WorldWideScience

Sample records for ongoing multidisciplinary challenges

  1. Ecommerce: Ongoing Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Mohammed

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines some of the challenges of online marketing, including the importance of adding online marketing to corporation budgets. A review of the pros and cons of social networking on the Internet, when used as a marketing tool by companies is presented. In addition, new forms of Internet shoppers and new niches for companies are identified

  2. Bioequivalence accomplishments, ongoing initiatives, and remaining challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M N

    2014-02-01

    Although bioequivalence (BE) concepts date back to the late 1960s, there has been a steady evolution in the tools applied to the assessment of product comparability. Despite these advancements, we continue to face a multitude of unresolved challenges. Several of these challenges are unique to veterinary medicine due to issues such as multiple species approvals, unique dosage forms (e.g., intramammary infusion and medicated premixes), physiological challenges (e.g., limitations in blood volume and stress reactions), and the need to evaluate product equivalence for products intended to release drug over a duration of months. Thus, while in some instances, we can adopt advancements implemented by our human health counterparts but in other situations, we need to pioneer our own method for resolving these challenges. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an update on recent advances, achievements, and ongoing initiatives associated with the assessment of product BE in veterinary medicine. This review reflects the highlights of a presentation given at the 2012 meeting of the European Association for Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology. Published (2013). This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Ongoing challenges in the management of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokwaro, Gilbert

    2009-10-12

    This article gives an overview of some of the ongoing challenges that are faced in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malaria. Malaria causes approximately 881,000 deaths every year, with nine out of ten deaths occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. In addition to the human burden of malaria, the economic burden is vast. It is thought to cost African countries more than US$12 billion every year in direct losses. However, great progress in malaria control has been made in some highly endemic countries. Vector control is assuming a new importance with the significant reductions in malaria burden achieved using combined malaria control interventions in countries such as Zanzibar, Zambia and Rwanda. The proportion of patients treated for malaria who have a confirmed diagnosis is low in Africa compared with other regions of the world, with the result that anti-malarials could be used to treat patients without malaria, especially in areas where progress has been made in reducing the malaria burden and malaria epidemiology is changing. Inappropriate administration of anti-malarials could contribute to the spread of resistance and incurs unnecessary costs. Parasite resistance to almost all commonly used anti-malarials has been observed in the most lethal parasite species, Plasmodium falciparum. This has presented a major barrier to successful disease management in malaria-endemic areas. ACT (artemisinin-based combination therapy) has made a significant contribution to malaria control and to reducing disease transmission through reducing gametocyte carriage. Administering ACT to infants and small children can be difficult and time consuming. Specially formulating anti-malarials for this vulnerable population is vital to ease administration and help ensure that an accurate dose is received. Education of healthworkers and communities about malaria prevention, diagnosis and treatment is a vital component of effective case management, especially as diagnostic policies change

  4. Gaucher disease: Progress and ongoing challenges.

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    Mistry, Pramod K; Lopez, Grisel; Schiffmann, Raphael; Barton, Norman W; Weinreb, Neal J; Sidransky, Ellen

    Over the past decades, tremendous progress has been made in the field of Gaucher disease, the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Many of the colossal achievements took place during the course of the sixty-year tenure of Dr. Roscoe Brady at the National Institutes of Health. These include the recognition of the enzymatic defect involved, the isolation and characterization of the protein, the localization and characterization of the gene and its nearby pseudogene, as well as the identification of the first mutant alleles in patients. The first treatment for Gaucher disease, enzyme replacement therapy, was conceived of, developed and tested at the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health. Advances including recombinant production of the enzyme, the development of mouse models, pioneering gene therapy experiments, high throughput screens of small molecules and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cell models have all helped to catapult research in Gaucher disease into the twenty-first century. The appreciation that mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene are an important risk factor for parkinsonism further expands the impact of this work. However, major challenges still remain, some of which are described here, that will provide opportunities, excitement and discovery for the next generations of Gaucher investigators.

  5. Infertility: Ongoing Global challenge of new millennium

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    Kantibhai Naranbhai Sonaliya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility tends to be the global challenge even in the second decade of the new millennium. Especially in developing countries like India, it is still one the most lethal social evil responsible for a big proportion of cases of psychological disturbances including suicide. Again, recently, few conditions other than communicable or Non-communicable diseases are given place among the categories of significant public health problems like Road Traffic Accidents, Burns, Poisoning, drowning and few more. But, for developing countries like India, the list is incomplete without inclusion of Infertility (there may be several others also. In public health, tuberculosis, leprosy and some other diseases are considered social diseases which produce social stigma for the patients and/or his family members.1 In same manner, Infertility is an important cause of social stigmatization since centuries for a couple suffering from, especially for woman involved. During a transitory phase of industrialization and socio-economic development, the situation is changed a minute smidgen at urban areas of India but at rural parts, sub-urban or even at urban slums (mainly among pockets of recent migrants the situation is as same as a few hundred years ago. A female of no religion, caste, social status or higher level of education are barred from some stringent mores related to infertility. Infertile females are still not allowed to take part in so many religious or social ceremonies; on the contrary, they have to face more harassment including domestic violence than their counterparts, who have given birth to the child. Due to social, psychological, economic disturbances, they are forced to take multiple sorts of treatments including religious quacks. So many infertile women are exploited physically and economically also in such weird ways of treatment to gain a pregnancy.

  6. Litigation Provides Clues to Ongoing Challenges in Implementing Insurance Parity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kelsey N; Huskamp, Haiden A; Goldman, Howard H; Rutkow, Lainie; Barry, Colleen L

    2017-08-11

    Over the past twenty-five years, thirty-seven states and the US Congress have passed mental health and substance use disorder (MH/SUD) parity laws to secure nondiscriminatory insurance coverage for MH/SUD services in the private health insurance market and through certain public insurance programs. However, in the intervening years, litigation has been brought by numerous parties alleging violations of insurance parity. We examine the critical issues underlying these legal challenges as a framework for understanding the areas in which parity enforcement is lacking, as well as ongoing areas of ambiguity in the interpretation of these laws. We identified all private litigation involving federal and state parity laws and extracted themes from a final sample of thirty-seven lawsuits. The primary substantive topics at issue include the scope of services guaranteed by parity laws, coverage of certain habilitative therapies such as applied behavioral analysis for autism spectrum disorders, credentialing standards for MH/SUD providers, determinations regarding the medical necessity of MH/SUD services, and the application of nonquantitative treatment limitations under the 2008 federal parity law. Ongoing efforts to achieve nondiscriminatory insurance coverage for MH/SUDs should attend to the major issues subject to private legal action as important areas for facilitating and monitoring insurer compliance. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  7. Rootstock breeding in Prunus species: Ongoing efforts and new challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Gainza

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The current global agricultural challenges imply the need to generate new technologies and farming systems. In this context, rootstocks are an essential component in modern agriculture. Most currently used are those clonally propagated and there are several ongoing efforts to develop this type of plant material. Despite this tendency, lesser number of rootstock breeding programs exists in comparison to the large number of breeding programs for scion cultivars. In the case of rootstocks, traits evaluated in new selection lines are quite different: From the agronomic standpoint vigor is a key issue in order to establish high-density orchards. Other important agronomic traits include compatibility with a wide spectrum of cultivars from different species, good tolerance to root hypoxia, water use efficiency, aptitude to extract or exclude certain soil nutrients, and tolerance to soil or water salinity. Biotic stresses are also important: Resistance/tolerance to pests and diseases, such as nematodes, soil-borne fungi, crown gall, bacterial canker, and several virus, viroids, and phytoplasms. In this sense, the creation of new rootstocks at Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Fruticultura (CEAF offers an alternative to stone fruit crop, particularly in Chile, where just a few alternatives are commercially available, and there are site-specific problems. The implementation of molecular markers in order to give support to the phenotypic evaluation of plant breeding has great potential assisting the selection of new genotypes of rootstocks. Marker-Assisted Selection (MAS can shorten the time required to obtain new cultivars and can make the process more cost-effective than selection based exclusively on phenotype, but more basic research is needed to well understood the molecular and physiological mechanisms behind the studied trait.

  8. Challenges of Trainees in a Multidisciplinary Research Program: Nano-Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Christina; Koehne, Jessica; Tinkle, Sally; Maynard, Andrew D.; Hill, Rodney A.

    2011-01-01

    The breadth of knowledge required for the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology challenges and extends traditional concepts of multidisciplinary graduate education. There is a paucity of information, both general reporting and peer-reviewed studies, on the challenges for graduate students working in this multidisciplinary paradigm, from the…

  9. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: ongoing clinical challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julayanont P

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Parunyou Julayanont,1 Amputch Karukote,2 Doungporn Ruthirago,1 Deepa Panikkath,3 Ragesh Panikkath3 1Department of Neurology, Texas Tech University Health Science Center, Lubbock, TX, USA; 2Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Science Center, Lubbock, TX, USA Abstract: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is an uncommon disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure without radiological or laboratory evidence of intracranial pathology except empty sella turcica, optic nerve sheath with filled out cerebrospinal fluid spaces, and smooth-walled nonflow-related venous sinus stenosis or collapse. This condition typically affects obese women. The incidence of IIH is increasing with the rising prevalence of obesity. Persistent headache is the most common symptom. Visual impairment is a serious complication that may not be recognized by the patients. This paper reviews clinical manifestations, diagnostic challenges, and current treatments of IIH in adults. Various imaging modalities have been studied on their validity for detection of IIH and papilledema. This review also includes new studies on medical, surgical, and interventional management of this condition. Acetazolamide and topiramate are the only two medications that have been studied in randomized controlled trials about their efficacy in treatment of IIH. In patients who have severe visual impairment or progressive visual deterioration despite medical management, surgical or interventional treatment may be considered. The efficacy and complications of cerebrospinal fluid diversion, optic nerve sheath fenestration, and endovascular venous stenting reported in the last 3 decades have been summarized in this review. Finally, the prospective aspects of biomarkers and treatments are proposed for future research. Keywords: acetazolamide, cerebrospinal fluid shunts, endovascular

  10. The Challenges of Multidisciplinary Education in Computer Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fred S. Roberts

    2011-01-01

    Some of the most important problems facing the United States and China,indeed facing our entire planet,require approaches that are fundamentally multidisciplinary in nature.Many of those require skills in computer science (CS),basic understanding of another discipline,and the ability to apply the skills in one discipline to the problems of another.Modern training in computer science needs to prepare students to work in other disciplines or to work on multidisciplinary problems.What do we do to prepare them for a multidisciplinary world when there are already too many things we want to teach them about computer science? This paper describes successful examples of multidisciplinary education at the interface between CS and the biological sciences,as well as other examples involving CS and security,CS and sustainability,and CS and the social and economic sciences.It then discusses general principles for multidisciplinary education of computer scientists.

  11. Tongue cancer during pregnancy: Surgery and more, a multidisciplinary challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabue, Marta; Elrefaey, Shimaa Hassan; Peccatori, Fedro; Favia, Gianfranco; Navach, Valeria; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Capaccio, Pasquale; Venturino, Marco; Tredici, Stefano; Alterio, Daniela; Mosca, Fabio; Pugni, Lorenza; Scarfone, Giovanna; Cossu Rocca, Maria; Calabrese, Luca

    2016-02-01

    No international guidelines are available for the treatment of oral tongue cancer during pregnancy. Six patients with tongue cancer during pregnancy were identified by a retrospective chart review. In three of the cases we did not follow the standard treatment, the women had disease progression, and two of them died after a short time. A multidisciplinary discussion and literature review suggest that following the standard surgical procedure could be the optimal treatment to ensure mother and baby health in tongue cancer. Nonetheless choosing between maternal advantage and potential fetal damage should not be an individual medical decision. Treatment "customization" is a possibility. Patients and their families should be provided with comprehensive information and appropriate support in order to fully participate in the decision-making process. The patient's care may be improved if carried out in a specialized maternity center where the surgical oncologic treatment is managed together with the obstetric aspects.

  12. Enrichment of foods with omega-3 fatty acids: A multidisciplinary challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Enrichment of foods with marine omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) poses a multidisciplinary challenge to food industry and academia. Although our knowledge about possible health effects of omega-3 PUFA has increased tremendously during the last 30 years, there is still a lot to be learned...... about these healthy fatty acids. Moreover, consumer acceptance and lipid oxidation of omega-3 PUFA-enriched food are other major challenges that the food industry meet when developing omega-3-enriched foods. Two examples on multidisciplinary research projects to overcome some of these challenges...... are given in this article together with cases studies illustrating how lipid oxidation can be prevented in a range of different omega-3-enriched foods....

  13. Correlating structure and function of drug-metabolizing enzymes: progress and ongoing challenges.

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    Johnson, Eric F; Connick, J Patrick; Reed, James R; Backes, Wayne L; Desai, Manoj C; Xu, Lianhong; Estrada, D Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S; Scott, Emily E

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Experimental Biology held April 20-24 in Boston, MA. Presentations discussed the status of cytochrome P450 (P450) knowledge, emphasizing advances and challenges in relating structure with function and in applying this information to drug design. First, at least one structure of most major human drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes is known. However, the flexibility of these active sites can limit the predictive value of one structure for other ligands. A second limitation is our coarse-grain understanding of P450 interactions with membranes, other P450 enzymes, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5. Recent work has examined differential P450 interactions with reductase in mixed P450 systems and P450:P450 complexes in reconstituted systems and cells, suggesting another level of functional control. In addition, protein nuclear magnetic resonance is a new approach to probe these protein/protein interactions, identifying interacting b5 and P450 surfaces, showing that b5 and reductase binding are mutually exclusive, and demonstrating ligand modulation of CYP17A1/b5 interactions. One desired outcome is the application of such information to control drug metabolism and/or design selective P450 inhibitors. A final presentation highlighted development of a CYP3A4 inhibitor that slows clearance of human immunodeficiency virus drugs otherwise rapidly metabolized by CYP3A4. Although understanding P450 structure/function relationships is an ongoing challenge, translational advances will benefit from continued integration of existing and new biophysical approaches.

  14. MOVE! multidisciplinary programs: Challenges and resources for weight management treatment in VHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Patricia H; Ruser, Christopher; Kashaf, Susan

    2011-12-01

    The MOVE! program has been a successful weight management and physical activity initiative from the Veteran's Health Administration. While it embraces a multicomponent approach to weight management, local facilities have primarily focused on the implementation of delivery of MOVE! educational materials to groups or individuals. We discuss additional MOVE!-related weight management efforts within VHA that reflect treatment strategies beyond delivery of these educational materials. First, we present a case study that highlights the special challenges associated with the Veteran overweight/obese population. Second, we describe the implementation of our local, multidisciplinary, individualized weight management clinic as an example of on-the-ground provision of a higher treatment intensity program as part of MOVE!'s multicomponent model. Third, we present program outcomes and consider challenges to program sustainability.

  15. Challenges in integrating multidisciplinary data into a single e-infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakan, Kuvvet; Jeffery, Keith G.; Bailo, Daniele; Harrison, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) aims to create a pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. The mission of EPOS is to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex Earth system by relying on new e-science opportunities and integrating diverse and advanced Research Infrastructures in Europe for solid Earth Science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. EPOS will improve our ability to better manage the use of the subsurface of the Earth. Through integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. EPOS is now getting into its Implementation Phase (EPOS-IP). One of the main challenges during the implementation phase is the integration of multidisciplinary data into a single e-infrastructure. Multidisciplinary data are organized and governed by the Thematic Core Services (TCS) and are driven by various scientific communities encompassing a wide spectrum of Earth science disciplines. TCS data, data products and services will be integrated into a platform "the ICS system" that will ensure their interoperability and access to these services by the scientific community as well as other users within the society. This requires dedicated tasks for interactions with the various TCS-WPs, as well as the various distributed ICS (ICS-Ds), such as High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities, large scale data storage facilities, complex processing and visualization tools etc. Computational Earth Science (CES

  16. Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings: Evidence, Challenges, and the Role of Clinical Decision Support Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Patkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidisciplinary team (MDT model in cancer care was introduced and endorsed to ensure that care delivery is consistent with the best available evidence. Over the last few years, regular MDT meetings have become a standard practice in oncology and gained the status of the key decision-making forum for patient management. Despite the fact that cancer MDT meetings are well accepted by clinicians, concerns are raised over the paucity of good-quality evidence on their overall impact. There are also concerns over lack of the appropriate support for this important but overburdened decision-making platform. The growing acceptance by clinical community of the health information technology in recent years has created new opportunities and possibilities of using advanced clinical decision support (CDS systems to realise full potential of cancer MDT meetings. In this paper, we present targeted summary of the available evidence on the impact of cancer MDT meetings, discuss the reported challenges, and explore the role that a CDS technology could play in addressing some of these challenges.

  17. Recent advances and on-going challenges of estimating past elevation from climate proxy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, K. E.; Peppe, D. J.; Eiler, J. M.; Wernicke, B. P.; Koch, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    The methods currently available to reconstruct paleoelevation dominantly rely on diverse sedimentary archives of past climate. The spatial and temporal distributions of these records are used to extract information about differences in elevation from site to site, and through geologic time. As such, our understanding of past elevations is only as good as our ability to understand past climate and to put these records into a reasonable chronologic framework. Currently, most techniques either exploit the difference in temperature or the difference in the hydrogen and/or oxygen isotopic composition of precipitation between high and low elevation sites. Temperature data dominantly come from leaf margin analysis of fossil plants; biomarkers preserved in sediments; and clumped isotope thermometry of paleosol and lacustrine carbonates and carbonate cements. Constraints on the isotopic composition of precipitation come from many of the same sedimentary archives: paleosol and lacustrine carbonates, carbonate cements and authigenic clays. Reconstructed gradients in temperature and isotopic composition are then compared with modern "lapse rates" to translate climate proxy data into elevation estimates. There are still many challenges in reconstructing past elevations from paleoclimate proxy data in this way. For example, modern lapse rates are generally empirical rather than based on thermodynamic principles alone, and so may vary for reasons that are not always understood. In addition, unrecognized differences in seasonal bias for the different sedimentary archives can lead to inaccurately averaged records and/or over-estimates of errors in each method. Finally, to appropriately estimate elevation, the effects of climate change must be accounted for by matching inferred high-elevation sites with known low-elevation sites of similar age and geographic location. This requires excellent chronologic control and correlation across terrestrial basins (or independent knowledge of

  18. Donation after circulatory death: current practices, ongoing challenges, and potential improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Paul E; Monaco, Anthony P

    2014-02-15

    Organ donation after circulatory death (DCD) has been endorsed by the World Health Organization and is practiced worldwide. This overview examines current DCD practices, identifies problems and challenges, and suggests clinical strategies for possible improvement. Although there is uniform agreement on DCD donor candidacy (ventilator-dependent individuals with nonrecoverable or irreversible neurologic injury not meeting brain death criteria), there are variations in all aspects of DCD practice. Utilization of DCD organs is limited by hypoxia, hypotension, reduced--then absent--organ perfusion, and ischemia/reperfusion syndrome. Nevertheless, DCD kidneys exhibit comparable function and survival to donors with brain death kidneys, although they have higher rates of primary graft nonfunction, delayed graft function, discard, and retrieval associated injury. Concern over ischemic organ injury underscores the reluctance to recover extrarenal DCD organs since lack of medical therapy to support inadequate allograft function limits their acceptability. Nevertheless, limited results with DCD pancreas, liver, and lung allografts (but not heart) are now approaching that of donors with brain death organs. Pretransplant machine perfusion of DCD kidneys (vs. static storage) may reduce delayed graft function but has no effect on long-term organ function and survival. Normothermic regional perfusion used during DCD abdominal organ retrieval may reduce ischemic organ injury and increase the number of usable organs, although critical confirmative studies have yet to be done. Minor increases in usable DCD kidneys could accrue from increased use of pediatric DCD kidneys and from selective use of DCD/ECD kidneys, whereas a modest increase could result through utilization of donors declared dead beyond 1 hr from withdrawal of life support therapy. A significant increase in transplantable kidneys could be achieved by extension of the concept of living kidney donation in relation to

  19. The challenge of wolf recovery: an ongoing dilemma for state managers

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    Mech, L. David

    2013-01-01

    “Dave, would you do another legal declaration on the wolf for us?” The weary voice on the phone belonged to Mike Jimenez, Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Management and Science Coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). He was calling from Wyoming to ask me to prepare a document to address a legal challenge to the FWS’s August 2012 delisting of the wolf (Canis lupus) in Wyoming, a highly controversial move. Mike’s tone reflected the reality that — as so many wildlife biologists know and live each day — wildlife management is mainly people management. This contention could not be truer for managing any wildlife species than for managing the wolf. Dubbed “the beast of waste and desolation” by Teddy Roosevelt (The Wilderness Hunter 1893/1900), wolves had been universally hated as prolific predators of valuable livestock and game. Around the turn of the 20th century, members of the U.S. Biological Survey and various state agents, ranchers, cowboys, and other frontiersmen poisoned and persecuted wolves, extirpating them from most of the contiguous United States (Young and Goldman 1944). By 1967, Minnesota and nearby Isle Royale National Park in Michigan held the only remaining wolves in the Lower 48 states, prompting the FWS to place the wolf on the Endangered Species List (established by the Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966). The wolf then became the list’s poster species, and the timing was ideal: Silent Spring (Carson 1962) had just seeded and fertilized the environmental movement, which blossomed on Earth Day (April 22, 1970) into the environmental revolution. “Save the wolf!” became one of the movement’s rallying cries. And save the wolf we did.

  20. Islet transplantation in type 1 diabetes: ongoing challenges, refined procedures, and long-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A M James

    2012-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in islet transplantation over a span of 40 years. Once just an experimental curiosity in mice, this therapy has moved forward, and can now provide robust therapy for highly selected patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), refractory to stabilization by other means. This progress could not have occurred without extensive dynamic international collaboration. Currently, 1,085 patients have undergone islet transplantation at 40 international sites since the Edmonton Protocol was reported in 2000 (752 allografts, 333 autografts), according to the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry. The long-term results of islet transplantation in selected centers now match registry data of pancreas-alone transplantation, with 6 sites reporting five-year insulin independence rates ≥50%. Islet transplantation has been criticized for the use of multiple donor pancreas organs, but progress has also occurred in single-donor success, with 10 sites reporting increased single-donor engraftment. The next wave of innovative clinical trial interventions will address instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR), apoptosis, and inflammation, and will translate into further marked improvements in single-donor success. Effective control of auto- and alloimmunity is the key to long-term islet function, and high-resolution cellular and antibody-based assays will add considerable precision to this process. Advances in immunosuppression, with new antibody-based targeting of costimulatory blockade and other T-B cellular signaling, will have further profound impact on the safety record of immunotherapy. Clinical trials will move forward shortly to test out new human stem cell derived islets, and in parallel trials will move forward, testing pig islets for compatibility in patients. Induction of immunological tolerance to self-islet antigens and to allografts is a difficult challenge, but potentially within our grasp.

  1. Path of infectious diseases in Brazil in the last 50 years: an ongoing challenge.

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    Waldman, Eliseu Alves; Sato, Ana Paula Sayuri

    2016-12-22

    In this article, we comment on the main features of infectious diseases in Brazil in the last 50 years, highlighting how much of this path Revista de Saúde Pública could portray. From 1967 to 2016, 1,335 articles focusing on infectious diseases were published in Revista de Saúde Pública. Although the proportion of articles on the topic have decreased from about 50.0% to 15.0%, its notability remained and reflected the growing complexity of the research required for its control. It is noteworthy that studies design and analysis strategies progressively became more sophisticated, following the great development of epidemiology in Brazil in the recent decades. Thus, the journal has followed the success of public health interventions that permitted to control or eliminate numerous infectious diseases - which were responsible, in the past, for high rates of morbidity and mortality -, and also followed the reemergence of diseases already controlled and the emergence of until then unknown diseases, with a strong impact on the Brazilian population, establishing a little predictable and very challenging path. RESUMO Neste artigo, comentamos as principais características das doenças infecciosas no Brasil, nos últimos 50 anos, destacando o quanto a Revista de Saúde Pública conseguiu capturar essa trajetória. De 1967 a 2016, foram publicados 1.335 artigos na Revista de Saúde Pública com foco em doenças infecciosas. Ainda que a proporção de artigos sobre esse tema tenha declinado de cerca de 50,0% para 15,0%, seu destaque se manteve e refletiu a crescente complexidade das pesquisas necessárias para o seu controle. Nota-se que os desenhos dos estudos e as estratégias de análise ganharam progressivamente maior sofisticação, acompanhando o grande desenvolvimento da epidemiologia no Brasil, nas últimas décadas. Assim, foi registrado não apenas o sucesso de intervenções de saúde pública que permitiram o controle ou a eliminação de inúmeras doen

  2. Roles and challenges of the multidisciplinary team involved in prosthetic rehabilitation, in a rural district in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennion L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Liezel Ennion, Anthea Rhoda Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Community and Health Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa Background: Major lower limb amputations result in a significant sense of loss, psychological stress, and decrease in function and overall quality of life for the amputee. The holistic, patient-centered prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputee requires input from a team of dedicated health professionals from different disciplines commonly referred to as a multidisciplinary team (MDT. MDT rehabilitation is considered crucial in the reintegration of the amputee into the community, as well as for providing psychological support after limb loss. Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary rehabilitation has been proven to be more successful than therapy provided by individual therapists in a number of different populations, regardless of the population studied. However, in most developing countries, there is a significant lack of multidisciplinary rehabilitation.Aim: To explore the roles and challenges of the members of the MDT involved in trans-tibial amputation rehabilitation in a rural community in South Africa (SA.Design: An explorative sequential qualitative descriptive study.Setting: A rural district in the KwaZulu Natal province in SA.Participants: Nine prosthetic users, three surgeons, three traditional healers, 17 therapists, four prosthetists, and four community health workers.Instruments for data collection: Semistructured interviews and focus group discussions.Results: The roles of the members of the MDT were clarified, and various members of the MDT highlighted specific challenges relating to their experiences and roles in the rehabilitation team. Lack of interdisciplinary rehabilitation and communication among team members, as well as lack of resources, and patient education negatively impact the rehabilitation of trans-tibial amputees.Conclusion: Aiming to address the limited resources

  3. Roles and challenges of the multidisciplinary team involved in prosthetic rehabilitation, in a rural district in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennion, Liezel; Rhoda, Anthea

    2016-01-01

    Background Major lower limb amputations result in a significant sense of loss, psychological stress, and decrease in function and overall quality of life for the amputee. The holistic, patient-centered prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputee requires input from a team of dedicated health professionals from different disciplines commonly referred to as a multidisciplinary team (MDT). MDT rehabilitation is considered crucial in the reintegration of the amputee into the community, as well as for providing psychological support after limb loss. Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary rehabilitation has been proven to be more successful than therapy provided by individual therapists in a number of different populations, regardless of the population studied. However, in most developing countries, there is a significant lack of multidisciplinary rehabilitation. Aim To explore the roles and challenges of the members of the MDT involved in trans-tibial amputation rehabilitation in a rural community in South Africa (SA). Design An explorative sequential qualitative descriptive study. Setting A rural district in the KwaZulu Natal province in SA. Participants Nine prosthetic users, three surgeons, three traditional healers, 17 therapists, four prosthetists, and four community health workers. Instruments for data collection Semistructured interviews and focus group discussions. Results The roles of the members of the MDT were clarified, and various members of the MDT highlighted specific challenges relating to their experiences and roles in the rehabilitation team. Lack of interdisciplinary rehabilitation and communication among team members, as well as lack of resources, and patient education negatively impact the rehabilitation of trans-tibial amputees. Conclusion Aiming to address the limited resources available to health care professionals, as well as improved communication and interdisciplinary rehabilitation, could potentially improve the overall rehabilitation of persons

  4. The MOOC and Learning Analytics Innovation Cycle (MOLAC): A Reflective Summary of Ongoing Research and Its Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachsler, H.; Kalz, M.

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the interplay between learning analytics and massive open online courses (MOOCs) and provides a conceptual framework to situate ongoing research in the MOOC and learning analytics innovation cycle (MOLAC framework). The MOLAC framework is organized on three levels: On the micro-level, the data collection and analytics…

  5. Bio-Nanotechnology: Challenges for Trainees in a Multidisciplinary Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica Erin

    2009-01-01

    The recent developments in the field of nanotechnology have provided scientists with a new set of nanoscale materials, tools and devices in which to investigate the biological science thus creating the mulitdisciplinary field of bio-nanotechnology. Bio-nanotechnology merges the biological sciences with other scientific disciplines ranging from chemistry to engineering. Todays students must have a working knowledge of a variety of scientific disciplines in order to be successful in this new field of study. This talk will provide insight into the issue of multidisciplinary education from the perspective of a graduate student working in the field of bio-nanotechnology. From the classes we take to the research we perform, how does the modern graduate student attain the training required to succeed in this field?

  6. MUSE: Challenges to integrate the Multi-Disciplinary field of BB access in one project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatome, J.; Pitois, S.; Kamagate, A.; Maillotte, H.; Massoubre., D.; González-Herráez, G.-H.; Smedt, A. de; Brink, R. van den

    2006-01-01

    The present paper discusses the managerial challenges of the MUSE integrated project on multi service broadband access. It addresses different aspects such as matrix organisation, project office, consensus process, standardisation, dissemination, and quality control.

  7. MUSE: Challenges to integrate the Multi-Disciplinary field of BB access in one project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatome, J.; Pitois, S.; Kamagate, A.; Maillotte, H.; Massoubre., D.; González-Herráez, G.-H.; Smedt, A. de; Brink, R. van den

    2006-01-01

    The present paper discusses the managerial challenges of the MUSE integrated project on multi service broadband access. It addresses different aspects such as matrix organisation, project office, consensus process, standardisation, dissemination, and quality control.

  8. Heart, tracheo-bronchial and thoracic spine trauma. Succesful multidisciplinary management:a challenging thoracic politrauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergio Nicola Forti Parri; Gian Marco Guiducci; Kenji Kawamukai; Carlo Coniglio; Giovanni Gordini; Federico De Iure; Rocco Trisolini; Salomone Di Saverio; Gregorio Tugnoli

    2014-01-01

    We reported the case of a36 years old woman involved in a car accident and admitted to theEmergencyRoom with critical conditions.ACT scan showed hemopericardium, pneumomediastinum andD2 unstable vertebral fracture; then a sternotomy was promptly performed.After admittance toIntensiveCareUnit a bronchoscopy showed a tear of the posterior wall of the trachea and the complete disruption ofthe left main bronchus with a2 cm gap beetwen two consecutive cartilage rings.D2 fracture would have required stabilization, but pronation of the patient was contraindicated by the bronchial rupture.On the nineth day the vertebral fracture was stabilized, thus allowing a lateral decubitus and a left thoracotomy.The bronchial laceration was wrapped all around with a pedicled pericardial flap and a bronchial stent was placed inside the gap with a pediatric bronchoscope.Postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was transferred to thePhysicalRehabilitationUnit after23 d.The successful outcome of this case is the result of multidisciplinary management where every decision was shared by each specialist. From the surgical point of view survival is uncommon in such severe association of lesions.The use of pericardium wrap together with a bronchial stent represents an innovative solution to treat a complicated bronchial disruption.

  9. Earthquake forewarning — A multidisciplinary challenge from the ground up to space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2013-08-01

    Most destructive earthquakes nucleate at between 5-7 km and about 35-40 km depth. Before earthquakes, rocks are subjected to increasing stress. Not every stress increase leads to rupture. To understand pre-earthquake phenomena we note that igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks contain defects which, upon stressing, release defect electrons in the oxygen anion sublattice, known as positive holes. These charge carriers are highly mobile, able to flow out of stressed rocks into surrounding unstressed rocks. They form electric currents, which emit electromagnetic radiation, sometimes in pulses, sometimes sustained. The arrival of positive holes at the ground-air interface can lead to air ionization, often exclusively positive. Ionized air rising upward can lead to cloud condensation. The upward flow of positive ions can lead to instabilities in the mesosphere, to mesospheric lightning, to changes in the Total Electron Content (TEC) at the lower edge of the ionosphere, and electric field turbulences. Advances in deciphering the earthquake process can only be achieved in a broadly multidisciplinary spirit.

  10. The challenges of meeting nutritional requirements in children and adults with epidermolysis bullosa: proceedings of a multidisciplinary team study day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, L; Haynes, L; Sklar, M; Martinez, A E; Mellerio, J E

    2011-08-01

    This is a report of a study day held in London on 3 March 2010 to discuss measures with which to meet the nutritional requirements of patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB). Members of national and international multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) caring for patients with EB attended this event. The study day focused on four challenging aspects of management intimately associated with nutritional status in EB, necessitating close cooperation between MDT members: iron-deficiency anaemia, gastrostomy placement and feeding, muscle mass and mobility, and dental health. The study day provided a unique forum for dietitians, doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, psychologists, psychotherapists, dentists, dental hygienists and occupational therapists to share knowledge and debate problems common to all who strive to promote best practice in this rare and complex group of conditions. © The Author(s). CED © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. An ongoing six-year innovative osteoporosis disease management program: challenges and success in an IPA physician group environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ann; Hittell, Jodi; Beardsley, Carrie; Noh, Charles; Stoukides, Cheryl A; Kaul, Alan F

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this ongoing comprehensive osteoporosis disease management initiative is to provide the adult primary care physicians' (PCPs) offices with a program enabling them to systematically identify and manage their population for osteoporosis. For over six years, Hill Physicians Medical Group (Hill Physicians) has implemented multiple strategies to develop a best practice for identifying and treating members who were candidates for osteoporosis therapy. Numerous tools were used to support this disease management effort, including: evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, patient education sessions, the Simple Calculated Osteoporosis Risk Estimation (SCORE) questionnaire tool, member specific reports for PCPs, targeted member mailings, office-based Peripheral Instantaneous X-ray Imaging (PIXI) test and counseling, dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan guidelines, and web-based Electronic Simple Calculated Osteoporosis Risk Estimation (eSCORE) questionnaire tools. Hill Physicians tabulated results for patients who completed 2649 SCORE tests, screened 978 patients with PIXI tests, and identified 338 osteopenic and 124 osteoporotic patients. The preliminary results of this unique six-year ongoing educational initiative are slow but promising. New physician offices express interest in participating and those offices that have participated in the program continue to screen for osteoporosis. Hill Physicians' message is consistent and is communicated to the physicians repeatedly in different ways in accordance with the principles of educational outreach. Physicians who have conducted the program have positive feedback from their patients and office staff and have begun to communicate their experience to their peers.

  12. From the National Academies: Ongoing Challenges to Evolution Education--Resources and Activities of the National Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labov, Jay B.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of misconceptions about science is not unique to evolution, of course. In the case of evolution, the problem is compounded because many students have been told that their personal belief systems will be challenged or undermined by engaging in learning about this subject. This concern underlies the angst and anger that some parents,…

  13. Water Policy Reforms in South Korea: A Historical Review and Ongoing Challenges for Sustainable Water Governance and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ik-Chang Choi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to provide an opinion on the state-of-the-art of changes and reforms of water policies in South Korea, as well as the challenges along with their implications for sustainable water governance and management. In parallel with change in water resource characteristics generated by physical, environmental and socio-economic challenges such as: (1 uncertainties about climate change (flooding and drought including seasonal and regional variation in precipitation; (2 significant increase in water use caused by rapid urbanization and population growth in industrialized urban areas; (3 inadequate water pricing mechanism which covers only around 80% of the production cost and makes it harder to maintain water systems; and (4 recursive water quality degradation and conflicts over water rights between regions resulting from non-point source pollution in highland versus lowland areas, Korean water policies have been developed through diverse reforms over 100 years. Nevertheless, new challenges for sustainable water management are continuously emerging. To meet those challenges we provide two ideas: (i provider-gets-principle (payment for ecosystem services of cost-benefit sharing among stakeholders who benefit from water use; and (ii water pricing applying full-cost pricing-principle internalizing environmental externalities caused by the intensive water use. Funds secured from the application of those methods would facilitate: (1 support for upstream (rural low income householders suffering from economic restrictions; (2 improvement in water facilities; and (3 efficient water use and demand management in South Korea’s water sectors. We expect that this paper can examine the lessons relevant to challenges that South Korea faces and offer some implications on the formulation of new integration and further reforms of the institutions, laws and organizations responsible for managing water resources in South Korea.

  14. Successful development of satiety enhancing food products: towards a multidisciplinary agenda of research challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kleef, E; Van Trijp, J C M; Van Den Borne, J J G C; Zondervan, C

    2012-01-01

    In the context of increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity in societies worldwide, enhancing the satiating capacity of foods may help people control their energy intake and weight. This requires an integrated approach between various food-related disciplines. By structuring this approach around the new product development process, this paper aims to present the contours of such an integrative approach by going through the current state of the art around satiety enhancing foods. It portrays actual food choice as the end result of a complex interaction between internal satiety signals, other food benefits, and environmental cues. Three interrelated routes to satiating enhancement are to change the food composition to develop stronger physiological satiation and satiety signals, anticipate and build on smart external stimuli at the moment of purchase and consumption, and improve palatability and acceptance of satiety enhanced foods. Key research challenges in achieving these routes in the field of nutrition, food technology, consumer, marketing, and communication are outlined.

  15. Successful Development of Satiety Enhancing Food Products: Towards a Multidisciplinary Agenda of Research Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kleef, E.; Van Trijp, J.C.M.; Van Den Borne, J.J.G.C.; Zondervan, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the context of increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity in societies worldwide, enhancing the satiating capacity of foods may help people control their energy intake and weight. This requires an integrated approach between various food-related disciplines. By structuring this approach around the new product development process, this paper aims to present the contours of such an integrative approach by going through the current state of the art around satiety enhancing foods. It portrays actual food choice as the end result of a complex interaction between internal satiety signals, other food benefits, and environmental cues. Three interrelated routes to satiating enhancement are to change the food composition to develop stronger physiological satiation and satiety signals, anticipate and build on smart external stimuli at the moment of purchase and consumption, and improve palatability and acceptance of satiety enhanced foods. Key research challenges in achieving these routes in the field of nutrition, food technology, consumer, marketing, and communication are outlined. PMID:22530713

  16. Challenges and opportunities of multi-disciplinary, multi-national and multi-sectoral projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Anja; Hamann, Kristin

    2017-04-01

    Collaborative research projects e.g. funded or supported by the European Commission are by nature multi-national. Often EU calls bring together different scientific communities to jointly tackle challenges that can only be addressed through the convergence of previously separated disciplines in one research consortium. Some work programmes even necessitate to team up as different disciplines as natural sciences, social science, legal science and economic science. Examples for such multi- national, -disciplinary and - sectoral projects are the EU projects ECO2 (FP7, concluded), AtlantOS (H2020) and MiningImpact (JPI Oceans). Project managers of such projects need to develop skills beyond the common technical and management skills namely go into the domain of partners and stakeholders psychology and be able to maintain different perspectives on communication and interaction needs regarding cultural-, discipline- and sectoral background. Accordingly, the project manager has besides his or her technical role as manager at least three further roles: that of a communicator, that of a mediator and that of a person convincing partners of the necessary and selling the project products to the stakeholders. As the typical project manager has not too much power and authority by his or her position he or she has to use the power of smart communication and persuasion to overcome potential dissension between disciplines, national reservation or potential conflicts regarding different sectoral views. Accordingly, the project manager of such complex projects would try to arrange the ideal working environment by considering cultural feel, the cooperation of disciplines, information and the control of resources. The way he or she develops such ideal working environment is by reflection of past, present and future experiences/needs.

  17. Barcoding the largest animals on Earth: ongoing challenges and molecular solutions in the taxonomic identification of ancient cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speller, Camilla; van den Hurk, Youri; Charpentier, Anne; Rodrigues, Ana; Gardeisen, Armelle; Wilkens, Barbara; McGrath, Krista; Rowsell, Keri; Spindler, Luke; Collins, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few centuries, many cetacean species have witnessed dramatic global declines due to industrial overharvesting and other anthropogenic influences, and thus are key targets for conservation. Whale bones recovered from archaeological and palaeontological contexts can provide essential baseline information on the past geographical distribution and abundance of species required for developing informed conservation policies. Here we review the challenges with identifying whale bones through traditional anatomical methods, as well as the opportunities provided by new molecular analyses. Through a case study focused on the North Sea, we demonstrate how the utility of this (pre)historic data is currently limited by a lack of accurate taxonomic information for the majority of ancient cetacean remains. We then discuss current opportunities presented by molecular identification methods such as DNA barcoding and collagen peptide mass fingerprinting (zooarchaeology by mass spectrometry), and highlight the importance of molecular identifications in assessing ancient species’ distributions through a case study focused on the Mediterranean. We conclude by considering high-throughput molecular approaches such as hybridization capture followed by next-generation sequencing as cost-effective approaches for enhancing the ecological informativeness of these ancient sample sets. This article is part of the themed issue ‘From DNA barcodes to biomes’. PMID:27481784

  18. "It's hard to tell": The challenges of scoring patients on standardised outcome measures by multidisciplinary teams: a case study of neurorehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flynn R

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest is increasing in the application of standardised outcome measures in clinical practice. Measures designed for use in research may not be sufficiently precise to be used in monitoring individual patients. However, little is known about how clinicians and in particular, multidisciplinary teams, score patients using these measures. This paper explores the challenges faced by multidisciplinary teams in allocating scores on standardised outcome measures in clinical practice. Methods Qualitative case study of an inpatient neurorehabilitation team who routinely collected standardised outcome measures on their patients. Data were collected using non participant observation, fieldnotes and tape recordings of 16 multidisciplinary team meetings during which the measures were recited and scored. Eleven clinicians from a range of different professions were also interviewed. Data were analysed used grounded theory techniques. Results We identified a number of instances where scoring the patient was 'problematic'. In 'problematic' scoring, the scores were uncertain and subject to revision and adjustment. They sometimes required negotiation to agree on a shared understanding of concepts to be measured and the guidelines for scoring. Several factors gave rise to this problematic scoring. Team members' knowledge about patients' problems changed over time so that initial scores had to be revised or dismissed, creating an impression of deterioration when none had occurred. Patients had complex problems which could not easily be distinguished from each other and patients themselves varied in their ability to perform tasks over time and across different settings. Team members from different professions worked with patients in different ways and had different perspectives on patients' problems. This was particularly an issue in the scoring of concepts such as anxiety, depression, orientation, social integration and cognitive problems

  19. Effects of a stepwise multidisciplinary intervention for challenging behavior in advanced dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, M.J.C.; Francke, A.L.; Steen, J.T. van der; Scherder, E.J.A.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Kovach, C.R.; Achterberg, W.P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether implementation of a stepwise multicomponent intervention (STA OP!) is effective in reducing challenging behavior and depression in nursing home residents with advanced dementia. Design: Cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting: Twenty-one clusters (single

  20. Effects of a Stepwise Multidisciplinary Intervention for Challenging Behavior in Advanced Dementia: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, M.J.; Francke, A.L.; Steen, J.T. van der; Scherder, E.J.; Twisk, J.W.; Kovach, C.R.; Achterberg, W.P.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether implementation of a stepwise multicomponent intervention (STA OP!) is effective in reducing challenging behavior and depression in nursing home residents with advanced dementia. DESIGN: Cluster randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Twenty-one clusters (single

  1. [Public Health as an Applied, Multidisciplinary Subject: Is Research-Based Learning the Answer to Challenges in Learning and Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardus, A; Schilling, I; Voss, M

    2017-03-01

    Public health education aims at enabling students to deal with complex health-related challenges using appropriate methods based on sound theoretical understanding. Virtually all health-related problems in science and practice require the involvement of different disciplines. However, the necessary interdisciplinarity is only partly reflected in the curricula of public health courses. Also theories, methods, health topics, and their application are often taught side-by-side and not together. For students, it can become an insurmountable challenge to integrate the different disciplines ("horizontal integration") and theories, methods, health topics, and their application ("vertical integration"). This situation is specific for education in public health but is representative for other interdisciplinary fields as well. Several approaches are available to achieve the horizontal integration of different disciplines and vertical integration of theories, methods, health topics, and their application. A curriculum that is structured by topics, rather than disciplines might be more successful in integrating different disciplines. Vertical integration can be achieved by research-based learning. Research-based learning places a student-led research project at the centre of teaching. Students choose a topic and a research question, raise their own questions for theories and methods and will hopefully cross the seeming chasm between science and practice. Challenges of research-based learning are enhanced demands on students, teachers and curriculum design. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Combining Multidisciplinary Science, Quantitative Reasoning and Social Context to Teach Global Sustainability and Prepare Students for 21st Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth's seven billion humans are consuming a growing proportion of the world's ecosystem products and services. Human activity has also wrought changes that rival the scale of many natural geologic processes, e.g. erosion, transport and deposition, leading to recognition of a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Because of these impacts, several natural systems have been pushed beyond the planetary boundaries that made the Holocene favorable for the expansion of humanity. Given these human-induced stresses on natural systems, global citizens will face an increasing number of grand challenges. Unfortunately, traditional discipline-based introductory science courses do little to prepare students for these complex, scientifically-based and technologically-centered challenges. With NSF funding, an introductory, integrated science course stressing quantitative reasoning and social context has been created at UW. The course (GEOL1600: Global Sustainability: Managing the Earth's Resources) is a lower division course designed around the energy-water-climate (EWC) nexus and integrating biology, chemistry, Earth science and physics. It melds lectures, lecture activities, reading questionnaires and labs to create a learning environment that examines the EWT nexus from a global through regional context. The focus on the EWC nexus, while important socially and intended to motivate students, also provides a coherent framework for identifying which disciplinary scientific principles and concepts to include in the course: photosynthesis and deep time (fossil fuels), biogeochemical cycles (climate), chemical reactions (combustion), electromagnetic radiation (solar power), nuclear physics (nuclear power), phase changes and diagrams (water and climate), etc. Lecture activities are used to give students the practice they need to make quantitative skills routine and automatic. Laboratory exercises on energy (coal, petroleum, nuclear power), water (in Bangladesh), energy

  3. Multidisciplinary care of craniosynostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchanan EP

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Edward P Buchanan,1 Yunfeng Xue,1 Amy S Xue,1 Asaf Olshinka,1 Sandi Lam2 1Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, 2Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The management of craniosynostosis, especially in the setting of craniofacial syndromes, is ideally done in a multidisciplinary clinic with a team focused toward comprehensive care. Craniosynostosis is a congenital disorder of the cranium, caused by the premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures. This fusion results in abnormal cranial growth due to the inability of the involved sutures to accommodate the growing brain. Skull growth occurs only at the patent sutures, resulting in an abnormal head shape. If cranial growth is severely restricted, as seen in multisuture craniosynostosis, elevation in intracranial pressure can occur. Whereas most patients treated in a multidisciplinary craniofacial clinic have non-syndromic or isolated craniosynostosis, the most challenging patients are those with syndromic craniosynostosis. The purpose of this article was to discuss the multidisciplinary team care required to treat both syndromic and non-syndromic craniosynostosis. Keywords: multidisciplinary team care, syndromic craniosynostosis, nonsyndromic craniosynostosis

  4. De-Conflicting Canada’s Anti-Terrorism Legislation: Khawaja and the Ongoing Challenges of the ‘Armed Conflict’ Exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K. Penny

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The definition of ‘terrorist activity’ is fundamental to Canada’s anti-terrorism legislation. Following the recent trial of Momin Khawaja before the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, it is clear that the ‘armed conflict’ exclusion – exempting wartime activities undertaken in accordance with international law – poses serious challenges to the coherence of this legislative regime, threatening the effectiveness of future domestic terrorism prosecutions. This article examines the ‘armed conflict’ exclusion and its judicial treatment in Khawaja, identifying key challenges and making specific recommendations to address them. Coupled with other issues arising from the ‘armed conflict’ exclusion, Khawaja serves to highlight a clear and pressing need for amendment of the statutory definition of ‘terrorist activity.’ La définition d’ « activité terroriste » est un élément fondamental de la législation canadienne contre le terrorisme. Suite au récent procès de Momin Khawaja devant la Cour supérieure de justice de l’Ontario, il est clair que l’exclusion « conflit armé » - qui fait exemption d’activités en temps de guerre entreprises conformément au droit international – présente des défis importants à la cohérence de ce régime législatif, menaçant l’efficacité de poursuites contre le terrorisme au Canada à l’avenir. Cet article examine l’exclusion « conflit armé » et le traitement juridique que l’on en fait dans Khawaja, identifiant des défis-clés et faisant des recommandations précises pour en traiter. En conjonction avec d’autres questions que soulève l’exclusion « conflit armé », Khawaja sert à mettre en évidence un besoin clair et pressant de modification à la définition statutaire d’ « activité terroriste ».

  5. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity. Monitoring the European drug situation: the ongoing challenge for the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Paul; Mounteney, Jane; Lopez, Dominique; Zobel, Frank; Götz, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) is the designated hub for drug-related information in the European Union. The organization's role is to provide the European Union (EU) and its Member States with a factual overview of European drug problems and a common information framework to support the drugs debate. In order to achieve its mission, the EMCDDA coordinates and relies on a network of 30 national monitoring centres, the Reitox National Focal Points. The Centre publishes on a wide range of drug-related topics, across epidemiology, interventions, laws and policies. Every November, the EMCDDA publishes its Annual Report, providing a yearly update on the European drug situation, translated into 23 EU languages. In line with its founding regulation, the EMCDDA has a role acting as an interface between the worlds of science and policy. While not a research centre in the formal sense, the results the Centre generates serve as catalysts for new research questions and help to identify priorities. Current challenges facing the agency include continuing to increase scientific standards while maintaining a strong institutional role, as well as supporting European efforts to identify, share and codify best practice in the drugs field. © 2011 EMCDDA.

  6. The Ongoing Catastrophe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kublitz, Anja

    intimacy, however, never seemed intimate but rather excessive: the sweets too sweet, the colours too bright, and the laughter too high-pitched. The stark contrast between the light chit-chat and the ongoing suffering of the individual women made these public get together not only pleasant but also...

  7. "Smartening Up": Ongoing Challenges for Australia's Outback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cradduck, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    As the international community moves inexorably towards a "smart" future, the position of Australia's non-urban areas in that future is less certain. The (re-elected) Australian federal government made a commitment to moving Australian cities forward as part of the international "smart city" movement. However, the effectiveness…

  8. The U.S. Forest Service's analysis of cumulative effects to wildlife: A study of legal standards, current practice, and ongoing challenges on a National Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Courtney A., E-mail: courtney.schultz@colostate.edu

    2012-01-15

    Cumulative effects analysis (CEA) allows natural resource managers to understand the status of resources in historical context, learn from past management actions, and adapt future activities accordingly. U.S. federal agencies are required to complete CEA as part of environmental impact assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Past research on CEA as part of NEPA has identified significant deficiencies in CEA practice, suggested methodologies for handling difficult aspects of CEA, and analyzed the rise in litigation over CEA in U.S. courts. This article provides a review of the literature and legal standards related to CEA as it is done under NEPA and then examines current practice on a U.S. National Forest, utilizing qualitative methods in order to provide a detailed understanding of current approaches to CEA. Research objectives were to understand current practice, investigate ongoing challenges, and identify impediments to improvement. Methods included a systematic review of a set of NEPA documents and semi-structured interviews with practitioners, scientists, and members of the public. Findings indicate that the primary challenges associated with CEA include: issues of both geographic and temporal scale of analysis, confusion over the purpose of the requirement, the lack of monitoring data, and problems coordinating and disseminating data. Improved monitoring strategies and programmatic analyses could support improved CEA practice.

  9. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Daniela Migliarese; Wu, Jessica; Mager, Diana R; Turner, Justine M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD) is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician) in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD.

  10. Barriers and Challenges in Seeking Psychiatric Intervention in a General Hospital, by the Collaborative Child Response Unit, (A Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Handling Child Abuse) A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, Vyjayanthi Kanugodu Srinivasa; Mital, Anukant; Rao, Chandrika; Chandra, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Child abuse is a serious criminal act against children in our country and punishable according to protection of children from sexual offenses act 2012. No one agency has the ability to respond completely to the abuse. Hence a multidisciplinary team approach was developed in India. Aim is to narrate the collaborative effort among the multiple disciplines in a general hospital to deliver child protection services and explore the barriers to integrate psychiatric services.

  11. Multidisciplinary Management of Mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Dybedal, Ingunn; Gülen, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases defined by an increased number and accumulation of mast cells, and often also by signs and symptoms of mast cell activation. Disease subtypes range from indolent to rare aggressive forms. Mastocytosis affects people of all ages and has been consid...... an individualized, multidisciplinary approach. We present here consensus recommendations from a Nordic expert group for the diagnosis and general management of patients with mastocytosis....... considered rare; however, it is probably underdiagnosed with potential severe implications. Diagnosis can be challenging and symptoms may be complex and involve multiple organ-systems. In general it is advised that patients should be referred to centres with experience in the disease offering...

  12. Informing via Research: Methods, Challenges and Success when Using a Multi-Disciplinary Team and Reverse Engineering Analysis Processes to Answer a 200 Year Old Question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda H. Connor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop the foundation for the creation of a 21st century spiritual which could be used to mitigate the effects of stress and violence. Using a multi-disciplinary team and basing the work in the music of the antebellum Negro Spiritual (a group of 6000 works, reverse engineering, extensive use of engineering principles and utilization of existing databases was done to aid in the analysis of the neurological and physiological impact of the musical form and development of an applicable theory.

