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Sample records for oncolytic measles virus

  1. Measles to the Rescue: A Review of Oncolytic Measles Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Aref

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapeutic agents are likely to become serious contenders in cancer treatment. The vaccine strain of measles virus is an agent with an impressive range of oncolytic activity in pre-clinical trials with increasing evidence of safety and efficacy in early clinical trials. This paramyxovirus vaccine has a proven safety record and is amenable to careful genetic modification in the laboratory. Overexpression of the measles virus (MV receptor CD46 in many tumour cells may direct the virus to preferentially enter transformed cells and there is increasing awareness of the importance of nectin-4 and signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM in oncolysis. Successful attempts to retarget MV by inserting genes for tumour-specific ligands to antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CD20, CD38, and by engineering the virus to express synthetic microRNA targeting sequences, and “blinding” the virus to the natural viral receptors are exciting measures to increase viral specificity and enhance the oncolytic effect. Sodium iodine symporter (NIS can also be expressed by MV, which enables in vivo tracking of MV infection. Radiovirotherapy using MV-NIS, chemo-virotherapy to convert prodrugs to their toxic metabolites, and immune-virotherapy including incorporating antibodies against immune checkpoint inhibitors can also increase the oncolytic potential. Anti-viral host immune responses are a recognized barrier to the success of MV, and approaches such as transporting MV to the tumour sites by carrier cells, are showing promise. MV Clinical trials are producing encouraging preliminary results in ovarian cancer, myeloma and cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and the outcome of currently open trials in glioblastoma multiforme, mesothelioma and squamous cell carcinoma are eagerly anticipated.

  2. A novel, polymer-coated oncolytic measles virus overcomes immune suppression and induces robust antitumor activity

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    Kaname Nosaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although various therapies are available to treat cancers, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, cancer has been the leading cause of death in Japan for the last 30 years, and new therapeutic modalities are urgently needed. As a new modality, there has recently been great interest in oncolytic virotherapy, with measles virus being a candidate virus expected to show strong antitumor effects. The efficacy of virotherapy, however, was strongly limited by the host immune response in previous clinical trials. To enhance and prolong the antitumor activity of virotherapy, we combined the use of two newly developed tools: the genetically engineered measles virus (MV-NPL and the multilayer virus-coating method of layer-by-layer deposition of ionic polymers. We compared the oncolytic effects of this polymer-coated MV-NPL with the naked MV-NPL, both in vitro and in vivo. In the presence of anti-MV neutralizing antibodies, the polymer-coated virus showed more enhanced oncolytic activity than did the naked MV-NPL in vitro. We also examined antitumor activities in virus-treated mice. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antitumor activities were higher in mice treated with polymer-coated MV-NPL than in mice treated with the naked virus. This novel, polymer-coated MV-NPL is promising for clinical cancer therapy in the future.

  3. Enhanced lysis by bispecific oncolytic measles viruses simultaneously using HER2/neu or EpCAM as target receptors

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    Jan RH Hanauer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To target oncolytic measles viruses (MV to tumors, we exploit the binding specificity of designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins. These DARPin-MVs have high tumor selectivity while maintaining excellent oncolytic potency. Stability, small size, and efficacy of DARPins allowed the generation of MVs simultaneously targeted to tumor marker HER2/neu and cancer stem cell (CSC marker EpCAM. For optimization, the linker connecting both DARPins was varied in flexibility and length. Flexibility had no impact on fusion helper activity whereas length had. MVs with bispecific MV-H are genetically stable and revealed the desired double-target specificity. In vitro, the cytolytic activity of bispecific MVs was superior or comparable to mono-targeted viruses depending on the target cells. In vivo, therapeutic efficacy of the bispecific viruses was validated in an orthotopic ovarian carcinoma model revealing an effective reduction of tumor mass. Finally, the power of bispecific targeting was demonstrated on cocultures of different tumor cells thereby mimicking tumor heterogeneity in vitro, more closely reflecting real tumors. Here, bispecific excelled monospecific viruses in efficacy. DARPin-based targeting domains thus allow the generation of efficacious oncolytic viruses with double specificity, with the potential to handle intratumoral variation of antigen expression and to simultaneously target CSCs and the bulk tumor mass.

  4. Safety Study: Intraventricular Injection of a Modified Oncolytic Measles Virus into Measles-Immune, hCD46-Transgenic, IFNαRko Mice.

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    Lal, Sangeet; Peng, Kah-Whye; Steele, Michael B; Jenks, Nathan; Ma, Hong; Kohanbash, Gary; Phillips, Joanna J; Raffel, Corey

    2016-12-01

    The modified Edmonston vaccine strain of measles virus (MV) has shown potent oncolytic efficacy against various tumor types and is being investigated in clinical trials. Our laboratory showed that MV effectively kills medulloblastoma tumor cells in both localized disease and when tumor cells are disseminated through cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Although the safety of repeated intracerebral injection of modified MV in rhesus macaques has been established, the safety of administering MV into CSF has not been adequately investigated. In this study, we assessed the safety of MV-NIS (MV modified to express the human sodium iodide symporter protein) injected into the CSF of measles-immunized and measles virus-susceptible transgenic (CD46, IFNαRko) mice. Treated animals were administered a single intraventricular injection of 1 × 10(5) or 1 × 10(6) TCID50 (50% tissue culture infective dose) of MV-NIS. Detailed clinical observation was performed over a 90-day period. Clinically, we did not observe any measles-related toxic effects or behavioral abnormality in animals of any treated cohort. The complete blood count and blood chemistry analysis results were found to be within normal range for all the cohorts. Histologic examination of brains and spinal cords revealed inflammatory changes, mostly related to the needle track; these resolved by day 21 postinjection. To assess viral biodistribution, quantitative RT-PCR to detect the measles virus N-protein was performed on blood and brain samples. Viral RNA was not detectable in the blood as soon as 2 days after injection, and virus cleared from the brain by 45 days postadministration in all treatment cohorts. In conclusion, our data suggest that a single injection of modified MV into the CSF is safe and can be used in future therapeutic applications.

  5. Treatment of medulloblastoma using an oncolytic measles virus encoding the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter shows enhanced efficacy with radioiodine

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    Hutzen Brian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Although the clinical outcome for medulloblastoma patients has improved significantly, children afflicted with the disease frequently suffer from debilitating side effects related to the aggressive nature of currently available therapy. Alternative means for treating medulloblastoma are desperately needed. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virus (MV can selectively target and destroy medulloblastoma tumor cells in localized and disseminated models of the disease. MV-NIS, an oncolytic measles virus that encodes the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS, has the potential to deliver targeted radiotherapy to the tumor site and promote a localized bystander effect above and beyond that achieved by MV alone. Methods We evaluated the efficacy of MV-NIS against medulloblastoma cells in vitro and examined their ability to incorporate radioiodine at various timepoints, finding peak uptake at 48 hours post infection. The effects of MV-NIS were also evaluated in mouse xenograft models of localized and disseminated medulloblastoma. Athymic nude mice were injected with D283med-Luc medulloblastoma cells in the caudate putamen (localized disease or right lateral ventricle (disseminated disease and subsequently treated with MV-NIS. Subsets of these mice were given a dose of 131I at 24, 48 or 72 hours later. Results MV-NIS treatment, both by itself and in combination with 131I, elicited tumor stabilization and regression in the treated mice and significantly extended their survival times. Mice given 131I were found to concentrate radioiodine at the site of their tumor implantations. In addition, mice with localized tumors that were given 131I either 24 or 48 hours after MV-NIS treatment exhibited a significant survival advantage over mice given MV-NIS alone. Conclusions These data suggest MV-NIS plus radioiodine may be a potentially useful therapy for

  6. Engineered measles virus Edmonston strain used as a novel oncolytic viral system against human hepatoblastoma

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    Zhang Shu-Cheng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatoblastoma (HB is the most common primary, malignant pediatric liver tumor in children. The treatment results for affected children have markedly improved in recent decades. However, the prognosis for high-risk patients who have extrahepatic extensions, invasion of the large hepatic veins, distant metastases and very high alpha-fetoprotein (AFP serum levels remains poor. There is an urgent need for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Methods An attenuated strain of measles virus, derived from the Edmonston vaccine lineage, was genetically engineered to produce carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. We investigated the antitumor potential of this novel viral agent against human HB both in vitro and in vivo. Results Infection of the Hep2G and HUH6 HB cell lines, at multiplicities of infection (MOIs ranging from 0.01 to 1, resulted in a significant cytopathic effect consisting of extensive syncytia formation and massive cell death at 72–96 h after infection. Both of the HB lines overexpressed the measles virus receptor CD46 and supported robust viral replication, which correlated with CEA production. The efficacy of this approach in vivo was examined in murine Hep2G xenograft models. Flow cytometry assays indicated an apoptotic mechanism of cell death. Intratumoral administration of MV-CEA resulted in statistically significant delay of tumor growth and prolongation of survival. Conclusions The engineered measles virus Edmonston strain MV-CEA has potent therapeutic efficacy against HB cell lines and xenografts. Trackable measles virus derivatives merit further exploration in HB treatment.

  7. Combination of the oral histone deacetylase inhibitor resminostat with oncolytic measles vaccine virus as a new option for epi-virotherapeutic treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

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    Benjamin Ruf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic therapies such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi not only have the capability to decrease tumor cell proliferation and to induce tumor cell death but also to silence antiviral response genes. Here, we investigated whether the combination of an oncolytic measles vaccine virus (MeV with the novel oral HDACi resminostat (Res, being in clinical testing in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, results in an enhanced efficacy of this epi-virotherapeutic approach compared to any of the two corresponding monotherapies. When testing a panel of human hepatoma cell lines, we found (i a significantly improved rate of primary infections when using oncolytic MeV under concurrent treatment with resminostat, (ii a boosted cytotoxic effect of the epi-virotherapeutic combination (Res + MeV with enhanced induction of apoptosis, and, quite importantly, (iii an absence of any resminostat-induced impairment of MeV replication and spread. Beyond that, we could also show that (iv resminostat, after hepatoma cell stimulation with exogenous human interferon (IFN-β, is able to prevent the induction of IFN-stimulated genes, such as IFIT-1. This finding outlines the possible impact of resminostat on cellular innate immunity, being instrumental in overcoming resistances to MeV-mediated viral oncolysis. Thus, our results support the onset of epi-virotherapeutic clinical trials in patients exhibiting advanced stages of HCC.

  8. Evolution of oncolytic viruses.

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    Sanjuán, Rafael; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2015-08-01

    Owing to their replicative capacity, oncolytic viruses (OVs) can evolve under the action of natural selection. Reversion to virulence and recombination with wild-type strains may compromise OV safety, therefore requiring evolutionary risk assessment studies. On the other hand, evolution can be directed in the laboratory to create more potent and safer OVs. Previous work in the experimental evolution field provides a background for OV directed evolution, and has identified interesting exploitable features. While genetic engineering has greatly advanced the field of oncolytic virotherapy, this approach is sometimes curtailed by the complexity and diversity of virus-host interactions. Directed evolution provides an alternative approach that may help to obtain new OVs without prejudice toward the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer

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    Goldufsky, Joe; Sivendran, Shanthi; Harcharik, Sara; Pan, Michael; Bernardo, Sebastian; Stern, Richard H; Friedlander, Philip; Ruby, Carl E; Saenger, Yvonne; Kaufman, Howard L

    2013-01-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses to treat cancer is based on the selection of tropic tumor viruses or the generation of replication selective vectors that can either directly kill infected tumor cells or increase their susceptibility to cell death and apoptosis through additional exposure to radiation or chemotherapy. In addition, viral vectors can be modified to promote more potent tumor cell death, improve the toxicity profile, and/or generate host antitumor immunity. A variety of viruses have been developed as oncolytic therapeutics, including adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpesvirus, coxsackie A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and reovirus. The clinical development of oncolytic viral therapy has accelerated in the last few years, with several vectors entering clinical trials for a variety of cancers. In this review, current strategies to optimize the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of the major oncolytic viruses are discussed, and a summary of current clinical trials is provided. Further investigation is needed to characterize better the clinical impact of oncolytic viruses, but there are increasing data demonstrating the potential promise of this approach for the treatment of human and animal cancers. PMID:27512656

  10. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldufsky, Joe; Sivendran, Shanthi; Harcharik, Sara; Pan, Michael; Bernardo, Sebastian; Stern, Richard H; Friedlander, Philip; Ruby, Carl E; Saenger, Yvonne; Kaufman, Howard L

    2013-01-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses to treat cancer is based on the selection of tropic tumor viruses or the generation of replication selective vectors that can either directly kill infected tumor cells or increase their susceptibility to cell death and apoptosis through additional exposure to radiation or chemotherapy. In addition, viral vectors can be modified to promote more potent tumor cell death, improve the toxicity profile, and/or generate host antitumor immunity. A variety of viruses have been developed as oncolytic therapeutics, including adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpesvirus, coxsackie A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and reovirus. The clinical development of oncolytic viral therapy has accelerated in the last few years, with several vectors entering clinical trials for a variety of cancers. In this review, current strategies to optimize the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of the major oncolytic viruses are discussed, and a summary of current clinical trials is provided. Further investigation is needed to characterize better the clinical impact of oncolytic viruses, but there are increasing data demonstrating the potential promise of this approach for the treatment of human and animal cancers.

  11. Human precision-cut liver tumor slices as a tumor patient-individual predictive test system for oncolytic measles vaccine viruses

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    Zimmermann, Martina; Armeanu, Sorin; Smirnow, Irina; Kupka, Susan; Wagner, Silvia; Wehrmann, Manfred; Rots, Marianne G.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Weiss, Thomas S.; Koenigsrainer, Alfred; Gregor, Michael; Bitzer, Michael; Lauer, Ulrich M.

    2009-01-01

    Availability of an individualized preselection of oncolytic viruses to be used for virotherapy of tumor patients would be of great help. Using primary liver tumor resection specimens we evaluated the precision-cut liver slice (PCLS) technology as a novel in vitro test system for characterization of

  12. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer

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    Goldufsky J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Joe Goldufsky,1 Shanthi Sivendran,3 Sara Harcharik,4 Michael Pan,4 Sebastian Bernardo,4 Richard H Stern,5 Philip Friedlander,4 Carl E Ruby,1,2 Yvonne Saenger,4 Howard L Kaufman1,2 Departments of 1Immunology & Microbiology and 2Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL, USA 3Hematology/Oncology Medical Specialists, Lancaster General Health, Lancaster, PA, USA, and Departments of 4Medical Oncology and 5Radiology, Tisch Cancer Institute, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of oncolytic viruses to treat cancer is based on the selection of tropic tumor viruses or the generation of replication selective vectors that can either directly kill infected tumor cells or increase their susceptibility to cell death and apoptosis through additional exposure to radiation or chemotherapy. In addition, viral vectors can be modified to promote more potent tumor cell death, improve the toxicity profile, and/or generate host antitumor immunity. A variety of viruses have been developed as oncolytic therapeutics, including adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpesvirus, coxsackie A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and reovirus. The clinical development of oncolytic viral therapy has accelerated in the last few years, with several vectors entering clinical trials for a variety of cancers. In this review, current strategies to optimize the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of the major oncolytic viruses are discussed, and a summary of current clinical trials is provided. Further investigation is needed to characterize better the clinical impact of oncolytic viruses, but there are increasing data demonstrating the potential promise of this approach for the treatment of human and animal cancers. Keywords: cancer, gene therapy, oncolytic therapy, virus, treatment

  13. Oncolytic viruses as anticancer vaccines

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    Norman eWoller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy has shown impressive results in preclinical studies and first promising therapeutic outcomes in clinical trials as well. Since viruses are known for a long time as excellent vaccination agents, oncolytic viruses are now designed as novel anticancer agents combining the aspect of lysis-dependent cytoreductive activity with concomitant induction of antitumoral immune responses. Antitumoral immune activation by oncolytic virus infection of tumor tissue comprises both, immediate effects of innate immunity and also adaptive responses for long lasting antitumoral activity which is regarded as the most prominent challenge in clinical oncology. To date, the complex effects of a viral tumor infection on the tumor microenvironment and the consequences for the tumor-infiltrating immune cell compartment are poorly understood. However, there is more and more evidence that a tumor infection by an oncolytic virus opens up a number of options for further immunomodulating interventions such as systemic chemotherapy, generic immunostimulating strategies, dendritic cell-based vaccines, and antigenic libraries to further support clinical efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy.

  14. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

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    Peters, Cole; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity. PMID:26462293

  15. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

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    Cole Peters

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity.

  16. Reverse genetics of measles virus and resulting multivalent recombinant vaccines: applications of recombinant measles viruses.

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    Billeter, M A; Naim, H Y; Udem, S A

    2009-01-01

    An overview is given on the development of technologies to allow reverse genetics of RNA viruses, i.e., the rescue of viruses from cDNA, with emphasis on nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses (Mononegavirales), as exemplified for measles virus (MV). Primarily, these technologies allowed site-directed mutagenesis, enabling important insights into a variety of aspects of the biology of these viruses. Concomitantly, foreign coding sequences were inserted to (a) allow localization of virus replication in vivo through marker gene expression, (b) develop candidate multivalent vaccines against measles and other pathogens, and (c) create candidate oncolytic viruses. The vector use of these viruses was experimentally encouraged by the pronounced genetic stability of the recombinants unexpected for RNA viruses, and by the high load of insertable genetic material, in excess of 6 kb. The known assets, such as the small genome size of the vector in comparison to DNA viruses proposed as vectors, the extensive clinical experience of attenuated MV as vaccine with a proven record of high safety and efficacy, and the low production cost per vaccination dose are thus favorably complemented.

  17. Oncolytic myxoma virus: the path to clinic.

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    Chan, Winnie M; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2013-09-06

    Many common neoplasms are still noncurative with current standards of cancer therapy. More therapeutic modalities need to be developed to significantly prolong the lives of patients and eventually cure a wider spectrum of cancers. Oncolytic virotherapy is one of the promising new additions to clinical cancer therapeutics. Successful oncolytic virotherapy in the clinic will be those strategies that best combine tumor cell oncolysis with enhanced immune responses against tumor antigens. The current candidate oncolytic viruses all share the common property that they are relatively nonpathogenic to humans, yet they have the ability to replicate selectively in human cancer cells and induce cancer regression by direct oncolysis and/or induction of improved anti-tumor immune responses. Many candidate oncolytic viruses are in various stages of clinical and preclinical development. One such preclinical candidate is myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family that, in its natural setting, exhibits a very restricted host range and is only pathogenic to European rabbits. Despite its narrow host range in nature, MYXV has been shown to productively infect various classes of human cancer cells. Several preclinical in vivo modeling studies have demonstrated that MYXV is an attractive and safe candidate oncolytic virus, and hence, MYXV is currently being developed as a potential therapeutic for several cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. This review highlights the preclinical cancer models that have shown the most promise for translation of MYXV into human clinical trials.

