatment were included. Positive surgical margin was defined as presence of cancer cells at inked resection margin in the final specimen. Margin presence (negative/positive), margin multiplicity (single/multiple), and margin length (≤3mm focal and >3mm extensive) were noted. Kaplan-Meier curves of biochemical recurrence-free survival (BRFS) as a function of SM were generated. Forward stepwise multivariate Cox regression was performed, with preoperative PSA, Gleason score, pathologic stage, prostate gland weight, and SM as covariates. Results: At our institution, 1437 patients underwent RALP (2003-2009). Of these, 1159 had sufficient data and were included in our analysis. Mean follow-up was 16 mo. Kaplan-Meier curves demonstrated significant increase in BRFS in low-risk and intermediate-risk groups with negative SM. Overall BRFS at 5 y was 72%. Gleason score, pathologic stage, and SM status were significant prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Negative surgical margins resulted in lower biochemical recurrence rates for low-risk and intermediate-risk groups. Multifocal and longer positive margins were associated with higher biochemical recurrence rates compared with unifocal and shorter positive margins. Documenting biochemical recurrence rates for RALP is important, because this treatment for localized prostate cancer is validated. PMID

  2. Correlation Between MRS and Serum PSA in the Diagnosis of Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghafuri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multifocality, multicentricity and extension beyond the prostate capsule are all characteristics of prostatic adenocarcinoma that may escape diagnosis by conventional CT scanning or MRI. This study was designed to assess the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS in prostatic carcinoma and its compatibility with prostatic specific antigen (PSA as the conventional method.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we recruited 139 patients with previous radical prostatectomy referring to Radiology department of Hazrate-e-Rasul Hospital during the first half of 2011 for the evaluation of local recurrence. Traditionally, local recurrence is defined as serum PSA concentration >0.2 ng/dl. We used 1.5-tesla Siemens Avanto MRI unit with endorectal coil and measured creatine, choline and citrate levels before calculating choline-creatine/citrate ratio. Correlation between MRS findings with PSA concentration was evaluated in regards to the multiple levels of the previously mentioned ratio.Results: Local recurrence was found in 107 (77% patients based on PSA levels. The mean values for serum PSA levels and creatine-choline/citrate ratio were significantly different in patients with and without local recurrence. Creatine-choline/citrate ratios greater than 50, 100 and 150 (as different cut-off points of recurrence were respectively seen in 104, 102 and 97 patients and agreement ratio between MRS and PSA in these levels were 94.1%, 94.4% and 85.1%, respectively. Correlation coefficient between these two methods was 0.481.Conclusion: MRS is a valuable tool for evaluating recurrence inpatients with prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy and it is in good agreement with serum PSA levels.

  3. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in low- and high-risk prostate cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylu, Uğur; Bindayi, Ahmet; Küçük, Eyüp Veli; Önol, Fikret Fatih; Gümüş, Eyüp

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the benefit of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in the low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) patients suitable for active surveillance and in the high-risk PCa patients who would be considered for alternative treatments such as radiotherapy (RT) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) instead of radical prostatectomy. Material and methods Of 548 patients, who underwent RARP, 298 PCa patients (258 low-risk and 40 high-risk) with a mean of 3.6 years follow-up, were included into this study. Oncological outcomes were compared separately in low- and high-risk PCa patients. Results The pathologic Gleason scores were ≥7 in 73 (28%), and 68 (26%) patients had a pathologic stage of T3, 29 (11%) patients had a positive surgical margin (PSM), and 20 (7%) patients had biochemical recurrence (BCR) in the first year follow-up in the low-risk group. Of 258 low-risk PCa patients, a total of 93 (36%) patients had not either BCR, pathologic Gleason score ≥7, or ≥pT3 disease with PSM. In the high-risk group, the pathologic stage was pT2 in 14 (35%) patients and 29 (72%) patients had no biochemical recurrence in the follow-up of these high-risk PCa patients. Of 40 high-risk PCa patients, in a total of 25 (62.5%) patients ≥pT3b disease, BCR, pT3a disease with PSM were not detected. Conclusion Approximately two thirds of high-risk PCa patients benefit from RARP without additional RT or ADT. Besides, more than one third of low-risk PCa patients who fit active surveillance criteria would have unfavorable results. PMID:28270949

  4. Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy learning curve for experienced laparoscopic surgeons: does it really exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias-Machado, Marcos; Mitre, Anuar Ibrahim; Rubinstein, Mauricio; da Costa, Eduardo Fernandes; Hidaka, Alexandre Kyoshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP) is a minimally invasive procedure that could have a reduced learning curve for unfamiliar laparoscopic surgeon. However, there are no consensuses regarding the impact of previous laparoscopic experience on the learning curve of RALP. We report on a functional and perioperative outcome comparison between our initial 60 cases of RALP and last 60 cases of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP), performed by three experienced laparoscopic surgeons with a 200+LRP cases experience. Materials and Methods Between January 2010 and September 2013, a total of 60 consecutive patients who have undergone RALP were prospectively evaluated and compared to the last 60 cases of LRP. Data included demographic data, operative duration, blood loss, transfusion rate, positive surgical margins, hospital stay, complications and potency and continence rates. Results The mean operative time and blood loss were higher in RALP (236 versus 153 minutes, p<0.001 and 245.6 versus 202ml p<0.001). Potency rates at 6 months were higher in RALP (70% versus 50% p=0.02). Positive surgical margins were also higher in RALP (31.6% versus 12.5%, p=0.01). Continence rates at 6 months were similar (93.3% versus 89.3% p=0.43). Patient’s age, complication rates and length of hospital stay were similar for both groups. Conclusions Experienced laparoscopic surgeons (ELS) present a learning curve for RALP only demonstrated by longer operative time and clinically insignificant blood loss. Our initial results demonstrated similar perioperative and functional outcomes for both approaches. ELS were able to achieve satisfactory oncological and functional results during the learning curve period for RALP. PMID:27136471

  5. Discovery and validation of a prostate cancer genomic classifier that predicts early metastasis following radical prostatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Erho

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Clinicopathologic features and biochemical recurrence are sensitive, but not specific, predictors of metastatic disease and lethal prostate cancer. We hypothesize that a genomic expression signature detected in the primary tumor represents true biological potential of aggressive disease and provides improved prediction of early prostate cancer metastasis. METHODS: A nested case-control design was used to select 639 patients from the Mayo Clinic tumor registry who underwent radical prostatectomy between 1987 and 2001. A genomic classifier (GC was developed by modeling differential RNA expression using 1.4 million feature high-density expression arrays of men enriched for rising PSA after prostatectomy, including 213 who experienced early clinical metastasis after biochemical recurrence. A training set was used to develop a random forest classifier of 22 markers to predict for cases--men with early clinical metastasis after rising PSA. Performance of GC was compared to prognostic factors such as Gleason score and previous gene expression signatures in a withheld validation set. RESULTS: Expression profiles were generated from 545 unique patient samples, with median follow-up of 16.9 years. GC achieved an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.75 (0.67-0.83 in validation, outperforming clinical variables and gene signatures. GC was the only significant prognostic factor in multivariable analyses. Within Gleason score groups, cases with high GC scores experienced earlier death from prostate cancer and reduced overall survival. The markers in the classifier were found to be associated with a number of key biological processes in prostate cancer metastatic disease progression. CONCLUSION: A genomic classifier was developed and validated in a large patient cohort enriched with prostate cancer metastasis patients and a rising PSA that went on to experience metastatic disease. This early metastasis prediction model based on

  6. Average Weight of Seminal Vesicles: An Adjustment Factor for Radical Prostatectomy Specimens Weighed With Seminal Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjionas, George A; Epstein, Jonathan I; Williamson, Sean R; Diaz, Mireya; Menon, Mani; Peabody, James O; Gupta, Nilesh S; Parekh, Dipen J; Cote, Richard J; Jorda, Merce; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N

    2015-12-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology in 2010 recommended weighing prostates without seminal vesicles (SV) to include only prostate weight in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density (PSAD) calculation, because SV do not produce PSA. Large retrospective cohorts exist with combined weight recorded that needs to be modified for retrospective analysis. Weights of prostates and SV were separately recorded in 172 consecutive prostatectomies. The average weight of SV and proportion of prostate weight from combined weight were calculated. The adjustment factors were then validated on databases of 2 other institutions. The average weight of bilateral SV was 6.4 g (range = 1-17.3 g). The prostate constituted on average 87% (range = 66% to 98%) of the total specimen weight. There was no correlation between patient age and prostate weight with SV weight. The best performing correction method was to subtract 6.4 g from total radical prostatectomy weight and to use this weight for PSAD calculation. The average weights of retrospective specimens weighed with SV were not significantly different between the 3 institutions. Using our data allowed calibration of the weights and PSAD between the cohorts weighed with and without SV. Thus, prostate weight in specimens including SV weight can be adjusted by subtracting 6.4 g, resulting in significant change of PSAD. Some institution-specific variations may exist, which could further increase the precision of retrospective analysis involving prostate weight and PSAD. However, unless institution-specific adjustment parameters are developed, we recommend that this correction factor be used for retrospective cohorts or in institutions where combined weight is still recorded.

  7. Effect of minimizing tension during robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy on urinary function recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Keith J; Huang, Andy C; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Yu, Hua-yin; Lynch, John H; Hu, Jim C

    2013-06-01

    Although most prostatectomy studies emphasize optimal nerve-sparing dissection planes, subtle technical variation also affects functional outcomes. The impact of minimizing assistant/surgeon tension on urinary function has not been quantified. We assess urinary function after attenuating neurovascular bundle (NVB) and rhabdosphincter tension during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Retrospective study of prospectively collected data for 268 (RARP-T) versus 342 (RARP-0T) men with versus without tension on the NVB and rhabdosphincter during RARP. Outcomes compared include Expanded Prostate Cancer Index (EPIC) urinary function, estimated blood loss (EBL), operative time, and positive surgical margins (PSM). In unadjusted analysis, men undergoing RARP-T versus RARP-0T were older, had higher biopsy and pathologic Gleason grade, and higher preoperative prostate specific antigen (all p ≤ 0.023). Baseline urinary function was similar. Postoperatively, RARP-0T versus RARP-T was associated with higher 5-month urinary function scores (69.7 versus 64, p = 0.049). In adjusted analyses, RARP-0T versus RARP-T was associated with improved 5-month urinary function [Parameter Estimate (PE) 7.37, Standard Error (SE) 2.67, p = 0.006], while bilateral versus non-/unilateral nerve-sparing was associated with improved 12-month urinary function and continence (both p ≤ 0.035). RARP-0T versus RARP-T was associated with shorter operative times (PE 6.66, SE 1.90, p = 0.001) and higher EBL (PE 20.88, SE 6.49, p = 0.001). There were no significant differences in PSM. While the use of tension aids in dissection of anatomic planes, avoidance of NVB counter-traction and minimizing tension on the rhabdosphincter during apical dissection attenuates neuropraxia and leads to earlier urinary function recovery. Bilateral versus non-/unilateral nerve-sparing also improves urinary function recovery.

  8. Open hardware for open science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the open source software movement, the Open Hardware Repository was created to enable hardware developers to share the results of their R&D activities. The recently published CERN Open Hardware Licence offers the legal framework to support this knowledge and technology exchange.   Two years ago, a group of electronics designers led by Javier Serrano, a CERN engineer, working in experimental physics laboratories created the Open Hardware Repository (OHR). This project was initiated in order to facilitate the exchange of hardware designs across the community in line with the ideals of “open science”. The main objectives include avoiding duplication of effort by sharing results across different teams that might be working on the same need. “For hardware developers, the advantages of open hardware are numerous. For example, it is a great learning tool for technologies some developers would not otherwise master, and it avoids unnecessary work if someone ha...

  9. Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  10. Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  11. Radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to see inside your belly during the procedure. Robotic surgery : Sometimes, laparoscopic surgery is performed using a robotic ... near the operating table. Not every hospital offers robotic surgery. Perineal : Your surgeon makes a cut in the ...

  12. Prostatic fascia and recovery of sexual function after radical prostatectomy: Is it a "Veil of Aphrodite" or "Veil of mystery"!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandhani, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is one of the most controversial aspects associated with radical prostatectomy. Since Walsh's description of neurovascular bundle there have been number of articles describing various modification to the technique of bilateral nerve sparing to augment the recovery of sexual function. There is a very thin line between performing an ideal nerve sparing and giving equally good oncological outcome in terms of negative surgical margin. "Veil of Aphrodite" nerve sparing technique was conceptualized by Menon et al. Lately other related terms have emerged in the literature e.g., "high anterior release, "curtain dissection," or "incremental nerve sparing. Does veil technique of radical prostatectomy help improve recovery of sexual function? Do mere presence of nerves in veil account for potency? Are these nerve parasympathetic? This short review tries to find the answer of these questions in contemporary world literature.

  13. Prostatic fascia and recovery of sexual function after radical prostatectomy: Is it a "Veil of Aphrodite" or "Veil of mystery"!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Mandhani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunction is one of the most controversial aspects associated with radical prostatectomy. Since Walsh′s description of neurovascular bundle there have been number of articles describing various modification to the technique of bilateral nerve sparing to augment the recovery of sexual function. There is a very thin line between performing an ideal nerve sparing and giving equally good oncological outcome in terms of negative surgical margin. ′′Veil of Aphrodite′′ nerve sparing technique was conceptualized by Menon et al. Lately other related terms have emerged in the literature e.g., ′′high anterior release, ′′curtain dissection,′′ or ′′incremental nerve sparing. Does veil technique of radical prostatectomy help improve recovery of sexual function? Do mere presence of nerves in veil account for potency? Are these nerve parasympathetic? This short review tries to find the answer of these questions in contemporary world literature.

  14. Rationale and development of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy post-prostatectomy: the present standard of care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray JR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Julia R Murray,1,2 Helen A McNair,2 David P Dearnaley1,2 1Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, London, 2Department of Radiotherapy, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, UK Abstract: The indications for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy have evolved over the last decade, although the optimal timing, dose, and target volume remain to be well defined. The target volume is susceptible to anatomical variations with its borders interfacing with the rectum and bladder. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy has become the gold standard for radical prostate radiotherapy. Here we review the current evidence for image-guided techniques with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed and describe current strategies to reduce or account for interfraction and intrafraction motion. Keywords: radiotherapy, prostate cancer, post-prostatectomy, image-guided radiation therapy

  15. Initial Experience of Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Radical Prostatectomy Requiring Well-Equipped Appliances and a Skilled Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Yong Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an initial experience in laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy (LESSRP using a homemade single-port device for prostate cancer. A 63-year-old man was diagnosed with prostate cancer. The patient underwent LESSRP using an Alexis® wound retractor, which was inserted through an umbilical incision. A homemade single-port device was made by fixing a 61/2 surgical glove to the retractor’s outer ring and securing the glove finger to the end of 4 trocars with a tie. Using the flexible laparoscopic and rigid instruments, LESSRP was performed using a procedure similar to conventional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. In the current case, we could not perform complete LESSRP, so we report our initial experience and consider the reason why laparoendoscopic single-site surgery was converted to conventional LRP.

  16. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) consensus conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens: rationale and organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egevad, Lars; Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston, made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. The activities of the conference were coordinated through five workgroups. The results are presented in five separate reports covering (1) specimen handling, (2) T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume, (3) extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease, (4) seminal vesicles and lymph node metastases and (5) surgical margins. In this introductory article we describe some novel features of the organization of the consensus process. Following the completion of a pre-meeting survey conference, participants discussed and voted on 43 specific issues of contention relating to the pathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Consensus, defined as agreement by at least 65% of participants present, was achieved for 30 questions.

  17. Increased fatty acid synthase expression in prostate biopsy cores predicts higher Gleason score in radical prostatectomy specimen

    OpenAIRE

    HAMADA, SHINSUKE; Horiguchi, Akio; Kuroda, Kenji; Ito, Keiichi; ASANO, TOMOHIKO; Miyai, Kosuke; Iwaya, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is highly expressed in various types of cancer, and elevated expression of FAS has been suggested to be a predictor of tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. We examined whether FAS expression in prostate biopsy cores could predict the pathological characteristics of radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens. Methods Paraffin-embedded prostate biopsy cores, obtained from 102 patients who subsequently underwent RP, were immunostained with polyclonal anti-FAS a...

  18. Stratified analysis of 800 Asian patients after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy with a median 64 months of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Raheem, Ali; Kim, Dae Keun; Santok, Glen Denmer; Alabdulaali, Ibrahim; Chung, Byung Ha; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho

    2016-09-01

    To report the 5-year oncological outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from the largest series ever reported from Asia. A retrospective analysis of 800 Asian patients who were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from July 2005 to May 2010 in the Department of Urology and Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea was carried out. The primary end-point was to evaluate the biochemical recurrence. The secondary end-point was to show the biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival and cancer-specific survival. A total of 197 (24.65%), 218 (27.3%), and 385 (48.1%) patients were classified as low-, intermediate- and high-risk patients according to the D'Amico risk stratification risk criteria, respectively. The median follow-up period was 64 months (interquartile range 28-71 months). The overall incidence of positive surgical margin was 36.6%. There was biochemical recurrence in 183 patients (22.9%), 38 patients (4.8%) developed distant metastasis and 24 patients (3%) died from prostate cancer. Actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates at 5 years were 76.4%, 94.6% and 96.7%, respectively. Positive lymph node was associated with lower 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival (9.1%), cancer-specific survival (75.7%) and metastasis-free survival (61.9%) rates (P < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, among all the predictors, positive lymph node was the strongest predictor of biochemical recurrence, cancer-specific survival and metastasis-free survival (P < 0.001). Herein we report the largest robot-assisted radical prostatectomy series from Asia. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is confirmed to be an oncologically safe procedure that is able to provide effective 5-year cancer control, even in patients with high-risk disease. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  19. A matched-pair comparison between bilateral intrafascial and interfascial nerve-sparing techniques in extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Zheng; Xu Zhang; Xin Ma; Hong-Zhao Li; Jiang-Pin Gao; Wei Cai; Jun Dong

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the advantages of the intrafascial nerve-sparing technique compared with the interfascial nerve-sparing technique in extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.From March 2010 to August 2011,65 patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa) underwent bilateral intrafascial nerve-sparing extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.These patients were matched in a 1:2 ratio to 130 patients with localized PCa who had undergone bilateral interfascial nerve-sparing extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy between January 2008 and August 2011.Operative data and oncological and functional results of both groups were compared.There was no difference in operative data,pathological stages and overall rates of positive surgical margins between the groups.There were 9 and 13 patients lost to follow-up in the intrafascial group and interfascial group,respectively.The intrafascial technique provided earlier recovery of continence at both 3 and 6 months than the interfascial technique.Equal results in terms of continence were found in both groups at 12 months.Better rates of potency at 6 months and 12 months were found in younger patients (age ≤65 years) and overall patients who had undergone the intrafascial nerve-sparing extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.Biochemical progression-free survival rates 1 year postoperatively were similar in both groups.Using strict indications,compared with the interfascial nerve-sparing technique,the intrafascial technique provided similar operative outcomes and short-term oncological results,quicker recovery of continence and better potency.The intrafascial nerve-sparing technique is recommended as a preferred approach for young PCa patients who are clinical stages cT1 to cT2a and have normal preoperative Potency.