  13. Barriers and challenges in seeking psychiatric intervention in a General Hospital, by the collaborative child response unit, (A multidisciplinary team approach to handling child abuse A qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyjayanthi Kanugodu Srinivasa Subramaniyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Child abuse is a serious criminal act against children in our country and punishable according to protection of children from sexual offenses act 2012. No one agency has the ability to respond completely to the abuse. Hence a multidisciplinary team approach was developed in India. Aim is to narrate the collaborative effort among the multiple disciplines in a general hospital to deliver child protection services and explore the barriers to integrate psychiatric services. Methodology: Members of the team were recruited from different disciplines and trained by experts. A mission statement, protocol to assess the victims and provide treatment was formulated as an algorithm. The barriers to psychiatric treatment among the stakeholders were analyzed using framework method of qualitative analysis. Results (After 20 months the unit received 27 referrals in 20 months, 24 females, and 3 males. Age of the victims was between 8 months and 17 years. Two cases found to be physically abused. Penetrative sexual abuse was found in 23 cases, pregnant victims were 4. Most referrals were by police, trafficking found in 6 cases. Discussion: It was possible to provide multidisciplinary care to the victims and families. Recurrent themes of barriers to psychiatric treatment were stigma, victim blaming; focus on termination of pregnancy, minimization of abuse in males by stakeholders. Conclusion is collaboration needs more effort to integrate psychiatric services but can minimize the reduplication of services.

  14. Barriers and Challenges in Seeking Psychiatric Intervention in a General Hospital, by the Collaborative Child Response Unit, (A Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Handling Child Abuse) A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, Vyjayanthi Kanugodu Srinivasa; Mital, Anukant; Rao, Chandrika; Chandra, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Child abuse is a serious criminal act against children in our country and punishable according to protection of children from sexual offenses act 2012. No one agency has the ability to respond completely to the abuse. Hence a multidisciplinary team approach was developed in India. Aim is to narrate the collaborative effort among the multiple disciplines in a general hospital to deliver child protection services and explore the barriers to integrate psychiatric services. Methodology: Members of the team were recruited from different disciplines and trained by experts. A mission statement, protocol to assess the victims and provide treatment was formulated as an algorithm. The barriers to psychiatric treatment among the stakeholders were analyzed using framework method of qualitative analysis. Results (After 20 months) the unit received 27 referrals in 20 months, 24 females, and 3 males. Age of the victims was between 8 months and 17 years. Two cases found to be physically abused. Penetrative sexual abuse was found in 23 cases, pregnant victims were 4. Most referrals were by police, trafficking found in 6 cases. Discussion: It was possible to provide multidisciplinary care to the victims and families. Recurrent themes of barriers to psychiatric treatment were stigma, victim blaming; focus on termination of pregnancy, minimization of abuse in males by stakeholders. Conclusion is collaboration needs more effort to integrate psychiatric services but can minimize the reduplication of services.

  15. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac DM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Migliarese Isaac,1 Jessica Wu,2 Diana R Mager,3,4 Justine M Turner1 1Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta; 2Alberta Health Services–Child Health Nutrition Services, Stollery Children’s Hospital; 3Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutritional Science; 4Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD. Keywords: celiac disease

  16. Mathematical modeling with multidisciplinary applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She

    2013-01-01

    Features mathematical modeling techniques and real-world processes with applications in diverse fields Mathematical Modeling with Multidisciplinary Applications details the interdisciplinary nature of mathematical modeling and numerical algorithms. The book combines a variety of applications from diverse fields to illustrate how the methods can be used to model physical processes, design new products, find solutions to challenging problems, and increase competitiveness in international markets. Written by leading scholars and international experts in the field, the

  17. Air pollution and detrimental effects on children’s brain. The need for a multidisciplinary approach to the issue complexity and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian eCalderón-Garcidueñas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Millions of children in polluted cities are showing brain detrimental effects. Urban children exhibit brain structural and volumetric abnormalities, systemic inflammation, olfactory, auditory, vestibular and cognitive deficits v low-pollution controls. Neuroinflammation and blood-brain-barrier breakdown target the olfactory bulb, prefrontal cortex and brainstem, but are diffusely present throughout the brain. Urban adolescent Apolipoprotein E4 carriers significantly accelerate Alzheimer pathology. Neurocognitive effects of air pollution are permanent, apparent across all populations, and potentially clinically relevant as early evidence of evolving neurodegenerative changes. The diffuse nature of the neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration forces to employ a weight of evidence approach incorporating current clinical, cognitive, neurophysiological, radiological and epidemiological research. Pediatric air pollution research requires extensive multidisciplinary collaborations to accomplish a critical goal: to protect exposed children through multidimensional interventions having both broad impact and reach. Protecting children and teens from neural effects of air pollution should be of pressing importance for public health.

  18. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ROBUST OPTIMIZATION DESIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jianjiang; Xiao Renbin; Zhong Yifang; Dou Gang

    2005-01-01

    Because uncertainty factors inevitably exist under multidisciplinary design environment, a hierarchical multidisciplinary robust optimization design based on response surface is proposed. The method constructs optimization model of subsystem level and system level to coordinate the coupling among subsystems, and also the response surface based on the artificial neural network is introduced to provide information for system level optimization tool to maintain the independence of subsystems,i.e. to realize multidisciplinary parallel design. The application case of electrical packaging demonstrates that reasonable robust optimum solution can be yielded and it is a potential and efficient multidisciplinary robust optimization approach.

  19. Multidisciplinary care in haemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ceci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While most complications are related to haemoglobinopathies and their treatment, it is also possible to observe substantial differences in comorbidities’ onset and seriousness which depend also to the different HPs genotypes. These differences should be carefully considered when health authorities set up and manage adequate care systems and treatments plans. We describe services organisation in Italy including the availability of multispecialty care and tools, in the HPs units participating to the HTA-THAL Multiregional Registry, with the aim to derive the impact of the services and multispecialty care availability on the management of the disease and on the patients wellbeing. The high dispersion and heterogeneity of services demonstrated, exposes the Italian system to a high risk of: a inappropriate use of economical and medical resources, b limited access to multidisciplinary care of some patients with apparent inequality among different centres, and c low patients satisfaction with the services provided. The identification of a ‘standard for HPs services’ is necessary not only at national but also at interventional level in order to implement collaborative research and the identification and networking of reference’ centres worldwide. Following the big efforts provided in the last years here there is a new challenging mission for the TIF.

  20. Establishing a framework for building multidisciplinary programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meguid C

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cheryl Meguid,1 Carrie E Ryan,2 Barish H Edil,1 Richard D Schulick,1 Csaba Gajdos,1 Megan Boniface,1 Tracey E Schefter,3 W Thomas Purcell,4 Martin McCarter1 1Department of Surgery, Division of GI, Tumor, and Endocrine Surgery, Section of Surgical Oncology, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, CO, 2Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: While most providers support the concept of a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, challenges exist to the implementation of successful multidisciplinary clinical programs. As patients become more knowledgeable about their disease through research on the Internet, they seek hospital programs that offer multidisciplinary care. At the University of Colorado Hospital, we utilize a formal multidisciplinary approach across a variety of clinical settings, which has been beneficial to patients, providers, and the hospital. We present a reproducible framework to be used as a guide to develop a successful multidisciplinary program. Keywords: multidisciplinary clinic, patient centered, tumor board

  1. [Ongoing Health Education in Brazil:education or ongoing management?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Cristiane Lopes Simão

    2016-03-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the concept and principles of Ongoing Health Education (OHE) - the Brazilian acronym is PNEPS. The methodology was based on the analysis of documents from the Ministry of Health and related scientific articles. It was revealed that the concept of OHE transcends its pedagogical significance and is undergoing a service restructuring process in the face of the new demands of the model. Precisely at the time in which jobs are increasingly unstable and precarious, the Ministry of Health engages in discourse regarding innovative management, focusing on the issue of OHE. The idea is not one of ongoing education, but of ongoing management. Rather than being an instrument for radical transformation, OHE becomes an attractive ideology due to its appearance as a pedagogical novelty.

  2. Development of knowledge tests for multi-disciplinary emergency training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, J. L.; Thellesen, L.; Strandbygaard, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The literature is sparse on written test developmentin a post-graduate multi-disciplinary setting. Developing and evalu-ating knowledge tests for use in multi-disciplinary post-graduatetraining is challenging. The objective of this study was to describethe process of developing...... and evaluating a multiple-choice question(MCQ) test for use in a multi-disciplinary training program inobstetric-anesthesia emergencies. Methods: A multi-disciplinary working committee with 12members representing six professional healthcare groups andanother 28 participants were involved. Recurrent revisions...

  3. Pediatric pain management: the multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odell S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Shannon Odell,1,2 Deirdre E Logan1,21Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, 2Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Chronic pain in children and adolescents is a growing problem and one that is increasingly being addressed with multidisciplinary treatment teams. This review summarizes different multidisciplinary clinics, focusing specifically on intensive pediatric pain rehabilitation centers. This review offers a summary of the challenges faced by these programs and areas for future study.Keywords: pediatric pain rehabilitation, pediatric chronic pain, interdisciplinary, pain associated disability

  4. Multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach to management of malignant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach to management of malignant diseases: A review. ... to care and ensuring that patients get the right treatment in optimum time. ... challenges facing the use of MDTs in the management of cancer in Nigeria ...

  5. MARFAN SYNDROME – A CONTINUOUS MULTIDISCIPLINARY CHALLENGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma MANEA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the clinical case of a 26 year-old pacient, diagnosed, as early as the age of 10 years, with a valvular pathology (at that time, objective reasons preventing the development ofadditional investigations on its etiology and recommended treatment. In January 2012, the patient suffers two tachyarhythmic episodes, during a longer trip, while driving his car and, next February, a routine stomatological exam evidences an ogival palatine arch and malar hypoplasia, so that a cardiological consultation follows. Clinical examination revealed a longiline status, arachnodactylia, pectus excavatum and telesystolic mitral murmur. Echocardiographic examination evidences prolapse of anterior mitral valve and mild secondary anterior mitral regurgitation, dilatation of the ascending aorta and mild aortic regurgitation. The suspicion of Marfan syndrome, based on the Ghent criteria, revised in 2010, was confirmed. Treatment with betablocking drugs (Bisoprolol was recommended. Patient’s evolution was favourable.

  6. Multidisciplinary management of complex care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Deborah; Fuller, Jeffrey; Wagner, Scott; Friis, Leanne; Tyrell, Bill

    2009-02-01

    Rural and remote areas of Australia are facing serious health workforce shortages. Multidisciplinary teams are one way of making the most of the rural workforce. In this paper, the advantages of multidisciplinary care in terms of patient outcomes, clinician satisfaction and system efficiency are considered with reference to an innovative rural multidisciplinary model that highlights how these positive outcomes can be achieved. Ways of developing the capacity of the future workforce for work in multidisciplinary teams are discussed.

  7. EMSO: European multidisciplinary seafloor observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favali, Paolo [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Roma (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Roma ' La Sapienza' , P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: emsopp@ingv.it; Beranzoli, Laura [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Roma (Italy)

    2009-04-11

    EMSO has been identified by the ESFRI Report 2006 as one of the Research Infrastructures that European members and associated states are asked to develop in the next decades. It will be based on a European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the aim of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes, providing long time series data for the different phenomenon scales which constitute the new frontier for study of Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry, and ocean processes. The development of an underwater network is based on past EU projects and is supported by several EU initiatives, such as the on-going ESONET-NoE, aimed at strengthening the ocean observatories' scientific and technological community. The EMSO development relies on the synergy between the scientific community and industry to improve European competitiveness with respect to countries such as USA, Canada and Japan. Within the FP7 Programme launched in 2006, a call for Preparatory Phase (PP) was issued in order to support the foundation of the legal and organisational entity in charge of building up and managing the infrastructure, and coordinating the financial effort among the countries. The EMSO-PP project, coordinated by the Italian INGV with participation by 11 institutions from as many European countries, started in April 2008 and will last four years.

  8. Multidisciplinary Management of Mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Dybedal, Ingunn; Gülen, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases defined by an increased number and accumulation of mast cells, and often also by signs and symptoms of mast cell activation. Disease subtypes range from indolent to rare aggressive forms. Mastocytosis affects people of all ages and has been consid...... an individualized, multidisciplinary approach. We present here consensus recommendations from a Nordic expert group for the diagnosis and general management of patients with mastocytosis....

  9. From management to leadership: a shift towards understanding the organizational complexity of multidisciplinary collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Anne Marie Anker; Kristensen, Ole Steen

    2015-01-01

    is to explore managerial roles and perspectives during an organizational process of developing multidisciplinary collaboration. Eighteen management meetings, held during a two-year period, are analysed. The analysis reveals that the management gradually grasps the complexity of multidisciplinary collaboration......; negotiations on the concept are ongoing while their point of view changes from distant to involved. The management takes leadership towards multidisciplinary collaboration through a series of legitimacy-related negotiations, illustrating the organizational and managerial contexts of multidisciplinary...... collaboration as well as introducing it as a new type of managerial task....

  10. Ongoing Projects on Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vaz de Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This number of the EAI Transactions on Serious Games is dedicated to a set of ongoing research and development projects in this area. The selected articles represent very well the diversity of approaches, contexts and objectives that foster and render highly dynamic this area of study. In Europe, several funding programmes like the 7th Framework Programme, the Lifelong Learning Programme and the most recent Horizon 2020 made specific provisions to support Serious Games projects. At the same time, enterprises are recognizing more and more the potential of SG to train and to motivate their workforce and are therefore joining forces with the academy and SG producers to design specific SG. Serious Games became one of the most interesting “places to be” due to its growing scientific and practitioner community. We can say that the motivating and addictive character of games has been successfully transmitted to the research and development of Serious Games.

  11. Multidisciplinary approaches to climate change questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Beth A.; LePage, Ben A.

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary approaches are required to address the complex environmental problems of our time. Solutions to climate change problems are good examples of situations requiring complex syntheses of ideas from a vast set of disciplines including science, engineering, social science, and the humanities. Unfortunately, most ecologists have narrow training, and are not equipped to bring their environmental skills to the table with interdisciplinary teams to help solve multidisciplinary problems. To address this problem, new graduate training programs and workshops sponsored by various organizations are providing opportunities for scientists and others to learn to work together in multidisciplinary teams. Two examples of training in multidisciplinary thinking include those organized by the Santa Fe Institute and Dahlem Workshops. In addition, many interdisciplinary programs have had successes in providing insight into climate change problems including the International Panel on Climate Change, the Joint North American Carbon Program, the National Academy of Science Research Grand Challenges Initiatives, and the National Academy of Science. These programs and initiatives have had some notable success in outlining some of the problems and solutions to climate change. Scientists who can offer their specialized expertise to interdisciplinary teams will be more successful in helping to solve the complex problems related to climate change.

  12. Multidisciplinary workshops: learning to work together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatchett, Anita; Taylor, Dawn

    2013-03-01

    Health and social care professional practice needs to move with the times and to respond to the ever-changing combination of health needs, economic realities and health-policy imperatives. A clear understanding of the variety of forces at play and the ability to marshal these to good effect by working in partnership with multidisciplinary colleagues and children/families is a must, not least in this time of economic austerity and ever-rising health inequalities, when vulnerable children's lives and complex family relationships and behaviours so easily become increasingly strained and challenged. This sad reality calls out for relevant joined-up solutions by all participants--an agenda so often called into question by court judgement after court judgement. The multidisciplinary workshops to be discussed have developed and changed over the past decade and provide a safe but realistic learning environment for students from health and social care backgrounds to experience the difficulties and barriers to good multidisciplinary working, to better understand others' perspectives and activities and consider and develop new and better practical strategies for working with multidisciplinary professional colleagues, children and families. All of the workshops are underpinned by specific discipline-focused theoretical work.

  13. Halitosis: the multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Curd M L; Beikler, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Halitosis, bad breath or oral malodour are all synonyms for the same pathology. Halitosis has a large social and economic impact. For the majority of patients suffering from bad breath, it causes embarrassment and affects their social communication and life. Moreover,halitosis can be indicative of underlying diseases. Only a limited number of scientific publications were presented in this field until 1995. Ever since, a large amount of research is published, often with lack of evidence. In general, intraoral conditions, like insufficient dental hygiene, periodontitis or tongue coating are considered to be the most important cause (85%) for halitosis. Therefore, dentists and periodontologists are the first-line professionals to be confronted with this problem. They should be well aware of the origin, the detection and especially of the treatment of this pathology. In addition, ear-nose-throat-associated (10%) or gastrointestinal/endocrinological (5%) disorders may contribute to the problem. In the case of halitophobia, psychiatrical or psychological problems may be present. Bad breath needs a multidisciplinary team approach: dentists, periodontologists, specialists in family medicine, ear-nose-throat surgeons, internal medicine and psychiatry need to be updated in this field, which still is surrounded by a large taboo.Multidisciplinary bad breath clinics offer the best environment to examine and treat this pathology that affects around 25% of the whole population. This article describes the origin, detection and treatment of halitosis, regarded from the different etiological origins.

  14. Ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Individual cases of adult incestuous abuse have surfaced repeatedly in the lay and professional literature of the past 1.5 centuries without it occasioning systematic investigation, such as the reporting of a case series of individuals subjected to such extreme abuse. Yet substantial numbers of patients with dissociative identity disorder at the time of presentation report incestuous abuse continuing into the adult years, and for many the abuse is ongoing. Data relating to a series of 10 such incestuously abused women are presented. These patients were sexually abused from a very early age (typically from before age 3), with the manipulation of their sexual response a key component in conditioning an enduring sexualized attachment. Shame and fear were also used to ensure compliance and silence. The women, when able to speak of it, describe the induction by their paternal abuser of orgasm at an early age, typically around the age of 6. The women have high indices of self-harm and suicidality and are prone to placing themselves in dangerous reenactment scenarios. The average duration of incestuous abuse for this group of women was 31 years, and the average estimate of total episodes of sexual abuse was 3,320. Most women do not feel that they own their body and experience being "fused" to their father. Their mother was reported as an active participant in the sexual abuse or as having done nothing to protect their daughter despite seeing obvious evidence of incest. The fathers, despite a propensity to use or threaten violence, were generally outwardly productively employed, financially comfortable, and stably married and half had close church involvement. However, suicide and murder occurred within the 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives of these women at a high frequency. All 10 had been sexually abused by various groupings of individuals connected to their fathers.

  15. Examples of Important Ongoing Research Topics for Offshore Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Bredmose, Henrik; Schløer, Signe

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to address some challenges related to offshore wind energy. A first example shows some results from an ongoing project on accurate computation of wave loads on monopole foundations. The effects of wave nonlinearity and bottom slope are examined and detailed CFD computation...

  16. International Multidisciplinary Microscopy Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Oral, Ahmet; Ozer, Mehmet; InterM; INTERM2013

    2014-01-01

    The International Multidisciplinary Microscopy Congress (INTERM2013) was organized on October 10-13, 2013. The aim of the congress was to bring together scientists from various branches to discuss the latest advances in the field of microscopy. The contents of the congress have been broadened to a more "interdisciplinary" scope, so as to allow all scientists working on related subjects to participate and present their work. These proceedings include 39 peer-reviewed technical papers, submitted by leading academic and research institutions from over 12 countries and representing some of the most cutting-edge research available. The 39 papers are grouped into the following sections: - Applications of Microscopy in the Physical Sciences - Applications of Microscopy in the Biological Sciences

  17. Epilepsy genetics: the ongoing revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesca, G; Depienne, C

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsies have long remained refractory to gene identification due to several obstacles, including a highly variable inter- and intrafamilial expressivity of the phenotypes, a high frequency of phenocopies, and a huge genetic heterogeneity. Recent technological breakthroughs, such as array comparative genomic hybridization and next generation sequencing, have been leading, in the past few years, to the identification of an increasing number of genomic regions and genes in which mutations or copy-number variations cause various epileptic disorders, revealing an enormous diversity of pathophysiological mechanisms. The field that has undergone the most striking revolution is that of epileptic encephalopathies, for which most of causing genes have been discovered since the year 2012. Some examples are the continuous spike-and-waves during slow-wave sleep and Landau-Kleffner syndromes for which the recent discovery of the role of GRIN2A mutations has finally confirmed the genetic bases. These new technologies begin to be used for diagnostic applications, and the main challenge now resides in the interpretation of the huge mass of variants detected by these methods. The identification of causative mutations in epilepsies provides definitive confirmation of the clinical diagnosis, allows accurate genetic counselling, and sometimes permits the development of new appropriate and specific antiepileptic therapies. Future challenges include the identification of the genetic or environmental factors that modify the epileptic phenotypes caused by mutations in a given gene and the understanding of the role of somatic mutations in sporadic epilepsies.

  18. Residential Environmental Education Center Program Evaluation: An Ongoing Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Nicholas; Buskist, Connie; Herron, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Residential environmental education centers (REECs) have been criticized for their lack of quality program evaluation. However, the last national study done on the practices of REECs was Chenery and Hammerman's (1985) research. This article presents the results of a national survey of directors of REECs (n = 114) that gives insight into the…

  19. The Korean Military Advisory Group -- Developmental Challenges during Ongoing Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    to indigenous Korean military forces has direct applicability to current military operations in Afghanistan. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Korean...Korean military forces has direct applicability to current military operations in Afghanistan. iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to firstly...and equipping under “Operation BAMBOO ” prior to the initiation of hostilities with North Korea. Developed in December of 1945, this program

  20. The ongoing challenge of restorative justice in South Africa: How ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-19

    Mar 19, 2014 ... As long as the poverty gap between rich and poor widens, even if some of the nouveaux riches are .... Africa are black and most lack any access to wage income ... of poverty and inequality continue to bear a persistent racial.

  1. The search for interreligious convivance, ongoing challenge and charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J D Gort

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay deals with the relationship between Christianity and other religions. Part one looks briefly at the matter of religion itself. Part two provides a condensed historical survey of the attitude of Christianity toward the world outside itself: the approach of the church to other religions changed from initial appreciation through a long phase of rejection to an increasingly affirmative posture in recent times. This shift is explained by a number of causal factors that gave rise to new understandings regarding God�s work in the world and Christian mission, which in turn led to the emergence of various theologies of religion. The question confronting religious people today is how to foster the removal of interhuman divisions and the promotion of justice and peace. One potential means of achieving this goal is interreligious dialogue. In part three, the author delineates his concept of the four facets of dialogue: that of histories, of theologies, of spiritualities, and of life. Dialogue at all four of these levels is key to the establishment of interreligious convivance, which in our present world is prerequisite to the security and well-being of humanity.

  2. Chronic Q fever: An ongoing challenge in diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Q fever is a potentially fatal disease. The current difficulty in the diagnosis of this condition is discussed in the present article. A 51-year-old woman with a history of aortic valve replacement presented with complaints of feeling generally unwell, pyrexia and occasional unproductive cough over a period of several weeks. Phase 1 immunoglobulin G titre to Coxiella burnetii was initially detected at a low level (1:320, detected using immunofluorescence and was not considered to be significant according to the modified Duke criteria. Later in the course of her illness, the patient’s antibody titre rose to a high level (1:1280. The issues regarding current laboratory diagnosis and management of Q fever are discussed. Chronic Q fever can be associated with an inadequate serological response. Close follow-up of cases is essential. The recommended serological criteria for the diagnosis of Q fever endocarditis needs to be revisited.

  3. Multidisciplinary System Reliability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code, developed under the leadership of NASA Glenn Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multidisciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

  4. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favali, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap (Report 2006, http://cordis.europa.eu/esfri/roadmap.htm), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. The development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90 and is being supported by several EU initiatives, as the on-going ESONET-NoE, coordinated by IFREMER (2007-2011, http://www.esonet-emso.org/esonet-noe/), and aims at gathering together the Research Community of the Ocean Observatories. In 2006 the FP7 Capacities Programme launched a call for Preparatory Phase (PP) projects, that will provide the support to create the legal and organisational entities in charge of managing the infrastructures, and coordinating the financial effort among the countries. Under this call the EMSO-PP project was approved in 2007 with the coordination of INGV and the participation of other 11 Institutions of 11 countries. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years. The EMSO is a key-infrastructure both for Ocean Sciences and for Solid Earth Sciences. In this respect it will enhance and complement profitably the capabilities of other European research infrastructures such as EPOS, ERICON-Aurora Borealis, and SIOS. The perspective of the synergy among EMSO and other ESFRI Research Infrastructures will be outlined. EMSO Partners: IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph

  5. Multidisciplinary team care in rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, Anne-Mette; Rasmussen, Jens Ole; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically investigate current scientific evidence about the effectiveness of multidisciplinary team rehabilitation for different health problems. Data sources: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in Cochrane, Medline, DARE, Embase, and Cinahl databases, and research...... from existing systematic reviews was critically appraised and summarized. Study selection: Using the search terms "rehabilitation", "multidisciplinary teams" or "team care", references were identified for existing studies published after 2000 that examined multidisciplinary rehabilitation team care...... for adults, without restrictions in terms of study population or outcomes. The most recent reviews examining a study population were selected. Data extraction: Two reviewers independently extracted information about study populations, sample sizes, study designs, rehabilitation settings, the team...

  6. Integrated Multidisciplinary Optimization Objects Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M4 Engineering proposes to implement physics-based, multidisciplinary analysis and optimization objects that will be integrated into a Python, open-source framework...

  7. The Ongoing and Open-Ended Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This case study explores a novel form of classroom simulation that differs from published examples in two important respects. First, it is ongoing. While most simulations represent a single learning episode embedded within a course, the ongoing simulation is a continuous set of interrelated events and decisions that accompany learning throughout…

  8. A Case Study of a Co-Instructed Multidisciplinary Senior Capstone Project in Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jinny; Oyamot, Clifton; Parent, David; Speer, Leslie; Basu, Anuradha; Gerston, Larry

    2014-01-01

    As societal challenges involving sustainable development increase, the need to effectively integrate this inherently multidisciplinary topic into existing curricula becomes more pressing. Multidisciplinary, team-taught, project-based instruction has shown effectiveness in teaching teamwork, communication, and life-long learning skills, and…

  9. RFID-Based Multidisciplinary Educational Platform to Improve the Engineering and Technology Curriculums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelamarthi, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Multidisciplinary projects involving electrical engineering (EE), mechanical engineering (ME), and computer engineering (CE) students are both exciting and difficult to conceptualize. Answering this challenge, this paper presents a multidisciplinary educational platform on radio frequency identification-based assistive devices. The combination of…

  10. RFID-Based Multidisciplinary Educational Platform to Improve the Engineering and Technology Curriculums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelamarthi, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Multidisciplinary projects involving electrical engineering (EE), mechanical engineering (ME), and computer engineering (CE) students are both exciting and difficult to conceptualize. Answering this challenge, this paper presents a multidisciplinary educational platform on radio frequency identification-based assistive devices. The combination of…

  11. Learning to evaluate multidisciplinary crisis-management team exercises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlo, M.P.W. van; Dommele, R. van; Schneider, P.; Veerdonk, I. van de; Braakhekke, E.; Hendriks van de Weem, N.; Dijkman, E. van; Wartna, S.

    2007-01-01

    Training of multidisciplinary crisis management teams is becoming more common practice. Nevertheless, the value of these trainings and exercises is questionable. Scenarios are quite often realistic and challenging to the trainees: the team members are heavily engaged in doing their jobs in a multidi

  12. Learning to evaluate multidisciplinary crisis-management team exercises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlo, M.P.W. van; Dommele, R. van; Schneider, P.; Veerdonk, I. van de; Braakhekke, E.; Hendriks van de Weem, N.; Dijkman, E. van; Wartna, S.

    2007-01-01

    Training of multidisciplinary crisis management teams is becoming more common practice. Nevertheless, the value of these trainings and exercises is questionable. Scenarios are quite often realistic and challenging to the trainees: the team members are heavily engaged in doing their jobs in a

  13. Integration of intradisciplinary quality assessment into a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, A

    1992-01-01

    One challenge for the QA professional in healthcare today is initiating, coordinating, and facilitating QA programs that cross traditional departmental and discipline barriers and bring together multidisciplinary teams. When looking at healthcare from a customer's perspective, the QA professional must not isolate what nursing does for the patient, what the medical staff does for the patient, what pharmacy does for the patient, and so on. The imperative, instead, is to evaluate the healthcare as it truly is perceived and delivered-as a team effort. This article presents one method that uses the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations' 10-step model to create an effective multidisciplinary QA program.

  14. Multidisciplinary care in pediatric oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantrell MA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mary Ann Cantrell1, Kathy Ruble21College of Nursing, Villanova University, Villanova, PA, USA; 2Department of Pediatric Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: This paper describes the significant advances in the treatment of childhood cancer and supportive care that have occurred over the last several decades and details how these advances have led to improved survival and quality of life (QOL for children with cancer through a multidisciplinary approach to care. Advances in the basic sciences, general medicine, cooperative research protocols, and policy guidelines have influenced and guided the multidisciplinary approach in pediatric oncology care across the spectrum from diagnosis through long-term survival. Two case studies are provided to highlight the nature and scope of multidisciplinary care in pediatric oncology care.Keywords: childhood cancer, chemotherapy, leukemia

  15. Multidisciplinary team care in rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, A.-M.; Nielsen, C.V.; Rasmussen, J.O.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically investigate current scientific evidence about the effectiveness of multidisciplinary team rehabilitation for different health problems. Data sources: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in Cochrane, Medline, DARE, Embase, and Cinahl databases, and research...... people with hip fracture, homeless people with mental illness, adults with multiple sclerosis, stroke, aquired brain injury, chronic arthropathy, chronic pain, low back pain, and fibromyalgia. Whereas evidence was not found for adults with amyetrophic lateral schlerosis, and neck and shoulder pain....... Conclusion: Although these studies included heterogeneous patient groups the overall conclusion was that multidisciplinary rehabilitation team care effectively improves rehabilitation intervention. However, further research in this area is needed. © 2012 The Authors....

  16. Multidisciplinary design using collaborative optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieski, Ian Patrick

    Management of the modern aircraft design process is a substantial challenge. Formal iterative optimization is commonly used with disciplinary design tools to aid designers in the definition of optimal subsystems. However, the expense in executing high fidelity analysis, the decomposition of the design expertise into disciplines, and the size of the design space, often precludes the use of direct optimization in the overall design process. Collaborative optimization is a recently developed methodology that shows promise in enabling formal optimization of the overall design. The architecture preserves disciplinary design autonomy while providing a coordinating mechanism that leads to interdisciplinary agreement and improved designs. The basic formulation has been applied to a variety of sample design problems which demonstrate that the method successfully discovers correct optimal solutions. This work places collaborative optimization in the context of other multidisciplinary design optimization methods and characterizes problems for which the basic formulation is applicable. Artifacts of the problem formulation are discussed and methods for handling high bandwidth coupling, such as that found in aeroelasticity, are presented. The use of response surfaces for representing expensive analyses has become increasingly popular in design optimization. Response surfaces are smooth analytic functions that are inexpensive to evaluate and may be generated from data points obtained from the parallel execution of analyses. These properties motivate the introduction of response surfaces into collaborative optimization. Response surfaces have been previously used to model subproblem analyses and were generated just once. Here, approximate models are used to represent the subproblem optimization results, not the analysis, and are regenerated as the design is modified. The use of response surfaces in collaborative optimization requires an inexpensive method for generating the

  17. Education and rehabilitation of deaf children with cochlear implants: a multidisciplinary task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Raeve, Leo

    2010-06-01

    In the last decade the population of deaf children has changed dramatically in a lot of countries, especially in those where universal neonatal hearing screening, early multi-disciplinary support, digital hearing aids and cochlear implants are available. Most of these children can acquire intelligible spoken language and choose spoken language as their main means of communication and for access to education, because they go to mainstream schools in larger proportions, and fewer to schools for the deaf. Mainstream placement does not eliminate the need for services, which will vary depending upon the child's age, language modality, and other child specific factors. But there is also evidence that the outcomes after paediatric implantation are very heterogeneous. All this is a big change for the educational services. We must ensure that their staff have the skills to meet these challenges: to be flexible, continually updated with the technology and changing expectations (ongoing professional training), to provide an environment which will utilise the hearing while meeting the linguistic and curricular needs of the children, to meet the psycho-social needs of this group as they grow through adolescence, and to work with other professionals. Now, and looking ahead, the challenge for deaf education is also to embrace the diversity of this population and to appropriately address the specific needs of each child.

  18. Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool Development Using a Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Li, Wesley

    2009-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization using a genetic algorithm is being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) to automate analysis and design process by leveraging existing tools to enable true multidisciplinary optimization in the preliminary design stage of subsonic, transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. This is a promising technology, but faces many challenges in large-scale, real-world application. This report describes current approaches, recent results, and challenges for multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization as demonstrated by experience with the Ikhana fire pod design.!

  19. Multidisciplinary development of Belerofont Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babović, V.

    1997-08-01

    Belerofont Astronomical Observatory in Kragujevac, inaugurated on the occasion of the appearance of Halley's comet on February 26, 1986, develops astronomical activities among pupils, university youth and people interested in cosmic phenomena. In preparing a course of astronomy and astrophysics in the physics study curriculum, the society tends toward a multidisciplinary way of work.

  20. Anorectal malformations : A multidisciplinary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van den Hondel (Desiree)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The research described in this thesis was performed with the aim to evaluate and improve multidisciplinary treatment of anorectal malformation patients. An overview of current literature on treatment of anorectal malformations is given in the Preface section, which also inc

  1. [Ectopia cordis: multidisciplinary approach with successful result].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano Gómez, Servando Germán; Bermlúez Sosa, Marco Tulio; Palma Hernández, Emigdio; del Castillo Salceda, Luis Fernando; Pinzón Muslera, Otto; Hernández Cortés, Bernardino; Méndez Machado, Gustavo

    2006-08-01

    Ectopia cordis is a pathology in which the heart is complete or partially outside of the thoracic cavity. It represents a challenge for the diagnosis and handling because of its high perinatal mortality. We present the first case of thoracic ectopia cordis with prenatal diagnostic (27th week), its multidisciplinary handling at Hospital de Ginecopediatria núm. 71 of the Centro Medico Nacional Adolfo Ruiz Cortines, IMSS, in Veracruz, Mexico. We communicate the case of a 24 year-old woman referred by her correspondent medical unit with the diagnosis of 23.6 weeks pregnancy with suspicion of heart malformation by ultrasound. The pregnancy was followed-up until the 38th week, when it was programmed a caesarean section. The newborn had ectopia cordis, which was treated at the moment of birth. In this article, we present pictures of the heart defect as well as its evolution. The up-to-date bibliography is revised about the medical profile and treatment. The handling of the ectopia cordis includes an appropriate prenatal diagnosis through echocardiograph, a multidisciplinary perinatal team, to program the caesarean operation, aseptic handling of the newborn, immediate correction of the wall defect with skin torn piece without trying to correct the costal grill, specific hemodynamic cares, to reprogramme a correction of associated defects.

  2. EIDA Next Generation: ongoing and future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strollo, Angelo; Quinteros, Javier; Sleeman, Reinoud; Trani, Luca; Clinton, John; Stammler, Klaus; Danecek, Peter; Pedersen, Helle; Ionescu, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    The European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA; http://www.orfeus-eu.org/eida/eida.html) is the distributed Data Centre system within ORFEUS, providing transparent access and services to high quality, seismic data across (currently) 9 large data archives in Europe. EIDA is growing, in terms of the number of participating data centres, the size of the archives, the variability of the data in the archives, the number of users, and the volume of downloads. The on-going success of EIDA is thus providing challenges that are the driving force behind the design of the next generation (NG) of EIDA, which is expected to be implemented within EPOS IP. EIDA ORFEUS must cope with further expansion of the system and more complex user requirements by developing new techniques and extended services. The EIDA NG is being designed to work on standard FDSN web services and two additional new web services: Routing Service and QC (quality controlled) service. This presentation highlights the challenges EIDA needs to address during the EPOS IP and focuses on these 2 new services. The Routing Service can be considered as the core of EIDA NG. It was designed to assist users and clients to locate data within a federated, decentralized data centre (e.g. EIDA). A detailed, FDSN-compliant specification of the service has been developed. Our implementation of this service will run at every EIDA node, but is also capable of running on a user's computer, allowing anyone to define virtual or integrate existing data centres. This (meta)service needs to be queried in order to locate the data. Some smart clients (in a beta status) have been also provided to offer the user an integrated view of the whole EIDA, hiding the complexity of its internal structure. The service is open and able to be queried by anyone without the need of credentials or authentication. The QC Service is developed to cope with user requirements to query for relevant data only. The web service provides detailed information on the

  3. Multidisciplinary treatment approach in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Joseph B; Leon-Salazar, Vladimir; Anderson, Gary C; De Felippe, Nanci L O

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a common genetic disorder with high penetrance and phenotypic variability. First and second branchial arches are affected in TCS, resulting in craniofacial and intraoral anomalies such as: severe convex facial profile; mid-face hypoplasia; microtia; eyelid colobomas; mandibular retrognathism; cleft palate; dental hypoplasia; heterotopic teeth; maxillary transverse hypoplasia; anterior open bite; and Angle Class II molar relationship. A high incidence of caries is also a typical finding in TCS patients. Nonetheless, even simple dental restorative procedures can be challenging in this patient population due to other associated medical conditions, such as: congenital heart defects; decreased oropharyngeal airways; hearing loss; and anxiety toward treatment. These patients often require a multidisciplinary treatment approach, including: audiology; speech and language pathology; otorhinolaryngology; general dentistry; orthodontics; oral and maxillofacial surgery; and plastic and reconstructive surgeries to improve facial appearance. This paper's purpose was to present a current understanding of Treacher Collins syndrome etiology, phenotype, and current treatment approaches.

  4. Recent advances in multidisciplinary management ofhepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asmaa I Gomaa; Imam Waked

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)is increasing, and it is currently the second leadingcause of cancer-related death worldwide. Potentiallycurative treatment options for HCC include resection,transplantation, and percutaneous ablation, whereaspalliative treatments include trans-arterial chemoembolization(TACE), radioembolization, and systemictreatments. Due to the diversity of available treatmentoptions and patients' presentations, a multidisciplinary team should decide clinical management of HCC, according to tumor characteristics and stage of liver disease. Potentially curative treatments are suitable for very-early- and early-stage HCC. However, the vast majority of HCC patients are diagnosed in later stages, where the tumor characteristics or progress of liver disease prevent curative interventions. For patients with intermediate-stage HCC, TACE and radioembolization improve survival and are being evaluated in addition to potentially curative therapies or with systemic targeted therapy. There is currently no effective systemic chemotherapy, immunologic, or hormonal therapy for HCC, and sorafenib is the only approved moleculartargeted treatment for advanced HCC. Other targeted agents are under investigation; trials comparing new agents in combination with sorafenib are ongoing. Combinations of systemic targeted therapies with local treatments are being evaluated for further improvements in HCC patient outcomes. This article provides an updated and comprehensive overview of the current standards and trends in the treatment of HCC.

  5. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...

  6. Placental Development in Ongoing Pregnancy and Miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Reus (Averil)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In this thesis three-dimensional ultrasound, three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound, virtual reality and histologic examination of the chorionic villous vascularization were used to investigate early placental development in normal ongoing pregnancy as well as misca

  7. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...... an overview of the structure of the research and a summary of current status archived so far....

  8. On the Ongoing Evolution of Very High Frequency Power Supplies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Toke Meyer; Kamby, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in radio frequency transmission equipment helps to overcome those. However those circuits were not designed to meet the same requirements as power converters. This paper summarizes the contributions in recent years in application of very high frequency (VHF) technologies in power electronics, describes......The ongoing demand for smaller and lighter power supplies is driving the motivation to increase the switching frequencies of power converters. Drastic increases however come along with new challenges, namely the increase of switching losses in all components. The application of power circuits used...

  9. Preparedness for ongoing Ebola virus infection: how to welcome it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sora Yasri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of Ebola virus infection is the big global concern. Preparedness for ongoing Ebola virus infection is the topic that should be discussed. In fact, it is necessary to set up a biosecurity system to protect against the present Ebola outbreak. The medical personnel have to prepare for fighting the problem. The management of the present outbreak requires international collaboration and control of cross-border disease transmission is also the big challenge. The good case study is the Hajj scenario.

  10. Multidisciplinary management of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Bowen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Bowen1,2, Russell L Rothman2,31Veterans Affairs Quality Scholars Fellowship Program, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Tennessee Valley Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Division of General Internal Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medicine, 3Vanderbilt Eskind Diabetes Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Although once considered a disease of adults, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth is increasing at a significant rate. Similar to adults, youth with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for developing hypertension, lipid abnormalities, renal disease, and other diabetes-related complications. However, children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes also face many unique management challenges that are different from adults with type 2 diabetes or children with type 1 diabetes. To deliver safe, effective, high-quality, cost-effective health care to adolescents with type 2 diabetes, reorganization and redesign of health care systems are needed. Multidisciplinary health care teams, which allow individuals with specialized training to maximally utilize their skills within an organized diabetes treatment team, may increase efficiency and effectiveness and may improve outcomes in children with type 2 diabetes. This review article provides a brief review of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, provides an overview of multidisciplinary health care teams, and discusses the role of multidisciplinary health care management in youth with type 2 diabetes.Keywords: adolescent, type 2 diabetes, multidisciplinary

  11. Global Multidisciplinary Learning in Construction Education: Lessons from Virtual Collaboration of Building Design Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction is a multidisciplinary activity in which effective communication between parties is essential for successful construction projects. However, the construction industry has been characterised by fragmentation, which prevents seamless communication. This problem has been further exacerbated by the need to communicate over distance within a time constraint in an increasingly interconnected and globalised construction sector. This has brought a particular challenge to the education sector in preparing the future graduates to work in this context. The paper reports on an on-going Hewlett Packard-sponsored project to implement an innovative learning approach which consists of distanced collaboration between students from different disciplines from two Universities in the UK and Canada. The empirical work involved interviews and questionnaire survey at different stages of the project. The preliminary findings reveal the impact of disciplinary training on the development of effective virtual collaboration, although this has been moderated, to some extent, by their earlier (not so positive experience during the course of the project. The research provides a material for further reflection and may serve as a useful consideration for future development of a guiding framework for effective training of built environment professionals.

  12. How Multidisciplinary Are the Multidisciplinary Journals Science and Nature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gregg E A; Carley, Stephen; Porter, Alan L

    2016-01-01

    Interest in cross-disciplinary research knowledge interchange runs high. Review processes at funding agencies, such as the U.S. National Science Foundation, consider plans to disseminate research across disciplinary bounds. Publication in the leading multidisciplinary journals, Nature and Science, may signify the epitome of successful interdisciplinary integration of research knowledge and cross-disciplinary dissemination of findings. But how interdisciplinary are they? The journals are multidisciplinary, but do the individual articles themselves draw upon multiple fields of knowledge and does their influence span disciplines? This research compares articles in three fields (Cell Biology, Physical Chemistry, and Cognitive Science) published in a leading disciplinary journal in each field to those published in Nature and Science. We find comparable degrees of interdisciplinary integration and only modest differences in cross-disciplinary diffusion. That said, though the rate of out-of-field diffusion might be comparable, the sheer reach of Nature and Science, indicated by their potent Journal Impact Factors, means that the diffusion of knowledge therein can far exceed that of leading disciplinary journals in some fields (such as Physical Chemistry and Cognitive Science in our samples).

  13. Eye-movements and ongoing task processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, David T; Meleger, Alec; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Snyder, Jim; Dorvlo, Atsu S S; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2003-06-01

    This study tests the relation between eye-movements and thought processing. Subjects were given specific modality tasks (visual, gustatory, kinesthetic) and assessed on whether they responded with distinct eye-movements. Some subjects' eye-movements reflected ongoing thought processing. Instead of a universal pattern, as suggested by the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis, this study yielded subject-specific idiosyncratic eye-movements across all modalities. Included is a discussion of the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis regarding eye-movements and its implications for the eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing theory.

  14. Universal patterns underlying ongoing wars and terrorism

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, N F; Restrepo, J A; Becerra, O; Bohorquez, J C; Suárez, N; Restrepo, E M; Zarama, R; Johnson, Neil F.; Spagat, Mike; Restrepo, Jorge A.; Becerra, Oscar; Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Suarez, Nicolas; Restrepo, Elvira Maria; Zarama, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    We report a remarkable universality in the patterns of violence arising in three high-profile ongoing wars, and in global terrorism. Our results suggest that these quite different conflict arenas currently feature a common type of enemy, i.e. the various insurgent forces are beginning to operate in a similar way regardless of their underlying ideologies, motivations and the terrain in which they operate. We provide a microscopic theory to explain our main observations. This theory treats the insurgent force as a generic, self-organizing system which is dynamically evolving through the continual coalescence and fragmentation of its constituent groups.

  15. [Multidisciplinary therapy of Tourette syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bábel, B Tamás; Németh, Attila; Gádoros, Júlia; Bihari, Katalin

    2003-02-01

    The marked fluctuation in symptoms with a spectrum of behavioral problems contribute to misdiagnosis of Tourette syndrome. The authors review the recent progress in diagnosis and management with an emphasis on multidisciplinary approach. Possible associations with various genes have been found in etiology of Tourette syndrome. Development of the disease comes of dopaminerg neurotransmission disorder resulting in cortico-striato-thalamic system dysfunction. Tics are brief movements or sounds that occur intermittently and unpredictably mimicking fragments of normal behavior. Diagnostic criteria are based on the motor and vocal phenomena and their dynamics. The key concept in management are the tic severity scaling correlating with quality of life measurements. Therapeutic interventions indicated at severe alteration in patient's quality of life. Treatment plan combines various drug protocols, psychotherapy and behavioral therapy which should be optimalized for most disabling symptom. Social isolation and self injurious behavior complicates the treatment resistant, severe cases. In these subgroup of patient, an adequate selection of stereotactic intervention could provide an effective control of tic severity or behavioral disorder. Tourette syndrome, as a typical neuropsychiatric disorder, is a striking example for improved efficacy of multidisciplinary approach.

  16. How Do You Learn Multidisciplinary Idea?

    OpenAIRE

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2015-01-01

    The way how to learn multidisciplinary ideas has been discussed. Biomedical engineering is exemplified for a multidisciplinary field. "Biomedical Engineering" makes a multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering and others. The cross-cultural student seminars on biomedical engineering have been exemplified as the case studies. In the group fieldwork, students were divided into small groups. Each group visited the university hospital to find research topics re...

  17. Oncoplastic multidisciplinary meetings: a necessity or luxury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusby, Jennifer E; Gough, Jenny; Harris, Paul A; MacNeill, Fiona A

    2011-05-01

    Although there is scant evidence to support multidisciplinary meetings in any cancer specialty, they are now regarded as best practice. We believe the oncoplastic multidisciplinary meeting plays a similarly important role, consolidating oncoplastic multidisciplinary working and allowing transparent decision making, standardisation of care and recording of results. This may drive oncoplastic surgery to an evidence-based position from which oncoplastic excellence can be achieved.

  18. Multidisciplinary management of chronic heart failure: principles and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Patricia M; Newton, Phillip J; Tankumpuan, Thitipong; Paull, G; Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl

    2015-10-01

    Globally, the management of chronic heart failure (CHF) challenges health systems. The high burden of disease and the costs associated with hospitalization adversely affect individuals, families, and society. Improved quality, access, efficiency, and equity of CHF care can be achieved by using multidisciplinary care approaches if there is adherence and fidelity to the program's elements. The goal of this article was to summarize evidence and make recommendations for advancing practice, education, research, and policy in the multidisciplinary management of patients with CHF. Essential elements of multidisciplinary management of CHF were identified from meta-analyses and clinical practice guidelines. The study factors were discussed from the perspective of the health care system, providers, patients, and their caregivers. Identified gaps in evidence were used to identify areas for future focus in CHF multidisciplinary management. Although there is high-level evidence (including several meta-analyses) for the efficacy of management programs for CHF, less evidence exists to determine the benefit attributable to individual program components or to identify the specific content of effective components and the manner of their delivery. Health care system, provider, and patient factors influence health care models and the effective management of CHF and require focus and attention. Extrapolating trial findings to clinical practice settings is limited by the heterogeneity of study populations and the implementation of models of intervention beyond academic health centers, where practice environments differ considerably. Ensuring that individual programs are both developed and assessed that consider these factors is integral to ensuring adherence and fidelity with the core dimensions of disease management necessary to optimize patient and organizational outcomes. Recognizing the complexity of the multidisciplinary CHF interventions will be important in advancing the design

  19. Whey protein stories - an experiment in writing a multidisciplinary biography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tenna; Bechschøft, Rasmus L.; Giacalone, Davide

    2016-01-01

    contributes to the field of food studies with a multidisciplinary biography of whey protein - including its sensory qualities and challenges, insights into its cultural history, its nutritional value and effects on the human body and an analysis of how it is perceived by people who consume it. The biography......This is an experimental, dual-purpose article about whey protein and how to conduct interdisciplinary analyses and writings. On the one hand, this article is a multidisciplinary commodity biography, which consists of five descriptions of whey protein written by the five different research groups...... thereby expands upon existing understandings of whey protein while discussing the usefulness of employing the commodity biography format in interdisciplinary writing. Moreover, the article contributes to the field of interdisciplinary research by providing a practical example of a joint publication...

  20. A social-cognitive framework of multidisciplinary team innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletz, Susannah B F; Schunn, Christian D

    2010-01-01

    The psychology of science typically lacks integration between cognitive and social variables. We present a new framework of team innovation in multidisciplinary science and engineering groups that ties factors from both literatures together. We focus on the effects of a particularly challenging social factor, knowledge diversity, which has a history of mixed effects on creativity, most likely because those effects are mediated and moderated by cognitive and additional social variables. In addition, we highlight the distinction between team innovative processes that are primarily divergent versus convergent; we propose that the social and cognitive implications are different for each, providing a possible explanation for knowledge diversity's mixed results on team outcomes. Social variables mapped out include formal roles, communication norms, sufficient participation and information sharing, and task conflict; cognitive variables include analogy, information search, and evaluation. This framework provides a roadmap for research that aims to harness the power of multidisciplinary teams. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  1. Anencephaly: An Ongoing Investigation in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Sara

    2016-03-01

    : In the spring of 2012, a nurse in Washington State detected a cluster of babies born with anencephaly-a fatal condition in which infants are born without parts of the brain or skull. The resulting investigation initially confirmed a rate of anencephaly between January 2010 and January 2013 of 8.4 per 10,000 live births-more than four times the national average. As of November 2015, cases of anencephaly in Washington State have continued to increase, with the current rate estimated at 9.5 per 10,000 live births. While no distinct cause has yet been determined, neural tube defects-including anencephaly-are known to have multiple causes, including folic acid deficit, genetic variants in the folate pathway, and exposure to a variety of environmental and occupational toxins. This article describes many of these risk factors and explores the findings of Washington's ongoing investigation.

  2. The Fukushima nuclear disaster is ongoing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Andrew R

    2016-07-01

    The 5th anniversary of the Fukushima disaster and the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the two most catastrophic nuclear accidents in history, both occurred recently. Images of Chernobyl are replete with the international sign of radioactive contamination (a circle with three broad spokes radiating outward in a yellow sign). In contrast, ongoing decontamination efforts at Fukushima lack international warnings about radioactivity. Decontamination workers at Fukushima appear to be poorly protected against radiation. It is almost as if the effort is to make the Fukushima problem disappear. A more useful response would be to openly acknowledge the monumental problems inherent in managing a nuclear plant disaster. Lessons from Chernobyl are the best predictors of what the Fukushima region of Japan is coping with in terms of health and environmental problems following a nuclear catastrophe.

  3. Learning Multidisciplinary Collaboration with Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the design of a game-based learning process for developing communication in public organisations. The game-design presented here emphasises those parts of public organisations that tend to employ multidisciplinary teams for solving wicked problems. As such teams employ...... members from different, professional backgrounds, the game Public Professional sought to develop new understandings among team members and across professions. The purpose of this game was to facilitate an understanding among team members and across professions, a game-based learning process named Public...... Professional was designed. Its purpose was to a) provide team members with a shared language for discussing work related problems in regard to communication. To facilitate an understanding on the collaboration across professions, and to provide a space for dialogue about professional cooperation, Public...

  4. [Multidisciplinary practice guideline 'Marfan syndrome'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multi-system disorder of dominant inheritance in which the cardiovasculature, in particular the aorta, the eyes and the skeleton are affected. Diagnostic assessment and treatment of patients who are suspected of or have Marfan syndrome should preferably be done by multidisciplinary teams such as those found in specialised Marfan syndrome centres. The practice guideline is intended for all care givers involved with the recognition, diagnosis, consultations and the medicinal and surgical treatment of Marfan patients; it includes referral criteria and information on the referral process. A diagnosis of Marfan syndrome is based on international criteria in which aortic root dilatation and dissection, ectopia lentis, an affected first-degree family member and a pathogenic FBN1 mutation are the cardinal features. Alternative diagnoses are also included in the practice guideline. Recommendations are given for the monitoring and treatment of Marfan patients during pregnancy and delivery. Advice on lifestyle is mainly focussed on sports activities.

  5. Vocational rehabilitation: a multidisciplinary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobelet, C; Luthi, F; Al-Khodairy, A T; Chamberlain, M A

    2007-09-15

    Vocational rehabilitation is by definition a multidisciplinary intervention in a process linked to the facilitation of return to work or to the prevention of loss of the work. Clinical staff in contact with a person who has lost his job (general practitioner, specialized physician) must promote vocational rehabilitation. Medical rehabilitation for those with disabilities, whether new or old, has to be followed without delay by vocational rehabilitation. It is even better if these two intertwined processes are overlapping. They involve many professionals including physiotherapists, occupational therapists, psychologists, vocational trainers, job counsellors, teachers, case-managers, job placement agencies. Vocational rehabilitation has a financial cost, borne by many state organizations (security, social system, social affairs) as well as by employers and private insurances, which are in case of accident, concerned by this process. However, the evidence suggests that this is recouped 2- to 10-fold as suggested by the British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine.