  18. Oncolytic Newcastle Disease Virus as treatment for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.R.A. Buijs (Pascal)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract In this thesis, experiments are presented that were undertaken to develop oncolytic NDV for the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Oncolytic viruses (OVs), reported first halfway the previous century, have undergone a tremendous evolution from anecdotal experimental an

  19. Converting Tumor-specific Markers Into Reporters of Oncolytic Virus Infection

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    Iankov, Ianko D.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Dietz, Allan B; Russell, Stephen J.; Galanis, Evanthia

    2009-01-01

    Preferential killing of transformed cells, while keeping normal cells and organs unharmed, is the main goal of cancer gene therapy. Genetically engineered trackable markers and imaging reporters enable noninvasive monitoring of transduction efficiency and pharmacokinetics of anticancer virotherapeutics. However, none of these reporters can differentiate between infection in the targeted tumors and that in the normal tissue. Thus, we constructed oncolytic measles virus (MV) armed with a human ...

  20. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications

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    Tsang JJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jovian J Tsang,1,2 Harold L Atkins2,3 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Ottawa, 2Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 3Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation (HSCT to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT. Keywords: hematopoietic stem cells, oncolytic virus, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, stem cell graft purging, hematopoietic malignancy, graft vs host disease

  1. Oncolytic viruses: a step into cancer immunotherapy

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    Pol JG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan G Pol, Julien Rességuier, Brian D LichtyMcMaster Immunology Research Centre, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is currently under investigation in phase I–III clinical trials for approval as a new cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses (OVs selectively infect, replicate in, and kill tumor cells. For a long time, the therapeutic efficacy was thought to depend on the direct viral oncolysis (virocentric view. The host immune system was considered as a brake that impaired virus delivery and spread. Attention was paid primarily to approaches enhancing virus tumor selectivity and cytotoxicity and/or that limited antiviral responses. Thinking has changed over the past few years with the discovery that OV therapy was also inducing indirect oncolysis mechanisms. Among them, induction of an antitumor immunity following OV injection appeared to be a key factor for an efficient therapeutic activity (immunocentric view. Indeed, tumor-specific immune cells persist post-therapy and can search and destroy any tumor cells that escape the OVs, and thus immune memory may prevent relapse of the disease. Various strategies, which are summarized in this manuscript, have been developed to enhance the efficacy of OV therapy with a focus on its immunotherapeutic aspects. These include genetic engineering and combination with existing cancer treatments. Several are currently being evaluated in human patients and already display promising efficacy.Keywords: oncolytic virus, cancer immunotherapy, tumor antigen, cancer vaccine, combination strategies

  2. Immunotherapeutic Potential of Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus

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    Stephen eThorne

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of oncolytic viral therapy was based on the hypothesis that engineering tumor-selectivity into the replication potential of viruses would permit direct destruction of tumor cells as a result of viral-mediated lysis, resulting in amplification of the therapy exclusively within the tumor environment. The immune response raised by the virus was considered to be necessary for the safety of the approach, but also something of a hindrance to optimal therapeutic activity and repeat dosing. However the pre-clinical and subsequent clinical success of several oncolytic viruses expressing selected cytokines has demonstrated the potential for harnessing the immune response as an additional and beneficial mechanism of therapeutic activity within the platform. Over the last few years a variety of novel approaches have been incorporated to try to enhance this immunotherapeutic activity. Several innovative and subtle approaches have moved far beyond the expression of a single cytokine transgene, with the hope of optimizing anti-tumor immunity while having minimal detrimental impact on viral oncolytic activity.

  3. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Jovian J; Atkins, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT.

  4. Measles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measles is an infectious disease caused by a virus. It spreads easily from person to person. It ... down Tiny white spots inside the mouth Sometimes measles can lead to serious problems. There is no ...

  5. Measles virus host invasion and pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. Laksono (Brigitta); R. de Vries (René); S. McQuaid (Stephen); W.P. Duprex (Paul); R.L. de Swart (Rik)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMeasles virus is a highly contagious negative strand RNA virus that is transmitted via the respiratory route and causes systemic disease in previously unexposed humans and non-human primates. Measles is characterised by fever and skin rash and usually associated with cough, coryza and

  6. Measles virus host invasion and pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. Laksono (Brigitta); R. de Vries (René); S. McQuaid (Stephen); W.P. Duprex (Paul); R.L. de Swart (Rik)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMeasles virus is a highly contagious negative strand RNA virus that is transmitted via the respiratory route and causes systemic disease in previously unexposed humans and non-human primates. Measles is characterised by fever and skin rash and usually associated with cough, coryza and co

  7. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866... Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological... to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides...

  8. The Measles Virus Receptor SLAMF1 Can Mediate Particle Endocytosis.

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    Gonçalves-Carneiro, Daniel; McKeating, Jane A; Bailey, Dalan

    2017-04-01

    on the surface of the virus and SLAMF1, the immune cell receptor. In this study, we have investigated the steps governing entry of measles virus into SLAMF1-positive cells and identified endocytic uptake of viral particles. This research will impact our understanding of morbillivirus-related immunosuppression as well as the application of measles virus as an oncolytic therapeutic. Copyright © 2017 Gonçalves-Carneiro et al.

  9. The Measles Virus Receptor SLAMF1 Can Mediate Particle Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Carneiro, Daniel; McKeating, Jane A.

    2017-01-01

    glycoproteins found on the surface of the virus and SLAMF1, the immune cell receptor. In this study, we have investigated the steps governing entry of measles virus into SLAMF1-positive cells and identified endocytic uptake of viral particles. This research will impact our understanding of morbillivirus-related immunosuppression as well as the application of measles virus as an oncolytic therapeutic. PMID:28100610

  10. Oncolytic Viruses: Therapeutics With an Identity Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbach, Caroline J; Lichty, Brian D; Bell, John C

    2016-07-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) are replicating viral therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and have been in laboratory development for about twenty years. Recently, the FDA approved Imlygic, a herpes virus based therapeutic for the treatment of melanoma and thus OVs have entered a new era where they are a weapon in the armament of the oncologist. OVs are unique therapeutics with multiple mechanisms of therapeutic activity. The exact path for their development and eventual uptake by pharmaceutical companies is somewhat clouded by an uncertain identity. Are they vaccines, tumour lysing therapeutics, inducers of innate immunity, gene therapy vectors, anti-vascular agents or all of the above? Should they be developed as stand-alone loco-regional therapeutics, systemically delivered tumour hunters or immune modulators best tested as combination therapeutics? We summarize data here supporting the idea, depending upon the virus, that OVs can be any or all of these things. Pursuing a "one-size fits all" approach is counter-productive to their clinical development and instead as a field we should build on the strengths of individual virus platforms.

  11. Oncolytic Viruses: Therapeutics With an Identity Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J. Breitbach

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OV are replicating viral therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and have been in laboratory development for about twenty years. Recently, the FDA approved Imlygic, a herpes virus based therapeutic for the treatment of melanoma and thus OVs have entered a new era where they are a weapon in the armament of the oncologist. OVs are unique therapeutics with multiple mechanisms of therapeutic activity. The exact path for their development and eventual uptake by pharmaceutical companies is somewhat clouded by an uncertain identity. Are they vaccines, tumour lysing therapeutics, inducers of innate immunity, gene therapy vectors, anti-vascular agents or all of the above? Should they be developed as stand-alone loco-regional therapeutics, systemically delivered tumour hunters or immune modulators best tested as combination therapeutics? We summarize data here supporting the idea, depending upon the virus, that OVs can be any or all of these things. Pursuing a “one-size fits all” approach is counter-productive to their clinical development and instead as a field we should build on the strengths of individual virus platforms.

  12. Spread of Measles Virus in Europe

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-06

    Dr. Paul Rota, team lead for the Measles Laboratory, Division of Viral Diseases, at CDC, talks about a measles virus survey in Europe, 2008-2011.  Created: 10/6/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) and National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 10/6/2011.

  13. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke MJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Burke Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, MACC Fund Research Center, Milwaukee, WI, USA Abstract: Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001 is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold. Keywords: oncolytic, virus, oncology, Seneca, valley

  14. Replication-selective oncolytic viruses in the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts, Bart; van der Poel, Henk G

    2005-02-01

    In the search for novel strategies, oncolytic virotherapy has recently emerged as a viable approach to specifically kill tumor cells. Unlike conventional gene therapy, it uses replication competent viruses that are able to spread through tumor tissue by virtue of viral replication and concomitant cell lysis. Recent advances in molecular biology have allowed the design of several genetically modified viruses, such as adenovirus and herpes simplex virus that specifically replicate in, and kill tumor cells. On the other hand, viruses with intrinsic oncolytic capacity are also being evaluated for therapeutic purposes. In this review, an overview is given of the general mechanisms and genetic modifications by which these viruses achieve tumor cell-specific replication and antitumor efficacy. However, although generally the oncolytic efficacy of these approaches has been demonstrated in preclinical studies the therapeutic efficacy in clinical trails is still not optimal. Therefore, strategies are evaluated that could further enhance the oncolytic potential of conditionally replicating viruses. In this respect, the use of tumor-selective viruses in conjunction with other standard therapies seems most promising. However, still several hurdles regarding clinical limitations and safety issues should be overcome before this mode of therapy can become of clinical relevance.

  15. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001) is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold.

  16. Measles virus, immune control and persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Diane E.; Lin, Wen-Hsuan; Pan, Chien-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    Measles remains one of the most important causes of child morbidity and mortality worldwide with the greatest burden in the youngest children. Most acute measles deaths are due to secondary infections that result from a poorly understood measles-induced suppression of immune responses. Young children are also vulnerable to late development of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a progressive, uniformly fatal neurologic disease caused by persistent measles virus (MeV) infection. During acute infection, the rash marks the appearance of the adaptive immune response and CD8+ T cell-mediated clearance of infectious virus. However, after clearance of infectious virus, MeV RNA persists and can be detected in blood, respiratory secretions, urine and lymphoid tissue for many weeks to months. This prolonged period of virus clearance may help to explain measles immunosuppression and the development of lifelong immunity to re-infection, as well as occasional infection of the nervous system. Once MeV infects neurons, the virus can spread transynaptically and the envelope proteins needed to form infectious virus are unnecessary, accumulate mutations and can establish persistent infection. Identification of the immune mechanisms required for clearance of MeV RNA from multiple sites will enlighten our understanding of the development of disease due to persistent infection. PMID:22316382

  17. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. Swift

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various “omics” technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy—from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse—has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system.

  18. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Stephanie L.; Stojdl, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various “omics” technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT) in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy—from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse—has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system. PMID:26861383

  19. Modelling Spread of Oncolytic Viruses in Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2014-03-01

    One of the most promising areas in current cancer research and treatment is the use of viruses to attack cancer cells. A number of oncolytic viruses have been identified to date that possess the ability to destroy or neutralize cancer cells while inflicting minimal damage upon healthy cells. Formulation of predictive models that correctly describe the evolution of infected tumor systems is critical to the successful application of oncolytic virus therapy. A number of different models have been proposed for analysis of the oncolytic virus-infected tumor system, with approaches ranging from traditional coupled differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models, to contemporary modeling frameworks based on neural networks and cellular automata. Existing models are focused on tumor cells and the effects of virus infection, and offer the potential for improvement by including effects upon normal cells. We have recently extended the traditional framework to a 2-cell model addressing the full cellular system including tumor cells, normal cells, and the impacts of viral infection upon both populations. Analysis of the new framework reveals complex interaction between the populations and potential inability to simultaneously eliminate the virus and tumor populations.

  20. Unique Measles Virus in Canada

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-08-24

    Dr. Shelley Deeks, chief of communicable diseases at Public Health Ontario, discusses a measles outbreak in Canada.  Created: 8/24/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/24/2017.

  1. Immunostimulatory Gene Therapy Using Oncolytic Viruses as Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Loskog

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunostimulatory gene therapy has been developed during the past twenty years. The aim of immunostimulatory gene therapy is to tilt the suppressive tumor microenvironment to promote anti-tumor immunity. Hence, like a Trojan horse, the gene vehicle can carry warriors and weapons into enemy territory to combat the tumor from within. The most promising immune stimulators are those activating and sustaining Th1 responses, but even if potent effects were seen in preclinical models, many clinical trials failed to show objective responses in cancer patients. However, with new tools to control ongoing immunosuppression in cancer patients, immunostimulatory gene therapy is now emerging as an interesting option. In parallel, oncolytic viruses have been shown to be safe in patients. To prolong immune stimulation and to increase efficacy, these two fields are now merging and oncolytic viruses are armed with immunostimulatory transgenes. These novel agents are racing towards approval as established cancer immunotherapeutics.

  2. Oncolytic herpes viruses, chemotherapeutics, and other cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braidwood L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lynne Braidwood,1 Sheila V Graham,2 Alex Graham,1 Joe Conner11Virttu Biologics Ltd, Department of Neurology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, UK; 2MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Jarrett Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: Oncolytic viruses are emerging as a potential new way of treating cancers. They are selectively replication-competent viruses that propagate only in actively dividing tumor cells but not in normal cells and, as a result, destroy the tumor cells by consequence of lytic infection. At least six different oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs have undergone clinical trials worldwide to date, and they have demonstrated an excellent safety profile and intimations of efficacy. The first pivotal Phase III trial with an oHSV, talimogene laherparepvec (T-Vec [OncoVexGM-CSF], is almost complete, with extremely positive early results reported. Intuitively, therapeutically beneficial interactions between oHSV and chemotherapeutic and targeted therapeutic drugs would be limited as the virus requires actively dividing cells for maximum replication efficiency and most anticancer agents are cytotoxic or cytostatic. However, combinations of such agents display a range of responses, with antagonistic, additive, or, perhaps most surprisingly, synergistic enhancement of antitumor activity. When synergistic interactions in cancer cell killing are observed, chemotherapy dose reductions that achieve the same overall efficacy may be possible, resulting in a valuable reduction of adverse side effects. Therefore, the combination of an oHSV with “standard-of-care” drugs makes a logical and reasonable approach to improved therapy, and the addition of a targeted oncolytic therapy with “standard-of-care” drugs merits further investigation, both preclinically and in the clinic. Numerous publications report

  3. Radioimmunoassay of measles virus hemagglutinin protein G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, G.A.; Salmi, A.A. (Turku Univ. (Finland))

    1982-08-01

    Guinea pig and rabbit antisera from animals immunized with purified measles virus hemagglutinin (G) protein were used to establish a solid-phase four-layer radioimmunoassay for quantitative measurement of the G protein. The sensitivity of the assay was 2 ng of purified G protein, and 200 ..mu..g of protein from uninfected Vero cells neither decreased the sensitivity nor reacted non-specifically in the assay. Radioimmunoassay standard dose-response curves were established and unknown values interpolated from these using the logit program of a desktop computer. Using this procedure, a measles virus growth curve in infected Vero cells was determined by measurement of G protein production. Under these same conditions, hemagglutination was not sensitive enough to detect early hemagglutinin production. Viral antigens in canine distemper virus, Newcastle disease virus, parainfluenza viruses 1-4, simian virus 5, and respiratory syncytial virus-infected cell lysates did not cross-react in the radioimmunoassay. A small degree of cross-reactivity was detected with mumps viral antigens, both with Vero cell-derived (wild-type strain) and egg-derived (Enders strain) purified virus preparations and with a cell lysate antigen prepared from wild-type mumps virus-infected Vero cells.

  4. Oncolytic Viruses in the Treatment of Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle G. Potts

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder carcinoma is the second most common malignancy of the urinary tract. Up to 85% of patients with bladder cancer are diagnosed with a tumor that is limited to the bladder mucosa (Ta, T1, and CIS. These stages are commonly termed as non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Although the treatment of NMIBC has greatly improved in recent years, there is a need for additional therapies when patients fail bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG and chemotherapeutic agents. We propose that bladder cancer may be an ideal target for oncolytic viruses engineered to selectively replicate in and lyse tumor cells leaving normal cells unharmed. In support of this hypothesis, here we review current treatment strategies for bladder cancer and their shortcomings, as well as recent advancements in oncolytic viral therapy demonstrating encouraging safety profiles and antitumor activity.

  5. Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses: Fed Ex for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmon, Candice; Harrington, Kevin; Kottke, Timothy; Prestwich, Robin; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2009-10-01

    Oncolytic viruses delivered directly into the circulation face many hazards that impede their localization to, and infection of, metastatic tumors. Such barriers to systemic delivery could be overcome if couriers, which confer both protection, and tumor localization, to their viral cargoes, could be found. Several preclincal studies have shown that viruses can be loaded into, or onto, different types of cells without losing the biological activity of either virus or cell carrier. Importantly, such loading can significantly protect the viruses from immune-mediated virus-neutralizing activities, including antiviral antibody. Moreover, an impressive portfolio of cellular vehicles, which have some degree of tropism for tumor cells themselves, or for the biological properties associated with the tumor stroma, is already available. Therefore, it will soon be possible to initiate clinical protocols to test the hypopthesis that cell-mediated delivery can permit efficient shipping of oncolytic viruses from the loading bay (the production laboratory) directly to the tumor in immune-competent patients with metastatic disease.

  6. Relevance of the Measles Virus Expression in Cancer - an Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benharroch, Daniel; Ariad, Samuel; Tadmor, Noa; Nalbandyan, Karen; Lazarev, Irena

    2016-10-01

    Evidence of an association between classical Hodgkin lymphoma and the measles virus has previously been presented by our group. Arguments held against our thesis were reevaluated. Substantiation of a relationship between the measles virus and additional solid tumors was submitted. Moreover, a pathogenic pathway was suggested to support a possible contribution of the measles virus to the development of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. We have chosen to exclude a discussion of measles virotherapy, since this carries distinct implications. We now add new evidence regarding the expression of the measles virus phosphoprotein in a few cancers. We also suggest a role in this context for atypical measles syndrome in malignant tumors. Last, we propose a collaboration which may make the best, on the one hand of our cohort of classical Hodgkin lymphoma, half of which carry the measles virus expression in their tumor cells. The planned study will also look into the patients vaccination records and into a previous history of the measles disease. On the other hand, cohorts of patients diagnosed with late onset measles will be assessed for the eventual diagnosis of atypical measles syndrome and will be followed up for the subsequent development of a malignant tumor.

  7. CRISPR-Cas9 as a Powerful Tool for Efficient Creation of Oncolytic Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Webb, Eika; Lemoine, Nicholas Robert; Wang, Yaohe

    2016-03-07

    The development of oncolytic viruses has led to an emerging new class of cancer therapeutics. Although the safety profile has been encouraging, the transition of oncolytic viruses to the clinical setting has been a slow process due to modifications. Therefore, a new generation of more potent oncolytic viruses needs to be exploited, following our better understanding of the complex interactions between the tumor, its microenvironment, the virus, and the host immune response. The conventional method for creation of tumor-targeted oncolytic viruses is based on homologous recombination. However, the creation of new mutant oncolytic viruses with large genomes remains a challenge due to the multi-step process and low efficiency of homologous recombination. The CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 has hugely advanced the potential to edit the genomes of various organisms due to the ability of Cas9 to target a specific genomic site by a single guide RNA. In this review, we discuss the CRISPR-Cas9 system as an efficient viral editing method for the creation of new oncolytic viruses, as well as its potential future applications in the development of oncolytic viruses. Further, this review discusses the potential of off-target effects as well as CRISPR-Cas9 as a tool for basic research into viral biology.