  20. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Post-Prostatectomy Patients Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Target Motion Tracking During External Beam Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, H; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso® 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in post-prostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Methods and Materials Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for post-prostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (Dmin) with the planned Dmin to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV Dmin is at least 95% of the planned CTV Dmin. Results Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: − 0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5 degrees, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Conclusion Target rotational motion could cause under-dosage to partial volume of the post-prostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery. PMID:23021439

  1. A novel miRNA-based predictive model for biochemical failure following post-prostatectomy salvage radiation therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Hlavin Bell

    Full Text Available To develop a microRNA (miRNA-based predictive model for prostate cancer patients of 1 time to biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy and 2 biochemical recurrence after salvage radiation therapy following documented biochemical disease progression post-radical prostatectomy.Forty three patients who had undergone salvage radiation therapy following biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy with greater than 4 years of follow-up data were identified. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were collected for all patients and total RNA was isolated from 1mm cores enriched for tumor (>70%. Eight hundred miRNAs were analyzed simultaneously using the nCounter human miRNA v2 assay (NanoString Technologies; Seattle, WA. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportion hazards regression models as well as receiver operating characteristics were used to identify statistically significant miRNAs that were predictive of biochemical recurrence.Eighty eight miRNAs were identified to be significantly (p36 months. Nine miRNAs were identified to be significantly (p<0.05 associated by multivariate analysis with biochemical failure after salvage radiation therapy. A new predictive model for biochemical recurrence after salvage radiation therapy was developed; this model consisted of miR-4516 and miR-601 together with, Gleason score, and lymph node status. The area under the ROC curve (AUC was improved to 0.83 compared to that of 0.66 for Gleason score and lymph node status alone.miRNA signatures can distinguish patients who fail soon after radical prostatectomy versus late failures, giving insight into which patients may need adjuvant therapy. Notably, two novel miRNAs (miR-4516 and miR-601 were identified that significantly improve prediction of biochemical failure post-salvage radiation therapy compared to clinico-histopathological factors, supporting the use of miRNAs within clinically used predictive models. Both findings warrant further

  2. Pharmacological Prevention and Reversion of Erectile Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy, By Modulation of Nitric Oxide/Cgmp Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    sparing quality with potency following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. J Urol. 2008 Apr;179(4):1510-4. 2: Madeb R, Golijanin D, Knopf J, Vicente I...222–227. 23 Perez -Sala D, Cernuda-Morollon E, Diaz-Cazorla M, Rodriguez- Pascual F, Lamas S. Posttranscriptional regulation of human iNOS by the NO...De Nicola AF (1990) Estrogens down-regulate type I but not type II adrenal corticoids receptors in rat anterior pituitary. J Steroid Biochem Mol

  3. Open Source and Open Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Publication reference: Koper, R. (2008). Open Source and Open Standards. In J. M. Spector, M. Merrill, J. van Merriënboer & M. P. Driscol (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology (3rd ed., pp. 355-368). New York: Routledge.

  4. Comparison of the effects of two intrathecal anaesthetic techniques for transurethral prostatectomy on haemodynamic and pulmonary function.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K H

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Transurethral prostatectomy is routinely performed under spinal anaesthesia. This technique can cause hypotension, which is particularly undesirable in the elderly. The objective was to compare spinal anaesthesia for transurethral prostatectomy using hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg (control group) and hyperbaric bupivacaine 10 mg (limiting spread by maintaining the upright position for 15 min) and fentanyl 25 microg (fentanyl group) in terms of haemodynamic and pulmonary function. METHODS: Thirty ASA I-III patients were randomly selected and underwent spinal anaesthesia with either hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg (immediately positioned supine) or hyperbaric bupivacaine 10 mg (upright for 15 min) and fentanyl 25 microg. RESULTS: The greatest changes in mean arterial pressure (P = 0.9), ephedrine requirements (P = 0.8) and mean maximum change in forced vital capacity (P = 0.5) were similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of fentanyl 25 microg to bupivacaine 10 mg and limiting the spread of the block does not improve either haemodynamic or pulmonary function compared with bupivacaine 15 mg in patients undergoing transurethral prostatectomy.

  5. Comparison of Transperineal Mapping Biopsy Results with Whole-Mount Radical Prostatectomy Pathology in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J. Katz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of transperineal mapping biopsy (TMB by comparing it to the pathology specimen of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP for localized prostate cancer. Methods. From March 2007 to September 2009, 78 men at a single center underwent TMB; 17 of 78 subsequently underwent RP. TMB cores were grouped into four quadrants and matched to data from RP whole-mount slides. Gleason score, tumor location and volume, cross-sectional area, and maximal diameter were measured; sensitivity and specificity were assessed. Results. For the 17 patients who underwent RP, TMB revealed 12 (71% had biopsy Gleason grades ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76% had bilateral disease. RP specimens showed 14 (82% had Gleason scores ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76% had bilateral disease. Sensitivity and specificity of TMB for prostate cancer detection were 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72%–94% and 83% (95% CI 62%–95%, respectively. Four quadrants negative for cancer on TMB were positive on prostatectomy, and six positive on TMB were negative on prostatectomy. Conclusion. TMB is a highly invasive procedure that can accurately detect and localize prostate cancer. These findings help establish baseline performance characteristics for TMB and its utility for organ-sparing strategies.

  6. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF BIOCHEMICAL RELAPSE FREE SURVIVAL FOLLOWING SALVAGE RADIOTHERAPY IN MEN WITH BIOCHEMICAL RECURRENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Demeshko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate influence of clinical, biochemical and histological factors to biochemical relapse free survival (BRFS following salvage radiotherapy (RT in men with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.Material and methods. 77 patients with newly diagnosed biochemical recurrence (BR after RPE were included into retrospective study. All of them underwent local salvage RT. Сlinical variables (age, serum prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level and PSA kinetics, time RPE-BR, Gleason grade, stage after RPE and clinical findings were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis.Results. The median, 1- and 3-year BRFS were 19,9 months, 63,8 ± 6,5 % and 24,7 ± 8,5 % respectively. Significant variables in the multivariable model were age, PSA level before RT, prostatectomy T3b stage, PSA doubling time and positive digital rectal examination findings (p < 0,05. Several clinical parameters help predict the outcomes of men with PSA elevation after radical prostatectomy. These data may be useful in counseling men regarding the timing of administration of adjuvant therapies.

  7. Combined laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection and robotic-assisted prostatectomy for synchronous double cancer of the rectum and the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Hirohiko; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; China, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Jun; Niwa, Koichiro; Ishiyama, Shun; Takahashi, Makoto; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Horie, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Here we report a combined laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection and robotic-assisted prostatectomy. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with T4b low rectal and prostate cancer. The operation was performed after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for the rectal cancer. The procedure used eight ports in total, five for laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection and six for robotic-assisted prostatectomy. First, laparoscopic total mesorectal excision including division of the inferior mesenteric artery was performed, and then, robotic dissection of the prostate was performed. The en bloc specimen was removed through the perineal wound. Then, robotic urethrovesical anastomosis was performed. An extraperitoneal end colostomy was created to finish the operation. The operating time was 545 min, and blood loss was 170 mL. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient discharged on postoperative day 17. The combined laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection and robotic-assisted prostatectomy were performed safely without any additional technical difficulty, as both procedures shared port settings and patient positions.

  8. Open IS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germonprez, Matt; Crowston, Kevin; Avital, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The collective intelligence and collective action of “open” communities have produced a variety of complex knowledge goods and radical social change. The Information Systems (IS) community has invested significant effort into researching open communities and the ecosystems in which they operate...... therefore seeks to stimulate a thoughtful and dynamic discussion around the proposition that becoming a more open community will enhance the IS discipline’s scholarly inquiry and global impact....

  9. Open IS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germonprez, Matt; Crowston, Kevin; Avital, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The collective intelligence and collective action of “open” communities have produced a variety of complex knowledge goods and radical social change. The Information Systems (IS) community has invested significant effort into researching open communities and the ecosystems in which they operate...... therefore seeks to stimulate a thoughtful and dynamic discussion around the proposition that becoming a more open community will enhance the IS discipline’s scholarly inquiry and global impact....

  10. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: histopathologic and biochemical recurrence data at one-year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    Introduction: Robotically assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a minimally invasive alternative for the treatment of prostate cancer. We report the histopathologic and short term PSA outcomes of 500 robotic prostatectomies. Materials and Methods: Five hundred patients underwent robotic radical prostatectomy. The procedure was performed via a six trocar transperitoneal technique. Prostatectomy specimens were analyzed for TNM Stage, Gleason's grade, tumor location, volume, specimen weight, seminal vesicle involvement and margin status. A positive margin was reported if cancer cells were found at the inked specimen margin. PSA data was collected every three months for the first year, then every six months for a year, then yearly. Results: Average pre-operative PSA was 6.9 (1-90) with Gleason's score of 5 (2%), 6 (52%), 7 (40%), 8 (4%), 9(2%). Post operatively histopathologic analysis showed Gleason's 6 (44%), 7(42%), 8(10%), 9(4%). 10%, 5%, 63%, 15%, 5% and 2% had pathologic stage T2a, T2b, T2c, T3a, T3b and T4 respectively. Positive margin rate was 9.4% for the entire series. The positive margin rate per 100 cases was: 13% (1-100), 8% (101-200), 13% (201-300), 5% (301-400) and 8% (401-500). By stage it was 2%, 4%, 2.5% for T2a, T2b, T2c tumors, 23% (T3a), 46% (T3b) and 53% (T4a). For organ confined disease (T2) the margin rate was 2.5% and 31% for non organ confined disease. There were a total of 47 positive margins, 26 (56%) posterolateral, 4 (8.5%) apical, 4 (8.5%) bladder neck, 2 (4%) seminal vesicle and 11 (23%) multifocally. Ninety five percent of patients (n=500) have undetectable PSA (<0.1) at average follow up of 9.7 months. Recurrence has only been seen with non organ confined tumors. Those patients with a minimum follow up of 1 year (average 15.7 months) 95% have undetectable PSA (<.1). Conclusion: Our initial experience with robotic radical prostatectomy is promising. Histopathologic outcomes are acceptable with a low overall margin positive rate

  11. Ocular parameters before and after steep Trendelenburg positioning for robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizumoto K

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kyoichi Mizumoto,1 Masahiko Gosho,2 Masayoshi Iwaki,1 Masahiro Zako3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Clinical Trial and Clinical Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Asai Hospital, Seto, Aichi, Japan Purpose: Intraocular pressure (IOP increases in patients in a steep Trendelenburg position during robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP. We hypothesized that a steep Trendelenburg position during RALP, an unusual systemic condition involving a transiently increased IOP, may induce ocular pathology that can be detected by detailed evaluations long after the surgery. This study aims to explore ocular structural and functional parameters in patients before and in the long term after the surgery. Patients and methods: A comparative observational study was performed. A total of 44 eyes of 22 male patients scheduled for RALP at Aichi Medical University from August 2012 to July 2013 were included. Clinical parameters before and after RALP were compared. Peri­operative IOP was measured immediately post-induction of anesthesia in the flat supine position (T1, immediately post-steep Trendelenburg position (T2, and prior to returning to a flat supine position while in a steep Trendelenburg position (T3. The thicknesses of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell complex (GCC, and central fovea were measured with spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Humphrey perimetry was performed before and at 3 and 6 months after surgery. Results: The average IOPs (mmHg at each stage were T1=10.4, T2=21.7, and T3=29.6, and differed significantly. The mean visual acuity (logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution, IOP, mean deviation, and pattern standard deviation measured by the Humphrey field analyzer showed no statistically significant difference before and after surgery. The ganglion

  12. A robotic needle driver to facilitate vescico-urethral anastomosis during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varca, Virginia; Benelli, Andrea; Pietrantuono, Francesco; Suardi, Nazareno; Gregori, Andrea; Gaboardi, Franco

    2017-06-19

    The completion of the vescico-urethral anastomosis (VUA) represents the most critical step of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP), and it can often discourage the use of minimally invasive surgery in less experienced laparoscopic surgeons. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the usefulness of a new robotic needle driver named Dextérité in performing the VUA after LRP. This prospective randomized clinical study enrolled 40 consecutive patients eligible for LRP, which were randomized into four groups: group A, patients undergoing LRP done by an expert surgeon; group B, patients undergoing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed by the same expert surgeon; group C, patients undergoing LRP performed by a young surgeon at the beginning of the learning curve; group D, patients undergoing LRP performed by another young surgeon at the beginning of the learning curve with the aid of Dextérité needle driver for completion of the VUA. The two young urologists performed the same steps of LRP so that they are at the same step of the learning curve. All the anastomosis were performed with the same technique in order to be comparable. We use interrupted sutures with Vicryl 2/0 and a 5/8 needle; we performed the Rocco stitch technique before all the anastomosis (6) and we applied bladder neck sparing technique. All patients underwent an ultrasound control of the anastomosis on the seventh postoperative day, as we usually do (9, 10). We consider continent who utilised no pad. Operative VUA completion time was 24.9 vs. 25 vs. 86.7 vs. 61 minutes, respectively. When comparing VUA completion time in group 3 and 4, the use of the Dextérité needle driver resulted in a reduction in VUA time. Urinary leakage was seen in zero out of 10 patients in groups 1 and 2 and in three out of 10 and one in 10 patients, respectively, in groups 3 and 4. All urinary leakages were managed conservatively. One-year continence rates were 95%, 97%, 93% and 95%, respectively. Only

  13. Influential factors in the response to salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarra, R; Tienza, A; Hevia, M; Zudaire, J; Rosell, D; Robles, J E; Pascual, I

    2014-12-01

    To analyze the influential factors in the response in prostatectomized patients with subsequent biochemical relapse (BCR) and treated with salvage radiotherapy (RTP). We analyzed 313 patients with pT2/pT3 prostate cancer who were receiving salvage therapy due to biochemical relapse (from a series of 1,310 radical prostatectomies between 1989-2012). Of the 313 patients; 159 (50.8%) only received androgen deprivation (AD), 63 (20.1%) Radiotherapy (RTP) plus concomitant AD and 91 (29.1%) only RTP. Of these, 57 (62.6%) have maintained complete response and 34 (37.4%) had failure response with post-RTP BCR. Study of the group treated exclusively with salvage RTP. Ninety-one patients were treated with salvage RTP. Median follow-up was 6.4 years and median to recurrence 11 months. Post-RTP biochemical relapse-free survival (PRBRFS) was 68 ± 7% and 30 ± 10% in 5 to 10 years. Median PRBRFS was 7.3 years (6.3-8.3). Initial PSA (HR: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.01-1.1 P=.02) with best PSA cut-off point PSA>20 ng/ml (HR: 13.6; 95% CI: 2.1-86 P=.005) and PSA pre-RTP (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2-3.3; P=.009), best PSA cut-off point PSA preRTP 0.92 ng/ml (HR: 4.5; 95% CI: 1.3-15.6; P=.01) showed independent influence in the response in the multivariate study. PRBRFS at 5 years, 81 ± 9% versus 58 ± 9% with initial PSA 20 ng/ml (P=.03). PRBRFS at 5 years, 93 ± 5% versus 53 ± 10% according to PSA pre-RTP 0.9 ng/ml (P=.02). In patients treated with salvage RTP after radical prostatectomy, the preoperative PSA>20 ng/ml and PSA preRTP>0.92 ng/ml shows an independent influence on the response. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Open access

    CERN Document Server

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispe...

  15. Open Brief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Leach

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To commence the thirtieth annual conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ, held on Australia’s Gold Coast in July 2013, ten delegates were invited with very little warning to take five minutes and one image to offer a provocation on the open matters of architectural history in the present moment. The term “open” was taken as the conference theme—a device used by SAHANZ meetings not so much to define the scope of papers presented as to declare the conference flavour year by year. It was not, therefore, an open conference (anything goes so much as a conference on open issues (where, indeed, to go.  The ten interlocutors were invited after the conference to document their interventions and they are presented here as a record of the preoccupations of a specific moment and institutional geography with all the idiosyncrasies and commonalities it might reveal to a broader audience.