  6. [Multidisciplinary treatment of orofacial pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, J W; Haumann, J; van Kleef, M

    2016-11-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of orofacial pain can be complex. The differential diagnosis is very extensive. Therefore, multidisciplinary diagnosis and treatment are often indicated. The diagnosis of chronic pain also entails the investigation of psychological factors. This is because psychological problems can play a role in the chronification of pain, but they can also be a consequence of chronic pain. Patients with persistent orofacial complaints should be seen by a medical team consisting of an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, a neurologist, an anaesthesiologist/pain specialist, a dentist-gnathologist, an orofacial physical therapist, and a psychologist or psychiatrist specialising in orofacial pain. Treatment options should be discussed, taking into account literature concerning their effectiveness. The general conclusion is that much research remains to be done into the causes of, and treatments for, orofacial pain.

  7. Intragastric balloon and multidisciplinary team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Mazure

    Full Text Available Background: The intragastric balloon is widely used for weight reduction in obese patients, but results are variable. We describe our results enhancing the importance of a Multidisciplinary Team (MT taking part in the treatment. Methods: A retrospective review was done concerning a total of 119 balloons , placed in 116 patients, under endoscopic control and conscious sedation, from May 2001 until August 2006. 49 patients were prepared and recommended to be followed by a MT in a physical unit, at least every 15 days during 6 months. 67 were indicated and followed by other colleagues, without MT. Removal was performed 6 months later. Results: Concerning our 49 patients, mean age was 38, 1 years, 31 female and 18 males, with BMI ranged between 32 and 63, average of 42. The average decrease of weight excess was 31, 85% (-4, 45-80, 4%, and the BMI diminished 5,3 points (from 13,6 to gain of 0,9. The treatment failed in 34,6 % of our patients -including 4 patients lost of follow-up (8, 16%-, compared with 53, 8% of patients without structured MT for selection and follow-up. Physical exercise enhanced markedly the results with 45, 8% of excess of weight loss in women and 39, 7% in males, compared with 14, 6 and 15, 6% in patients who didn't follow the program. The weight loss was mostly fat mass, 89,9% in men and 75,6% in women.- The results maintenance was obtained in 40% of patients one year later. There were no major complications; one balloon had to be removed at 3 weeks because of intolerance, another at 5 months because of gastroesophageal reflux. Conclusions: BIB is an effective help to achieve a short term weight loss in obese patients; nevertheless, good and long lasting results will depend on the modification of life style obtained by a multidisciplinary approach.

  8. Sensitivity Analysis for Multidisciplinary Systems (SAMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AFRL-RQ-WP-TM-2017-0017 SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY SYSTEMS (SAMS) Richard D. Snyder Design & Analysis Branch Aerospace Vehicles...for public release. Distribution is unlimited. 1 AFRL-NASA Collaboration Provide economical, accurate sensitivities for multidisciplinary design and... Concept Refinement Technology Development System Development & Demonstration Production & Deployment Operation & Support • Knowledge is most limited

  9. How Do You Learn Multidisciplinary Idea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The way how to learn multidisciplinary ideas has been discussed. Biomedical engineering is exemplified for a multidisciplinary field. "Biomedical Engineering" makes a multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering and others. The cross-cultural student seminars on biomedical engineering have been exemplified as the case studies. In the group fieldwork, students were divided into small groups. Each group visited the university hospital to find research topics related to biomedical engineering as the fieldwork by the cross cultural group. Students pointed out several topics related to the multidisciplinary field, which includes mechanics, informatics, and systemics. They have learned how to communicate with people, who has variety of cultural backgrounds. Through the training, students realized another way of thinking, which stands on another base of idea. The process is effective to master multidisciplinary ideas.

  10. Alta Scuola Politecnica: An Ongoing Experiment in the Multidisciplinary Education of Top Students towards Innovation in Engineering, Architecture and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, S.; Bernelli Zazzera, F.; Bertola, P.; Cantamessa, M.; Ceri, S.; Ranci, C.; Spaziante, A.; Zanino, R.

    2010-01-01

    Politecnico di Milano and Politecnico di Torino, the top technical universities in Italy, united their efforts in 2004 by launching a unique excellence programme called Alta Scuola Politecnica (ASP). The ASP programme is devoted to 150 students, selected each year from among the top 5-10% of those enrolled in the Engineering, Architecture and…

  11. Ongoing Mars Missions: Extended Mission Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Richard; Diniega, Serina; Crisp, Joy; Fraeman, Abigail; Golombek, Matt; Jakosky, Bruce; Plaut, Jeff; Senske, David A.; Tamppari, Leslie; Thompson, Thomas W.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.

    2016-10-01

    Many key scientific discoveries in planetary science have been made during extended missions. This is certainly true for the Mars missions both in orbit and on the planet's surface. Every two years, ongoing NASA planetary missions propose investigations for the next two years. This year, as part of the 2016 Planetary Sciences Division (PSD) Mission Senior Review, the Mars Odyssey (ODY) orbiter project submitted a proposal for its 7th extended mission, the Mars Exploration Rover (MER-B) Opportunity submitted for its 10th, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) for its 4th, and the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover and the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MVN) orbiter for their 2nd extended missions, respectively. Continued US participation in the ongoing Mars Express Mission (MEX) was also proposed. These missions arrived at Mars in 2001, 2004, 2006, 2012, 2014, and 2003, respectively. Highlights of proposed activities include systematic observations of the surface and atmosphere in twilight (early morning and late evening), building on a 13-year record of global mapping (ODY); exploration of a crater rim gully and interior of Endeavour Crater, while continuing to test what can and cannot be seen from orbit (MER-B); refocused observations of ancient aqueous deposits and polar cap interiors, while adding a 6th Mars year of change detection in the atmosphere and the surface (MRO); exploration and sampling by a rover of mineralogically diverse strata of Mt. Sharp and of atmospheric methane in Gale Crater (MSL); and further characterization of atmospheric escape under different solar conditions (MVN). As proposed, these activities follow up on previous discoveries (e.g., recurring slope lineae, habitable environments), while expanding spatial and temporal coverage to guide new detailed observations. An independent review panel evaluated these proposals, met with project representatives in May, and made recommendations to NASA in June 2016. In this

  12. Management of Membranous Glomerulonephritis in Pregnancy: A Multidisciplinary Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherifat Ope-Adenuga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of 28-year-old female, who had a past obstetrical history complicated by uncontrolled blood pressure, early onset preeclampsia, and a fetal demise at 29 weeks. Her blood pressure normalized after each pregnancy, and no diagnosis of renal disease was ever established. In her most recent pregnancy, she remained normotensive and initially presented with normal blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels. However, after the early first trimester, she developed nephrotic range proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and peripheral edema. After delivery of the baby, all clinical symptoms rapidly resolved and laboratory values normalized. We review the clinical course, diagnosis, and management of new onset nephrotic syndrome in pregnancy.

  13. Philosophical implications and multidisciplinary challenges of moral physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleim, Stephan; Schirmann, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Neuroethics deals with the normative implications of advances and new technology of neuroscience. Some scholars argue that experiments on moral judgment might allow solutions to moral problems in the future or already nowadays. We discuss this research under the label of moral physiology to delineat

  14. Geoethics and geoscientists: some ongoing initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua, Giuseppe; Peppoloni, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    The awareness and role of the scientific community in the defense from natural hazards and in building geoeducational strategies for the population are key themes of Geoethics. But, what is the awareness among Geoscientists about the importance of an ethical debate within Earth Sciences? Intuitively, this awareness is present in all, but not in an explicit and shared manner. With the goal to increase it, during the 34th International Geological Congress, that was held in Australia in August 2012, the IAPG - International Association for Promoting Geoethics was founded (http://www.iapg.geoethics.org). The IAPG aims to join forces of Geoscientists all over the world, by creating an international, multidisciplinary and scientific platform for discussing on ethical problems and dilemmas in Earth Sciences, for promoting Geoethics themes through scientific publications and conferences, for strengthening the research base on Geoethics, for focusing on case-studies to be taken as models for the development of effective and operative strategies. The IAPG network is growing fast and currently it has reached more than 330 members. Every day dozens of people visit its web pages (Website, Blog, Facebook page, Linkedin Group, Twitter page, YouTube channel) from almost all the countries of the world. National sections have been established in Brazil, India, Italy, Congo, Malawi, Ukraine and others are going to be founded. The IAPG has also obtained the status of affiliated organization by the IUGS - International Union of Geological Sciences and it is among the collaborative organizations of the IUGS - Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism (TGGGP). The IAPG objectives require the involvement of the entire international scientific community, and especially of geoscientists from low income countries, where ethical problems related to Earth sciences appear even more evident, where the consequences of wrong choices and the lack of rules and controls in managing geo

  15. Development of practice principles for the management of ongoing suicidal ideation in young people diagnosed with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M Rice

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is a lack of clear guidance regarding the management of ongoing suicidality in young people experiencing major depressive disorder. This study utilised an expert consensus approach in identifying practice principles to complement relevant clinical guidelines for the treatment of major depressive disorder in young people. The study also sought to outline a broad treatment framework for clinical intervention with young people experiencing ongoing suicidal ideation. Methods: In-depth focus groups were undertaken with a specialist multidisciplinary clinical team (the Youth Mood Clinic at Orygen Youth Health Clinical Program, Melbourne working with young people aged 15–25 years experiencing ongoing suicidal ideation. Each focus group was audio recorded and transcribed verbatim using orthographic conventions. Principles of grounded theory and thematic analysis were used to analyse and code the resultant data. Results: The identified codes were subsequently synthesised into eight practice principles reflecting engagement and consistency of care, ongoing risk assessment and documentation, individualised crisis planning, engaging systems of support, engendering hopefulness, development of adaptive coping, management of acute risk, and consultation and supervision. Conclusions: The identified practice principles provide a broad management framework, and may assist to improve treatment consistency and clinical management of young people experiencing ongoing suicidal ideation. The practice principles may be of use to health professionals working within a team-based setting involved in the provision of care, even if peripherally, to young people with ongoing suicidal ideation. Findings address the lack of treatment consistency and shared terminology and may provide containment and guidance to multidisciplinary clinicians working with this at-risk group.

  16. Dry needling versus acupuncture: the ongoing debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kehua; Ma, Yan; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Although Western medical acupuncture (WMA) is commonly practised in the UK, a particular approach called dry needling (DN) is becoming increasingly popular in other countries. The legitimacy of the use of DN by conventional non-physician healthcare professionals is questioned by acupuncturists. This article describes the ongoing debate over the practice of DN between physical therapists and acupuncturists, with a particular emphasis on the USA. DN and acupuncture share many similarities but may differ in certain aspects. Currently, little information is available from the literature regarding the relationship between the two needling techniques. Through reviewing their origins, theory, and practice, we found that DN and acupuncture overlap in terms of needling technique with solid filiform needles as well as some fundamental theories. Both WMA and DN are based on modern biomedical understandings of the human body, although DN arguably represents only one subcategory of WMA. The increasing volume of research into needling therapy explains its growing popularity in the musculoskeletal field including sports medicine. To resolve the debate over DN practice, we call for the establishment of a regulatory body to accredit DN courses and a formal, comprehensive educational component and training for healthcare professionals who are not physicians or acupuncturists. Because of the close relationship between DN and acupuncture, collaboration rather than dispute between acupuncturists and other healthcare professionals should be encouraged with respect to education, research, and practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal conditions who require needling therapy.

  17. Methylated spirit burns: an ongoing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansbeken, J R H; Vloemans, A F P M; Tempelman, F R H; Breederveld, R S

    2012-09-01

    Despite many educational campaigns we still see burns caused by methylated spirit every year. We undertook a retrospective study to analyse the impact of this problem. We retrospectively collected data of all patients with burns caused by methylated spirit over twelve years from 1996 to 2008. Our main endpoints were: incidence, age, mechanism of injury, total body surface area (TBSA) burned, burn depth, need for surgery and length of hospital stay. Ninety-seven patients with methylated spirit burns were included. During the study period there was no decrease in the number of patients annually admitted to the burn unit with methylated spirit burns. 28% of the patients (n=27) were younger than eighteen years old, 15% (n=15) were ten years old or younger. The most common cause of burns was carelessness in activities involving barbecues, campfires and fondues. Mean TBSA burned was 16% (SD 12.4). 70% (n=68) had full thickness burns. 66% (n=64) needed grafting. Mean length of hospital stay was 23 days (SD 24.7). The use of methylated spirit is an ongoing problem, which continues to cause severe burns in adults and children. Therefore methylated spirit should be banned in households. We suggest sale only in specialised shops, clear labelling and mandatory warnings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    -Ing. Ulvi Arslan, Univ., ., Dr. _., Prof.; Heiko Huber, Dipl.-Ing.

    2010-05-01

    KEYWORDS Geothermal sciences, geothermics, research, theory and application, numerical calculation, geothermal modeling, Technical University Darmstadt, Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) INTRODUCTION In times of global warming renewable, green energies are getting more and more important. The development of application of geothermal energy as a part of renewable energies in Germany is a multidisciplinary process of fast growing research and improvements. Geothermal energy is the energy, which is stored below earth's surface. The word geothermal derives from the Greek words geo (earth) and thermos (heat), so geothermal is a synonym to earth heat. Geothermal energy is one of the auspicious renewable energies. In average the temperature increases 3°C every 100 m of depth, which is termed as geothermal gradient. Therefore 99 percent of our planet is hotter than 1.000°C, while 99 percent of that last percent is even hotter than 100°C. Already in a depth of about 1 kilometer temperatures of 35 - 40°C can be achieved. While other renewable energies arise less or more from the sun, geothermal energy sources its heat from the earth's interior, which is caused mostly by radioactive decay of persistent isotopes. This means a possibility of a base-loadable form of energy supply. Especially efficient is the use of deep geothermal energy of high-enthalpie reservoirs, which means a high energy potential in low depths. In Germany no high-enthalpie reservoirs are given. To use the given low-enthalpie potential and to generate geothermal power efficiently inventions and improvements need to be performed. An important part of geothermal progresses is performed by universities with multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling. Especially in deep geothermal systems numerical calculations are essential for a correct dimensioning of the geothermal system. Therefore German universities and state aided organizations are developing numerical programs for a detailed use of

  19. Continued multidisciplinary project-based learning - implementation in health informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, C; Spreckelsen, C

    2009-01-01

    Problem- and project-based learning are approved methods to train students, graduates and post-graduates in scientific and other professional skills. The students are trained on realistic scenarios in a broader context. For students specializing in health informatics we introduced continued multidisciplinary project-based learning (CM-PBL) at a department of medical informatics. The training approach addresses both students of medicine and students of computer science. The students are full members of an ongoing research project and develop a project-related application or module, or explore or evaluate a sub-project. Two teachers guide and review the students' work. The training on scientific work follows a workflow with defined milestones. The team acts as peer group. By participating in the research team's work the students are trained on professional skills. A research project on a web-based information system on hospitals built the scenario for the realistic context. The research team consisted of up to 14 active members at a time, who were scientists and students of computer science and medicine. The well communicated educational approach and team policy fostered the participation of the students. Formative assessment and evaluation showed a considerable improvement of the students' skills and a high participant satisfaction. Alternative education approaches such as project-based learning empower students to acquire scientific knowledge and professional skills, especially the ability of life-long learning, multidisciplinary team work and social responsibility.

  20. Whey protein stories - An experiment in writing a multidisciplinary biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Tenna; Bechshoeft, Rasmus L; Giacalone, Davide; Otto, Marie Haulund; Castro-Mejía, Josue; Bin Ahmad, Hajar Fauzan; Reitelseder, Søren; Jespersen, Astrid Pernille

    2016-12-01

    This is an experimental, dual-purpose article about whey protein and how to conduct interdisciplinary analyses and writings. On the one hand, this article is a multidisciplinary commodity biography, which consists of five descriptions of whey protein written by the five different research groups involved in the interdisciplinary research project CALM(Counteracting Age-related loss of Skeletal Muscle Mass). On the other hand, it is a meta-analysis, which aims to uncover and highlight examples of how the five descriptions contribute to each other with insights into the contextualisation of knowledge, contrasts between the descriptions and the new dimensions they bring to established fields of interest. The meta-analysis also contains a discussion of interdisciplinary study objects and the usefulness of the multidisciplinary commodity biography as a format for interdisciplinary publications. The article contributes to the field of food studies with a multidisciplinary biography of whey protein - including its sensory qualities and challenges, insights into its cultural history, its nutritional value and effects on the human body and an analysis of how it is perceived by people who consume it. The biography thereby expands upon existing understandings of whey protein while discussing the usefulness of employing the commodity biography format in interdisciplinary writing. Moreover, the article contributes to the field of interdisciplinary research by providing a practical example of a joint publication and reflections upon the existence, interaction and possibilities of monodisciplinary knowledge structures within interdisciplinary studies and publications.

  1. An uncertain multidisciplinary design optimization method using interval convex models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangyi; Luo, Zhen; Sun, Guangyong; Zhang, Nong

    2013-06-01

    This article proposes an uncertain multi-objective multidisciplinary design optimization methodology, which employs the interval model to represent the uncertainties of uncertain-but-bounded parameters. The interval number programming method is applied to transform each uncertain objective function into two deterministic objective functions, and a satisfaction degree of intervals is used to convert both the uncertain inequality and equality constraints to deterministic inequality constraints. In doing so, an unconstrained deterministic optimization problem will be constructed in association with the penalty function method. The design will be finally formulated as a nested three-loop optimization, a class of highly challenging problems in the area of engineering design optimization. An advanced hierarchical optimization scheme is developed to solve the proposed optimization problem based on the multidisciplinary feasible strategy, which is a well-studied method able to reduce the dimensions of multidisciplinary design optimization problems by using the design variables as independent optimization variables. In the hierarchical optimization system, the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II, sequential quadratic programming method and Gauss-Seidel iterative approach are applied to the outer, middle and inner loops of the optimization problem, respectively. Typical numerical examples are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  2. Submarine Landslides: A Multidisciplinary Crossroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscardelli, L. G.

    2014-12-01

    The study of submarine landslides has advanced considerably in the last decade. A multitude of geoscience disciplines, including marine, petroleum and planetary geology, as well as geohazard assessments, are concerned with the study of these units. Oftentimes, researchers working in these fields disseminate their findings within their own communities and a multidisciplinary approach seems to lack. This presentation showcases several case studies in which a broader approach has increased our understanding of submarine landslides in a variety of geologic settings. Three-dimensional seismic data from several continental margins (Trinidad, Brazil, Morocco, Canada, GOM), as well as data from outcrop localities are shown to explore geomorphological complexities associated with submarine landslides. Discussion associated with the characterization and classification of submarine landslides is also part of this work. Topics that will be cover include: 1) how data from conventional oil and gas exploration activities can be used to increase our understanding of the dynamic behavior of submarine landslides, 2) analogies between terrestrial submarine landslides and potential Martian counterparts, 3) impact of submarine landslides in margin construction, as well as their economic significance and 4) the importance of quantifying the morphology of submarine landslides in a systematic fashion.

  3. Consequences of ongoing retrotransposition in mammalian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell PH

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Patrick H Maxwell Department of Biological Sciences, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA Abstract: Retrotransposons can have significant influences on gene expression and genome stability through their ability to integrate reverse-transcript copies of their sequences at new genomic locations by retrotransposition. These elements have been long known to retrotranspose in mammalian germ cells to give rise to inherited insertion alleles, but more recent work has also shown that retrotransposition can occur in mammalian somatic cells, particularly in brain tissue and tumors. Retrotransposition makes appreciable contributions to spontaneous disease-causing alleles in humans and a more significant contribution to spontaneous mutations in mice. Genome-wide studies have found high levels of polymorphic retrotransposon insertions in human populations that are consistent with ongoing retrotransposition. Many insertions do not disrupt exons, but insertions into introns or flanking genes can alter gene expression patterns, generate truncated or antisense gene transcripts, alter splicing patterns, or result in premature polyadenylation of gene transcripts. Furthermore, the very high genomic copy numbers of these elements can lead to nonallelic homologous recombination events that produce gene deletions/duplications and genome rearrangements, and can also lead to evolution of particular insertions or types of elements to have cellular functions through exaptation. Mobility of these elements occurs despite multiple epigenetic mechanisms to restrict their expression. While the potential for retrotransposons to significantly influence mammalian health and cellular functions is clear, substantial research efforts will be needed to fully elucidate the actual contributions of natural levels of mobility of endogenous elements to the health and development of humans and other mammals. Keywords: retrotransposon, human, mouse, mutations, epigenetics

  4. Ongoing dengue epidemic - Angola, June 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    On April 1, 2013, the Public Health Directorate of Angola announced that six cases of dengue had been reported to the Ministry of Health of Angola (MHA). As of May 31, a total of 517 suspected dengue cases had been reported and tested for dengue with a rapid diagnostic test (RDT). A total of 313 (60.5%) specimens tested positive for dengue, including one from a patient who died. All suspected cases were reported from Luanda Province, except for two from Malanje Province. Confirmatory diagnostic testing of 49 specimens (43 RDT-positive and six RDT-negative) at the CDC Dengue Branch confirmed dengue virus (DENV) infection in 100% of the RDT-positive specimens and 50% of the RDT-negative specimens. Only DENV-1 was detected by molecular diagnostic testing. Phylogenetic analysis indicated this virus has been circulating in the region since at least 1968, strongly suggesting that dengue is endemic in Angola. Health-care professionals throughout Angola should be aware of the ongoing epidemic, the recommended practices for clinical management of dengue patients, and the need to report cases to MHA. Persons in Angola should seek medical care for acute febrile illness to reduce the risk for developing complications. Laboratory-confirmed dengue also has been reported from seven countries on four continents among persons who had recently traveled to Luanda, including 79 persons from Portugal. Angola is the third of four African countries to report a dengue outbreak in 2013. Persons returning from Africa with acute febrile illness should seek medical care, including testing for DENV infection, and suspected cases should be reported to public health authorities.

  5. Supporting the Thesis Writing Process of International Research Students through an Ongoing Writing Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linda Y.; Vandermensbrugghe, Joelle

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from research suggests writing support is particularly needed for international research students who have to tackle the challenges of thesis writing in English as their second language in Western academic settings. This article reports the development of an ongoing writing group to support the thesis writing process of international…

  6. Supporting the Thesis Writing Process of International Research Students through an Ongoing Writing Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linda Y.; Vandermensbrugghe, Joelle

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from research suggests writing support is particularly needed for international research students who have to tackle the challenges of thesis writing in English as their second language in Western academic settings. This article reports the development of an ongoing writing group to support the thesis writing process of international…

  7. The importance of a multidisciplinary approach to hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Osama; Yoo, Eric R; Perumpail, Ryan B; Perumpail, Brandon J; Liu, Andy; Cholankeril, George; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The rising incidence, genetic heterogeneity, multiple etiologies, and concurrent chronic liver diseases make diagnosis, staging, and selection of treatment options challenging in patients with HCC. The best approach to optimize the management of HCC is one that utilizes a core multidisciplinary liver tumor board, consisting of hepatologists, pathologists, interventional radiologists, oncologists, hepatobiliary and transplant surgeons, nurses, and general practitioners. In most cases, HCC is diagnosed by abdominal imaging studies, preferably with a triphasic computed tomography scan of the abdomen or magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen. Histopathological diagnosis using a guided liver biopsy may be needed in noncirrhotic patients or when radiological diagnostic criteria are not fulfilled in the setting of cirrhosis. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging system facilitates a standardized therapeutic strategy based on the tumor burden, extent of metastasis, severity of hepatic decompensation, comorbid medical illnesses, functional status of patient, HCC-related symptoms, and preference of the patient. Treatment options include curative surgery (hepatic resection and liver transplantation) and palliative measures (radiofrequency ablation, transarterial chemoembolization, and chemotherapy with sorafenib). The role of the multidisciplinary team is crucial in promptly reconfirming the diagnosis, staging the HCC, and formulating an individualized treatment plan. In potential liver transplant candidates, timely liver transplant evaluation and coordinating bridging/downsizing treatment modalities, such as radiofrequency ablation and transarterial chemoembolization, can be time-consuming. In summary, a multidisciplinary team approach provides a timely, individualized treatment plan, which can vary from curative surgery in patients with early-stage HCC to palliative

  8. An architecture for integration of multidisciplinary models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belete, Getachew F.; Voinov, Alexey; Holst, Niels

    2014-01-01

    , Enterprise Application Integration, and Integration Design Patterns. We developed an architecture of a multidisciplinary model integration framework that brings these three aspects of integration together. Service-oriented-based platform independent architecture that enables to establish loosely coupled...

  9. Moebius sequence -a multidisciplinary clinical approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Kjeldgaard; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2017-01-01

    ) and vascular events in utero are reported. The purpose of present study was through a multidisciplinary clinical approach to examine children diagnosed with Moebius-like symptoms. Ten children underwent odontological, ophthalmological, obstetric, paediatric, orthopaedic, genetic, radiological...

  10. Light Microscopy: An ongoing contemporary revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Weisenburger, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Optical microscopy is one of the oldest scientific instruments that is still used in forefront research. Ernst Abbe's nineteenth century formulation of the resolution limit in microscopy let generations of scientists believe that optical studies of individual molecules and resolving sub-wavelength structures were not feasible. The Nobel Prize in 2014 for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy marks a clear recognition that the old beliefs have to be revisited. In this article, we present a critical overview of various recent developments in optical microscopy. In addition to the popular super-resolution fluorescence methods, we discuss the prospects of various other techniques and imaging contrasts and consider some of the fundamental and practical challenges that lie ahead.

  11. Multidisciplinary treatment of the neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bree, Remco; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Since lymph node metastases are one of the most important prognostic factors, treatment of the neck is challenging. In clinically N0 neck, (super)selective neck dissection is indicated, whereas a more extensive neck dissection with preservation of important structures is performed in N2-N3 disease.

  12. Service-Learning: Through a Multidisciplinary Lens. Advances in Service Learning Research Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billig, Shelley H., Ed.; Furco, Andrew, Ed.

    This document contains 11 papers on researching service learning through a multidisciplinary lens. The following papers are included: "Introduction" (Shelley H. Billig, Andrew Furco); "Stretching to Meet the Challenge: Improving the Quality of Research to Improve the Quality of Service-Learning" (Janet Eyler);…

  13. GEOWOW: a drought scenario for multidisciplinary data access and use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Mattia; Sorichetta, Alessandro; Roglia, Elena; Craglia, Massimo; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Recent enhancements of the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI; http://www.earthobservations.org/gci_gci.shtml), and in particular the introduction of a middleware in the GCI that brokers across heterogeneous information systems, have increased significantly the number of information resources discoverable worldwide. Now the challenge moves to the next level of ensuring access and use of the resources discovered, which have many different and domain-specific data models, communication protocols, encoding formats, etc. The GEOWOW Project - GEOSS interoperability for Weather, Ocean and Water, http://www.geowow.eu - developed a set of multidisciplinary use scenarios to advance the present GCI. This work describes the "Easy discovery and use of GEOSS resources for addressing multidisciplinary challenges related to drought scenarios" showcase demonstrated at the last GEO Plenary in Foz de Iguazu (Brazil). The scientific objectives of this showcase include: prevention and mitigation of water scarcity and drought situations, assessment of the population and geographical area potentially affected, evaluation of the possible distribution of mortality and economic loss risk, and support in building greater capacity to cope with drought. The need to address these challenges calls for producing scientifically robust and consistent information about the extent of land affected by drought and degradation. Similarly, in this context it is important: (i) to address uncertainties about the way in which various biological, physical, social, and economic factors interact each other and influence the occurrence of drought events, and (ii) to develop and test adequate indices and/or combination of them for monitoring and forecasting drought in different geographic locations and at various spatial scales (Brown et al., 2002). The scientific objectives above can be met with an increased interoperability across the multidisciplinary domains relevant to this drought scenario. In particular

  14. OECI accreditation at Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV -- IRCCS, general framework and multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiusole, Daniela; Cioffredi, Piero; Basso, Umberto; Bortolami, Alberto; Crivellari, Gino; Gennaro, Gisella; Spina, Romina; Opocher, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the accreditation process of the Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV-IRCCS) according to the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) model, with particular reference to the standards for the multidisciplinary approach. Through the analysis of the process and the activities of each multidisciplinary team (MDT) and the development, at a regional level, of diagnostic, therapeutic, and care pathways (PDTA), all the necessary steps to meet the OECI standards have been determined. Adjustment is ongoing. We are working on the inclusion of the MDT registration forms in the electronic medical records and on the possibility to extend the OECI model to the MDT not based at IOV, but participated in by IOV professionals. The sarcoma MDT has achieved results demonstrating that the OECI framework has allowed the professionals involved in the multidisciplinary meeting to systematically share the clinical information of the patient, who can benefit from better continuity of care. The model has also provided greater clarity in the management of patients who are enrolled in clinical trials and deviate from Guide Lines (GL)/PDTA. The accreditation process according to the OECI model has added value to the IOV's already well-developed multidisciplinary activities.

  15. Emerging multidisciplinary research across database management systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nica, Anisoara; Varde, Aparna

    2011-01-01

    The database community is exploring more and more multidisciplinary avenues: Data semantics overlaps with ontology management; reasoning tasks venture into the domain of artificial intelligence; and data stream management and information retrieval shake hands, e.g., when processing Web click-streams. These new research avenues become evident, for example, in the topics that doctoral students choose for their dissertations. This paper surveys the emerging multidisciplinary research by doctoral students in database systems and related areas. It is based on the PIKM 2010, which is the 3rd Ph.D. workshop at the International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management (CIKM). The topics addressed include ontology development, data streams, natural language processing, medical databases, green energy, cloud computing, and exploratory search. In addition to core ideas from the workshop, we list some open research questions in these multidisciplinary areas.

  16. Buyer-Seller Interaction Patterns During Ongoing Service Exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. van der Valk (Wendy)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis dissertation focuses on the ongoing interactions that take place between buyers and sellers of business services after the contract has been signed. This ongoing interaction is important since services are produced and consumed simultaneously; therefore, both buyer and seller have t

  17. The ongoing Digitalization of an Introductory Programming Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This paper is about the ongoing digitalization of a C programming course. The paper describes our considerations about the use of video resources, as well as other digital learning resources. In particular, we discuss the ongoing transition from using a number of supplementary videos (in...

  18. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jacob HG Grand¹, Sienna Caspar², Stuart WS MacDonald11Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada; 2Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1 Alzheimer’s disease; 2 vascular dementias; 3 frontotemporal dementias; and 4 dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of

  19. Promoting Implementation of Multi-Disciplinary Sustained Ocean Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Jay; Bourassa, Mark; Hill, Katherine; Miloslavich, Patricia; Simmons, Samantha; Sloyan, Bernadette; Telszewski, Maciej

    2017-04-01

    Since the OceanObs'09 Conference, the ocean observing community has been improving coordination and collaboration amongst physical, biogeochemical and biology/ecosystem communities. Societal and scientific requirements for sustained observations are being captured in Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs), many of which are also Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) as defined by the Global Climate Observing System reporting to the UNFCCC. Significant progress has been made through the introduction of the Framework for Ocean Observing in 2012 and the creation and refinement of the disciplinary EOVs, based on expert evaluation of feasibility and impact. With advances in observing technology, and the definition of EOVs, clear opportunities exist to improve the coordinated planning and implementation of observing activities measuring EOVs across the three disciplines of physical, biogeochemical and biology/ecosystem oceanography. In early 2017, a workshop examined priority steps forward with the objectives: • To build on the established societal and scientific requirements expressed in EOVs, identify the key applications and phenomena that will benefit from co-located multi-disciplinary sustained observations • To identify near-term innovation priorities for observing platforms and sensors to enable multi-disciplinary observations, and • To identify programmatic and professional connections between existing and emerging observing networks that will increase multi-disciplinary observations. To support these objectives and to provide a mechanism for looking at convergence across the oceans disciplines, three preselected demonstration themes were defined and discussed: • Changes in plankton communities (including ocean color), • Oxygen minimum zones, • Open ocean/shelf interactions (including boundary currents) These themes were chosen because they represent global and challenging problems that are best addressed through collaboration of physical, biogeochemical and

  20. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Techniques: Implications and Opportunities for Fluid Dynamics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Green, Lawrence L.

    1999-01-01

    A challenge for the fluid dynamics community is to adapt to and exploit the trend towards greater multidisciplinary focus in research and technology. The past decade has witnessed substantial growth in the research field of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). MDO is a methodology for the design of complex engineering systems and subsystems that coherently exploits the synergism of mutually interacting phenomena. As evidenced by the papers, which appear in the biannual AIAA/USAF/NASA/ISSMO Symposia on Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, the MDO technical community focuses on vehicle and system design issues. This paper provides an overview of the MDO technology field from a fluid dynamics perspective, giving emphasis to suggestions of specific applications of recent MDO technologies that can enhance fluid dynamics research itself across the spectrum, from basic flow physics to full configuration aerodynamics.

  1. Learning mechanisms in multidisciplinary teamwork with real customers and open-ended problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Juho; Isomöttönen, Ville

    2015-11-01

    Recently, there has been a trend towards adding a multidisciplinary or multicultural element to traditional monodisciplinary project courses in computing and engineering. In this article, we examine the implications of multidisciplinarity for students' learning experiences during a one-semester project course for real customers. We use a qualitative research approach and base our analysis on students' learning reports on three instances of a project course titled Multidisciplinary working life project. The main contribution of this article is the unified theoretical picture of the learning mechanisms stemming from multidisciplinarity. Our main conclusions are that (1) students generally have a positive view of multidisciplinarity; (2) multidisciplinary teams enable students to better identify their own expertise, which leads to increased occupational identity; and (3) learning experiences are not fixed, as team spirit and student attitude play an important role in how students react to challenging situations arising from introduction of the multidisciplinarity.

  2. The importance of multidisciplinary team management of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, P M

    2012-06-01

    Historically, a simple approach to the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) was applicable to nearly all patients. Recently, a more complex treatment algorithm has emerged, driven by both pathologic and molecular phenotype. This increasing complexity underscores the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach to the diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care of patients with nsclc. A team approach to management is important at all points: from diagnosis, through treatment, to end-of-life care. It also needs to be patient-centred and must involve the patient in decision-making concerning treatment. Multidisciplinary case conferencing is becoming an integral part of care. Early integration of palliative care into the team approach appears to contribute significantly to quality of life and potentially extends overall survival for these patients. Supportive approaches, including psychosocial and nutrition support, should be routinely incorporated into the team approach. Challenges to the implementation of multidisciplinary care require institutional commitment and support.

  3. Migraine with Aura or Sports-Related Concussion: Case Report, Pathophysiology, and Multidisciplinary Approach to Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Cordingley, Dean; Girardin, Richard; Ritchie, Lesley; Johnston, Janine

    The evaluation and management of athletes presenting with clinical features of migraine headache with aura in the setting of sports-related head trauma is challenging. We present a case report of a 15-yr-old boy with a history of migraine with visual aura that developed acute visual disturbance and headache after a head injury during an ice hockey game. The patient underwent comprehensive assessment at a multidisciplinary concussion program, including neuro-ophthalmological examination, neurocognitive testing, and graded aerobic treadmill testing. Clinical history and multidisciplinary assessment was consistent with the diagnosis of coexisting sports-related concussion and migraine with brainstem aura. The authors discuss the pearls and pitfalls of managing patients who develop migraine headache with visual aura after sports-related head injury and the value of a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to this unique patient population.

  4. Environmental impact of ongoing sources of metal contamination on remediated sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, Anna Sophia, E-mail: anna.knox@srn.doe.gov [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Paller, Michael H., E-mail: michael.paller@srnl.doe.gov [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Milliken, Charles E., E-mail: charles.milliken@srnl.doe.gov [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Redder, Todd M., E-mail: tredder@limno.com [LimnoTech, Ann Arbor, Minnesota 48108 (United States); Wolfe, John R., E-mail: jwolfe@limno.com [LimnoTech, Ann Arbor, Minnesota 48108 (United States); Seaman, John, E-mail: seaman@srel.uga.edu [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A challenge to all remedial approaches for contaminated sediments is the continued influx of contaminants from uncontrolled sources following remediation. We investigated the effects of ongoing contamination in mesocosms employing sediments remediated by different types of active and passive caps and in-situ treatment. Our hypothesis was that the sequestering agents used in active caps and in situ treatment will bind elements (arsenic, chromium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead, selenium, and zinc) from ongoing sources thereby reducing their bioavailability and protecting underlying remediated sediments from recontamination. Most element concentrations in surface water remained significantly lower in mesocosms with apatite and mixed amendment caps than in mesocosms with passive caps (sand), uncapped sediment, and spike solution throughout the 2520 h experiment. Element concentrations were significantly higher in Lumbriculus variegatus from untreated sediment than in Lumbriculus from most active caps. Pearson correlations between element concentrations in Lumbriculus and metal concentrations in the top 2.5 cm of sediment or cap measured by diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) sediment probes were generally strong (as high as 0.98) and significant (p < 0.05) for almost all tested elements. Metal concentrations in both Lumbriculus and sediment/cap were lowest in apatite, mixed amendment, and activated carbon treatments. These findings show that some active caps can protect remediated sediments by reducing the bioavailable pool of metals/metalloids in ongoing sources of contamination. - Graphical abstract: Conventional methods of remediating contaminated sediments may be inadequate for the protection of benthic organisms when ongoing sources of contamination are present. However, sediment caps with chemically active sequestering agents have the ability to reduce the bioavailable pool of metals in ongoing sources of contamination (red dots), reduce toxicity to

  5. Turtles to Terabytes: The Ongoing Revolution in Volcano Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzurisin, D.

    2015-12-01

    Volcano geodesy is in the midst of a revolution. GPS and InSAR, together with extensive ground-based sensor networks, have enabled major advances in understanding how and why volcanoes deform. Surveying techniques that produced a few bytes of information per benchmark per year have been replaced by continuously operating deformation networks and imaging radar satellites that generate terabytes of data at resolutions unattainable only a few decades ago. These developments have enabled more detailed assessments of volcano hazards, more accurate forecasts of volcanic activity, and better insights into how volcanoes behave over a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Forty years ago, repeated leveling surveys showed that the floor of the Yellowstone caldera had risen more than 70 cm in the past 5 decades. Today a network of GPS stations tracks surface movements continuously with millimeter-scale accuracy and the entire deformation field is imaged frequently by a growing number of SAR satellites, revealing a far more complex style of deformation than was recognized previously. At Mount St. Helens, the 1980-1986 eruption taught us that a seemingly quiescent volcano can suddenly become overtly restless, and that accurate eruption predictions are possible at least in some limited circumstances given sufficient observations. The lessons were revisited during the volcano's 2004-2008 eruption, during which a new generation of geodetic sensors and methods detected a range of co-eruptive changes that enabled new insights into the volcano's magma storage and transport system. These examples highlight volcano deformation styles and scales that were unknown just a few decades ago but now have been revealed by a growing number of data types and modeling methods. The rapid evolution that volcano geodesy is currently experiencing provides an ongoing challenge for geodesists, while also demonstrating that geodetic unrest is common, widespread, and illuminating. Vive la révolution!

  6. Placenta accreta and anesthesia: A multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Khokhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Placenta accreta (an abnormally adherent placenta is one of the two leading causes of peripartum hemorrhage and the most common indication for peripartum hysterectomy. Placenta accreta may be associated with significant maternal hemorrhage at delivery owing to the incomplete placental separation. When placenta accreta is diagnosed before delivery, a multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome.

  7. Augmented Reality for Multi-disciplinary Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, XIANGYU; Rui

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents a framework for multi-disciplinary collaboration. Tangible Augmented Reality has been raised as one of suitable systems for design collaboration. Furthermore, it emphasizes the advantages of Tangible Augmented Reality to illustrate the needs for integrating the Tangible User Interfaces and Augmented Reality Systems.

  8. The Multidisciplinary Economics of Money Laundering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferwerda, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314405526

    2012-01-01

    Money laundering has been studied for many years, but mainly by lawyers and criminologists. This dissertation presents a number of ways on how an economist – mainly in a multidisciplinary fashion – can contribute to this field of research. This dissertation answers four important questions about

  9. Thoughts about multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2013-10-01

    This essay focuses on multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research. The definitions and objectives for these three types of multiple discipline research are given. Discussion centers on the gains and losses that may be experienced by individual nurses who engage in such research, as well as gains and losses for the discipline of nursing.

  10. Placenta accreta and anesthesia: A multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, R S; Baaj, J; Khan, M U; Dammas, F A; Rashid, N

    2016-01-01

    Placenta accreta (an abnormally adherent placenta) is one of the two leading causes of peripartum hemorrhage and the most common indication for peripartum hysterectomy. Placenta accreta may be associated with significant maternal hemorrhage at delivery owing to the incomplete placental separation. When placenta accreta is diagnosed before delivery, a multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome.

  11. The Multidisciplinary Economics of Money Laundering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferwerda, J.

    2012-01-01

    Money laundering has been studied for many years, but mainly by lawyers and criminologists. This dissertation presents a number of ways on how an economist – mainly in a multidisciplinary fashion – can contribute to this field of research. This dissertation answers four important questions about mon

  12. New Approaches to HSCT Multidisciplinary Design and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrage, Daniel P.; Craig, James I.; Fulton, Robert E.; Mistree, Farrokh

    1999-01-01

    New approaches to MDO have been developed and demonstrated during this project on a particularly challenging aeronautics problem- HSCT Aeroelastic Wing Design. To tackle this problem required the integration of resources and collaboration from three Georgia Tech laboratories: ASDL, SDL, and PPRL, along with close coordination and participation from industry. Its success can also be contributed to the close interaction and involvement of fellows from the NASA Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization (MAO) program, which was going on in parallel, and provided additional resources to work the very complex, multidisciplinary problem, along with the methods being developed. The development of the Integrated Design Engineering Simulator (IDES) and its initial demonstration is a necessary first step in transitioning the methods and tools developed to larger industrial sized problems of interest. It also provides a framework for the implementation and demonstration of the methodology. Attachment: Appendix A - List of publications. Appendix B - Year 1 report. Appendix C - Year 2 report. Appendix D - Year 3 report. Appendix E - accompanying CDROM.

  13. Occupational Therapy in Multidisciplinary Residency in Family and Community Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzianne Feijó Alexandre Paiva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report the experiences of occupational therapist during the Multidisciplinary Residency Program in Family and Community Health in Fortaleza, Ceará state, Brazil. With the creation of the Support Center for Family Health – NASF, occupational therapists began to participate more effectively in the Family Health Strategy of the Brazilian National Health System. Given this rocess, the category, which historically has trained its professionals following the biomedical model, is faced with the challenge to build a new field of knowledge. Objective: To analyze the inclusion of occupational therapy in the Family Health Strategy within the scope of Multidisciplinary Residency. Methodology: This is a descriptive study of qualitative approach, which was based on the experience of four occupational therapy resident students, performed through the documental analysis of field diaries, scientific papers, and case studies produced between 2009 and 2011. Results: The occupational therapists as well as the other NASF professionals operated the logic of Matrix Support to the Family Health teams, sharing their knowledge and assisting in resolving complex cases of the families, groups, and communities served. In this context, we found people with different relationships with their doings and a reduced repertoire of activities. The occupational therapists invested in the creation or consolidation of groups in the Family Health Centers and in the territory, which also stood as living and socializing spaces, focusing on prevention and health promotion.

  14. A relational conceptual framework for multidisciplinary health research centre infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Joy L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although multidisciplinary and team-based approaches are increasingly acknowledged as necessary to address some of the most pressing contemporary health challenges, many researchers struggle with a lack of infrastructure to facilitate and formalise the requisite collaborations. Specialised research centres have emerged as an important organisational solution, yet centre productivity and sustainability are frequently dictated by the availability and security of infrastructure funds. Despite being widely cited as a core component of research capacity building, infrastructure as a discrete concept has been rather analytically neglected, often treated as an implicit feature of research environments with little specification or relegated to a narrow category of physical or administrative inputs. The terms research infrastructure, capacity, and culture, among others, are deployed in overlapping and inconsistent ways, further obfuscating the crucial functions of infrastructure specifically and its relationships with associated concepts. The case is made for an expanded conceptualisation of research infrastructure, one that moves beyond conventional 'hardware' notions. Drawing on a case analysis of NEXUS, a multidisciplinary health research centre based at the University of British Columbia, Canada, a conceptual framework is proposed that integrates the tangible and intangible structures that interactively underlie research centre functioning. A relational approach holds potential to allow for more comprehensive accounting of the returns on infrastructure investment. For those developing new research centres or seeking to reinvigorate existing ones, this framework may be a useful guide for both centre design and evaluation.

  15. Breast cancer in young women: special considerations in multidisciplinary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna C

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chantal Reyna, Marie Catherine Lee Comprehensive Breast Program, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in females, and 5%–7% of breast cancer cases occur in women under 40 years of age. Breast cancer in the young has gained increased attention with an attempt to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Young patients tend to have different epidemiology, presenting with later stages and more aggressive phenotypes. Diagnostic imaging is also more difficult in this age group. Multidisciplinary care generally encompasses surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and social workers. Other special considerations include reconstruction options, fertility, genetics, and psychosocial issues. These concerns enlarge the already diverse multidisciplinary team to incorporate new expertise, such as reproductive specialists and genetic counselors. This review encompasses an overview of the current multimodal treatment regimens and the unique challenges in treating this special population. Integration of diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues should be addressed and understood by each member in the interdisciplinary team in order to optimize outcomes. Keywords: diagnosis, interdisciplinary, quality of life, treatment, premenopausal, fertility preservation

  16. Multifidelity, multidisciplinary optimization of turbomachines with shock interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Michael Marie

    Research on high-speed air-breathing propulsion aims at developing aircraft with antipodal range and space access. Before reaching high speed at high altitude, the flight vehicle needs to accelerate from takeoff to scramjet takeover. Air turbo rocket engines combine turbojet and rocket engine cycles to provide the necessary thrust in the so-called low-speed regime. Challenges related to turbomachinery components are multidisciplinary, since both the high compression ratio compressor and the powering high-pressure turbine operate in the transonic regime in compact environments with strong shock interactions. Besides, lightweight is vital to avoid hindering the scramjet operation. Recent progress in evolutionary computing provides aerospace engineers with robust and efficient optimization algorithms to address concurrent objectives. The present work investigates Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) of innovative transonic turbomachinery components. Inter-stage aerodynamic shock interaction in turbomachines are known to generate high-cycle fatigue on the rotor blades compromising their structural integrity. A soft-computing strategy is proposed to mitigate the vane downstream distortion, and shown to successfully attenuate the unsteady forcing on the rotor of a high-pressure turbine. Counter-rotation offers promising prospects to reduce the weight of the machine, with fewer stages and increased load per row. An integrated approach based on increasing level of fidelity and aero-structural coupling is then presented and allows achieving a highly loaded compact counter-rotating compressor.

  17. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Mixer-Ejector Analysis and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Eric, S.; Seidel, Jonathan, A.

    2012-01-01

    The design of an engine for a civil supersonic aircraft presents a difficult multidisciplinary problem to propulsion system engineers. There are numerous competing requirements for the engine, such as to be efficient during cruise while yet quiet enough at takeoff to meet airport noise regulations. The use of mixer-ejector nozzles presents one possible solution to this challenge. However, designing a mixer-ejector which will successfully address both of these concerns is a difficult proposition. Presented in this paper is an integrated multidisciplinary approach to the analysis and design of these systems. A process that uses several low-fidelity tools to evaluate both the performance and acoustics of mixer-ejectors nozzles is described. This process is further expanded to include system-level modeling of engines and aircraft to determine the effects on mission performance and noise near airports. The overall process is developed in the OpenMDAO framework currently being developed by NASA. From the developed process, sample results are given for a notional mixer-ejector design, thereby demonstrating the capabilities of the method.

  18. The LUSI LAB project: a platform for multidisciplinary experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Adriano; Svensen, Henrik; Hensen, Christian; Scholz, Florian; Romeo, Giovanni; Hadi, Soffian; Husein, Alwi; Planke, Sverre; Akhmanov, Grigorii; Krueger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Lusi is a spectacular mud eruption that started in northeast Java the 29 of May 2006 following a 6.3 M earthquake. Nearly eight years later Lusi is still active. The Lusi Lab is an ERC-funded project to perform multidisciplinary studies using Lusi as a natural laboratory. This represents an unprecedented opportunity to study an ongoing active high-temperature mud eruption and to evaluate the role of seismicity, local faulting and the neighbouring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex on the long-lasting mud eruption. A multipurpose hexacopter has been designed and constructed to access and monitor the otherwise inaccessible Lusi crater and its mud-filled outskirts. The "Lusi drone" showed to be a powerful monitoring and sampling tool duringteh fieldwork in Dec. 2013. Videos and photogrammetry were acquired with various cameras. Designed tools allow the drone to measure and log temperature and to complete remote-controlled sampling of mud, water and gas from the erupting crater. A collection of evenly spaced mud samples has been taken along a transect that extends for 1100 m outside the crater. The incubation of these will be used for geomicrobiological studies and will help to shed light on the type of the ongoing hydrocarbon generation and degradation. A network of temperature loggers deployed around the crater aims to investigate a correlation between seismic activity and temperature variation of the erupted mud. Geochemical analyses indicate that the geochemistry of the crater water represents a geochemical anomaly when comparing with both basinal brines and volcano-hosted hot springs. A combination of high temperatures in the source region and fluid-rock interactions with silicates and carbonate-rich lithologies can explain the geochemistry. This is consistent with the result of gas analyses and with a deep-seated (>4 km) source region, possibly related to the presence of hot igneous intrusions from the volcanic arc.

  19. Mimicking Bone - Chemical and Physical Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie C Cox

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It is known that chemical and physical features of bone contribute to its functionality, reactivity and mechanical performance. This fundamental rationale underpins the author’s research strategy. This paper presents a summary of efforts to fabricate a synthetic structure, referred to as a scaffold, that both chemically and physical emulates the intricate structure of bone. An understanding of key features of bone tissue that contribute to its remarkable properties is presented as a background to this work. Novel work aimed at improving the understanding of the synthesis of a ceramic biomaterial, namely hydroxyapatite, that is chemically similar to bone mineral is discussed. A case study involving the manufacture of porous scaffolds by 3D printing is also presented. In summary, this article highlights a number of on-going challenges that multidisciplinary tissue engineers aim to solve to get one step closer to mimicking bone, which clinically could improve the quality of life for millions of people worldwide.  Photo credit: By Doc. RNDr. Josef Reischig, CSc. (Author's archive [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

  20. Need for multidisciplinary research towards a second green revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenweber, Bernd; Porter, John R; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Despite recent achievements in conventional plant breeding and genomics, the rate of increase of crop yields is declining and thus there is a need for a second green revolution. Advances within single disciplines, alone, cannot solve the challenges of increasing yield. As scientific disciplines have become increasingly diversified, a more complete understanding of the mechanisms by which genetic and environmental variation modify grain yield and composition is needed, so that specific quantitative and quality targets can be identified. To achieve this aim, the expertise of plant genomics, physiology and agronomy, as well as recently developed plant modelling techniques, must be combined. There has been recent progress in these individual disciplines, but multidisciplinary approaches must be implemented to tackle drought stress and salinity as major constraints to achieving sufficient grain yield in the future.

  1. Multidisciplinary collaboration as a sustainable research model for device development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ankur

    2013-02-01

    The concurrent problems of research sustainability and decreased clinician involvement with medical device development can be jointly addressed through a novel, multidisciplinary solution. The University of Rochester Cardiovascular Device Design Program is a sustainable program in medical device design supported through a collaboration between the Schools of Medicine and Engineering. This article provides a detailed description of the motivation for starting the program, the current structure of the program, the methods of financial sustainability, and the direct impact it intends to have on the national vascular surgery community. The further expansion of this program and encouragement for development of similar programs throughout the country aims to address many of our current challenges in both research funding and device development education.

  2. Multidisciplinary Approach for Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Fröhlich, Hanna; Cleland, John G F

    2015-10-01

    Acute heart failure describes the rapid deterioration, over minutes, days or hours, of symptoms and signs of heart failure. Its management is an interdisciplinary challenge that requires the cooperation of various specialists. While emergency providers, (interventional) cardiologists, heart surgeons, and intensive care specialists collaborate in the initial stabilization of acute heart failure patients, the involvement of nurses, discharge managers, and general practitioners in the heart failure team may facilitate the transition from inpatient care to the outpatient setting and improve acute heart failure readmission rates. This review highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to acute heart failure with particular focus on the chain-of-care delivered by the various services within the healthcare system. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Locally advanced rectal cancer: the importance of a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Rossana; Maccaroni, Elena; Onofri, Azzurra; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Tiberi, Michela; Ferrini, Consuelo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-12-14

    Rectal cancer accounts for a relevant part of colorectal cancer cases, with a mortality of 4-10/100000 per year. The development of locoregional recurrences and the occurrence of distant metastases both influences the prognosis of these patients. In the last two decades, new multimodality strategies have improved the prognosis of locally advanced rectal cancer with a significant reduction of local relapse and an increase in terms of overall survival. Radical surgery still remains the principal curative treatment and the introduction of total mesorectal excision has significantly achieved a reduction in terms of local recurrence rates. The employment of neoadjuvant treatment, delivered before surgery, also achieved an improved local control and an increased sphincter preservation rate in low-lying tumors, with an acceptable acute and late toxicity. This review describes the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, focusing on the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and of post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy both in the standard combined modality treatment programs and in the ongoing research to improve these regimens.