  8. Viral oncolysis - can insights from measles be transferred to canine distemper virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapp, Stefanie; Pfankuche, Vanessa M; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Puff, Christina

    2014-06-11

    Neoplastic diseases represent one of the most common causes of death among humans and animals. Currently available and applied therapeutic options often remain insufficient and unsatisfactory, therefore new and innovative strategies and approaches are highly needed. Periodically, oncolytic viruses have been in the center of interest since the first anecdotal description of their potential usefulness as an anti-tumor treatment concept. Though first reports referred to an incidental measles virus infection causing tumor regression in a patient suffering from lymphoma several decades ago, no final treatment concept has been developed since then. However, numerous viruses, such as herpes-, adeno- and paramyxoviruses, have been investigated, characterized, and modified with the aim to generate a new anti-cancer treatment option. Among the different viruses, measles virus still represents a highly interesting candidate for such an approach. Numerous different tumors of humans including malignant lymphoma, lung and colorectal adenocarcinoma, mesothelioma, and ovarian cancer, have been studied in vitro and in vivo as potential targets. Moreover, several concepts using different virus preparations are now in clinical trials in humans and may proceed to a new treatment option. Surprisingly, only few studies have investigated viral oncolysis in veterinary medicine. The close relationship between measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV), both are morbilliviruses, and the fact that numerous tumors in dogs exhibit similarities to their human counterpart, indicates that both the virus and species dog represent a highly interesting translational model for future research in viral oncolysis. Several recent studies support such an assumption. It is therefore the aim of the present communication to outline the mechanisms of morbillivirus-mediated oncolysis and to stimulate further research in this potentially expanding field of viral oncolysis in a highly suitable

  9. Viral Oncolysis — Can Insights from Measles Be Transferred to Canine Distemper Virus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Lapp

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neoplastic diseases represent one of the most common causes of death among humans and animals. Currently available and applied therapeutic options often remain insufficient and unsatisfactory, therefore new and innovative strategies and approaches are highly needed. Periodically, oncolytic viruses have been in the center of interest since the first anecdotal description of their potential usefulness as an anti-tumor treatment concept. Though first reports referred to an incidental measles virus infection causing tumor regression in a patient suffering from lymphoma several decades ago, no final treatment concept has been developed since then. However, numerous viruses, such as herpes-, adeno- and paramyxoviruses, have been investigated, characterized, and modified with the aim to generate a new anti-cancer treatment option. Among the different viruses, measles virus still represents a highly interesting candidate for such an approach. Numerous different tumors of humans including malignant lymphoma, lung and colorectal adenocarcinoma, mesothelioma, and ovarian cancer, have been studied in vitro and in vivo as potential targets. Moreover, several concepts using different virus preparations are now in clinical trials in humans and may proceed to a new treatment option. Surprisingly, only few studies have investigated viral oncolysis in veterinary medicine. The close relationship between measles virus (MV and canine distemper virus (CDV, both are morbilliviruses, and the fact that numerous tumors in dogs exhibit similarities to their human counterpart, indicates that both the virus and species dog represent a highly interesting translational model for future research in viral oncolysis. Several recent studies support such an assumption. It is therefore the aim of the present communication to outline the mechanisms of morbillivirus-mediated oncolysis and to stimulate further research in this potentially expanding field of viral oncolysis in a highly

  10. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan KJ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available KJ Allan,1,2 David F Stojdl,1–3 SL Swift1 1Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO Research Institute, 2Department of Biology, Microbiology and Immunology, 3Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. Keywords: oncolytic, virus, screen, high-throughput, cancer, chemical, genomic, immunotherapy

  11. Measles Edmonston Vaccine Strain Derivatives have Potent Oncolytic Activity against Osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musibay, Evidio Domingo; Allen, Cory; Kurokawa, Cheyne; Hardcastle, Jayson J.; Aderca, Ileana; Msaouel, Pavlos; Bansal, Aditya; Jiang, Huailei; DeGrado, Timothy R.; Galanis, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor affecting children and young adults, and development of metastatic disease is associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of virotherapy with engineered measles virus (MV) vaccine strains in the treatment of osteosarcoma. Cell lines derived from pediatric patients with osteosarcoma (HOS, MG63, 143B, KHOS-312H, U2-OS and SJSA1) were examined for MV-GFP and MV-NIS gene expression and cytotoxicity as defined by syncytial formation, cell death, and eradication of cell monolayers: significant antitumor activity was demonstrated. Findings were correlated with in vivo efficacy in subcutaneous, orthotopic (tibial bone), and lung metastatic osteosarcoma xenografts treated with the MV derivative MV-NIS via the intratumoral (IT) or intravenous (IV) route. Following treatment, we observed decrease in tumor growth of subcutaneous xenografts (p=0.0374) and prolongation of survival in mice with orthotopic (posteosarcoma tumors (p=0.0207). Expression of the NIS transgene in MV-NIS infected tumors allowed for SPECT-CT and PET-CT imaging of virus infected tumors in vivo. Our data support the translational potential of MV-based virotherapy approaches in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic osteosarcoma. PMID:25394505

  12. Will Synergizing Vaccination with Therapeutics Boost Measles Virus Eradication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plemper, Richard K; Hammond, Anthea L

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Measles virus is a major human pathogen responsible for approximately 150,000 measles deaths annually. The disease is vaccine preventable and eradication of the virus is considered feasible in principle. However, a herd immunity exceeding 95% is required to prevent sporadic viral outbreaks in a population. Declining disease prevalence combined with public anxieties about vaccination safety has increased vaccine refusal especially in the European region, which has resulted in measles resurgence in some areas. Areas covered Here, we discuss whether synergizing effective measles therapeutics with vaccination could contribute to solving an endgame conundrum of measles elimination by accelerating the eradication effort. Based on an anticipated use for protection of high-risk contacts of confirmed measles cases through post-exposure prophylaxis, we identify key elements of the desirable drug profile, review current disease management strategies and the state of experimental inhibitor candidates, evaluate the risk associated with viral escape from inhibition, and consider the potential of measles therapeutics for the management of persistent viral infection of the CNS. Assuming a post-measles world with waning measles immunity, we contemplate the possible impact of therapeutics on controlling the threat imposed by closely related zoonotic pathogens of the same genus as measles virus. Expert opinion Efficacious therapeutics given for post-exposure prophylaxis of high-risk social contacts of confirmed index cases may aid measles eradication by closing herd immunity gaps due to vaccine refusal or failure in populations with overall good vaccination coverage. The envisioned primarily prophylactic application of measles therapeutics to a predominantly pediatric and/or adolescent patient population dictates the drug profile; the article must be safe and efficacious, orally available, shelf-stable at ambient temperature, and amenable to cost-effective manufacture

  13. Oncolytic effects of a novel influenza A virus expressing interleukin-15 from the NS reading frame.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke van Rikxoort

    Full Text Available Oncolytic influenza A viruses with deleted NS1 gene (delNS1 replicate selectively in tumour cells with defective interferon response and/or activated Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signalling pathway. To develop a delNS1 virus with specific immunostimulatory properties, we used an optimised technology to insert the interleukin-15 (IL-15 coding sequence into the viral NS gene segment (delNS1-IL-15. DelNS1 and delNS1-IL-15 exerted similar oncolytic effects. Both viruses replicated and caused caspase-dependent apoptosis in interferon-defective melanoma cells. Virus replication was required for their oncolytic activity. Cisplatin enhanced the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses. The cytotoxic drug increased delNS1 replication and delNS1-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. Interference with MEK/ERK signalling by RNAi-mediated depletion or the MEK inhibitor U0126 did not affect the oncolytic effects of the delNS1 viruses. In oncolysis sensitive melanoma cells, delNS1-IL-15 (but not delNS1 infection resulted in the production of IL-15 levels ranging from 70 to 1140 pg/mL in the cell culture supernatants. The supernatants of delNS1-IL-15-infected (but not of delNS1-infected melanoma cells induced primary human natural killer cell-mediated lysis of non-infected tumour cells. In conclusion, we constructed a novel oncolytic influenza virus that combines the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses with immunostimulatory properties through production of functional IL-15. Moreover, we showed that the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses can be enhanced in combination with cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Oncolytic viruses and their application to cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiocca, E Antonio; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2014-04-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) selectively replicate and kill cancer cells and spread within the tumor, while not harming normal tissue. In addition to this direct oncolytic activity, OVs are also very effective at inducing immune responses to themselves and to the infected tumor cells. OVs encompass a broad diversity of DNA and RNA viruses that are naturally cancer selective or can be genetically engineered. OVs provide a diverse platform for immunotherapy; they act as in situ vaccines and can be armed with immunomodulatory transgenes or combined with other immunotherapies. However, the interactions of OVs with the immune system may affect therapeutic outcomes in opposing fashions: negatively by limiting virus replication and/or spread, or positively by inducing antitumor immune responses. Many aspects of the OV-tumor/host interaction are important in delineating the effectiveness of therapy: (i) innate immune responses and the degree of inflammation induced; (ii) types of virus-induced cell death; (iii) inherent tumor physiology, such as infiltrating and resident immune cells, vascularity/hypoxia, lymphatics, and stromal architecture; and (iv) tumor cell phenotype, including alterations in IFN signaling, oncogenic pathways, cell surface immune markers [MHC, costimulatory, and natural killer (NK) receptors], and the expression of immunosuppressive factors. Recent clinical trials with a variety of OVs, especially those expressing granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have demonstrated efficacy and induction of antitumor immune responses in the absence of significant toxicity. Manipulating the balance between antivirus and antitumor responses, often involving overlapping immune pathways, will be critical to the clinical success of OVs.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of measles virus in Italy during 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Magurano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. In view of the goal of measles elimination, it is of great importance to assess the circulation of wild-type measles virus (MV. Genetic analysis is indispensable to understand the epidemiology of measles. A large measles outbreak occurred in Italy in 2008, with over 4000 cases reported to the enhanced measles surveillance system introduced in 2007, 37% of which were laboratory confirmed. METHODS. Urine and saliva samples were collected during 2008. A phylogenetic analysis of measles sequences was performed in order to understand the epidemiological situation of wild-type (MV circulation in that period. RESULT AND DISCUSSION. Data showed predominant circulation of the genotype D4. Genotypes A, D8, D9 and H1 were also detected in a small number of samples, probably representing imported cases.

  16. ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-MEDIATED REVERSAL OF IMPAIRED TUMOR ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

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    Shashi Ashok Gujar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor immunity can eliminate existing cancer cells and also maintain a constant surveillance against possible relapse. Such an antigen-specific adaptive response begins when tumor-specific T cells become activated. T cell activation requires two signals on antigen presenting cells (APCs: antigen presentation through MHC molecules and co-stimulation. In the absence of one or both of these signals, T cells remain inactivated or can even become tolerized. Cancer cells and their associated microenvironment strategically hinder the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and consequently prevent the development of anti-tumor immunity. Many studies, however, demonstrate that interventions that overturn tumor-associated immune evasion mechanisms can establish anti-tumor immune responses of therapeutic potential. One such intervention is oncolytic virus (OV-based anti-cancer therapy. Here we discuss how OV-induced immunological events override tumor-associated antigen presentation impairment and promote appropriate T cell:APC interaction. Detailed understanding of this phenomenon is pivotal for devising the strategies that will enhance the efficacy of OV-based anti-cancer therapy by complementing its inherent oncolytic

  17. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, KJ; Stojdl, David F; Swift, SL

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  18. Measles virus genotypes circulating in India, 2011-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Chowdhury, Deepika T

    2017-05-01

    The Government of India is accepted to participate in the measles elimination and rubella control goal 2020, hence genetic characterization of measles viruses (MeV) becomes essential. At National Reference Laboratory (National Institute of Virology, Pune), the throat swabs/urine specimens (n = 380) or PCR products (n = 219) obtained from the suspected measles cases were referred for the molecular testing and subsequently, MeV nucleoprotein (N) gene sequencing/genotyping. In addition, 2,449 suspected measles cases, mainly from the Maharashtra state were referred for the laboratory diagnosis. A detailed study was performed on N gene sequences obtained during last two decades. Indian MeV sequences obtained during 2011-2015 were compared with 1996-2010 sequences and genetic divergence was studied. Circulation of measles genotypes B3 (n = 3), D4 (n = 49), and D8 (n = 351) strains were observed in 19 States and three Union Territories of India. In addition, 64 measles viruses were isolated from 253 throat swab or urine specimens obtained from the suspected measles cases. During 2011-2015, 67.9% (1,663/2,449) suspected measles cases were laboratory confirmed. Molecular studies showed circulation of measles genotype B3 in India along with prominently circulating genotypes D4 and D8 except D7 strains. The genetic diversion within Indian B3, D4, and D8 genotypes was 0.3%, 1.1%, and 2.1%, respectively. The genetic divergence of Indian B3, D4, and D8 measles strains with the WHO reference sequences was 2.5%, 2.6%, and 1.8%, respectively. It is crucial data for national immunization program. More measles/rubella genotyping studies are necessary to track transmission and to support measles elimination and rubella control. J. Med. Virol. 89:753-758, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Attacking postoperative metastases using perioperative oncolytic viruses and viral vaccines

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    Lee-Hwa eTai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Surgical resection of solid primary malignancies is a mainstay of therapy for cancer patients. Despite being the most effective treatment for these tumors, cancer surgery has been associated with impaired metastatic clearance due to immunosuppression. In preclinical surgery models and human cancer patients, we and others have demonstrated a profound suppression of both natural killer (NK and T cell function in the postoperative period and this plays a major role in the enhanced development of metastases following surgery. Oncolytic viruses (OV were originally designed to selectively infect and replicate in tumours, with the primary objective of directly lysing cancer cells. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that OV infection results in a profound inflammatory reaction within the tumour, initiating innate and adaptive immune responses against it that is critical for its therapeutic benefit. This anti-tumour immunity appears to be mediated predominantly by NK and cytotoxic T cells. In preclinical models, we found that preoperative OV prevents postoperative NK cell dysfunction and attenuates tumor dissemination. Due to theoretical safety concerns of administering live virus prior to surgery in cancer patients, we characterized safe, attenuated versions of OV and viral vaccines that could stimulate NK cells and reduce metastases when administered in the perioperative period. In cancer patients, we observed that in vivo infusion with oncolytic vaccinia virus and ex vivo stimulation with viral vaccines promotes NK cell activation. These preclinical studies provide a novel and clinically relevant setting for OV therapy. Our challenge is to identify safe and promising OV therapies that will activate NK and T cells in the perioperative period preventing the establishment of micrometastatic disease in cancer patients.

  20. Changing faces in virology: the dutch shift from oncogenic to oncolytic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaid, Zineb; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Hoeben, Rob C

    2014-10-01

    Viruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular transformation and cancer. On the other hand, viruses may provide hope: hope for an efficacious treatment of serious disease. Examples of the latter are the use of viruses as a vaccine, as transfer vector for therapeutic genes in a gene therapy setting, or, more directly, as therapeutic anticancer agent in an oncolytic-virus therapy setting. Already there is evidence for antitumor activity of oncolytic viruses. The antitumor efficacy seems linked to their capacity to induce a tumor-directed immune response. Here, we will provide an overview on the development of oncolytic viruses and their clinical evaluation from the Dutch perspective.

  1. [Oncolytic viruses as a new way of treatment of neoplastic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Urszula; Chronowska, Justyna; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-08-01

    Despite the unceasing progression in chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, neoplasms are still the second, after cardiovascular diseases, cause of death in the world. The creation of oncolytic viruses gives hope for increase of anticancer therapy effectiveness. Oncolytic viruses are the type of viruses that selectively infect and cause the lyse of tumor cells excluding normal cells. This mechanism allows to avoid the consequences of the possible replication of the virus, which having entered to the organism, replicates in organism's cells by using the DNA of host cells. The development of genetic engineering and molecular biology has enabled the creation of this kind of genetically modified viruses, which deprive them of their virulence. Currently, there are many clinical trials in progress including the use of oncolytic viruses in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, thyroid cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, melanoma and glioblastoma multiforme treatment. There are parallel studies in animals using the subsequent viruses. Oncolytic viruses treatment is generally well tolerated, without significant side effects. It is worth to point out that this method combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy allows to reduce the use of therapeutic doses, which significantly reduces the toxicity of conventional treatment. Further clinical studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of oncolytic viruses will develop more effective and better tolerated therapeutic protocols in the future.

  2. Development of new therapy for canine mammary cancer with recombinant measles virus

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    Koichiro Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising treatment strategy for cancer. We previously generated a recombinant measles virus (rMV-SLAMblind that selectively uses a poliovirus receptor-related 4 (PVRL4/Nectin4 receptor, but not signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM. We demonstrated that the virus exerts therapeutic effects against human breast cancer cells. Here, we examined the applicability of rMV-SLAMblind to treating canine mammary cancers (CMCs. We found that the susceptibilities of host cells to rMV-SLAMblind were dependent on canine Nectin-4 expression. Nectin-4 was detected in four of nine CMC cell lines. The rMV-SLAMblind efficiently infected those four Nectin-4-positive cell lines and was cytotoxic for three of them (CF33, CHMm, and CTBm. In vivo experiment showed that the administration of rMV-SLAMblind greatly suppressed the progression of tumors in mice xenografted with a CMC cell line (CF33. Immunohistochemistry revealed that canine Nectin-4 was expressed in 45% of canine mammary tumors, and the tumor cells derived from one clinical specimen were efficiently infected with rMV-SLAMblind. These results suggest that rMV-SLAMblind infects CMC cells and displays antitumor activity in vitro, in xenografts, and ex vivo. Therefore, oncolytic virotherapy with rMV-SLAMblind can be a novel method for treating CMCs.

  3. Measles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reported. But recent years have seen spikes in measles outbreaks, including 131 cases in the first half of ... nutrition or weakened immune systems. Exposure During a measles outbreak, an injection of measles antibodies (called immune globulin) ...

  4. Moving oncolytic viruses into the clinic: clinical-grade production, purification, and characterization of diverse oncolytic viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Ungerechts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OVs are unique anticancer agents based on their pleotropic modes of action, which include, besides viral tumor cell lysis, activation of antitumor immunity. A panel of diverse viruses, often genetically engineered, has advanced to clinical investigation, including phase 3 studies. This diversity of virotherapeutics not only offers interesting opportunities for the implementation of different therapeutic regimens but also poses challenges for clinical translation. Thus, manufacturing processes and regulatory approval paths need to be established for each OV individually. This review provides an overview of clinical-grade manufacturing procedures for OVs using six virus families as examples, and key challenges are discussed individually. For example, different virus features with respect to particle size, presence/absence of an envelope, and host species imply specific requirements for measures to ensure sterility, for handling, and for determination of appropriate animal models for toxicity testing, respectively. On the other hand, optimization of serum-free culture conditions, increasing virus yields, development of scalable purification strategies, and formulations guaranteeing long-term stability are challenges common to several if not all OVs. In light of the recent marketing approval of the first OV in the Western world, strategies for further upscaling OV manufacturing and optimizing product characterization will receive increasing attention.