  16. Open Education and the Open Science Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Openness as a complex code word for a variety of digital trends and movements has emerged as an alternative mode of "social production" based on the growing and overlapping complexities of open source, open access, open archiving, open publishing, and open science. This paper argues that the openness movement with its reinforcing structure of…

  17. Vacuum therapy in penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy: review of hemodynamic and antihypoxic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Qiang Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, hypoxia is a normal physiological condition in the flaccid penis, which is interrupted by regular nocturnal erections in men with normal erectile function. [1] Lack of spontaneous and nocturnal erections after radical prostatectomy due to neuropraxia results in persistent hypoxia of cavernosal tissue, which leads to apoptosis and degeneration of cavernosal smooth muscle fibers. Therefore, overcoming hypoxia is believed to play a crucial role during neuropraxia. The use of a vacuum erectile device (VED in penile rehabilitation is reportedly effective and may prevent loss of penile length. The corporal blood after VED use is increased and consists of both arterial and venous blood, as revealed by color Doppler sonography and blood gas analysis. A similar phenomenon was observed in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT. However, NPWT employs a lower negative pressure than VED, and a hypoperfused zone, which increases in response to negative pressure adjacent to the wound edge, was observed. Nonetheless, questions regarding ideal subatmospheric pressure levels, modes of action, and therapeutic duration of VED remain unanswered. Moreover, it remains unclear whether a hypoperfused zone or PO 2 gradient appears in the penis during VED therapy. To optimize a clinical VED protocol in penile rehabilitation, further research on the mechanism of VED, especially real-time PO 2 measurements in different parts of the penis, should be performed.

  18. Side docking of the da Vinci robotic system for radical prostatectomy: advantages over traditional docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestari, Andrea; Ferrari, Matteo; Zanoni, Matteo; Sangalli, Mattia; Ghezzi, Massimo; Fabbri, Fabio; Sozzi, Francesco; Rigatti, Patrizio

    2015-09-01

    The standard low lithotomic position, used during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), with prolonged positioning in stirrups together with steep Trendelenburg may expose the patient to neurapraxia phenomena of the lower limbs and can rarely be used in patients with problems of hip abduction. To overcome these hurdles, we evaluated the clinical benefits of "side docking" (SD) of the da Vinci(®) robotic system in comparison to "traditional docking" (TD). A cohort of 120 patients submitted to RARP were prospectively randomized into two groups by docking approach: SD with the patient supine with lower limbs slightly abducted on the operating table, and TD docking time, intraoperative number of collisions between the robotic arms and postoperative neurological problems in the lower limbs were noted. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze outcomes. Docking time was shorter for the SD group [SD: median 13 min (range 10-18); TD: median 21 min (range 15-34)]. None in the SD group and six of 60 patients (10%) in the TD group suffered from temporary (<30 days) unilateral neurological deficits of the lower limbs. In both groups no collisions between the robotic arms occurred. The SD approach is technically feasible. It does not cause collisions between the robotic arms, and is a reliable method for reducing the setup time of RARP. The supine position of the patient may prevent neurological complications of the lower limbs. Based on these results, SD has become the standard docking technique used by our department.

  19. Vacuum therapy in penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy: review of hemodynamic and antihypoxic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Sheng-Qiang; Gao, Liang; Wei, Qiang; Yuan, Jiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Generally, hypoxia is a normal physiological condition in the flaccid penis, which is interrupted by regular nocturnal erections in men with normal erectile function. [1] Lack of spontaneous and nocturnal erections after radical prostatectomy due to neuropraxia results in persistent hypoxia of cavernosal tissue, which leads to apoptosis and degeneration of cavernosal smooth muscle fibers. Therefore, overcoming hypoxia is believed to play a crucial role during neuropraxia. The use of a vacuum erectile device (VED) in penile rehabilitation is reportedly effective and may prevent loss of penile length. The corporal blood after VED use is increased and consists of both arterial and venous blood, as revealed by color Doppler sonography and blood gas analysis. A similar phenomenon was observed in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, NPWT employs a lower negative pressure than VED, and a hypoperfused zone, which increases in response to negative pressure adjacent to the wound edge, was observed. Nonetheless, questions regarding ideal subatmospheric pressure levels, modes of action, and therapeutic duration of VED remain unanswered. Moreover, it remains unclear whether a hypoperfused zone or PO 2 gradient appears in the penis during VED therapy. To optimize a clinical VED protocol in penile rehabilitation, further research on the mechanism of VED, especially real-time PO 2 measurements in different parts of the penis, should be performed.

  20. Periurethral constrictor: late results of the treatment of post prostatectomy urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto S. Lima

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We evaluated retrospectively, the long-term outcome of patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPUI after placement of the Periurethral Constrictor (PUC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-six men with severe PPUI were studied, with a mean age of 68.5 years old. Fifty-one men had PPUI due to radical surgery having the device placed around the bulbous urethra, and five individuals with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH had placement around the bladder neck. The mean follow-up was 82.2 months. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients (39.28% became continent (0 to 1 pad a day and 34 (60.72% were incontinent. Complications were as follows: urethral erosion in 15 (26.78%; mechanical malfunction in 2 (3.5%; infection in 2 (3.5%; urinary fistula in 1 (1.7%; Urinary tract infection1 (1.7%. Twenty-three patients needed to have the device removed (41.07%. Success rate (continent me was 30.35%. CONCLUSION: In the present series the PUC was not effective for the treatment of severe PPUI in the long-term follow-up.

  1. In-vitro and clinical evaluation of transurethral laser-induced prostatectomy (TULIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Swol, Christiaan F. P.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; Mooibroek, Jaap; Boon, Tom A.

    1993-05-01

    Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser induced prostatectomy (TULIP) is a recent development in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The system is based upon Nd:YAG laser irradiation delivered by a right angled fiber. The dosimetry used in a clinical situation is mostly based upon animal studies. In this study, the light and temperature distribution in the prostate during Nd:YAG laser irradiation were modeled using Monte Carlo and finite differences theory. The results of this model were compared with in vitro experiments. The influence of the different parameters involved, e.g., the scanning speed and the power of the laser beam, were evaluated. Initial results show the temperature distribution and thus the therapeutic effect of the TULIP procedure. Until now 36 patients have been treated successfully. The mean in-hospital time was somewhat shorter than for a TURP treatment while the results were comparable. These treatments, however, show the need for a better understanding of the mechanisms involved. Modeling and subsequent in vitro and in vivo measurements might improve the understanding and safe and successful application of prostate treatment using laser based systems.

  2. Pelvic Radiotherapy versus Radical Prostatectomy with Limited Lymph Node Sampling for High-Grade Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B. Baker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare oncologic outcomes for patients with Gleason score (GS ≥ 8 prostate adenocarcinoma treated with radical prostatectomy (RP versus external beam radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation (RT + ADT. Methods. Between 2001 and 2014, 121 patients with GS ≥ 8 were treated at our institution via RT + ADT (n=71 or RP (n=50 with ≥ 1 year of biochemical follow-up. Endpoints included biochemical failure (BF, distant metastasis, and initiation of salvage ADT. Results. The RT + ADT group was older, had higher biopsy GS, and had greater risk of lymph node involvement. All other pretreatment characteristics were similar between groups. Mean number of lymph nodes (LNs sampled for patients undergoing RP was 8.2 (±6.18. Mean biochemical follow-up for all patients was 61 months. Five-year estimates of BF for the RT + ADT and RP groups were 7.2% versus 42.3%, (p<0.001. The RT + ADT group also had lower rates of distant metastasis (2% versus 7.8% and salvage ADT (8% versus 33.8%. Conclusion. In this analysis, RT + ADT was associated with improved biochemical and metastatic control when compared to RP with limited LN sampling. How RT + ADT compares with more aggressive lymphadenectomy, as is currently our institutional standard, remains an important unanswered question.

  3. Management of pelvic lymphoceles after radical prostatectomy: A multicentre community based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoder WY

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pelvic lymphoceles (LC following radical prostatectomy (LC-RP have an incidence up to 27%. LC-managements constitute 50% of surgical interventions performed in post-RP patients. Objectives To describe a therapeutic algorithm for LC-managements based on a community based representative retrospective study. Patients and methods: Multicentre data from 304 patients with LC-RP were retrospectively examined for LC-managements. RPs were performed by various surgeons from 67 urological departments. All patients had undergone 3 weeks rehabilitation in a specialized hospital where the data base was generated. Indications and results of therapeutic manoeuvres were used to develop a general concept for planning therapy decisions. Results Median age was 64 years. Complications occurred in 9% (28/304 of patients. Median LC-volume was 36 ml (range 20-1800 ml. There were more complications for LCs with ≥100 ml volume than those Conclusions This study based treatment algorithm provides a rationale approach with an accurate LC-classification as regard the indications and decision making for the available LC-RP-therapies. This could facilitate management decisions. Evaluation of this concept prospectively in large patient cohort is mandatory.

  4. Radical prostatectomy neutralizes obesity-driven risk of prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, Jonas; Salomon, Georg; Tilki, Derya; Budäus, Lars; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Pompe, Raisa S; Haese, Alexander; Heinzer, Hans; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus; Tennstedt, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Obesity negatively affects several prostate cancer (PCa) outcomes, including mortality to PCa. However, the validity of several such associations is still under debate, including its effect on pathological stage at radical prostatectomy (RP) and subsequent biochemical recurrence (BCR), which represents the focus of this study. We relied on patients with PCa treated with RP at the Martini-Klinik Prostate Cancer Center between 2004 and 2015. First, multivariable logistic regression analyses tested for association between obesity and non-organ-confined disease (≥pT3 or pN1). Second, multivariable Cox regression analyses examined obesity effect on BCR. Last, in a propensity score-matched cohort, Kaplan-Meier analyses assessed BCR-free survival according to body mass index (kg/m(2)) (BMI) strata (≥30 vs.obese (BMI≥30). Median follow-up was 36.4 months (interquartile range: 13.3-60.8). Obese patients were more likely to harbor non-organ-confined disease at final pathology (odds ratio = 1.27; 95% CI: 1.13-1.43; Pobese and nonobese men, after propensity score matching (log rank P = 0.9). Obesity (BMI ≥30) might predispose to higher rates of non-organ-confined disease at RP. However, obesity was not an independent predictor of BCR after surgery. Consequently, the unfavorable effect of obesity on PCa might be limited to local spread of the disease and might be neutralized after RP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Significance and management of positive surgical margins at the time of radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Jonathan L; Eastham, James A

    2014-10-01

    Positive surgical margins (PSM) at the time of radical prostatectomy (RP) result in an increased risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) and secondary treatment. We review current literature with a focus on stratifying the characteristics of the PSM that may define its significance, the impact of modern imaging and surgical approaches in avoidance of PSM, and management strategies when PSM do occur. We performed a review of the available literature to identify factors associated with PSM and their management. PSM have been repeatedly demonstrated to be associated with an increased risk of BCR following RP. The specific characteristics (size, number, location, Gleason score at the margin) of the PSM may influence the risk of recurrence. Novel imaging and surgical approaches are being investigated and may allow for reductions of PSM in the future. The use of adjuvant treatment for a PSM remains controversial and should be decided on an individual basis after a discussion about the risks and benefits. The goal of RP is complete resection of the tumor. PSM are associated with increased risk of BCR and secondary treatments. Of the risk factors associated with BCR after RP, a PSM is directly influenced by surgical technique.

  6. Multiparametric MRI for recurrent prostate cancer post radical prostatectomy and postradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchetti, Flavio; Panebianco, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    The clinical suspicion of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa) after radical prostatectomy (RP) and after radiation therapy (RT) is based on the onset of biochemical failure. The aim of this paper was to review the current role of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A systematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed from January 1995 up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of mp-MRI in the detection of PCa local recurrence after RP; the second part provides an insight about the impact of mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence after RT (interstitial or external beam). Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the detection and localization of locally recurrent PCa both after RP and RT which represents an information of paramount importance to perform focal salvage treatments.

  7. Advanced Imaging for the Early Diagnosis of Local Recurrence Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Panebianco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa after radical prostatectomy (RT is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence.

  8. Multiparametric MRI for Recurrent Prostate Cancer Post Radical Prostatectomy and Postradiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Barchetti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical suspicion of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa after radical prostatectomy (RP and after radiation therapy (RT is based on the onset of biochemical failure. The aim of this paper was to review the current role of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A systematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed from January 1995 up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of mp-MRI in the detection of PCa local recurrence after RP; the second part provides an insight about the impact of mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence after RT (interstitial or external beam. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the detection and localization of locally recurrent PCa both after RP and RT which represents an information of paramount importance to perform focal salvage treatments.

  9. Advanced imaging for the early diagnosis of local recurrence prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Flavio; Musio, Daniela; De Felice, Francesca; Proietti, Camilla; Indino, Elena Lucia; Megna, Valentina; Schillaci, Orazio; Catalano, Carlo; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa) after radical prostatectomy (RT) is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence.

  10. Erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy – a challenge for both patient and physician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratu, O; Oprea, I; Marcu, D; Spinu, D; Niculae, A; Geavlete, B; Mischianu, D

    2017-01-01

    Post-radical prostatectomy erectile dysfunction (post RP ED) is a major postoperative complication with a great impact on the quality of life of the patients. Until present, no proper algorithm or guideline based on the clinical trials has been established for the management of post RP ED. According to literature, it is better to initiate a penile rehabilitation program as soon as possible after surgery than doing nothing, in order to prevent and limit the postoperative local hypoxygenation and fibrosis. The results of numerous clinical trials regarding the effectiveness of the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors therapy on post RP ED have made them the gold standard treatment. Encouraging results have been achieved in studies with vacuum erectile devices, intraurethral suppositories with alprostadil and intracavernosal injections, but due to their side effects, especially in the cases of intracavernosal injections and intraurethral suppositories, their clinical use was limited therefore making them a second line option for the post RP ED treatment. What should not be forgotten is that penile implant prosthesis has proven very effective, numerous studies confirming high rates of satisfaction for both patients and partners. PMID:28255370

  11. Frozen section evaluation of margins in radical prostatectomy specimens: a contemporary study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Amberly L; Giannico, Giovanna A; Mukhtar, Faisal; Dailey, Virginia; El-Galley, Rizk; Hameed, Omar

    2016-10-01

    The utility of routine frozen section (FS) analysis for margin evaluation during radical prostatectomy (RP) remains controversial. A retrospective search was conducted to identify RPs evaluated by FS over a 5-year period. The potential of FS to discriminate between benign and malignant tissue and to predict final margins was evaluated. During the study period, 71 (12.3%) of 575 cases underwent FS evaluation of margins, generating 192 individual FSs. There were 8 FSs diagnosed as atypical/indeterminate because of significant freezing, crushing, and/or thermal artifacts; 11 as positive for carcinoma; and 173 as benign. Two FSs classified as benign were diagnosed as positive for carcinoma on subsequent permanent section. Frozen sections' sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy for diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma were 85%, 100%, 100%, 99%, and 99%, respectively. Overall RP final margin predictive accuracy was 81%. Positive FS was significantly associated with perineural invasion on biopsy and extraprostatic extension and higher stage disease on RP, but not with the overall final margin status. The high FS accuracy supports its use to guide the extent of surgery. However, FS cannot be used to predict the overall final margin status. Recognition of the histological artifacts inherent to the FS procedure is important to ensure appropriate utilization.

  12. The Open

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saitya Brata Das

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Open darkness and light, remembrance and oblivion, coming into existence and disappearing in death play their originary co-belonging, or co-figuration. Existence belongs to this opening and is exposed to its coming to presence: it is on the basis of this originary opening, this originary historical which is revealed to this mortal being called ‘man,’ on the basis of this revelation, man founds something like politics and history. There thus comes into existence out of this freedom, out of this “play space”2, this field called ‘polis’3 where there takes place war and festival, where historical revolutions tear apart history, brings ruptures and discontinuities in the very mode of his existence, where man seeks the foundation of his own foundation (which is his metaphysical task , where occurs the dialectics of negativity between man and man, where man puts at stake his own death, his own dissolution, and by the power of his own dissolution stands in relation to the total world that he seeks to dominate. This means that man’s attempts to metaphysically found his own political and historical existence must presuppose a far more originary non-foundation, the differentiating revealing of the open, the ungrounded spacing play, or playing space of natality and mortality.

  13. Open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Joel; Bogers, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    by small, new, and not-for-profit organizations, as well as the linkage of individual actions and motivations to open innovation. Other opportunities include better measuring the costs, benefits, antecedents, mediators and moderators of the effects of OI on performance, and understanding why and how OI...

  14. 经耻骨后无张力阴道吊带术的临床解剖研究%Clinical Anatomic Study on the Procedure of the Retropubic Tension-Free Vaginal Tape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾贵海; 李怀芳; 王建军; 孙静; 童晓文

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To identify the route of the retropubic tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure which is applied to treat stress urinary incontinence(SUI) ,and to explore the safety range. Methods; From October 2009 to October 2010, two fresh female cadavers were injected colored latex from radial artery; After 5 days, TVT procedure was performed when lactoprene solidified; Then, a clinical anatomic study and measurements between the trocar locations and related vassels, nerves or organs were carried out; In the end, the safety ranges were calculated for the procedure. Results:There was no complication during all procedures. The distance between TVT trocar and the bladder, obturator vessels and nerves, external iliac vessels, inferior epigastric vessels and superficial epigastric vessels were 0. 5 ±0.1 cm ,4. 2 ±0.2 cm >4. 7 ±0.1 cm ,4.4 ±0.6 cm and 2. 7 ±0. 4 cm respectively. Conclusions .-Out of control of TVT trocar, the deflection of TVT handle could injure the important vessels or nerves and organs in pelvis, but the correct localization in abdominal wall before TVT procedure is helpful to reduce injury.%目的:明确经耻骨后无张力阴道吊带术的穿刺路径,并探讨其在治疗女性压力性尿失禁时的安全操作范围.方法:2009年10月至2010年10月应用红色乳胶分别对2具新鲜女性尸体标本进行桡动脉血管灌注,将灌注好的标本保存在1℃ -3℃的冰柜里等待乳胶凝固,5天后对标本进行手术穿刺和路径解剖.同时测量穿刺针与相关血管、神经和脏器之间的空间距离,最后分析并计算出该术式的安全操作范围.结果:实验中所有穿刺均未发生副损伤,穿刺针与膀胱、闭孔血管神经、髂外血管、腹壁下血管和腹壁浅血管的距离分别是0.5±0.1 cm,4.2±0.2 cm,4.7±0.1 cm,4.4±0.6 cm和2.7±0.4 cm.结论:术中穿刺针有失控导致穿刺方向旋转而损伤上述重要血管、神经和脏器的可能,但是只要在穿刺前正确定位

  15. Open Source, Open Access, Open Review, Open Data. Initiativen zu mehr Offenheit in der digitalen Welt

    OpenAIRE

    Herb, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the principles of openess, open access and open availability of information based on the examples of open access to scientific information, open government data, open geographical data and open source software.