  4. Energy efficiency and the law: A multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willemien du Plessis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available South Africa is an energy-intensive country. The inefficient use of, mostly, coal-generated energy is the cause of South Africa's per capita contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, pollution and environmental degradation and negative health impacts. The inefficient use of the country's energy also amounts to the injudicious use of natural resources. Improvements in energy efficiency are an important strategy to stabilise the country's energy crisis. Government responded to this challenge by introducing measures such as policies and legislation to change energy consumption patterns by, amongst others, incentivising the transition to improved energy efficiencies. A central tenet underpinning this review is that the law and energy nexus requires a multidisciplinary approach as well as a multi-pronged adoption of diverse policy instruments to effectively transform the country's energy use patterns. Numerous, innovative instruments are introduced by relevant legislation to encourage the transformation of energy generation and consumption patterns of South Africans. One such innovative instrument is the ISO 50001 energy management standard. It is a voluntary instrument, to plan for, measure and verify energy-efficiency improvements. These improvements may also trigger tax concessions. In this paper, the nature and extent of the various policy instruments and legislation that relate to energy efficiency are explored, while the interactions between the law and the voluntary ISO 50001 standard and between the law and the other academic disciplines are highlighted. The introduction of energy-efficiency measures into law requires a multidisciplinary approach, as lawyers may be challenged to address the scientific and technical elements that characterise these legal measures and instruments. Inputs by several other disciplines such as engineering, mathematics or statistics, accounting, environmental management and auditing may be needed. Law is often

  5. A multidisciplinary approach for improving outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierchio, Grace P

    2003-01-01

    The healthcare environment has been impacted tremendously by higher patient acuity, cost-cutting measures, an increase in litigation, and increased expectations by an educated generation of healthcare consumers. This has led to the need to continually measure, assess, and improve quality. These activities must consider not only patient clinical outcomes, but also customer service ratings and financial outcomes. Quality improvement requires a collaborative approach to succeed, and the need to build a cohesive and effective multidisciplinary team is critical for positive outcomes. Strategies to build a culture of teamwork include incorporating total quality management principles into every level of the organization, seeking participation from every discipline and level of the organization, and recognizing employees for their efforts. Infusion nurses have an excellent opportunity to contribute their expertise to any multidisciplinary team that impacts the outcomes of infusion patients. In addition, team-building and quality improvement may prove to be excellent career moves for infusion nurses looking to further specialize their practice.

  6. Multidisciplinary Optimization Methods for Aircraft Preliminary Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroo, Ilan; Altus, Steve; Braun, Robert; Gage, Peter; Sobieski, Ian

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a research program aimed at improved methods for multidisciplinary design and optimization of large-scale aeronautical systems. The research involves new approaches to system decomposition, interdisciplinary communication, and methods of exploiting coarse-grained parallelism for analysis and optimization. A new architecture, that involves a tight coupling between optimization and analysis, is intended to improve efficiency while simplifying the structure of multidisciplinary, computation-intensive design problems involving many analysis disciplines and perhaps hundreds of design variables. Work in two areas is described here: system decomposition using compatibility constraints to simplify the analysis structure and take advantage of coarse-grained parallelism; and collaborative optimization, a decomposition of the optimization process to permit parallel design and to simplify interdisciplinary communication requirements.

  7. The Multidisciplinary Economics of Money Laundering

    OpenAIRE

    J. Ferwerda

    2012-01-01

    Money laundering has been studied for many years, but mainly by lawyers and criminologists. This dissertation presents a number of ways on how an economist – mainly in a multidisciplinary fashion – can contribute to this field of research. This dissertation answers four important questions about money laundering: Why should we fight money laundering? How is money laundered? In which sectors is money laundered? And how can we fight money laundering? The literature mentions 25 effects of money ...

  8. An architecture for integration of multidisciplinary models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belete, Getachew F.; Voinov, Alexey; Holst, Niels

    2014-01-01

    , integration of models requires us to address technical, semantic, and dataset aspects of interoperability. So we need a genuine techniques that enable us to integrate various domain specific models for interdisciplinary study. In this research work, we investigated best practices of System Integration......Integrating multidisciplinary models requires linking models: that may operate at different temporal and spatial scales; developed using different methodologies, tools and techniques; different levels of complexity; calibrated for different ranges of inputs and outputs, etc. On the other hand...

  9. [Multidisciplinary oncology teams: beware of endless discussions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giard, Raimond W M

    2010-01-01

    The continual and increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment options in oncology demands careful communication, coordination and decision making. Cancer care could be improved by multidisciplinary teamwork. Although this sort of teamwork has many advantages in theory, we know very little about its effectiveness in practice. We have to answer questions such as how teams can accomplish their task most effectively and how we must manage organizations in such a way that team-based working contributes optimally to organizational effectiveness.

  10. The Multidisciplinary Economics of Money Laundering

    OpenAIRE

    J. Ferwerda

    2012-01-01

    Money laundering has been studied for many years, but mainly by lawyers and criminologists. This dissertation presents a number of ways on how an economist – mainly in a multidisciplinary fashion – can contribute to this field of research. This dissertation answers four important questions about money laundering: Why should we fight money laundering? How is money laundered? In which sectors is money laundered? And how can we fight money laundering? The literature mentions 25 effects of money ...

  11. Multidisciplinary training of cancer specialists in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benstead, Kim; Turhal, Nazim Serdar; O'Higgins, Niall

    2017-01-01

    The best care for patients with cancer is most likely to be achieved when decisions about diagnosis, staging and treatment are made at multidisciplinary and multiprofessional meetings, preferably when all the professional expertise relevant to the patient's condition is gathered together. Questio...... surgeons training in cancer surgery) is recommended. This is likely to improve the value of multidisciplinary meetings and may result in improved patient care. The Expert Group on Cancer Control of the European Commission has endorsed this recommendation........ Questionnaires were sent to National Societies of Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology concerning similarities and differences in training programs and multidisciplinary care in member states in Europe. Results indicated wide variation in training systems and practice. Data were lacking for Surgery because...... Surgical Oncology is not recognised as a speciality in the EU and most specialist training in cancer surgery is organ based. A period of time in cross-disciplinary training in each of the other two disciplines for all trainees in Medical Oncology, Radiation Oncology and Surgical Oncology (including all...

  12. Multidisciplinary team interaction: summary and Action Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, B; Bugslag, R; González Del Castillo, B; Hastings, P; Kipor, G V; Lee, S W; Lo, C B; Poles, L; Robinson, P; Ronquillo, E L; Staña, J; Sydor, J; Thani, H

    2001-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team interaction has become a commonplace phrase in the discussion of disaster response. Theme 6 explored multidisciplinary team interactions and attempted to identify some of the key issues and possible solutions to the seemingly intractable problems inherent in this endeavour. Details of the methods used are provided in the introductory paper. The Cochairs moderated all presentations and produced a summary that was presented to an assembly of all of the delegates. The Cochairs then presided over a workshop that resulted in the generation of a set of Action Plans that then were reported to the collective group of all delegates. Main points developed during the presentations and discussion included: (1) promotion of multidisciplinary collaboration, (2) standardization, (3) the Incident Command System, (4) professionalism, (5) regional disparities, and (6) psychosocial impact. Action plans recommended: (1) a standardized template for Needs Assessment be developed, implemented, and applied using collaboration with international organizations, focusing on needs and criteria appropriate to each type of event, and (2) team needs assessments be recognized for local responses and for determination of when international assistance may be required, for planning a command system, and for evaluating the psychosocial impact. There is a clear need for the development of standardized methods for the assessment of needs, development and implementation of a command structure, and for appreciation of regional differences and the psychosocial impact of all interventions.

  13. Exploring Forms of Triangulation to Facilitate Collaborative Research Practice: Reflections From a Multidisciplinary Research Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Tiainen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This article contains critical reflections of a multidisciplinary research group studying the human and technological dynamics around some newly offered electronic services in a specific rural area of Finland. For their research, the group adopted ethnography. On facing the challenges of doing ethnographic research in a multidisciplinary setting, the group evolved its own breed of research practice based on multiple forms of triangulation. This implied the use of multiple data sources, methods, theories, and researchers, in different combinations. One of the outcomes of the work is a model for collaborative research. It highlights, among others, the importance of creating a climate for collaboration within the research group and following a process of individual and collaborative writing to achieve the potential benefits of such research. The article also identifies a set of remaining challenges relevant to collaborative research.

  14. Management Considerations for Ongoing Pregnancies Complicated by Trisomy 13 and 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Kuller, Jeffrey A; Grace, Matthew R; Laifer, Steven A; Strauss, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Pregnancies complicated by trisomy 13 (T13) or trisomy 18 (T18) present unique challenges for obstetric management. From the initial diagnosis, the task of counseling these women and families is difficult because fetal and neonatal outcomes vary depending on the phenotype and degree of intervention chosen by the family. A literature review was performed using PubMed to gather information regarding obstetric management and outcomes of pregnancies complicated by T13 and T18. Spontaneous abortion and in uterofetal demise occur at rates well above those seen in chromosomally normal pregnancies. In addition, infants with T13 or T18 frequently have structural anomalies, which lead to worse prognoses and long-term survival. In cases in which a woman and her family desire to continue the pregnancy, multidisciplinary consultation with obstetrics, social work, genetics, and pediatrics can optimize care of both the fetus and the mother. Most commonly, prenatal care does not differ from routine. A detailed delivery plan should be generated, specifically discussing interventions for the patient and her fetus. When managing pregnancies complicated by T13 and T18, active, open, and frequent communication between the patient, her family, and a multidisciplinary health care team throughout the pregnancy is crucial.

  15. The Multi-disciplinary Nature of Reading—A Personal Journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Chase, PhD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many optometric patients have reading difficulties, and the road to becoming an efficient reader can be long and challenging for them and their families. Here we would like to tell the story of a young professional who, as an adult, comes to understand her lifelong reading difficulties through the treatment of both visual and non-visual problems. Her story highlights the need for multidisciplinary care for patients who struggle with reading.

  16. Ongoing Slow Fluctuations in V1 Impact on Visual Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlschläger, Afra M; Glim, Sarah; Shao, Junming; Draheim, Johanna; Köhler, Lina; Lourenço, Susana; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human brain's ongoing activity is characterized by intrinsic networks of coherent fluctuations, measured for example with correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. So far, however, the brain processes underlying this ongoing blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal orchestration and their direct relevance for human behavior are not sufficiently understood. In this study, we address the question of whether and how ongoing BOLD activity within intrinsic occipital networks impacts on conscious visual perception. To this end, backwardly masked targets were presented in participants' left visual field only, leaving the ipsi-lateral occipital areas entirely free from direct effects of task throughout the experiment. Signal time courses of ipsi-lateral BOLD fluctuations in visual areas V1 and V2 were then used as proxies for the ongoing contra-lateral BOLD activity within the bilateral networks. Magnitude and phase of these fluctuations were compared in trials with and without conscious visual perception, operationalized by means of subjective confidence ratings. Our results show that ipsi-lateral BOLD magnitudes in V1 were significantly higher at times of peak response when the target was perceived consciously. A significant difference between conscious and non-conscious perception with regard to the pre-target phase of an intrinsic-frequency regime suggests that ongoing V1 fluctuations exert a decisive impact on the access to consciousness already before stimulation. Both effects were absent in V2. These results thus support the notion that ongoing slow BOLD activity within intrinsic networks covering V1 represents localized processes that modulate the degree of readiness for the emergence of visual consciousness.

  17. Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor C

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cath Taylor,1 Amanda Shewbridge,2 Jenny Harris,1 James S Green3,4 1Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London, London UK; 2Breast Cancer Services, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 3Department of Urology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK; 4Department of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University, London, UK Abstract: The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT-work for breast cancer management has in part evolved due to the increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment decision-making. An MDT approach aims to bring together the range of specialists required to discuss and agree treatment recommendations and ongoing management for individual patients. MDTs are resource-intensive yet we lack strong (randomized controlled trial evidence of their effectiveness. Clinical consensus is generally favorable on the benefits of effective specialist MDT-work. Many studies have shown the benefits of receiving treatment from a specialist center, and evidence continues to accrue from comparative studies of clinical benefits of an MDT approach, including improved survival. Patients’ views of the MDT model of decision-making (and in particular its impact on involvement in decisions about their care have been under-researched. Barriers to effective teamwork and poor decision-making include excessive caseload, low attendance at meetings, lack of leadership, poor communication, role ambiguity, and failure to consider patients’ holistic needs. Breast cancer nurses have a key role in relation to assessing holistic needs, and their specialist contribution has also been associated with improved patient experience and quality of life. This paper examines the evidence for the benefits of MDT-work, in particular for breast cancer. Evidence is considered within a context of growing cancer incidence at a time of increased financial restraint, and it may now be important to

  18. High School Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Concepts: An Ongoing Challenge for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damanhuri, Muhd Ibrahim Muhamad; Treagust, David F.; Won, Mihye; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Using a quantitative case study design, the "Acids-Bases Chemistry Achievement Test" ("ABCAT") was developed to evaluate the extent to which students in Malaysian secondary schools achieved the intended curriculum on acid-base concepts. Responses were obtained from 260 Form 5 (Grade 11) students from five schools to initially…

  19. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcal Food-Borne Disease: An Ongoing Challenge in Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhalka Kadariya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal food-borne disease (SFD is one of the most common food-borne diseases worldwide resulting from the contamination of food by preformed S. aureus enterotoxins. It is one of the most common causes of reported food-borne diseases in the United States. Although several Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs have been identified, SEA, a highly heat-stable SE, is the most common cause of SFD worldwide. Outbreak investigations have found that improper food handling practices in the retail industry account for the majority of SFD outbreaks. However, several studies have documented prevalence of S. aureus in many food products including raw retail meat indicating that consumers are at potential risk of S. aureus colonization and subsequent infection. Presence of pathogens in food products imposes potential hazard for consumers and causes grave economic loss and loss in human productivity via food-borne disease. Symptoms of SFD include nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps with or without diarrhea. Preventive measures include safe food handling and processing practice, maintaining cold chain, adequate cleaning and disinfection of equipment, prevention of cross-contamination in home and kitchen, and prevention of contamination from farm to fork. This paper provides a brief overview of SFD, contributing factors, risk that it imposes to the consumers, current research gaps, and preventive measures.

  20. How nursing managers respond to intraprofessional aggression: novel strategies to an ongoing challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Nursing managers are identified as playing a central role in workplace aggression management. In effect, employees' decisions to report unacceptable behavior is said to be directly influenced by how a manager will respond to their claims. Using principles from critical nursing ethnography, data were collected from interviews, organizational documents, and observation of physical environment. Twenty-three semistructured interviews were conducted in both a university-affiliated psychiatric hospital and a community hospital located in a large metropolitan city in Ontario. The study aimed at broadening the understanding of how nurse managers respond to intraprofessional and interprofessional workplace aggression. Several strategies were described by managers including coaching individuals so they feel capable of addressing the issue themselves, acting as mediator to allow both sides to openly and respectfully talk about the issue, and disciplining employees whose actions warrant harsh consequences. As part of the study, managers reported that dealing with workplace aggression could be difficult and time consuming and admitted that they sometimes came to doubt their abilities to be able to positively resolve such a widespread problem. Conclusions drawn from the study suggest that aggression management is not solely the responsibility of managers but must involve several actors including the aggressive individual, peers, human resources department, and unions.

  1. Islet Transplantation in Type 1 Diabetes: Ongoing Challenges, Refined Procedures, and Long-Term Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, A M James

    2012-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in islet transplantation over a span of 40 years. Once just an experimental curiosity in mice, this therapy has moved forward, and can now provide robust therapy for highly selected patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), refractory to stabilization by other means. This progress could not have occurred without extensive dynamic international collaboration. Currently, 1,085 patients have undergone islet transplantation at 40 international sites since the Edmonton...

  2. Council of the Classroom : the benefits of ongoing teacher education and the challenges facing the profession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erculj, Justina; Snoek, Marco

    2011-01-01

    In een artikel in ‘Public Servive Review’ schetsen Justina Erculj en Marco Snoek de uitdagingen ten aanzien van lerarenkwaliteit en lerarenopleidingen in Europa. Daarbij vragen ze aandacht voor inductie van leraren (begeleiding van beginnende leraren), onderzoek als strategie voor professionele ontw

  3. Staphylococcus aureus and staphylococcal food-borne disease: an ongoing challenge in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadariya, Jhalka; Smith, Tara C; Thapaliya, Dipendra

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal food-borne disease (SFD) is one of the most common food-borne diseases worldwide resulting from the contamination of food by preformed S. aureus enterotoxins. It is one of the most common causes of reported food-borne diseases in the United States. Although several Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) have been identified, SEA, a highly heat-stable SE, is the most common cause of SFD worldwide. Outbreak investigations have found that improper food handling practices in the retail industry account for the majority of SFD outbreaks. However, several studies have documented prevalence of S. aureus in many food products including raw retail meat indicating that consumers are at potential risk of S. aureus colonization and subsequent infection. Presence of pathogens in food products imposes potential hazard for consumers and causes grave economic loss and loss in human productivity via food-borne disease. Symptoms of SFD include nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps with or without diarrhea. Preventive measures include safe food handling and processing practice, maintaining cold chain, adequate cleaning and disinfection of equipment, prevention of cross-contamination in home and kitchen, and prevention of contamination from farm to fork. This paper provides a brief overview of SFD, contributing factors, risk that it imposes to the consumers, current research gaps, and preventive measures.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcal Food-Borne Disease: An Ongoing Challenge in Public Health

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal food-borne disease (SFD) is one of the most common food-borne diseases worldwide resulting from the contamination of food by preformed S. aureus enterotoxins. It is one of the most common causes of reported food-borne diseases in the United States. Although several Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) have been identified, SEA, a highly heat-stable SE, is the most common cause of SFD worldwide. Outbreak investigations have found that improper food handling practices in the retail ...

  5. Modernising Dutch Heritage Conservation: Current Progress and Ongoing Challenges for Heritage-Based Planning and Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, Dutch heritage conservation shifted from a preservationist and object-focused to an area-based and development-oriented activity. Today's heritage management looks not only at the monument itself, but at its spatial context. The Belvedere Memorandum in 1999 has played a key ro

  6. [Neglected infectious diseases: an ongoing challenge for public health and equity in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas-Sánchez, César

    2014-04-01

    Neglected Infectious Diseases (NID) affect more than one billion people worldwide, and are associated with poverty, geographic isolation of populations, social stigma, lack of precise data on estimates on both the global and local burden of disease (underreporting of the diseases), inadequate financial and political resources to effective control measures, lack of lobbying on behalf of the most vulnerable population, as well as scarce drug and diagnostic methods development. In this article we describe the relationship between NID, poverty and inequality, we propose a new concept of disease in the tropics, expanding the list of diseases that share characteristics with NID in the Peruvian context, discuss the limited availability of drugs and diagnostic tests to properly deal with these diseases, as well as highlight the contributions by the Peruvian National Institute of Health, and as final thoughts, we state that the solution for the prevention and control of NID must include an integrated approach, including the social determinants of health in the context of the fight against poverty and inequality.

  7. Fatigue of Nitinol: The state-of-the-art and ongoing challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtabi, M J; Shamsaei, Nima; Mitchell, M R

    2015-10-01

    Nitinol, a nearly equiatomic alloy of nickel and titanium, has been considered for a wide range of applications including medical and dental devices and implants as well as aerospace and automotive components and structures. The realistic loading condition in many of these applications is cyclic; therefore, fatigue is often the main failure mode for such components and structures. The fatigue behavior of Nitinol involves many more complexities compared with traditional metal alloys arising from its uniqueness in material properties such as superelasticity and shape memory effects. In this paper, a review of the present state-of-the-art on the fatigue behavior of superelastic Nitinol is presented. Various aspects of fatigue of Nitinol are discussed and microstructural effects are explained. Effects of material preparation and testing conditions are also reviewed. Finally, several conclusions are made and recommendations for future works are offered.

  8. Issues and Strategies for Establishing Work-Integrated Learning for Multidisciplinary Teams: A Focus on Degrees in Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robyn Fay

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify challenges and potential strategies to streamline work-integrated learning placements for multidisciplinary teams of students undertaking degrees in sustainability. Face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire were conducted with 15 academics and senior university staff, from four universities…

  9. Sensitivity Analysis of Multidisciplinary Rotorcraft Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Diskin, Boris; Biedron, Robert T.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Bauchau, Olivier A.

    2017-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis of rotorcraft simulations involving tightly coupled high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics and comprehensive analysis solvers is presented and evaluated. An unstructured sensitivity-enabled Navier-Stokes solver, FUN3D, and a nonlinear flexible multibody dynamics solver, DYMORE, are coupled to predict the aerodynamic loads and structural responses of helicopter rotor blades. A discretely-consistent adjoint-based sensitivity analysis available in FUN3D provides sensitivities arising from unsteady turbulent flows and unstructured dynamic overset meshes, while a complex-variable approach is used to compute DYMORE structural sensitivities with respect to aerodynamic loads. The multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis is conducted through integrating the sensitivity components from each discipline of the coupled system. Numerical results verify accuracy of the FUN3D/DYMORE system by conducting simulations for a benchmark rotorcraft test model and comparing solutions with established analyses and experimental data. Complex-variable implementation of sensitivity analysis of DYMORE and the coupled FUN3D/DYMORE system is verified by comparing with real-valued analysis and sensitivities. Correctness of adjoint formulations for FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces is verified by comparing adjoint-based and complex-variable sensitivities. Finally, sensitivities of the lift and drag functions obtained by complex-variable FUN3D/DYMORE simulations are compared with sensitivities computed by the multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis, which couples adjoint-based flow and grid sensitivities of FUN3D and FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces with complex-variable sensitivities of DYMORE structural responses.

  10. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface MM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Megan M Boniface,1 Sachin B Wani,2 Tracey E Schefter,3 Phillip J Koo,4 Cheryl Meguid,1 Stephen Leong,5 Jeffrey B Kaplan,6 Lisa J Wingrove,7 Martin D McCarter1 1Section of Surgical Oncology, Division of GI, Tumor and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Therapeutic and Interventional Endoscopy, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, 4Division of Radiology-Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, 5Division of Medical Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Denver, 7Department of Food and Nutrition Services, University of Colorado Hospital Cancer Center, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical, and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Keywords: tumor board, upper gastrointestinal malignancies, patient centered

  11. The role of the multidisciplinary team in antifungal stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Samir; Barnes, Rosemary; Brüggemann, Roger J; Rautemaa-Richardson, Riina; Warris, Adilia

    2016-11-01

    There are a variety of challenges faced in the management of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), including high case-fatality rates, high cost of antifungal drugs and development of antifungal resistance. The diagnostic challenges and poor outcomes associated with IFD have resulted in excessive empirical use of antifungals in various hospital settings, exposing many patients without IFD to potential drug toxicities as well as causing spiralling antifungal drug costs. Further complexity arises as different patient groups show marked variation in their risk for IFD, fungal epidemiology, sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests and the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antifungal drugs. To address these issues and to ensure optimal management of IFD, specialist knowledge and experience from a range of backgrounds is required, which extends beyond the remit of most antibiotic stewardship programmes. The first step in the development of any antifungal stewardship (AFS) programme is to build a multidisciplinary team encompassing the necessary expertise in the management of IFD to develop and implement the AFS programme. The specific roles of the key individuals within the AFS team and the importance of collaboration are discussed in this article.

  12. Multidisciplinary meetings as an effective clinical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallam, Jackie; Higgins, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    When used well, multidisciplinary meetings can function in the same way as other clinical interventions to improve communication, efficiency and outcomes. They help break down barriers, manage difficult emotions, and benefit service users and staff. But it is imperative that they are well prepared, well attended, and that the purpose and agenda are agreed. It is also vital to have an efficient chair and that meetings take place in an environment where feelings can be shared openly and respected. Services should recognise and address relevant training and support requirements.

  13. Multidisciplinary Graduate Education in Bioprocess Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Eiteman

    2006-04-18

    This report describes the accomplishments of the University of Georgia in establishing an academic program geared toward the emerging biobased products industry. By virtue of its strengths and structure, the University of Georgia is particularly well-suited for developing a program focused on plant- and microbial-based bioproducts, and it was in this general area that this program was developed. The program had several unique characteristics. First, we implemented a distinguished lecture series that brought outstanding scientists and engineers to our University to interact with students and share their vision of the biobased economy. Second, we offered industrially-oriented and multidisciplinary courses that provided students with a broad background on various facets of biobased business and technology. Third, we provided the students with opportunities to expand beyond the classroom by engaging in research lab rotations and industrial internships. Fourth, each student was engaged in a creative research project as led by a multidisciplinary faculty team. Throughout the implementation of these activities, we maintained a student-centered, mentoring approach to education. The most tangible outcome of this project was the graduation of two students who participated in a variety of scholarly activities, culminating in research toward the completion of a thesis and dissertation. Both research projects involved the use of microorganisms to produce industrial products from agricultural substrates via fermentation processes. The research advanced our understanding of microorganisms as used for industrial processes and products, as described in several articles published in scholarly journals and presentations made at scientific conferences (see information on pp. 14-15). Another outcome is one graduate course, Fermentation Engineering Laboratory, which is a unique experiential and multidisciplinary course. This course will be offered in the future as an elective to

  14. Climate Change: A Multidisciplinary Approach, Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk-Davidoff, Daniel

    2008-07-01

    William Burroughs, who died in November 2007, was a wonderfully clear and evocative writer. Chapter 3 of his last work, Climate Change: A Multidisciplinary Approach, begins with the loveliest four-paragraph description of the general circulation of the Earth's atmosphere I have ever encountered. His writing also shines in his descriptions of the climate record of the past few thousand years, and in his introduction to the measurement of climate change. Unfortunately, the book is marred by inconsistencies in its treatment of climate dynamics, as well as by a number of idiosyncratic choices of emphasis that detract from the book's quality as a general introduction to the science of climate change.

  15. Multidisciplinary Techniques and Novel Aircraft Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Rogers, James L.; Raney, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The Aircraft Morphing Program at NASA Langley Research Center explores opportunities to improve airframe designs with smart technologies. Two elements of this basic research program are multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) and advanced flow control. This paper describes examples where MDO techniques such as sensitivity analysis, automatic differentiation, and genetic algorithms contribute to the design of novel control systems. In the test case, the design and use of distributed shape-change devices to provide low-rate maneuvering capability for a tailless aircraft is considered. The ability of MDO to add value to control system development is illustrated using results from several years of research funded by the Aircraft Morphing Program.

  16. A multidisciplinary approach to short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegri, Andrea; Paparo, Francesco; Denegri, Roberto; Revelli, Matteo; Frascio, Marco; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; Fornaro, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a complex clinical picture, characterized by signs and symptoms of malabsorption and subsequent malnutrition, which often occurs after extensive bowel resections. Short bowel syndrome's treatment must begin together with the planning of the first surgery, especially for disease that may need multiple interventions. Patients with short bowel should be individually managed because they all are different in diagnosis, length of the remaining bowel and in psychosocial characteristics. For all these reasons, a multidisciplinary approach between the various specialists is therefore needed.

  17. Multidisciplinary design optimization in computational mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Breitkopf, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the mathematical and algorithmic methods for the Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) of complex mechanical systems such as aircraft or car engines. We have focused on the presentation of strategies efficiently and economically managing the different levels of complexity in coupled disciplines (e.g. structure, fluid, thermal, acoustics, etc.), ranging from Reduced Order Models (ROM) to full-scale Finite Element (FE) or Finite Volume (FV) simulations. Particular focus is given to the uncertainty quantification and its impact on the robus

  18. Fast adjustments of ongoing movements in spastic hemiparesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiel, E. van; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.; Smeets, J.B.J.; Hulstijn, W.

    2002-01-01

    The present study focuses on the ability of participants with spastic hemiparesis caused by cerebral palsy to adjust an ongoing movement. Typical symptoms associated with the disorder would lead one to expect that people with spastic hemiparesis would be unable to adjust their movements quickly and

  19. Overview of ongoing cohort and dietary studies in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Pál; Bjerregaard, Peter; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the ongoing cohort and dietary studies underlying the assessment of population health in the Arctic. The emphasis here is on a description of the material, methods and results or preliminary results for each study. Detailed exposure information is available in an...

  20. Fast adjustments of ongoing movements in spastic hemiparesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiel, E. van; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.; Smeets, J.B.J.; Hulstijn, W.

    2002-01-01

    The present study focuses on the ability of participants with spastic hemiparesis caused by cerebral palsy to adjust an ongoing movement. Typical symptoms associated with the disorder would lead one to expect that people with spastic hemiparesis would be unable to adjust their movements quickly and

  1. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  2. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  3. Atmospheric sulfur loading by the ongoing Nornahraun eruption, North Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Hartley, Margaret

    2015-04-01

    The ongoing Nornahraun fissure eruption has maintained a 1-4 km-high, gas-charged and sulfur-rich eruption plume since the onset of eruption on 31 August 2014 and had discharged ~1 km3 of lava at the end of 2014. During this time (i.e. September through December 2014), the SO2 emissions have produced significant volcanic pollution across Iceland with several short-lived events where the SO2 concentrations have exceeded toxic levels [1]. Although measurements of SO2 concentrations and fluxes is relatively straightforward at specific sites or localities within Iceland, it has been challenging to obtain good ground- or satellite-based time series measurements of the SO2 flux released by the magma upon venting. These difficulties arise because: (i) the eruption site is remote and nested in the centre of the Icelandic highland, thus these measurements are hampered by access and by weather conditions, (ii) the plume is confined to the lower troposphere where the conversion rate of SO2 to H2SO4 aerosols is very rapid, or hours (?) to days [2] and (iii) the plume is commonly obscured by clouds due of its low rise heights. The empirical sulphur emission method of Thordarson et al (2003) is an alternative way to obtain estimates on the total as well as temporal atmospheric SO2-loading by the Nornahraun eruption. We use the TiO2/FeO value of 0.156, obtained via microprobe analyses of groundmass glass in tephra grains, to calculate initial (1420 ppm) and degassed (435 ppm) S values for the Nornahraun magma. These values compare well with measured groundmass values (425 ppm = degassed S content) and melt inclusion values (~1400 ppm = initial S content of the magma). The difference in the above listed values represents the amount of S released into the atmosphere at the vents and indicates a 5.3 kg SO2-loading by each cubic meter of erupted magma. This implies a total atmospheric SO2-mass-loading of 5 million tons (= 5 terragrams) by the Nornahraun event during the first 4

  4. Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cath; Shewbridge, Amanda; Harris, Jenny; Green, James S

    2013-01-01

    The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT)-work for breast cancer management has in part evolved due to the increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment decision-making. An MDT approach aims to bring together the range of specialists required to discuss and agree treatment recommendations and ongoing management for individual patients. MDTs are resource-intensive yet we lack strong (randomized controlled trial) evidence of their effectiveness. Clinical consensus is generally favorable on the benefits of effective specialist MDT-work. Many studies have shown the benefits of receiving treatment from a specialist center, and evidence continues to accrue from comparative studies of clinical benefits of an MDT approach, including improved survival. Patients' views of the MDT model of decision-making (and in particular its impact on involvement in decisions about their care) have been under-researched. Barriers to effective teamwork and poor decision-making include excessive caseload, low attendance at meetings, lack of leadership, poor communication, role ambiguity, and failure to consider patients' holistic needs. Breast cancer nurses have a key role in relation to assessing holistic needs, and their specialist contribution has also been associated with improved patient experience and quality of life. This paper examines the evidence for the benefits of MDT-work, in particular for breast cancer. Evidence is considered within a context of growing cancer incidence at a time of increased financial restraint, and it may now be important to reevaluate the structure and models of MDT-work to ensure that MDTs are an efficient use of resources.

  5. Opus: A Coordination Language for Multidisciplinary Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Chapman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Data parallel languages, such as High Performance Fortran, can be successfully applied to a wide range of numerical applications.However, many advanced scientific and engineering applications are multidisciplinary and heterogeneous in nature, and thus do not fit well into the data parallel paradigm. In this paper we present Opus, a language designed to fill this gap. The central concept of Opus is a mechanism called ShareD Abstractions (SDA. An SDA can be used as a computation server, i.e., a locus of computational activity, or as a data repository for sharing data between asynchronous tasks. SDAs can be internally data parallel, providing support for the integration of data and task parallelism as well as nested task parallelism. They can thus be used to express multidisciplinary applications in a natural and efficient way. In this paper we describe the features of the language through a series of examples and give an overview of the runtime support required to implement these concepts in parallel and distributed environments.

  6. Photogrammetry Education for Multidisciplinary Geomatics in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Qing

    2006-01-01

    After briefly reviews the history of photogrammetry education in China, the development of undergraduate and graduate program, and the corresponding curricula design are analyzed by use of the data from Wuhan University in which the photogrammetry is awarded as the state-level key discipline. The academic educational program of photogrammetry in universities has trained students to perform tasks in all fields of the photogrammetric profession. In recent years, the nature of photogrammetry is changing and multidisciplinary geomatics are developing very rapidly, the educational program of photogrammetry has also changed in new concepts and structures to adapt very new technologies and the extension of the field. Finally, the prospect of photogrammetry education for the requirements of multidisciplinary geomatics is proposed. The growing interest in fast and accurate 3D spatial data collection (such as city modeling and digital earth) results in the increasing need of photogrammetry as principal tool, photogrammetric courses are therefore requested to be up-to-date and to become one kind of the fundamental professional courses for university geomatics and remote sensing degree programs.

  7. Opus: A Coordination Language for Multidisciplinary Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Barbara; Haines, Matthew; Mehrotra, Piyush; Zima, Hans; vanRosendale, John

    1997-01-01

    Data parallel languages, such as High Performance fortran, can be successfully applied to a wide range of numerical applications. However, many advanced scientific and engineering applications are multidisciplinary and heterogeneous in nature, and thus do not fit well into the data parallel paradigm. In this paper we present Opus, a language designed to fill this gap. The central concept of Opus is a mechanism called ShareD Abstractions (SDA). An SDA can be used as a computation server, i.e., a locus of computational activity, or as a data repository for sharing data between asynchronous tasks. SDAs can be internally data parallel, providing support for the integration of data and task parallelism as well as nested task parallelism. They can thus be used to express multidisciplinary applications in a natural and efficient way. In this paper we describe the features of the language through a series of examples and give an overview of the runtime support required to implement these concepts in parallel and distributed environments.

  8. Developing a Collaborative Multidisciplinary Online Design Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Bender

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Technology is transforming the practice of architecture and design from the conceptual stages right down to the actual construction. One would assume technology is being readily integrated into current design education. Unfortunately, this is not the case. The purpose of this study is to explore the integration of online education into the curriculum of architecture and design. The three primary obstacles to integrating technology with education in these disciplines are identified as: 1 the limited evidence of online education in the fields of architecture and design (Sagun, Demirkan, & Goktepe, 2001; 2 the reluctance of design educators to teach in an online environment (Bender & Good, 2003; and 3 the lack of multidisciplinary coursework currently available between architecture, design, and other related fields (IIDA Report, 1998. This paper will discuss online education in the context of traditional architecture and design studio instruction. A case study of the development of a collaborative, multidisciplinary online course offered between five major universities will be presented as a catalyst for change. The paper concludes with reflections on the pedagogical advantages and disadvantages of this new educational model and its implications for instructors involved in online education.

  9. Palliative medicine update: a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, Kris C P; van den Brand, Maria W M; Jacobs, Jose; Groot, Marieke; Veldhoven, Carel; Verhagen, Constans; Hasselaar, Jeroen; Engels, Yvonne

    2013-09-01

    Palliative medicine is a young specialty that is officially recognized in relatively few countries. The World Health Organization published an adapted definition in 2002, describing palliative care as an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness. When the accent is shifting from curative to palliative, the goal of management is the maintenance or improvement of the patient's quality of life. The different dimensions of palliative care and the multitude of types of care to be provided require a multidisciplinary, well-functioning team, effective communication and a clear task division between primary and hospital care. Considering the complexity of care for incurable patients, a multidisciplinary approach is a prerequisite to balance curative and palliative intervention options. Optimal functioning of a team requires excellent training, communication and a description of the tasks and responsibilities of each team member. More and more advanced care planning is introduced in palliative care, focusing on an early identification of patients in a palliative trajectory and on the prevention of annoying symptoms, hoping that this approach results in an improved quality of life for the individual patient, less useless technical investigations and a better end-of-life care on the place the patient and his family desires.

  10. Practical Multi-Disciplinary Analysis Tools for Combustion Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The use of multidisciplinary analysis (MDA) techniques for combustion device environment prediction, including complex fluid mixing phenomena, is now becoming...

  11. Practical Multi-Disciplinary Analysis Tools for Combustion Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The use of multidisciplinary analysis (MDA) techniques for complex fluid/structure interaction phenomena is increasing as proven numerical and visualization...

  12. UP states protect ongoing cortical activity from thalamic inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendon O Watson

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vitro and in vivo fluctuate spontaneously between two stable membrane potentials: a depolarized UP state and a hyperpolarized DOWN state. UP states temporally correspond with multineuronal firing sequences which may be important for information processing. To examine how thalamic inputs interact with ongoing cortical UP state activity, we used calcium imaging and targeted whole-cell recordings of activated neurons in thalamocortical slices of mouse somatosensory cortex. Whereas thalamic stimulation during DOWN states generated multineuronal, synchronized UP states, identical stimulation during UP states had no effect on the subthreshold membrane dynamics of the vast majority of cells or on ongoing multineuronal temporal patterns. Both thalamocortical and corticocortical PSPs were significantly reduced and neuronal input resistance was significantly decreased during cortical UP states -- mechanistically consistent with UP state insensitivity. Our results demonstrate that cortical dynamics during UP states are insensitive to thalamic inputs.

  13. Implementation of Sustainability in Ongoing Supply Chain Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørsfeldt, Liliyana Makarowa; Meulengracht Jensen, Peter; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2012-01-01

    The need to take the sustainable agenda beyond its technological outset and include operational and supply chain practices is well-established, but still very little has happened and the supply chain and operational logics have remained largely unaffected. This paper asks why this may be the case...... and investigates what happens in the translation from ambitious strategic goals to operational practices. To do this an exploratory case study is presented detailing the efforts of a large Danish manufacturing company to introduce an ambitious sustainability agenda in its ongoing supply chain operations. The study...... aims to develop a deeper un-derstanding of the, inter-functional coordination and operational practices related to introducing the sustainable agenda in the supply chain. The study points to a lack of tangible environmental performance measurements related to day-to-day practice in the ongoing supply...

  14. Linear superposition of sensory-evoked and ongoing cortical hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Saka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern non-invasive brain imaging techniques utilise changes in cerebral blood flow, volume and oxygenation that accompany brain activation. However, stimulus-evoked hemodynamic responses display considerable inter-trial variability even when identical stimuli are presented and the sources of this variability are poorly understood. One of the sources of this response variation could be ongoing spontaneous hemodynamic fluctuations. To investigate this issue, 2-dimensional optical imaging spectroscopy was used to measure cortical hemodynamics in response to sensory stimuli in anaesthetised rodents Pre-stimulus cortical hemodynamics displayed spontaneous periodic fluctuations and as such, data from individual stimulus presentation trials were assigned to one of four groups depending on the phase angle of pre-stimulus hemodynamic fluctuations and averaged. This analysis revealed that sensory evoked cortical hemodynamics displayed distinctive response characteristics and magnitudes depending on the phase angle of ongoing fluctuations at stimulus onset. To investigate the origin of this phenomenon, ‘null-trails’ were collected without stimulus presentation. Subtraction of phase averaged ‘null trials’ from their phase averaged stimulus-evoked counterparts resulted in four similar time series that resembled the mean stimulus-evoked response. These analyses suggest that linear superposition of evoked and ongoing cortical hemodynamic changes may be a property of the structure of inter-trial variability.

  15. Status of the ELIMED multidisciplinary and medical beam-line at ELI-Beamlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Amico, A.; Candiano, G.; Giordanengo, S.; Guarachi, L. F.; Korn, G.; Larosa, G.; Leanza, R.; Manna, R.; Marchese, V.; Marchetto, F.; Margarone, D.; Milluzzo, G.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Sacchi, R.; Vignati, A.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, one of the biggest challenges consists in using high intensity laser-target interaction to generate high-energy ions for medical purposes, eventually replacing the old paradigm of acceleration characterized by huge and complex machines. In order to investigate the feasibility of using laser-driven ion beams for multidisciplinary application, a dedicated beam transport line will be installed at the ELI-Beamlines facility in Prague (CZ), as a part of the User-oriented ELIMAIA beam-line dedicated to ion acceleration and their potential applications. The beam-line section dedicated to transport and dosimetric endpoints is called ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and multidisciplinary applications) and will be developed by the INFN-LNS.

  16. Teacher perspectives on science literacy in multilingual classrooms –multidisciplinary explorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajer, Maaike; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Tytler, Russell

    2017-01-01

    part of science teachers’ practice and thinking? The multidisciplinary team includes expertise in applied linguistics (text analysis, second language teaching), science pedagogy and teacher professional development. Having gathered the SALT data, the challenge in this phase is in the analysis. How can...... that requires multidisciplinary cooperation. The Swedish Science and Literacy Teaching (SALT)project focuses on the questions How do science teachers address literacy skills in classes with secondary students in a multilingual classroom? and How can an explicit focus on literacy development become an integrated...... disciplinary analytical perspectives meet and lead to a deeper understanding of science literacy learning and teaching?This international Roundtable first presents the SALT-work-in-progress from selected teacher discussions and from classroom data. Subtitled video clips will be shown with tentative analysis...

  17. Multidisciplinary Treatment Approach in a Patient with History of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atacan Yavuz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy in NPC patients has side effects on the dentition, which affects quality of life dramatically. This case report presents multidisciplinary dental treatment approach in a 17-year-old male patient with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, which was treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The adolescent patient applied to dental hospital 4 years after the radiotherapy with aesthetic and functional problems on dentition affecting psychological, social, and physical aspects of his life. The dentition of the patient demonstrated the severe destruction as a devastating side effect of radiotherapy. With a successful multidisciplinary approach, our patient’s aesthetics, function, and self-confidence were obtained. Well-established procedures, which include preventative care and maintenance, can reduce the duration and expenses of the treatment and help in challenging the life-long complications of radiotherapy.

  18. Robust Parameter Coordination for Multidisciplinary Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduced a robust parameter coordination method to analyze parameter uncertainties so as to predict conflicts and coordinate parameters in multidisciplinary design. The proposed method is based on constraints network, which gives a formulated model to analyze the coupling effects between design variables and product specifications. In this model, interval boxes are adopted to describe the uncertainty of design parameters quantitatively to enhance the design robustness. To solve this constraint network model, a general consistent algorithm framework is designed and implemented with interval arithmetic and the genetic algorithm, which can deal with both algebraic and ordinary differential equations. With the help of this method, designers could infer the consistent solution space from the given specifications. A case study involving the design of a bogie dumping system demonstrates the usefulness of this approach.

  19. Multidisciplinary Modelling Tools for Power Electronic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad

    This thesis presents multidisciplinary modelling techniques in a Design For Reliability (DFR) approach for power electronic circuits. With increasing penetration of renewable energy systems, the demand for reliable power conversion systems is becoming critical. Since a large part of electricity...... in reliability assessment of power modules, a three-dimensional lumped thermal network is proposed to be used for fast, accurate and detailed temperature estimation of power module in dynamic operation and different boundary conditions. Since an important issue in the reliability of power electronics...... are generic and valid to be used in circuit simulators or any programing software. These models are important building blocks for the reliable design process or performance assessment of power electronic circuits. The models can save time and cost in power electronics packaging and power converter to evaluate...

  20. Internationality of the Multidisciplinary Psychology Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUALBERTO BUELA-CASAL

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available International journals are considered more prestigious and with more quality than national ones, although the meaning of this had not been established until recently. Moreover, internationality has been used as a criterion to make important decisions, for example to assess the performance of scientists,universities, doctoral degree programs, and so on, without knowing the exact meaning of internationality. Thus, the current study uses the criteriaof internationality established by a survey on more than 16,000 scientists from all over the world to create an Internationality Index of multidisciplinary psychology journals published in Ibero-America and included in the Web of Science. Results show that the most international journal is Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología, followed by The Spanish Journal of Psychology,Psicothema and Universitas Psychologica. All the journals fulfill the criteria for internationality and the study provides very important results which will allow its increase.

  1. [Low back pain during pregnancy. Multidisciplinary approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Padilla, D; Gallo-Padilla, C; Gallo-Vallejo, F J; Gallo-Vallejo, J L

    2016-09-01

    After explaining that low back pain is considered the most common pregnancy complication, its pathogenesis, risk factors and the clinical characteristics of the very painful symptoms of this condition are described. As for its approach, it is stressed that it must be multidisciplinary, introducing very important preventive measures, including proper postural hygiene. For its treatment, the methods may be based on non-surgical or pharmacological interventions of a conservative non-invasive nature. Thus, physiotherapy, osteopathic manipulation, multimodal intervention (exercise and education), exercises performed in water environment, acupuncture, etc., have proven to be effective. Finally, it is emphasised that given the significant impact on their quality of life, different health professionals must be proactive and treat the lumbar disease in pregnant women. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Pemphigus vulgaris: a multidisciplinary approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinall, Christopher; Stevens, Lucy; McArdle, Paul

    2013-12-16

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare but potentially life-threatening autoimmune disease affecting the mucosa and the skin. The disease is caused by circulating antibodies to desmosomes (important adhesion proteins linking cells together). Disruption of these intercellular connections results in a loss of cohesion between cells (acantholysis). The clinical result of this process is the development of multiple blisters that easily rupture, leaving behind painful sloughing eroded areas of mucosa and/or skin. We report a case of severe PV in a 56-year-old man presenting with widespread, painful, eroded mucocutaneous lesions. The severity of the disease demanded a range of medical and surgical specialties to successfully manage the problem. This paper highlights the importance of an early multidisciplinary team approach to improve the outcome of patients suffering with this disease.

  3. Gummy smile: A contemporary and multidisciplinary overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Tomás Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate the diagnosis, etiology, and therapeutic options for the treatment of gummy smile. The smile level is an imaginary line after the lower superior lip and used seems to be convex. The presence of 3 mm or grater continuous gingival band exposures to natural smile or speech performs the gummy smile. Original articles studying the diagnosis, etiology, and therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of gummy smile were searched in the Medline, Scopus, Science direct, and EBSCO host databases. Together with some example and diagnosis method was purposed. The authors conclude that the etiology is multifactorial and can be showed excessive vertical maxillary grow up, excessive labial contraction, shorter upper lip, gingival excess, and extrusion of the anterior teeth. The therapeutics alternative are often multidisciplinary, besides can be used orthognathic, plastic and periodontal surgery, and orthodontic.

  4. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesher, Melissa S

    2015-06-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with months of severe widespread musculoskeletal pain. He was profoundly fatigued and unable to attend school. Laboratory evaluation, including complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, and thyroid function, was unrevealing. Physical examination was also normal except for multiple tender points. The patient was diagnosed with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome and referred for multidisciplinary treatment including physical therapy, exercise, and counseling, and his daily functioning gradually improves. Juvenile fibromyalgia is a complex syndrome that often severely limits patients' activities and can impede normal adolescent development. Effective treatment requires an understanding of the biologic, psychologic, and social factors contributing to the perpetuation of chronic pain. The author reviews the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, and treatment of juvenile fibromyalgia. Medications, particularly antidepressants and anticonvulsants, can be useful adjuncts to therapy. However, multimodal pain management including intensive physical therapy, exercise, counseling, and sleep hygiene is most effective in treating fibromyalgia.

  5. Turner syndrome case report: A multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Thiesen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome (TS was fi rst reported in the literature in 1938 by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich and Henry Turner. This chromosomal alteration only affects female individuals, who have monosomy of the X chromosome. Only one X chromosome is functional, while the other sexual chromosome is either absent or abnormal. The main oral characteristics are transverse defi ciency of the maxilla, mandibular retrognathism, anterior open bite, cleft palate, premature dental eruption, and alterations in the shape, size and thickness of teeth, with an increased number of roots on the fi rst and second premolars. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical case of a patient with TS undergoing orthodontic treatment, and to emphasize the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to patients with TS.

  6. Multidisciplinary systems engineering architecting the design process

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, James A; Demijohn, Russell

    2016-01-01

    This book presents Systems Engineering from a modern, multidisciplinary engineering approach, providing the understanding that all aspects of systems design, systems, software, test, security, maintenance and the full life-cycle must be factored in to any large-scale system design; up front, not factored in later. It lays out a step-by-step approach to systems-of-systems architectural design, describing in detail the documentation flow throughout the systems engineering design process. It provides a straightforward look and the entire systems engineering process, providing realistic case studies, examples, and design problems that will enable students to gain a firm grasp on the fundamentals of modern systems engineering.  Included is a comprehensive design problem that weaves throughout the entire text book, concluding with a complete top-level systems architecture for a real-world design problem.

  7. A multidisciplinary conceptualization of conservation opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Katie; Adams, Vanessa M; Januchowski-Hartley, Stephanie R; Polyakov, Maksym; Mills, Morena; Biggs, Duan; Knight, Andrew T; Game, Edward T; Raymond, Christopher M

    2014-12-01

    An opportunity represents an advantageous combination of circumstances that allows goals to be achieved. We reviewed the nature of opportunity and how it manifests in different subsystems (e.g., biophysical, social, political, economic) as conceptualized in other bodies of literature, including behavior, adoption, entrepreneur, public policy, and resilience literature. We then developed a multidisciplinary conceptualization of conservation opportunity. We identified 3 types of conservation opportunity: potential, actors remove barriers to problem solving by identifying the capabilities within the system that can be manipulated to create support for conservation action; traction, actors identify windows of opportunity that arise from exogenous shocks, events, or changes that remove barriers to solving problems; and existing, everything is in place for conservation action (i.e., no barriers exist) and an actor takes advantage of the existing circumstances to solve problems. Different leverage points characterize each type of opportunity. Thus, unique stages of opportunity identification or creation and exploitation exist: characterizing the system and defining problems; identifying potential solutions; assessing the feasibility of solutions; identifying or creating opportunities; and taking advantage of opportunities. These stages can be undertaken independently or as part of a situational analysis and typically comprise the first stage, but they can also be conducted iteratively throughout a conservation planning process. Four types of entrepreneur can be identified (business, policy, social, and conservation), each possessing attributes that enable them to identify or create opportunities and take advantage of them. We examined how different types of conservation opportunity manifest in a social-ecological system (the Great Barrier Reef) and how they can be taken advantage of. Our multidisciplinary conceptualization of conservation opportunity strengthens and

  8. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome treatment: a multidisciplinary approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani-Zur, Dana; Wolkomir, Keren

    2015-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome affects 9-23% of the general population. This diagnosis contributes to more frequent doctor visits and multiple consultations by patients. The current approach to treating IBS is symptomatic and consists of a regimen of first line pharmacological treatment options; the use of anti-depressant drugs is also common. The efficiency of complementary medicine in the treatment of IBS has been studied in the last few years. Qualitative multidisciplinary approach studies, using personalized medicines with complementary therapies are needed. We present the case of a 39-year-old woman with a diagnosis of IBS since 2009, who complained about gastrointestinal symptoms since the age of 13 and severe episodes of spasmodic stomach aches in the last year self-ranked as 10, on a 0-10 scale; 3-4 episodes a month, which last for 5 days, accompanied by severe flatulence and bloating. In addition, she has constipation (one bowel movement every 10 days), alternating with multiple diarrheic bowel movements (6 times a day). Using a multidisciplinary approach, including medicinal care, Chinese medicine, reflexology and naturopathy resulted in significant improvement in symptoms and quality of life, as well as gradual reduction of drugs, approved by her physician. Stomach ache self-ranked now as 1, on a 0-10 scale; and flatulence and bloating self-ranked as mild. Bowel movement frequency increased and is now every other day. She no longer has diarrheic and/or multiple bowel movements. This case report emphasizes the importance of integrative treatment in IBS and its benefit in improving patients' quality of life.

  9. Surrogate assisted multidisciplinary design optimization for an all-electric GEO satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Renhe; Liu, Li; Long, Teng; Liu, Jian; Yuan, Bin

    2017-09-01

    State-of-the-art all-electric geostationary earth orbit (GEO) satellites use electric thrusters to execute all propulsive duties, which significantly differ from the traditional all-chemical ones in orbit-raising, station-keeping, radiation damage protection, and power budget, etc. Design optimization task of an all-electric GEO satellite is therefore a complex multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) problem involving unique design considerations. However, solving the all-electric GEO satellite MDO problem faces big challenges in disciplinary modeling techniques and efficient optimization strategy. To address these challenges, we presents a surrogate assisted MDO framework consisting of several modules, i.e., MDO problem definition, multidisciplinary modeling, multidisciplinary analysis (MDA), and surrogate assisted optimizer. Based on the proposed framework, the all-electric GEO satellite MDO problem is formulated to minimize the total mass of the satellite system under a number of practical constraints. Then considerable efforts are spent on multidisciplinary modeling involving geosynchronous transfer, GEO station-keeping, power, thermal control, attitude control, and structure disciplines. Since orbit dynamics models and finite element structural model are computationally expensive, an adaptive response surface surrogate based optimizer is incorporated in the proposed framework to solve the satellite MDO problem with moderate computational cost, where a response surface surrogate is gradually refined to represent the computationally expensive MDA process. After optimization, the total mass of the studied GEO satellite is decreased by 185.3 kg (i.e., 7.3% of the total mass). Finally, the optimal design is further discussed to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed framework to cope with the all-electric GEO satellite system design optimization problems. This proposed surrogate assisted MDO framework can also provide valuable references for other all

  10. Development of a brief multidisciplinary education programme for patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moe Rikke H

    2011-11-01

    questions are addressed. As part of an ongoing process, a patient representative regularly attends the MEP and gives feedback concerning content and perceived value. Conclusion A MEP has been developed to enhance self-management in patients with OA attending a multidisciplinary OA outpatient clinic. The effectiveness of the MEP followed by individual consultations with members of the multidisciplinary team is currently evaluated in a randomised controlled trial with respect to patient satisfaction and functioning.