  5. John F. Enders and measles virus vaccine--a reminiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, S L

    2009-01-01

    Following their initial isolation in cell culture of the virus in 1954, a succession of investigators under the mentorship of John E Enders conducted the research, development, and initial clinical studies responsible for the licensure in 1963 of a successful live attenuated measles virus vaccine. Propagation of the virus successively in human kidney cells, human amnion cells, embryonated hens' eggs, and finally chick embryo cell cultures had selected virus that when inoculated into susceptible monkeys proved immunogenic without viremia or overt disease, in contrast to the early kidney cell-passaged material, which in similar monkeys produced viremia with illness mimicking human measles. Careful clinical studies in children by the Enders group and then by collaborating investigators in many sites established its safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy. This Edmonston strain measles virus became the progenitor of vaccines prepared, studied, and utilized throughout the United States and many other countries. With appreciation of measles morbidity and mortality, most marked among infants and children in the resource-limited lands, the vaccine was incorporated into the World Health Organization's (WHO) Expanded Programme of Immunization (EPI) in 1974 along with BCG, OPV, and DTP. Successful efforts to further reduce measles' burden were launched in 2001 and are continuing as the Measles Initiative (Partnership) under the leadership of the American Red Cross, International Red Cross, and Red Crescent societies, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), WHO, and the United Nations Foundation.

  6. Oncolytic viruses: From bench to bedside with a focus on safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Pascal RA; Verhagen, Judith HE; van Eijck, Casper HJ; van den Hoogen, Bernadette G

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are a relatively new class of anti-cancer immunotherapy agents. Several viruses have undergone evaluation in clinical trials in the last decades, and the first agent is about to be approved to be used as a novel cancer therapy modality. In the current review, an overview is presented on recent (pre)clinical developments in the field of oncolytic viruses that have previously been or currently are being evaluated in clinical trials. Special attention is given to possible safety issues like toxicity, environmental shedding, mutation and reversion to wildtype virus. PMID:25996182

  7. Oncolytic virotherapy using herpes simplex virus: how far have we come?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolowski NAS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas AS Sokolowski,1 Helen Rizos,2 Russell J Diefenbach1 1Centre for Virus Research, Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research, The University of Sydney, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW, Australia Abstract: Oncolytic virotherapy exploits the properties of human viruses to naturally cause cytolysis of cancer cells. The human pathogen herpes simplex virus (HSV has proven particularly amenable for use in oncolytic virotherapy. The relative safety of HSV coupled with extensive knowledge on how HSV interacts with the host has provided a platform for manipulating HSV to enhance the targeting and killing of human cancer cells. This has culminated in the approval of talimogene laherparepvec for the treatment of melanoma. This review focuses on the development of HSV as an oncolytic virus and where the field is likely to head in the future. Keywords: herpes simplex virus, cancer, immunity, combination therapy, oncolysis

  8. Measles Virus IgG Avidity Assay for Use in Classification of Measles Vaccine Failure in Measles Elimination Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Philip; Bellini, William J.

    2012-01-01

    In regions where endemic measles virus has been eliminated, diagnostic assays are needed to assist in correctly classifying measles cases irrespective of vaccination status. A measles IgG avidity assay was configured using a commercially available measles-specific IgG enzyme immunoassay by modifying the protocol to include three 5-min washes with diethylamine (60 mM; pH 10.25) following serum incubation; serum was serially diluted, and the results were expressed as the end titer avidity index. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used for evaluation and validation and to establish low (≤30%) and high (≥70%) end titer avidity thresholds. Analysis of 319 serum specimens expected to contain either high- or low-avidity antibodies according to clinical and epidemiological data indicated that the assay is highly accurate, with an area under the curve of 0.998 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.978 to 1.000), sensitivity of 91.9% (95% CI, 83.2% to 97.0%), and specificity of 98.4% (95% CI, 91.6% to 100%). The assay is rapid (measles cases with low-avidity results; both were IgM-positive samples. Additionally, 11 patients (15 samples) with modified measles who were found to have high-avidity IgG results were classified as secondary vaccine failures; one sample with an intermediate-avidity result was not interpretable. In elimination settings, measles IgG avidity assays can complement existing diagnostic tools in confirming unvaccinated acute cases and, in conjunction with adequate clinical and epidemiologic investigation, aid in the classification of vaccine failure cases. PMID:22971778

  9. Nucleoprotein gene analysis of the wild-type measles viruses circulated in Beijing in 2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢正德; 申昆玲; 许文波; 照日格图; 朱贞

    2004-01-01

    @@ The hemagglutinin (H) and nucleoprotein (N) genes are the most variable regions on the genome of the measles virus. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the H and/or N genes has been used to describe different genetic groups of wild-type measles virus.1-3 This genetic information has been used in molecular epidemiological studies to identify the transmission pathways of measles virus. The present study was conducted to reveal the genotype of measles viruses which circulated in Beijing in 2001.

  10. Measles Epidemics Among Children in Vietnam: Genomic Characterization of Virus Responsible for Measles Outbreak in Ho Chi Minh City, 2014

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    Van H. Pham

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Measles viruses responsible for outbreaks in Southern Vietnam belonged to a genotype D8 variant group which had unique amino acid sequences in the N gene. Our report provides important genomic information about the virus for measles elimination in Southeast Asia.

  11. Ultrasound-mediated oncolytic virus delivery and uptake for increased therapeutic efficacy: state of art

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    Nande R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rounak Nande,1 Candace M Howard,2 Pier Paolo Claudio,3,4 1Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Marshall University School of Medicine, Huntington, WV, 2Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, 3Department of BioMolecular Sciences and National Center for Natural Products Research, School of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi, MS, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA Abstract: The field of ultrasound (US has changed significantly from medical imaging and diagnosis to treatment strategies. US contrast agents or microbubbles (MB are currently being used as potential carriers for chemodrugs, small molecules, nucleic acids, small interfering ribonucleic acid, proteins, adenoviruses, and oncolytic viruses. Oncolytic viruses can selectively replicate within and destroy a cancer cell, thus making them a powerful therapeutic in treating late-stage or metastatic cancer. These viruses have been shown to have robust activity in clinical trials when injected directly into tumor nodules. However limitations in oncolytic virus’ effectiveness and its delivery approach have warranted exploration of ultrasound-mediated delivery. Gene therapy bearing adenoviruses or oncolytic viruses can be coupled with MBs and injected intravenously. Following application of US energy to the target region, the MBs cavitate, and the resulting shock wave enhances drug, gene, or adenovirus uptake. Though the underlying mechanism is yet to be fully understood, there is evidence to suggest that mechanical pore formation of cellular membranes allows for the temporary uptake of drugs. This delivery method circumvents the limitations due to stimulation of the immune system that prevented intravenous administration of viruses. This review provides insight into this intriguing new frontier on the delivery of oncolytic viruses to tumor sites.Keywords: microbubbles, ultrasound

  12. Oncolytic Virotherapy for Multiple Myeloma: Past, Present, and Future

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    Chandini M. Thirukkumaran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a B-cell malignancy that is currently felt to be incurable. Despite recently approved novel targeted treatments such as lenalidomide and bortezomib, most MM patients' relapse is emphasizing the need for effective and well-tolerated therapies for this deadly disease. The use of oncolytic viruses has garnered significant interest as cancer therapeutics in recent years, and are currently under intense clinical investigation. Both naturally occurring and engineered DNA and RNA viruses have been investigated preclinically as treatment modalities for several solid and hematological malignancies. Presently, only a genetically modified measles virus is in human clinical trials for MM. The information obtained from this and other future clinical trials will guide clinical application of oncolytic viruses as anticancer agents for MM. This paper provides a timely overview of the history of oncolytic viruses for the treatment of MM and future strategies for the optimization of viral therapy for this disease.

  13. Complete Genome Characterization of Two Wild-Type Measles Viruses from Vietnamese Infants during the 2014 Outbreak

    OpenAIRE

    Oude Munnink, Bas B; Phan, My V. T.; Kellam, Paul; Cotten, Matthew; ,

    2016-01-01

    A large measles virus outbreak occurred across Vietnam in 2014. We identified and obtained complete measles virus genomes in stool samples collected from two diarrheal pediatric patients in Dong Thap Province. These are the first complete genome sequences of circulating measles viruses in Vietnam during the 2014 measles outbreak.

  14. Oncolytic viruses as immunotherapy: progress and remaining challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelian L

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Laure Aurelian Department of Pharmacology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Oncolytic viruses (OVs comprise an emerging cancer therapeutic modality whose activity involves both direct tumor cell lysis and the induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD. Cellular proteins released from the OV-lysed tumor cells, known as damage-associated molecular patterns and tumor-associated antigens, activate dendritic cells and elicit adaptive antitumor immunity. Interaction with the innate immune system and the development of long-lasting immune memory also contribute to OV-induced cell death. The degree to which the ICD component contributes to the clinical efficacy of OV therapy is still unclear. Modulation of a range of immune interactions may be beneficial or detrimental in nature and the interactions depend on the specific tumor, the site and extent of the disease, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, the OV platform, the dose, time, and delivery conditions, as well as individual patient responses. To enhance the contribution of ICD, OVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory genes and strategies have been developed to combine OV therapy with chemo- and immune-based therapeutic regimens. However, these approaches carry the risk that they may also be tolerogenic depending on their levels and the presence of other cytokines, their direct antiviral effects, and the timing and conditions of their expression. The contribution of autophagy to adaptive immunity, the ability of the OVs to kill cancer stem cells, and the patient’s baseline immune status are additional considerations. This review focuses on the complex and as yet poorly understood balancing act that dictates the outcome of OV therapy. We summarize current understanding of the OVs’ function in eliciting antitumor immunity and its relationship to therapeutic efficacy. Also discussed are the criteria involved in restraining antiviral

  15. Oncolytic vaccinia virus synergizes with irinotecan in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolino-Perry, Kathryn; Acuna, Sergio A; Angarita, Fernando A; Sellers, Clara; Zerhouni, Siham; Tang, Nan; McCart, J Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) is complex clinical challenge for which there are limited treatment options. Chemotherapy with or without surgery provides moderate improvements in overall survival and quality of life; nevertheless the 5-year survival remains below 30%. Oncolytic vaccinia virus (VV) shows strong anti-tumour activity in models of CRC, however transient delays in disease progression are insufficient to lead to long-term survival. Here we examined the efficacy of VV with oxaliplatin or SN-38 (active metabolite of irinotecan) in CRC cell lines in vitro and VV with irinotecan in an orthotopic model of metastatic CRC. Synergistic improvements in in vitro cell killing were observed in multiple cell lines. Combination therapy was well tolerated in tumour-bearing mice and the median survival was significantly increased relative to monotherapy despite a drug-dependent decrease in the mean tumour titer. Increased apoptosis following in vitro and in vivo combination therapy was observed. In vitro cell cycle analysis showed increases in S-phase cells following infection occurred in both infected and uninfected cell populations. This corresponded to a 4-fold greater increase in apoptosis in the uninfected compared to infected cells following combination therapy. Combination treatment strategies are among the best options for patients with advanced cancers. VV is currently under clinical investigation in patients with CRC and the data presented here suggest that its combination with irinotecan may provide benefit to a subset of CRC patients. Further, investigation of this combination is necessary to determine the tumour characteristics responsible for mediating synergy. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Recombinant measles AIK-C vaccine strain expressing heterologous virus antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tetsuo; Sawada, Akihito; Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Ito, Takashi

    2016-01-04

    Further attenuated measles vaccines were developed more than 50 years ago and have been used throughout the world. Recombinant measles vaccine candidates have been developed and express several heterologous virus protective antigens. Immunogenicity and protective actions were confirmed using experimental animals: transgenic mice, cotton rats, and primates. The recent development of measles vaccine-based vectored vaccine candidates has been reviewed and some information on recombinant measles vaccines expressing respiratory syncytial virus proteins has been shown and discussed.

  17. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Nancy Y; Wasserfall, Clive H; Meacham, Amy M; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2015-06-11

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens.

  18. Vaccination against acute respiratory virus infections and measles in man.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); P. de Vries (Petra)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractSeveral viruses may cause more or less severe acute respiratory infections in man, some of which are followed by systemic infection. Only for influenza and measles are licensed vaccines available at present. The protection induced by influenza vaccines, which are based on inactivated

  19. Vaccination against acute respiratory virus infections and measles in man.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); P. de Vries (Petra)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractSeveral viruses may cause more or less severe acute respiratory infections in man, some of which are followed by systemic infection. Only for influenza and measles are licensed vaccines available at present. The protection induced by influenza vaccines, which are based on inactivated who

  20. Neuroblastoma cell lines contain pluripotent tumor initiating cells that are susceptible to a targeted oncolytic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Y Mahller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although disease remission can frequently be achieved for patients with neuroblastoma, relapse is common. The cancer stem cell theory suggests that rare tumorigenic cells, resistant to conventional therapy, are responsible for relapse. If true for neuroblastoma, improved cure rates may only be achieved via identification and therapeutic targeting of the neuroblastoma tumor initiating cell. Based on cues from normal stem cells, evidence for tumor populating progenitor cells has been found in a variety of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four of eight human neuroblastoma cell lines formed tumorspheres in neural stem cell media, and all contained some cells that expressed neurogenic stem cell markers including CD133, ABCG2, and nestin. Three lines tested could be induced into multi-lineage differentiation. LA-N-5 spheres were further studied and showed a verapamil-sensitive side population, relative resistance to doxorubicin, and CD133+ cells showed increased sphere formation and tumorigenicity. Oncolytic viruses, engineered to be clinically safe by genetic mutation, are emerging as next generation anticancer therapeutics. Because oncolytic viruses circumvent typical drug-resistance mechanisms, they may represent an effective therapy for chemotherapy-resistant tumor initiating cells. A Nestin-targeted oncolytic herpes simplex virus efficiently replicated within and killed neuroblastoma tumor initiating cells preventing their ability to form tumors in athymic nude mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that human neuroblastoma contains tumor initiating cells that may be effectively targeted by an oncolytic virus.

  1. Recombinant immunomodulating lentogenic or mesogenic oncolytic newcastle disease virus for treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.R.A. Buijs (Pascal); S. van Nieuwkoop (Stefan); Vaes, V. (Vincent); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractOncolytic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) might be a promising new therapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We evaluated recombinant NDVs (rNDVs) expressing interferon (rNDV-hIFNβ-F0) or an IFN antagonistic protein (rNDV-NS1-F0), as well as rNDV with

  2. The immunoregulatory properties of oncolytic myxoma virus and their implications in therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; McFadden, Grant

    2010-12-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a poxvirus with a strict rabbit-specific host-tropism for pathogenesis. The immunoregulatory factors encoded by MYXV can suppress some functions of immune effectors from other species. We review their mechanisms of action, implications in therapeutics and the potential to improve MYXV as an oncolytic agent in humans.

  3. The immunoregulatory properties of oncolytic myxoma virus and their implications in therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a poxvirus with a strict rabbit-specific host-tropism for pathogenesis. The immunoregulatory factors encoded by MYXV can suppress some functions of immune effectors from other species. We review their mechanisms of action, implications in therapeutics and the potential to improve MYXV as an oncolytic agent in humans.

  4. Effect of Repeat Dosing of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus on Preclinical Models of Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M. Waters

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS, a tumor of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common sarcoma of childhood. Despite multidrug chemotherapy regimens, surgical intervention, and radiation treatment, outcomes remain poor, especially in advanced disease, and novel therapies are needed for the treatment of these aggressive malignancies. Genetically engineered oncolytic viruses, such as herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV, are currently being explored as treatments for pediatric tumors. M002, an oncolytic HSV, has both copies of the γ134.5 gene deleted, enabling replication in tumor cells but thwarting infection of normal, postmitotic cells. We hypothesized that M002 would infect human RMS tumor cells and lead to decreased tumor cell survival in vitro and impede tumor growth in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrated that M002 could infect, replicate in, and decrease cell survival in both embryonal (ERMS and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS cells. Additionally, M002 reduced xenograft tumor growth and increased animal survival in both ARMS and ERMS. Most importantly, we showed for the first time that repeated dosing of oncolytic virus coupled with low-dose radiation provided improved tumor response in RMS. These findings provide support for the clinical investigation of oncolytic HSV in pediatric RMS.

  5. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part I: strategies for utilizing oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P Cripe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress for improving outcomes in pediatric patients with solid tumors remains slow. In addition, currently available therapies are fraught with numerous side effects, often causing significant life-long morbidity for long-term survivors. The use of viruses to kill tumor cells based on their increased vulnerability to infection is gaining traction, with several viruses moving through early and advanced phase clinical testing. The prospect of increased efficacy and decreased toxicity with these agents is thus attractive for pediatric cancer. In part I of this two-part review, we focus on strategies for utilizing oncolytic engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV to target pediatric malignancies. We discuss mechanisms of action, routes of delivery, and the role of preexisting immunity on antitumor efficacy. Challenges to maximizing oncolytic HSV in children are examined, and we highlight how these may be overcome through various arming strategies. We review the preclinical and clinical evidence demonstrating safety of a variety of oncolytic HSVs. In Part II, we focus on the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic HSV in pediatric tumor types, pediatric clinical advances made to date, and future prospects for utilizing HSV in pediatric patients with solid tumors.

  6. Oncolytic viral purging of leukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with Myxoma virus.

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    Rahman, Masmudur M; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by autologous blood and marrow transplantation (ABMT) has been used for the treatment of certain cancers that are refractory to standard therapeutic regimes. However, a major challenge with ABMT for patients with hematologic malignancies is disease relapse, mainly due to either contamination with cancerous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within the autograft or the persistence of residual therapy-resistant disease niches within the patient. Oncolytic viruses represent a promising therapeutic approach to prevent cancer relapse by eliminating tumor-initiating cells that contaminate the autograft. Here we summarize an ex vivo "purging" strategy with oncolytic Myxoma virus (MYXV) to remove cancer-initiating cells from patient autografts prior to transplantation. MYXV, a novel oncolytic poxvirus with potent anti-cancer properties in a variety of in vivo tumor models, can specifically eliminate cancerous stem and progenitor cells from samples obtained from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients, while sparing normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells capable of rescuing hematopoiesis following high dose conditioning. We propose that a broader subset of patients with intractable hematologic malignancies who have failed standard therapy could become eligible for ABMT when the treatment schema is coupled with ex vivo oncolytic therapy.

  7. Inhibition of Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO in Glioblastoma Cells by Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus

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    Bonnie Reinhart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful oncolytic virus treatment of malignant glioblastoma multiforme depends on widespread tumor-specific lytic virus replication and escape from mitigating innate immune responses to infection. Here we characterize a new HSV vector, JD0G, that is deleted for ICP0 and the joint sequences separating the unique long and short elements of the viral genome. We observed that JD0G replication was enhanced in certain glioblastoma cell lines compared to HEL cells, suggesting that a vector backbone deleted for ICP0 may be useful for treatment of glioblastoma. The innate immune response to virus infection can potentially impede oncolytic vector replication in human tumors. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is expressed in response to interferon γ (IFNγ and has been linked to both antiviral functions and to the immune escape of tumor cells. We observed that IFNγ treatment of human glioblastoma cells induced the expression of IDO and that this expression was quelled by infection with both wild-type and JD0G viruses. The role of IDO in inhibiting virus replication and the connection of this protein to the escape of tumor cells from immune surveillance suggest that IDO downregulation by HSV infection may enhance the oncolytic activity of vectors such as JD0G.