  16. Open Source, Open Access, Open Review, Open Data. Initiativen zu mehr Offenheit in der digitalen Welt

    OpenAIRE

    Herb, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the principles of openess, open access and open availability of information based on the examples of open access to scientific information, open government data, open geographical data and open source software.

  17. OpenAPC. Open-Access-Publikationskosten als Open Data

    OpenAIRE

    Tullney, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Präsentationsfolien zum Vortrag „OpenAPC. Open-Access-Publikationskosten als Open Data“ in der Session „Ausgestaltung eines wissenschaftsadäquaten APC-Marktes: Grundsätze, Finanzierungsansätze und Management“ der Open-Access-Tage 2015 in Zürich (https://www.open-access.net/community/open-access-tage/open-access-tage-2015-zuerich/programm/#c1974)

  18. The dosimetric significance of using 10 MV photons for volumetric modulated arc therapy for post-prostatectomy irradiation of the prostate bed

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of the study was to analyse the dosimetric differences when using 10 MV instead of 6 MV for VMAT treatment plans for post-prostatectomy irradiation of the prostate bed. Methods and materials Ten post-prostatectomy prostate bed irradiation cases previously treated using 6 MV with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were re-planned using 10 MV with VMAT. Prescription dose was 66.6 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction for 37 daily fractions. The same structure set, num...

  19. Prostate cancer: 1.5 T endo-coil dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopy-correlation with prostate biopsy and prostatectomy histopathological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, E.; Balslev, I.; Løgager, Vibeke Berg

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 43 patients, scheduled for radical...... prostatectomy, underwent prostate MR examination. Prostate cancer was identified by transrectal ultrasonographically (TRUS) guided sextant biopsy. MR examination was performed at 1.5T with an endorectal MR coil. Cancer localisation was performed on sextant-basis - for comparison between TRUS biopsy, MR...

  20. A Pilot Study of Potential Pre-operative Barriers to Couples’ Sexual Recovery after Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Daniela; Northouse, Laurel; Crossley, Heather; Miller, David; Dunn, Rodney; Nidetz, Jennifer; Montie, Jeanne; Moyad, Mia; Lavin, Katie; Montie, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Prostate cancer affects couples’ sexual intimacy, but men rarely use recommended pro-erectile aids. Our mixed methods study aimed to identify couples’ pre-prostatectomy barriers to sexual recovery. Methods Interviews about anticipated sexual recovery were paired with surveys: the Dyadic Assessment Scale, Protective Buffering Scale, Expanded Prostate Index Composite, Sexual Experience Questionnaire (men), Female Sexual Function Index. Barriers were derived using Grounded Theory. Quantitative data triangulated qualitative findings. Results Heterosexual couples (28) participated. Men were 62, partners 58 years old on average. Pre-existing and diagnosis-related barriers included aging-related sexual dysfunction, inadequate sexual problemsolving skills, stressors, worry, avoidance of planning for sexual recovery, dislike of ‘assisted’ sex. Participants endorsed moderate/high marital satisfaction (Mean DAS: men=110.0, SD ±11.4, partners=114.1, SD±12.1) and communication (Mean PBS: men=24.5.2, SD±6.1, partners=25.1, SD±6.2). Men reported mild ED and incontinence (Mean EPIC: 76.6, SD±.21.5; 88.4, SD±18.2, respectively). Men’s couple sexual satisfaction was lowest (Mean SEX-Q: 60.1, SD±26.9). Mean Total FSFI was low (21.6, SD±7.8). Conclusions Heterosexual couples face prostatectomy-related sexual side-effects having experienced developmental sexual losses. Couples use avoidant strategies to defend against worry about cancer and anticipated prostatectomy-related sexual changes. These barriers are modifiable if couples can learn to cope with sexual losses and accept sexual rehabilitation strategies. PMID:24405053

  1. Weight gain is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer recurrence after prostatectomy in the PSA era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshu, Corinne E; Mondul, Alison M; Menke, Andy; Meinhold, Cari; Han, Misop; Humphreys, Elizabeth B; Freedland, Stephen J; Walsh, Patrick C; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2010-01-01

    Purpose While obesity at time of prostatectomy has been associated with prostate cancer recurrence, it is unknown whether obesity before or after surgery, or weight change from the years prior to surgery to after surgery is associated with recurrence. Thus, we examined the influence of obesity and weight change on recurrence after prostatectomy. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 1,337 men with clinically-localized prostate cancer who underwent prostatectomy performed during 1993-2006 by the same surgeon. Men self-reported weight and physical activity at 5 years before and 1 year after surgery on a survey during follow-up. Mean follow up was 7.3 years. We estimated multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of prostate cancer recurrence comparing obesity at 5 years before and at 1 year after surgery with normal weight, and a gain of >2.2 kg from 5 years before to 1 year after surgery with stable weight. Results During 9,797 person years of follow-up, 102 men recurred. Compared with men who had stable weight, those whose weight increased >2.2 kg had twice the recurrence risk (HR=1.94, 95% CI 1.14-3.32) after taking into account age, pathological stage and grade, and other characteristics. The HR of recurrence was 1.20 (95% CI 0.64-2.23) and 1.72 (95% CI 0.94-3.14) comparing obesity at 5 years before and at 1 year after surgery, respectively, with normal weight. Physical activity (≥5 hrs/wk) did not attenuate risk in men who gained >2.2 kg. Conclusions By avoiding weight gain, men with prostate cancer may both prevent recurrence and improve overall well-being. PMID:21325564

  2. The effect of steep Trendelenburg positioning on intraocular pressure and visual function during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshikawa, Yuko; Tsutsumi, Noriko; Ohkoshi, Kisiko; Serizawa, Satoshi; Hamada, Masafumi; Inagaki, Keiji; Tsuzuki, Kentaro; Koshimizu, Junko; Echizen, Nariaki; Fujitani, Syuko; Takahashi, Osamu; Deshpande, Gautam A

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate intraocular pressure (IOP) changes in patients undergoing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and to evaluate complications from increased IOP. Thirty-one eyes scheduled for robotic prostatectomy were included. Perioperative IOP measurements were performed as follows: prior to induction of anaesthesia while supine and awake (T1); immediately post-induction while supine (T2); every hour from 0 to 5 h while anaesthetised in a steep Trendelenburg position (T3-T8); prior to awakening while supine (T9); and 30 min after awakening while supine (T10). A complete ophthalmic examination including visual acuity and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFL) was performed at enrolment and 1 month postoperatively. Average IOP (mm Hg) for each time point was as follows: T1=18.0, T2=9.8, T3=18.9, T4=21.6, T5=22.5, T6=22.3, T7=24.2, T8=24.0, T9=15.7 and T10=17.9. The proportion of eyes with intraoperative IOP ≧30 mm Hg were as follows: T3=0%, T4=3.23%, T5=9.68%, T6=6.45%, T7=22.22%, and T8=25%. Maximum IOP was 36 mm Hg. Mean visual acuity (logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution) and RNFL showed no statistically significant difference before and after operation and no other ocular complications were found at final examination. While IOP increased in a time-dependent fashion in anesthaetised patients undergoing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy in a steep Trendelenburg position, visual function showed no significant change postoperatively and no complications were seen. Steep Trendelenburg positioning during time-limited procedures appears to pose little or no risk from IOP increases in patients without pre-existing ocular disease.

  3. A Retrospective Study of Erectile Function and Use of Erectile Aids in Prostate Cancer Patients After Radical Prostatectomy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Martha Kirstine; Azawi, Nessn H; Andersen, Line Grønbaek

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radical prostatectomy (RP) offers a good long-term cancer control for clinically localized prostate cancer. However, complications such as erectile dysfunction and substantial decreases quality of life of the afflicted men and their sexual partners. Identification of pre-, per......-, and postoperative factors that correlate with poor postoperative erectile status must be considered an important step to improving penile rehabilitation. AIM: To describe postoperative erectile function after RP in a Danish cohort. METHODS: The medical records of 1,127 patients undergoing RP from March 2003 through...

  4. Health-related quality of life outcomes in Scandinavian patients after radical prostatectomy or watchful waiting:a critical appraisal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea A Chan; Steven E Canfield; Run Wang

    2012-01-01

    The Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group4 recently reported the long-term survival benefit in men who were randomized to radical prostatectomy versus men watchful waiting for localized prostate cancer.The authors have now presented the companion article that updates the long-term quality of life evaluation in these men.2 Given the excellent prognosis of patients with early stage prostate cancer,the impact of therapy on patient's quality of life is a significant factor in the optimal management of this disease.

  5. Transurethral prostatectomy: immediate and postoperative complications. A cooperative study of 13 participating institutions evaluating 3,885 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebust, W K; Holtgrewe, H L; Cockett, A T; Peters, P C

    1989-02-01

    The mortality rate for transurethral prostatectomy was 0.2 per cent in 3,885 patients reviewed retrospectively. The immediate postoperative morbidity rate was 18 per cent. Increased morbidity was found in patients with a resection time of more than 90 minutes, gland size of more than 45 gm., acute urinary retention and patient age greater than 80 years, and in the black population. Of the patients 77 per cent had significant pre-existing medical problems. Operative mortality, significant morbidity and hospital stay were reduced in comparison to studies done 15 and 30 years ago.

  6. Is It Worth Continuing Sexual Rehabilitation after Radical Prostatectomy with Intracavernous Injection of Alprostadil for More than 1 Year?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Yiou, MD, PhD, PUPH

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The response to IAI remained stable after 2 years of treatment, and no significant improvement of spontaneous erections during intercourse attempts was found between M12 and M24. Patients should be informed of the limited effect of IAI on natural erections after 1 year. Yiou R, Bütow Z, Parisot J, Binhas M, Lingombet O, Augustin D, de la Taille A, and Audureau E. Is it worth continuing sexual rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy with intracavernous injection of alprostadil for more than 1 year? Sex Med 2015;3:42–48.

  7. Predictive factors of [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT in patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovacchini, Giampiero; Coradeschi, Elisa [University of Milano-Bicocca, Center for Molecular Bioimaging, Milano (Italy); Picchio, Maria; Bettinardi, Valentino; Gianolli, Luigi [Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milano (Italy); Scattoni, Vincenzo; Rigatti, Patrizio [Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Department of Urology, Milano (Italy); Cozzarini, Cesare; Di Muzio, Nadia [Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Department of Radiation Oncology, Milano (Italy); Fazio, Ferruccio [University of Milano-Bicocca, Center for Molecular Bioimaging, Milano (Italy); Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milano (Italy); Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Department of Radiation Oncology, Milano (Italy); Messa, Cristina [University of Milano-Bicocca, Center for Molecular Bioimaging, Milano (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milano (Italy); Hospital San Gerardo, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    Detection of recurrence in prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy by [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT depends on the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. The role of other clinical and pathological variables has not been explored. A total of 2,124 prostate cancer patients referred to our Institution for [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT from December 2004 to January 2007 for restaging of disease were retrospectively considered for this study. Inclusion criteria were: previous treatment by radical prostatectomy, and biochemical failure, defined as at least two consecutive PSA measurements of >0.2 ng/ml. These criteria were met for 358 patients. Binary logistic analysis was used to investigate the predictive factors of [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT. PET/CT findings were validated using criteria based on histological analysis, and follow-up clinical and imaging data. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the performance of [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT in relation to PSA levels. The mean PSA level was 3.77 {+-} 6.94 ng/ml (range 0.23-45 ng/ml; median 1.27 ng/ml). PET/CT was positive for recurrence in 161 of 358 patients (45%). On an anatomical region basis, [{sup 11}C]choline pathological uptake was observed in lymph nodes (107/161 patients, 66%), prostatectomy bed (55/161 patients, 34%), and in the skeleton (46/161 patients, 29%). PET/CT findings were validated using histological criteria (46/358, 13%), and follow-up clinical and imaging criteria (312/358, 87%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and overall accuracy were, respectively, 85%, 93%, 91%, 87%, and 89%. In multivariate analysis, high PSA levels, advanced pathological stage, previous biochemical failure and older age were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with an increased risk of positive PET/CT findings. The percentage of positive scans was 19% in those with a PSA level between 0.2 and 1 ng/ml, 46% in those

  8. Evaluation of a genomic classifier in radical prostatectomy patients with lymph node metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HJ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hak J Lee,1 Kasra Yousefi,2 Zaid Haddad,2 Firas Abdollah,3 Lucia LC Lam,2 Heesun Shin,2 Mohammed Alshalalfa,2 Elana Godebu,1 Song Wang,4 Ahmed Shabaik,5 Elai Davicioni,2 Christopher J Kane1 1Department of Urology, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA; 2GenomeDx Biosciences Inc., Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, 4UC San Diego Health System, San Diego, CA, 5Department of Pathology, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA Objective: To evaluate the performance of the Decipher test in predicting lymph node invasion (LNI on radical prostatectomy (RP specimens. Methods: We identified 1,987 consecutive patients with RP who received the Decipher test between February and August 2015 (contemporary cohort. In the contemporary cohort, only the Decipher score from RP specimens was available for analysis. In addition, we identified a consecutive cohort of patients treated with RP between 2006 and 2012 at the University of California, San Diego, with LNI upon pathologic examination (retrospective cohort. The retrospective cohort yielded seven, 22, and 18 tissue specimens from prostate biopsy, RP, and lymph nodes (LNs for individual patients, respectively. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the performance of Decipher in the contemporary cohort with LNI as the endpoint. In the retrospective cohort, concordance of risk groups was assessed using validated cut-points for low (<0.45, intermediate (0.45–0.60, and high (>0.60 Decipher scores. Results: In the contemporary cohort, 51 (2.6% patients had LNI. Decipher had an odds ratio of 1.73 (95% confidence interval, 1.46–2.05 and 1.42 (95% confidence interval, 1.19–1.7 per 10% increase in score on univariable and multivariable (adjusting for pathologic Gleason score, extraprostatic extension, and seminal vesicle invasion, respectively. No significant difference in the clinical

  9. Adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhao Chen

    Full Text Available In men with adverse prognostic factors (APFs after radical prostatectomy (RP, the most appropriate timing to administer radiotherapy remains a subject for debate. We conducted a systemic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the therapeutic strategies: adjuvant radiotherapy (ART and salvage radiotherapy (SRT.We comprehensively searched PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library and performed the meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials (RCTs and retrospective comparative studies assessing the prognostic factors of ART and SRT.Between May 1998 and July 2012, 2 matched control studies and 16 retrospective studies including a total of 2629 cases were identified (1404 cases for ART and 1185 cases for SRT. 5-year biochemical failure free survival (BFFS for ART was longer than that for SRT (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 0.37; 95% CI, 0.30-0.46; p<0.00001, I(2 = 0%. 3-year BFFS was significantly longer in the ART (HR: 0.38; 95% CI, 0.28-0.52; p<0.00001, I(2 = 0%. Overall survival (OS was also better in the ART (RR: 0.53; 95% CI, 0.41-0.68; p<0.00001, I(2 = 0%, as did disease free survival (DFS (RR: 0.53; 95% CI, 0.43-0.66; p<0.00001, I(2  = 0%. Exploratory subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis revealed the similar results with original analysis.ART therapy offers a safe and efficient alternative to SRT with longer 3-year and 5-year BFFS, better OS and DFS. Our recommendation is to suggest ART for patients with APFs and may reduce the need for SRT. Given the inherent limitations of the included studies, future well-designed RCTs are awaited to confirm and update this analysis.

  10. Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Foley, Kathleen A. [Strategic Consulting, Thomson Reuters Healthcare, Cambridge, MA (United States); Keith, Scott W. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D. [Department of Urology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hoffman-Censits, Jean [Department of Medical Oncology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pizzi, Laura T. [School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gomella, Leonard G. [Department of Urology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

  11. Robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: assistant's seniority has no influence on perioperative course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Ghanem, Yasmin; Erlich, Tomer; Ramon, Jacob; Dotan, Zohar; Zilberman, Dorit E

    2016-11-09

    An experienced surgical team, in general, and the surgeon assistant in particular are believed to play a critical role in the operation's safety and success. We sought to explore whether the assistant's seniority influences perioperative course following robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP). We reviewed our prospective registry database of RALP cases performed by a single surgeon who during the study period was beyond his learning curve. The following parameters were documented and analyzed: patient's age, body mass index (BMI), associated comorbidities, previous abdominal surgeries, assistant's identity, total and skin-to-skin operative time (tOT, ssOT, respectively), estimated blood loss (EBL), immediate post-operative complications, length of stay (LOS), and prostate weight per final pathology report. Univariate analysis and Spearman's correlation test were used to evaluate whether the assistant's seniority influenced perioperative course. Between the years 2011-2015, 106 consecutive cases were retrieved and analyzed. Prostate weight was found to be associated with longer tOT (Spearman's ρ = 0.34, p < 0.001), ssOT (0.3, p < 0.01) and increased EBL (0.28, p < 0.01). Patient's age, BMI, associated comorbidities, and previous abdominal surgeries were found to have no influence on neither tOT, ssOT nor EBL. Three assistants' subgroups were identified (seniors, PGY 1-3, PGY 4-6). The assistant's seniority was found to have no influence on tOT, ssOT, EBL, immediate post-operative complications and LOS. Same results were obtained following prostate size adjustments. The assistant's seniority has no influence on perioperative course following RALP. Consequently, given a highly experienced primary surgeon, a less experienced assistant can be safely incorporated into this procedure.