  11. Evaluating Multidisciplinary Child Abuse and Neglect Teams: A Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalayants, Marina; Epstein, Irwin

    2005-01-01

    A review of child welfare research literature reveals that although multidisciplinary teams are increasingly used to investigate and intervene in child abuse and neglect cases, the field does not know enough about their structural variations, implementation processes, or effectiveness. Moreover, although articles advocating multidisciplinary teams…

  12. Effects of a nurse practitioner on a multidisciplinary consultation team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Corry K.; Datema, Linetta; Saan, Ingrid; Stant, Dennis; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of a nurse practitioner on a multidisciplinary consultation team. This paper is a report of a study to evaluate the impact on office hours capacity, patient satisfaction, quality of life and costs of including a nurse practitioner in a multidisciplinary consultation team for patients with ha

  13. A case study on collaboration within multidisciplinary teamwork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne; Karlshøj, Jan; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2010-01-01

    and teamwork at the final stage of the engineering education. The course was held by a multidisciplinary team of teachers for 9 multidisciplinary teams of students. The team of teachers and the student teams had similar working conditions. These teams were subject of investigation on collaboration...

  14. The Problems Facing Multidisciplinary Teams: As Perceived by Team Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the problems team members perceive to exist on multidisciplinary teams. Results indicated the two major areas of concern for urban, multidisciplinary team members were: too constrictive a set of team roles and goals, and teams functioning under extensive pressure with minimal support. (Author)

  15. Multi-disciplinary design optimisation via dashboard portals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijtenhaak, T.; Coenders, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper will present the opportunities a dashboard-based system provides to gather information on alternatives and display this in such a way that it will help the user making decisions by making use of multi-disciplinary optimisation (MDO) technology. The multi-disciplinary set up of the program

  16. Using Sustainability Themes and Multidisciplinary Approaches to Enhance STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Michael; Pfaff, Thomas; Hamilton, Jason; Erkan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the Multidisciplinary Sustainability Education Project (MSEP) as a framework using sustainability-themed education modules to introduce students to the need for multidisciplinary approaches to solving twenty-first-century problems while retaining traditional course strengths and content.…

  17. Multi-disciplinary design optimisation via dashboard portals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijtenhaak, T.; Coenders, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper will present the opportunities a dashboard-based system provides to gather information on alternatives and display this in such a way that it will help the user making decisions by making use of multi-disciplinary optimisation (MDO) technology. The multi-disciplinary set up of the program

  18. Multidisciplinary teaching – Engineering course in advanced building design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne; Karlshøj, Jan; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration within the building process is difficult. This calls for employees who are experienced in collaborating in interdisciplinary teams. To fulfil this demand a multidisciplinary course in “Advanced building design” has been developed at the Technical University of Denmark. The goal of t....... It is worthwhile to offer a multidisciplinary course and give engineering students experience in new collaboration methods....

  19. Multidisciplinary Teamwork in Autism: Can One Size Fit All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenburger, Karola; Röttgers, Hanns-Rüdiger; Dounavi, Katerina; Sparkman, Coleen; Keenan, Mickey; Thyer, Bruce; Nikopoulos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary practice has become an accepted approach in many education and social and health care fields. In fact, the right to a multidisciplinary assessment is enshrined in the United Nations Convention of the Rights for Persons with Disabilities (United Nations, 2007). In order to avert a "one size fits all" response to…

  20. Effects of a nurse practitioner on a multidisciplinary consultation team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Corry K.; Datema, Linetta; Saan, Ingrid; Stant, Dennis; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of a nurse practitioner on a multidisciplinary consultation team. This paper is a report of a study to evaluate the impact on office hours capacity, patient satisfaction, quality of life and costs of including a nurse practitioner in a multidisciplinary consultation team for patients with ha

  1. Right ventricular cardiomyopathies: a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongelli, Giuseppe; Rea, Alessandra; Masarone, Daniele; Francalanci, M Paola; Anastasakis, Aris; Calabro', Raffaele; Giovanna, Russo Maria; Bossone, Eduardo; Elliott, Perry Mark; Pacileo, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The physiological importance of the right ventricle (RV) has been underestimated over the past years. Finally in the early 1950s through the 1970s, cardiac surgeons recognized the importance of RV function. Since then, the importance of RV function has been recognized in many acquired cardiac heart disease. RV can be mainly or together with left ventricle (LV) affected by inherited or acquired cardiomyopathy. In fact, RV morphological and functional remodeling occurs more common during cardiomyopathies than in ischemic cardiomyopathies and more closely parallels LV dysfunction. Moreover, there are some cardiomyopathy subtypes showing a predominant or exclusive involvement of the RV, and they are probably less known by cardiologists. The clinical approach to right ventricular cardiomyopathies is often challenging. Imaging is the first step to raise the suspicion and to guide the diagnostic process. In the differential diagnosis, cardiologists should consider athlete's heart, congenital heart diseases, multisystemic disorders, and inherited arrhythmias. However, a multiparametric and multidisciplinary approach, involving cardiologists, experts in imaging, geneticists, and pathologists with a specific expertise in these heart muscle disorders is required.

  2. Lessons Learned During Solutions of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Suna N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Optimization research at NASA Glenn Research Center has addressed the design of structures, aircraft and airbreathing propulsion engines. During solution of the multidisciplinary problems several issues were encountered. This paper lists four issues and discusses the strategies adapted for their resolution: (1) The optimization process can lead to an inefficient local solution. This deficiency was encountered during design of an engine component. The limitation was overcome through an augmentation of animation into optimization. (2) Optimum solutions obtained were infeasible for aircraft and air-breathing propulsion engine problems. Alleviation of this deficiency required a cascading of multiple algorithms. (3) Profile optimization of a beam produced an irregular shape. Engineering intuition restored the regular shape for the beam. (4) The solution obtained for a cylindrical shell by a subproblem strategy converged to a design that can be difficult to manufacture. Resolution of this issue remains a challenge. The issues and resolutions are illustrated through six problems: (1) design of an engine component, (2) synthesis of a subsonic aircraft, (3) operation optimization of a supersonic engine, (4) design of a wave-rotor-topping device, (5) profile optimization of a cantilever beam, and (6) design of a cvlindrical shell. The combined effort of designers and researchers can bring the optimization method from academia to industry.

  3. [Principles of multidisciplinary management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabrol, B; Mayer, M

    2015-12-01

    Given the gradual progression observed in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, organization of care in multidisciplinary consultations is essential for optimal management of the different aspects of the disease. Drawing up a care plan is always preceded by a specific consultation for the announcement of the diagnosis with both the parents and the child. Explaining to the child the origin of his problems with simple words, telling him that why he experienced a particular symptom has been understood, is a fundamental step. The child needs to receive the information at different times of the disease following the rhythms of the disease stages, with an appropriate lead time. With the progress achieved in managing this disease, more than 90% of these children now live into adulthood. The switch from pediatric consultations to adult consultations, marking the transition from childhood management at adulthood, is a major challenge in the organization of care. Although today death occurs most often in adulthood, some children die in childhood. For the majority of teams who care for children, whatever the initial pathology may be, the notion of care continuity and accompaniment from the announcement of the disease to the terminal phase is essential. Increasing numbers of therapeutic trials have been developed over the past few years aiming to investigate children with DMD. However, they must not neglect the overall management of these patients and provide the best accompaniment possible.

  4. A Correlation Analysis Model for Multidisciplinary Data in Disaster Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyue Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Data play an important role in disaster mitigation applications, and the integrated employment of multidisciplinary data promotes the development of disaster science. Therefore it is very useful to identify the multidisciplinary data usage in the research of disaster events. In order to discover the correlation between multidisciplinary data and disaster research, three earthquake events, the Tangshan earthquake, the Wenchuan earthquake, and the Haidi earthquake were selected as typical study cases for this paper. A knowledge model for literature data mining was applied to analyze the correlation between earthquake events and multidisciplinary data types. The results indicate that high-cited papers show different data usage trends when compared with whole-set papers and also that data usage for the three earthquake events varies. According to analysis results, the factors that influence multidisciplinary data usage include the characteristics of spatial and temporal elements as well as differing interests of the data users.

  5. An improved multidisciplinary feasible method using DACE approximation approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Zijian; Xiao Renbin; Zhong Yifang

    2005-01-01

    Multidisciplinary feasible method (MDF) is conventional method to multidisciplinary optimization (MDO) and well-understood by users. It reduces the dimensions of the multidisciplinary optimization problem by using the design variables as independent optimization variables. However, at each iteration of the conventional optimization procedure,multidisciplinary analysis (MDA) is numerously performed that results in extreme expense and low optimization efficiency. The intrinsic weakness of MDF is due to the times that it loop fixed-point iterations in MDA, which drive us to improve MDF by building inexpensive approximations as surrogates for expensive MDA. An simple example is presented to demonstrate the usefulness of the improved MDF. Results show that a significant reduction in the number of multidisciplinary analysis required for optimization is obtained as compared with original MDF and the efficiency of optimization is increased.

  6. Ongoing clinical trials of the pleiotropic effects of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Davignon

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Jean Davignon1, Lawrence A Leiter21Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, CanadaBackground: The multiple effects (ie, pleiotropic effects of statins have received increasing recognition and may have clinical applicability across a broad range of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular conditions. Objective: To determine the relevance and significance of ongoing clinical trials of the pleiotropic effects of statins, focusing on nonlipid effects. Method: Ongoing trials were identified through personal communication, reports presented at scientific meetings (2000–2004, and queries made to AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co, Merck & Co, Novartis, and Pfizer, manufacturers of the currently marketed statins. Published trials and other source material were identified through electronic searches on MEDLINE (1990–2003, abstract books, and references identified from bibliographies of pertinent articles. Eligible studies were the clinical trials of statins currently under way in which primary or secondary outcomes included the statins’ nonlipid (ie, pleiotropic effect(s. Data were extracted and trial quality was assessed by the authors. Results: Of the 22 ongoing trials of the nonlipid effects of statins identified, 10 assessed inflammatory markers and plaque stabilization, 4 assessed oxidized low density lipoprotein/vascular oxidant stress, 3 assessed end-stage renal disease, 3 assessed fibrinogen/viscosity, 2 assessed endothelial function, 2 assessed acute coronary syndrome, 2 assessed aortic stenosis progression, and 1 each assessed hypertension, osteoporosis, ischemic burden, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke (outcomes often overlapped. Conclusion: Given the excellent safety and tolerability of statins as a class, full exploration of their pleiotropic effects has the potential to provide additional benefits to many patients

  7. Offsetting Ongoing Methane Emissions --- An Alternative to Emission Equivalence Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clisby, N.; Enting, I. G.; Lauder, A.; Carter, J.; Cowie, A.; Henry, B.; Raupach, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Global Warming Potential (GWP) has been widely adopted as a metric for comparing the climate impact of different greenhouse gases. As has been frequently noted, there are many problems with using GWPs to define emission equivalence in spite of the use of GWPs for this purpose in contexts such as the Kyoto Protocol. We propose that for methane, rather than define emission equivalence, the appropriate comparison is between ongoing emissions of 0.9 to 1.0 kg of CH4 per year and one-off emissions of 1 tonne of carbon. This approach represents an approximate solution to the inverse problem of defining a forcing equivalent index (FEI) that gives exact equivalence of radiative forcing over a range of timescales. In our approach, if ongoing methane emissions are offset by a one-off carbon removal that is built up with 40-year e-folding time, then the result is close to radiatively neutral over periods from years to centuries. In contrast, the GWP provides radiative equivalence (in integrated terms) only at a single time, with large discrepancies at other times. Our approach also follows from consideration of greenhouse gas stabilisation, since stabilising atmospheric CO2 requires an approximate cap on total emissions, while stabilising methane requires stabilisation of ongoing emissions. Our quantitative treatment recognises that, on time scales of centuries, removal of 1 tonne of carbon only lowers the atmospheric carbon content by 0.3 to 0.35 tonnes. We discuss the implications for rangeland grazing systems. In the absence of effective mitigation techniques for methane from rangeland systems, this approach may provide an attractive offset mechanism in spite of requiring that woody vegetation be established and maintained over about 15% of the landscape, or an equivalent amount of carbon storage in soil.

  8. Ongoing outbreak of invasive listeriosis, Germany, 2012 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppitsch, Werner; Prager, Rita; Halbedel, Sven; Hyden, Patrick; Pietzka, Ariane; Huhulescu, Steliana; Lohr, Dorothee; Schönberger, Katharina; Aichinger, Elisabeth; Hauri, Anja; Stark, Klaus; Vygen, Sabine; Tietze, Erhard; Allerberger, Franz; Wilking, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Listeriosis patient isolates in Germany have shown a new identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern since 2012 (n = 66). Almost all isolates (Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a) belonged to cases living in southern Germany, indicating an outbreak with a so far unknown source. Case numbers in 2015 are high (n = 28). No outbreak cases outside Germany have been reported. Next generation sequencing revealed the unique cluster type CT1248 and confirmed the outbreak. Investigations into the source are ongoing.

  9. Overview of ongoing cohort and dietary studies in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pál Weihe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an overview of the ongoing cohort and dietary studies underlying the assessment of population health in the Arctic. The emphasis here is on a description of the material, methods and results or preliminary results for each study. Detailed exposure information is available in an article in this journal, whereas another paper describes the effects associated with contaminant exposure in the Arctic. The cohort descriptions have been arranged geographically, beginning in Norway and moving east to Finland, Sweden, Russia and the other Arctic countries and ultimately to the Faroe Islands. No cohort studies have been reported for Alaska or Iceland.

  10. Overview of ongoing cohort and dietary studies in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihe, Pál; Bjerregaard, Peter; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva; Dudarev, Alexey; Halling, Jónrit; Hansen, Solrunn; Muckle, Gina; Nøst, Therese; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Rautio, Arja; Veyhe, Anna Sofía; Wennberg, Maria; Bergdahl, Ingvar

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the ongoing cohort and dietary studies underlying the assessment of population health in the Arctic. The emphasis here is on a description of the material, methods and results or preliminary results for each study. Detailed exposure information is available in an article in this journal, whereas another paper describes the effects associated with contaminant exposure in the Arctic. The cohort descriptions have been arranged geographically, beginning in Norway and moving east to Finland, Sweden, Russia and the other Arctic countries and ultimately to the Faroe Islands. No cohort studies have been reported for Alaska or Iceland. PMID:27974135

  11. Peer-reviewed forensic consultation in practice: multidisciplinary oversight in common expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welner, Michael; Davey, Emily E; Bernstein, Adam

    2014-09-01

    The fallibility of forensic science consultation is an ongoing and major justice concern. Prospective peer-reviewed forensic consultation has over 10 years of application in American criminal and civil courts, adapting from the traditional oversight of teaching hospitals, rules of evidence and discovery, conventions of testimony of expert witnesses, and attorneys' overall trial strategy. In systematizing heightened oversight, this process ensures greater accountability in forensic science consultation. The integration of peer reviewers' complementary expertise and experience enhances the sophistication and overall quality of assessment. Forensic examination frequently involves the interface of different specialties. Multidisciplinary peer review augments expert proficiency with that of professional peers having different vantage points from relevant scientific disciplines. This approach ensures greater sophistication of a case inquiry, built-in accountability, and streamlined processes when multiple experts are necessitated. Here, the authors present examples of several cases and the primary and secondary benefits of this collaborative, rigorous, cross-disciplinary exercise.

  12. The Rare Cancer Network: ongoing studies and future strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Ozsahin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Rare Cancer Network (RCN was formed in the early 1990’s to create a global network that could pool knowledge and resources in the studies of rare malignancies whose infrequency prevented both their study with prospective clinical trials. To date, the RCN has initiated 74 studies resulting in 46 peer reviewed publications. The First International Symposium of the Rare Cancer Network took place in Nice in March of 2014. Status updates and proposals for new studies were heard for fifteen topics. Ongoing studies continue for cardiac sarcomas, thyroid cancers, glomus tumors, and adult medulloblastomas. New proposals were presented at the symposium for primary hepatic lymphoma, solitary fibrous tumors, Rosai-Dorfman disease, tumors of the ampulla of Vater, salivary gland tumors, anorectal melanoma, midline nuclear protein in testes carcinoma, pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea, osteosarcomas of the mandible, and extra-cranial hemangiopericytoma. This manuscript presents the abstracts of those proposals and updates on ongoing studies, as well a brief summary of the vision and future of the RCN.

  13. Desensitization to rituximab in a multidisciplinary setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorós-Reboredo, Patrícia; Sánchez-López, Jaime; Bastida-Fernández, Carla; do Pazo-Oubiña, Fernando; Borràs-Maixenchs, Núria; Giné, Eva; Valero, Antonio; Creus-Baró, Natàlia

    2015-10-01

    The need to offer first-line therapy to the increasing number of patients who have suffered an hypersensitivity reaction has stimulated the use of rapid desensitization protocols. To present our experience working as a multidisciplinary team using a rituximab rapid desensitization scheme. Patient demographics, allergic reaction, skin tests to rituximab, number of desensitizations, reactions during the desensitization protocol and actions taken, number of administered and completed cycles, were retrospectively collected in patients who received at least one desensitization to rituximab. Number of desensitizations successfully managed. Between 2012 and June 2013 five patients received a total of 19 desensitizations to rituximab using a 12 step rapid desensitization protocol. All patients received the scheduled chemotherapeutic cycles as inpatients, with no delay in administration dates. Three patients presented a hypersensitivity reaction during the first desensitization and in one patient the event occurred again during the second treatment cycle. All reactions occurred in the last step, when the infusion rate reached the maximum speed. The developed protocol for rapid desensitization was successful in five patients receiving rituximab. Patients could receive the full intended dose.

  14. Multidisciplinary Russian biomedical research in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, O. I.; Sychev, V. N.; Samarin, G. I.; Ilyin, E. A.; Belakovskiy, M. S.; Kussmaul, A. R.

    2014-08-01

    Research activities on a comprehensive multidisciplinary program are vital for enhancement of the system of crew's medical care, environmental health and hygiene in space missions. The primary goal of the program must be identification of patterns, intensity and dynamics of structural and functional shifts in organism induced by an aggregate of spaceflight factors including microgravity, isolation, artificial environment, space radiation, etc. Also, the program must pursue differential assessment of emerging deviations from the standpoint of adequacy to the spaceflight conditions and prospects of returning to Earth and guide the development of principles, methods and techniques necessary to maintain health and working capacity of humans during short- and long-duration missions and on return to Earth. Over 50 years, since 1963, the IBMP researchers apply systemic and innovational approaches to fundamental and exploratory studies in the fields of medical sciences, radiation biology, engineering science, biotechnology, etc. with participation of various biological specimens and human volunteers. Investigations aboard manned spacecrafts and biological satellites as well as in ground-based laboratories further enhancement of the medical care system for crews on orbital and remote space missions; they give insight into the fundamental problems of gravitational physiology and biology, psychophysiology, radiation biology, and contribute thereby to the development of knowledge, methods and technologies, as well as medical and scientific equipment.

  15. Instruction of Multidisciplinary Content in Introductory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaibani, Saami J.

    2017-01-01

    There has been an ever-increasing emphasis on the integration of material in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics during the past decade or so. However, there are two major requirements for accomplishing the effective delivery of such multidisciplinary content in the classroom: having high levels of expertise in all of the subjects; and, having the ability to combine the separate fields in a consistent manner without compromising academic purity. The research reported here involves a teacher with this skill set and it includes an example from kinematics, which is initially explored with standard treatment of concepts in mechanics and then developed with analysis employing algebra. As often happens, the non-trivial nature of the result in this case does not readily allow students to have a sense that the physics-based outcome is correct. This shortfall is remedied by adopting a complementary approach with geometry and calculus, which adds an independent perspective that reassures students by confirming the validity of the original answer. The enhanced quality of instruction achieved with the above methodology produces many benefits, including greater student understanding and more opportunities for active involvement by students in the learning process.

  16. Multi-Disciplinary System Reliability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code developed under the leadership of NASA Lewis Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multi-disciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

  17. Multidisciplinary Management of Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas M. Nystrom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue sarcoma is a rare malignancy, with approximately 11,000 cases per year encountered in the United States. It is primarily encountered in adults but can affect patients of any age. There are many histologic subtypes and the malignancy can be low or high grade. Appropriate staging work up includes a physical exam, advanced imaging, and a carefully planned biopsy. This information is then used to guide the discussion of definitive treatment of the tumor which typically involves surgical resection with a negative margin in addition to neoadjuvant or adjuvant external beam radiation. Advances in imaging and radiation therapy have made limb salvage surgery the standard of care, with local control rates greater than 90% in most modern series. Currently, the role of chemotherapy is not well defined and this treatment is typically reserved for patients with metastatic or recurrent disease and for certain histologic subtypes. The goal of this paper is to review the current state of the art in multidisciplinary management of soft tissue sarcoma.

  18. Multidisciplinary approach for patients with esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria M Villaflor; Marco E Allaix; Bruce Minsky; Fernando A Herbella; Marco G Patti

    2012-01-01

    Patients with esophageal cancer have a poor prognosis because they often have no symptoms until their disease is advanced.There are no screening recommendations for patients unless they have Barrett's esophagitis or a significant family history of this disease.Often,esophageal cancer is not diagnosed until patients present with dysphagia,odynophagia,anemia or weight loss.When symptoms occur,the stage is often stage Ⅲ or greater.Treatment of patients with very early stage disease is fairly straight forward using only local treatment with surgical resection or endoscopic mucosal resection.The treatment of patients who have locally advanced esophageal cancer is more complex and controversial.Despite multiple trials,treatment recommendations are still unclear due to conflicting data.Sadly,much of our data is difficult to interpret due to many of the trials done have included very heterogeneous groups of patients both histologically as well as anatomically.Additionally,studies have been underpowered or stopped early due to poor accrual.In the United States,concurrent chemoradiotherapy prior to surgical resection has been accepted by many as standard of care in the locally advanced patient.Patients who have metastatic disease are treated palliatively.The aim of this article is to describe the multidisciplinary approach used by an established team at a single high volume center for esophageal cancer,and to review the literature which guides our treatment recommendations.

  19. Inadequate description of educational interventions in ongoing randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pino Cécile

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The registration of clinical trials has been promoted to prevent publication bias and increase research transparency. Despite general agreement about the minimum amount of information needed for trial registration, we lack clear guidance on descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions in trial registries. We aimed to evaluate the quality of registry descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions assessed in ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs of patient education. Methods On 6 May 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the 10 trial registries accessible through the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We included trials evaluating an educational intervention (that is, designed to teach or train patients about their own health and dedicated to participants, their family members or home caregivers. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data related to the description of the experimental intervention, the centers, and the caregivers. Results We selected 268 of 642 potentially eligible studies and appraised a random sample of 150 records. All selected trials were registered in 4 registers, mainly ClinicalTrials.gov (61%. The median [interquartile range] target sample size was 205 [100 to 400] patients. The comparator was mainly usual care (47% or active treatment (47%. A minority of records (17%, 95% CI 11 to 23% reported an overall adequate description of the intervention (that is, description that reported the content, mode of delivery, number, frequency, duration of sessions and overall duration of the intervention. Further, for most reports (59%, important information about the content of the intervention was missing. The description of the mode of delivery of the intervention was reported for 52% of studies, the number of sessions for 74%, the frequency of sessions for 58%, the duration of each session for 45% and the overall duration for 63

  20. Torpedo Overall Multidisciplinary Design Based on Collaborative Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU De-hai; SONG Bao-wei; LI Jia-wang; YANG Shi-xing; GAO Zhi-yong

    2008-01-01

    A torpedo multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) based on the collaborative optimization is proposed. Through decomposition and coordination, some problems in torpedo design such as multidisciplinary coupling, large data volume and complex data relationships can be solved. Taking aim at some complex problems in the torpedo design, such as computation in multidisciplinary design, organization, modeling and information exchange, the collaborative optimization methods based on approximate technology are presented. An example to increase the torpedo range is also given. It demonstrates that the method can converge quickly, has higher reliability and smaller data throughput, and is a very effective MDO method.

  1. An Efficient Method for Reliability-based Multidisciplinary Design Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Hui; Li Weiji

    2008-01-01

    Design for modem engineering system is becoming multidisciplinary and incorporates practical uncertainties; therefore, it is necessary to synthesize reliability analysis and the multidiscipLinary design optimization (MDO) techniques for the design of complex engineering system. An advanced first order second moment method-based concurrent subspace optimization approach is proposed based on the comparison and analysis of the existing multidisciplinary optimization techniques and the reliability analysis methods. It is seen through a canard configuration optimization for a three-surface transport that the proposed method is computationally efficient and practical with the least modification to the current deterministic optimization process.

  2. Ongoing Analysis of Jupiter's Equatorial Hotspots and Plumes from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D. S.; Showmwn, A. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated results from our ongoing analysis of Cassini observations of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach of the planet, the ISS instrument onboard Cassini regularly imaged the atmosphere of Jupiter. We created time-lapse movies from this period that show the complex activity and interactions of the equatorial atmosphere. During this period, hot spots exhibited significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes appear to be a result of interactions with passing vortex systems in adjacent latitudes. Strong anticyclonic gyres to the southeast of the dark areas converge with flow from the west and appear to circulate into a hot spot at its southwestern corner.

  3. Review of EGFR TKIs in metastatic NSCLC, including ongoing trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eMelosky

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI in the treatment of patients with advanced metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Most of these recent trials were conducted in patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumours. As our knowledge of the EGFR mutation and its resistant pathways develops, the complexity of the situation expands. This article briefly reviews the pivotal trials leading to approval of EGFR TKIs in the first-line setting for patients with EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung carcinomas. It discusses the historical use of EGFR TKIs after the first line setting in unselected patients and briefly describes ongoing trials.

  4. Ongoing Space Nuclear Systems Development in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Werner; S. Johnson; Michael G. Houts; Donald T. Palac; Lee S. Mason; David I. Poston; A. Lou Qualls

    2011-10-01

    Reliable, long-life power systems are required for ambitious space exploration missions. Nuclear power and propulsion options can enable a bold, new set of missions and introduce propulsion capabilities to achieve access to science destinations that are not possible with more conventional systems. Space nuclear power options can be divided into three main categories: radioisotope power for heating or low power applications; fission power systems for non-terrestrial surface application or for spacecraft power; and fission power systems for electric propulsion or direct thermal propulsion. Each of these areas has been investigated in the United States since the 1950s, achieving various stages of development. While some nuclear systems have achieved flight deployment, others continue to be researched today. This paper will provide a brief overview of historical space nuclear programs in the U.S. and will provide a summary of the ongoing space nuclear systems research, development, and deployment in the United States.

  5. Asymptomatic moyamoya disease: literature review and ongoing AMORE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of a non-invasive magnetic resonance examination has increased the opportunity to identify asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease who have experienced no cerebrovascular events. However, their clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategy are still unclear because of small number of subjects and short follow-up periods. Therefore, we have designed Asymptomatic Moyamoya Registry (AMORE) study in Japan. The objectives of this nation-wide, multi-center prospective study are to clarify long-term prognosis of asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease and to determine the risk factors that cause ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in them. In this article, we review the published data on asymptomatic moyamoya disease and report the on-going multi-center prospective cohort study, AMORE study. We would like to emphasize the importance to determine the clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategies of asymptomatic moyamoya disease in very near future.

  6. A Multidisciplinary Investigation of a Polycythemia Vera Cancer Cluster of Unknown Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Klotz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cluster investigations rarely receive significant public health resource allocations due to numerous inherent challenges and the limited success of past efforts. In 2008, a cluster of polycythemia vera, a rare blood cancer with unknown etiology, was identified in northeast Pennsylvania. A multidisciplinary group of federal and state agencies, academic institutions, and local healthcare providers subsequently developed a multifaceted research portfolio designed to better understand the cause of the cluster. This research agenda represents a unique and important opportunity to demonstrate that cancer cluster investigations can produce desirable public health and scientific outcomes when necessary resources are available.

  7. Planned and ongoing projects (pop) database: development and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Claudia; Erdös, Judit; Warmuth, Marisa; Hinterreiter, Gerda; Krämer, Peter; Chalon, Patrice

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to present the development, structure and results of a database on planned and ongoing health technology assessment (HTA) projects (POP Database) in Europe. The POP Database (POP DB) was set up in an iterative process from a basic Excel sheet to a multifunctional electronic online database. The functionalities, such as the search terminology, the procedures to fill and update the database, the access rules to enter the database, as well as the maintenance roles, were defined in a multistep participatory feedback loop with EUnetHTA Partners. The POP Database has become an online database that hosts not only the titles and MeSH categorizations, but also some basic information on status and contact details about the listed projects of EUnetHTA Partners. Currently, it stores more than 1,200 planned, ongoing or recently published projects of forty-three EUnetHTA Partners from twenty-four countries. Because the POP Database aims to facilitate collaboration, it also provides a matching system to assist in identifying similar projects. Overall, more than 10 percent of the projects in the database are identical both in terms of pathology (indication or disease) and technology (drug, medical device, intervention). In addition, approximately 30 percent of the projects are similar, meaning that they have at least some overlap in content. Although the POP DB is successful concerning regular updates of most national HTA agencies within EUnetHTA, little is known about its actual effects on collaborations in Europe. Moreover, many non-nationally nominated HTA producing agencies neither have access to the POP DB nor can share their projects.

  8. Outcomes in registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials of patient education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Pino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life. METHODS: On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1 patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2 surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333 of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623 of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150 used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150 as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150, primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61 of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59 in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22 in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs.

  9. Strongyloidiasis in a young French woman raises concern about possible ongoing autochthonous transmission in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Duvignaud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is one of the most common geohelminth infections in tropical and subtropical areas. Accurate diagnosis remains challenging, leading to an overall underestimation of strongyloidiasis prevalence. The possibility of ongoing autochthonous transmission in some temperate areas and especially in southern Europe is still debated, and data supporting this hypothesis are scarce. The case of a young French woman, who had travelled frequently to Spain and had acquired Strongyloides stercoralis infection as revealed by gastrointestinal symptoms and hypereosinophilia, is reported here. Physicians should keep in mind the risk of being infected in some areas of southern Europe, even if low, in order to avoid the life-threatening manifestations of strongyloidiasis favoured by pathological or therapeutic immunosuppression.

  10. The MED-SUV Multidisciplinary Interoperability Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Paolo; D'Auria, Luca; Reitano, Danilo; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Roncella, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Nativi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    In accordance with the international Supersite initiative concept, the MED-SUV (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes) European project (http://med-suv.eu/) aims to enable long-term monitoring experiment in two relevant geologically active regions of Europe prone to natural hazards: Mt. Vesuvio/Campi Flegrei and Mt. Etna. This objective requires the integration of existing components, such as monitoring systems and data bases and novel sensors for the measurements of volcanic parameters. Moreover, MED-SUV is also a direct contribution to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) as one the volcano Supersites recognized by the Group on Earth Observation (GEO). To achieve its goal, MED-SUV set up an advanced e-infrastructure allowing the discovery of and access to heterogeneous data for multidisciplinary applications, and the integration with external systems like GEOSS. The MED-SUV overall infrastructure is conceived as a three layer architecture with the lower layer (Data level) including the identified relevant data sources, the mid-tier (Supersite level) including components for mediation and harmonization , and the upper tier (Global level) composed of the systems that MED-SUV must serve, such as GEOSS and possibly other global/community systems. The Data level is mostly composed of existing data sources, such as space agencies satellite data archives, the UNAVCO system, the INGV-Rome data service. They share data according to different specifications for metadata, data and service interfaces, and cannot be changed. Thus, the only relevant MED-SUV activity at this level was the creation of a MED-SUV local repository based on Web Accessible Folder (WAF) technology, deployed in the INGV site in Catania, and hosting in-situ data and products collected and generated during the project. The Supersite level is at the core of the MED-SUV architecture, since it must mediate between the disparate data sources in the layer below, and provide a harmonized view to

  11. Enhancing Transparency in Multidisciplinary Expert Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hukki, Kristiina; Pulkkinen, Urho [VTT Industrial Systems (Finland)

    2003-10-01

    Faced with problems of public acceptance most nuclear waste management organisations now acknowledge the importance of transparency in their pursuit of solutions for high-level nuclear waste disposal. To make progress the implementing organizations need the trust of other stakeholders in the decision-making process. For such trust these outside stakeholders need knowledge on the grounds for the judgments and decisions made in different scientific and technical disciplines. Transparency is, however, at least as important for the multidisciplinary expert communication itself. As a matter of fact, the transparency of the internal expert interaction processes is a prerequisite for the true transparency of the communication between the implementer and the external stakeholder groups. The introduced conceptual framework has been developed for the identification of the requirements of safety-informed communication in multidisciplinary expert work in nuclear waste management. The framework offers a common thinking model and common concepts which can be utilized in the development of the communication practices. The basis of the framework is on the possibility to understand the safety-critical significance of one's work. The transparency of communication is, for its part, based on making explicit the relevant knowledge necessary for gaining the understanding. This supplementary knowledge, which is related to the substance issues but is not scientific-technical by nature, enhances the experts' awareness of the context of their own contribution and of the background of the other experts' contributions. The common conceptualization and modelling of the knowledge-related dependencies between the tasks make it possible to realize the significance of the supplementary knowledge for transparent communication in actual situations. They also facilitate the recognition of the need for different types of supplementary knowledge in the interfaces between the tasks. By

  12. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuefel (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Kang, Huining (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fields, Chris (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Cowie, Jim R. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Mosquera-Caro, Monica P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Xu, Yuexian (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Andries, Erik (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ar, Kerem (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Potter, Jeffrey (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Willman, Cheryl L. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Murphy, Maurice H. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  13. Multidisciplinary cognitive content of nanoscience and nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojević, Staša

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the cognitive evolution and disciplinary diversity of nanoscience/nanotechnology (nano research) as expressed through the terminology used in titles of nano journal articles. The analysis is based on the NanoBank bibliographic database of 287,106 nano articles published between 1981 and 2004. We perform multifaceted analyses of title words, focusing on 100 most frequent words or phrases (terms). Hierarchical clustering of title terms reveals three distinct time periods of cognitive development of nano research: formative (1981-1990), early (from 1991 to 1998), and current (after 1998). Early period is characterized by the introduction of thin film deposition techniques, while the current period is characterized by the increased focus on carbon nanotube and nanoparticle research. We introduce a method to identify disciplinary components of nanotechnology. It shows that the nano research is being carried out in a number of diverse parent disciplines. Currently, only 5% of articles are published in dedicated nano-only journals. We find that some 85% of nano research today is multidisciplinary. The case study of the diffusion of several nano-specific terms (e.g., "carbon nanotube") shows that concepts spread from the initially few disciplinary components to the majority of them in a time span of around a decade. Hierarchical clustering of disciplinary components reveals that the cognitive content of current nanoscience can be divided into nine clusters. Some clusters account for a large fraction of nano research and are identified with such parent disciplines as the condensed matter and applied physics, materials science, and analytical chemistry. Other clusters represent much smaller parts of nano research, but are as cognitively distinct. In the decreasing order of size, these fields are: polymer science, biotechnology, general chemistry, surface science, and pharmacology. Cognitive content of research published in nano-only journals is the

  14. Multidisciplinary cognitive content of nanoscience and nanotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milojevic, Stasa, E-mail: smilojev@indiana.edu [Indiana University, School of Library and Information Science (United States)

    2012-01-15

    This article examines the cognitive evolution and disciplinary diversity of nanoscience/nanotechnology (nano research) as expressed through the terminology used in titles of nano journal articles. The analysis is based on the NanoBank bibliographic database of 287,106 nano articles published between 1981 and 2004. We perform multifaceted analyses of title words, focusing on 100 most frequent words or phrases (terms). Hierarchical clustering of title terms reveals three distinct time periods of cognitive development of nano research: formative (1981-1990), early (from 1991 to 1998), and current (after 1998). Early period is characterized by the introduction of thin film deposition techniques, while the current period is characterized by the increased focus on carbon nanotube and nanoparticle research. We introduce a method to identify disciplinary components of nanotechnology. It shows that the nano research is being carried out in a number of diverse parent disciplines. Currently, only 5% of articles are published in dedicated nano-only journals. We find that some 85% of nano research today is multidisciplinary. The case study of the diffusion of several nano-specific terms (e.g., 'carbon nanotube') shows that concepts spread from the initially few disciplinary components to the majority of them in a time span of around a decade. Hierarchical clustering of disciplinary components reveals that the cognitive content of current nanoscience can be divided into nine clusters. Some clusters account for a large fraction of nano research and are identified with such parent disciplines as the condensed matter and applied physics, materials science, and analytical chemistry. Other clusters represent much smaller parts of nano research, but are as cognitively distinct. In the decreasing order of size, these fields are: polymer science, biotechnology, general chemistry, surface science, and pharmacology. Cognitive content of research published in nano-only journals

  15. Automation enhancements in multidisciplinary design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wujek, Brett Alan

    The process of designing complex systems has necessarily evolved into one which includes the contributions and interactions of multiple disciplines. To date, the Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) process has been addressed mainly from the standpoint of algorithm development, with the primary concerns being effective and efficient coordination of disciplinary activities, modification of conventional optimization methods, and the utility of approximation techniques toward this goal. The focus of this dissertation is on improving the efficiency of MDO algorithms through the automation of common procedures and the development of improved methods to carry out these procedures. In this research, automation enhancements are made to the MDO process in three different areas: execution, sensitivity analysis and utility, and design variable move-limit management. A framework is developed along with a graphical user interface called NDOPT to automate the setup and execution of MDO algorithms in a research environment. The technology of automatic differentiation (AD) is utilized within various modules of MDO algorithms for fast and accurate sensitivity calculation, allowing for the frequent use of updated sensitivity information. With the use of AD, efficiency improvements are observed in the convergence of system analyses and in certain optimization procedures since gradient-based methods, traditionally considered cost-prohibitive, can be employed at a more reasonable expense. Finally, a method is developed to automatically monitor and adjust design variable move-limits for the approximate optimization process commonly used in MDO algorithms. With its basis in the well established and probably convergent trust region approach, the Trust region Ratio Approximation method (TRAM) developed in this research accounts for approximation accuracy and the sensitivity of the model error to the design space in providing a flexible move-limit adjustment factor. Favorable results

  16. Necrotizing pancreatitis: a review of multidisciplinary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Anthony; Goussous, Naeem; Sardana, Neeraj; Patel, Shirali; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this review is to summarize the current state of the art of the management of necrotizing pancreatitis, and to clarify some confusing points regarding the terminology and diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis, as these points are essential for management decisions and communication between providers and within the literature. Acute pancreatitis varies widely in its clinical presentation. Despite the publication of the Atlanta guidelines, misuse of pancreatitis terminology continues in the literature and in clinical practice, especially regarding the local complications associated with severe acute pancreatitis. Necrotizing pancreatitis is a manifestation of severe acute pancreatitis associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is aided by pancreas-protocol computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, ideally 72 h after onset of symptoms to achieve the most accurate characterization of pancreatic necrosis. The extent of necrosis correlates well with the incidence of infected necrosis, organ failure, need for debridement, and morbidity and mortality. Having established the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis, goals of appropriately aggressive resuscitation should be established and adhered to in a multidisciplinary approach, ideally at a high-volume pancreatic center. The role of antibiotics is determined by the presence of infected necrosis. Early enteral feeds improve outcomes compared with parenteral nutrition. Pancreatic necrosis is associated with a multitude of complications which can lead to long-term morbidity or mortality. Interventional therapy should be guided by available resources and the principle of a minimally invasive approach. When open debridement is necessary, it should be delayed at least 3-6 weeks to allow demarcation of necrotic from viable tissue.

  17. Multi-disciplinary engineering for cyber-physical production systems data models and software solutions for handling complex engineering projects

    CERN Document Server

    Lüder, Arndt; Gerhard, Detlef

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses challenges and solutions for the required information processing and management within the context of multi-disciplinary engineering of production systems. The authors consider methods, architectures, and technologies applicable in use cases according to the viewpoints of product engineering and production system engineering, and regarding the triangle of (1) product to be produced by a (2) production process executed on (3) a production system resource. With this book industrial production systems engineering researchers will get a better understanding of the challenges and requirements of multi-disciplinary engineering that will guide them in future research and development activities. Engineers and managers from engineering domains will be able to get a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of applicable methods, architectures, and technologies for selected use cases. IT researchers will be enabled to identify research issues related to the development of new methods, arc...

  18. Multidisciplinary care and management selection in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizer, Ayal A; Paly, Jonathan J; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2013-07-01

    The management of prostate cancer is complicated by the multitude of treatment options, the lack of proven superiority of one modality of management, and the presence of physician bias. Care at a multidisciplinary prostate cancer clinic offers patients the relative convenience of consultation with physicians of multiple specialties within the confines of a single visit and appears to serve as a venue in which patients can be counseled regarding the risks and benefits of available therapies in an open and interactive environment. Physician bias may be minimized in such an environment, and patient satisfaction rates are high. Available data suggest that low-risk patients who are seen at a multidisciplinary prostate cancer clinic appear to select active surveillance in greater proportion. However, relatively few studies have investigated the other added value that multidisciplinary clinics provide to the patient or health care system, and therefore, additional studies assessing the impact of multidisciplinary care in the management of patients with prostate cancer are needed.

  19. Improving Nurse-Physician Teamwork: A Multidisciplinary Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeton, Abigail; Bisbey, Cindy; O'Neill, Carrie; Allen, Danielle; O'Hara, Sara; Weinhold, Megan; Miller, Jenna; Bursiek, April; Grubbs, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Nurses surveyed on an inpatient gynecology surgical unit suggested communication and teamwork between nurses and physicians could be improved. To enhance teamwork, a multidisciplinary collaboration committee of nurses and physicians was created.

  20. Diagnostics of halitosis complaints by a multidisciplinary team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, Cees de; Mulder, J.; Broek, A.M. van den; Feenstra, L.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The study objective was to collect diagnostic data, to explore correlations between diagnostic variables, to provide an accurate initial diagnosis, and to provide appropriate management in consecutive subjects consulting with a multidisciplinary halitosis team because of a halitosis complaint.

  1. Diagnostics of halitosis complaints by a multidisciplinary team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, Cees de; Mulder, J.; Broek, A.M. van den; Feenstra, L.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The study objective was to collect diagnostic data, to explore correlations between diagnostic variables, to provide an accurate initial diagnosis, and to provide appropriate management in consecutive subjects consulting with a multidisciplinary halitosis team because of a halitosis complaint.

  2. Transforming Multidisciplinary Customer Requirements to Product Design Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Jie; Ding, Guo-Fu; Qin, Sheng-Feng; Li, Rong; Yan, Kai-Yin; Xiao, Shou-Ne; Yang, Guang-Wu

    2017-09-01

    With the increasing of complexity of complex mechatronic products, it is necessary to involve multidisciplinary design teams, thus, the traditional customer requirements modeling for a single discipline team becomes difficult to be applied in a multidisciplinary team and project since team members with various disciplinary backgrounds may have different interpretations of the customers' requirements. A new synthesized multidisciplinary customer requirements modeling method is provided for obtaining and describing the common understanding of customer requirements (CRs) and more importantly transferring them into a detailed and accurate product design specifications (PDS) to interact with different team members effectively. A case study of designing a high speed train verifies the rationality and feasibility of the proposed multidisciplinary requirement modeling method for complex mechatronic product development. This proposed research offersthe instruction to realize the customer-driven personalized customization of complex mechatronic product.

  3. Multidisciplinary Engagement with Nanoethics Through Education-The Nanobio-RAISE Advanced Courses as a Case Study and Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurbiers, Daan; Sleenhoff, Susanne; Jacobs, Johannes F; Osseweijer, Patricia

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents and evaluates two advanced courses organised in Oxford as part of the European project Nanobio-RAISE and suggests using their format to encourage multidisciplinary engagement between nanoscientists and nanoethicists. Several nanoethicists have recently identified the need for 'better' ethics of emerging technologies, arguing that ethical reflection should become part and parcel of the research and development (R&D) process itself. Such new forms of ethical deliberation, it is argued, transcend traditional disciplinary boundaries and require the active engagement and involvement of both nanoethicists and nanoscientists with the broader issues surrounding technological developments. Whereas significant research efforts into multi- and interdisciplinary collaborations during R&D processes are now emerging, opportunities for encouraging multidisciplinary engagement through education have remained relatively underexplored. This paper argues that educational programmes could be a natural extension of ongoing collaborative research efforts 'in the lab' and analyses how the Nanobio-RAISE courses could be used as a model for course development. In addition to exploring how the elements that were conducive to multidisciplinary engagement in this course could be preserved in future courses, this paper suggests shifting the emphasis from public communication towards ethical deliberation. Further course work could thus build capacity among both nanoscientists and nanoethicists for doing 'better' nanoethics.

  4. EDITORIAL: Ongoing climatic change in Northern Eurasia: justification for expedient research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber J.

    2009-12-01

    A brief overview of the ongoing climatic and environmental changes in Northern Eurasia serves as an editorial introduction to this, the second, special Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) focus issue of Environmental Research Letters. Climatic changes in Northern Eurasia over the last hundred years are reflected in numerous atmospheric and terrestrial variables. Many of these are noticeably significant above the confidence level for 'weather' or other (fire regime, ecosystem change) noise and thus should be further investigated in order to adapt to their impacts. In this focus issue, we introduce assorted studies of different aspects of contemporary change in Northern Eurasia. Most of these have been presented at one of the NEESPI workshops (for more information see neespi.org) and/or American Geophysical Union and European Geosciences Union NEESPI open sessions during the past year. These studies are diverse, representing the diversity of climates and ecosystems across Northern Eurasia. Some of these are focused on smaller spatial scales and/or address only specific aspects of the global change implications across the subcontinent. But the feeling (and observational evidence) that these changes have already been quite rapid and can have global implications inspires us to bring this suite of papers to the readers' attention. See the PDF for the full text of the editorial. Focus on Climatic and Environmental Change in Northern Eurasia Contents Preface Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative Pavel Groisman and Amber J Soja Editorial Siberia integrated regional study: Multidisciplinary investigations of interrelation between Siberia environment dynamics and global climate change E P Gordov and E A Vaganov Studies of the energy and water cycles in Northern Eurasia Comparison and evaluation of gridded radiation products across northern Eurasia T J Troy and E F Wood Reanalysis data underestimate significant changes in growing

  5. A multidisciplinary approach for the management of hypodontia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accácio Lins do Valle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypodontia is the congenital absence of one or more teeth and may affect permanent teeth. Several options are indicated to treat hypodontia, including the maintenance of primary teeth or space redistribution for restorative treatment with partial adhesive bridges, tooth transplantation, and implants. However, a multidisciplinary approach is the most important requirement for the ideal treatment of hypodontia. This paper describes a multidisciplinary treatment plan for congenitally missing permanent mandibular second premolars involving orthodontics, implantology and prosthodontic specialties.

  6. [Multidisciplinary treatment of lung cancer in 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Hirokazu; Sagawa, M; Usuda, K; Ueno, M; Tanaka, M; Machida, Y; Sakuma, T

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Japan. Recently, big progress in the treatment of lung cancer has been achieved, such as new anti-cancer drugs, molecular targeted therapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, etc. Multidisciplinary approach has been required to the therapy for lung cancer patients. In this paper, we introduce The 21st Century Multidisciplinary Center in Kanazawa Medical University, and the Hokuriku Training Program for Making Specialists in Cancer Treatment.

  7. Multidisciplinary Care Models for Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiro, Rubén; Coto, Pablo; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Navío Marco, Teresa; de la Cueva, Pablo; Pujol Busquets, Manel; García Font, Mercè; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Alvarez Vega, Jose Luis; Chaves Álvarez, Antonio Javier; Sánchez Parera, Ricardo; Ruiz Carrascosa, Jose Carlos; Rodríguez Martínez, Fernando José; Pardo Sánchez, José; Feced Olmos, Carlos; Pujol, Conrad; Galindez, Eva; Pérez Barrio, Silvia; Urruticoechea Arana, Ana; Hergueta, Mercedes; Luelmo, Jesús; Gratacós, Jordi

    To describe (structure, processes) of the multidisciplinary care models in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in Spain, as well as barriers and facilitators of their implementation. A qualitative study was performed following structured interviews with 24 professionals (12 rheumatologists, 12 dermatologists who provide multidisciplinary care for patients with PsA). We collected data related to the hospital, department, population and multidisciplinary care model (type, physical and human resources, professional requirements, objectives, referral criteria, agendas, protocols, responsibilities, decision- making, research and education, clinical sessions, development and planning of the model, advantages and disadvantages of the model, barriers and facilitators in the implementation of the model. The models characteristics are described. We analyzed 12 multidisciplinary care models in PsA, with at least 1-2 years of experience, and 3 subtypes of models, face-to-face, parallel, and preferential circuit. All are adapted to the hospital and professionals characteristics. A proper implementation planning is essential. The involvement and empathy between professionals and an access and well-defined referral criteria are important facilitators in the implementation of a model. The management of agendas and data collection to measure the multidisciplinary care models health outcomes are the main barriers. There are different multidisciplinary care models in PsA that can improve patient outcomes, system efficiency and collaboration between specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  8. Continuously on-going hindcast simulations for impact applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Ivonne; Geyer, Beate

    2016-04-01

    Observations for e.g. temperature, precipitation, radiation, or wind are often used as meteorological forcing for different impact models, like e.g. crop models, urban models, economic models and energy system models. To assess a climate signal, the time period covered by the observation is often too short, they have gaps in between, and are inhomogeneous over time, due to changes in the measurements itself or in the near surrounding. Thus output from global and regional climate models can close the gap and provide homogeneous and physically consistent time series of meteorological parameters. CORDEX evaluation runs performed for the IPCC-AR5 provide a good base for the regional scale. However, with respect to climate services, continuously on-going hindcast simulations are required for regularly updated applications. In this study two projects are presented where hindcast-simulations optimized for a region of interest are performed continuously. The hindcast simulation performed by HZG covering Europe includes the EURO-CORDEX domain with a wider extend to the north to cover the ice edge. The simulation under consideration of the coastDat-experiences is available for the period of 1979 - 2015, prolonged ongoing and fulfills the customer's needs with respect of output variables, levels, intervals and statistical measures. CoastDat - customers are dealing e.g. with naval architecture, renewable energies, offshore wind farming, shipping emissions, coastal flood risk and others. The evaluation of the hindcast is done for Europe by using the EVAL-tool of the CCLM community and by comparison with HYRAS - data for Germany and neighbouring countries. The Climate Research group at the national Austrian weather service, ZAMG, is focusing on high mountain regions and, especially on the Alps. The hindcast-simulation is forced by ERA-interim and optimized for the Alpine Region. One of the main tasks is to capture strong precipitation events which often occur during summer when

  9. Multidisciplinary integrated Parent and Child Centres in Amsterdam: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Busch

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In several countries centres for the integrated delivery of services to the parent and child have been established. In the Netherlands family health care service centres, called Parent and Child Centres (PCCs involve multidisciplinary teams. Here doctors, nurses, midwives, maternity help professionals and educationists are integrated into multidisciplinary teams in neighbourhood-based centres. To date there has been little research on the implementation of service delivery in these centres.Study Design: A SWOT analysis was performed by use of triangulation data; this took place by integrating all relevant published documents on the origin and organization of the PCCs and the results from interviews with PCC experts and with PCC professionals (N=91. Structured interviews were performed with PCC-professionals (health care professionals (N=67 and PCC managers N=12 and PCC-experts (N=12 in Amsterdam and qualitatively analysed thematically. The interview themes were based on a pre-set list of codes, derived from a prior documentation study and a focus group with PCC experts. Results: Perceived advantages of PCCs were more continuity of care, shorter communication lines, low-threshold contact between professionals and promising future perspectives. Perceived challenges included the absence of uniform multidisciplinary guidelines, delays in communication with hospitals and midwives, inappropriate accommodation for effective professional integration, differing expectations regarding the PCC-manager role among PCC-partners and the danger of professionals' needs dominating clients' needs.Conclusions: Professionals perceive PCCs as a promising development in the integration of services. Remaining challenges involved improvements at the managerial and organizational level. Quantitative research into the improvements in quality of care and child health is recommended.

  10. Multidisciplinary integrated Parent and Child Centres in Amsterdam: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Busch

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In several countries centres for the integrated delivery of services to the parent and child have been established. In the Netherlands family health care service centres, called Parent and Child Centres (PCCs involve multidisciplinary teams. Here doctors, nurses, midwives, maternity help professionals and educationists are integrated into multidisciplinary teams in neighbourhood-based centres. To date there has been little research on the implementation of service delivery in these centres. Study Design: A SWOT analysis was performed by use of triangulation data; this took place by integrating all relevant published documents on the origin and organization of the PCCs and the results from interviews with PCC experts and with PCC professionals (N=91. Structured interviews were performed with PCC-professionals (health care professionals (N=67 and PCC managers N=12 and PCC-experts (N=12 in Amsterdam and qualitatively analysed thematically. The interview themes were based on a pre-set list of codes, derived from a prior documentation study and a focus group with PCC experts.  Results: Perceived advantages of PCCs were more continuity of care, shorter communication lines, low-threshold contact between professionals and promising future perspectives. Perceived challenges included the absence of uniform multidisciplinary guidelines, delays in communication with hospitals and midwives, inappropriate accommodation for effective professional integration, differing expectations regarding the PCC-manager role among PCC-partners and the danger of professionals' needs dominating clients' needs. Conclusions: Professionals perceive PCCs as a promising development in the integration of services. Remaining challenges involved improvements at the managerial and organizational level. Quantitative research into the improvements in quality of care and child health is recommended.

  11. Geoengineering:Basic science and ongoing research efforts in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Long; GAO Chao-Chao; ZHAO Li-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Geoengineering (also called climate engineering), which refers to large-scale intervention in the Earth's climate system to counteract greenhouse gas-induced warming, has been one of the most rapidly growing areas of climate research as a potential option for tackling global warming. Here, we provide an overview of the scientific background and research progress of proposed geoengineering schemes. Geo-engineering can be broadly divided into two categories:solar geoengineering (also called solar radiation management, or SRM), which aims to reflect more sunlight to space, and carbon dioxide removal (CDR), which aims to reduce the CO2 content in the atmosphere. First, we review different proposed geoengineering methods involved in the solar radiation management and carbon dioxide removal schemes. Then, we discuss the fundamental science underlying the climate response to the carbon dioxide removal and solar radiation management schemes. We focus on two basic issues:1) climate response to the reduction in solar irradiance and 2) climate response to the reduction in atmospheric CO2. Next, we introduce an ongoing geoengineering research project in China that is supported by National Key Basic Research Program. This research project, being the first coordinated geoengineering research program in China, will systematically investigate the physical mechanisms, climate impacts, and risk and governance of a few targeted geoengineering schemes. It is expected that this research program will help us gain a deep under-standing of the physical science underlying geoengineering schemes and the impacts of geoengineering on global climate, in particular, on the Asia monsoon region.