  8. Preclinical evaluation of oncolytic vaccinia virus for therapy of canine soft tissue sarcoma.

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    Ivaylo Gentschev

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV strains is one promising new strategy for canine cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of an in vivo model of canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS using the new isolated cell line STSA-1 and the analysis of the virus-mediated oncolytic and immunological effects of two different Lister VACV LIVP1.1.1 and GLV-1h68 strains against CSTS. Cell culture data demonstrated that both tested VACV strains efficiently infected and destroyed cells of the canine soft tissue sarcoma line STSA-1. In addition, in our new canine sarcoma tumor xenograft mouse model, systemic administration of LIVP1.1.1 or GLV-1h68 viruses led to significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to control mice. Furthermore, LIVP1.1.1 mediated therapy resulted in almost complete tumor regression and resulted in long-term survival of sarcoma-bearing mice. The replication of the tested VACV strains in tumor tissues led to strong oncolytic effects accompanied by an intense intratumoral infiltration of host immune cells, mainly neutrophils. These findings suggest that the direct viral oncolysis of tumor cells and the virus-dependent activation of tumor-associated host immune cells could be crucial parts of anti-tumor mechanism in STSA-1 xenografts. In summary, the data showed that both tested vaccinia virus strains and especially LIVP1.1.1 have great potential for effective treatment of CSTS.

  9. Directed Evolution Generates a Novel Oncolytic Virus for the Treatment of Colon Cancer

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    Kuhn, Irene; Harden, Paul; Bauzon, Maxine; Chartier, Cecile; Nye, Julie; Thorne, Steve; Reid, Tony; Ni, Shaoheng; Lieber, Andre; Fisher, Kerry; Seymour, Len; Rubanyi, Gabor M.; Harkins, Richard N.; Hermiston, Terry W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Viral-mediated oncolysis is a novel cancer therapeutic approach with the potential to be more effective and less toxic than current therapies due to the agents selective growth and amplification in tumor cells. To date, these agents have been highly safe in patients but have generally fallen short of their expected therapeutic value as monotherapies. Consequently, new approaches to generating highly potent oncolytic viruses are needed. To address this need, we developed a new method that we term “Directed Evolution” for creating highly potent oncolytic viruses. Methodology/Principal Findings Taking the “Directed Evolution” approach, viral diversity was increased by pooling an array of serotypes, then passaging the pools under conditions that invite recombination between serotypes. These highly diverse viral pools were then placed under stringent directed selection to generate and identify highly potent agents. ColoAd1, a complex Ad3/Ad11p chimeric virus, was the initial oncolytic virus derived by this novel methodology. ColoAd1, the first described non-Ad5-based oncolytic Ad, is 2–3 logs more potent and selective than the parent serotypes or the most clinically advanced oncolytic Ad, ONYX-015, in vitro. ColoAd1's efficacy was further tested in vivo in a colon cancer liver metastasis xenograft model following intravenous injection and its ex vivo selectivity was demonstrated on surgically-derived human colorectal tumor tissues. Lastly, we demonstrated the ability to arm ColoAd1 with an exogenous gene establishing the potential to impact the treatment of cancer on multiple levels from a single agent. Conclusions/Significance Using the “Directed Evolution” methodology, we have generated ColoAd1, a novel chimeric oncolytic virus. In vitro, this virus demonstrated a >2 log increase in both potency and selectivity when compared to ONYX-015 on colon cancer cells. These results were further supported by in vivo and ex vivo studies. Furthermore

  10. The Role of Sphingomyelin Breakdown in Measles Virus Immunmodulation

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    Elita Avota

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MV efficiently causes generalized immunosuppression which accounts to a major extent for cases of measles-asscociated severe morbidity and mortality. MV infections alter many functions of antigen presenting cells (APC (dendritic cells (DCs and lymphocytes, yet many molecular targets of the virus remain poorly defined. Cellular interactions and effector functions of DCs and lymphocytes are regulated by surface receptors. Associating with other proteins involved in cell signaling, receptors form part of receptosomes that respond to and transmit external signals through dynamic interctions with the cytoskeleton. Alterations in the composition and metabolism of membrane sphingolipids have a substantial impact on both processes. In this review we focus on the regulation of sphingomyelinase activity and ceramide release in cells exposed to MV and discuss the immunosuppressive role of sphingomyelin breakdown induced by MV.

  11. Modulation of the Intratumoral Immune Landscape by Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus Virotherapy

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    Jie Yin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines and immunotherapeutic approaches to cancers with the advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells have recently demonstrated preclinical success and entered clinical trials. Despite advances in these approaches and combinatorial therapeutic regimens, depending on the nature of the cancer and the immune and metabolic landscape within the tumor microenvironment, current immunotherapeutic modalities remain inadequate. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated clear evidence of significant, and sometimes dramatic, antitumor activity, and long-term survival effects of a variety of oncolytic viruses (OVs, particularly oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV. Acting as a multifaceted gene therapy vector and potential adjuvant-like regimens, oHSV can carry genes encoding immunostimulatory molecules in its genome. The oncolytic effect of oHSV and the inflammatory response that the virus stimulates provide a one-two punch at attacking tumors. However, mechanisms underlying oHSV-induced restoration of intratumoral immunosuppression demand extensive research in order to further improve its therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we discuss the current OV-based therapy, with a focus on the unique aspects of oHSV-initiated antiviral and antitumor immune responses, arising from virus-mediated immunological cell death to intratumoral innate and adaptive immunity.

  12. Monitoring progress toward measles elimination by genetic diversity analysis of measles viruses in China 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Wang, H; Xu, S; Mao, N; Zhu, Z; Shi, J; Huang, G; Liu, C; Bo, F; Feng, D; Lu, P; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Lei, Y; Chen, M; Chen, H; Wang, C; Fu, H; Li, C; He, J; Gao, H; Gu, S; Wang, S; Ling, H; Liu, Y; Ding, Z; Ba, Z; Feng, Y; Zheng, H; Tang, X; Lei, Y; Xiong, Y; Bellini, W J; Rota, P A; Jee, Y; Xu, W

    2014-09-01

    With the achievement of high coverage for routine immunization and supplementary immunization activities (SIAs), measles incidence in mainland China reached its lowest level in 2010. The proportion of measles cases in the vaccination-targeted population decreased during 2007-2010 after the SIAs. More than 60% of measles cases were in adults or infants, especially in the coastal and eastern provinces during 2009 and 2010. A total 567 isolates of measles virus were obtained from clinical specimens from 27 of 31 provinces in mainland China during 2009 and 2010. Except for two vaccine-associated cases, one genotype D4 strain, two genotype D9 strains, and four genotype D11 strains, the other 558 strains were genotype H1 cluster H1a. Genotype H1 has been the only endemic genotype detected in China since surveillance began in 1993. Only genotype H1 was found in mainland China during 1993-2008, except for one detection of genotype H2. More recently, multiple genotypes of imported measles were detected even with the background of endemic genetotype H1 viruses. Analysis of the 450-nucleotide sequencing window of the measles virus N gene showed that the overall genetic diversity of the recent geneotype H1 strains decreased between 2008 and 2010. The lower genetic diversity of H1 strains suggested that enhanced vaccination may have reduced the co-circulating lineages of endemic genotype H1 strains in mainland China.

  13. MEASLES VIRUS IMMUNITY LEVEL STUDY IN PARTICULAR POPULATION GROUPS OF THE REPUBLIC OF GUINEA WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF GLOBAL MEASLES ELIMINATION PROGRAM. REPORT 1

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    A. Yu. Popova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Measles remains one of the main reasons for child mortality in developing countries and periodically leads to the emergence of large outbreaks in different countries. This problem became especially urgent after WHO accepted the strategic plan to fight against measles. The plan has set the goal to decrease measles on a global scale. In 2010–2011 the large outbreaks of measles were registered on the African continent: in the Democratic Republic of Congo in the south of Africa, in Nigeria and in some other African countries. In the Republic of Guinea vaccination against measles is carried out singly to children aged 9 months. In 2014–2015 the increase of measles incidence was noted. Materials and methods. Using ELISA 22 blood serum samples of healthy adult Guineans aged 24–71 and 136 blood serum samples received from children and adults — the patients of hospital in the town of Kindi (Republic of Guinea have been examined. The clinical samples were received in 2015–2016. The following test systems were used: the test systems produced by Euroimmun Medizinische Labordiagnostika AG (Germany: «Anti-Measles Virus ELISA (IGM», «Anti-Measles Virus ELISA (IgG»; «Avidity: Anti-Measles Virus ELISA (IgG», and also ELISA Vector-Best IgM-measles test system (Russia. Results and discussion. Only one out of 22 examined healthy individuals hasn’t revealed IgG-antibodies to measles virus. The quantitative titre test of IgG-antibodies, and also their avidity among other 21 individuals testify experiencing measles in the recent or remote past. Having examined 116 blood serum samples of hospital patients in Kindi for IgM-measles-antibodies, the measles case with a 2.5-year-old child has been retrospectively revealed. Having examined 130 blood serum samples for IgG-antibodies to measles virus, 12.3% of seronegative to measles individuals have been revealed. All examined individuals aged 23 and older were seropositive to measles virus, and 60% of them

  14. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic myxoma virus.

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    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2014-12-15

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the immune response of the patient to the virus infection limits the utility of the therapy, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using nonspecific pharmacologic inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumors, and robust monocyte, T-, and NK cell infiltration 3 days after MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumor-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumor-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of cyclophosphamide-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multifaceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with cyclophosphamide-mediated lymphoablation.

  15. Entry of Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus into Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Ultrasound

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    Shusuke Okunaga

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Low-intensity ultrasound is a useful method to introduce materials into cells due to the transient formation of micropores, called sonoporations, on the cell membrane. Whether oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 can be introduced into oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells through membrane pores remains undetermined. Human SCC cell line SAS and oncolytic HSV-1 RH2, which was deficient in the 134.5 gene and fusogenic, were used. Cells were exposed to ultrasound in the presence or absence of microbubbles. The increase of virus entry was estimated by plaque numbers. Viral infection was hardly established without the adsorption step, but plaque number was increased by the exposure of HSV-1-inoculated cells to ultrasound. Plaque number was also increased even if SAS cells were exposed to ultrasound and inoculated with RH2 without the adsorption step. This effect was abolished when the interval from ultrasound exposure to virus inoculation was prolonged. Scanning electron microscopy revealed depressed spots on the cell surface after exposure to ultrasound. These results suggest that oncolytic HSV-1 RH2 can be introduced into SAS cells through ultrasound-mediated pores of the cell membrane that are resealed after an interval.

  16. Measles virus-induced suppression of immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Diane E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Measles is an important cause of child mortality that has a seemingly paradoxical interaction with the immune system. In most individuals, the immune response is successful in eventually clearing measles virus (MV) infection and in establishing life-long immunity. However, infection is also associated with persistence of viral RNA and several weeks of immune suppression, including loss of delayed type hypersensitivity responses and increased susceptibility to secondary infections. The initial T-cell response includes CD8+ and T-helper 1 CD4+ T cells important for control of infectious virus. As viral RNA persists, there is a shift to a T-helper 2 CD4+ T-cell response that likely promotes B-cell maturation and durable antibody responses but may suppress macrophage activation and T-helper 1 responses to new infections. Suppression of mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation can be induced by lymphocyte infection with MV or by lymphocyte exposure to a complex of the hemagglutinin and fusion surface glycoproteins without infection. Dendritic cells are susceptible to infection and can transmit infection to lymphocytes. MV-infected dendritic cells are unable to stimulate a mixed lymphocyte reaction and can induce lymphocyte unresponsiveness through expression of MV glycoproteins. Thus, multiple factors may contribute both to measles-induced immune suppression and to the establishment of durable protective immunity. PMID:20636817

  17. Selective replication of oncolytic virus M1 results in a bystander killing effect that is potentiated by Smac mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Haipeng; Liang, Jiankai; Tan, Yaqian; Cavenee, Webster K; Yan, Guangmei

    2017-06-27

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a treatment modality that uses native or genetically modified viruses that selectively replicate in and kill tumor cells. Viruses represent a type of pathogen-associated molecular pattern and thereby induce the up-regulation of dozens of cytokines via activating the host innate immune system. Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) mimetic compounds (SMCs), which antagonize the function of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and induce apoptosis, sensitize tumor cells to multiple cytokines. Therefore, we sought to determine whether SMCs sensitize tumor cells to cytokines induced by the oncolytic M1 virus, thus enhancing a bystander killing effect. Here, we report that SMCs potentiate the oncolytic effect of M1 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. This strengthened oncolytic efficacy resulted from the enhanced bystander killing effect caused by the M1 virus via cytokine induction. Through a microarray analysis and subsequent validation using recombinant cytokines, we identified IL-8, IL-1A, and TRAIL as the key cytokines in the bystander killing effect. Furthermore, SMCs increased the replication of M1, and the accumulation of virus protein induced irreversible endoplasmic reticulum stress- and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated apoptosis. Nevertheless, the combined treatment with M1 and SMCs had little effect on normal and human primary cells. Because SMCs selectively and significantly enhance the bystander killing effect and the replication of oncolytic virus M1 specifically in cancer cells, this combined treatment may represent a promising therapeutic strategy.

  18. Wild type measles virus attenuation independent of type I IFN

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    Horvat Branka

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measles virus attenuation has been historically performed by adaptation to cell culture. The current dogma is that attenuated virus strains induce more type I IFN and are more resistant to IFN-induced protection than wild type (wt. Results The adaptation of a measles virus isolate (G954-PBL by 13 passages in Vero cells induced a strong attenuation of this strain in vivo. The adapted virus (G954-V13 differs from its parental strain by only 5 amino acids (4 in P/V/C and 1 in the M gene. While a vaccine strain, Edmonston Zagreb, could replicate equally well in various primate cells, both G954 strains exhibited restriction to the specific cell type used initially for their propagation. Surprisingly, we observed that both G954 strains induced type I IFN, the wt strain inducing even more than the attenuated ones, particularly in human plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells. Type I IFN-induced protection from the infection of both G954 strains depended on the cell type analyzed, being less efficient in the cells used to grow the viral strain. Conclusion Thus, mutations in M and P/V/C proteins can critically affect MV pathogenicity, cellular tropism and lead to virus attenuation without interfering with the α/β IFN system.

  19. Single-particle characterization of oncolytic vaccinia virus by flow virometry.

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    Tang, Vera A; Renner, Tyler M; Varette, Oliver; Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Wang, Jiahu; Diallo, Jean-Simon; Bell, John C; Langlois, Marc-André

    2016-09-30

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an oncolytic virus that is currently being evaluated as a promising cancer vaccine in several phase I, II and III clinical trials. Although several quality control tests are performed on each new batch of virus, these do not routinely include a systematic characterization of virus particle homogeneity, or relate the infectious titer to the total number of submicron sized particles (SSPs) present in the sample. SSPs are comprised of infectious virus and non-infectious viral particles, but also cell contaminants derived from the virus isolation procedures, such as cellular vesicles and debris. Here we have employed flow virometry (FV) analysis and sorting to isolate and characterize distinct SSP populations in therapeutic oncolytic VV preparations. We show that VV preparations contain SSPs heterogeneous in size and include large numbers of non-infectious VV particles. Furthermore, we used FV to illustrate how VV has a propensity to aggregate over time and under various handling and storage procedures. Accordingly, we find that together the infectious titer, the total number of SSPs, the number of viral genomes and the level of particle aggregation in a sample constitute useful parameters that greatly facilitate inter-sample assessment of physical quality, and also provides a means to monitor sample deterioration over time. Additionally, we have successfully employed FV sorting to further isolate virus from other particles by identifying a lipophilic dye that preferentially stains VV over other SSPs in the sample. Overall, we demonstrate that FV is a fast and effective tool that can be used to perform quality, and consistency control assessments of oncolytic VV vaccine preparations.

  20. Antigen profiling analysis of vaccinia virus injected canine tumors: oncolytic virus efficiency predicted by boolean models.

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    Cecil, Alexander; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Adelfinger, Marion; Nolte, Ingo; Dandekar, Thomas; Szalay, Aladar A

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is a novel approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe for the first time the use of dynamic boolean modeling for tumor growth prediction of vaccinia virus GLV-1h68-injected canine tumors including canine mammary adenoma (ZMTH3), canine mammary carcinoma (MTH52c), canine prostate carcinoma (CT1258), and canine soft tissue sarcoma (STSA-1). Additionally, the STSA-1 xenografted mice were injected with either LIVP 1.1.1 or LIVP 5.1.1 vaccinia virus strains.   Antigen profiling data of the four different vaccinia virus-injected canine tumors were obtained, analyzed and used to calculate differences in the tumor growth signaling network by type and tumor type. Our model combines networks for apoptosis, MAPK, p53, WNT, Hedgehog, TK cell, Interferon, and Interleukin signaling networks. The in silico findings conform with in vivo findings of tumor growth. Boolean modeling describes tumor growth and remission semi-quantitatively with a good fit to the data obtained for all cancer type variants. At the same time it monitors all signaling activities as a basis for treatment planning according to antigen levels. Mitigation and elimination of VACV- susceptible tumor types as well as effects on the non-susceptible type CT1258 are predicted correctly. Thus the combination of Antigen profiling and semi-quantitative modeling optimizes the therapy already before its start.

  1. Tumor cell marker PVRL4 (nectin 4 is an epithelial cell receptor for measles virus.

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    Ryan S Noyce

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine and laboratory adapted strains of measles virus can use CD46 as a receptor to infect many human cell lines. However, wild type isolates of measles virus cannot use CD46, and they infect activated lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and macrophages via the receptor CD150/SLAM. Wild type virus can also infect epithelial cells of the respiratory tract through an unidentified receptor. We demonstrate that wild type measles virus infects primary airway epithelial cells grown in fetal calf serum and many adenocarcinoma cell lines of the lung, breast, and colon. Transfection of non-infectable adenocarcinoma cell lines with an expression vector encoding CD150/SLAM rendered them susceptible to measles virus, indicating that they were virus replication competent, but lacked a receptor for virus attachment and entry. Microarray analysis of susceptible versus non-susceptible cell lines was performed, and comparison of membrane protein gene transcripts produced a list of 11 candidate receptors. Of these, only the human tumor cell marker PVRL4 (Nectin 4 rendered cells amenable to measles virus infections. Flow cytometry confirmed that PVRL4 is highly expressed on the surfaces of susceptible lung, breast, and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Measles virus preferentially infected adenocarcinoma cell lines from the apical surface, although basolateral infection was observed with reduced kinetics. Confocal immune fluorescence microscopy and surface biotinylation experiments revealed that PVRL4 was expressed on both the apical and basolateral surfaces of these cell lines. Antibodies and siRNA directed against PVRL4 were able to block measles virus infections in MCF7 and NCI-H358 cancer cells. A virus binding assay indicated that PVRL4 was a bona fide receptor that supported virus attachment to the host cell. Several strains of measles virus were also shown to use PVRL4 as a receptor. Measles virus infection reduced PVRL4 surface expression in MCF7 cells, a

  2. Relative contributions of measles virus hemagglutinin- and fusion protein- specific serum antibodies to virus neutralization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. de Swart (Rik); S. Yüksel (Selma); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe relative contribution of measles virus hemagglutinin (H)- or fusion protein (F)-specific antibodies to virus neutralization (VN) has not been demonstrated. We have depleted these specific antibodies from sera collected from young adults, who had been vaccinated during childhood, by

  3. Relative contributions of measles virus hemagglutinin- and fusion protein- specific serum antibodies to virus neutralization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. de Swart (Rik); S. Yüksel (Selma); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe relative contribution of measles virus hemagglutinin (H)- or fusion protein (F)-specific antibodies to virus neutralization (VN) has not been demonstrated. We have depleted these specific antibodies from sera collected from young adults, who had been vaccinated during childhood, by p

  4. Development and evaluation of the TD97 measles virus vaccine

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    Suzuki, K.; Morita, M.; Katoh, M.; Kidokoro, M.; Saika, S.; Yoshizawa, S.; Hashizume, S.; Horiuchi, K.; Okabe, N.; Shinozaki, T. (Chiba Serum Institute (Japan))

    1990-11-01

    The TD97 strain vaccine virus was prepared from the Tanabe strain measles virus by low-temperature passages in primary cell cultures and ultraviolet (UV) mutagenesis. The TD97 strain exhibited the following characteristics: highly temperature sensitive, neither multiplying nor forming any plaques at 40 degrees C in Vero cells; genetically stable, maintaining high temperature sensitivity after ten successive passages in CE cells at 30 degrees C or 35 degrees C; and M proteins of this virus about 1 KD slower in mobility in SDS-PAGE than that of the Tanabe strain. The TD97 strain was further confirmed to be attenuated by an inoculation test into primate brain. In field trials, 752 healthy children were inoculated with a live virus vaccine prepared with this strain, and the following results were obtained: the seroconversion rate was 97% (517/533), and the average HI antibody titer was 2(5.2). An antibody-increasing effect was also observed in children who were initially seropositive. In children who seroconverted, the rates of fever were 15.7% (55/351) for 37.5 degrees C or higher and 4.0% (14/351) for 39 degrees C or higher. The rash rate was 7.7% (27/351), and the incidence of local reaction was 5.4% (19/351). The TD97 strain is thus considered to be suitable in use for an attenuated measles vaccine.