  12. Oncological outcomes following radical prostatectomy for patients with pT4 prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharam Kaushik

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: Radical prostatectomy (RP for locally advanced prostate cancer may reduce the risk of metastasis and cancer-specific death. Herein, we evaluated the outcomes for patients with pT4 disease treated with RP. Materials and methods: Among 19,800 men treated with RP at Mayo Clinic from 1987 to 2010, 87 were found to have pT4 tumors. Biochemical recurrence (BCR-free survival, systemic progression (SP free survival and overall survival (OS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association of clinic-pathological features with outcome. Results: Median follow-up was 9.8 years (IQR 3.6, 13.4. Of the 87 patients, 50 (57.5% were diagnosed with BCR, 30 (34.5% developed SP, and 38 (43.7% died, with 11 (12.6% dying of prostate cancer. Adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was administered to 77 men, while 32 received adjuvant external beam radiation therapy. Ten-year BCR-free survival, SP-free survival, and OS was 37%, 64%, and 70% respectively. On multivariate analysis, the presence of positive lymph nodes was marginally significantly associated with patients' risk of BCR (HR: 1.94; p=0.05, while both positive lymph nodes (HR 2.96; p=0.02 and high pathologic Gleason score (HR 1.95; p=0.03 were associated with SP. Conclusions: Patients with pT4 disease may experience long-term survival following RP, and as such, when technically feasible, surgical resection should be considered in the multimodal treatment approach to these men.

  13. Low serum testosterone predicts upgrading and upstaging of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Often, pathological Gleason Score (GS and stage of prostate cancer (PCa were inconsistent with biopsy GS and clinical stage. However, there were no widely accepted methods predicting upgrading and upstaging PCa. In our study, we investigated the association between serum testosterone and upgrading or upstaging of PCa after radical prostatectomy (RP. We enrolled 167 patients with PCa with biopsy GS ≤6, clinical stage ≤T2c, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA <10 ng ml−1 from April 2009 to April 2015. Data including age, body mass index, preoperative PSA level, comorbidity, clinical presentation, and preoperative serum total testosterone level were collected. Upgrading occurred in 62 (37.1% patients, and upstaging occurred in 73 (43.7% patients. Preoperative testosterone was lower in the upgrading than nonupgrading group (3.72 vs 4.56, P< 0.01. Patients in the upstaging group had lower preoperative testosterone than those in the nonupstaging group (3.84 vs 4.57, P= 0.01. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, as both continuous and categorical variables, low serum testosterone was confirmed to be an independent predictor of pathological upgrading (P = 0.01 and P= 0.01 and upstaging (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02 after RP. We suggest that low serum testosterone (<3 ng ml−1 is associated with a high rate of upgrading and upstaging after RP. It is better for surgeons to ensure close monitoring of PSA levels and imaging examination when selecting non-RP treatment, to be cautious in proceeding with nerve-sparing surgery, and to be enthusiastic in performing extended lymph node dissection when selecting RP treatment for patients with low serum testosterone.

  14. Critical analysis of salvage radical prostatectomy in the management of radioresistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seabra, Daniel; Faria, Eliney; Dauster, Breno; Rodrigues, Gunther; Fava, Gilberto [Pio XII Foundation, Barretos, SP (Brazil). Section of Urology], e-mail: daniel.seabra@terra.com.br

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To critically evaluate salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) in the treatment of patients with recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and Methods: From January 2005 to June 2007, we assessed patients with recurrent localized PCa. Recurrence was suspected when there were three or more successive increases in prostate specific antigen (PSA) after nadir. After the routine imagery examinations, and once localized PCa was confirmed, patients were offered SRP. Following surgery, we evaluated bleeding, rectal injury, urinary incontinence or obstruction and impotence. PSA values were measured at 1, 3, 6, months and thereafter twice a year. Results: Forty-two patients underwent SRP. The average age was 61 years. Following radiotherapy , the mean PSA nadir was 1.5 ng/mL (0.57-5.5). The mean prostate specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT) was 14 months (6-20). Prior to SRP, the mean PSA was 5.7 ng/mL (2.9-18). The pathologic staging was pT2a: 13%; pT2b: 34%; pT2c: 27%; pT3a: 13%; and pT3b: 13%. Bleeding > 600 mL occurred in 14% of the cases; urethral stenosis in 50%; and urinary incontinence (two or more pads/day) in 72%. The mean follow-up post-SRP ranged from 6 to 30 months. The PSA level rose in 9, of which 6 had PSA-DT < 10 months. Conclusions: SRP is a feasible method in the management of localized radioresistant PCa. PSA-DT has shown to be important for the selection and SRP should not be performed if PSA-DT > 10 months. Due to its increased morbidity, SRP should be only offered to the patients who are more concerned about survival rather than quality of life. (author)

  15. 4-Ports endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy: preliminary and learning curve results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Humberto do Nascimento; Siqueira, Tiberio Moreno; Barreto, Françualdo; Menezes, Leonardo Gomes; Luna, Mauro José Catunda; Calado, Adriano Almeida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction There is a lack of studies in our national scenario regarding the results obtained by laparoscopic radical prostatectomy technique (LRP). Except for a few series, there are no consistent data on oncological, functional, and perioperative results on LRP held in Brazil. As for the LRP technique performed by extraperitoneal access (ELRP), when performed by a single surgeon, the results are even scarcer. Objective To analyze the early perioperative and oncologic results obtained with the ELRP, throughout the technical evolution of a single surgeon. Patients and methods A non-randomized retrospective study was held in a Brazilian hospital of reference. In the 5-year period, 115 patients underwent the ELRP procedure. Patients were divided into two groups, the first 57 cases (Group 1) and the following 58 cases, (Group 2). A comparative analysis between the groups of efficacy results and ELRP safety was carried out. Results The average age of patients was 62.8 year-old and the PSA of 6.9ng/dl. The total surgery time was 135.8 minutes on average, and the urethral-bladder anastomosis was 21.9 min (23.3 min versus 20.7 min). The positive surgical margins (PSM) rate was 17.1%, showing no difference between groups (16.4% versus 17.9%; p=0.835). There was statistical difference between the groups in relation to the anastomosis time, estimated blood loss and the withdrawal time of the urinary catheter. Conclusion The ELRP technique proved to be a safe and effective procedure in the treatment of prostate cancer, with low morbidity. PMID:27286105

  16. Correlation of diffusion-weighted MRI with whole mount radical prostatectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van As, N; Charles-Edwards, E; Jackson, A; Jhavar, S; Reinsberg, S; Desouza, N; Dearnaley, D; Bailey, M; Thompson, A; Christmas, T; Fisher, C; Corbishley, C; Sohaib, S

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of benign central gland (bCG), benign peripheral zone (bPZ) and cancer using diffusion-weighted MRI and whole mount specimens. 11 patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent diffusion-weighted MRI prior to radical prostatectomy. A single-shot echo planar image technique was used with b-values of 0 s mm(-2), 300 s mm(-2), 500 s mm(-2) and 800 s mm(-2). Whole mount specimens were compared with ADC maps. Areas of cancer, bCG and bPZ were identified, and regions of interest were drawn on ADC maps. Mean ADC values were recorded for all regions of interest, and paired t-tests were performed to compare mean values. Cancer was outlined in nine patients. In two patients, the tumours were too small to correlate with images; bCG was identified in 11 patients and bPZ was identified in 10 patients. Mean ADC values for bCG, bPZ and cancer were, 1.5 x 10(-3) mm(2) s(-1) (standard error (SE) = 0.04), 1.7 x 10(-3) mm(2) s(-1) (SE = 0.1), and 1.3 x 10(-3) mm(2) s(-1) (SE = 0.09), respectively. The most significant difference between benign tissue and cancer existed at b-values of 0-300 s mm(-2) (bCG vs cancer: mean difference = 0. 29, p = 0.001, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.17-0.41; bPZ vs cancer: mean difference = 0.34, p = 0.003, 95% CI = 0.18-0.61). In conclusion, we have confirmed, using whole mount verification, a significant difference in the ADC between benign tissue and cancer.

  17. The natural history of voiding function after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lushun; Chung, Stephanie Fook-Chong Man; Yip, Sidney Kam Hung; Lau, Weber Kam On; Cheng, Christopher Wai Sam; Sim, Hong Gee

    2011-01-01

    We report the natural history of voiding function in men with clinically localized prostate cancer after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RLRP), describing the trend of functional recovery, which is currently not well described using the robot-assisted laparoscopic approach. We determined the impact on voiding function by prospectively evaluating 100 consecutive men who underwent RLRP between May 2005 and December 2006 and compared their reported International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and Quality of Life (QOL) scores at 3, 6, and 12 months with preoperative scores after surgery. Patients with preoperative IPSS of 0-7 and 8-35 were defined as having mild lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and moderate to severe LUTS, respectively. Continence was achieved in 82%, 87%, and 91% of men at 3, 6, and 12 months after RLRP, respectively. There were statistically and clinically significant improvements in both IPSS and QOL preoperative scores at all studied time points for patients with moderate to severe preexisting LUTS. The mean IPSS scores for these patients preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery were 14.1, 5.2, 3.0, and 2.9, respectively and the corresponding mean QOL scores were 3.4, 2.1, 1.6, and 1.6, respectively. Patients with mild preexisting LUTS showed no statistically significant improvement in IPSS at 3 and 6 months after surgery but significant improvement was found at 1 year (P = 0.04). Good continence recovery is expected in most patients undergoing RLRP. Patients with moderate to severe preexisting LUTS can expect early and clinically significant symptom and QOL improvements after RLRP. Patients with mild preexisting LUTS show significant symptom improvement at 1 year. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gleason sum upgrading between biopsy and radical prostatectomy in Chinese population: Updated nomograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H; Bai, P D; Hu, M B; Mao, S H; Zhu, W H; Hu, J M; Liu, S H; Yang, T; Hou, J Y; Hu, Y; Ding, Q; Jiang, H W

    2017-04-01

    To assess the risk factors of Gleason sum upgrading between biopsy and radical prostatectomy (RP) and update the nomogram for the prediction of Gleason sum upgrading. The study cohort consisted of 237 Chinese prostate adenocarcinoma patients who underwent 10-core prostate biopsy and subsequently received RP in Huashan Hospital from February 2011 to May 2015. The main outcome of our study was Gleason sum upgrading between biopsy and RP pathology. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were conducted to explore the potential predictors, and ultimately to build the nomograms. The prediction model was further evaluated for its ability to predict significant upgrading in patients with biopsy Gleason sum<8. In the main cohort of all the patients, Gleason sum upgrading was observed in 62 (26.16%) patients. The pre-operative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, biopsy Gleason sum, and digital rectal examination were used in building the nomogram, which was validated internally with a bootstrap-corrected concordance index of 0.787. In the sub-cohort of 115 patients with standardized biopsy details, Gleason sum upgrading was observed in 31 (26.96%) patients. The pre-operative PSA level, biopsy Gleason sum, and number of positive cores were used in the nomogram, which was also validated internally with a bootstrap-corrected concordance index of 0.833. These two nomograms both demonstrated satisfactory statistical performance for predicting significant upgrading. Updated nomograms to predict Gleason sum upgrading in Chinese population between biopsy and RP were developed, demonstrating good statistical performance upon internal validation. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Pentafecta rates of three-dimensional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: our experience after 150 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Andrea; Varca, Virginia; Simonato, Alchiede; Terrone, Carlo; Gregori, Andrea

    2017-04-28

    Three-dimensional (3D) laparoscopy with a flexible camera was developed to overcome the main limitation of traditional laparoscopic surgery, which is two-dimensional (2D) vision.The aim of our article is to present the largest casistic of 3D laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) available in literature and evaluate our results in terms of pentafecta and compare it with the literature. We retrospectively evaluated consecutive patients who underwent LRP with 3D technology between March 2014 and December 2015. Total operative time (TOT), anasthomosis time (AT), blood loss and complications were registered. All patients presented at least 3 months of follow-up. Surgical outcome was evaluated in terms of Pentafecta. One hundred fifty consecutive patients underwent 3D LRP. Mean follow-up was 16.9 months. Mean age was 67.7 ± 8.3 years (range 50-76). Mean preoperative PSA value was 8.3 ± 5.8 ng/ml and mean bioptic Gleason Score (GS) was 6.6. We had a mean TOT of 158 ± 23 minutes and a mean AT of 25 ± 12.6. Mean blood loss was 240 ± 40 ml. Eighteen (12%) postoperative complications occurred. Pathologic results: pT2 in 91 patients (58%) and pT3 in 59 (39.3%). Pentafecta was reached by 31.3% of patients at 3 months and 51.6% at 12 months. Our oncological and functional results are comparable to those present in literature for laparoscopic and robotic surgery. We believe that our findings can encourage the use of 3D laparoscopy especially considering the increasing attention to healthcare costs.

  20. Safety of holmium laser prostatectomy in patients with cardiac pacemaker implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmada P Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The use of the standard monopolar electrocautery is associated with significant risks of implant malfunction in patients on a cardiac pacemaker. It is also associated with a risk of adverse cardiac events due to blood loss and fluid absorption. The properties of the holmium laser prevent the occurrence of these adverse events. We report the successful use of this technology in resecting the gland in patients on a permanent cardiac pacemaker implant. MATERIALS AND Methods: Six patients with permanent cardiac pacemaker implant were treated with holmium laser resection of prostate over a period of two years. Treated patients had bothersome prostatic symptoms and failed to respond to medical therapy. All patients were operated under spinal anesthesia using a high power VersaPulse ® PowerSuiteTM Holmium laser source. Normal saline was used as irrigant. Intravesical tissue morcellator was also used to remove the larger fragments in two of the patients. Results : Median patient age was 60 years (range 56-73 and median prostate volume was 40cc (range 20-48cc. None of the patient required blood transfusion or had significant hyponatremia or Transurethral resection syndrome. No patients had any pacemaker malfunction or hemodynamic instability during the procedure or in immediate postoperative period. Improvement in maximum urine flow rate was observed from an average of 7 ml/sec in preoperative period to 22 ml/sec postoperatively at 3 month followup. Conclusions: Holmium laser prostatectomy offers the ideal modality of surgery in patients on a cardiac pacemaker. It helps to avoid additional preparation and minimizes the risk of device malfunction and adverse post operative events.

  1. Hormonal changes after localized prostate cancer treatment. Comparison between external beam radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, J; Celma, A; Placer, J; Maldonado, X; Trilla, E; Salvador, C; Lorente, D; Regis, L; Cuadras, M; Carles, J; Morote, J

    2016-11-01

    To determine the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on the hypothalamic pituitary axis of 120 men with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with RP or EBRT exclusively. 120 patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled. Ninety two patients underwent RP and 28 patients EBRT exclusively. We measured serum levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone (T), free testosterone, and estradiol at baseline and at 3 and 12 months after treatment completion. Patients undergoing RP were younger and presented a higher prostate volume (64.3 vs. 71.1 years, p<0.0001 and 55.1 vs. 36.5 g, p<0.0001; respectively). No differences regarding serum hormonal levels were found at baseline. Luteinizing hormone and FSH levels were significantly higher in those patients treated with EBRT at three months (luteinizing hormone 8,54 vs. 4,76 U/l, FSH 22,96 vs. 8,18 U/l, p<0,0001) while T and free testosterone levels were significantly lower (T 360,3 vs. 414,83ng/dl, p 0,039; free testosterone 5,94 vs. 7,5pg/ml, p 0,018). At 12 months FSH levels remained significantly higher in patients treated with EBRT compared to patients treated with RP (21,01 vs. 8,51 U/l, p<0,001) while T levels remained significantly lower (339,89 vs. 402,39ng/dl, p 0,03). Prostate cancer treatment influences the hypothalamic pituitary axis. This influence seems to be more important when patients with prostate cancer are treated with EBRT rather than RP. More studies are needed to elucidate the role that prostate may play as an endocrine organ. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Dyadic planning of health-behavior change after prostatectomy: a randomized-controlled planning intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, Silke; Scholz, Urte; Gralla, Oliver; Roigas, Jan; Knoll, Nina

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of dyadic planning for health-behavior change. Dyadic planning refers to planning health-behavior change together with a partner. We assumed that dyadic planning would affect the implementation of regular pelvic-floor exercise (PFE), with other indicators of social exchange and self-regulation strategies serving as mediators. In a randomized-controlled trial at a German University Medical Center, 112 prostatectomy-patients with partners were randomly assigned to a dyadic PFE-planning condition or one of three active control conditions. Questionnaire data were assessed at multiple time points within six months post-surgery, measuring self-reported dyadic PFE-planning and pelvic-floor exercise as primary outcomes and social exchange (support, control) and a self-regulation strategy (action control) as mediating mechanisms. There were no specific intervention effects with regard to dyadic PFE-planning or pelvic-floor exercise, as two active control groups also showed increases in either of these variables. However, results suggested that patients instructed to plan dyadically still benefited from self-reported dyadic PFE-planning regarding pelvic-floor exercise. Cross-sectionally, received negative control from partners was negatively related with PFE only in control groups and individual action control mediated between self-reported dyadic PFE-planning and PFE for participants instructed to plan PFE dyadically. Longitudinally, action control mediated between self-reported dyadic PFE-planning and pelvic-floor exercise for all groups. Findings provide support for further investigation of dyadic planning in health-behavior change with short-term mediating effects of behavior-specific social exchange and long-term mediating effects of better self-regulation.