  12. Milieu matters: Evidence that ongoing lifestyle activities influence health behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Rob; Norman, Paul; Sheeran, Paschal

    2017-01-01

    Health behaviors occur within a milieu of lifestyle activities that could conflict with health actions. We examined whether cognitions about, and performance of, other lifestyle activities augment the prediction of health behaviors, and whether these lifestyle factors are especially influential among individuals with low health behavior engagement. Participants (N = 211) completed measures of past behavior and cognitions relating to five health behaviors (e.g., smoking, getting drunk) and 23 lifestyle activities (e.g., reading, socializing), as well as personality variables. All behaviors were measured again at two weeks. Data were analyzed using neural network and cluster analyses. The neural network accurately predicted health behaviors at follow-up (R2 = .71). As hypothesized, lifestyle cognitions and activities independently predicted health behaviors over and above behavior-specific cognitions and previous behavior. Additionally, lifestyle activities and poor self-regulatory capability were more influential among people exhibiting unhealthy behaviors. Considering ongoing lifestyle activities can enhance prediction and understanding of health behaviors and offer new targets for health behavior interventions.

  13. Milieu matters: Evidence that ongoing lifestyle activities influence health behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Rob; Norman, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Health behaviors occur within a milieu of lifestyle activities that could conflict with health actions. We examined whether cognitions about, and performance of, other lifestyle activities augment the prediction of health behaviors, and whether these lifestyle factors are especially influential among individuals with low health behavior engagement. Participants (N = 211) completed measures of past behavior and cognitions relating to five health behaviors (e.g., smoking, getting drunk) and 23 lifestyle activities (e.g., reading, socializing), as well as personality variables. All behaviors were measured again at two weeks. Data were analyzed using neural network and cluster analyses. The neural network accurately predicted health behaviors at follow-up (R2 = .71). As hypothesized, lifestyle cognitions and activities independently predicted health behaviors over and above behavior-specific cognitions and previous behavior. Additionally, lifestyle activities and poor self-regulatory capability were more influential among people exhibiting unhealthy behaviors. Considering ongoing lifestyle activities can enhance prediction and understanding of health behaviors and offer new targets for health behavior interventions. PMID:28662120

  14. Sandia's mentoring program : an ongoing success.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, Soila

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the Mentoring Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which has been an on-going success since its inception in 1995. The Mentoring Program provides a mechanism to develop a workforce able to respond to changing requirements and complex customer needs. The program objectives are to enhance employee contributions through increased knowledge of SNL culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. Mentoring is a proven mechanism for attracting new employees, retaining employees, and developing leadership. It helps to prevent the loss of corporate knowledge from attrition and retirement, and it increases the rate and level of contributions of new managers and employees, also spurring cross-organizational teaming. The Mentoring Program is structured as a one-year partnership between an experienced staff member or leader and a less experienced one. Mentors and mentees are paired according to mutual objectives and interests. Support is provided to the matched pairs from their management as well as division program coordinators in both New Mexico and California locations. In addition, bi-monthly large-group training sessions are held.

  15. New insights in the ongoing surge of the Austfonna icecap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, T.; Dunse, T.; Kääb, A.; Hagen, J. O.; Schuler, T.; Reijmer, C.

    2014-12-01

    Basin-3, a major drainage basin of the Austfonna icecap in NE-Svalbard switched to full surge mode in autumn 2012 after a multiannual, stepwise acceleration of its northern branch. A time series of velocity maps from repeat TerraSAR-X acquisitions revealed a maximum speed at the terminus of >18 m d-1 around the turn of the year 2012. The frontal ablation of Basin-3 was estimated to 4.2±1.6 Gt a-1 between April 2012 and May 2013, tripling the total dynamic mass loss from the largest icecap in the Eurasian arctic. Today, TerraSAR-X, Radarsat-2 and GPS data show that the surge is still ongoing. While the speed at the calving front dropped to 10 m d-1 until July 2014, areas further inland continued to accelerate after the climax, and 10 m d-1 were also measured ~20 km inland in summer 2014. This development will be further investigated by exploiting a time series of velocity maps based on Radarsat-2 Fine Beam data starting from July 2014, which will, other than the TerraSAR-X data, cover almost the entire fast flowing part of the basin. By combining both datasets we will extend the estimation of the frontal ablation and related sea-level rise contribution of the Basin-3 surge.

  16. Biomarkers for the prediction of acute ongoing arterial plaque rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo YL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuan-Lin Guo, Jian-Jun Li Division of Dyslipidemia, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fu Wai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Acute coronary syndrome (ACS is the main cause of mortality for coronary artery disease (CAD. Accordingly, earlier detection and diagnosis might be a key point for reducing the mortality in patients with ACS. One promising strategy is biomarker measurement in patients with ACS. Biomarkers are generally considered to be plasma measurements of molecules, proteins, or enzymes that provide independent diagnostic and prognostic values that can reflect underlying disease state and condition, especially repeated measurements. Nowadays, the most widely used biomarkers to identify or predict ACS are high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and high sensitivity troponin T/I (hs-TnT/I. The aim of the present review was principally to summarize recent evidence regarding some new biomarkers by which we could directly predict acute ongoing arterial plaque rupture, which may help to identify at-risk patients earlier than hs-CRP or hs-TnT/I. Keywords: matrix metalloproteinase-9, lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2, myeloperoxidase, soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1, pregnancy-associated plasma protein A, placental growth factor, acute coronary syndrome

  17. Geoengineering: Basic science and ongoing research efforts in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Cao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Geoengineering (also called climate engineering, which refers to large-scale intervention in the Earth's climate system to counteract greenhouse gas-induced warming, has been one of the most rapidly growing areas of climate research as a potential option for tackling global warming. Here, we provide an overview of the scientific background and research progress of proposed geoengineering schemes. Geoengineering can be broadly divided into two categories: solar geoengineering (also called solar radiation management, or SRM, which aims to reflect more sunlight to space, and carbon dioxide removal (CDR, which aims to reduce the CO2 content in the atmosphere. First, we review different proposed geoengineering methods involved in the solar radiation management and carbon dioxide removal schemes. Then, we discuss the fundamental science underlying the climate response to the carbon dioxide removal and solar radiation management schemes. We focus on two basic issues: 1 climate response to the reduction in solar irradiance and 2 climate response to the reduction in atmospheric CO2. Next, we introduce an ongoing geoengineering research project in China that is supported by National Key Basic Research Program. This research project, being the first coordinated geoengineering research program in China, will systematically investigate the physical mechanisms, climate impacts, and risk and governance of a few targeted geoengineering schemes. It is expected that this research program will help us gain a deep understanding of the physical science underlying geoengineering schemes and the impacts of geoengineering on global climate, in particular, on the Asia monsoon region.

  18. Hydrothermal conditions of South Eastern Siberia under the ongoing warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voropay, N. N.; Maksyutova, E. V.; Riazanova, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    A great increase in air temperature has been observed since 1976. Siberia is a region with most severe ongoing climate change. To monitor the extreme weather events is important. To evaluate moisture conditions we used the D.A. Ped index (Si). Monthly air temperature and precipitation data from 19 weather stations of South Eastern Siberia (50-60° N 90-120° E) were used for the index calculation during the vegetation period. During 1976-2010 the number of droughts in the study region was more than the number of excessive moisture periods. The maximal statistically significant trend (0.4-0.6 per 10 years) in Eastern Siberia was observed in May. The characteristics of the winter-spring period preceding the vegetation season were analyzed. Significant positive trends exist in the study area for the May temperature (0.5-0.9 °C per 10 years) and the May sum of positive temperatures (14-28 °C per 10 years). There are tendencies to increase the number of days with temperatures above zero in March (1-3 days per 10 years) and the sum of positive temperatures in April (5-16 °C per 10 years). The stable transition of air temperature over 0 °C shifts into early dates by 1-7 days every 10 years.

  19. The ongoing impact of modular localization on particle theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schroer, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Modular localization is the concise conceptual formulation of causal localization in the setting of local quantum physics. Unlike QM it does not refer to individual operators but rather to ensembles of observables which share the same localization region, as a result it explains the probabilistic aspects of QFT in terms of the impure KMS nature arising from the local restriction of the pure vacuum. Whereas it played no important role in the perturbation theory of low spin particles, it becomes indispensible for interactions which involve higher spin s fields, where is leads to the replacement of the operator (BRST) gauge theory setting in Krein space by a new formulation in terms of stringlocal fields in Hilbert space. The main purpose of this paper is to present new results which lead to a rethinking of important issues of the Standard Model concerning massive gauge theories and the Higgs mechanism. We place these new findings into the broader context of ongoing conceptual changes within QFT which already le...

  20. Control of energy and matter at nanoscales: challenges and opportunities for plasma nanoscience in a sustainability age

    Science.gov (United States)

    (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya

    2011-05-01

    Plasma nanoscience is an emerging multidisciplinary research field at the cutting edge of a large number of disciplines including but not limited to physics and chemistry of plasmas and gas discharges, materials science, surface science, nanoscience and nanotechnology, solid-state physics, space physics and astrophysics, photonics, optics, plasmonics, spintronics, quantum information, physical chemistry, biomedical sciences and related engineering subjects. This paper examines the origin, progress and future perspectives of this research field driven by the global scientific and societal challenges. The future potential of plasma nanoscience to remain a highly topical area in the global research and technological agenda in the age of fundamental-level control for a sustainable future is assessed using a framework of the five Grand Challenges for Basic Energy Sciences recently mapped by the US Department of Energy. It is concluded that the ongoing research is very relevant and is expected to substantially expand to competitively contribute to the solution of all of these Grand Challenges. The approach to controlling energy and matter at nano- and subnanoscales is based on identifying the prevailing carriers and transfer mechanisms of the energy and matter at the spatial and temporal scales that are most relevant to any particular nanofabrication process. Strong accent is made on the competitive edge of the plasma-based nanotechnology in applications related to the major socio-economic issues (energy, food, water, health and environment) that are crucial for a sustainable development of humankind. Several important emerging topics, opportunities and multidisciplinary synergies for plasma nanoscience are highlighted. The main nanosafety issues are also discussed and the environment- and human health-friendly features of plasma-based nanotech are emphasized.

  1. A Practitioner’s Perspective of Multidisciplinary Teams: Analysis of Potential Barriers and Key Factors for Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Roncaglia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Multidisciplinary team working is well established in the literature within health and social sciences, as well as in the last decade within sport science teams. Knowledge and expertise that stems from different disciplines, which aim to be complementary and enriching can bring great benefits and potentially positive outcomes to clients, teams and organisation as a whole. However, little has been written and reported on the barriers and risks that stem from this multidisciplinary approach. The aim of this paper is to highlight and reflect on the potential barriers and risk factors that arise within this concept of multidisciplinary teams approach and to present and reflect on some corrective treatments. Suggestions which function as critical factors for success are then presented. This paper solely reflects on the author’s experiences in working within multidisciplinary teams over a period of time of twenty-four months across a number of health, education and social care providers in the UK. A framework is suggested in order to better understand and ultimately address some of the challenges faced by this approach. Furthermore the paper proposes drivers for positive change which are highlighted in this context.

  2. Radical university-industry innovation – research design and preliminary findings from an on-going qualitative case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertsen, Frank; Nielsen, René Nesgaard

    This paper reports from an on-going pilot project investigating university-industry collaboration on the development of radical innovation. There is evidence in the literature that such collaboration increases the likelihood of radical innovation. A conceptual framework is presented and it is arg......This paper reports from an on-going pilot project investigating university-industry collaboration on the development of radical innovation. There is evidence in the literature that such collaboration increases the likelihood of radical innovation. A conceptual framework is presented....... Some preliminary findings are presented and briefly discussed, including the role of the university’s formal set-up to deal with IPR/commercialisation and the researchers’ personal networking with industry as well as challenges concerning the sharing of IPR/commercialisation outcomes....

  3. Initiation of a multidisciplinary summer studentship in palliative and supportive care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairchild A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Alysa Fairchild,1 Sharon Watanabe,1 Carole Chambers,2 Janice Yurick,3 Lisa Lem,4 Patty Tachynski51Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, 2Department of Pharmacy, Alberta Health Services, 3Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, 4Department of Respiratory Therapy, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, 5Department of Clinical Nutrition, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaPurpose: The optimal setting for interprofessional education (IPE for prelicensure health care trainees is unclear, especially in a field as complex and emotionally challenging as oncology. In this article, the authors describe the initiation of the Cross Cancer Institute Multidisciplinary Summer Studentship in Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology, a 6-week, multidisciplinary team-based clinical placement in supportive care, designed to incorporate features of best practice cooperative learning.Methods: A steering committee established goals, structure, eligibility criteria, application process, funding, and a consensus approach to instruction and evaluation for the IPE program. Studentship components included mandatory and flexible clinical time, an exploratory investigation, discussion groups, and a presentation. Two senior students per iteration were selected from clinical nutrition, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, respiratory therapy, social work, and speech–language pathology applicants. These students completed questionnaires investigating their views of their own and others' professions at baseline, at the end of the rotation, and 6 months after the studentship.Results: Eight students from medicine, clinical nutrition, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and speech–language pathology have participated to date. At the elective's end, students have described a more positive view of multidisciplinary team practice, with each participating discipline perceived as

  4. Recurrences and Ongoing Complaints of Diverticulitis; Results of a Survey among Gastroenterologists and Surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, M. A W; Draaisma, W. A.; Consten, E. C J; Broeders, I. A M J

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the current opinion of gastroenterologists and surgeons on treatment strategies for patients, with recurrences or ongoing complaints of diverticulitis. Background: Treatment of recurrences and ongoing complaints remains a point of debate. No randomized trial

  5. Early markers of ongoing action-effect learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Hannes; Krebs, Ruth M; Wolfensteller, Uta

    2012-01-01

    Acquiring knowledge about the relationship between stimulus conditions, one's own actions, and the resulting consequences or effects, is one prerequisite for intentional action. Previous studies have shown that such contextualized associations between actions and their effects (S-R-E associations) can be picked up very quickly. The present study examined how such weakly practiced associations might affect overt behavior during the process of initial learning and during subsequent retrieval, and how these two measures are inter-related. We examined incidental (S-)R-E learning in the context of trial-and-error S-R learning and in the context of instruction-based S-R learning. Furthermore, as a control condition, common outcome (CO) learning blocks were included in which all responses produced one common sound effect, hence precluding differential (S-)R-E learning. Post-learning retrieval of R-E associations was tested by re-using previously produced sound effects as novel imperative stimuli combined with actions that were either compatible or incompatible with the previously encountered R-E mapping. The central result was that the size of the compatibility effect could be predicted by the size of relative response slowing during ongoing learning in the preceding acquisition phase, both in trial-and-error learning and in instruction-based learning. Importantly, this correlation was absent for the CO control condition, precluding accounts based on unspecific factors. Instead, the results suggest that differential outcomes are "actively" integrated into action planning and that this takes additional planning time. We speculate that this might be especially true for weakly practiced (S-)R-E associations before an initial goal-directed action mode transitions into a more stimulus-based action mode.

  6. Early markers of ongoing action-effect learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes eRuge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring knowledge about the relationship between stimulus conditions, one’s own actions, and the resulting consequences or effects, is one prerequisite for intentional action. Previous studies have shown that such contextualized associations between actions and their effects (S-R-E associations can be picked up very quickly. The present study examined how such weakly practiced associations might affect overt behavior during the process of initial learning and during subsequent retrieval, and how these two measures are inter-related. We examined incidental (S-R-E learning in the context of trial-and-error S-R learning and in the context of instruction-based S-R learning. Furthermore, as a control condition, common outcome (CO learning blocks were included in which all responses produced one common sound effect, hence precluding differential (S-R-E learning. Post-learning retrieval of R-E associations was tested by re-using previously produced sound effects as novel imperative stimuli combined with actions that were either compatible or incompatible with the previously encountered R-E mapping. The central result was that the size of the compatibility effect could be predicted by the size of relative response slowing during ongoing learning in the preceding acquisition phase, both in trial-and-error learning and in instruction-based learning. Importantly, this correlation was absent for the common outcome control condition, precluding accounts based on unspecific factors. Instead, the results suggest that differential outcomes are ‘actively’ integrated into action planning and that this takes additional planning time. We speculate that this might be especially true for weakly practiced (S-R-E associations before an initial goal-directed action mode transitions into a more stimulus-based action mode.

  7. The Ongoing Impact of Modular Localization on Particle Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, Bert

    2014-08-01

    Modular localization is the concise conceptual formulation of causal localization in the setting of local quantum physics. Unlike QM it does not refer to individual operators but rather to ensembles of observables which share the same localization region, as a result it explains the probabilistic aspects of QFT in terms of the impure KMS nature arising from the local restriction of the pure vacuum. Whereas it played no important role in the perturbation theory of low spin particles, it becomes indispensible for interactions which involve higher spin s≥1 fields, where is leads to the replacement of the operator (BRST) gauge theory setting in Krein space by a new formulation in terms of stringlocal fields in Hilbert space. The main purpose of this paper is to present new results which lead to a rethinking of important issues of the Standard Model concerning massive gauge theories and the Higgs mechanism. We place these new findings into the broader context of ongoing conceptual changes within QFT which already led to new nonperturbative constructions of models of integrable QFTs. It is also pointed out that modular localization does not support ideas coming from string theory, as extra dimensions and Kaluza-Klein dimensional reductions outside quasiclassical approximations. Apart from hologarphic projections on null-surfaces, holograhic relations between QFT in different spacetime dimensions violate the causal completeness property, this includes in particular the Maldacena conjecture. Last not least, modular localization sheds light onto unsolved problems from QFT's distant past since it reveals that the Einstein-Jordan conundrum is really an early harbinger of the Unruh effect.

  8. Towards Multidisciplinary HIV-Cure Research: Integrating Social Science with Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Cynthia I; Ross, Anna Laura; Auerbach, Judith D; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Dubé, Karine; Tucker, Joseph D; Noseda, Veronica; Possas, Cristina; Rausch, Dianne M

    2016-01-01

    The quest for a cure for HIV remains a timely and key challenge for the HIV research community. Despite significant scientific advances, current HIV therapy regimens do not completely eliminate the negative impact of HIV on the immune system; and the economic impact of treating all people infected with HIV globally, for the duration of their lifetimes, presents significant challenges. This article discusses, from a multidisciplinary approach, critical social, behavioral, ethical, and economic issues permeating the HIV-cure research agenda. As part of a search for an HIV cure, both the perspective of patients/participants and clinical researchers should be taken into account. In addition, continued efforts should be made to involve and educate the broader community.

  9. Multidisciplinary care team for cancer patients and its implementation in several Middle Eastern countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbermann, M; Pitsillides, B; Al-Alfi, N; Omran, S; Al-Jabri, K; Elshamy, K; Ghrayeb, I; Livneh, J; Daher, M; Charalambous, H; Jafferri, A; Fink, R; El-Shamy, M

    2013-10-01

    This article introduces palliative care to cancer patients in Middle Eastern countries. It considers the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing an adequate service to the patient and his/her family. It provides views of professionals from the various countries with regard to the role of the nurse in such teams; whereby the three elements of palliative care nursing entail: 1. Working directly with patients and families; 2. Working with other health and social care professionals to network and co-ordinate services; and 3. working at an organizational level to plan, develop and manage service provision in local, regional and national settings. This article also details the challenges that nurses face in the Middle East and outlines the preferable ways to overcome such challenges. The latter include more focused educational activities at the undergraduate and graduate levels and continuous clinical training throughout their work as palliative care nurse specialists.

  10. Management of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Caroline L; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease predominantly affecting women, particularly those of childbearing age. SLE provides challenges in the prepregnancy, antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum periods for these women, and for the medical, obstetric, and midwifery teams who provide their care. As with many medical conditions in pregnancy, the best maternal and fetal-neonatal outcomes are obtained with a planned pregnancy and a cohesive multidisciplinary approach. Effective prepregnancy risk assessment and counseling includes exploration of factors for poor pregnancy outcome, discussion of risks, and appropriate planning for pregnancy, with consideration of discussion of relative contraindications to pregnancy. In pregnancy, early referral for hospital-coordinated care, involvement of obstetricians and rheumatologists (and other specialists as required), an individual management plan, regular reviews, and early recognition of flares and complications are all important. Women are at risk of lupus flares, worsening renal impairment, onset of or worsening hypertension, preeclampsia, and/or venous thromboembolism, and miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm delivery, and/or neonatal lupus syndrome (congenital heart block or neonatal lupus erythematosus). A cesarean section may be required in certain obstetric contexts (such as urgent preterm delivery for maternal and/or fetal well-being), but vaginal birth should be the aim for the majority of women. Postnatally, an ongoing individual management plan remains important, with neonatal management where necessary and rheumatology followup. This article explores the challenges at each stage of pregnancy, discusses the effect of SLE on pregnancy and vice versa, and reviews antirheumatic medications with the latest guidance about their use and safety in pregnancy. Such information is required to effectively and safely manage each stage of pregnancy in women with SLE.

  11. Managing drug-resistant epilepsy: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalic, Linda; Cook, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), ~20%–30% of people with epilepsy remain refractory to treatment and are said to have drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). This multifaceted condition comprises intractable seizures, neurobiochemical changes, cognitive decline, and psychosocial dysfunction. An ongoing challenge to both researchers and clinicians alike, DRE management is complicated by the heterogeneity among this patient group. The underlying mechanism of DRE is not completely understood. Many hypotheses exist, and relate to both the intrinsic characteristics of the particular epilepsy (associated syndrome/lesion, initial response to AED, and the number and type of seizures prior to diagnosis) and other pharmacological mechanisms of resistance. The four current hypotheses behind pharmacological resistance are the “transporter”, “target”, “network”, and “intrinsic severity” hypotheses, and these are reviewed in this paper. Of equal challenge is managing patients with DRE, and this requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving physicians, surgeons, psychiatrists, neuropsychologists, pharmacists, dietitians, and specialist nurses. Attention to comorbid psychiatric and other diseases is paramount, given the higher prevalence in this cohort and associated poorer health outcomes. Treatment options need to consider the economic burden to the patient and the likelihood of AED compliance and tolerability. Most importantly, higher mortality rates, due to comorbidities, suicide, and sudden death, emphasize the importance of seizure control in reducing this risk. Overall, resective surgery offers the best rates of seizure control. It is not an option for all patients, and there is often a significant delay in referring to epilepsy surgery centers. Optimization of AEDs, identification and treatment of comorbidities, patient education to promote adherence to treatment, and avoidance of triggers should be periodically performed until further

  12. Management of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Caroline L; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease predominantly affecting women, particularly those of childbearing age. SLE provides challenges in the prepregnancy, antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum periods for these women, and for the medical, obstetric, and midwifery teams who provide their care. As with many medical conditions in pregnancy, the best maternal and fetal–neonatal outcomes are obtained with a planned pregnancy and a cohesive multidisciplinary approach. Effective prepregnancy risk assessment and counseling includes exploration of factors for poor pregnancy outcome, discussion of risks, and appropriate planning for pregnancy, with consideration of discussion of relative contraindications to pregnancy. In pregnancy, early referral for hospital-coordinated care, involvement of obstetricians and rheumatologists (and other specialists as required), an individual management plan, regular reviews, and early recognition of flares and complications are all important. Women are at risk of lupus flares, worsening renal impairment, onset of or worsening hypertension, preeclampsia, and/or venous thromboembolism, and miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm delivery, and/or neonatal lupus syndrome (congenital heart block or neonatal lupus erythematosus). A cesarean section may be required in certain obstetric contexts (such as urgent preterm delivery for maternal and/or fetal well-being), but vaginal birth should be the aim for the majority of women. Postnatally, an ongoing individual management plan remains important, with neonatal management where necessary and rheumatology followup. This article explores the challenges at each stage of pregnancy, discusses the effect of SLE on pregnancy and vice versa, and reviews antirheumatic medications with the latest guidance about their use and safety in pregnancy. Such information is required to effectively and safely manage each stage of pregnancy in women with SLE

  13. Recent and ongoing selection in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Hellmann, Ines; Hubisz, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    The recent availability of genome-scale genotyping data has led to the identification of regions of the human genome that seem to have been targeted by selection. These findings have increased our understanding of the evolutionary forces that affect the human genome, have augmented our knowledge...... of gene function and promise to increase our understanding of the genetic basis of disease. However, inferences of selection are challenged by several confounding factors, especially the complex demographic history of human populations, and concordance between studies is variable. Although such studies...

  14. Whiplash: are you at risk for ongoing pain or disability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Have you recently sustained an injury and been diagnosed with whiplash or a whiplash-associated disorder? If so, you may be wondering what your recovery will be like. If health care providers could identify, soon after the initial injury, which patients would probably improve naturally over time and which ones would not, they could better manage the patient's treatment in the early stages of recovery. A study published in the April 2015 issue of JOSPT provides new insights into this challenge, which may help improve decision making for providers and outcomes for patients.

  15. The effect of multidisciplinary team care on cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Ganiy Opeyemi

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the multidisciplinary team management of many medical conditions especially cancers has increasingly taken a prominent role in patient management in many hospitals and medical centres in the developed countries. In the United Kingdom, it began to gain prominence following the Calman-Heine report in 1995 which suggested that each Cancer Unit in a hospital should have in place arrangements for non-surgical oncological input into services, with a role for a non-surgical oncologist. The report further suggested that a lead clinician with a well established interest in cancer care should be appointed to organise and coordinate the whole range of cancer services provided within the Cancer Unit. Many people have argued that the multidisciplinary team management of patients has resulted in better care and improved survival. However, there are barriers to the optimal effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team. This paper aims to review various studies on the effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team in the management of cancer patients and also discuss some of the barriers to the multidisciplinary team.

  16. Technological Design in a multidisciplinary, sensory, context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Emmitt

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Architecture involves measurable (tangible and immeasurable (intangible elements, which makes the pursuit of good architecture a constant challenge for all project contributors. It is often the immeasurable aspects, the intuition and feel for a project and the way in which actors interact, which help to bring about exciting, creative and functional buildings that reflect the best of humanity, time and place. In this article the author explores the role of technological design within an environmentally responsible age. The narrative moves through the sustainable vernacular to the constructive link between design and construction, concluding with some reflections on the shape of things to come.

  17. Avionics Architectures for Exploration: Ongoing Efforts in Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Montgomery B.; Ratliff, James E.; Hames, Kevin L.; Vitalpur, Sharada V.; Woodman, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    The field of Avionics is advancing far more rapidly in terrestrial applications than in spaceflight applications. Spaceflight Avionics are not keeping pace with expectations set by terrestrial experience, nor are they keeping pace with the need for increasingly complex automation and crew interfaces as we move beyond Low Earth Orbit. NASA must take advantage of the strides being made by both space-related and terrestrial industries to drive our development and sustaining costs down. This paper describes ongoing efforts by the Avionics Architectures for Exploration (AAE) project chartered by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program to evaluate new avionic architectures and technologies, provide objective comparisons of them, and mature selected technologies for flight and for use by other AES projects. The AAE project team includes members from most NASA centers, and from industry. It is our intent to develop a common core avionic system that has standard capabilities and interfaces, and contains the basic elements and functionality needed for any spacecraft. This common core will be scalable and tailored to specific missions. It will incorporate hardware and software from multiple vendors, and be upgradeable in order to infuse incremental capabilities and new technologies. It will maximize the use of reconfigurable open source software (e.g., Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC's) Core Flight Software (CFS)). Our long-term focus is on improving functionality, reliability, and autonomy, while reducing size, weight, and power. Where possible, we will leverage terrestrial commercial capabilities to drive down development and sustaining costs. We will select promising technologies for evaluation, compare them in an objective manner, and mature them to be available for future programs. The remainder of this paper describes our approach, technical areas of emphasis, integrated test experience and results as of mid-2014, and future plans. As a part of the AES

  18. Ongoing contact activation in patients with hereditary angioedema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke Konings

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema (HAE is predominantly caused by a deficiency in C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH (HAE-C1INH. C1INH inhibits activated factor XII (FXIIa, activated factor XI (FXIa, and kallikrein. In HAE-C1INH patients the thrombotic risk is not increased even though activation of the contact system is poorly regulated. Therefore, we hypothesized that contact activation preferentially leads to kallikrein formation and less to activation of the coagulation cascade in HAE-C1INH patients. We measured the levels of C1INH in complex with activated contact factors in plasma samples of HAE-C1INH patients (N=30, 17 during remission and 13 during acute attack and healthy controls (N=10. We did not detect differences in enzyme-inhibitor complexes between samples of controls, patients during remission and patients during an acute attack. Reconstitution with C1INH did not change this result. Next, we determined the potential to form enzyme-inhibitory complexes after complete in vitro activation of the plasma samples with a FXII trigger. In all samples, enzyme-C1INH levels increased after activation even in patients during an acute attack. However, the levels of FXIIa-C1INH, FXIa-C1INH and kallikrein-C1INH were at least 52% lower in samples taken during remission and 70% lower in samples taken during attack compared to samples from controls (p<0.05. Addition of C1INH after activation led to an increase in levels of FXIIa-C1INH and FXIa-C1INH (p<0.05, which were still lower than in controls (p<0.05, while the levels of kallikrein-C1INH did not change. These results are consistent with constitutive activation and attenuated depletion of the contact system and show that the ongoing activation of the contact system, which is present in HAE-C1INH patients both during remission and during acute attacks, is not associated with preferential generation of kallikrein over FXIa.

  19. Risk Stratification in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Ongoing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omry-Orbach, Gal

    2016-01-28

    Thyroid cancer is an increasingly common malignancy, with a rapidly rising prevalence worldwide. The social and economic ramifications of the increase in thyroid cancer are multiple. Though mortality from thyroid cancer is low, and most patients will do well, the risk of recurrence is not insignificant, up to 30%. Therefore, it is important to accurately identify those patients who are more or less likely to be burdened by their disease over years and tailor their treatment plan accordingly. The goal of risk stratification is to do just that. The risk stratification process generally starts postoperatively with histopathologic staging, based on the AJCC/UICC staging system as well as others designed to predict mortality. These do not, however, accurately assess the risk of recurrence/persistence. Patients initially considered to be at high risk may ultimately do very well yet be burdened by frequent unnecessary monitoring. Conversely, patients initially thought to be low risk, may not respond to their initial treatment as expected and, if left unmonitored, may have higher morbidity. The concept of risk-adaptive management has been adopted, with an understanding that risk stratification for differentiated thyroid cancer is dynamic and ongoing. A multitude of variables not included in AJCC/UICC staging are used initially to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk for recurrence. Over the course of time, a response-to-therapy variable is incorporated, and patients essentially undergo continuous risk stratification. Additional tools such as biochemical markers, genetic mutations, and molecular markers have been added to this complex risk stratification process such that this is essentially a continuum of risk. In recent years, additional considerations have been discussed with a suggestion of pre-operative risk stratification based on certain clinical and/or biologic characteristics. With the increasing prevalence of thyroid cancer but stable mortality

  20. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in a sickle-cell anemia patient in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Oladejo, Taoreed; Olarinoye, Timothy Oyetunde; Adetoye, Adedapo Omowonuola; Osho, Patrick Olanrewaju

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the multidisciplinary management of a 35-year-old female sickle-cell anemia patient who had unilateral bony ankylosis of the left temporomandibular joint secondary to septic arthritis. She was managed by a team comprising of maxillofacial surgeons, anesthetists, otorhinolaryngologist, and hematologist. Unilateral left interpositional arthroplasty and ipsilateral coronoidectomy through a postrami approach were done and followed by aggressive jaw physiotherapy in the postsurgical period. No perioperative morbidity was encountered. Mouth opening of 3.5 cm was achieved and maintained 7 months after surgery. Challenges and rationale for the use of a multidisciplinary team approach in treatment of such cases were discussed.

  1. Crisis resource management: evaluating outcomes of a multidisciplinary team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankouskas, Tara; Bush, Mary Chasko; Murray, Bosseau; Rudy, Sally; Henry, Jody; Dyer, Anne Marie; Liu, Wenlei; Sinz, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Crisis resource management (CRM) is a team-training program that teaches nontechnical skills such as: collaboration, communication, task management, teamwork, and leadership. The purpose of this study was to evaluate improvement in the nontechnical skills of a multidisciplinary team of pediatric residents, anesthesiology residents and pediatric nurses following participation in the CRM educational program. Self-efficacy theory guided the teaching method used in the CRM program. The Collaboration and Satisfaction about Care Decisions instrument and the Anesthetists' Nontechnical Skills System served as outcome measures. Seven multidisciplinary groups were studied with a total of 40 subjects. A significant increase was found in posttest scores for perceived collaboration and satisfaction with care and in numerical ratings of observed team skills following the CRM program. The results suggest multidisciplinary team participation in the CRM program increased perceived team collaboration, satisfaction with care, and observed teamwork skills.

  2. Design of efficient and safe neural stimulators a multidisciplinary approach

    CERN Document Server

    van Dongen, Marijn

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the design of neural stimulator systems which are used for the treatment of a wide variety of brain disorders such as Parkinson’s, depression and tinnitus. Whereas many existing books treating neural stimulation focus on one particular design aspect, such as the electrical design of the stimulator, this book uses a multidisciplinary approach: by combining the fields of neuroscience, electrophysiology and electrical engineering a thorough understanding of the complete neural stimulation chain is created (from the stimulation IC down to the neural cell). This multidisciplinary approach enables readers to gain new insights into stimulator design, while context is provided by presenting innovative design examples. Provides a single-source, multidisciplinary reference to the field of neural stimulation, bridging an important knowledge gap among the fields of bioelectricity, neuroscience, neuroengineering and microelectronics;Uses a top-down approach to understanding the neural activation proc...

  3. Effective multidisciplinary working: the key to high-quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoro, Samuel

    This article explores multidisciplinary team working, inter-disciplinary, trans-disciplinary and effective collaborative practice in order to provide high-quality patient care. It discusses different views on collaboration, some of the issues around cross-discipline and multi-agency working and concerns around promoting 'high-quality' care. It also discusses the importance of evidence-based practice in multidisciplinary teams. Issues around good-quality care, clinical governance and the audit cycle in MDTs are addressed. The article highlights the importance of the 6Cs (care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment) in MDTs if quality care is to be achieved. The article also explores advantages and limitations of multidisciplinary team working, trans-disciplinary working and inter-professional working in developing and delivering high-quality patient-centred care. Further research is needed on how clinical audits can help to improve how MDTs function in order improve the quality of service provided to clients.

  4. The ongoing quest for biomarkers in Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danve, Abhijeet; O'Dell, James

    2015-11-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis poses significant challenges in terms of early diagnosis, assessment of disease activity, predicting response to the treatment and monitoring radiographic progression. With better understanding of underlying immunopathogenesis, effective targeted therapies are available which improve symptoms, quality of life and possibly slow the radiographic progression. There has been a growing interest in the discovery of biomarkers for defining various aspects of disease assessment and management in Ankylosing Spondylitis. The C-reactive protein and HLA-B27 are most commonly used biomarkers. This review describes many other newer biomarkers which have potential clinical applications in this chronic inflammatory disease. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Mathematical sciences with multidisciplinary applications in honor of professor Christiane Rousseau and in recognition of the Mathematics for Planet Earth initiative

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is the fourth in a multidisciplinary series which brings together leading researchers in the STEAM-H disciplines (Science, Technology, Engineering, Agriculture, Mathematics and Health) to present their perspective on advances in their own specific fields, and to generate a genuinely interdisciplinary collaboration that transcends parochial subject-matter boundaries. All contributions are carefully edited, peer-reviewed, reasonably self-contained, and pedagogically crafted for a multidisciplinary readership. Contributions are drawn from a variety of fields including mathematics, statistics, game theory and behavioral sciences, biomathematics and physical chemistry, computer science and human-centered computing. This volume is dedicated to Professor Christiane Rousseau, whose work inspires the STEAM-H series, in recognition of her passion for the mathematical sciences and her on-going initiative, the Mathematics of Planet Earth paradigm of interdisciplinarity. The volume's primary goal is to enhance i...

  6. Multidisciplinary Optimization of Airborne Radome Using Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinggang; Zhang, Weihong; Zhu, Jihong

    A multidisciplinary optimization scheme of airborne radome is proposed. The optimization procedure takes into account the structural and the electromagnetic responses simultaneously. The structural analysis is performed with the finite element method using Patran/Nastran, while the electromagnetic analysis is carried out using the Plane Wave Spectrum and Surface Integration technique. The genetic algorithm is employed for the multidisciplinary optimization process. The thicknesses of multilayer radome wall are optimized to maximize the overall transmission coefficient of the antenna-radome system under the constraint of the structural failure criteria. The proposed scheme and the optimization approach are successfully assessed with an illustrative numerical example.

  7. Thriving in multidisciplinary research: advice for new bioinformatics students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Raymond K

    2012-09-01

    The sciences have seen a large increase in demand for students in bioinformatics and multidisciplinary fields in general. Many new educational programs have been created to satisfy this demand, but navigating these programs requires a non-traditional outlook and emphasizes working in teams of individuals with distinct yet complementary skill sets. Written from the perspective of a current bioinformatics student, this article seeks to offer advice to prospective and current students in bioinformatics regarding what to expect in their educational program, how multidisciplinary fields differ from more traditional paths, and decisions that they will face on the road to becoming successful, productive bioinformaticists.

  8. A new member of the multidisciplinary ALS team: the otolaryngologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Adam D; Griffin, Garrett R; Hogikyan, Norman D; Feldman, Eva L

    2012-02-01

    The multidisciplinary approach to treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has improved the overall care of patients suffering from this disease ( 1 , 2 ). This approach typically has included neurologists, physiatrists, occupational therapists, respiratory therapists and speech therapists. Dysphonia, dysarthria, and dysphagia are three of the most common bulbar manifestations of ALS, and are often the presenting symptoms in bulbar-onset patients. Despite this, otolaryngologists are often not included in ALS management until a tracheostomy is considered. The otolaryngologist can play an important role in early diagnosis and subsequent management of bulbar manifestations of ALS, and would be a valuable member of the multidisciplinary team.

  9. Building collaborative teams for multidisciplinary educational projects in optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Nan Marie; Brooke, Martin A.; Laskar, Joy; Wills, D. Scott; Brown, April S.; Ingram, Mary Ann

    2000-06-01

    Multidisciplinary team-oriented research is an effective method for investigating systems spanning multiple knowledge areas. Building on cross-functional team strategies developed for highly competitive industries, experts from a variety of technical domains can be brought together in a team and focused toward a common set of goals. However, building and maintaining these teams is an art that combines technical, social, and management skills, and requires proactive, conscious attention to enable and achieve positive results. This paper explores some avenues toward effective multi-disciplinary team building, and explores the educational potential associated with team-oriented research.

  10. Balancing confidentiality and collaboration within multidisciplinary health care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Liew, Julia R

    2012-12-01

    As multidisciplinary perspectives are increasingly integrated into the treatment of health problems, opportunities for clinical psychologists in medical settings are expanding. Although cross-discipline collaboration is at the core of multidisciplinary treatment models, psychologists must be particularly cautious about information sharing due to their profession's ethical standards regarding patient confidentiality. Psychologists' ethical obligations require them to achieve a delicate balance between contributing to the treatment team and protecting patient confidentiality. In the current review, relevant ethical standards and federal guidelines are applied to everyday practices of clinical psychologists in medical settings. Additionally, recommendations for individual psychologists, health care organizations, and graduate training programs are presented.

  11. Thriving in Multidisciplinary Research: Advice for New Bioinformatics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Raymond K.

    2012-01-01

    The sciences have seen a large increase in demand for students in bioinformatics and multidisciplinary fields in general. Many new educational programs have been created to satisfy this demand, but navigating these programs requires a non-traditional outlook and emphasizes working in teams of individuals with distinct yet complementary skill sets. Written from the perspective of a current bioinformatics student, this article seeks to offer advice to prospective and current students in bioinformatics regarding what to expect in their educational program, how multidisciplinary fields differ from more traditional paths, and decisions that they will face on the road to becoming successful, productive bioinformaticists. PMID:23012580

  12. Kilauea's Ongoing Eruption: 25th Year Brings Major Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, T. R.

    2007-12-01

    2007 marks the 25th year of nearly continuous eruption on Kilauea's east rift zone. Episodic high lava fountains, which built the Pu`u `O`o cone during the first three years of the eruption, ended in 1986. Activity then migrated downrift and the Kupaianaha shield was formed by passive effusion of lava. The change in eruptive style resulted in a switch at Pu`u `O`o from cone construction to cone collapse that has been ongoing for the last two decades. Activity at Kupaianaha ceased in 1992, and the eruption resumed at Pu`u `O`o. The eruptive style established at Kupaianaha continued, however, with continuous effusion from vents on the southwest flank of the Pu`u `O`o cone. The last 15 years have been characterized by the formation of relatively stable tube systems---broken only by a brief fissure eruption uprift of Pu`u `O`o in 1997---that have carried lava from the flank vents to the ocean about 9 km away. The Prince Kuhio Kalanianaole (PKK) tube, the most recent of these tube systems to develop, was active from March 2004 to June 2007. The PKK flow was emplaced almost entirely on older flows of this eruption and entered the ocean in several locations over a span of 6 km. The "Father's Day" intrusion of June 17--19, 2007, robbed the supply of magma to Pu`u `O`o and, thus, the active flow field. The floor of the Pu`u `O`o crater dropped 80--100 m, the PKK tube system drained, and the active flows and ocean entry quickly stagnated. On June 19, a short-lived fissure eruption broke out low on the east flank of Kane Nui o Hamo, about 6 km uprift of Pu`u `O`o, burying only 0.22 hectares. The eruption at Kilauea paused from June 20 through July 1 or 2, when lava returned to Pu`u `O`o and began refilling the collapsed crater. Near midnight on July 20--21, after at least 19 days of lava lake growth, the lava pond within the Pu`u `O`o crater drained suddenly when a series of fissures opened on the east flank of the cone and propagated ~2 km downrift. The new activity, dubbed

  13. Deformation patterns on Kythnos, Western Cyclades; ongoing work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, A. Hugh N.; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    footwall part of the exposed West Cycladic Detachment System in the extreme SW of the island. The cause of the change from BGM in the east to YBM in the west is enigmatic. A primary sedimentary variation is unlikely, as it is parallel to the stretching direction; syn-tectonic dissolution seems more likely, but implies a massive fluid flow through the rocks. The confusion between BGM and YBM is seen elsewhere, with, for example, the map showing BGM changing to YBM across a normal fault, with little apparent offset of the marble boundary. Clearly, the map of de Smeth (1975), although very good in general, needs careful reworking. More important, it is potentially obscuring significant large-scale structures by mapping the same marble as two different lithostratigraphic units. Work is ongoing in the area.

  14. The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Partners HealthCare system′s Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1 New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2 taxing electronic health record (EHR and laboratory information system (LIS implementations; and (3 increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular "learning laboratories". Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows′ ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship′s core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among

  15. The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Andrew M; Klepeis, Veronica E; Mandelker, Diana L; Platt, Mia Y; Rao, Luigi K F; Riedlinger, Gregory; Baron, Jason M; Brodsky, Victor; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lane, William; Lee, Roy E; Levy, Bruce P; McClintock, David S; Beckwith, Bruce A; Kuo, Frank C; Gilbertson, John R

    2014-01-01

    The Partners HealthCare system's Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA) faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1) New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2) taxing electronic health record (EHR) and laboratory information system (LIS) implementations; and (3) increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs) in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular "learning laboratories". Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows' ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship's core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among the entirety of the

  16. Development of a model to guide decision making in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis multidisciplinary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogden, Anne; Greenfield, David; Nugus, Peter; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2015-10-01

    Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) face numerous decisions for symptom management and quality of life. Models of decision making in chronic disease and cancer care are insufficient for the complex and changing needs of patients with ALS . The aim was to examine the question: how can decision making that is both effective and patient-centred be enacted in ALS multidisciplinary care? Fifty-four respondents (32 health professionals, 14 patients and eight carers) from two specialized ALS multidisciplinary clinics participated in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were transcribed, coded and analysed thematically. Comparison of stakeholder perspectives revealed six key themes of ALS decision making. These were the decision-making process; patient-centred focus; timing and planning; information sources; engagement with specialized ALS services; and access to non-specialized services. A model, embedded in the specialized ALS multidisciplinary clinic, was derived to guide patient decision making. The model is cyclic, with four stages: 'Participant Engagement'; 'Option Information'; 'Option Deliberation'; and 'Decision Implementation'. Effective and patient-centred decision making is enhanced by the structure of the specialized ALS clinic, which promotes patients' symptom management and quality of life goals. However, patient and carer engagement in ALS decision making is tested by the dynamic nature of ALS, and patient and family distress. Our model optimizes patient-centred decision making, by incorporating patients' cyclic decision-making patterns and facilitating carer inclusion in decision processes. The model captures the complexities of patient-centred decision making in ALS. The framework can assist patients and carers, health professionals, researchers and policymakers in this challenging disease environment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The importance of a multidisciplinary approach for solid earth geophysics in Seafloor Observatories data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embriaco, Davide; De Caro, Mariagrazia; De Santis, Angelo; Etiope, Giuseppe; Frugoni, Francesco; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Lo Bue, Nadia; Marinaro, Giuditta; Monna, Stephen; Montuori, Caterina; Sgroi, Tiziana; Beranzoli, Laura; Favali, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Continuous time-series in deep ocean waters are the basis for an original approach in ocean exploration. The observation of phenomena variability over time is key to understanding many Earth processes, among which: hydrothermal systems, active tectonics, and ecosystem life cycles. Geo-hazards at sea have often been studied with a single-parameter approach on a short time-scale, but it is now becoming clear that to understand these phenomena and, specifically, to identify precursors to very energetic events, such as mega-earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions, continuous long-term multiparameter monitoring is strongly needed. In fact, given a signal of interest, by using several sensors recording simultaneously it is possible to identify the contribution of different sources to this signal, and to be less prone to false associations. In Europe, large cabled systems with marine sensors are being developed for near real-time and real-time long-term monitoring of ocean processes within the EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water column Observatory www.emso-eu.org) Research Infrastructure. Obtaining good quality long-term multiparameter data from sensors on-board seafloor observatories, which are the base of a multidisciplinary approach, is a challenging task. We describe the main steps we have taken to retrieve good quality multiparametric data acquired by GEOSTAR class seafloor observatories, both standalone and cabled, deployed at various sites offshore European coast during the last decade. Starting from this data we show the application of a multidisciplinary approach with some examples coming from experiments in EMSO sites.

  18. Case Study: Managing Undergraduate Interns in the Context of Multidisciplinary Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebke, J. P.; Gentry, D.

    2016-12-01

    Internship opportunities can be immensely beneficial to both the students who pursue them and the labs that employ them. However, optimal results for all stakeholders can be uncertain. Several factors compound this issue. In this case study, the highly multidisciplinary nature of the BioEngineering Instrumentation Group at NASA Ames Research Center has made productively integrating short-term summer interns challenging. In general, taking on more undergraduate interns during a given time period can lead to diminishing returns, particularly if those interns are primarily short-time interns with few long-term senior students present. Introducing a level of industry-style project management processes can help. On the one hand, extreme formality can reduce the enthusiasm that students can bring; also, time constraints on internships make extensive training in formal process an investment with comparatively little return. On the other hand, lack of process can result in many forms of wastage. A moderate, "lightweight" level of process - i.e., simple processes with high payoff to time invested ratios, including processes to effectively handle multidisciplinary issues - can yield both a far more efficient lab, and a richer educational experience for the interns. In this case study, we implemented simple processes such as brief weekly stand-up meetings, a standard action item / bug tracking process, and deadline-based scheduling with prudent reserves and critical path tracking. To evaluate these steps, several parameters were considered: the number of projects the lab could successfully pursue, the number of interns that could be successfully integrated onto each project, diversity of student intern educational backgrounds, student satisfaction, student understanding of expectations, and student preparation for industry-standard work. Generally, outcomes were enhanced across the board, even with imperfectly implemented processes. "Lightweight" process implementation is

  19. LUSI LAB: a multidisciplinary project in a natural active laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Adriano; Lusi Lab Team

    2016-04-01

    The 29th of May 2006 several gas and mud eruption sites suddenly appeared along a strike-slip fault (Watukosek fault system) in the NE of Java, Indonesia. The eruption occurred almost two days after a 6.3 M earthquake striking the island of Java. Within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. To date Lusi is still active. This disaster has forced 50.000 people to be evacuated and an area of ~7 km2 is covered by mud. The social impact of the eruption and its spectacular dimensions still attract the attention of international media reporting on the "largest mud eruption site on Earth". LUSI LAB (ERC grant n° 308126) focuses on five main aspects in order to complete a comprehensive regional investigation of this impressive event: 1) sampling and monitoring the active Lusi eruption site; 2) monitoring and sampling the neighbouring volcanic arc; 3) monitoring the local micro-seismicity and its relationship with regional seismicity; 4) monitoring the fault system originating from the volcanic arc, crossing Lusi and extending to the NE of Java island; 5) numerical modelling of Lusi activity and the strike-slip/magmatic complex system. We completed several field expeditions. Our studies investigated the mechanisms of reactivation of the Watukosek fault system that crosses Lusi locality and continues to the NE of Java. Results show that after the 27-05-2009 earthquake it was activated the lateral movement of this strike-slip system resulting in these several aligned eruptions sites including Lusi. Further, our geochemical studies of the erupted fluids reveal a mantle signature and point to a connection with the neighboring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex indicating that Lusi is a sedimentary hosted geothermal system. We have designed, developed and constructed the Lusi drone. This is a remote controlled hexacopter developed and assembled in order to complete multidisciplinary studies in extreme and

  20. Urbanization and the Carbon Cycle: Synthesis of Ongoing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, K. R.; Duren, R. M.; Hutyra, L.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Patarasuk, R.; Song, Y.; Huang, J.; Davis, K.; Kort, E. A.; Shepson, P. B.; Turnbull, J. C.; Lauvaux, T.; Rao, P.; Eldering, A.; Miller, C. E.; Wofsy, S.; McKain, K.; Mendoza, D. L.; Lin, J. C.; Sweeney, C.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.

    2015-12-01

    Given the explosive growth in urbanization and its dominant role in current and future global greenhouse gas emissions, urban areas have received increasing research attention from the carbon cycle science community. The emerging focus is driven by the increasingly dense atmospheric observing capabilities - ground and space-based - in addition to the rising profile of cities within international climate change policymaking. Dominated by anthropogenic emissions, urban carbon cycle research requires a cross-disciplinary perspective with contributions from disciplines such as engineering, economics, social theory, and atmospheric science. We review the recent results from a sample of the active urban carbon research efforts including the INFLUX experiment (Indianapolis), the Megacity carbon project (Los Angeles), Salt Lake City, and Boston. Each of these efforts represent unique approaches in pursuit of different scientific and policy questions and assist in setting priorities for future research. From top-down atmospheric measurement systems to bottom-up estimation, these research efforts offer a view of the challenges and opportunities in urban carbon cycle research.

  1. Multidisciplinary approach to the geriatric oncology patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terret, Catherine; Zulian, Gilbert B; Naiem, Arash; Albrand, Gilles

    2007-05-10

    Given the dramatic demographic shift observed in developed countries, the medical community, especially oncologists, geriatricians, and primary care providers, are confronted with the expanding challenge of the management of elderly people with cancer. Ageing is associated with the accumulation of multiple and various medical and social problems. With a prevalence comparable to that of other chronic conditions in this age group, such as diabetes or dementia, cancer holds a prominent place among diseases of the elderly. The care of elderly cancer patients is fundamentally interdisciplinary. Communication and collaboration between geriatricians/primary care providers and oncologists represent key features of effective care in geriatric oncology. The combination of the disease-oriented approach of oncologists and the patient-oriented approach of geriatricians is the most powerful way to better serve this specific population. The medical approach of elderly cancer patients should ideally be under the lead of geriatricians or primary care providers sensitive to geriatric issues. Oncologists should manage the biologic consequences of the interplay between cancer and ageing. Close collaboration between clinicians will help promote active dedicated clinical research and the development of guidelines on the management of elderly people with cancer.

  2. A Multidisciplinary Engineering Summer School in an Industrial Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peter Gorm; Fernandes, Joao M.; Habel, Jacek; Lehrskov, Hanne; Vos, Richard J. C.; Wallington, Oliver; Zidek, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Most university-level engineering studies produce technically skilled engineers. However, typically students face several difficulties when working in multidisciplinary teams when they initiate their industrial careers. In a globalised world, it becomes increasingly important that engineers are capable of collaborating across disciplinary…

  3. A Multidisciplinary Process Curriculum in Environmental Education, Grade 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds School District 15, Lynnwood, WA.

    This second grade curriculum guide is based on a multidisciplinary approach to environmental education. The guide includes activities, guidelines for field trip planning, and a resource section. The guide deals with the subjects of plants, soil, and litter. Each subject section includes activities based on the physical characteristics, man's use,…

  4. Can collaboration within multidisciplinary teamwork be explained using Belbin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne; Karlshøj, Jan

    2013-01-01

    of teachers for 13 multidisciplinary teams of students. Belbin’s theory on teamwork was introduced and the teams were formed according to the theory, in order to optimize the collaboration. Students were given a standard- and course specific questionnaire including the possibility for making individual notes...