  5. Myxoma virus oncolytic efficiency can be enhanced through chemical or genetic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton.

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    Chad R Irwin

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus (MYXV is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV, MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L(+ MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L(+ MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2. These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies.

  6. Myxoma virus oncolytic efficiency can be enhanced through chemical or genetic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Chad R; Favis, Nicole A; Agopsowicz, Kate C; Hitt, Mary M; Evans, David H

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L(+)) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L(+) MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies.

  7. Reovirus FAST Protein Enhances Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Oncolytic Virotherapy in Primary and Metastatic Tumor Models

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    Fabrice Le Boeuf

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The reovirus fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST proteins are the smallest known viral fusogens (∼100–150 amino acids and efficiently induce cell-cell fusion and syncytium formation in multiple cell types. Syncytium formation enhances cell-cell virus transmission and may also induce immunogenic cell death, a form of apoptosis that stimulates immune recognition of tumor cells. These properties suggest that FAST proteins might serve to enhance oncolytic virotherapy. The oncolytic activity of recombinant VSVΔM51 (an interferon-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV] mutant encoding the p14 FAST protein (VSV-p14 was compared with a similar construct encoding GFP (VSV-GFP in cell culture and syngeneic BALB/c tumor models. Compared with VSV-GFP, VSV-p14 exhibited increased oncolytic activity against MCF-7 and 4T1 breast cancer spheroids in culture and reduced primary 4T1 breast tumor growth in vivo. VSV-p14 prolonged survival in both primary and metastatic 4T1 breast cancer models, and in a CT26 metastatic colon cancer model. As with VSV-GFP, VSV-p14 preferentially replicated in vivo in tumors and was cleared rapidly from other sites. Furthermore, VSV-p14 increased the numbers of activated splenic CD4, CD8, natural killer (NK, and natural killer T (NKT cells, and increased the number of activated CD4 and CD8 cells in tumors. FAST proteins may therefore provide a multi-pronged approach to improving oncolytic virotherapy via syncytium formation and enhanced immune stimulation.

  8. Angiogenesis inhibition using an oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing endostatin in a murine lung cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Jonathan M; Schmitt, Anthony D; McGinn, Christopher M; Fuchs, Bryan C; Kuruppu, Darshini; Tanabe, Kenneth K; Lanuti, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Herpes-mediated viral oncolysis alone is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors. In this study we used a replication conditional, endostatin-expressing herpes simplex virus-1 mutant (HSV-Endo) in a murine lung cancer model. We hypothesized that the anti-angiogenic action of endostatin would improve upon the oncolytic effect of HSV-1. HSV-Endo was evaluated in a pulmonary metastases and orthotopic flank model, where there was significantly less tumor burden and reduced microvessel density compared to a control virus. Endostatin expression appears to improve the anti-tumor effect of HSV-1 in a lung cancer model.

  9. Identification of different lineages of measles virus strains circulating in Uttar Pradesh, North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakya Akhalesh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic analysis of measles viruses associated with recent cases and outbreaks has proven to bridge information gaps in routine outbreak investigations and has made a substantial contribution to measles control efforts by helping to identify the transmission pathways of the virus. Materials and methods The present study describes the genetic characterization of wild type measles viruses from Uttar Pradesh, India isolated between January 2008 and January 2011. In the study, 526 suspected measles cases from 15 outbreaks were investigated. Blood samples were collected from suspected measles outbreaks and tested for the presence of measles specific IgM; throat swab and urine samples were collected for virus isolation and RT-PCR. Genotyping of circulating measles viruses in Uttar Pradesh was performed by sequencing a 450-bp region encompassing the nucleoprotein hypervariable region and phylogenetic analysis. Results and conclusion Based on serological results, all the outbreaks were confirmed as measles. Thirty eight strains were obtained. Genetic analysis of circulating measles strains (n = 38 in Uttar Pradesh from 235 cases of laboratory-confirmed cases from 526 suspected measles cases between 2008 and 2011 showed that all viruses responsible for outbreaks were within clade D and all were genotype D8. Analysis of this region showed that it is highly divergent (up to 3.4% divergence in the nucleotide sequence and 4.1% divergence in the amino acid sequence between most distant strains. Considerable genetic heterogeneity was observed in the MV genotype D8 viruses in North India and underscores the need for continued surveillance and in particular increases in vaccination levels to decrease morbidity and mortality attributable to measles.

  10. Epidemiology of laboratory confirmed measles virus cases in the southern nations of Ethiopia, 2007-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getahun, Mekonen; Beyene, Berhane; Ademe, Ayesheshem; Teshome, Birke; Tefera, Mesfin; Afework, Aklog; HaileMariam, Yoseph; Assefa, Esete; Hailegiorgis, Yonas; Asha, Anjelo

    2017-01-19

    In Ethiopia, measles case-based surveillance was introduced in 2004 as one strategy for measles control by laboratory confirmation of suspected cases. In this article, epidemiological distribution of laboratory-confirmed measles cases were reported from the Southern Nation Nationalities and Peoples Region (SNNPR) of Ethiopia between 2007 and 2014, as the region is one of the highly measles affected areas in Ethiopia. A serum sample was collected from all measles suspected cases, and patient information was captured by case reporting format (CRF). Samples were transported to the National Measles Laboratory for Measles IgM testing by ELISA technique. Data entry and analysis were done using Epi-Info 3.5.4 software. A total of 4810 samples were tested for measles IgM using ELISA technique and 1507 (31.3%) were found positive during 2007-2014 in SNNPR of Ethiopia. Patients with age 1-4 years were the most affected regardless of sex. The incidence of measles confirmed cases increased from 15 in 2007 to 180 in 2013 per million population. The highest percentage of laboratory-confirmed cases were found in 2014. Measles was found distributed throughout the regional state. Measles was found a public health important disease in SNNPR of Ethiopia, mostly affecting children 1-4 years. The incidence of measles cases is increasing from time to time. Additional research to determine the genotype of circulating measles virus, knowledge, attitude and practice of professionals and the population for measles vaccination and infection in the region is important. A wide age group measles vaccination campaign is highly recommended.

  11. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition

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    Philippe Plattet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MeV, a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options.

  12. Structural and mechanistic studies of measles virus illuminate paramyxovirus entry.

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    Richard K Plemper

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MeV, a member of the paramyxovirus family of enveloped RNA viruses and one of the most infectious viral pathogens identified, accounts for major pediatric morbidity and mortality worldwide although coordinated efforts to achieve global measles control are in place. Target cell entry is mediated by two viral envelope glycoproteins, the attachment (H and fusion (F proteins, which form a complex that achieves merger of the envelope with target cell membranes. Despite continually expanding knowledge of the entry strategies employed by enveloped viruses, our molecular insight into the organization of functional paramyxovirus fusion complexes and the mechanisms by which the receptor binding by the attachment protein triggers the required conformational rearrangements of the fusion protein remain incomplete. Recently reported crystal structures of the MeV attachment protein in complex with its cellular receptors CD46 or SLAM and newly developed functional assays have now illuminated some of the fundamental principles that govern cell entry by this archetype member of the paramyxovirus family. Here, we review these advances in our molecular understanding of MeV entry in the context of diverse entry strategies employed by other members of the paramyxovirus family.

  13. Permissivity of the NCI-60 cancer cell lines to oncolytic Vaccinia Virus GLV-1h68

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    Bedognetti Davide

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic viral therapy represents an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. We previously described GLV-1h68, a modified Vaccinia Virus with exclusive tropism for tumor cells, and we observed a cell line-specific relationship between the ability of GLV-1h68 to replicate in vitro and its ability to colonize and eliminate tumor in vivo. Methods In the current study we surveyed the in vitro permissivity to GLV-1h68 replication of the NCI-60 panel of cell lines. Selected cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV strain. In order to identify correlates of permissity to viral infection, we measured transcriptional profiles of the cell lines prior infection. Results We observed highly heterogeneous permissivity to VACV infection amongst the cell lines. The heterogeneity of permissivity was independent of tissue with the exception of B cell derivation. Cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV strain and a significant correlation was found suggesting a common permissive phenotype. While no clear transcriptional pattern could be identified as predictor of permissivity to infection, some associations were observed suggesting multifactorial basis permissivity to viral infection. Conclusions Our findings have implications for the design of oncolytic therapies for cancer and offer insights into the nature of permissivity of tumor cells to viral infection.

  14. Genetic characterization of Measles Viruses in China, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ji, Yixin; Jiang, Xiaohong; Xu, Songtao; Zhu, Zhen; Zheng, Lei; He, Jilan; Ling, Hua; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang; Du, Wen; Yang, Xuelei; Mao, Naiying; Xu, Wenbo

    2008-01-01

    Genetic characterization of wild-type measles virus was studied using nucleotide sequencing of the C-terminal region of the N protein gene and phylogenetic analysis on 59 isolates from 16 provinces of China in 2004. The results showed that all of the isolates belonged to genotype H1. 51 isolates were belonged to cluster 1 and 8 isolates were cluster 2 and Viruses from both clusters were distributed throughout China without distinct geographic pattern. The nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid homologies of the 59 H1 strains were 96.5%–100% and 95.7%–100%, respectively. The report showed that the transmission pattern of genotype H1 viruses in China in 2004 was consistent with ongoing endemic transmission of multiple lineages of a single, endemic genotype. Multiple transmission pathways leaded to multiple lineages within endemic genotype. PMID:18928575

  15. Oncolytic and immunologic cancer therapy with GM-CSF-armed vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lili; Fan, Jun; Guo, Mingming; Huang, Biao

    2016-03-28

    Targeted oncolytic vaccinia viruses are being developed as a novel strategy in cancer therapy. Arming vaccinia viruses with immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance antitumor efficacy. Such engineered oncolytic viruses, like JX-594, a Wyeth strain vaccinia virus modified with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have shown promising results and have proceeded rapidly in clinical trials. However, the oncolytic potential of the Chinese vaccine strain Tian Tan (VTT) has not been explored. In this study, we constructed a targeted oncolytic vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9 (VG9) expressing murine GM-CSF (VG9-GMCSF) and evaluated the antitumor effect of this recombinant vaccinia virus in a murine melanoma model. In vitro, viral replication and cytotoxicity of VG9-GMCSF was as potent as VG9; in vivo, VG9-GMCSF significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneously implanted melanoma tumors, prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice, and produced an antitumor cytotoxic response. Such antitumor effect may be due to the lytic nature of virus as well as the stimulation of immune activity by GM-CSF production. Our results indicate that VG9-GMCSF induces strong tumoricidal activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy for combating cancer.

  16. Exponential enhancement of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus potency by vector-mediated suppression of inflammatory responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomonte, Jennifer; Wu, Lan; Chen, Li; Meseck, Marcia; Ebert, Oliver; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fallon, John; Woo, Savio L C

    2008-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising strategy for treatment of malignancy, although its effectiveness is hampered by host antiviral inflammatory responses. The efficacy of treatment of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in rats bearing multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be substantially elevated by antibody-mediated depletion of natural killer (NK) cells. In order to test the hypothesis that the oncotyic potency of VSV can be exponentially elevated by evasion of inflammatory responses in vivo, we constructed a recombinant VSV vector expressing equine herpes virus-1 glycoprotein G, which is a broad-spectrum viral chemokine binding protein (rVSV-gG). Infusion of rVSV-gG via the hepatic artery into immune-competent rats bearing syngeneic and multifocal HCC in their livers, resulted in a reduction of NK and NKT cells in the tumors and a 1-log enhancement in intratumoral virus titer in comparison with a reference rVSV vector. The treatment led to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged animal survival without toxicities. These results indicate that rVSV-gG has the potential to be developed as an effective and safe oncolytic agent to treat patients with advanced HCC. Furthermore, the novel concept that oncolytic potency can be substantially enhanced by vector-mediated suppression of host antiviral inflammatory responses could have general applicability in the field of oncolytic virotherapy for cancer.

  17. Cell tropism and pathogenesis of measles virus in monkeys

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    Sei-ich eKato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MV is an enveloped negative strand RNA virus belonging to the family of Paramyxoviridae, genus Morbillivirus, and causes one of the most contagious diseases in humans. Experimentally infected non-human primates are used as animal models for studies of the pathogenesis of human measles. We established a reverse genetics system based on a highly pathogenic wild-type MV (IC-B strain. Infection of monkeys with recombinant MV strains generated by reverse genetics enabled analysis of the molecular basis of MV pathogenesis. In addition, recombinant wild-type MV strains expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein enable visual tracking of MV-infected cells in vitro and in vivo. To date, 3 different molecules have been identified as receptors for MV. Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM, also called CD150, expressed on immune cells, is a major receptor for MV. CD46, ubiquitously expressed in all nucleated cells in humans and monkeys, is a receptor for vaccine and laboratory strains of MV. The newly identified nectin-4 (also called PVRL4 is an epithelial cell receptor for MV. The impact of MV receptor usage in vivo on disease outcomes is now under investigation.

  18. Measles-mumps-rubella vaccination and respiratory syncytial virus-associated hospital contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Sørup, Signe; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The live measles vaccine has been associated with lower non-measles mortality and admissions in low-income countries. The live measles-mumps-rubella vaccine has also been associated with lower rate of admissions with any type of infection in Danish children; the association...... was strongest for admissions with lower respiratory infections. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination was associated with reduced rate of hospital contact related to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a high-income country. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study of laboratory...

  19. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus vectors for the treatment of human breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ren-bin; Samuel D.Rabkin

    2005-01-01

    Background Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors can be used for cancer therapy as direct cytotoxic agents, inducers of anti-tumor immune responses, and as expressers of anti-cancer genes. In this study, the efficacy of HSV vectors, G47Δ and NV1023 were examined for the treatment of the human breast cancer.Methods Human breast cancer MDA-MB-435 cells were cultured or implanted subcutaneously in BALB/c nude mice. The cells or tumors were inoculated with G47Δ or NV1023, and cell killing or inhibition of tumor growth determined. Both viruses contained the LacZ gene and expression in infected cells was detected with X-gal histochemistry. Results G47Δ and NV1023 were highly cytotoxic to MDA-MB-435 cells in vitro at very low multiplicities of infection. X-gal staining of infected tumor cells in vitro and in vivo illustrated the replication and spread of both viruses. G47Δ and NV1023 inoculation inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mouse survival. Both vectors behaved similarly.Conclusions Oncolytic HSV vectors, G47Δ and NV1023, were extremely effective at killing human breast cancer cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts in vivo. This novel form of cancer therapy warrants further investigation and consideration of clinical application.

  20. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part II: potential clinical application of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

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    Gregory K Friedman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic engineered herpes simplex viruses (HSVs possess many biologic and functional attributes that support their use in clinical trials in children with solid tumors. Tumor cells, in an effort to escape regulatory mechanisms that would impair their growth and progression, have removed many mechanisms that would have protected them from virus infection and eventual virus-mediated destruction. Viruses engineered to exploit this weakness, like mutant HSV, can be safely employed as tumor cell killers, since normal cells retain these antiviral strategies. Many preclinical studies and early phase trials in adults demonstrated that oncolytic HSV can be safely used and are highly effective in killing tumor cells that comprise pediatric malignancies, without generating the toxic side effects of nondiscriminatory chemotherapy or radiation therapy. A variety of engineered viruses have been developed and tested in numerous preclinical models of pediatric cancers and initial trials in patients are underway. In Part II of this review series, we examine the preclinical evidence to support the further advancement of oncolytic HSV in the pediatric population. We discuss clinical advances made to date in this emerging era of oncolytic virotherapy.