  3. Haemodynamics and cardiac function during robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy in steep Trendelenburg position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Sebastian; Haese, Alexander; Goetz, Alwin E; Kubitz, Jens C

    2011-12-01

    Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) is usually performed in steep Trendelenburg position, which can be associated with cardiac impairment due to positioning and capnoperitoneum. This study investigated haemodynamic consequences and cardiac function in this type of surgery and evaluated the hypothesis that steep Trendelenburg position and capnoperitoneum results in haemodynamic and ventricular impairment. 10 patients (ASA I-III) scheduled for RALP in steep Trendelenburg position with capnoperitoneum were prospectively studied. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and central venous pressure (CVP) were recorded. Stroke volume variation (SVV) and cardiac output (CO) were measured using pulse-contour analysis. Further, cardiac function was assessed using trans-oesophageal echocardiography before positioning (T1) and 10 min (T2) and 60 min (T3) after implementation of steep Trendelenburg position and capnoperitoneum. HR did not change statistically. MAP (T1, 69.7 ± 1.55; T2, 82.9 ± 3.05; T3, 79.4 ± 2.18 mmHg), CVP (T1, 7.7 ± 1.3; T2, 17.3 ± 2.01; T3, 16.9 ± 1.66 mmHg) and CO (T1, 4.0 ± 0.15; T2, 4.9 ± 0.26; T3, 4.9 ± 0.36 l/min) increased significantly at T2 and T3. Echocardiography showed no deterioration of left or right ventricular function. In one patient with pre-existing mitral valve insufficiency (I°) an aggravation of the insufficiency (III°) was observed. No other valve dysfunctions were observed. The steep Trendelenburg position may improve haemodynamic function and does not deteriorate left or right ventricular function during RALP. However, mitral valve insufficiency may be aggravated by positioning and capnoperitoneum. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Is rhabdomyolysis an anaesthetic complication in patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsah Karaoren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP, pneumoperitoneum, intraoperative fluid restriction and prolonged Trendelenburg position may cause rhabdomyolysis (RM due to hypoperfusion in gluteal muscles and lower extremities. In this study, it was aimed to assess effects of body mass index (BMI, comorbidities, intra-operative positioning, fluid restriction and length of surgery on the development of RM in RARP patients during the perioperative period. Subjects and Methods: The study included 52 American Society of Anesthesiologists I–II patients aged 50–80 years with BMI >25 kg/m2, who underwent RARP. Fluid therapy with normal saline (1 ml/kg/h and 6% hydroxyethyl starch 200/05 (1 ml/kg/h was given during the surgery. Charlson comorbidity index (CCI, operation time (OT and Trendelenburg time (TT were recorded. Blood samples for creatine phosphokinase (CPK, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine (Cr, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine transferase (ALT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatinine kinase-MB, cardiac troponin I and arterial blood gases were drawn at baseline and on 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. RM was defined by serum CPK level exceeding 5000 IU/L. Results: Seven patients met predefined criteria for RM. There were positive correlations among serum CPK and Cr, AST, ALT and LDH levels. However, there was no significant difference in BMI, OT and TT between patients with or without RM (P > 0.05. CCI scores were higher in patients with RM than those without (3.00 ± 0.58 vs. 2.07 ± 0.62; P< 0.01. No renal impairment was detected among patients with RM at the post-operative period. Conclusions: It was found that comorbid conditions are more important in the development of RM during RARP rather than BMI, OT or TT. Patients with higher comorbidity are at risk for RM development and that this should be kept in mind at follow-up and when informing patients.

  5. Effects of Bowel Preparation and Fluid Restriction in Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaören, Gülşah Yılmaz; Bakan, Nurten; Yürük, Cafer Tayyar; Çetinkaya, Ali Osman

    2015-04-01

    In Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) patients, preoperative bowel preparation and intraoperative fluid restriction may cause dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. In these patients, laboratory results that are considered "normal" in the pre-anaesthesia clinic may be misleading, and cardiac arrhythmia due to hypokalaemia and hypocalcaemia, as well as problems, such as prolonged non-depolarising blockade and delayed recovery from anaesthesia, may be observed during anaesthesia practice. In this study, we aimed to determine these disturbances by comparing the preoperative (T1) laboratory values with those at the beginning of the operation (T2) and at the 6(th) hour of the operation (T3) and values at discharge. This prospective study comprised 49 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I-II patients. Bowel preparation was made with a rectal enema (NaP) twice in 12 hours and with one single dose of oral laxative soda (NaP). During surgery, 1 mL kg(-1) h(-1) 0.09% NaCl and 1 mL kg(-1) h(-1) 6% HES 200/05 infusions were applied. The potassium level at T2 was significantly lower than at T1 and T3. The calcium levels at T2 and T3 were significantly lower than at T1, and the level at T3 was significantly lower than at T2. The creatinine level at T3 was significantly higher than at T1 and T2. Although there were no severe increases or decreases in laboratory test values due to bowel preparation and fluid restriction in RARP operations, which reflected on the clinical outcome in this ASA I-II patient group, these changes may be important in critically ill or ASA III-IV patients.

  6. Is rhabdomyolysis an anaesthetic complication in patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoren, Gulsah; Bakan, Nurten; Kucuk, Eyüp Veli; Gumus, Eyup

    2017-01-01

    In patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), pneumoperitoneum, intraoperative fluid restriction and prolonged Trendelenburg position may cause rhabdomyolysis (RM) due to hypoperfusion in gluteal muscles and lower extremities. In this study, it was aimed to assess effects of body mass index (BMI), comorbidities, intra-operative positioning, fluid restriction and length of surgery on the development of RM in RARP patients during the perioperative period. The study included 52 American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients aged 50-80 years with BMI >25 kg/m2, who underwent RARP. Fluid therapy with normal saline (1 ml/kg/h) and 6% hydroxyethyl starch 200/05 (1 ml/kg/h) was given during the surgery. Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), operation time (OT) and Trendelenburg time (TT) were recorded. Blood samples for creatine phosphokinase (CPK), blood urea nitrogen, creatinine (Cr), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatinine kinase-MB, cardiac troponin I and arterial blood gases were drawn at baseline and on 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. RM was defined by serum CPK level exceeding 5000 IU/L. Seven patients met predefined criteria for RM. There were positive correlations among serum CPK and Cr, AST, ALT and LDH levels. However, there was no significant difference in BMI, OT and TT between patients with or without RM (P > 0.05). CCI scores were higher in patients with RM than those without (3.00 ± 0.58 vs. 2.07 ± 0.62; P< 0.01). No renal impairment was detected among patients with RM at the post-operative period. It was found that comorbid conditions are more important in the development of RM during RARP rather than BMI, OT or TT. Patients with higher comorbidity are at risk for RM development and that this should be kept in mind at follow-up and when informing patients.

  7. Open Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderhoff, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Museums around the world hold enormous troves of public domain artworks. In digitized form, they can be powerful tools for research and learning, as well as building blocks, in the hands of students, teachers, scholars, developers, and creative people. By opening up their digitized assets for reuse......, museums have a unique opportunity to broaden the scope of their public mission to serve and educate the public on 21st century media terms. What could be controversial about that? Art museums have a long legacy of restricting access to high quality images of artworks in order to protect them from improper...

  8. Open University

    CERN Document Server

    Pentz,M

    1975-01-01

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  9. Superior quality of life and improved surgical margins are achievable with robotic radical prostatectomy after a long learning curve: a prospective single-surgeon study of 1552 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James E; Egger, Sam; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Matthews, Jayne; Rasiah, Krishan; Stricker, Phillip D

    2014-03-01

    Comparative studies suggest functional and perioperative superiority of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) over open radical prostatectomy (ORP). To determine whether high-volume experienced open surgeons can improve their functional and oncologic outcomes with RARP and, if so, how many cases are required to surpass ORP outcomes and reach the learning curve plateau. A prospective observational study compared two surgical techniques: 1552 consecutive men underwent RARP (866) or ORP (686) at a single Australian hospital from 2006 to 2012, by one surgeon with 3000 prior ORPs. Demographic and clinicopathologic data were collected prospectively. The Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite quality of life (QoL) questionnaire was administered at baseline, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mo. Multivariate linear and logistic regression modelled the difference in QoL domains and positive surgical margin (PSM) odds ratio (OR), respectively, against case number. A total of 1511 men were included in the PSM and 609 in the QoL analysis. RARP sexual function scores surpassed ORP scores after 99 RARPs and increased to a mean difference at 861st case of 11.0 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9-16.1), plateauing around 600-700 RARPs. Early urinary incontinence scores for RARP surpassed ORP after 182 RARPs and increased to a mean difference of 8.4 points (95% CI, 2.1-14.7), plateauing around 700-800 RARPs. The odds of a pT2 PSM were initially higher for RARP but became lower after 108 RARPs and were 55% lower (OR: 0.45; 95% CI, 0.22-0.92) by the 866th RARP. The odds of a pT3/4 PSM were initially higher for RARP but decreased, plateauing around 200-300 RARPs with an OR of 1.15 (0.68-1.95) at the 866th RARP. Limitations include single-surgeon data and residual confounding. RARP had a long learning curve with inferior outcomes initially, and then showed progressively superior sexual, early urinary, and pT2 PSM outcomes and similar pT3 PSM and late urinary outcomes. Learning RARP

  10. Prognostic significance of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 polymorphisms on biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in a Chinese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luyao; Lei, Zhengwei; Ma, Xin; Huang, Qingbo; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Hao, Peng; Yang, Minggang; Zhao, Xuetao; Chen, Jun; Liu, Gongxue; Zheng, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is a transmembrane receptor with ligand-induced tyrosine kinase activity and is involved in various biological and pathological processes. Several polymorphisms of FGFR4 are associated with the incidence and mortality of numerous cancers, including prostate cancer. In this study, we investigated whether the polymorphisms of FGFR4 influence the biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer in Chinese men after radical prostatectomy. Three common polymorphisms (rs1966265, rs2011077, and rs351855) of FGFR4 were genotyped from 346 patients with prostate cancer by using the Sequenom MassARRAY system. Kaplan–Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard models were used for survival analysis. Results showed biochemical recurrence (BCR) free survival was significantly affected by the genotypes of rs351855 but not influenced by rs1966265 and rs2011077. After adjusting for other variables in multivariable analysis, patients with rs351855 AA/AG genotypes showed significantly worse BCR-free survival than those with the GG genotype (HR = 1.873; 95% CI, 1.209–2.901; P = 0.005). Hence, FGFR4 rs351855 could be a novel independent prognostic factor of BCR after radical prostatectomy in the Chinese population. This functional polymorphism may also provide a basis for surveillance programs. Additional large-scale studies must be performed to validate the significance of this polymorphism in prostate cancer. PMID:27640814

  11. Effect of serum testosterone and percent tumor volume on extra-prostatic extension and biochemical recurrence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eu Chang Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have revealed that the preoperative serum testosterone and percent tumor volume (PTV predict extra-prostatic extension (EPE and biochemical recurrence (BCR after radical prostatectomy. This study investigated the prognostic significance of serum testosterone and PTV in relation to EPE and BCR after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. We reviewed 520 patients who underwent LRP between 2004 and 2012. PTV was determined as the sum of all visually estimated tumor foci in every section. BCR was defined as two consecutive increases in the postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA >0.2 ng ml−1 . The threshold for serum total testosterone was 3.0 ng ml−1 . Multivariate logistic regression was used to define the effect of variables on the risk of EPE and BCR. A low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 was associated with a high serum PSA, Gleason score, positive core percentage of the prostate biopsy, PTV, and all pathological variables. On multivariate analysis, similar to previous studies, the serum PSA, biopsy positive core percentage, Gleason score, and pathological variables predicted EPE and BCR. In addition, low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 , adjusted OR, 8.52; 95% CI, 5.04-14.4, P= 0.001 predicted EPE and PTV (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.05, P= 0.046 predicted BCR. In addition to previous predictors of EPE and BCR, low serum testosterone and PTV are valuable predictors of EPE and BCR after LRP.

  12. A NEW METHOD OF BLADDER NECK RECONSTRUCTION DURING THE RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY IN PATIENTS WITH LOCALIZED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Tolkach

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy is a «gold standard» for treatment of the patients with a localized prostate cancer. Urinary incontinence is one of the two most common complications of this operation. In this article we report a study aimed to compare the efficacy parameters linked to postoperative continence in 39 patients with new technique for reconstruction of the bladder neck during the radical prostatectomy using a deep suture of the bladder wall dorsally to the neck aperture with 45 patients in control group with a standard type of reconstruction in the form of tennis racket. According to the results, application of the new technique leads to a significant improvement in continence during the first 6 months after the operation with no difference among groups during follow-up later on. Given the results of the anatomical study, the efficacy of the new method of reconstruction is linked to passive closure mechanism created in the area of the bladder neck.

  13. Regaining Candidacy for Heart Transplantation after Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy in Left Ventricular Assist Device Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq A. Khemees

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several factors may highlight the relevance of prostate cancer to the pre-heart-transplant population. First, the expansion in candidate selection criteria led to increased number of men over the age of fifty to be considered for heart transplantation. With the introduction of left ventricular assist device (LVAD therapy, waiting-list mortality has dramatically declined over the past decade. Additionally, transplant candidates are diligently screened for preexisting neoplasm while on the waiting list. Taken together, screening-detected prostate cancer may increasingly be diagnosed in patients on the waiting list. If discovered, it will pose unique challenge to clinicians as to date there has been no universally accepted management guideline. We report a case of LVAD-treated heart transplant candidate diagnosed with prostate cancer while on the waiting list. Patient screening demonstrated PSA elevation which prompted prostate biopsy. Low-risk clinically localized prostate cancer was confirmed and led to removal of patient from transplant list. When counseled regarding management of his cancer, the patient elected to undergo radical prostatectomy in a hope to regain candidacy for heart transplantation. Despite being of high surgical risk, multidisciplinary team approach led to successful management of prostate cancer and the patient eventually received heart transplant one year following prostatectomy.

  14. Evaluation of pelvic floor muscle strength before and after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and early outcomes on urinary continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Lauren; Gibson, Luke; Papa, Nathan; Beharry, Bhawanie Koonj; Johnson, Liana; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) assessment and training before and after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) in improving PFM strength and urinary continence. We performed an analysis of a database of patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed by two urologists from 2011 to 2013. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activation and strength were graded by a trained pelvic floor physiotherapist. Patients were given an exercise program, grouped according to the strength of their pelvic floor as graded by assessment, to complete before and after surgery. PFM strength was recorded preoperatively, 4 days post-catheter removal and 4 weeks post-catheter removal. Continence was recorded at 4 weeks postop and was defined as the requirement of no continence aids. A total of 98 patients had RARP and a preoperative physiotherapy assessment plus postoperative appointments at around 1 and 4 weeks post-RARP. The majority of men improved their PFM strength regardless of preoperative strength with no significant predictors of postoperative strength found. Age was the only significant predictor of postoperative incontinence. In this pilot study, a majority of patients increased their pelvic floor strength with time. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is an important modifiable patient factor, which does have an impact in improving patients' urinary continence by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles. Patient age influences response to pelvic floor physiotherapy.

  15. Changes in reciprocal support provision and need-based support from partners of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Nina; Burkert, Silke; Roigas, Jan; Gralla, Oliver

    2011-07-01

    We examined need-related and reciprocal provision of support in couples facing radical prostatectomy and its sequelae, including patients' urinary incontinence. Partners' reciprocal support provision to patients was assumed to drop from prior to until after patients' surgeries and increase again in the following months, while need-related indicators were assumed to remain unique correlates throughout. In this study of German prostatectomy patients and their partners, N = 141 couples provided data on 4 measurement occasions from presurgery to 1-year postsurgery. Need-based predictors of partners' support provision were patients' mobilized support, such as efforts to obtain advice or comfort, and degree of postsurgery incontinence. Strength of association between partner-received and provided supports served as an indicator of reciprocal support provision. Data suggested that partners' reciprocal support provision dropped significantly postsurgery and then increased again in the following months. This was true for emotional as well as instrumental reciprocal support provision. Findings also indicated that one need-based predictor of partners' support provision, patients' mobilization of support from their partners, remained a unique correlate of partners' support provision to patients. Reciprocal support provision in couples may vary during the adaptation to illness-related functional impairment and coexist with need-oriented support provision.

  16. Does Prior Laparoscopic and Open Surgery Experience Have Any Impact on Learning Curve in Transition to Robotic Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cüneyt Adayener

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been 15 years since the Food And Drug Administration approved the Da Vinci® robotic surgery system. Robotic applications are being used extensively in urology, particularly in radical prostatectomy. Like all high-tech products, this system also has a high cost and a steep learning curve, therefore, preventing it from becoming widespread. There are various studies on the effect of open surgery or laparoscopy experience on the learning curve of robotic surgery. Analyzing these interactions well will provide valuable information on making the training period of robotic system more efficient.

  17. 体质指数对根治性前列腺切除术的影响%Impact of body mass index on radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤建儿; 谢立平; 郑祥毅; 陈善闻; 汪朔; 夏丹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of body mass index (BMI) on laparoscopy and the open radical prostatectomy.Methods A retrospective analysis of 226 cases of radical prostatectomy from 2012 January to 2013 May was performed.106 patients underwent laparoscopic surgery,with aged 66.5±0.7,height (167.7±0.5) cm,weight (66.8±0.9) kg; 120 patients underwent open surgery,with aged (65.8±0.7) year,height (168.1±0.5) cm,weight (66.5±0.8) kg.Non-obese (BMI <25 kg/m2) and obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) were divided in each group.The preoperative serum PSA level,the operation time,the blood loss during operation,the preoperative and postoperative hemoglobin,Gleason score,and the postoperative indwelling catheter time were compared between non-obese group and obese group.In the laparoscopic surgery group including 76 non-obese cases (71.7%) and 30 obese cases (28.3%),no difference showed in PSA values and age before operation between the two sub-groups.In the open surgery group,including 84 non-obese cases (70.0%) and 36 obese cases (30.0%),no statistical difference of preoperative PSA values and age showed in the two sub-groups.Results In the laparoscopic group,the operation time is (nonobese 169.4±37.8 min and obese 188.5±42.3 min),and the blood Hb decrease(non-obese-22.8± 11.0g/L,obese-30.9±15.9 g/L) and the blood loss(non-obese 115.9±68.9 ml,obese 178.3±126.4 ml)showed significant difference in the two sub-groups (P<0.05).The two sub-groups showed no statisticaldifference in postoperative indwelling catheter time and Gleason score (P>0.05).In the open surgery group,the intraoperative hemorrhage (non-obese 413.7±289.4 ml,obese 594.4-±534.9 ml) and the hemoglobin decrease (non-obese-27.2± 13.3 g/L,obese-34.9± 15.8 g/L) showed significant difference (P<0.05).The two sub-groups showed no significant difference in the preoperative hemoglobin,postoperative indwelling catheter time,Gleason score and operation time (P>0.05).Conclusions For the patients

  18. The prognostic influence of neuroendocrine cells in prostate cancer: Results of a long-term follow-up study with patients treated by radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Noordzij (Marinus); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); F.H. Schröder (Fritz)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe distribution of immunohistochemically defined neuroen-docrine (NE) cells in benign, pre-cancerous and neoplastic prostatic tissues and the prognostic value of these cells in prostate cancer were studied in the radical prostatectomy specimens of 90 patients from whom complete long-ter

  19. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 2: T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwast, T.H. van der; Amin, M.B.; Billis, A.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.; Humphrey, P.A.; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Egevad, L.; Delahunt, B.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the substaging of pT2 prostate cancers according to the TNM 2002/2010 system, reporti

  20. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 2: T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwast, T.H. van der; Amin, M.B.; Billis, A.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.; Humphrey, P.A.; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Egevad, L.; Delahunt, B.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the substaging of pT2 prostate cancers according to the TNM 2002/2010 system, reporti

  1. A comparative study of erectile function and use of erectile aids in high-risk prostate cancer patients after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby-Deglum, Marie; Brennhovd, B.; Axcrona, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Erectile function with and without use of erectile aids was compared in high-, intermediate- and low-risk prostate cancer patients at a mean of 3 years after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Materials and methods. A sample of 982 men who underwent RALP at Oslo University...