  5. Autism and Multidisciplinary Teamwork through the SCERTS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molteni, Paola; Guldberg, Karen; Logan, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates multidisciplinary teamwork in an English special school located in the West Midlands region of the UK. The research was carried out by Paola Molteni, a PhD student at Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Karen Guldberg of the Autism Centre for Education and Research Director at the University of Birmingham School…

  6. The development of a design behaviour questionnaire for multidisciplinary teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Miranda A.G.; Tuijl, van Harrie F.J.M.; Reymen, Isabelle M.M.J.; Rutte, Christel G.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between design behaviours and successful design task completion is studied for multidisciplinary design teams. In this research, no observational methods such as audio–visual recordings or ethnographic fieldwork were used, as often the case in design research, but a questionnaire ta

  7. Multidisciplinary conservative management in classical Volkmann's contracture: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.F.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Eisma, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    This clinical note describes the case of a nine-year-old girl with classical Volkmann's contracture of the left forearm. The report demonstrates the results and follow-up of conservative orthotic management used as a mode of treatment by a multidisciplinary team. When using an orthosis it is

  8. Research on Multidisciplinary Optimization Design of Bridge Crane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Yifei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bridge crane is one of the most widely used cranes in our country, which is indispensable equipment for material conveying in the modern production. In this paper, the framework of multidisciplinary optimization for bridge crane is proposed. The presented research on crane multidisciplinary design technology for energy saving includes three levels, respectively: metal structures level, transmission design level, and electrical system design level. The shape optimal mathematical model of the crane is established for shape optimization design of metal structure level as well as size optimal mathematical model and topology optimal mathematical model of crane for topology optimization design of metal structure level is established. Finally, system-level multidisciplinary energy-saving optimization design of bridge crane is further carried out with energy-saving transmission design results feedback to energy-saving optimization design of metal structure. The optimization results show that structural optimization design can reduce total mass of crane greatly by using the finite element analysis and multidisciplinary optimization technology premised on the design requirements of cranes such as stiffness and strength; thus, energy-saving design can be achieved.

  9. Decisions about Product Safety. A Multidisciplinary Teaching Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    A multidisciplinary educational unit featuring product safety decisions made by businesses and consumers is presented. teach critical thinking and decision making while supplementing the science, home economics, social studies, and economics curricula. The activities rely extensively, though not exclusively, on Procter & Gamble's experiences…

  10. An information driven strategy to support multidisciplinary design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Ravi M.; Fulton, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    The design of complex engineering systems such as aircraft, automobiles, and computers is primarily a cooperative multidisciplinary design process involving interactions between several design agents. The common thread underlying this multidisciplinary design activity is the information exchange between the various groups and disciplines. The integrating component in such environments is the common data and the dependencies that exist between such data. This may be contrasted to classical multidisciplinary analyses problems where there is coupling between distinct design parameters. For example, they may be expressed as mathematically coupled relationships between aerodynamic and structural interactions in aircraft structures, between thermal and structural interactions in nuclear plants, and between control considerations and structural interactions in flexible robots. These relationships provide analytical based frameworks leading to optimization problem formulations. However, in multidisciplinary design problems, information based interactions become more critical. Many times, the relationships between different design parameters are not amenable to analytical characterization. Under such circumstances, information based interactions will provide the best integration paradigm, i.e., there is a need to model the data entities and their dependencies between design parameters originating from different design agents. The modeling of such data interactions and dependencies forms the basis for integrating the various design agents.

  11. IMI - An information system for effective Multidisciplinary Incident Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, M.D.E. van der; Vugt, M. van der

    2004-01-01

    The field of crisis response and disaster management can be characterized, upon many other factors, by distributed operations, not daily routine work and multidisciplinary aspects. In designing and developing information systems for crisis response these factors need special attention. On behalf of

  12. System Design and Engineering, lubricating multidisciplinary development projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten; Veenvliet, Karel; Broenink, Johannes F.

    This text book introduces systems engineering for designing systems in multidisciplinary projects. First an overview of the systems engineering process is given. Several systems thinking tracks are presented, to think about the system in a number of ways, its context, its user, its functionality,

  13. Training Multidisciplinary Biomedical Informatics Students: Three Years of Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. van Mulligen (Erik); M. Cases (Montserrat); K.M. Hettne (Kristina); E. Molero (Eva); M. Weeber (Marc); K.A. Robertson (Kevin); B. Oliva (Baldomero); G. de la Calle (Guillermo); V. Maojo (Victor)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The European INFOBIOMED Network of Excellence1recognized that a successful education program in biomedical informatics should include not only traditional teaching activities in the basic sciences but also the development of skills for working in multidisciplinary teams.

  14. Can collaboration within multidisciplinary teamwork be explained using Belbin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne; Karlshøj, Jan

    2013-01-01

    of teachers for 13 multidisciplinary teams of students. Belbin’s theory on teamwork was introduced and the teams were formed according to the theory, in order to optimize the collaboration. Students were given a standard- and course specific questionnaire including the possibility for making individual notes...

  15. Systems design and engineering : facilitating multidisciplinary development projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten; Veenvliet, Karel; Broenink, Johannes F.

    2016-01-01

    As its name implies, the aim of Systems Design and Engineering: Facilitating Multidisciplinary Development Projects is to help systems engineers develop the skills and thought processes needed to successfully develop and implement engineered systems. Such expertise typically does not come through

  16. Cost and benefits of a multidisciplinary intensive diabetes education programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keers, J.C.; Groen, H.; Sluiter, W.J.; Bouma, J.; Links, T.P.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the cost and benefits of an intensive diabetes education programme for patients with prolonged self-management problems and to determine the inclusion criteria for optimal outcomes. METHODS: Sixty-one participants of a multidisciplinary intensive diabetes education programme

  17. Autism and Multidisciplinary Teamwork through the SCERTS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molteni, Paola; Guldberg, Karen; Logan, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates multidisciplinary teamwork in an English special school located in the West Midlands region of the UK. The research was carried out by Paola Molteni, a PhD student at Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Karen Guldberg of the Autism Centre for Education and Research Director at the University of Birmingham School…

  18. A Multidisciplinary Engineering Summer School in an Industrial Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peter Gorm; Fernandes, Joao M.; Habel, Jacek; Lehrskov, Hanne; Vos, Richard J. C.; Wallington, Oliver; Zidek, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Most university-level engineering studies produce technically skilled engineers. However, typically students face several difficulties when working in multidisciplinary teams when they initiate their industrial careers. In a globalised world, it becomes increasingly important that engineers are capable of collaborating across disciplinary…

  19. Agronomy—A Multidisciplinary and Open Access Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Langridge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Agronomy is a highly multidisciplinary area of science. It includes all aspects of science and technology related to the production and utilization of plants for food, feed, fuel, fiber and even land reclamation. In many respects, agronomy represents the integration of activities and disciplines ranging from genetics, chemistry and biotechnology to ecology, soil science and meteorology. [...

  20. Multidisciplinary teaching – Engineering course in advanced building design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne; Karlshøj, Jan; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration within the building process is difficult. This calls for employees who are experienced in collaborating in interdisciplinary teams. To fulfil this demand a multidisciplinary course in “Advanced building design” has been developed at the Technical University of Denmark. The goal...

  1. Ethnic Group Differences in the Outcomes of Multidisciplinary Pain Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Brian; Campbell, Claudia M; Buenaver, Luis F.; McGuire, Lynanne; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Doleys, Daniel M.; Edwards, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this prospective investigation was to evaluate ethnic group differences in pain-related outcomes following multidisciplinary chronic pain treatment. A prospective pre- and post-treatment assessment design was employed to investigate the effects of ethnicity on changes in pain-related variables following completion of a multidisciplinary pain treatment program. Methods One hundred fifty five chronic pain patients participating in a multidisciplinary pain treatment program completed measures of pain and mood both prior to and following the four-week treatment. Primary outcome variables included pain severity, pain-related interference, and depressive symptoms. Results Baseline differences between African-Americans and Whites were observed for depressive symptoms, but not for pain severity or pain-related interference. Following multidisciplinary pain treatment, both White and African-American patients displayed post-treatment reductions in depressive symptoms and pain-related interference. However, White patients also reported reduced pain severity while African-Americans did not. Conclusions The treatment approach used in the present study appeared to be less effective in reducing self-reported pain severity in African-American versus White patients, though both groups benefited in terms of reduced depressive symptoms and pain-related interference. Moreover, the observation that improvements in functioning occurred without reductions in pain severity in African-American patients suggests that differences may exist in treatment processes as a function of ethnic group, and will consequently be an important area for future research. PMID:21731407

  2. Decisions about Product Safety. A Multidisciplinary Teaching Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    A multidisciplinary educational unit featuring product safety decisions made by businesses and consumers is presented. teach critical thinking and decision making while supplementing the science, home economics, social studies, and economics curricula. The activities rely extensively, though not exclusively, on Procter & Gamble's experiences in…

  3. IMI - An information system for effective Multidisciplinary Incident Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, M.D.E. van der; Vugt, M. van der

    2004-01-01

    The field of crisis response and disaster management can be characterized, upon many other factors, by distributed operations, not daily routine work and multidisciplinary aspects. In designing and developing information systems for crisis response these factors need special attention. On behalf of

  4. Using Student Technical Conferences to Build Multidisciplinary Teamwork Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, David L.

    2007-01-01

    An open-ended student conference project involving sophomore, junior, and senior chemical engineering students is described. The project is designed to address outcomes in each of the courses in which those students are enrolled, as well as broader "soft skills" including multidisciplinary teamwork, communications, lifelong learning, and…

  5. Training Multidisciplinary Biomedical Informatics Students: Three Years of Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. van Mulligen (Erik); M. Cases (Montserrat); K.M. Hettne (Kristina); E. Molero (Eva); M. Weeber (Marc); K.A. Robertson (Kevin); B. Oliva (Baldomero); G. de la Calle (Guillermo); V. Maojo (Victor)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The European INFOBIOMED Network of Excellence1recognized that a successful education program in biomedical informatics should include not only traditional teaching activities in the basic sciences but also the development of skills for working in multidisciplinary teams. Desig

  6. [Better multidisciplinary team meetings are linked to better care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drielen, E. van; Vries, A.W. de; Ottevanger, P.B.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Discussing a patient in an oncology multidisciplinary team meeting (MTM) increases the value of the quality of the treatment chosen. MTMs are increasingly mentioned in guidelines and indicator sets. Based on literature review and observations, the Comprehensive Cancer Centre Netherlands (CCCNL), in

  7. The Interplay of Conflict and Analogy in Multidisciplinary Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletz, Susannah B. F.; Schunn, Christian D.; Kim, Kevin H.

    2013-01-01

    Creative teamwork in multidisciplinary teams is a topic of interest to cognitive psychologists on the one hand, and to both social and organizational psychologists on the other. However, the interconnections between cognitive and social layers have been rarely explored. Drawing on mental models and dissonance theories, the current study takes a…

  8. justification of a multidisciplinary approach to teaching language arts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adeyemim

    teaching of a concept with the use of the multidisciplinary approaches with the attendant ... Environmental Science, Mathematics, History and so on. In this way, each subject ..... Finally, it is an area of knowledge that is open to more research to ...

  9. The multidisciplinary team in palliative care: A case reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Bowen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay is a reflection on the multidisciplinary team in palliative care, from the perspective of a final year MBBS student from the UK spending one month with an Indian pain and palliative care team at Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital (IRCH, AIIMS, New Delhi.

  10. Oncologic multidisciplinary team meetings: evaluation of quality criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottevanger, N.; Hilbink, M.; Weenk, M.; Janssen, R.; Vrijmoeth, T.; Vries, A. de; Hermens, R.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To develop a guideline with quality criteria for an optimal structure and functioning of a multidisciplinary team meeting (MTM), and to assess to what extent the Dutch MTMs complied with these criteria. METHOD: A literature search and expert opinions were used to deve

  11. Herpes zoster epidemiology, management, and disease and economic burden in Europe: a multidisciplinary perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert W.; Alvarez-Pasquin, Marie-José; Bijl, Marc; Franco, Elisabetta; Gaillat, Jacques; Clara, João G.; Labetoulle, Marc; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Naldi, Luigi; Sanmarti, Luis S.; Weinke, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is primarily a disease of nerve tissue but the acute and longer-term manifestations require multidisciplinary knowledge and involvement in their management. Complications may be dermatological (e.g. secondary bacterial infection), neurological (e.g. long-term pain, segmental paresis, stroke), ophthalmological (e.g. keratitis, iridocyclitis, secondary glaucoma) or visceral (e.g. pneumonia, hepatitis). The age-related increased incidence of HZ and its complications is thought to be a result of the decline in cell-mediated immunity (immunosenescence), higher incidence of comorbidities with age and social-environmental changes. Individuals who are immunocompromised as a result of disease or therapy are also at increased risk, independent of age. HZ and its complications (particularly postherpetic neuralgia) create a significant burden for the patient, carers, healthcare systems and employers. Prevention and treatment of HZ complications remain a therapeutic challenge despite recent advances. This is an overview of the multidisciplinary implications and management of HZ in which the potential contribution of vaccination to reducing the incidence HZ and its complications are also discussed. PMID:26478818

  12. The CTSA as an exemplar framework for developing multidisciplinary translational teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, William J; Wooten, Kevin; Bhavnani, Suresh; Anderson, Karl E; Freeman, Jean; Brasier, Allan R

    2013-02-01

    Translational science requires that scientists from multiple disciplines work together to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human disease. Although a literature exists on the design and management of multidisciplinary teams, little has been written on multidisciplinary translational teams (MTTs). MTTs are distinct hybrid entities, with goals taken from both industry and academic models. We identified 30 design factors in 10 domains from a literature survey relevant to our MTT model: specific goals, structures, and processes. These dimensions were adapted to our own institutional environment in the selection and management of 11 MTTs that exploited resources of University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Clinical and Translational Sciences Awards (CTSA). Case illustrations of two specific MTTs illustrate some of the challenges encountered and opportunities realized in terms of education and scientific advances. Network depiction of disciplinarity indicated that CTSA KRs and CTSA leadership contributed to discipline diversity especially in small (or nascent) MTTs. A separate depiction of MTT-KR utilization indicated that data analysis, translational technologies, and novel methods were heavily utilized by MTTs, whereas other KRs contributed significant effort to infrastructure development. We conclude that the CTSA can provide a rich infrastructural framework and scientific environment for the development of successful MTTs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A Team Formation Framework for Managing Diversity in Multidisciplinary Engineering Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawqi Mohammed Hossain

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Team formation is one of the essential elements in constructing effective teamwork of any team size that requires different skill sets. Diversity in team encourages students to challenge and compete with one another while searching for new ideas, which in turn can lead to a better team performance. In a well-functioning diverse teams, the students who performed poorly may gain benefit by observing how excellent students approach the assignments. They may also benefit by getting advice and assistance from the excellent students. Studies have shown that Malaysian university graduates lack of team skills. The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for forming a diverse multidisciplinary team among engineering undergraduates based on selected criteria such as individual personality type, gender, and other relevant demographic information. The proposed framework can also be used to design an automated team-formation system based on the identified metrics. The purpose of the framework is to consolidate the existing team formation literature, and to develop and test interventions for maximizing individual member and team performance as a whole that makes an effective team. For this study, a multidisciplinary approach was used where first year engineering students from three different faculties, namely Faculty of Electrical Engineering (FKE, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering (FKM, and Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering (FBME at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM worked on an innovation project using the Conceive, Design, Implement, and Operate (CDIO framework. Keirsey Temperament Sorter was used as an instrument to identify an individual's personality type.

  14. Active and Healthy Ageing as a Wicked Problem: The Contribution of a Multidisciplinary Research University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Graffigna, Guendalina; Baitieri, Maddalena; Amato, Alessandra; Bonanomi, Maria Grazia; Valentini, Paolo; Castelli, Guido

    2014-01-01

    The quest for an active and healthy ageing can be considered a "wicked problem." It is a social and cultural problem, which is difficult to solve because of incomplete, changing, and contradictory requirements. These problems are tough to manage because of their social complexity. They are a group of linked problems embedded in the structure of the communities in which they occur. First, they require the knowledge of the social and cultural context in which they occur. They can be solved only by understanding of what people do and why they do it. Second, they require a multidisciplinary approach. Wicked problems can have different solutions, so it is critical to capture the full range of possibilities and interpretations. Thus, we suggest that Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore (UCSC) is well suited for accepting and managing this challenge because of its applied research orientation, multidisciplinary approach, and integrated vision. After presenting the research activity of UCSC, we describe a possible "systems thinking" strategy to consider the complexity and interdependence of active ageing and healthy living.

  15. A methodology towards virtualisation-based high performance simulation platform supporting multidisciplinary design of complex products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lei; Zhang, Lin; Tao, Fei; (Luke) Zhang, Xiaolong; Luo, Yongliang; Zhang, Yabin

    2012-08-01

    Multidisciplinary design of complex products leads to an increasing demand for high performance simulation (HPS) platforms. One great challenge is how to achieve high efficient utilisation of large-scale simulation resources in distributed and heterogeneous environments. This article reports a virtualisation-based methodology to realise a HPS platform. This research is driven by the issues concerning large-scale simulation resources deployment and complex simulation environment construction, efficient and transparent utilisation of fine-grained simulation resources and high reliable simulation with fault tolerance. A framework of virtualisation-based simulation platform (VSIM) is first proposed. Then the article investigates and discusses key approaches in VSIM, including simulation resources modelling, a method to automatically deploying simulation resources for dynamic construction of system environment, and a live migration mechanism in case of faults in run-time simulation. Furthermore, the proposed methodology is applied to a multidisciplinary design system for aircraft virtual prototyping and some experiments are conducted. The experimental results show that the proposed methodology can (1) significantly improve the utilisation of fine-grained simulation resources, (2) result in a great reduction in deployment time and an increased flexibility for simulation environment construction and (3)achieve fault tolerant simulation.

  16. Game playbooks: tools to guide multidisciplinary teams in developing videogame-based behavior change interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Lindsay R; Hieftje, Kimberly D; Culyba, Sabrina; Fiellin, Lynn E

    2014-03-01

    As mobile technologies and videogaming platforms are becoming increasingly prevalent in the realm of health and healthcare, so are the opportunities to use these resources to conduct behavioral interventions. The creation and empirical testing of game style interventions, however, is challenged by the requisite collaboration of multidisciplinary teams, including researchers and game developers who have different cultures, terminologies, and standards of evidence. Thus, traditional intervention development tools such as logic models and intervention manuals may need to be augmented by creating what we have termed "Game Playbooks" which are intervention guidebooks that are created by, understood by, and acceptable to all members of the multidisciplinary game development team. The purpose of this paper is to describe the importance and content of a Game Playbook created to aide in the development of a videogame intervention designed specifically for health behavior change in young teens as well as the process for creating such a tool. We draw on the experience of our research and game design team to describe the critical components of the Game Playbook and the necessity of creating such a tool.

  17. A case study on development of an integrated, multidisciplinary dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadershahi, Nader A; Bender, Daniel J; Beck, Lynn; Alexander, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Calls for fundamental reform of dental education were made twice in the twentieth century. More recently, spurred by the work of the American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (ADEA CCI), North American dental educators have again begun advocating for major curriculum reform in order to develop in students the higher order thinking skills required for the contemporary practice of dentistry. This case study describes the process of curricular reform at one school designed to move from a traditional siloed curriculum to one that uses case-based, integrated multidisciplinary courses to improve teaching and learning. The process was broad-based and comprehensive and included a schoolwide values clarification exercise and agreement on desired characteristics of an ideal graduate. Stakeholders agreed that the reform curriculum should incorporate inter- and multidisciplinary courses, case-based and active learning strategies, and concepts from adult learning theory. The new curriculum model is comprised of five unique but related curriculum "strands," each managed by a small group of interdisciplinary faculty content experts. Challenges in the development and implementation of the reform curriculum are discussed, and an assessment plan is presented.

  18. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of ongoing statin plus ezetimibe versus doubling the ongoing statin dose in hypercholesterolemic Taiwanese patients: an open-label, randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chih-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C is associated with reduced risk for major coronary events. Despite statin efficacy, a considerable proportion of statin-treated hypercholesterolemic patients fail to reach therapeutic LDL-C targets as defined by guidelines. This study compared the efficacy of ezetimibe added to ongoing statins with doubling the dose of ongoing statin in a population of Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, parallel-group comparison study of ezetimibe 10 mg added to ongoing statin compared with doubling the dose of ongoing statin. Adult Taiwanese hypercholesterolemic patients not at optimal LDL-C levels with previous statin treatment were randomized (N = 83 to ongoing statin + ezetimibe (simvastatin, atorvastatin or pravastatin + ezetimibe at doses of 20/10, 10/10 or 20/10 mg or doubling the dose of ongoing statin (simvastatin 40 mg, atorvastatin 20 mg or pravastatin 40 mg for 8 weeks. Percent change in total cholesterol, LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and triglycerides, and specified safety parameters were assessed at 4 and 8 weeks. Results At 8 weeks, patients treated with statin + ezetimibe experienced significantly greater reductions compared with doubling the statin dose in LDL-C (26.2% vs 17.9%, p = 0.0026 and total cholesterol (20.8% vs 12.2%, p = 0.0003. Percentage of patients achieving treatment goal was greater for statin + ezetimibe (58.6% vs doubling statin (41.2%, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.1675. The safety and tolerability profiles were similar between treatments. Conclusion Ezetimibe added to ongoing statin therapy resulted in significantly greater lipid-lowering compared with doubling the dose of statin in Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Studies to assess clinical outcome benefit are ongoing. Trial registration Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00652327

  19. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of ongoing statin plus ezetimibe versus doubling the ongoing statin dose in hypercholesterolemic Taiwanese patients: an open-label, randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Chih-Chieh; Lai Wen-Ter; Shih Kuang-Chung; Lin Tsung-Hsien; Lu Chieh-Hua; Lai Hung-Jen; Hanson Mary E; Hwang Juey-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is associated with reduced risk for major coronary events. Despite statin efficacy, a considerable proportion of statin-treated hypercholesterolemic patients fail to reach therapeutic LDL-C targets as defined by guidelines. This study compared the efficacy of ezetimibe added to ongoing statins with doubling the dose of ongoing statin in a population of Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Methods This was a rand...

  20. The Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute: reflections on an ongoing experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Jean E; Boyer, Joy T; Sun, Kathie Y; Rothenberg, Karen H; Lockhart, Nicole C; Guyer, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute has supported empirical and conceptual research to anticipate and address the ethical, legal, and social implications of genomics. As a component of the agency that funds much of the underlying science, the program has always been an experiment. The ever-expanding number of issues the program addresses and the relatively low level of commitment on the part of other funding agencies to support such research make setting priorities especially challenging. Program-supported studies have had a significant impact on the conduct of genomics research, the implementation of genomic medicine, and broader public policies. The program's influence is likely to grow as ELSI research, genomics research, and policy development activities become increasingly integrated. Achieving the benefits of increased integration while preserving the autonomy, objectivity, and intellectual independence of ELSI investigators presents ongoing challenges and new opportunities.

  1. Investigation of exposure to Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields: Ongoing animal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.E.

    1994-03-01

    There is now convincing evidence from a large number of laboratories, that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields produces biological responses in animals. Many of the observed effects appear to be directly or indirectly associated with the neural or neuroendocrine systems. Such effects include increased neuronal excitability, chemical and hormonal changes in the nervous system, altered behavioral responses, some of which are related to sensing the presence of the field, and changes in endogenous biological rhythms. Additional indices of general physiological status appear relatively unaffected by exposure, although effects have occasionally been described in bone growth and fracture repair, reproduction and development, and immune system function. A major current emphasis in laboratory research is to determine whether or not the reported epidemiological studies that suggest an association between EMF exposure and risk of cancer are supported in studies using animal models. Three major challenges exist for ongoing research: (1) knowledge about the mechanisms underlying observed bioeffects is incomplete, (2) researchers do not as yet understand what physical aspects of exposure produce biological responses, and (3) health consequences resulting from ELF exposure are unknown. Although no animal studies clearly demonstrate deleterious effects of ELF fields, several are suggestive of potential health impacts. From the perspective of laboratory animal studies, this paper will discuss biological responses to ELF magnetic and/or electric field exposures.

  2. Initial versus ongoing education: Perspectives of people with type 1 diabetes in 13 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, David; Golay, Alain

    2017-05-01

    To understand the perspectives of people with type 1 diabetes with regards to the diabetes education they receive within the health system. Grounded Theory was used for the collection and analysis of data from interviews with 101 people with type 1 diabetes from 13 countries. There are two aspects to education, namely initial education received when diagnosed and the ongoing education people continue to receive. Within these two categories content and process of diabetes education are important as are factors linked to the healthcare worker and setting. Tangible elements are the "what" that is delivered and are the different skills and information needed for people to manage their diabetes. Process elements are the "how" this is delivered. Finally intangible elements are those, which were found to be specific to certain contexts and health professionals. These could be the hardest to replicate, but possibly the most important. Health systems can provide the tangible elements and organize themselves to have processes in place to deliver education. The challenge is how can the intangible elements be seen as important and developed and delivered to improve management, but also meet the needs of people with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Challenge Based Innovation gala

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Utriainen, Tuuli Maria; Toivonen, Harri; Nordberg, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Challenge Based Innovation gala   There’s a new experiment starting in CERN called IdeaLab where we work together with detector R&D researchers to help them to bridge their knowledge into a more human, societally oriented context. Currently we are located in B153, but will move our activities to a new facility next to the Globe in May 2014. One of our first pilot projects is a 5 month course CBI (Challenge Based Innovation) where two multidisciplinary student teams join forces with Edusafe & TALENT projects at CERN. Their goal is to discover what kind of tools for learning could be created in collaboration with the two groups. After months of user interviews and low resolution prototyping they are ready to share the results with us in the form of an afternoon gala. We warmly welcome you to join us to see the students' results and experience the prototypes they have conceived. The event is in three parts, you are welcome to visit all of them,...

  4. Issues and Strategies in Solving Multidisciplinary Optimization Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Surya

    2013-01-01

    Optimization research at NASA Glenn Research Center has addressed the design of structures, aircraft and airbreathing propulsion engines. The accumulated multidisciplinary design activity is collected under a testbed entitled COMETBOARDS. Several issues were encountered during the solution of the problems. Four issues and the strategies adapted for their resolution are discussed. This is followed by a discussion on analytical methods that is limited to structural design application. An optimization process can lead to an inefficient local solution. This deficiency was encountered during design of an engine component. The limitation was overcome through an augmentation of animation into optimization. Optimum solutions obtained were infeasible for aircraft and airbreathing propulsion engine problems. Alleviation of this deficiency required a cascading of multiple algorithms. Profile optimization of a beam produced an irregular shape. Engineering intuition restored the regular shape for the beam. The solution obtained for a cylindrical shell by a subproblem strategy converged to a design that can be difficult to manufacture. Resolution of this issue remains a challenge. The issues and resolutions are illustrated through a set of problems: Design of an engine component, Synthesis of a subsonic aircraft, Operation optimization of a supersonic engine, Design of a wave-rotor-topping device, Profile optimization of a cantilever beam, and Design of a cylindrical shell. This chapter provides a cursory account of the issues. Cited references provide detailed discussion on the topics. Design of a structure can also be generated by traditional method and the stochastic design concept. Merits and limitations of the three methods (traditional method, optimization method and stochastic concept) are illustrated. In the traditional method, the constraints are manipulated to obtain the design and weight is back calculated. In design optimization, the weight of a structure becomes the

  5. Multidisciplinary management of lung cancer: how to test its efficacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Francesco; Venissac, Nicolas; Poudenx, Michel; Otto, Josiane; Mouroux, Jérôme

    2007-01-01

    The multidisciplinary management of lung cancer has been universally accepted. In France, the multidisciplinary approach for cancer patients is established by law. However, the efficacy of this approach remains theoretical, given that no evaluation criteria have been made available and no previous reports have been published on the prospective follow-up of these patients. The Groupe d' Oncologie Thoracique Azuréen carried out a 1-year prospective study on patients discussed during its multidisciplinary weekly meetings, to analyze the concordance between the proposed and administered treatment, the delay of treatment, and the 1-year actuarial survival. Of the 344 patients discussed during the period considered, the therapeutic decision was chemotherapy in 183 patients, surgery in 93, radiochemotherapy in 42, radiotherapy in 14, and supportive care 12. Therapeutic discordance between the planned and the administered treatment was recorded in 15 cases (4.4%), mainly for patient's refusal (seven cases) or poor performance status (five cases). The median delay of treatment was 20 days, shorter for chemotherapy (16 days), and longer for radiotherapy (27 days). The overall 1-year survival rate was 51.4%: 80.4% for stage I, 50.3% for stage II, 37.5% for stage III, and 27.2% for stage IV. For patients for whom discordance of treatment was recorded, a lower survival rate was recorded, without reaching statistical significance (0.07). In conclusion, the efficacy of the Groupe d' Oncologie Thoracique Azuréen multidisciplinary management was confirmed, as we believe that a discordant rate of less than 5% and a delay of treatment of 4 weeks can be considered acceptable. Furthermore, a periodic survival evaluation of the population as a whole could provide additional useful information for multidisciplinary groups.

  6. Challenges and counter challenges in HIV/AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingsheng Li; Charles Wood

    2010-01-01

    @@ Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, there has been significant progress in combating the virus.In addition to identifying HIV,1 scientists have developed an array of antiretroviral drugs and successfully converted the once deadly disease into a treatable and chronic condition.2 Nevertheless, this battle is far from over and HIV still outsmarts humans in multiple ways and poses tremendous challenges. Within this context, the Chinese Medical Journal has timely published this special issue on HIV/AIDS, highlighting the ongoing challenges posed by HIV and potential solutions to these problems.

  7. Academic pediatric radiology in 2010: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, George A

    2010-04-01

    Academic pediatric radiology is under considerable stress as the result of ongoing financial pressures and recent health-care legislation. This article reviews the current challenges, and suggests both departmental and individual strategies important in sustaining our academic mission.

  8. Fostering multidisciplinary learning through computer-supported collaboration script: The role of a transactive memory script

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, O.; Weinberger, A.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Teasley, S.D.; Mulder, M.

    2012-01-01

    For solving many of today's complex problems, professionals need to collaborate in multidisciplinary teams. Facilitation of knowledge awareness and coordination among group members, that is through a Transactive Memory System (TMS), is vital in multidisciplinary collaborative settings. Online platfo

  9. Fostering multidisciplinary learning through computer-supported collaboration script: The role of a transactive memory script

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, O.; Weinberger, A.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Teasley, S.D.; Mulder, M.

    2012-01-01

    For solving many of today's complex problems, professionals need to collaborate in multidisciplinary teams. Facilitation of knowledge awareness and coordination among group members, that is through a Transactive Memory System (TMS), is vital in multidisciplinary collaborative settings. Online

  10. Multi-Fidelity Multi-Strategy and Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Multidisciplinary design and optimization (MDO) tools developed to perform multi-disciplinary analysis based on low fidelity computation methods have been used in...

  11. A multidisciplinary esthetic approach to single-tooth replacement and diastema closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyssova, Valentina; Estafan, Denise; Cunnigham, Ralph P

    2008-05-01

    Anterior tooth replacement has always posed an esthetic challenge for dentists. A multidisciplinary approach makes it possible to provide patients with esthetics and function. Treatment planning should involve other specialists when clinicians are faced with the additional esthetic concerns of the patient (such as anterior spatial anomalies and esthetically unpleasant existing restorations). Metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures have been used to allow the replacement of missing teeth for many years, providing both strength and esthetics. Several other options also are available, including implant placement. Dental implants in the esthetic zone are well-documented in the literature; numerous controlled clinical trials have shown overall implant survival and success rates. This article illustrates a step-by-step analysis and treatment option for a single-tooth replacement and maxillary anterior spatial dilemma using Captek crowns.

  12. Minding the Genes: a Multidisciplinary Approach towards Genetic Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ashley; Rosman, Lindsey; Cahill, John; Ingles, Jodie; Murray, Brittney; Tichnell, Crystal; James, Cynthia A; Sears, Samuel F

    2017-04-01

    Genetic assessment for inherited cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasingly available, due in part to rapid innovations in genetic sequencing technologies. While genetic testing is aimed at reducing uncertainty, it also produces awareness of potential medical conditions and can leave patients feeling uncertain about their risk, especially if there are ambiguous results. This uncertainty can produce psychological distress for patients and their families undergoing the assessment process. Additionally, patients may experience psychological distress related to living with inherited CVD. In order to more effectively manage the psychosocial challenges related to genetic assessment for CVD, a multidisciplinary model expanded to include psychologists and other allied health professionals is outlined. A case study is provided to illustrate how psychological distress can manifest in a patient living with inherited CVD, as well as proposed psychological management of this patient. Finally, a guide for genetic counselors is provided to aid in identifying and managing common psychological reactions to genetic assessment for CVD.

  13. Multidisciplinary studies, systems approaches and parasite eco-epidemiology: something old, something new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudoux, P; Raoul, F; Pleydell, D; Craig, P S

    2008-09-01

    Parasite requires an understanding of complex transmission systems where individual, population and environmental factors and their interactions can hardly been considered separately. Moreover, the importance of space and time in host population and parasite transmission processes is increasingly recognised. The present review illustrates how epidemiology and transmission ecology have evolved in a multidisciplinary framework to a systems approach that includes both spatial and temporal dimensions. Focusing on population processes, three significant challenges are discussed: (i) integration of landscape ecology concepts and modelling across time-space scales, (ii) development of molecular methods that permits easy parasite/host identification and process tracking (e.g. host and parasite movements), and (iii) integration of sociology methods to estimate zoonotic risk and exposure.

  14. Multidisciplinary studies, systems approaches and parasite eco-epidemiology: something old, something new

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giraudoux P.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Parasite requires an understanding of complex transmission systems where individual, population and environmental factors and their interactions can hardly been considered separately. Moreover, the importance of space and time in host population and parasite transmission processes is increasingly recognised. The present review illustrates how epidemiology and transmission ecology have evolved in a multidisciplinary framework to a systems approach that includes both spatial and temporal dimensions. Focusing on population processes, three significant challenges are discussed: (i integration of landscape ecology concepts and modelling across time-space scales, (ii development of molecular methods that permits easy parasite/host identification and process tracking (e.g. host and parasite movements, and (iii integration of sociology methods to estimate zoonotic risk and exposure.

  15. Roadmap to the multidisciplinary design analysis and optimisation of wind energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Perez-Moreno, S.; Zaaijer, M. B.; Bottasso, C. L.; Dykes, K.; Merz, K. O.; Réthoré, P.-E.; Zahle, F.

    2016-09-01

    A research agenda is described to further encourage the application of Multidisciplinary Design Analysis and Optimisation (MDAO) methodologies to wind energy systems. As a group of researchers closely collaborating within the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 37 for Wind Energy Systems Engineering: Integrated Research, Design and Development, we have identified challenges that will be encountered by users building an MDAO framework. This roadmap comprises 17 research questions and activities recognised to belong to three research directions: model fidelity, system scope and workflow architecture. It is foreseen that sensible answers to all these questions will enable to more easily apply MDAO in the wind energy domain. Beyond the agenda, this work also promotes the use of systems engineering to design, analyse and optimise wind turbines and wind farms, to complement existing compartmentalised research and design paradigms.

  16. Structural Model Tuning Capability in an Object-Oriented Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2008-01-01

    Updating the finite element model using measured data is a challenging problem in the area of structural dynamics. The model updating process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of dynamic properties of structures. Accurate rigid body dynamics are important for flight control system design and aeroelastic trim analysis. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. In this research, a multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool is introduced to optimize the objective function and constraints such that the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes are matched to the target data as well as the mass matrix being orthogonalized.

  17. Multidisciplinary collaborative development of a plain-language prenatal education book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottl-Santiago, Julie; Fox, Carolyn Shepard; Pecci, Christine Chang; Iverson, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    During pregnancy, women actively seek out health information that promotes the well-being of themselves and their fetuses. For those with health literacy challenges, access to understandable health information can be difficult. Written information, in particular, needs to be readable and usable by the women served. Plain language is an essential component of effective health education material. In an effort to create standardized prenatal education materials for a diverse population of childbearing women, Boston Medical Center's midwifery service led a multidisciplinary initiative to develop a comprehensive plain-language prenatal education book. Midwives, obstetricians, family physicians, nurses, and community doulas contributed to the content of the book; art students provided graphic design skills; and a literacy consultant assisted in the wording and layout. The Hey Mama! book provides women with woman-centered, readable, comprehensive information about pregnancy, labor, postpartum, and newborn care.

  18. Multidisciplinary team of intensive therapy: humanization and fragmentation of the work process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Viviane Canhizares; Domingos, Thiago da Silva; Siqueira, Fernanda Paula Cerântola; Braga, Eliana Mara

    2016-01-01

    to understand the meaning of humanized care in intensive care units considering the experience of the multidisciplinary team. descriptive and exploratory qualitative research. For this purpose, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 professionals of the heath-care team, and, after transcription, we organized the qualitative data according to content analysis. from two main categories, we were able to understand that humanized care is characterized in the actions of health-care: effective communication, team work, empathy, singularity, and integrality; and mischaracterized in the management processes, specifically in the fragmentation of the work process and health-care, in the precarious work conditions, and in differing conceptual aspects of the political proposal of humanization. care activities in intensive therapy are guided by the humanization of care and corroborate the hospital management as a challenge to be overcome to boost advances in the operationalization of this Brazilian policy.

  19. Environmental management of the design process. Managing multidisciplinary design: the role of environmental consultancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangemi, V.; Malanga, R.; Ranzo, P. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy). Dpto. di Configurazione e Attuazione dell' Architettura

    2000-02-01

    Complexity and multi-disciplinary represent the challenge that the design and construction of sustainable buildings have to face. The nature and quantity of information needed are further considerations which lead to re-thinking the whole design process. The architect alone cannot have all the skills required, so he/she should be able to rely on other specialized professionals. In some European countries, environmental consultancy - which deals with ecology matters - is becoming more and more crucial for the design of a successful building. Taking into account two British consultancy companies - investigated as case studies - this paper looks at the way the design process related to complex projects is managed, and at the effects on the architectural sector. (author)

  20. Multidisciplinary Practice Experience of Nursing Faculty and Their Collaborators for Primary Health Care in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Ja Kim, PhD, RN, FAAN

    2008-03-01

    Conclusion: Teamwork should be included in all health professions' curricula, and nursing clinical practicums should include primary health care in all specialty areas. More faculties should engage in multidisciplinary primary health care. The benefits of a multidisciplinary approach to primary health care outweigh the difficulties experienced by multidisciplinary team members. The findings of this study may be useful for future multidisciplinary primary health care work worldwide.

  1. Successful development of satiety enhancing food products: towards a multidisciplinary agenda of research challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleef, van E.; Trijp, van J.C.M.; Borne, van den J.J.G.C.; Zondervan, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the context of increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity in societies worldwide, enhancing the satiating capacity of foods may help people control their energy intake and weight. This requires an integrated approach between various food related disciplines. By structuring this approach arou

  2. Multi-disciplinary solutions to industry and government´s E-business challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliot, Steve; Viborg Andersen, Kim; Trauth, Eileen

    Successful implementations of E-Business frequently require additional interaction between elements that extend beyond technology and organizational issues to include environmental (e.g. infrastructure, national culture, national and international payment mechanisms) and consumer factors....

  3. Multi-disciplinary solutions to industry and government´s E-business challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliot, Steve; Viborg Andersen, Kim; Trauth, Eileen

    Successful implementations of E-Business frequently require additional interaction between elements that extend beyond technology and organizational issues to include environmental (e.g. infrastructure, national culture, national and international payment mechanisms) and consumer factors....

  4. A managed multidisciplinary programme on multi-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Danish university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl

    2013-11-01

    Bacteria-producing extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes are resistant to commonly used antimicrobials. In 2008, routine monitoring revealed a clonal hospital outbreak of ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-KP). At a 510-bed Danish university hospital, a multidisciplinary change project inspired by Kotter's Eight Steps of Change was designed. In addition to revision of antimicrobial guidelines and restriction of selected antimicrobials, the complex, managed, multi-faceted intervention comprised training and education, enhanced isolation precautions, and a series of actions to improve the infection control measures and standardise procedures across the hospital. A prospective interrupted time series design was used to analyse data collected at hospital level from January 2008 through December 2011. Though overall antimicrobial consumption remained unaffected, the intervention led to intended, immediate and sustained reduction in the use of cefuroxime, and an increase in the use of ertapenem, piperacillin/tazobactam and β-lactamase sensitive penicillin. Moreover, a postintervention reduction in the rate of ESBL-KP in diagnostic samples and in the incidence of ESBL-KP infections was observed. The intervention may also have reduced the need for isolation precautions and may have shortened each isolation period. The results indicate that an immediate and sustained change in the antimicrobial consumption and a decreasing rate of ESBL-KP are achievable through the application of a managed, multi-faceted intervention that does not require ongoing antibiotic stewardship.

  5. Factors contributing to sleep deprivation in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie J. Ehlers

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients in intensive care units require rest and sleep to recuperate, but might suffer from sleep deprivation due to ongoing unit activities. The study aimed to identify and describe the factors contributing to sleep deprivation in one multi-disciplinary intensive care unit MDICU in a private hospital in South Africa. Quantitative, descriptive research was conducted to identify factors contributing to sleep deprivation in the research setting, and to make recommendations to enhance these patients’ abilities to sleep. Structured interviewswere conducted with 34 adult non-ventilated patients who had spent at least one night in the MDICU and who gave informed consent. Out of the 34 interviewed patients 70.6% n = 24 indicated that they suffered from sleep deprivation in the MDICU. The five major factors contributing to sleep deprivation in a MDICU were, (1 not knowing nurses’ names, noise caused by alarms, (2 stress, (3 inability to understand medical terms, and (3 blood pressure cuffs that restricted patients’ movements and smelled badly. Patients’ abilities to sleep were enhanced by reassuring nurses whose names they knew and with whom they could communicate. By attending to the identified five major factors, patients’ abilities to sleep in a MDICU could be enhanced enabling patients to recuperate faster. The implementation of such measures need not incur financial costs for the MDICU concerned.

  6. Factors contributing to sleep deprivation in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie J. Ehlers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients in intensive care units require rest and sleep to recuperate, but might suffer from sleep deprivation due to ongoing unit activities. The study aimed to identify and describe the factors contributing to sleep deprivation in one multi-disciplinary intensive care unit (MDICU in a private hospital in South Africa. Quantitative, descriptive research was conducted to identify factors contributing to sleep deprivation in the research setting, and to make recommendations to enhance these patients’ abilities to sleep. Structured interviews were conducted with 34 adult non-ventilated patients who had spent at least one night in the MDICU and who gave informed consent. Out of the 34 interviewed patients 70.6% (n = 24 indicated that they suffered from sleep deprivation in the MDICU. The five major factors contributing to sleep deprivation in a MDICU were, (1 not knowing nurses’ names, noise caused by alarms, (2 stress, (3 inability to understand medical terms, and (3 blood pressure cuffs that restricted patients’ movements and smelled badly. Patients’ abilities to sleep were enhanced by reassuring nurses whose names they knew and with whom they could communicate. By attending to the identified five major factors, patients’ abilities to sleep in a MDICU could be enhanced enabling patients to recuperate faster. The implementation of such measures need not incur financial costs for the MDICU concerned.

  7. Two sides of the coin - general practitioners' experience of working in multidisciplinary teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Anders; Friberg, Febe; Segesten, Kerstin; Gedda, Birgitta; Mattsson, Bengt

    2008-01-01

    Multidisciplinary teamwork, defined as the collaboration between different professional groups to achieve a common purpose, is commonly regarded as a means to meet the complex tasks that medicine has to deal with today. However, many attempts to introduce the method in primary care have failed and this is supposed to be partly due to the fact that general practitioners (GPs) did not participate in the implementation of the method. The aim of this investigation was to get a deeper understanding of their attitude to teamwork by interviewing nine GPs at four Swedish health care centres, where successful teamwork had been ongoing since 1997. Themes and categories in the interviews were identified according to content analysis. Although the attitude in general was in favour of teamwork, four major themes: time-consuming versus time-saving; shared responsibility versus main responsibility; medical expert versus generalist; shared knowledge versus all knowing, could be identified, which all revealed ambivalence towards teamwork among the interviewees. It was concluded that, if teamwork is to be successfully introduced into primary care, the GPs' self-perception has to be taken into consideration as has the prestige and status associated with their traditional role and the benefits of teamwork to the profession of medicine. Apart from time, teamwork requires, professional supervision and doctors need to be trained in this method as early as in medical school.

  8. Multidisciplinary centres for safety and quality improvement: learning from climate change science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Effective improvement and research rely on sustained multidisciplinary collaboration, but few examples are available of centres with the broad range of disciplines and practical experience that are needed to sustain long-term improvement in healthcare quality and safety. In a number of respects, the parlous state of the quality and safety of medical care resembles the problem of climate change. Both constitute a profoundly serious man-made threat to the public good which have until recently been both ignored and denied but are increasingly being recognised, taken seriously and acted on. Among the most interesting and important responses to the challenge of climate change has been the creation of Centres of Climate Change in which experts from multiple diverse disciplines are brought together to tackle the problem. Such centres, while science-based, express their vision in solid pragmatic terms and embrace policy, public engagement and education as essential components of that vision. Cross-discipline collaboration has unfortunately not achieved the same effectiveness or visibility in healthcare quality and safety as it has in the area of climate change. The authors argue that there is a need to create multidisciplinary centres in healthcare to accelerate the improvement of safety and quality, and provide the necessary theoretical and empirical foundations. Such centres would draw on disciplines such as epidemiology, statistics and relevant clinical disciplines but equally from psychology, engineering, ergonomics, sociology, economics, organisational development in addition to engaging with patients and citizens and leaders with practical experience of improvement in the field. In this paper, we address some of the pragmatic challenges of creating such centres and consider how the right groups and networks of researchers and practitioners might be assembled. PMID:21450778

  9. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. 25.403. Section... COMMUNITIES Post-Designation Requirements § 25.403. Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. (a) Each Empowerment Zone and Enterprise Community shall prepare and submit annually, work plans for the subsequent...

  10. The Use of Process Energy Characteristics to Predict Energy Performance Indicators on an Ongoing Basis

    OpenAIRE

    Izabela Sadowska

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents possible uses of process energy characteristics for ongoing monitoring of energy indicators. The method of ongoing monitoring of indicators consists in comparison of indicators determined on the basis of the processes’ energy characteristics. The method is primarily applicable in early detection and elimination of excessive and irrational energy consumption and in adjustments of the current energy management.

  11. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh M. Bhatt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immune dysfunction leading to recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections; aspiration resulting from dysfunctional swallowing due to neurodegenerative deficits; inefficient cough; and interstitial lung disease/pulmonary fibrosis. Malnutrition is a significant comorbidity. The increased radiosensitivity and increased risk of cancer should be borne in mind when requesting radiological investigations. Aggressive proactive monitoring and treatment of these various aspects of lung disease under multidisciplinary expertise in the experience of national multidisciplinary clinics internationally forms the basis of this statement on the management of lung disease in A-T. Neurological management is outwith the scope of this document.

  12. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Jayesh M; Bush, Andrew; van Gerven, Marjo; Nissenkorn, Andreea; Renke, Michael; Yarlett, Lian; Taylor, Malcolm; Tonia, Thomy; Warris, Adilia; Zielen, Stefan; Zinna, Shairbanu; Merkus, Peter J F M

    2015-12-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immune dysfunction leading to recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections; aspiration resulting from dysfunctional swallowing due to neurodegenerative deficits; inefficient cough; and interstitial lung disease/pulmonary fibrosis. Malnutrition is a significant comorbidity. The increased radiosensitivity and increased risk of cancer should be borne in mind when requesting radiological investigations. Aggressive proactive monitoring and treatment of these various aspects of lung disease under multidisciplinary expertise in the experience of national multidisciplinary clinics internationally forms the basis of this statement on the management of lung disease in A-T. Neurological management is outwith the scope of this document. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  13. A Web-Based Monitoring System for Multidisciplinary Design Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, James L.; Salas, Andrea O.; Weston, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    In today's competitive environment, both industry and government agencies are under pressure to reduce the time and cost of multidisciplinary design projects. New tools have been introduced to assist in this process by facilitating the integration of and communication among diverse disciplinary codes. One such tool, a framework for multidisciplinary computational environments, is defined as a hardware and software architecture that enables integration, execution, and communication among diverse disciplinary processes. An examination of current frameworks reveals weaknesses in various areas, such as sequencing, displaying, monitoring, and controlling the design process. The objective of this research is to explore how Web technology, integrated with an existing framework, can improve these areas of weakness. This paper describes a Web-based system that optimizes and controls the execution sequence of design processes; and monitors the project status and results. The three-stage evolution of the system with increasingly complex problems demonstrates the feasibility of this approach.

  14. A Multidisciplinary Engineering Summer School in an Industrial Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Gorm; Fernandes, Joao M.; Habel, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    Most university-level engineering studies produce technically skilled engineers. However, typically students face several difficulties when working in multidisciplinary teams when they initiate their industrial careers. In a globalised world, it becomes increasingly important that engineers...... are capable of collaborating across disciplinary boundaries and exhibit soft competencies, like communication, interpersonal and social skills, time planning, creativity, initiative, and reflection. To prepare a group of engineering and industrial design students to acquire those capabilities......, an international summer school that combined industrial design with different kinds of engineering disciplines was organised on the site of Bang & Olufsen (B&O) in Denmark. This multidisciplinary engineering summer school was attended by students from six European university-level teaching institutions...

  15. Multidisciplinary Teaching-Changing Collaboration During Building Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne; Karlshøj, Jan

    2011-01-01

    to an increasing need of functioning collaboration in large teams during the design phase; as well as a need of new work methods within the process. This calls for employees who are experienced in collaborating in interdisciplinary teams. To fulfill this demand a multidisciplinary course in “Advanced building...... design” has been developed at the Technical University of Denmark. The goal of the course is to provide training in teamwork at the final stage of the engineering education. The course has been carried out twice. It was held by a multidisciplinary team of professors in periods 2008/09 and 2009....../10. The team of professors and the student teams had similar working conditions. These teams were subject of a questionnaire investigation on collaboration and team work. The study has the following findings. Collaboration can be learned and improves in time. It is shown that the team leader is not necessarily...

  16. Anxiety and depression levels among multidisciplinary health residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Salvagni Rotta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess symptoms of anxiety and depression of professionals of Multidisciplinary Health Residence Programs. Methods: this is a cross-sectional study, performed with fifty professionals, using three instruments: one for socioeconomic and demographic data, and the Beck’s Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results: predominance of females (92.0%, average age 26 years old, single (88.0%, family income from two to five salaries (56.0% satisfied with the work (82.0% and thought about quitting the program (56.0% showed anxiety (50.0% and depression (28.0%. Conclusion: there was an association between anxiety and depression in multidisciplinary residents, which points to the need for rethinking strategies for identifying these symptoms and control of stress factors for the promotion of mental health.

  17. A Concise Introduction to Mechanics of Rigid Bodies Multidisciplinary Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, L

    2012-01-01

    A Concise Introduction to Mechanics of Rigid Bodies: Multidisciplinary Engineering presents concise, key concepts of kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies. This compact volume bridges the steep gap between  introductory texts on engineering mechanics, which focus on one and two dimensional motions of particles and rigid bodies, and advanced texts on multi-body dynamics in high dimension spaces  found in multidisciplinary areas like mechatronics, robotics and biomechanics. In the book, rigid body motions in the spaces with different dimensions are described in addition to studies in a uniform framework supported by vector and matrix operations. Rigorous mathematic tools and explanations are provided to clarify the most complex concepts. This book also: Provides practical examples from different engineering areas, offering a link between theoretical fundamentals and everyday applications Offers simplified mathematical equations to clearly present essential theories in robotics and mechanics Presents statics...

  18. An Educational Program of Mechatronics for Multidisciplinary Knowledge Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Keiichi; Kojima, Kazuyuki

    Recently, as the technologies surrounding mechanical engineering have improved remarkably, the expectations for students who graduate from departments of mechanical engineering have increased. For example, in order to develop a mechatronics system, a student needs to integrate a wide variety of technologies, such as mechanical engineering, electrical and electronics engineering, and information technology. Therefore, from the perspective of educators, the current education system, which stresses expertizing each technology, should be replaced by an education system that stresses integrating multidisciplinary knowledge. In this paper, a trial education program for students of the department of mechanical engineering in our university, in which students are required to integrate multidisciplinary knowledge in order to develop a biologically-based robot, is described. Finally, the efficacy of the program is analyzed.

  19. Late mental health changes in tortured refugees in multidisciplinary treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Jessica Mariana; Olsen, Dorte Reff; Kastrup, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine long-term changes in symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, and in health-related quality of life in traumatized refugees 23 months after admission to multidisciplinary treatment. The study group comprised 45 persons admitted to the R......The aim of this study was to examine long-term changes in symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, and in health-related quality of life in traumatized refugees 23 months after admission to multidisciplinary treatment. The study group comprised 45 persons admitted....... Thus, no clinically significant improvement was observed, but there is a need for further studies, in particular randomized trials evaluating the efficacy of various health-related and social interventions among severely traumatized refugees....

  20. A case study on collaboration within multidisciplinary teamwork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne; Karlshøj, Jan; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2010-01-01

    Collaboration within the building process has always been difficult. Additionally the new demands on functionality such as energy and cost efficiency change the roles within the teams of engineers and architects, engaged in building design and generate a need of new work methods within the process...... and teamwork at the final stage of the engineering education. The course was held by a multidisciplinary team of teachers for 9 multidisciplinary teams of students. The team of teachers and the student teams had similar working conditions. These teams were subject of investigation on collaboration...... and transprofessionalism. 32 students and 7 teachers answered a questionnaire leading to the following findings. Collaboration was improving during the course. Other than in traditional building teams we could see that the students placed the role as a designer only in a few cases were perceived the team leader...