  1. Towards measles elimination: Phylogenetic analysis of measles viruses in Turkey (2012-2013) and identification of genotype D8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaycioglu, Atila T; Yolbakan, Sultan; Guldemir, Dilek; Korukluoglu, Gulay; Coskun, Aslihan; Cosgun, Yasemin; Durmaz, Riza

    2016-11-01

    Molecular characterization of different measles virus (MV) strains is essential to combat the disease. Sixty measles MV strains were obtained from throat swabs or urine of patients in Turkey between 2012 and 2013 and characterized. MV RNA sequences (n = 60) were analysed for 456 nucleotides representing hypervariable domain of the nucleoprotein (N) gene. Of the 60 strains analysed 53 were the D8 genotype, 6 were B3, 1 was D4, and 1 was A. This report describes MV genotype D8 that was involved in a measles outbreak in Turkey. Sequences of most genotype D8 strains (n = 51) were identical to the sequence of variant D8-Frankfurt-Main, which has been associated with outbreaks throughout Europe. Despite the lack of epidemiologic information, a phylogenetic analysis suggested that the genotype D8 MV may have been brought to Turkey from elsewhere. Phylogenetic and epidemiological findings suggested that strains identified in tourists and associated with importation included one strain of genotype D8, one strain of genotype B3, and one strain of genotype D4. These findings from the 2012 to 2013 outbreak in Turkey confirm that pockets of unimmunised individuals are making the country susceptible to measles outbreaks. To prevent further outbreaks, deliberate and sustained effort must be made to reach, and immunise susceptible age groups. Towards measles elimination process, continued molecular surveillance of measles strains in Turkey will help identify transmission patterns of virus and evaluate vaccination efforts. J. Med. Virol. 88:1867-1873, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Novel oncolytic viral therapies in patients with thoracic malignancies

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    Ahmad Z

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Zeeshan Ahmad, Robert A Kratzke Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Transplantation, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is the use of replication-competent viruses to treat malignancies. The potential of oncolytic virotherapy as an approach to cancer therapy is based on historical evidence that certain viral infections can cause spontaneous remission of both hematologic and solid tumor malignancies. Oncolytic virotherapy may eliminate cancer cells through either direct oncolysis of infected tumor cells or indirect immune-mediated oncolysis of uninfected tumor cells. Recent advances in oncolytic virotherapy include the development of a wide variety of genetically attenuated RNA viruses with precise cellular tropism and the identification of cell-surface receptors that facilitate viral transfer to the tissue of interest. Current research is also focused on targeting metastatic disease by sustaining the release of progeny viruses from infected tumor cells and understanding indirect tumor cell killing through immune-mediated mechanisms of virotherapy. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate recent evidence on the clinical development of tissue-specific viruses capable of targeting tumor cells and eliciting secondary immune responses in lung cancers and mesothelioma. Keywords: lung cancer, mesothelioma, VSV, adenovirus, measles

  3. Measles Resurgence Associated with Continued Circulation of Genotype H1 Viruses in China, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yixin; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Songtao; Zhu, Zhen; Zuo, Shuyan; Jiang, Xiaohong; Lu, Peishan; Wang, Changyin; Liang, Yong; Zheng, Huanying; Liu, Yang; Mao, Naiying; Liang, Xiaofeng; Featherstone, David Alexander; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J; Xu, Wenbo

    2009-01-01

    Measles morbidity and mortality decreased significantly after measles vaccine was introduced into China in 1965. From 1995 to 2004, average annual measles incidence decreased to 5.6 cases per 100,000 population following the establishment of a national two-dose regimen. Molecular characterization of wild-type measles viruses demonstrated that genotype H1 was endemic and widely distributed throughout the country in China during 1995-2004. A total of 124,865 cases and 55 deaths were reported from the National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System (NNDRS) in 2005, which represented a 69.05% increase compared with 2004. Over 16,000 serum samples obtained from 914 measles outbreaks and the measles IgM positive rate was 81%. 213 wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 18 of 31 provinces in China during 2005, and all of the isolates belonged to genotype H1. The ranges of the nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid sequence homologies of the 213 genotype H1 strains were 93.4%-100% and 90.0%-100%, respectively. H1-associated cases and outbreaks caused the measles resurgence in China in 2005. H1 genotype has the most inner variation within genotype, it could be divided into 2 clusters, and cluster 1 viruses were predominant in China throughout 2005. PMID:19737391

  4. Measles Resurgence Associated with Continued Circulation of Genotype H1 Viruses in China, 2005

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    Featherstone David

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Measles morbidity and mortality decreased significantly after measles vaccine was introduced into China in 1965. From 1995 to 2004, average annual measles incidence decreased to 5.6 cases per 100,000 population following the establishment of a national two-dose regimen. Molecular characterization of wild-type measles viruses demonstrated that genotype H1 was endemic and widely distributed throughout the country in China during 1995-2004. A total of 124,865 cases and 55 deaths were reported from the National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System (NNDRS in 2005, which represented a 69.05% increase compared with 2004. Over 16,000 serum samples obtained from 914 measles outbreaks and the measles IgM positive rate was 81%. 213 wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 18 of 31 provinces in China during 2005, and all of the isolates belonged to genotype H1. The ranges of the nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid sequence homologies of the 213 genotype H1 strains were 93.4%-100% and 90.0%-100%, respectively. H1-associated cases and outbreaks caused the measles resurgence in China in 2005. H1 genotype has the most inner variation within genotype, it could be divided into 2 clusters, and cluster 1 viruses were predominant in China throughout 2005.

  5. [Circulating pattern analysis for endemic measles viruses in mainland of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ji, Yi-Xin; Zhu, Zhen

    2009-04-01

    To analysis of the circulating pattern for endemic measles viruses in mainland of China (Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan were excluded) between 1993 and 2006. To analyze the database of Measles laboratory network surveillance, and the database of virology surveillance of National laboratory for Measles in Chinese Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CCDC). Total 748 positive measles isolates were available from 29 provinces of China. 743 were H1 genotypes, 1 was H2 genotype, 1 was A genotype and 3 were vaccine like A genotypes. Among H1 genotype, 684 were H1a subgenotypes, 50 were H1b subgenotypes, 9 were H1c subgenotypes. H1a was isolated from 29 provinces (Tibet and Hubei did not carry out virus isolation), H1b was isolated from 10 provinces, H1c was isolated from 4 provinces during 1993-1994. H1a became predominant subgenotype since 2000; H1b shrink annually, its circulating has been interrupted since 2006; H1c circulating has been interrupted since 1995. Molecular epidemiology of measles viruses between 1993 and 2006 showed the character of genetic variation and the geographic distribution of the measles viruses in different years, and revealed that genotype H1 was the predominant indigenous measles virus genotype in mainland China and H1a became the predominant subgenotype in recent years.

  6. Doxorubicin-enriched, ALDHbr mouse breast cancer stem cells are treatable to oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1

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    Zhuang Xiufen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objective of this study was to test whether oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 could eradicate chemoresistant cancer stem cells (CSCs. Methods The fluorescent aldefluor reagent-based technique was used to identify and isolate ALDHbr cells as CSCs from the 4T1 murine breast cancer cell line. The presence of ALDHbr 4T1 cells was also examined in 4T1 breast cancer transplanted in immune-competent syngeneic mice. Results Compared with ALDHlo cells, ALDHbr cells had a markedly higher ability to form tumor spheres in vitro and a higher tumorigenic potential in vivo. ALDHbr cells also exhibited increased doxorubicin resistance in vitro, which correlated with a selective increase in the percentage of ALDHbr cells after doxorubicin treatment and an increased expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, a known chemoresistance factor. In contrast, oncolytic HSV1 was able to kill ALDHbr cells in vitro and even more markedly in vivo. Furthermore, in in vivo studies, systemic administration of doxorubicin followed by intratumoral injection of oncolytic HSV1 resulted in much more significant suppression of tumor growth with increased median survival period compared with each treatment given alone (p+ T lymphocytes were induced by oncolytic HSV1, no significant specific T cell response against CSCs was detected in vivo. Conclusions These results suggested that the use of oncolytic HSV1 following doxorubicin treatment may help eradicate residual chemoresistant CSCs in vivo.

  7. Constraints on the Genetic and Antigenic Variability of Measles Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Shannon M; Lee, Benhur

    2016-04-21

    Antigenic drift and genetic variation are significantly constrained in measles virus (MeV). Genetic stability of MeV is exceptionally high, both in the lab and in the field, and few regions of the genome allow for rapid genetic change. The regions of the genome that are more tolerant of mutations (i.e., the untranslated regions and certain domains within the N, C, V, P, and M proteins) indicate genetic plasticity or structural flexibility in the encoded proteins. Our analysis reveals that strong constraints in the envelope proteins (F and H) allow for a single serotype despite known antigenic differences among its 24 genotypes. This review describes some of the many variables that limit the evolutionary rate of MeV. The high genomic stability of MeV appears to be a shared property of the Paramyxovirinae, suggesting a common mechanism that biologically restricts the rate of mutation.

  8. MEASLES VIRUS IMMUNITY LEVEL STUDY IN PARTICULAR POPULATION GROUPS OF THE REPUBLIC OF GUINEA WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF GLOBAL MEASLES ELIMINATION PROGRAM. REPORT 2

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    A. Yu. Popova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A goal for measles elimination globally by 2010–2020 was recognized as one of the priorities in the WHO program “Health for All in the 21st Century” (1998. However measles outbreaks occurred in 2010–2016 in countries with high level of measles vaccine coverage including USA and some European countries.Large measles outbreaks were also registered on the African continent and particular in the Republic of Guinea as a result of the decline of measles vaccine coverage due to the Ebola virus epidemic in the Republic of Guinea in 2014–2015. WHO recommends carrying out the routine measles vaccination as well as the supplemental immunization activities after the stop of the Ebola virus transmission. Effectiveness of the activities is definitely connected with the detection of the epidemically significant for the supplemental immunization age groups. The aim of the study was to evaluate the measles immunity level in different age groups of population in the Republic of Guinea. Materials and methods. Twenty five blood serum samples of healthy adult Guineans aged 28–66 and 121 blood serum samples of adolescences and adults admitted to hospital in the town of Kindia (Republic of Guinea for indoor treatment were tested by ELISA. The specific measles virus antibodies were detected using the following commercial ELISA test-systems produced by Euroimmun Medizinische Labordiagnostika AG Company (Germany: IgM-antibodies — by “Anti-Measles Virus ELISA (IgM”, IgG-antibodi es — by “Anti-Measles Virus ELISA (IgG”, IgG-avidity measles virus antibodies — by “Avidity: Anti-Measles Virus ELISA (IgG”. A part of sera was studied by “Vector-Best IgM-measles” and “Vector-Best IgG-measles” ELISA test-systems (Russia. Results and discussion. The comparative quantitative study of the measles immunity level (i.e. IgG-antibodies titers of the healthy adult Guineans in 2015 and 2016 revealed the lack of IgGantibodies in serum

  9. Myxoma Virus Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Gemcitabine and Is an Effective Oncolytic Virotherapeutic in Models of Disseminated Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wennier, Sonia Tusell; Liu, Jia; Li, Shoudong; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mona, Mahmoud; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a novel oncolytic virus that has been shown to replicate in pancreatic cancer cells, but its efficacy in animal models of pancreatic cancer has not been determined. The efficacy of MYXV as monotherapy or in combination with gemcitabine was evaluated in intraperitoneal dissemination (IPD) models of pancreatic cancer. The effects of an intact immune system on the efficacy of MYXV therapy was tested by comparing immunodeficient versus immunocompetent murine models and comb...

  10. The recombinant globular head domain of the measles virus hemagglutinin protein as a subunit vaccine against measles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanova, Liubov M; Eng, Nelson F; Satkunarajah, Malathy; Mutwiri, George K; Rini, James M; Zakhartchouk, Alexander N

    2012-04-26

    Despite the availability of live attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines, a large number of measles-associated deaths occur among infants in developing countries. The development of a measles subunit vaccine may circumvent the limitations associated with the current live attenuated vaccines and eventually contribute to global measles eradication. Therefore, the goal of this study was to test the feasibility of producing the recombinant globular head domain of the MV hemagglutinin (H) protein by stably transfected human cells and to examine the ability of this recombinant protein to elicit MV-specific immune responses. The recombinant protein was purified from the culture supernatant of stably transfected HEK293T cells secreting a tagged version of the protein. Two subcutaneous immunizations with the purified recombinant protein alone resulted in the production of MV-specific serum IgG and neutralizing antibodies in mice. Formulation of the protein with adjuvants (polyphosphazene or alum) further enhanced the humoral immune response and in addition resulted in the induction of cell-mediated immunity as measured by the production of MV H-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin 5 (IL-5) by in vitro re-stimulated splenocytes. Furthermore, the inclusion of polyphosphazene into the vaccine formulation induced a mixed Th1/Th2-type immune response. In addition, the purified recombinant protein retained its immunogenicity even after storage at 37°C for 2 weeks.

  11. Preclinical evaluation of engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus for the treatment of pediatric solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Megison

    Full Text Available Recently, investigators showed that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas that were treated with a neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV, M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ134.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal cells. Previous studies have shown antitumor effects of other oHSV against a number of adult tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of M002 against difficult to treat pediatric liver and kidney tumors. We showed that the oHSV, M002, infected, replicated, and decreased cell survival in hepatoblastoma, malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor, and renal sarcoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly increased survival and decreased tumor growth. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 (nectin-1 was present in human hepatoblastoma and malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted these rare aggressive tumor types and that M002 may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed pediatric solid tumors.

  12. Preclinical Evaluation of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for the Treatment of Pediatric Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megison, Michael L.; Gillory, Lauren A.; Stewart, Jerry E.; Nabers, Hugh C.; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth; Waters, Alicia M.; Coleman, Jennifer M.; Kelly, Virginia; Markert, James M.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Friedman, Gregory K.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, investigators showed that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas that were treated with a neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV), M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ134.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal cells. Previous studies have shown antitumor effects of other oHSV against a number of adult tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of M002 against difficult to treat pediatric liver and kidney tumors. We showed that the oHSV, M002, infected, replicated, and decreased cell survival in hepatoblastoma, malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor, and renal sarcoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly increased survival and decreased tumor growth. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 (nectin-1) was present in human hepatoblastoma and malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted these rare aggressive tumor types and that M002 may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed pediatric solid tumors. PMID:24497984

  13. Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus as a Viro-Immunotherapy: Defeating Cancer with a “Hammer” and “Anvil”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Karl Melzer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have gained much attention in recent years, due, not only to their ability to selectively replicate in and lyse tumor cells, but to their potential to stimulate antitumor immune responses directed against the tumor. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a negative-strand RNA virus, is under intense development as an oncolytic virus due to a variety of favorable properties, including its rapid replication kinetics, inherent tumor specificity, and its potential to elicit a broad range of immunomodulatory responses to break immune tolerance in the tumor microenvironment. Based on this powerful platform, a multitude of strategies have been applied to further improve the immune-stimulating potential of VSV and synergize these responses with the direct oncolytic effect. These strategies include: 1. modification of endogenous virus genes to stimulate interferon induction; 2. virus-mediated expression of cytokines or immune-stimulatory molecules to enhance anti-tumor immune responses; 3. vaccination approaches to stimulate adaptive immune responses against a tumor antigen; 4. combination with adoptive immune cell therapy for potentially synergistic therapeutic responses. A summary of these approaches will be presented in this review.

  14. Wild-type measles virus is intrinsically dual-tropic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto eTakeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Measles is a highly contagious disease that causes temporary and severe immunosuppression in patients. Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM expressed on cells of the immune system functions as a receptor for measles virus (MV. In addition to SLAM, vaccine strains of MV also use a ubiquitously expressed complement regulatory protein, CD46, as a receptor, whereas wild-type (wt MV strains do not use this receptor. However, recent studies have indicated that SLAM is not the sole receptor for wt MV strains. These strains have an intrinsic ability to enter both immune and epithelial cells using distinct receptor binding sites in their hemagglutinin (H protein. Recently, a clear answer was obtained through the identification of an epithelial MV receptor, nectin4, expressed at adherens junctions, thereby greatly improving our knowledge of MV receptors. It is now clear that MV specifically targets two cell types, immune cells and epithelial cells, using SLAM and nectin4, respectively. MV loses the ability to use either SLAM or nectin4 when it possesses specific mutations in the H protein. However, nectin4-blind MV still infects SLAM-positive immune cells efficiently (SLAM-tropic, and conversely, SLAM-blind MV infects nectin4-positive epithelial cells efficiently (nectin4-tropic. In this regard, MV is intrinsically dual-tropic to immune cells and epithelial cells. Although many aspects and molecular mechanisms underlying immunosuppressive effects and a highly contagious nature of MV still remain to be elucidated, analyses of physiological functions of these two receptors would provide deep insights into MV pathogenesis.

  15. Complex spatial dynamics of oncolytic viruses in vitro: mathematical and experimental approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Wodarz

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses replicate selectively in tumor cells and can serve as targeted treatment agents. While promising results have been observed in clinical trials, consistent success of therapy remains elusive. The dynamics of virus spread through tumor cell populations has been studied both experimentally and computationally. However, a basic understanding of the principles underlying virus spread in spatially structured target cell populations has yet to be obtained. This paper studies such dynamics, using a newly constructed recombinant adenovirus type-5 (Ad5 that expresses enhanced jellyfish green fluorescent protein (EGFP, AdEGFPuci, and grows on human 293 embryonic kidney epithelial cells, allowing us to track cell numbers and spatial patterns over time. The cells are arranged in a two-dimensional setting and allow virus spread to occur only to target cells within the local neighborhood. Despite the simplicity of the setup, complex dynamics are observed. Experiments gave rise to three spatial patterns that we call "hollow ring structure", "filled ring structure", and "disperse pattern". An agent-based, stochastic computational model is used to simulate and interpret the experiments. The model can reproduce the experimentally observed patterns, and identifies key parameters that determine which pattern of virus growth arises. The model is further used to study the long-term outcome of the dynamics for the different growth patterns, and to investigate conditions under which the virus population eliminates the target cells. We find that both the filled ring structure and disperse pattern of initial expansion are indicative of treatment failure, where target cells persist in the long run. The hollow ring structure is associated with either target cell extinction or low-level persistence, both of which can be viewed as treatment success. Interestingly, it is found that equilibrium properties of ordinary differential equations describing the

  16. Are there altered antibody responses to measles, mumps, or rubella viruses in autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbey, Jane E; Coon, Hilary H; Kirkman, Nikki J; Sweeten, Thayne L; Miller, Judith N; Lainhart, Janet E; McMahon, William M; Fujinami, Robert S

    2007-06-01

    The role that virus infections play in autism is not known. Others have reported that antibodies against measles virus are higher in the sera/plasma of children with autism versus controls. The authors investigated antibody titers to measles, mumps, and rubella viruses and diphtheria toxoid in children with autism, both classic onset (33) and regressive onset (26) forms, controls (25, healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with Tourette's syndrome (24) via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. No significant differences in antibody titers to measles, mumps, and rubella viruses and diphtheria toxoid were found among the four groups. Additionally, there were no significant differences between the four groups for total immunoglobulin (Ig)G or IgM. Interestingly, the authors did find a significant number (15/59) of autism subjects (classic and regressive onset combined) who had a very low or no antibody titer against rubella virus, compared to a combine control/Tourette's group (2/49).

  17. Cloning and identification of measles virus receptor gene from marmoset cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The measles virus (MV) strains with mutated hemagglutinin gene (ha) lost the capacity to infect its sensitive host cells (Vero cells), but it may infect the marmoset B-lymphoblastoid cell line B95a. From above, we can presume that there is a novel cellular receptor for those measles virus strains on B95a cell s. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we screened and cloned a novel gene--bip (B-lympho- blastoid interaction protein of marmoset) from B95a cell cDNA library, which encoded a protein interacting with measles virus hemagglutinin protein (Ha). The bip cDNA was 1540 base pairs in length and contained a unique open rea ding frame (ORF) of 1011 base pairs encoding a transmembrane protein of 337 amino acid residues. The primary structure of amino acids residue is predicted that the Bip comprised a hydrophobic transmembrane domain and a hydrophobic leader region. The researches about the deletion mutants showed that the deletion of tran smembrane domain in Bip did not affect the interaction between Bip and Ha protei ns. Expression of bip in measles virus non-permissive cell line--CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells was performed to prove that CHO/Bip can be infected by meas les virus and then turned to the MV permissive cells. We concluded that the bip gene is a novel measles virus receptor gene in marmoset B-lymphoblastoid cells.