  2. A prospective evaluation of conventional cystography for detection of urine leakage at the vesicourethral anastomosis site after radical prostatectomy based on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, K.S. [Urologic Oncology Clinic, Center for Prostate Cancer, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu-dong, Ilsan-dong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 411-769, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, H.J. [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, D.C. [Department of Radiology, Center for Specific Organs Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. [Cancer Registration and Biostatistics Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, K.S.; Joung, J.Y.; Seo, H.K.; Chung, J. [Urologic Oncology Clinic, Center for Prostate Cancer, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu-dong, Ilsan-dong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 411-769, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K.H., E-mail: uroonco@ncc.re.k [Urologic Oncology Clinic, Center for Prostate Cancer, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu-dong, Ilsan-dong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 411-769, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of conventional cystography for the detection of urine leakage at the vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA) site after radical prostatectomy based on computed tomography (CT) cystography. Materials and methods: Patients who underwent radical prostatectomies at a single tertiary cancer centre were prospectively enrolled. Conventional cystography was routinely performed on postoperative day 7. Non-enhanced pelvic CT images were obtained after retrograde instillation of the same contrast material for a reference standard of urine leakage at the VUA site. Urine leakage was classified as follows: none; a plication abnormality; mild; moderate; and excessive. Results: One hundred and twenty consecutive patients were enrolled. Conventional cystography detected 14 urine leakages, but CT cystography detected 40 urine leakages, which consisted of 28 mild and 12 moderate urine leakages. When using CT cystography as the standard measurement, conventional cystography showed a diagnostic accuracy of 17.8% (5/28) for mild urine leakage and 75% (9/12) for moderate leakage. Of nine patients diagnosed with mild leakage on conventional cystography, four (44.4%) had complicated moderate urine leakages based on CT cystography, requiring prolonged catheterization. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of conventional cystography were 35, 100, 100, 75.4, and 78.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Conventional cystography is less accurate than CT cystography for diagnosing urine leakage at the VUA site after a radical prostatectomy. The present results suggest that CT cystography is a good choice for diagnostic imaging of urine leakage after radical prostatectomy.

  3. OpenER, a Dutch Initiative in Open Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuwer, Robert; Mulder, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Over the period 2006-2008, the Dutch Open Universiteit Nederland conducted an experiment in which Open Educational Resources (OER) were offered in an effort to bridge the gap between informal and formal learning and to establish a new style of entry portal to higher education with no barriers at all. OpenER received considerable attention both in…

  4. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: evaluation of complications and influence of radiation timing on outcomes in a large, population-based cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Hegarty

    Full Text Available To evaluate the influence of timing of salvage and adjuvant radiation therapy on outcomes after prostatectomy for prostate cancer.Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database, we identified prostate cancer patients diagnosed during 1995-2007 who had one or more adverse pathological features after prostatectomy. The final cohort of 6,137 eligible patients included men who received prostatectomy alone (n = 4,509 or with adjuvant (n = 894 or salvage (n = 734 radiation therapy. Primary outcomes were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and erectile dysfunction events and survival after treatment(s.Radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events, but not erectile dysfunction. In adjusted models, earlier treatment with adjuvant radiation therapy was not associated with increased rates of genitourinary or erectile dysfunction events compared to delayed salvage radiation therapy. Early adjuvant radiation therapy was associated with lower rates of gastrointestinal events that salvage radiation therapy, with hazard ratios of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67-0.95 for procedure-defined and 0.70 (95% CI, 0.59, 0.83 for diagnosis-defined events. There was no significant difference between ART and non-ART groups (SRT or RP alone for overall survival (HR = 1.13 95% CI = (0.96, 1.34 p = 0.148.Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events. However, earlier radiation therapy is not associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal, genitourinary or sexual events. These findings oppose the conventional belief that delaying radiation therapy reduces the risk of radiation-related complications.

  5. Robotic radical prostatectomy-a minimally invasive therapy for prostate cancer: results of initial 530 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tewari

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In 2000, the number of new cases of prostate cancer was estimated at 5 13 000 worldwide [Eur J Cancer 2001; 37 (Suppl 8: S4]. In next 15 years, prostate cancer is predicted to be the most common cancer in men [Eur J Cancer 2001; 37 (Suppl 8: S4]. Radical prostatectomy is one of the most common surgical treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer. In spite of its excellent oncological results, due to the fear of pain, risk for side effects, and inconvenience (Semin Urol Oncol 2002; 20: 55, many patients seek alternative treatments for their prostate cancer. At Vattikuti Urology institute, we have developed a minimally invasive technique for treating prostate cancer, which achieves oncological results of surgical treatment without causing significant pain, large surgical incision, and side effects (BJU Int, 2003; 92: 205. This technique involves a da Vinci™ (Intuitive Surgical ®, Sunnyvale, CA surgical robot with 3-D stereoscopic visualization and ergonomic multijointed instruments. Presented herein are our results after treating 750 patients. Methods: We prospectively collected baseline demographic data such as age, race, body mass index (BMI, serum prostate specific antigen, prostate volume, Gleason score, percentage cancer, TNM clinical staging, and comorbidities. Urinary symptoms were measured with the international prostate symptom score (IPSS, and sexual health with the sexual health inventory of males (SHIM. In addition, the patients were mailed the expanded prostate inventory composite at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months after the procedure. Results: Gleason seven or more cancer grade was noted in 33.5% of patients. The average BMI was high (27.7 and 87% patients had pathological stage PT2a-b. The mean operative time was 160 min and the mean blood loss was 153 cm3. No patient required blood transfusion. At 6 months 82% of the men who were younger and 75% of those older than 60 years had return of sexual

  6. Unidirectional barbed suture versus standard monofilament for urethrovesical anastomosis during robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Manganiello

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: V-LocTM180 (Covidien Healthcare, Mansfield, MA is a new unidirectional barbed suture that may reduce loss of tension during a running closure. We evaluated the use of the barbed suture for urethrovesical anastomosis (UVA during robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP. Time to completion of UVA, post-operative anastomotic leak rate, and urinary incontinence were compared in patients undergoing UVA with 3-0 unidirectional-barbed suture vs. 3-0 MonocrylTM (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were prospectively collected for 70 consecutive patients undergoing RALP for prostate cancer between November 2009 and October 2010. In the first 35 patients, the UVA was performed using a modified running van Velthoven anastomosis technique using two separate 3-0 monofilament sutures. In the subsequent 35 patients, the UVA was performed using two running novel unidirectional barbed sutures. At 7-12 days postoperatively, all patients were evaluated with a cystogram to determine anastomotic integrity. Urinary incontinence was assessed at two months and five months by total daily pad usage. Clinical symptoms suggestive of bladder neck contracture were elicited. RESULTS: Age, PSA, Gleason score, prostate size, estimated blood loss, body mass index, and clinical and pathologic stage between the 2 groups were similar. Comparing the monofilament group and V-LocTM180 cohorts, average time to complete the anastomosis was similar (27.4 vs. 26.4 minutes, p = 0.73 as was the rate of urinary extravasation on cystogram (5.7 % vs. 8.6%, p = 0.65. There were no symptomatic bladder neck contractures noted at 5 months of follow-up. At 2 months, the percentage of patients using 2 or more pads per day was lower in the V-LocTM180 cohort (24% vs. 44%, p < 0.02. At 5 months, this difference was no longer evident. CONCLUSIONS: Time to complete the UVA was similar in the intervention and control groups. Rates of urine leak were also comparable

  7. High-Dose Adjuvant Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ost, Piet, E-mail: piet.ost@ugent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); De Potter, Bruno [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Briganti, Alberto [Department of Urology, San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute University, Milan (Italy); Nagler, Evi V.T. [Department of Nephrology, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Montorsi, Francesco [Department of Urology, San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute University, Milan (Italy); Fonteyne, Valerie [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital San Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity in patients receiving high-dose (>69 Gy) adjuvant radiotherapy (HD-ART) and the impact of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 225 node-negative patients were referred for HD-ART with or without ADT to two large academic institutions. Indications for HD-ART were extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and/or positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy (RP). A dose of at least 69.1 Gy was prescribed to the prostate bed and seminal vesicle bed. The ADT consisted of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog. The duration and indication of ADT was left at the discretion of the treating physician. The effect of HD-ART and ADT on biochemical (bRFS) and clinical (cRFS) relapse-free survival was examined through univariate and multivariate analysis, with correction for known patient- and treatment-related variables. Interaction terms were introduced to evaluate effect modification. Results: After a median follow-up time of 5 years, the 7-year bRFS and cRFS were 84% and 88%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the addition of ADT was independently associated with an improved bRFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.4, p = 0.02) and cRFS (HR 0.2, p = 0.008). Higher Gleason scores and SVI were associated with decreased bRFS and cRFS. A lymphadenectomy at the time of RP independently improved cRFS (HR 0.09, p = 0.009). The 7-year probability of late Grade 2-3 toxicity was 29% and 5% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, respectively. The absolute incidence of Grade 3 toxicity was <1% and 10% for GI and GU symptoms, respectively. The study is limited by its retrospective design and the lack of a standardized use of ADT. Conclusions: This retrospective study shows significantly improved bRFS and cRFS rates with the addition of ADT to HD-ART, with low Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and 10% Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity.

  8. Openness initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  9. Gallbladder removal - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholecystectomy - open; Surgery - gallbladder - open ... a medical instrument called a laparoscope ( laparoscopic cholecystectomy ). Open gallbladder surgery is used when laparoscopic surgery cannot ...

  10. Opening Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovini, L.

    1994-01-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen To quote Mr Jean Terrien: "Physics must be one step ahead of metrology". A long-serving Director of the BIPM, he said these words when visiting the IMGC in 1970 as a member of the scientific board of our Institute. At that time it was still an open question whether the IMGC should start research work on the absolute measurement of silicon lattice spacing. Mr Terrien underlined the revolutionary character of x-ray interferometry and, eventually, he caused the balance needle to lean towards the ... right direction. Mr Terrien correctly foresaw that, like Michelson's interferometer of 1880, x-ray interferometry could have a prominent place in today's science and technology. And while, in the first case, after more than a century we can see instruments based on electromagnetic wave interaction within every one's reach in laboratories and, sometimes, in workshops, in the second case, twenty-five years since the first development of an x-ray interferometer we can witness its role in nanometrology. Today and tomorrow we meet to discuss how to go beyond the sixth decimal place in the value of the Avogadro constant. We are aware that the quest for this achievement requires the cooperation of scientists with complementary capabilities. I am sure that the present workshop is a very good opportunity to present and discuss results and to improve and extend existing cooperation. The new adjustment of fundamental constants envisaged by the CODATA Task Group is redoubling scientists' efforts to produce competitive values of NA. The results of the measurements of the silicon lattice spacing in terms of an optical wavelength, which were available for the 1986 adjustment, combined with the determination of silicon molar volume, demonstrate how such an NA determination produces a consistent set of other constants and opens the way to a possible redefinition of the kilogram. We shall see in these two days how far we have progressed along this road. For us at the

  11. Open life science research, open software and the open century

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhua Chen

    2015-01-01

    At the age of knowledge explosion and mass scientific information, I highlighted the importance of conducting open science in life and medical researches through the extensive usage of open software and documents. The proposal of conducting open science is to reduce the limited repeatability of researches in life science. I outlined the essential steps for conducting open life science and the necessary standards for creating, reusing and reproducing open materials. Different Creative Commons licenses were presented and compared of their usage scope and restriction. As a conclusion, I argued that open materials should be widely adopted in doing life and medical researches.

  12. Urinary and sexual outcomes in long-term (5+ years prostate cancer disease free survivors after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambruosi Carlo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After long term disease free follow up (FUp patients reconsider quality of life (QOL outcomes. Aim of this study is assess QoL in prostate cancer patients who are disease-free at least 5 years after radical prostatectomy (RP. Methods 367 patients treated with RP for clinically localized pCa, without biochemical failure (PSA ≤ 0.2 ng/mL at the follow up ≥ 5 years were recruited. Urinary (UF and Sexual Function (SF, Urinary (UB and Sexual Bother (SB were assessed by using UCLA-PCI questionnaire. UF, UB, SF and SB were analyzed according to: treatment timing (age at time of RP, FUp duration, age at time of FUp, tumor characteristics (preoperative PSA, TNM stage, pathological Gleason score, nerve sparing (NS procedure, and hormonal treatment (HT. We calculated the differences between 93 NS-RP without HT (group A and 274 non-NS-RP or NS-RP with HT (group B. We evaluated the correlation between function and bother in group A according to follow-up duration. Results Time since prostatectomy had a negative effect on SF and a positive effect SB (both p Higher stage PCa negatively affected UB, SF, and SB (all: p ≤ 0.05. NS was associated with better UB, SF and SB (all: p ≤ 0.05; conversely, HT was associated with worse UF, SF and SB (all: p ≤ 0.05. More than 8 years after prostatectomy SF of group A and B were similar. Group A subjects (NS-RP without HT demonstrated worsening SF, but improved SB, suggesting dissociation of the correlation between SF and SB over time. Conclusion Older age at follow up and higher pathological stage were associated with worse QoL outcomes after RP. The direct correlation between UF and age at follow up, with no correlation between UF and age at time of RP suggests that other issues (i.e: vascular or neurogenic disorders, subsequent to RP, are determinant on urinary incontinence. After NS-RP without HT the correlation between SF and SB is maintained for 7 years, after which function and bother

  13. Neoadjuvant hormone therapy following treatment with robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy achieved favorable in high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou CP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cheng-Pang Hou,1,2,* Wei-Chang Lee,1,2,* Yu-Hsiang Lin,1,2 Shao-Ming Chen,3 Chien-Lun Chen,1,2 Phei-Lang Chang,1,2,4 Horng-Heng Juang,4,5 Ke-Hung Tsui1,2,4 1Department of Urology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2School of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 3Hou-Pin Taipei Hospital, 4Bioinformation Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 5Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Patients with a high risk of prostate carcinoma typically have higher rates of positive surgical margins and biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy and adjuvant hormone therapy. In this study, we assessed the effects of neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT on prostate carcinoma in high-risk patients following robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP. Methods: This retrospective study investigated the medical records of 28 patients who underwent RARP between January 2009 and October 2013. Twenty-two patients underwent NHT prior to RARP. Furthermore, six patients did not undergo NHT prior to RARP. Parameters including age, operating time, blood loss, blood transfusion status, and cancer stage were checked against anatomical correlations. Potential predictors of prolonged operating time and prolonged surgical procedures were assessed using multiple logistic regressions. Results: NHT was shown to be an independent predictor of prolonged total operating time. Tumor stage alterations did not appear to be associated with NHT followed by RARP. The patients who underwent NHT were not more likely to have positive surgical margins, and an increase in patients requiring blood transfusion was not seen. Conclusion: NHT appears to increase

  14. Perioperative and continence outcomes of robotic radical prostatectomy in elderly Indian men (≥70 years: A sub-group analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many healthy elderly Indian men seek surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer. Quite often, radical surgery is not offered to the patients over 70 years of age due to the perception of increased side-effects and complications. We have previously reported our results of robotic radical prostatectomy in a study comprising 150 Indian patients, where almost a quarter of patients were elderly. This subgroup analysis was therefore focused on evaluating perioperative and continence outcomes in elderly men (≥70 years with localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Between April 2010 and August 2013, 153 men had robot-assisted radical prostatectomy performed by two surgeons. Of the 150 men analyzed, 39 (26% were aged ≥70 years. All patients underwent robotic prostatectomy using a 4 arm da Vinci surgical system. Pre-operative, intraoperative and post-operative parameters were studied. Check cystogram was performed in all patients prior to catheter removal. Complications were categorized using the Clavien-Dindo classification system. Continence was defined as use of "no pad" or security liner only. All data were recorded prospectively and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: There were no significant intraoperative or perioperative complications in this group. Median blood loss during surgery was 150 mL. None of the patient required blood transfusion. There were two minor complications (5.1% within the first 30 days of surgery: Minimal anastomotic site leak (one patient requiring replacement and prolongation of Foley′s drainage by 1 week and ileus (one patient. No patient had any cardiopulmonary or vascular complications in the post-operative period. The median duration of hospital stay was 3 days. The median duration of catheterization was 7 days. No patient had problem of bladder neck stenosis in the follow-up period. At 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year of follow-up, 66.7% (n = 26, 74.3% (n = 29, 87.9% (n = 34