  1. MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEACHING – MSc COURSE ON TEAMWORK AND OPARATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlshøj, Jan; Dederichs, Anne

    2011-01-01

    of Denmark. The goal of the course is to provide training in teamwork at the final stage of the engineering education. The course has been carried out twice. It was held by a multidisciplinary team of professors in periods 2008/09, 2009/10 and 20010/2011. Teams of students were subject of a questionnaire...... investigation on collaboration and team work. The study has the following findings. The latest year there has been a special focus on team work and all members tested their role according to Belbin’s theory on teamwork. The work has the following findings: Collaboration was generally good. However the extra...... focus on teamwork did not lead to a improvement of the team work in contrary. The team-structure was generally flat and decisions were mostly made in consensus. It is worthwhile to offer a multidisciplinary course and give engineering students experience in collaboration methods....

  2. Multidisciplinary approach for the rehabilitation of dentoalveolar trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustün, Yakup; Esen, Emin; Toroğlu, M Serdar; Akova, Tolga

    2004-10-01

    Satisfactory dental rehabilitation of dentoalveolar trauma requires intense effort and time. Usually multidisciplinary treatment planning and teamwork are necessary to deal with multitask problems associated with these cases. Dental implants have been successfully used for replacement of missing teeth, but in trauma cases insufficient alveolar bone hinders implantation. In this report we present the multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of a trauma case. Maxillary segmental alveolar osteotomy in conjunction with interpositional and onlay bone grafting was performed to prepare the site for placement of osseointegrated implants. Titanium microplate and screws were used to provide orthodontic anchorage for intrusion of the extruded mandibular incisors. The patient was rehabilitated by implant supported fixed partial denture 6 months after implant placement.

  3. Breaking Down the Siloes: Developing Effective Multidisciplinary HIV Research Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Manya; Castel, Amanda

    2016-09-01

    As the HIV epidemic passes its 35 years mark, the role of multidisciplinary approaches to HIV research has become increasingly important. Development of diverse, cross-cutting research teams has been found to be key to engaging and retaining participants in population-based studies; it is also a crucial component of designing studies capable of examining the sensitive and nuanced issues that surround HIV related risk and adherence behavior. Expanding our understanding of these issues is central to being able to overcome them and ultimately to the development of best practices for translation of research discovery into improvements in prevention and care. The objectives of this paper are to characterize the importance of multidisciplinary teams in HIV research where they are critical to gaining information that can have a positive impact on the epidemic and to propose specific methods for creating teams to conduct research with optimal public health impact.

  4. Multidisciplinary teams in consultation-liaison psychiatry: the Yale model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, H

    1987-01-01

    The consultation-liaison service at Yale features integrated teams of psychiatrists, social workers, and clinical nurse specialists working together in both consultation and outpatient settings. The model is based on the tenets that (1) comprehensive evaluation of patients is essential for effective treatment; (2) role definition is necessary for specific disciplines, including the definition of overlapping and separate areas of expertise and practice. The multidisciplinary teams are coordinated by a psychiatric resident, who is supervised by an attending psychiatrist. The role of the resident is that of a diagnostician and coordinating physician. The social worker functions as an expert in family evaluation and treatment, and the nurse specialist functions as supportive therapist and liaison with the nursing staff. The structure of the division of consultation-liaison and ambulatory services at Yale is described and the advantages and disadvantages of the multidisciplinary team concept are discussed in comparison with other models of consultation-liaison psychiatry.

  5. Managing the patient with osteogenesis imperfecta: a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Caroline; Seasman, Alison; Bishop, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by low bone density. The type and severity of OI are variable. The primary manifestations are fractures, bone deformity, and bone pain, resulting in reduced mobility and function to complete everyday tasks. OI affects not only the physical but also the social and emotional well-being of children, young people, and their families. As such, medical, surgical, and allied health professionals’ assessments all play a role in the management of these children. The multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of children and young people living with OI seeks to provide well-coordinated, comprehensive assessments, and interventions that place the child and family at the very center of their care. The coordinated efforts of a multidisciplinary team can support children with OI to fulfill their potential, maximizing function, independence, and well-being. PMID:28435282

  6. Multidisciplinary design optimization of mechatronic vehicles with active suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuping; McPhee, John

    2005-05-01

    A multidisciplinary optimization method is applied to the design of mechatronic vehicles with active suspensions. The method is implemented in a GA-A'GEM-MATLAB simulation environment in such a way that the linear mechanical vehicle model is designed in a multibody dynamics software package, i.e. A'GEM, the controllers and estimators are constructed using linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) method, and Kalman filter algorithm in Matlab, then the combined mechanical and control model is optimized simultaneously using a genetic algorithm (GA). The design variables include passive parameters and control parameters. In the numerical optimizations, both random and deterministic road inputs and both perfect measurement of full state variables and estimated limited state variables are considered. Optimization results show that the active suspension systems based on the multidisciplinary optimization method have better overall performance than those derived using conventional design methods with the LQG algorithm.

  7. A Multidisciplinary Research Agenda for Understanding Vaccine-Related Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Sevdalis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is increasingly broad global recognition of the need to better understand determinants of vaccine acceptance. Fifteen social science, communication, health, and medical professionals (the “Motors of Trust in Vaccination” (MOTIV think tank explored factors relating to vaccination decision-making as a step to building a multidisciplinary research agenda. One hundred and forty seven factors impacting decisions made by consumers, professionals, and policy makers on vaccine acceptance, delay, or refusal were identified and grouped into three major categories: cognition and decision-making; groups and social norms; and communication and engagement. These factors should help frame a multidisciplinary research agenda to build an evidence base on the determinants of vaccine acceptance to inform the development of interventions and vaccination policies.

  8. ICTR-PHE: scientists engage with multidisciplinary research

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    In 2016, the next edition of the unique conference that gathers scientists from a variety of fields will focus on many topics particularly dear to the heart of physicists, clinicians, biologists, and computer specialists. The call for abstracts is open until 16 October.   When detector physicists, radiochemists, nuclear-medicine physicians and other physicists, biologists, software developers, accelerator experts and oncologists think outside the box and get involved in multidisciplinary research, they create innovative healthcare. ICTR-PHE is a biennial event, co-organised by CERN, whose main aim is to foster multidisciplinary research by positioning itself at the crossing of physics, medicine and biology. At the ICTR-PHE conference, physicists, engineers, and computer scientists share their knowledge and technologies while doctors and biologists present their needs and vision for the medical tools of the future, thus triggering breakthrough ideas and technological developments in speci...

  9. Lipid-based nanosystems for CD44 targeting in cancer treatment: recent significant advances, ongoing challenges and unmet needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Thais Leite; Hillaireau, Hervé; Vergnaud, Juliette; Fattal, Elias

    2016-07-01

    Extensive experimental evidence demonstrates the important role of hyaluronic acid (HA)-CD44 interaction in cell proliferation and migration, inflammation and tumor growth. Taking advantage of this interaction, the design of HA-modified nanocarriers has been investigated for targeting CD44-overexpressing cells with the purpose of delivering drugs to cancer or inflammatory cells. The effect of such modification on targeting efficacy is influenced by several factors. In this review, we focus on the impact of HA-modification on the characteristics of lipid-based nanoparticles. We try to understand how these modifications influence particle physicochemical properties, interaction with CD44 receptors, intracellular trafficking pathways, toxicity, complement/macrophage activation and pharmacokinetics. Our aim is to provide insight in tailoring particle modification by HA in order to design more efficient CD44-targeting lipid nanocarriers.

  10. Is Social Work Evidence-Based? Does Saying So Make It So? Ongoing Challenges in Integrating Research, Practice and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    The integration of research and practice is of concern in all helping professions. Has social work become an evidence-based profession as some claim? Characteristics of current-day social work are presented that dispute this view, related continuing concerns are suggested, and promising developments (mostly outside social work) are described that…

  11. Challenges Facing New North Atlantic Treaty Organization Member States: An Analysis of the Alliance’s Ongoing Enlargement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-16

    Civil-Military Relations Theory in the Postcommunist World ,” Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces Geneva, July 2002, 1. 27Samuel P...and the District of Columbia maintain active partnerships with fifty emerging democracies around the world . State partnerships with new alliance...assistance to emerging democracies . Given the already substantial contributions to military operations in the Balkans, Afghanistan, and Iraq, it appears

  12. Health data use, stewardship, and governance: ongoing gaps and challenges: a report from AMIA's 2012 Health Policy Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hripcsak, George; Bloomrosen, Meryl; FlatelyBrennan, Patti; Chute, Christopher G; Cimino, Jim; Detmer, Don E; Edmunds, Margo; Embi, Peter J; Goldstein, Melissa M; Hammond, William Ed; Keenan, Gail M; Labkoff, Steve; Murphy, Shawn; Safran, Charlie; Speedie, Stuart; Strasberg, Howard; Temple, Freda; Wilcox, Adam B

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of personal health data are being collected and made available through existing and emerging technological media and tools. While use of these data has significant potential to facilitate research, improve quality of care for individuals and populations, and reduce healthcare costs, many policy-related issues must be addressed before their full value can be realized. These include the need for widely agreed-on data stewardship principles and effective approaches to reduce or eliminate data silos and protect patient privacy. AMIA's 2012 Health Policy Meeting brought together healthcare academics, policy makers, and system stakeholders (including representatives of patient groups) to consider these topics and formulate recommendations. A review of a set of Proposed Principles of Health Data Use led to a set of findings and recommendations, including the assertions that the use of health data should be viewed as a public good and that achieving the broad benefits of this use will require understanding and support from patients.

  13. A Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Model for AUV Synthetic Conceptual Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU Guang-zhi; ZHANG Yu-wen

    2006-01-01

    Autonomous undersea vehicle (AUV) is a typical complex engineering system. This paper studies the disciplines and coupled variables in AUV design with multidisciplinary design optimization (M DO) methods. The framework of AUV synthetic conceptual design is described first, and then a model with collaborative optimization is studied. At last,an example is given to verify the validity and efficiency of MDO in AUV synthetic conceptual design.

  14. Hepatic encephalopathy: what the multidisciplinary team can do

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Andy Liu,1 Eric R Yoo,2 Osama Siddique,3 Ryan B Perumpail,4 George Cholankeril,5 Aijaz Ahmed4 1Department of Medicine, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, 2Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, 4Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 5Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN, USA Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a complex disease requiring a multidisciplinary approach among specialists, primary care team, family, and caregivers. HE is currently a diagnosis of exclusion, requiring an extensive workup to exclude other possible etiologies, including mental status changes, metabolic, infectious, traumatic, and iatrogenic causes. The categorization of HE encompasses a continuum, varying from the clinically silent minimal HE (MHE, which is only detectable using psychometric tests, to overt HE, which is further divided into four grades of severity. While there has been an increased effort to create fast and reliable methods for the detection of MHE, screening is still underperformed due to the lack of standardization and efficient methods of diagnosis. The management of HE requires consultation from various disciplines, including hepatology, primary care physicians, neurology, psychiatry, dietician/nutritionist, social workers, and other medical and surgical subspecialties based on clinical presentation and clear communication among these disciplines to best manage patients with HE throughout their course. The first-line therapy for HE is lactulose with or without rifaximin. Following the initial episode of overt HE, secondary prophylaxis with lactulose and/or rifaximin is indicated with the goal to prevent recurrent episodes and improve quality of life. Recent studies have demonstrated the negative impact

  15. Advanced computational aeroelasticity and multidisciplinary application for composite curved wing

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Yu-Sung

    2008-01-01

    This article preferentially describes advanced computational aeroelasticity and its multidisciplinary applications based on the coupled CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) and CSD (Computational Structural Dynamics) method. A modal-based coupled nonlinear aeroelastic analysis system incorporated with unsteady Euler aerodynamics has been developed based on the high-speed parallel processing technique. It is clearly expected to give accurate and practical engineering data in the design fields of...

  16. Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This three-part document contains a collection of technical papers presented at the Second NASA/Air Force Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, held September 28-30, 1988 in Hampton, Virginia. The topics covered include: aircraft design, aeroelastic tailoring, control of aeroelastic structures, dynamics and control of flexible structures, structural design, design of large engineering systems, application of artificial intelligence, shape optimization, software development and implementation, and sensitivity analysis.

  17. Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor C.; Shewbridge A; Harris J; Green JS

    2013-01-01

    Cath Taylor,1 Amanda Shewbridge,2 Jenny Harris,1 James S Green3,4 1Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London, London UK; 2Breast Cancer Services, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 3Department of Urology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK; 4Department of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University, London, UK Abstract: The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT)-work for breast cance...

  18. Educating primary care providers about HIV disease: multidisciplinary interactive mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Macher, A; Goosby, E; Barker, L; Volberding, P; Goldschmidt, R.; Balano, K B; Williams, A; Hoenig, L; Gould, B; Daniels, E.

    1994-01-01

    As HIV-related prophylactic and therapeutic research findings continue to evolve, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the Public Health Service has created multidisciplinary mechanisms to disseminate new treatment options and educate primary care providers at rural and urban sites throughout our nation's health care system. HRSA has implemented (a) the International State-of-the-Art HIV Clinical Conference Call Series, (b) the national network of AIDS Education and Trai...

  19. Importance of multidisciplinary approach in diagnosis of histoplasmosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Patricia Botini; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado; Mattos, Antônio Luiz de Arruda

    2016-01-01

    A patient with systemic involvement, initially treated as tuberculosis, is presented in this report. There were only two painful subcutaneous nodules, from which we arrived at the correct diagnosis of histoplasmosis. The patient was attended by several experts in the fields of infectious diseases, nephrology and internal medicine, but the diagnosis was only possible after dermatological examination and skin biopsy. This case values multidisciplinary interaction between dermatologists and other medical areas for diagnosis of cases with atypical manifestations. PMID:27438207

  20. 3rd International Multidisciplinary Microscopy and Microanalysis Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Oral, Zehra

    2017-01-01

    The 3rd International Multidisciplinary Microscopy Congress (InterM2015), held from 19 to 23 October 2015, focused on the latest developments concerning applications of microscopy in the biological, physical and chemical sciences at all dimensional scales, advances in instrumentation, techniques in and educational materials on microscopy. These proceedings gather 17 peer-reviewed technical papers submitted by leading academic and research institutions from nine countries and representing some of the most cutting-edge research available.

  1. The effect of multidisciplinary team care on cancer management

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulrahman, Ganiy Opeyemi

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the multidisciplinary team management of many medical conditions especially cancers has increasingly taken a prominent role in patient management in many hospitals and medical centres in the developed countries. In the United Kingdom, it began to gain prominence following the Calman-Heine report in 1995 which suggested that each Cancer Unit in a hospital should have in place arrangements for non-surgical oncological input into services, with a role for a non-surgical o...

  2. Family meetings in palliative care: Multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hanlon Brendan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Support for family carers is a core function of palliative care. Family meetings are commonly recommended as a useful way for health care professionals to convey information, discuss goals of care and plan care strategies with patients and family carers. Yet it seems there is insufficient research to demonstrate the utlility of family meetings or the best way to conduct them. This study sought to develop multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines for conducting family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting based on available evidence and consensus based expert opinion. Methods The guidelines were developed via the following methods: (1 A literature review; (2 Conceptual framework; (3 Refinement of the guidelines based on feedback from an expert panel and focus groups with multidisciplinary specialists from three palliative care units and three major teaching hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Results The literature review revealed that no comprehensive exploration of the conduct and utility of family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting has occurred. Preliminary clinical guidelines were developed by the research team, based on relevant literature and a conceptual framework informed by: single session therapy, principles of therapeutic communication and models of coping and family consultation. A multidisciplinary expert panel refined the content of the guidelines and the applicability of the guidelines was then assessed via two focus groups of multidisciplinary palliative care specialists. The complete version of the guidelines is presented. Conclusion Family meetings provide an opportunity to enhance the quality of care provided to palliative care patients and their family carers. The clinical guidelines developed from this study offer a framework for preparing, conducting and evaluating family meetings. Future research and clinical implications are outlined.

  3. The road we must take: multidisciplinary team science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disis, Mary L; Slattery, John T

    2010-03-10

    Translational research is acknowledged to be complex and to require a diverse skill set. Many organizations, particularly academic institutions, have invested in educational programs, facilities, and enhanced resources to encourage translational research. Critically needed, however, is an emphasis on creating and sustaining multidisciplinary research teams. It is through the power of many and a diverse approach to our health care problems that we will realize lasting solutions.

  4. Posttraumatic stress disorder under ongoing threat: a review of neurobiological and neuroendocrine findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iro Fragkaki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although numerous studies have investigated the neurobiology and neuroendocrinology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD after single finished trauma, studies on PTSD under ongoing threat are scarce and it is still unclear whether these individuals present similar abnormalities. Objective: The purpose of this review is to present the neurobiological and neuroendocrine findings on PTSD under ongoing threat. Ongoing threat considerably affects PTSD severity and treatment response and thus disentangling its neurobiological and neuroendocrine differences from PTSD after finished trauma could provide useful information for treatment. Method: Eighteen studies that examined brain functioning and cortisol levels in relation to PTSD in individuals exposed to intimate partner violence, police officers, and fire fighters were included. Results: Hippocampal volume was decreased in PTSD under ongoing threat, although not consistently associated with symptom severity. The neuroimaging studies revealed that PTSD under ongoing threat was not characterized by reduced volume of amygdala or parahippocampal gyrus. The neurocircuitry model of PTSD after finished trauma with hyperactivation of amygdala and hypoactivation of prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was also confirmed in PTSD under ongoing threat. The neuroendocrine findings were inconsistent, revealing increased, decreased, or no association between cortisol levels and PTSD under ongoing threat. Conclusions: Although PTSD under ongoing threat is characterized by abnormal neurocircuitry patterns similar to those previously found in PTSD after finished trauma, this is less so for other neurobiological and in particular neuroendocrine findings. Direct comparisons between samples with ongoing versus finished trauma are needed in future research to draw more solid conclusions before administering cortisol to patients with PTSD under ongoing threat who may already exhibit increased endogenous

  5. Dropout of a multidisciplinary treatment program for women with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Rehder Gonçalves

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the dropout of a multidisciplinary treatment program in fibromyalgia (FM. Methods: An observational study conducted during the period of April 2000 to December 2005, including 133 women with fibromyalgia, participating in a multidisciplinary treatment program. Those who had left the treatment for two weeks or more were classified as inactive and contacted by telephone to record the reasons for their noncompliance, which were divided into four groups: 1 Family; 2 Occupations; 3 Medical; 4 Other Reasons. Results: When collecting data, 92 (69.4% women were considered inactive. There was no significant difference between noncompliance before and after six months of treatment. Of the total number of inactive women, 54 (40.8% participants left for medical reasons, 30 (22.6% for other reasons, 26 (19.4% for family reasons and 23 (17.2% due to occupation. There was no statistical difference between the motives of dropout according to the length of stay in the program (p> 0.05. Conclusion: We conclude that the multidisciplinary program for women with fibromyalgia had high levels of noncompliance, half of them occurred in the first six months. Among the main reasons reported for dropout, the medical reasons were more frequent.

  6. Multidisciplinary approach to transvenous lead extraction: a single center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Timothy M; Shurter, Jesse; Nguyen, Liem; Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika; Pretorius, Victor

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the success and complication rates of a single center's multidisciplinary approach to transvenous lead extraction. One university hospital. One hundred ninety-five patients scheduled for transvenous lead extraction. A multidisciplinary approach to transvenous lead extraction involving cardiac surgery, electrophysiology, perfusion, and cardiac anesthesiology. A case series of 351 lead extractions performed in 195 patients over a 42-month period. Indications, success rates, and complication rates were tracked and retrospectively evaluated and reported. Indications for lead extraction included 53.3% because of lead malfunction, 36.9% because of infection, with the remaining 9.7% from other categories such as venous stenosis. The lead extraction rate was 99.7%, with complete removal in 97.7%. The overall major complication rate was 3.08%. After an initial 1-year period of performing lead extractions, the overall major complication rate reduced to 1.23%. Transvenous lead extraction generally is a safe procedure, but not without complications. A multidisciplinary approach involving cardiac surgery, electrophysiology, and cardiac anesthesiology allows for successful management and the ability to rapidly manage major complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Epstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE, improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like "well-oiled machines," multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include "staff" from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses′ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others. Their enhanced teamwork counters the "silo effect" by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of "teamwork" for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs, hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs, and most critically, operating rooms (ORs. Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS, and yielded greater patient "staff" satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a "team sport." The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers′ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their "well-oiled machines" enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling "staff" to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction.

  8. Quality of education at multidisciplinary case conferences in psychiatry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naughton, Marie

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: A large Dublin-based teaching hospital facilitates a weekly Psychiatric Case Presentation meeting, which is relatively unique in medicine and even in psychiatry, in that there is a large variety of attendees from various multidisciplinary groups: consultant psychiatrists, psychiatric trainees, nurses, psychologists and psychoanalytic psychotherapists, occupational therapists, social workers and pastoral care staff. The aim of this audit is to assess the quality of education for members of different disciplines at these meetings, and to highlight the differing learning needs of the attendees. DESIGN\\/METHODOLOGY\\/APPROACH: Group-structured assessments and Likert scale questionnaires were used to identify what attendees thought were educational and what needed to be improved. FINDINGS: Overall, the case conference is educationally worthwhile but there were several areas of dissatisfaction. Some felt that the case conference was overly medical in its orientation and that there was excessive medical jargon. The seating arrangements were not conducive to group discussion. Consultants and psychiatric trainees felt that the quality of the clinical presentations could be improved. Presentation skills teaching classes and topic-based classes would be useful inclusions. Feedback to the multidisciplinary group on the patients\\' progress and feedback to the patient is important. Changes were implemented in areas of dissatisfaction, and these changes evaluated. ORIGINALITY\\/VALUE: The educational qualities of multidisciplinary Case Conferences need to be constantly evaluated to ensure that the learning needs of the different disciplines who attend are being met.

  9. A multidisciplinary approach to solving computer related vision problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jennifer; Helland, Magne

    2012-09-01

    This paper proposes a multidisciplinary approach to solving computer related vision issues by including optometry as a part of the problem-solving team. Computer workstation design is increasing in complexity. There are at least ten different professions who contribute to workstation design or who provide advice to improve worker comfort, safety and efficiency. Optometrists have a role identifying and solving computer-related vision issues and in prescribing appropriate optical devices. However, it is possible that advice given by optometrists to improve visual comfort may conflict with other requirements and demands within the workplace. A multidisciplinary approach has been advocated for solving computer related vision issues. There are opportunities for optometrists to collaborate with ergonomists, who coordinate information from physical, cognitive and organisational disciplines to enact holistic solutions to problems. This paper proposes a model of collaboration and examples of successful partnerships at a number of professional levels including individual relationships between optometrists and ergonomists when they have mutual clients/patients, in undergraduate and postgraduate education and in research. There is also scope for dialogue between optometry and ergonomics professional associations. A multidisciplinary approach offers the opportunity to solve vision related computer issues in a cohesive, rather than fragmented way. Further exploration is required to understand the barriers to these professional relationships. © 2012 The College of Optometrists.

  10. Local cattle movements in response to ongoing bovine tuberculosis zonation and regulations in Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grear, Daniel A; Kaneene, John B; Averill, James J; Webb, Colleen T

    2014-06-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) is an ongoing management issue in the state of Michigan with eradication from livestock as the ultimate goal. Eradication has been a challenge owing to the presence of a wildlife reservoir; competing interests in managing the livestock and wildlife hosts; and many uncertainties in transmission dynamics of M. bovis. One of the cornerstones of the eradication effort has been to stop movement of infected cattle among farms by imposing strict pre-movement testing on cattle being moved within, into and out of the Modified Accredited Zone (MAZ) in northeastern Michigan. In addition to pre-movement tuberculosis testing, detailed information about the origin and destination premises of all movements within the MAZ has been recorded in Michigan. The aim of this study was to describe the farm-to-farm movements of cattle within the MAZ, report changes in the network of movements during a 6-year period when the MAZ was a constant size (2004-2009), and examine changes in cattle movement patterns when the MAZ was reduced from 11 to 5 counties in 2010. Non-slaughter cattle movement within the MAZ was characterized by predominantly local movements at a sub-county scale. Premises that shipped cattle were primarily senders or receivers, but rarely both. From 2004 to 2009, the number of cattle shipped, size of shipments, number of shipments and distance of shipments decreased; there was little change in the network patterns of interaction among individual premises; and interactions among all premises became more disconnected. After accounting for MAZ size, there were also no changes in cattle movement network patterns following the reduction of the MAZ in 2010. The movement of cattle was likely not a key risk factor in bTB spread among premises in the MAZ during the study period and the effect of zonation and movement regulations appeared to further reduce the risk of tuberculosis spread via cattle movements among farms in Michigan's MAZ.

  11. Geocomputation over Hybrid Computer Architecture and Systems: Prior Works and On-going Initiatives at UARK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    As NSF indicated - "Theory and experimentation have for centuries been regarded as two fundamental pillars of science. It is now widely recognized that computational and data-enabled science forms a critical third pillar." Geocomputation is the third pillar of GIScience and geosciences. With the exponential growth of geodata, the challenge of scalable and high performance computing for big data analytics become urgent because many research activities are constrained by the inability of software or tool that even could not complete the computation process. Heterogeneous geodata integration and analytics obviously magnify the complexity and operational time frame. Many large-scale geospatial problems may be not processable at all if the computer system does not have sufficient memory or computational power. Emerging computer architectures, such as Intel's Many Integrated Core (MIC) Architecture and Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), and advanced computing technologies provide promising solutions to employ massive parallelism and hardware resources to achieve scalability and high performance for data intensive computing over large spatiotemporal and social media data. Exploring novel algorithms and deploying the solutions in massively parallel computing environment to achieve the capability for scalable data processing and analytics over large-scale, complex, and heterogeneous geodata with consistent quality and high-performance has been the central theme of our research team in the Department of Geosciences at the University of Arkansas (UARK). New multi-core architectures combined with application accelerators hold the promise to achieve scalability and high performance by exploiting task and data levels of parallelism that are not supported by the conventional computing systems. Such a parallel or distributed computing environment is particularly suitable for large-scale geocomputation over big data as proved by our prior works, while the potential of such advanced

  12. SATISFACTION OF PATIENTS WITH ARTHROSIS FROM MULTIDISCIPLINARY COOPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergana Nenova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The research of patient satisfaction with arthrosis from multidisciplinary cooperation is related to clarifying the position and the role of the physiotherapist in public health and in the development of integrated care. AIM OF THE STUDY: To investigate the satisfaction of patients with arthrosis from multidisciplinary cooperation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this research study participated 30 patients of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology of University Hospital "St. Marina" EAD - Varna for the period 2012-2016 of which 13 were men and 17 women. A feedback from these patients was sought based on the 5-point Likert scale regarding their satisfaction after the completion of the work of the multidisciplinary task team that provides integrated care at home. The questionnaire includes 12 questions, grouped in the following areas: awareness, attitude / communication, time, physical activity, professionalism and benefit / effectiveness. The data were compared with the results from a study of the satisfaction of a control group of 30 patients who were treated in the same ward, but chose to continue their rehabilitation with NHIF. RESULTS: The respondents from the test group are highly satisfied in the "awareness" area (respectively 4.80 and 4.90. They say that they have more freedom in daily activities after the procedure conducted by physiotherapist (4.93 and would seek the same physiotherapist if they need rehabilitation in the future. Patients appreciate the quality behavior/approach and communication skills displayed by the physiotherapist during the rehabilitation process (5.00, which enables them to better understand their illness (4.93. The respondents from the test group felt much better after each procedure performed by the physiotherapist (5.00 and would recommend him/her to other patients who have the same need (5.00. The satisfaction from the work of the physiotherapist is appreciated by patients extremely high, but

  13. The relation of ongoing brain activity, evoked neural responses, and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Sadaghiani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing brain activity has been observed since the earliest neurophysiological recordings and is found over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. It is characterized by remarkably large spontaneous modulations. Here, we review evidence for the functional role of these ongoing activity fluctuations and argue that they constitute an essential property of the neural architecture underlying cognition. The role of spontaneous activity fluctuations is probably best understood when considering both their spatiotemporal structure and their functional impact on cognition. We first briefly argue against a ‘segregationist’ view on ongoing activity, both in time and space, countering this view with an emphasis on integration within a hierarchical spatiotemporal organization of intrinsic activity. We then highlight the flexibility and context-sensitivity of intrinsic functional connectivity that suggest its involvement in functionally relevant information processing. This role in information processing is pursued by reviewing how ongoing brain activity interacts with afferent and efferent information exchange of the brain with its environment. We focus on the relationship between the variability of ongoing and evoked brain activity, and review recent reports that tie ongoing brain activity fluctuations to variability in human perception and behavior. Finally, these observations are discussed within the framework of the free-energy principle which – applied to human brain function - provides a theoretical account for a non-random, coordinated interaction of ongoing and evoked activity in perception and behaviour.

  14. Applied Linguistics: The Challenge of Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Language has featured prominently in contemporary social theory, but the relevance of this fact to the concerns of Applied Linguistics, with its necessary orientation to practical issues of language in context, represents an ongoing challenge. This article supports the need for a greater engagement with theory in Applied Linguistics. It considers…

  15. Applied Linguistics: The Challenge of Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Language has featured prominently in contemporary social theory, but the relevance of this fact to the concerns of Applied Linguistics, with its necessary orientation to practical issues of language in context, represents an ongoing challenge. This article supports the need for a greater engagement with theory in Applied Linguistics. It considers…

  16. Multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of self-injurious behavior in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability: integration of psychological and biological theory and approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshawi, Noha F; Hurwitz, Sarah; Morriss, Danielle; McDougle, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this review is to consider the psychological (largely behavioral) and biological [neurochemical, medical (including genetic), and pharmacological] theories and approaches that contribute to current thinking about the etiology and treatment of self-injurious behavior (SIB) in individuals with autism spectrum disorder and/or intellectual disability. Algorithms for the assessment and treatment of SIB in this context, respectively, from a multidisciplinary, integrative perspective are proposed and challenges and opportunities that exist in clinical and research settings are discussed.

  17. [Geriatrics - an interdisciplinary challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Roland; Djukic, Marija; Wappler, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    The care of elderly patients will continue to challenge the healthcare system over the next decades. As a rule geriatric patients suffer from multimorbidities with complex disease patterns, and the ability to cope with everyday life is severely reduced. Treatment is provided by a multiprofessional geriatric team, and the primary goal is improvement of functional status, quality of life in the social environment and autonomy by employing a holistic approach. In Germany geriatric care is provided by physicians from various medical specialties (e.g. general practitioners, internists, neurologists and psychiatrists). In the training for the subspecialty clinical geriatrics, these specialties enjoy equal rights. Recent efforts to establish a qualification as physician for internal medicine and geriatrics have initiated a discussion to make the suitability for qualification as a geriatrician dependent on the medical specialty. Geriatric patients benefit from multidisciplinary cooperation. Neurologists possess great expertise in the treatment of patients with dementia, depression, delirium, consequences of degenerative spinal cord diseases and vertebral bone fractures, stroke, Parkinson's syndrome, epileptic seizures, vertigo and dizziness, neuropathies, lesions of peripheral nerves and in the multimodal therapy of pain. To function in a position of responsibility in a geriatric department, neurologists need skills in general internal medicine. These are acquired either on a geriatric ward or during specialization as a neurologist by full time secondment to large neurological or interdisciplinary intensive care units.

  18. Guiding transcranial brain stimulation by EEG/MEG to interact with ongoing brain activity and associated functions: A position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thut, Gregor; Bergmann, Til Ole; Fröhlich, Flavio; Soekadar, Surjo R; Brittain, John-Stuart; Valero-Cabré, Antoni; Sack, Alexander T; Miniussi, Carlo; Antal, Andrea; Siebner, Hartwig Roman; Ziemann, Ulf; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2017-05-01

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques have a wide range of applications but also suffer from a number of limitations mainly related to poor specificity of intervention and variable effect size. These limitations motivated recent efforts to focus on the temporal dimension of NTBS with respect to the ongoing brain activity. Temporal patterns of ongoing neuronal activity, in particular brain oscillations and their fluctuations, can be traced with electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG), to guide the timing as well as the stimulation settings of NTBS. These novel, online and offline EEG/MEG-guided NTBS-approaches are tailored to specifically interact with the underlying brain activity. Online EEG/MEG has been used to guide the timing of NTBS (i.e., when to stimulate): by taking into account instantaneous phase or power of oscillatory brain activity, NTBS can be aligned to fluctuations in excitability states. Moreover, offline EEG/MEG recordings prior to interventions can inform researchers and clinicians how to stimulate: by frequency-tuning NTBS to the oscillation of interest, intrinsic brain oscillations can be up- or down-regulated. In this paper, we provide an overview of existing approaches and ideas of EEG/MEG-guided interventions, and their promises and caveats. We point out potential future lines of research to address challenges. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Virtual physiological human: training challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, Patricia V; Narracott, Andrew V; McCormack, Keith; Bisbal, Jesus; Martin, Carlos; Bijnens, Bart; Brook, Bindi; Zachariou, Margarita; Freixa, Jordi Villà I; Kohl, Peter; Fletcher, Katherine; Diaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2010-06-28

    The virtual physiological human (VPH) initiative encompasses a wide range of activities, including structural and functional imaging, data mining, knowledge discovery tool and database development, biomedical modelling, simulation and visualization. The VPH community is developing from a multitude of relatively focused, but disparate, research endeavours into an integrated effort to bring together, develop and translate emerging technologies for application, from academia to industry and medicine. This process initially builds on the evolution of multi-disciplinary interactions and abilities, but addressing the challenges associated with the implementation of the VPH will require, in the very near future, a translation of quantitative changes into a new quality of highly trained multi-disciplinary personnel. Current strategies for undergraduate and on-the-job training may soon prove insufficient for this. The European Commission seventh framework VPH network of excellence is exploring this emerging need, and is developing a framework of novel training initiatives to address the predicted shortfall in suitably skilled VPH-aware professionals. This paper reports first steps in the implementation of a coherent VPH training portfolio.

  20. An international, multidisciplinary, service-learning program: an option in the dental school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Mier, Esperanza A; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Stelzner, Sarah M; Lorant, Diane E; Riner, Mary E; Yoder, Karen M

    2011-04-01

    Many health professions students who treat Spanish-speaking patients in the United States have little concept of their culture and health related traditions. The lack of understanding of these concepts may constitute major barriers to healthcare for these patients. International service-learning experiences allow students to work directly in communities from which patients immigrate and, as a result, students gain a better understanding of these barriers. This article describes the implementation of an international, multidisciplinary, service-learning program in a dental school in the United States. The Indiana University International Service-Learning program in Hidalgo, Mexico began in 1999 as an alternative spring break travel and clinical experience for medical students, focusing on the treatment of acute health problems. Travel-related preparatory sessions were offered, and no learning or service objectives had been developed. The program has evolved to include a multidisciplinary team of dental, medical, nursing, public health and social work students and faculty. The experience is now integrated into a curriculum based on the service-learning model that allows students to use their clinical skills in real-life situations and provides structured time for reflection. The program aims to enhance teaching and foster civic responsibility in explicit partnership with the community. Preparatory sessions have evolved into a multidisciplinary graduate level course with defined learning and service objectives. PROGRAM EVALUATION METHODS: In order to assess the program's operation as perceived by students and faculty and to evaluate student's perceptions of learning outcomes, evaluation tools were developed. These tools included student and faculty evaluation questionnaires, experiential learning journals, and a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis. Evaluation data show that after program participation, students perceived an increase in their

  1. Indigenous Peoples, States and Higher Education. Lessons from Latin American experiences and their potential for ongoing processes in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mato

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades a significant number of indigenous and/or intercultural universities and other higher education institutions (HEIs have been created in several Latin American countries. Additionally, “conventional” universities and other HEIs have established degrees, diplomas, and various types of special programs aimed at the inclusion of indigenous people. Some of these educational modalities have been created by indigenous peoples’ organizations and /or leaders, others by universities and other “conventional” HEIs, sometimes through partnerships between these types of institutions and indigenous organizations, while other initiatives have been driven by States. In Argentina these processes are comparatively newer than in several other countries in the region. This article presents an overview of the types of experiences being developed in several Latin American countries, highlights their main achievements and challenges, and suggests some potentially useful lessons for ongoing processes in Argentina.

  2. Early manifestations in a cohort of children prenatally diagnosed with 47,XYY. Role of multidisciplinary counseling for parental guidance and prevention of aggressive behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalatta Faustina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of foetuses are recognized as having double Y because of the widespread use of prenatal screening using chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis. 47, XYY karyotype occurs in about one out of 1,000 newborn males, but it is not often detected unless it is diagnosed during prenatal testing. Despite the fact that unbiased follow-up studies demonstrate largely normal post-natal development of young men with 47, XYY, there is a scarcity of controlled studies about the neurological, cognitive and behavioural phenotype which remains the main reason for anxiety and anticipatory negative attitudes of parents. Furthermore, prejudices still exist among professionals and the general population concerning the relationship between this sex chromosome aneuploidy and aggressive and antisocial behaviours. Methods We report on the clinical follow-up of children diagnosed prenatally with a 47,XYY karyotype, whose parents received multidisciplinary counselling and support at time of diagnosis. The specific focus of our study is on auxology, facial features, developmental milestones, behaviour, detection of aggressiveness as well as the evaluation of parental attitudes toward prenatal counselling. Clinical evaluations including auxological measurements and dysmorphological descriptions were as conducted on 13 boys aged 9 month -7 years. The Child Behavior Check List test specific for age and a 15 item questionnaire were administered to both parents. An update of ongoing problems was carried out by means of a telephone interview two years later. Results Our results show that, from birth, weight, height and head circumference were above average values while some facial features such mild hypertelorism are overrepresented when compared to parents' facial features. Language delay was detected in 8 out of 11 children older than 20 months. Parental attitudes were found to be favourable toward prenatal diagnoses of sexual

  3. Managing patients with heart failure: a qualitative study of multidisciplinary teams with specialist heart failure nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogowska, Margaret; Simmonds, Rosemary; McLachlan, Sarah; Cramer, Helen; Sanders, Tom; Johnson, Rachel; Kadam, Umesh T; Lasserson, Daniel S; Purdy, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of health care clinicians working in multidisciplinary teams that include specialist heart failure nurses when caring for the management of heart failure patients. We used a qualitative in-depth interview study nested in a broader ethnographic study of unplanned admissions in heart failure patients (HoldFAST). We interviewed 24 clinicians across primary, secondary, and community care in 3 locations in the Midlands, South Central, and South West of England. Within a framework of the role and contribution of the heart failure specialist nurse, our study identified 2 thematic areas that the clinicians agreed still represent particular challenges when working with heart failure patients. The first was communication with patients, in particular explaining the diagnosis and helping patients to understand the condition. The participants recognized that such communication was most effective when they had a long-term relationship with patients and families and that the specialist nurse played an important part in achieving this relationship. The second was communication within the team. Multidisciplinary input was especially needed because of the complexity of many patients and issues around medications, and the participants believed the specialist nurse may facilitate team communication. The study highlights the role of specialist heart failure nurses in delivering education tailored to patients and facilitating better liaison among all clinicians, particularly when dealing with the management of comorbidities and drug regimens. The way in which specialist nurses were able to be caseworkers for their patients was perceived as a method of ensuring coordination and continuity of care. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  4. SPHERE's 'Dress Sense' a Multi-disciplinary approach to designing wearable technology to improve health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Martin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Healthcare systems face financial challenges, with a greater number of the population living longer with long term conditions. In order to deliver safe, high quality care within these constraints, we must place more emphasis on preventing illness than treating illness. We can use the science of behaviour change, health, and technology to create solutions to these problems. An example of innovation in this field include SPHERE’s multidisciplinary project entitled ‘Dress Sense’, with the aim to create a piece of wearable technology to improve health. Description This competition was run by SPHERE (Sensor Platform for HEalthcare in a Residential Environment which focuses on developing sensor systems to monitor health and wellbeing in the home. The teams comprised of computer scientists, medical professionals, students and school children, engineers, fashion designers and textile artists. They were provided with a kit including Arduino software, sensors and other items to make wearable computers. There were no constraints on what they could produce, except for a deadline of 3 weeks. The end project was judged according to the innovation and usefulness of the overall concept; the functionality, usability and desirability (aesthetics of the constructed device and the multi-displinary component. The idea was to foster open innovation in order to share ideas between specialities. Conclusions Ideas included tackling diabetic medical adherence through a wearable band to sensors woven into socks to prevent deep vein thrombosis. The winning concept was, ‘Yo’ a support system to aid cognitive behaviour therapy, through wearable products and accessories, to help those who begin CBT, stay motivated to engage effectively with therapy. This project highlighs how through multi-disciplinary collaboration and including the younger generation, innovative effective ideas can be found to harness digital technology to improve health.

  5. 78 FR 5409 - Ongoing Equivalence Verifications of Foreign Food Regulatory Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... (SRT), which structures the criteria used to assess each component of initial and on-going equivalence... to standardize its collection of information. This standardization improves the quality of...

  6. Seismological challenges for stellar structure

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J

    2010-01-01

    Helioseismology has provided very detailed information about the solar interior, and extensive data on a large number of stars, although at less detail, are promised by the ongoing and upcoming asteroseismic projects. In the solar case there remain serious challenges in understanding the inferred solar structure, particularly in the light of the revised determinations of the solar surface composition. Also, a secure understanding of the origins of solar rotation as inferred from helioseismology, both in the radiative interior and in the convection zone, is still missing. In the stellar case challenges are certain to appear as the data allow more detailed inferences of the properties of stellar cores. Large remaining uncertainties in modelling concerns the properties of convective cores and other processes that may cause mixing. As a result of developing asteroseismic signatures addressing these and other issues, we can look forward to a highly challenging, and hence exciting, era of stellar astrophysics.

  7. The Brokering Approach for Multidisciplinary Data Discovery and Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Global sustainability research requires an integrated multidisciplinary effort underpinned by a collaborative environment discovering and accessing heterogeneous data across disciplines. Traditionally, interoperability has been achieved by implementing federation of systems. The federating approach entails the adoption of a set of common technologies and standards. This presentation argues that for complex (and uncontrolled) environments such as global, multidisciplinary, and voluntary-based infrastructures, federated solutions proved not to be well-accepted. In fact, the adoption of a limited common set of technologies and standards raises a couple of important issues: (a) high level entry barriers for both data producers and users; (b) lack of appropriateness to address domain specificities. More recently, a new interoperability approach was successfully experimented: the brokering approach. This presentation identifies the principles of brokering, and gives examples of practical implementation relating to data discovery, semantic searching, and data access. The benefit of the brokering approach includes: (a) lowers barriers to participation in distributed systems for both users and resource providers (minimal burden or cost impact on existing systems); (b) accelerates interconnection of disparate systems; (c) facilitates sustainability, reusability, extensibility, and flexibility of multidisciplinary infrastructures; (d) removes need to impose common (e.g. federal, "top-down") specifications and software components enabling a more adaptive "bottom-up" evolution of infrastructures. The Brokering approach was considered and successfully adopted by cross-disciplinary initiatives (e.g. GEOSS: Global Earth Observation System of Systems; several European FP7 programmes, NSIDC, etc. ); recently, the NSF EarthCube initiative funded a project dealing with "Data Broker".

  8. Achieving Multidisciplinary Collaboration for the Creation of a Pulmonary Embolism Response Team: Creating a "Team of Rivals".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabrhel, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Pulmonary embolism response teams (PERTs) have recently been developed to streamline care for patients with life-threatening pulmonary embolism (PE). PERTs are unique among rapid response teams, in that they bring together a multidisciplinary team of specialists to care for a single disease for which there are novel treatments but few comparative data to guide treatment. The PERT model describes a process that includes activation of the team; real-time, multidisciplinary consultation; communication of treatment recommendations; mobilization of resources; and collection of research data. Interventional radiologists, along with cardiologists, emergency physicians, hematologists, pulmonary/critical care physicians, and surgeons, are core members of most PERTs. Bringing together such a wide array of experts leverages the expertise and strengths of each specialty. However, it can also lead to challenges that threaten team cohesion and cooperation. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways to integrate multiple specialists, with diverse perspectives and skills, into a cohesive PERT. The authors will discuss the purpose of forming a PERT, strengths of different PERT specialties, strategies to leverage these strengths to optimize participation and cooperation across team members, as well as unresolved challenges.

  9. A Method for Knowledge Management and Communication Within and Across Multidisciplinary Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Flynn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of knowledge management (KM and communication tools in an applied scientific arena where research is performed and knowledge must be managed within and across multidisciplinary teams and organizations is a challenge. Teams of scientists and engineers from up to 17 different technical specialties required knowledge management tools for developing multiple environmental impact statements under challenging circumstances. Factors that contributed to the success of the KM tools included 1 pairing of project staff with Knowledge Systems staff to determine system requirements, 2 the use of the tools by the team as they were being developed thus allowing many opportunities for feedback and interaction, 3 developing the tools to approximate the overall project structure and work flow already in place, 4 providing immediate assistance to the project team as they learned to use the new KM tools, and 5 replacing earlier practices with the new KM approach by "burning the bridges" to past practices after the team had learned to use the new KM tools.

  10. The proliferation of multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTMs): how can radiology departments continue to support them all?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramaniam, Ravivarma; Subesinghe, Manil; Smith, Jonathan T. [St. James' University Hospital, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Clinical Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    To quantify the changes in multidisciplinary team meeting (MDTM) workload for consultant radiologists working in a single UK tertiary referral cancer institution, assess its impact and suggest solutions to these challenges. The annual number of MDTM cases was collated over a 5-year period (2009 - 2013). Qualitative information was obtained through questionnaire-based interviews of 47 consultant radiologists. Data analysed included number of MDTMs involved with, type of MDTM (oncological or non-oncological), time allocation for preparation and perceived deficiencies in the current MDTM. Thirteen thousand and forty-nine cases were discussed in MDTMs in 2009 with a continued yearly increase over the 5-year period. Fifty-five percent of MDTM attendances were at oncological MDTMs. Consultant radiologists attended a median of two MDTMs per week, each requiring 4 hours time commitment; 60 % used out-of-hours time for MDTM preparation. The most frequently cited MDTM deficiency was lack of sufficient clinical input. The MDTM is a challenging but worthwhile demand on the modern radiologist's time. Solutions to the increasing MDTM workload include demonstration of the benefits of MDTMs to hospital administrators to justify additional resources required, improving MDTM efficiency and ensuring this increased workload is accurately represented and remunerated in individual job plans. (orig.)

  11. PARAMETER COORDINATION AND ROBUST OPTIMIZATION FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY DESIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jie; PENG Yinghong; XIONG Guangleng

    2006-01-01

    A new parameter coordination and robust optimization approach for multidisciplinary design is presented. Firstly, the constraints network model is established to support engineering change, coordination and optimization. In this model, interval boxes are adopted to describe the uncertainty of design parameters quantitatively to enhance the design robustness. Secondly, the parameter coordination method is presented to solve the constraints network model, monitor the potential conflicts due to engineering changes, and obtain the consistency solution space corresponding to the given product specifications. Finally, the robust parameter optimization model is established, and genetic arithmetic is used to obtain the robust optimization parameter. An example of bogie design is analyzed to show the scheme to be effective.

  12. Multidisciplinary Analysis and Control of High Performance Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-06

    communication and transport of data between different modules. The testbed is used for performing Multidisciplinary Optimization design and analysis of aerospace...over-bar indicates nominal values, is ana- tena inties neto b e clrfed. Tevl and lyze futherand as n eampe, te efect ofSpi the uncertainties need to...be found in.54’ 55,57-o, 83 ,117 ology and the increase of interest of the academic re- search community in it for the last fifteen years, there The

  13. Case Study: Caregiver Perception of Pediatric Multidisciplinary Feeding Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F. Fisher PhD, OT, FAOTA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the perception of satisfaction of caregivers who attended a feeding clinic at a large pediatric hospital in the midwest. The clinic is designed for a multidisciplinary team to meet with the child and the caregiver. Thirty-five participants were involved in the study. Results indicated that most participants were satisfied with the clinic experience. However, there were areas of care not covered by the members of the feeding team, which indicates a need. It is suggested that this need could be filled by occupational therapists.

  14. MDO can help resolve the designer's dilemma. [multidisciplinary design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Tulinius, Jan R.

    1991-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is presented as a rapidly growing body of methods, algorithms, and techniques that will provide a quantum jump in the effectiveness and efficiency of the quantitative side of design, and will turn that side into an environment in which the qualitative side can thrive. MDO borrows from CAD/CAM for graphic visualization of geometrical and numerical data, data base technology, and in computer software and hardware. Expected benefits from this methodology are a rational, mathematically consistent approach to hypersonic aircraft designs, designs pushed closer to the optimum, and a design process either shortened or leaving time available for different concepts to be explored.

  15. [Global brain metastases management strategy: a multidisciplinary-based approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métellus, P; Tallet, A; Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Carpentier, A; Spano, J-P; Azria, D; Noël, G; Barlési, F; Taillibert, S; Le Rhun, É

    2015-02-01

    Brain metastases management has evolved over the last fifteen years and may use varying strategies, including more or less aggressive treatments, sometimes combined, leading to an improvement in patient's survival and quality of life. The therapeutic decision is subject to a multidisciplinary analysis, taking into account established prognostic factors including patient's general condition, extracerebral disease status and clinical and radiological presentation of lesions. In this article, we propose a management strategy based on the state of current knowledge and available therapeutic resources. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  16. Multidisciplinary patient education in groups increases knowledge on Osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorthe; Ryg, Jesper; Nissen, Nis;

    2008-01-01

    of osteoporosis may be increased by a group-based multidisciplinary education programme. Methods: Three hundred patients, aged 45-81 years, recently diagnosed with osteoporosis and started on specific treatment, were randomized to either the ‘‘school'' or ‘‘control'' group. Teaching was performed by nurses......, physiotherapists, dieticians, and doctors, and designed to increase the patient's empowerment. The patient's knowledge of osteoporosis was tested at study entry and at 3 months using a validated questionnaire. Results: At study entry, no differences in age or score (22 (18-24) (median (25-75 percentiles)) vs. 22...

  17. Fiber-reinforced technology in multidisciplinary chairside approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arhun Neslihan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand to improve dentofacial esthetics in the adult population. This demand usually requires a close collaboration within the various disciplines of dentistry and the patient at every stage of the therapy. The materials and techniques used by these interdisciplinary clinicians must be conservative and minimally invasive. Fiber-reinforced composite technology offers such solutions for chairside applications. This case report presents two cases where fiber-reinforced ribbon and composite complex was used in a multidisciplinary approach to improve esthetics.

  18. [Secondary lymphedema--the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldenberg, Eitan; Bass, Arie

    2013-03-01

    Secondary lymphedema is the most common type of lymphedema. Malignancy, mainly breast carcinoma, is the main cause of upper extremity lymphedema, while groin dissection, irradiation and trauma are the cause of lower extremity lymphedema. Early recognition of the pathology followed by early referral to a vascular surgeon, leading a multidisciplinary team, who takes care of those patients, can prevent a miserable Life from these patients. Lifelong commitment of the patients, prolonged financial support of the health insurance supplier, as well as team work of the group taking care of the patient, is the only way to help these patients.

  19. Integrated Care and the Evolution of the Multidisciplinary Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Mary Iftner; Thomas, Sheila A; Melton, Stacy L Stokes; Lee, Stacy

    2016-06-01

    The primary care medical home continues to adapt by applying new research to population health approaches to care. With the discovery that life experiences trigger a chain of biologic events linked to chronic illnesses, the role of patient-centered multidisciplinary care teams becomes of paramount importance. Subsequently, mental health professionals are being incorporated into the primary care setting, using their skills in nontraditional models to customize care for each patient. This "integration" of primary care and unique mental health services engenders opportunity for enhanced clinical care, professional workforce development and support, more effective population health initiatives, and informed health care policy.

  20. Optimizing value utilizing Toyota Kata methodology in a multidisciplinary clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merguerian, Paul A; Grady, Richard; Waldhausen, John; Libby, Arlene; Murphy, Whitney; Melzer, Lilah; Avansino, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Value in healthcare is measured in terms of patient outcomes achieved per dollar expended. Outcomes and cost must be measured at the patient level to optimize value. Multidisciplinary clinics have been shown to be effective in providing coordinated and comprehensive care with improved outcomes, yet tend to have higher cost than typical clinics. We sought to lower individual patient cost and optimize value in a pediatric multidisciplinary reconstructive pelvic medicine (RPM) clinic. The RPM clinic is a multidisciplinary clinic that takes care of patients with anomalies of the pelvic organs. The specialties involved include Urology, General Surgery, Gynecology, and Gastroenterology/Motility. From May 2012 to November 2014 we performed time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) analysis by measuring provider time for each step in the patient flow. Using observed time and the estimated hourly cost of each of the providers we calculated the final cost at the individual patient level, targeting clinic preparation. We utilized Toyota Kata methodology to enhance operational efficiency in an effort to optimize value. Variables measured included cost, time to perform a task, number of patients seen in clinic, percent value-added time (VAT) to patients (face to face time) and family experience scores (FES). At the beginning of the study period, clinic costs were $619 per patient. We reduced conference time from 6 min/patient to 1 min per patient, physician preparation time from 8 min to 6 min and increased Medical Assistant (MA) preparation time from 9.5 min to 20 min, achieving a cost reduction of 41% to $366 per patient. Continued improvements further reduced the MA preparation time to 14 min and the MD preparation time to 5 min with a further cost reduction to $194 (69%) (Figure). During this study period, we increased the number of appointments per clinic. We demonstrated sustained improvement in FES with regards to the families overall experience with their providers