  15. Incidence of Second Malignancies in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Radical Prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Sarah Nicole; Tyldesley, Scott [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Hamm, Jeremy [Department of Population Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Jiang, Wei Ning [Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Lapointe, Vince [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kahnamelli, Adam [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Miller, Stacy [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Morris, W. James, E-mail: jmorris@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the second malignancy incidence in prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy (BT) relative to radical prostatectomy (RP) and to compare both groups with the cancer incidence in the general population. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 2418 patients were treated with Iodine 125 prostate BT monotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency, and 4015 referred patients were treated with RP. Cancer incidence was compared with the age-matched general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Pelvic malignancies included invasive and noninvasive bladder cancer and rectal cancer. Cox multivariable analysis was performed with adjustment for covariates to determine whether treatment (RP vs BT) was associated with second malignancy risk. Results: The median age at BT was 66 years and at RP 62 years. The SIR comparing BT patients with the general population was 1.06 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91-1.22) for second malignancy and was 1.53 (95% CI 1.12-2.04) for pelvic malignancy. The SIR comparing RP patients with the general population was 1.11 (95% CI 0.98-1.25) for second malignancy and was 1.11 (95% CI 0.82-1.48) for pelvic malignancy. On multivariable analysis, older age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05) and smoking (HR 1.65) were associated with increased second malignancy risk (P<.0001). Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased second malignancy risk relative to BT (HR 0.90, P=.43), even when excluding patients who received postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy (HR 1.13, P=.25). Older age (HR 1.09, P<.0001) and smoking (HR 2.17, P=.0009) were associated with increased pelvic malignancy risk. Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased pelvic malignancy risk compared with BT (HR 0.57, P=.082), even when excluding postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy patients (HR 0.87, P=.56). Conclusions: After adjustment for covariates, BT patients did not have an increased second

  16. Risk Factors Analysis for Positive Surgical Margins in Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy%腹腔镜根治性前列腺切除术后切缘阳性的相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎乙夫; 黄毅; 马潞林

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To analysis the risk factors for positive surgical margins in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and pathological data of 188 cases, who received laparoscopic radical prostatectomy from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2010 in our hospital. The patients average 72 years old. All patients were dignosised by pathology before prostatectomy, and no metastasis was found before surgery. Univari-able analyse were used to estimate the relationship between the parameters and surgical margin status. Multivari-able logistic regression analyse were used to determine relative risk factors for positive surgical margins. Results; Except that two patients were converted to open surgery, laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was successfully applied in other 186 patients. The operating time was average 246 min, the blood loss during operation was average 309 ml. 76 cases (40. 5%) had positive surgical margin. Result from univariable analyse showed there were significance difference between positive and negtive surgical margins patients on biopsy Gleason score, number of positive biopsy cores, surgical Gleason score, and pathological stage. On multivariable logistic regression analyses, surgical Gleason score and pathological stage were independent factor of positive surgical margins. A surgical Gleason score more than 7 was associated with a 17. 1-fold higher chance of positive surgical margin than a surgical Gleason score not more than 6 (OR:17. 131, 95%CI:5. 237-56. 037,F<0. 001). A pathological stage of T3 was associated with a 9. 0-fold higher risk of positive surgical margin than a psthology stage of T2 (OR:8. 970, 95%CI: 4. 128-19. 493,P<0. 001). Conclusions; Surgical Gleason score and pathological stage were independent factors of positive surgical margins in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Patients with surgical Gleason score more than 7 and pathological stage of T3 had a higher rate of positive surgical margins.%目的:分析

  17. Open life science research, open software and the open century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Youhua Chen

    2015-01-01

    At the age of knowledge explosion and mass scientific information, I highlighted the importance of conducting open science in life and medical researches through the extensive usage of open software and documents...

  18. Open Standards, Open Source, and Open Innovation: Harnessing the Benefits of Openness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Committee for Economic Development, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Digitization of information and the Internet have profoundly expanded the capacity for openness. This report details the benefits of openness in three areas--open standards, open-source software, and open innovation--and examines the major issues in the debate over whether openness should be encouraged or not. The report explains each of these…

  19. Primary Gleason pattern in biopsy Gleason score 7 is predictive of adverse histopathological features and biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyse whether primary Gleason pattern in biopsy Gleason score (GS) 7 predicted adverse histopathological features and had an impact on the risk of biochemical failure in a consecutive series of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). MATERIAL...... (p Gleason score 3+4 had a significantly lower biochemical failure rate compared with Gleason score 4+3 (p = 0.0035). PSA (p Gleason pattern 4 (p = 0.001) and percentage of biopsies......+3. No difference in age, PSA, percentage of biopsies with cancer, clinical tumour stage or volume on transrectal ultrasonography was found. Primary Gleason pattern 4 was associated with worse pathological stage (p = 0.049). On multivariate analysis, primary Gleason pattern 4 (p

  20. Feasibility of robotic radical prostatectomy for medication refractory chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: Initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sameer; Satkunasivam, Raj; Aron, Monish

    2016-01-01

    Four patients diagnosed with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), met criteria for National Institute of Health (NIH) Category III prostatitis, failed multiple medicinal treatments and underwent robotic radical prostatectomy (RRP). Median operative time (range): 157 (127-259) min. Validated functional questionnaires responses and NIH CP symptom index (NIH-CPSI) score were collected for each patient's status at different time points pre- and post-operatively. Median decreases (range) were: International Prostate Symptom Score - 14 (1-19); Sexual Health Inventory for Men - 6 (-14-22); and NIH-CPSI total - 23.5 (13-33). Median length of follow-up (range) was 34 (24-43) months. RRP appears to be an option for carefully selected patients with medication-refractory CP/CPPS who understand that baseline sexual function may not be restored postoperatively.

  1. [Radical prostatectomy: local recurrence and persistence of disease. Is it possible to hypothesize any responsibility of the surgeon?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattoni, Filiberto; Gigli, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) represents the most frequently chosen therapeutic option for treating newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer. Cancer recurrence after surgery is linked to biologic variables. But are these the only ones that must be considered to give an explanation of a possible local or distal recurrence, or can it also admit the possibility that an incorrectly conducted surgery has a negative role in the unfavorable evolution after PR? Prostate cancer recurrence, as a matter of fact, is related also to surgical technique. The PR, by definition is a surgical, potentially complicated act. Surgery outcomes depend on a whole series of factors: the surgeon's ability, and the way the surgical procedure is conducted, play an essential role. Here we evaluate the role of biological and surgical factors on biochemical recurrence.

  2. The use of a bulldog clamp to control the dorsal vein complex during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüfek, Ilter; Atuğ, Fatih; Argun, Burak; Keskin, Selçuk; Obek, Can; Coşkuner, Enis; Kural, Ali Riza

    2012-12-01

    Optimal control of the dorsal venous complex (DVC) is a critical step in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). If DVC is not controlled properly, bleeding may occur during the apical dissection. On the other hand, if it is controlled well, a bloodless field is attained and, thus, a precise apical dissection and urethral division is possible. Suture ligation is the most common technique used for dorsal vein control, while some authors recommend using an endovascular stapler. Recently, athermal division and selective suture ligation technique has been reported for DVC control. We describe a new technique: Use of a bulldog clamp to control the DVC during RARP. The control of the DVC with a bulldog clamp allows a bloodless field with precise apical dissection and provides preservation of maximum urethral length while avoiding sphincteral injury.

  3. Feasibility of robotic radical prostatectomy for medication refractory chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: Initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Four patients diagnosed with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS, met criteria for National Institute of Health (NIH Category III prostatitis, failed multiple medicinal treatments and underwent robotic radical prostatectomy (RRP. Median operative time (range: 157 (127–259 min. Validated functional questionnaires responses and NIH CP symptom index (NIH-CPSI score were collected for each patient's status at different time points pre- and post-operatively. Median decreases (range were: International Prostate Symptom Score - 14 (1–19; Sexual Health Inventory for Men - 6 (−14–22; and NIH-CPSI total - 23.5 (13–33. Median length of follow-up (range was 34 (24–43 months. RRP appears to be an option for carefully selected patients with medication-refractory CP/CPPS who understand that baseline sexual function may not be restored postoperatively.

  4. FORMATION OF VESICOURETHRAL ANASTOMOSIS DURING ENDOVIDEOSURGICAL EXTRAPERITONEAL RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: СOMPARATIVE STUDY OF THREE DIFFERENT PROCEDURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Popov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraperitoneoscopic (endovideosurgical extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (ERPE is one of the current surgical treatment procedures in patients with localized prostate cancer. Failure of vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA and the development of its stricture are common surgi-cal complications. This investigation compares the efficiency and safety of different procedures to form VUA during ERPE: an interrupted suture (n = 24, a MVAC suture (n = 23, and a MVAC suture using self-locking suture material (n = 24. The performed comparative analysis of different procedures for forming VUA during ERPE may conclude that there are a number of advantages of the MVAC suture ap-plying the self-locking suture material. These advantages include less time taken to form VUA with the low frequency of complications, such as leakages occurring during control cystography or the development of delayed VUA strictures. 

  5. Long-term tolerance and outcomes for dose escalation in early salvage post-prostatectomy radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safdieh, Joseph; Schwartz, David; Weiner, Joseph; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Madeb, Isaac; Rotman, Marvin; Schreiber, David [Dept.of Veteran Affairs, New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn (United States); Rineer, Justin [University of Florida Health Cancer Center, Orlando (United States)

    2014-09-15

    To study the long-term outcomes and tolerance in our patients who received dose escalated radiotherapy in the early salvage post-prostatectomy setting. The medical records of 54 consecutive patients who underwent radical prostatectomy subsequently followed by salvage radiation therapy (SRT) to the prostate bed between 2003-2010 were analyzed. Patients included were required to have a pre-radiation prostate specific antigen level (PSA) of 2 ng/mL or less. The median SRT dose was 70.2 Gy. Biochemical failure after salvage radiation was defined as a PSA level >0.2 ng/mL. Biochemical control and survival endpoints were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis were used to identify the potential impact of confounding factors on outcomes. The median pre-SRT PSA was 0.45 ng/mL and the median follow-up time was 71 months. The 4- and 7-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 75.7% and 63.2%, respectively. The actuarial 4- and 7-year distant metastasis-free survival was 93.7% and 87.0%, respectively, and the actuarial 7-year prostate cancer specific survival was 94.9%. Grade 3 late genitourinary toxicity developed in 14 patients (25.9%), while grade 4 late genitourinary toxicity developed in 2 patients (3.7%). Grade 3 late gastrointestinal toxicity developed in 1 patient (1.9%), and grade 4 late gastrointestinal toxicity developed in 1 patient (1.9%). In this series with long-term follow-up, early SRT provided outcomes and toxicity profiles similar to those reported from the three major randomized trials studying adjuvant radiation therapy.

  6. Loss of PTEN expression is associated with increased risk of recurrence after prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Alcides; Peskoe, Sarah B; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Schultz, Luciana; Albadine, Roula; Hicks, Jessica; De Marzo, Angelo M; Platz, Elizabeth A; Netto, George J

    2012-11-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) is one of the most frequently lost tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and it has been described in more than two-thirds of patients with advanced/aggressive prostate cancer. Previous studies suggest that, in prostate cancer, genomic PTEN loss is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. Thus, we evaluated whether immunohistochemical PTEN expression in prostate cancer glands was associated with higher risk of recurrence, using a nested case-control study that included 451 men who recurred and 451 men who did not recur with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy. Recurrence was defined as biochemical recurrence (serum prostate-specific antigen >0.2 ng/ml) or clinical recurrence (local recurrence, systemic metastases, or prostate cancer-related death). Cases and controls were matched on pathological T stage, Gleason score, race/ethnicity, and age at surgery. Odds ratios of recurrence and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression to account for the matching factors and to adjust for year of surgery, preoperative prostate-specific antigen concentrations, and status of surgical margins. Men who recurred had a higher proportion of PTEN negative expression (16 vs 11%, P=0.05) and PTEN loss (40 vs 31%, P=0.02) than controls. Men with markedly decreased PTEN staining had a higher risk of recurrence (odds ratio=1.67; 95% confidence intervals 1.09, 2.57; P=0.02) when compared with all other men. In summary, in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by prostatectomy, decreased PTEN expression was associated with an increased risk of recurrence, independent of known clinicopathological factors.

  7. High serum folate is associated with reduced biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy: Results from the SEARCH Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Moreira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction To analyze the association between serum levels of folate and risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy among men from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH database. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of 135 subjects from the SEARCH database treated between 1991-2009 with available preoperative serum folate levels. Patients' characteristics at the time of the surgery were analyzed with ranksum and linear regression. Uni- and multivariable analyses of folate levels (log-transformed and time to biochemical recurrence were performed with Cox proportional hazards. Results The median preoperative folate level was 11.6ng/mL (reference = 1.5-20.0ng/mL. Folate levels were significantly lower among African-American men than Caucasians (P = 0.003. In univariable analysis, higher folate levels were associated with more recent year of surgery (P < 0.001 and lower preoperative PSA (P = 0.003. In univariable analysis, there was a trend towards lower risk of biochemical recurrence among men with high folate levels (HR = 0.61, 95%CI = 0.37-1.03, P = 0.064. After adjustments for patients characteristics' and pre- and post-operative clinical and pathological findings, higher serum levels of folate were independently associated with lower risk for biochemical recurrence (HR = 0.42, 95%CI = 0.20-0.89, P = 0.023. Conclusion In a cohort of men undergoing radical prostatectomy at several VAs across the country, higher serum folate levels were associated with lower PSA and lower risk for biochemical failure. While the source of the folate in the serum in this study is unknown (i.e. diet vs. supplement, these findings, if confirmed, suggest a potential role of folic acid supplementation or increased consumption of folate rich foods to reduce the risk of recurrence.

  8. Predictive factors for lymph node positivity in patients undergoing extended pelvic lymphadenectomy during robot assisted radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Batra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pelvic lymphadenectomy during radical prostatectomy (RP improves staging and may provide a therapeutic benefit. However, there is no clear consensus on the selection criteria for subjecting patients to this additional procedure. With a growing adoption of robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP in India, it has become imperative to study the incidence and predictive factors for lymph node involvement in our patients. Materials and Methods: From February 2010 to February 2014, 452 RARP procedures were performed at our institution. A total of 100 consecutive patients from July 2011 to August 2012 were additionally subjected to a robotic extended pelvic lymphadenectomy (EPLND. Lymph node positivity rates and lymph node density were analyzed on the basis of preoperative prostate specific antigen (PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, D′Amico risk category and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings. Multivariate analysis was performed to ascertain factors associated with lymph node positivity in our cohort. Results: The mean age of the patients was 65.5 (47-77 years and the body mass index was 26.3 (16.3-38.7 kg/m 2 . The mean console time for EPLND was 45 (32-68 min. A median of 17 (two to 40 lymph nodes were retrieved. Seventeen patients (17% had positive lymph nodes (median of 1, range 1-6. Median lymph node density in these patients was 10%. When stratified by PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, D′Amico risk category and features of locally advanced disease on MRI, a trend towards increasing incidence of lymph node positivity was observed, with an increase in adverse factors. However, on multivariate analysis, clinical stage > T2a was the only significant factor impacting lymph node positivity in our cohort. Conclusions: A significant proportion of men undergoing RARP in India have positive lymph nodes on EPLND. While other variables may also have a potential impact, a higher clinical stage predisposes to an increased

  9. Secondary Circulating Prostate Cells Predict Biochemical Failure in Prostate Cancer Patients after Radical Prostatectomy and without Evidence of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel P. Murray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although 90% of prostate cancer is considered to be localized, 20%–30% of patients will experience biochemical failure (BF, defined as serum PSA >0.2 ng/mL, after radical prostatectomy (RP. The presence of circulating prostate cells (CPCs in men without evidence of BF may be useful to predict patients at risk for BF. We describe the frequency of CPCs detected after RP, relation with clinicopathological parameters, and association with biochemical failure. Methods and Patients. Serial blood samples were taken during followup after RP, mononuclear cells were obtained by differential gel centrifugation, and CPCs identified using standard immunocytochemistry using anti-PSA monoclonal antibodies. Age, pathological stage (organ confined, nonorgan confined, pathological grade, margin status (positive, negative, extracapsular extension, perineural, vascular, and lymphatic infiltration (positive, negative were compared with the presence/absence of CPCs and with and without biochemical failure. Kaplan Meier methods were used to compare the unadjusted biochemical failure free survival of patients with and without CPCs. Results. 114 men participated, and secondary CPCs were detected more frequently in patients with positive margins, extracapsular extension, and vascular and lymphatic infiltration and were associated with biochemical failure independent of these clinicopathological variables, and with a shorter time to BF. Conclusions. Secondary CPCs are an independent risk factor associated with increased BF in men with a PSA <0.2 ng/mL after radical prostatectomy, but do not determine if the recurrence is due to local or systemic disease. These results warrant larger studies to confirm the findings.

  10. A comparative analysis of primary and secondary Gleason pattern predictive ability for positive surgical margins after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfoungaristos, S; Kavouras, A; Kanatas, P; Polimeros, N; Perimenis, P

    2011-01-01

    To compare the predictive ability of primary and secondary Gleason pattern for positive surgical margins in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer and a preoperative Gleason score ≤ 6. A retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients undergone a radical prostatectomy between January 2005 and October 2010 was conducted. Patients' age, prostate volume, preoperative PSA, biopsy Gleason score, the 1st and 2nd Gleason pattern were entered a univariate and multivariate analysis. The 1st and 2nd pattern were tested for their ability to predict positive surgical margins using receiver operating characteristic curves. Positive surgical margins were noticed in 56 cases (38.1%) out of 147 studied patients. The 2nd pattern was significantly greater in those with positive surgical margins while the 1st pattern was not significantly different between the 2 groups of patients. ROC analysis revealed that area under the curve was 0.53 (p=0.538) for the 1st pattern and 0.60 (p=0.048) for the 2nd pattern. Concerning the cases with PSA <10 ng/ml, it was also found that only the 2nd pattern had a predictive ability (p=0.050). When multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted it was found that the 2nd pattern was the only independent predictor. The second Gleason pattern was found to be of higher value than the 1st one for the prediction of positive surgical margins in patients with preoperative Gleason score ≤ 6 and this should be considered especially when a neurovascular bundle sparing radical prostatectomy is planned, in order not to harm the oncological outcome.

  11. A pilot study of potential pre-operative barriers to couples' sexual recovery after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Daniela; Northouse, Laurel; Crossley, Heather; Miller, David; Dunn, Rodney; Nidetz, Jennifer; Montie, Jeanne; Moyad, Mia; Lavin, Katie; M