  18. Clinical development of reovirus for cancer therapy: An oncolytic virus with immune-mediated antitumor activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Sachdev, Esha; Mita, Alain C; Mita, Monica M

    2016-01-01

    Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with demonstrated oncolysis or preferential replication in cancer cells. The oncolytic properties of reovirus appear to be dependent, in part, on activated Ras signaling. In addition, Ras-transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by affecting several steps of the viral life cycle. Reovirus-mediated immune responses can present barriers to tumor targeting, serve protective functions against reovirus systemic toxicity, and contribute to therapeutic efficacy through antitumor immune-mediated effects via innate and adaptive responses. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the broad anticancer activity of wild-type, unmodified type 3 Dearing strain reovirus (Reolysin®) across a spectrum of malignancies. The development of reovirus as an anticancer agent and available clinical data reported from 22 clinical trials will be reviewed. PMID:27019795

  19. Clinical development of reovirus for cancer therapy: An oncolytic virus with immune-mediated antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Sachdev, Esha; Mita, Alain C; Mita, Monica M

    2016-03-26

    Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with demonstrated oncolysis or preferential replication in cancer cells. The oncolytic properties of reovirus appear to be dependent, in part, on activated Ras signaling. In addition, Ras-transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by affecting several steps of the viral life cycle. Reovirus-mediated immune responses can present barriers to tumor targeting, serve protective functions against reovirus systemic toxicity, and contribute to therapeutic efficacy through antitumor immune-mediated effects via innate and adaptive responses. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the broad anticancer activity of wild-type, unmodified type 3 Dearing strain reovirus (Reolysin(®)) across a spectrum of malignancies. The development of reovirus as an anticancer agent and available clinical data reported from 22 clinical trials will be reviewed.

  20. Oncolytic Virotherapy for Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarna Bais

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological malignancies such as leukemias, lymphomas, multiple myeloma (MM, and the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs primarily affect adults and are difficult to treat. For high-risk disease, hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT can be used. However, in the setting of autologous HCT, relapse due to contamination of the autograft with cancer cells remains a major challenge. Ex vivo manipulations of the autograft to purge cancer cells using chemotherapies and toxins have been attempted. Because these past strategies lack specificity for malignant cells and often impair the normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, prior efforts to ex vivo purge autografts have resulted in prolonged cytopenias and graft failure. The ideal ex vivo purging agent would selectively target the contaminating cancer cells while spare normal stem and progenitor cells and would be applied quickly without toxicities to the recipient. One agent which meets these criteria is oncolytic viruses. This paper details experimental progress with reovirus, myxoma virus, measles virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, coxsackievirus, and vaccinia virus as well as requirements for translation of these results to the clinic.

  1. Recombinant Measles AIK-C Vaccine Strain Expressing the prM-E Antigen of Japanese Encephalitis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Akira; Toriniwa, Hiroko; Komiya, Tomoyoshi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    An inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine, which induces neutralizing antibodies, has been used for many years in Japan. In the present study, the JEV prM-E protein gene was cloned, inserted at the P/M junction of measles AIK-C cDNA, and an infectious virus was recovered. The JEV E protein was expressed in B95a cells infected with the recombinant virus. Cotton rats were inoculated with recombinant virus. Measles PA antibodies were detected three weeks after immunization. Neutralizing antibodies against JEV developed one week after inoculation, and EIA antibodies were detected three weeks after immunization. The measles AIK-C-based recombinant virus simultaneously induced measles and JEV immune responses, and may be a candidate for infant vaccines. Therefore, the present strategy of recombinant viruses based on a measles vaccine vector would be applicable to the platform for vaccine development.

  2. Transmission and molecular characterisation of wild measles virus in Romania, 2008 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necula, G; Lazar, M; Stanescu, A; Pistol, A; Santibanez, S; Mankertz, A; Lupulescu, E

    2013-12-12

    Molecular characterisation of measles virus is a powerful tool for tracing transmission. Genotyping may prove the absence of endemic circulation of measles virus, i.e. transmission for more than 12 months, which is one of the criteria for verifying elimination of the disease. We have genetically characterised measles viruses detected in Romania from 2008 to 2012, focusing on the recent outbreaks from 2010 to 2012 that affected mainly groups with limited access to healthcare and schools. The findings emphasise the importance of genotyping during the different phases of an outbreak. A total of 8,170 cases were notified, and 5,093 (62%) of the 7,559 possible cases were serologically confirmed. RT-PCR was performed for 104 samples: from the 101 positive samples obtained from sporadic measles cases or clusters from different counties, 73 were genotyped. Sporadic measles cases associated with D4 and D5 viruses were observed from2008 to 2009. Genotype D4-Manchester was predominant in 2011 and 2012. In addition, the related variant D4-Maramures and MVs/Limoges.FRA/17.10[D4] and a few D4-Hamburg strains were detected. The detection of several distinct MV-D4 genotypes suggests multiple virus importations to Romania. The outbreak associated with D4 genotype is the second largest outbreak in Romania in less than 10 years.

  3. Live-attenuated measles virus vaccine targets dendritic cells and macrophages in muscle of nonhuman primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Rennick (Linda); R.D. de Vries (Rory); T.J. Carsillo (Thomas J.); K. Lemon (Ken); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M. Ludlow (Martin); D.T. Nguyen (Tien); S. Yüksel (Selma); R.J. Verbugh (Joyce); P. Haddock (Paula); S. McQuaid (Stephen); W.P. Duprex (Paul); R.L. de Swart (Rik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAlthough live-attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines have been used successfully for over 50 years, the target cells that sustain virus replication in vivo are still unknown. We generated a reverse genetics system for the live-attenuated MV vaccine strain Edmonston- Zagreb (EZ), allowing

  4. Live-attenuated measles virus vaccine targets dendritic cells and macrophages in muscle of nonhuman primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Rennick (Linda); R.D. de Vries (Rory); T.J. Carsillo (Thomas J.); K. Lemon (Ken); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M. Ludlow (Martin); D.T. Nguyen (Tien); S. Yüksel (Selma); R.J. Verbugh (Joyce); P. Haddock (Paula); S. McQuaid (Stephen); W.P. Duprex (Paul); R.L. de Swart (Rik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAlthough live-attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines have been used successfully for over 50 years, the target cells that sustain virus replication in vivo are still unknown. We generated a reverse genetics system for the live-attenuated MV vaccine strain Edmonston- Zagreb (EZ), allowing

  5. Viral replication and development of specific immunity in macaques after infection with different measles virus strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.S. van Binnendijk (Rob); R.W.J. van der Heijden (Roger); G. van Amerongen (Geert); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractCynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were experimentally infected with a wild type measles virus (MV) strain (MV-BIL). Following intratracheal inoculation with different infectious doses, the virus could be isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), lung lavage cells, a

  6. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko, E-mail: ckai@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  7. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    OpenAIRE

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellul...

  8. Targeting gallbladder cancer: oncolytic virotherapy with myxoma virus is enhanced by rapamycin in vitro and further improved by hyaluronan in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Mingzhe; Gong, Wei; Ma, Mingzhe; Chu, Bingfeng; Qin, Yiyu; Zhang, Mingdi; Lun, XueQing; McFadden, Grant; Forsyth, Peter; Yong YANG; Quan, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Background Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is highly lethal, and effective treatment will require synergistic anti-tumor management. The study is aimed at investigating the oncolytic value of myxoma virus (MYXV) infection against GBC and optimizing MYXV oncolytic efficiency. Methods We examined the permissiveness of GBC cell lines to MYXV infection and compared the effects of MYXV on cell viability among GBC and control permissive glioma cells in vitro and in vivo after MYXV + rapamycin (Rap) tre...

  9. Measles (lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shostakovych-Koretsraya L.R.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article provides comprehensive review of different aspects of measles. Definition of disease, historical overview, measles in the world epidemiology and in the countries bordering Ukraine over the recent years, particularities of measles epidemiology in Ukraine are given in details. Etiology of measles virus including known genomic structure and viral proteins list, genetic changeability of the virus. Particularities of measles epidemiological process are discussed, criteria of determination of morbidity level and contagiosity of the given disease are outlined. Detailed pathogenesis of measles in different periods of disease is provided, reciprocal influence of the disease and vitamin A metabolism is given. Particularities of humoral and cellular immunological response, including those in early-aged and in patients with immune deficiency are described. Possibility of development of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is pointed out; currently accepted causes of this complication development, its immunological and virological particularities are summarized. Pathogenetic mechanisms of rash development, complications as well as morphological changes in different organs and systems are given. The article gives both international and different clinical classifications of measles. Clinical manifestations of typical and atypical measles course are described in details by syndromes and according to disease periods. Particularities of measles course at different premorbid conditions are described. The article provides colored photos which illustrate clinical mani¬festations of measles manifestation on the skin and mucosa at different disease periods.

  10. Efficient colonization and therapy of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC using the oncolytic vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus strains is one of the most promising new strategies for cancer therapy. In this study, we analyzed for the first time the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 in two human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines HuH7 and PLC/PRF/5 (PLC in cell culture and in tumor xenograft models. By viral proliferation assays and cell survival tests, we demonstrated that GLV-1h68 efficiently colonized, replicated in, and did lyse these cancer cells in culture. Experiments with HuH7 and PLC xenografts have revealed that a single intravenous injection (i.v. of mice with GLV-1h68 resulted in a significant reduction of primary tumor sizes compared to uninjected controls. In addition, replication of GLV-1h68 in tumor cells led to strong inflammatory and oncolytic effects resulting in intense infiltration of MHC class II-positive cells like neutrophils, macrophages, B cells and dendritic cells and in up-regulation of 13 pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, GLV-1h68 infection of PLC tumors inhibited the formation of hemorrhagic structures which occur naturally in PLC tumors. Interestingly, we found a strongly reduced vascular density in infected PLC tumors only, but not in the non-hemorrhagic HuH7 tumor model. These data demonstrate that the GLV-1h68 vaccinia virus may have an enormous potential for treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma in man.

  11. Measles-mumps-rubella vaccination and respiratory syncytial virus-associated hospital contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Sørup, Signe; Stensballe, Lone Graff;

    2015-01-01

    -confirmed RSV hospital contacts at age 14-23 months in all children born in Denmark 1997-2002 who had already received the vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (acellular), polio, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib) at the recommended ages of 3, 5, and 12 months. RESULTS: The study......BACKGROUND: The live measles vaccine has been associated with lower non-measles mortality and admissions in low-income countries. The live measles-mumps-rubella vaccine has also been associated with lower rate of admissions with any type of infection in Danish children; the association...... was strongest for admissions with lower respiratory infections. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination was associated with reduced rate of hospital contact related to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a high-income country. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study of laboratory...

  12. Genetic characterization of measles viruses that circulated in Thailand from 1998 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamadilok, Sirima; Incomserb, Patcha; Primsirikunawut, Athiwat; Lukebua, Atchariya; Rota, Paul A; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom

    2012-05-01

    During the period between 1998 and 2008, 48 representative measles viruses (MeVs) circulating in Thailand were subjected to genetic characterization. Three genotypes, G2, D5, and D9 were detected. The results suggested that measles genotype D5, which has been circulating since at least 1998, is the endemic genotype in Thailand. Genotype G2 was detected between 1998 and 2001. In addition, almost all of the MeVs detected throughout the country in 2008 were genotype D9. This is the first report of genotype D9 in Thailand. This report provides important baseline data about measles genotypes in Thailand and this information will be needed to help verify measles elimination in Thailand.

  13. Structure of the measles virus hemagglutinin bound to its cellular receptor SLAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Takao; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kubota, Marie; Maita, Nobuo; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2011-02-01

    Measles virus, a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide, predominantly infects immune cells using signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as a cellular receptor. Here we present crystal structures of measles virus hemagglutinin (MV-H), the receptor-binding glycoprotein, in complex with SLAM. The MV-H head domain binds to a β-sheet of the membrane-distal ectodomain of SLAM using the side of its β-propeller fold. This is distinct from attachment proteins of other paramyxoviruses that bind receptors using the top of their β-propeller. The structure provides templates for antiviral drug design, an explanation for the effectiveness of the measles virus vaccine, and a model of the homophilic SLAM-SLAM interaction involved in immune modulations. Notably, the crystal structures obtained show two forms of the MV-H-SLAM tetrameric assembly (dimer of dimers), which may have implications for the mechanism of fusion triggering.

  14. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Manbok, E-mail: manbok66@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Rahman, Masmudur M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Cogle, Christopher R. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McFadden, Grant [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  15. Immune status of health care workers to measles virus: evaluation of protective titers in four measles IgG EIAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorigo-Zetsma, J.W.; Hall, M.A.; Vreeswijk, J.; Vries, J.J. de; Vossen, A.C.; Hulscher, H.I. Ten; Kerkhof, J.; Smits, G.P.; Ruijs, W.L.M.; Koopmans, M.P.; Binnendijk, R.S. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following the recognition of a measles case in a hospital in The Netherlands, health care workers (HCW) from the premises were screened by a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for measles IgG to identify persons at risk for measles. At least 10% of the HCW were tested measles

  16. Immune status of health care workers to measles virus: evaluation of protective titers in four measles IgG EIAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorigo-Zetsma, J.W.; Hall, M.A.; Vreeswijk, J.; Vries, J.J. de; Vossen, A.C.; Hulscher, H.I. Ten; Kerkhof, J.; Smits, G.P.; Ruijs, W.L.M.; Koopmans, M.P.; Binnendijk, R.S. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following the recognition of a measles case in a hospital in The Netherlands, health care workers (HCW) from the premises were screened by a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for measles IgG to identify persons at risk for measles. At least 10% of the HCW were tested measles IgG-negati

  17. Oncolytic reovirus induces intracellular redistribution of Ras to promote apoptosis and progeny virus release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garant, K A; Shmulevitz, M; Pan, L; Daigle, R M; Ahn, D-G; Gujar, S A; Lee, P W K

    2016-02-11

    Reovirus is a naturally oncolytic virus that preferentially replicates in Ras-transformed cells and is currently undergoing clinical trials as a cancer therapeutic. Ras transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by enhancing virion disassembly during entry, viral progeny production, and virus release through apoptosis; however, the mechanism behind the latter is not well understood. Here, we show that reovirus alters the intracellular location of oncogenic Ras to induce apoptosis of H-RasV12-transformed fibroblasts. Reovirus infection decreases Ras palmitoylation levels and causes accumulation of Ras in the Golgi through Golgi fragmentation. With the Golgi being the site of Ras palmitoylation, treatment of target cells with the palmitoylation inhibitor, 2-bromopalmitate (2BP), prompts a greater accumulation of H-RasV12 in the Golgi, and a dose-dependent increase in progeny virus release and subsequent spread. Conversely, tethering H-RasV12 to the plasma membrane (thereby preventing its movement to the Golgi) allows for efficient virus production, but results in basal levels of reovirus-induced cell death. Analysis of Ras downstream signaling reveals that cells expressing cycling H-RasV12 have elevated levels of phosphorylated JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase), and that Ras retained at the Golgi body by 2BP increases activation of the MEKK1/MKK4/JNK signaling pathway to promote cell death. Collectively, our data suggest that reovirus induces Golgi fragmentation of target cells, and the subsequent accumulation of oncogenic Ras in the Golgi body initiates apoptotic signaling events required for virus release and spread.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A Gillory

    Full Text Available Despite intensive research efforts and therapeutic advances over the last few decades, the pediatric neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma, continues to be responsible for over 15% of pediatric cancer deaths. Novel therapeutic options are needed for this tumor. Recently, investigators have shown that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas treated with an engineered, neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV, M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ 1 34.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal neural cells. We hypothesized that M002 would also be effective in the neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma. We showed that M002 infected, replicated, and decreased survival in neuroblastoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly decreased tumor growth, and that this effect was augmented with the addition of ionizing radiation. Importantly, survival could be increased by subsequent doses of radiation without re-dosing of the virus. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 was expressed by numerous neuroblastoma cell lines and was also present in human neuroblastoma specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted neuroblastoma and that this oHSV may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed neuroblastoma.

  19. Preclinical Evaluation of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for the Treatment of Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillory, Lauren A.; Megison, Michael L.; Stewart, Jerry E.; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth; Nabers, Hugh C.; Waters, Alicia M.; Kelly, Virginia; Coleman, Jennifer M.; Markert, James M.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Friedman, Gregory K.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive research efforts and therapeutic advances over the last few decades, the pediatric neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma, continues to be responsible for over 15% of pediatric cancer deaths. Novel therapeutic options are needed for this tumor. Recently, investigators have shown that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas treated with an engineered, neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV), M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ134.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal neural cells. We hypothesized that M002 would also be effective in the neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma. We showed that M002 infected, replicated, and decreased survival in neuroblastoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly decreased tumor growth, and that this effect was augmented with the addition of ionizing radiation. Importantly, survival could be increased by subsequent doses of radiation without re-dosing of the virus. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 was expressed by numerous neuroblastoma cell lines and was also present in human neuroblastoma specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted neuroblastoma and that this oHSV may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed neuroblastoma. PMID:24130898

  20. Recombinant measles virus vaccine expressing the Nipah virus glycoprotein protects against lethal Nipah virus challenge.

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    Misako Yoneda

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study, we have developed a recombinant measles virus (rMV vaccine expressing NiV envelope glycoproteins (rMV-HL-G and rMV-Ed-G. Vaccinated hamsters were completely protected against NiV challenge, while the mortality of unvaccinated control hamsters was 90%. We trialed our vaccine in a non-human primate model, African green monkeys. Upon intraperitoneal infection with NiV, monkeys showed several clinical signs of disease including severe depression, reduced ability to move and decreased food ingestion and died at 7 days post infection (dpi. Intranasal and oral inoculation induced similar clinical illness in monkeys, evident around 9 dpi, and resulted in a moribund stage around 14 dpi. Two monkeys immunized subcutaneously with rMV-Ed-G showed no clinical illness prior to euthanasia after challenge with NiV. Viral RNA was not detected in any organ samples collected from vaccinated monkeys, and no pathological changes were found upon histopathological examination. From our findings, we propose that rMV-NiV-G is an appropriate NiV vaccine candidate for use in humans.

  1. Recombinant measles virus vaccine expressing the Nipah virus glycoprotein protects against lethal Nipah virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Misako; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Ikeda, Fusako; Ishii, Miho; Nagata, Noriyo; Jacquot, Frederic; Raoul, Hervé; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2013-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study, we have developed a recombinant measles virus (rMV) vaccine expressing NiV envelope glycoproteins (rMV-HL-G and rMV-Ed-G). Vaccinated hamsters were completely protected against NiV challenge, while the mortality of unvaccinated control hamsters was 90%. We trialed our vaccine in a non-human primate model, African green monkeys. Upon intraperitoneal infection with NiV, monkeys showed several clinical signs of disease including severe depression, reduced ability to move and decreased food ingestion and died at 7 days post infection (dpi). Intranasal and oral inoculation induced similar clinical illness in monkeys, evident around 9 dpi, and resulted in a moribund stage around 14 dpi. Two monkeys immunized subcutaneously with rMV-Ed-G showed no clinical illness prior to euthanasia after challenge with NiV. Viral RNA was not detected in any organ samples collected from vaccinated monkeys, and no pathological changes were found upon histopathological examination. From our findings, we propose that rMV-NiV-G is an appropriate NiV vaccine candidate for use in humans.

  2. Structural basis of efficient contagion: measles variations on a theme by parainfluenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Mathieu; Navaratnarajah, Chanakha K; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    A quartet of attachment proteins and a trio of fusion protein subunits play the cell entry concert of parainfluenza viruses. While many of these viruses bind sialic acid to enter cells, wild type measles binds exclusively two tissue-specific proteins, the lymphatic receptor signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM), and the epithelial receptor nectin-4. SLAM binds near the stalk-head junction of the hemagglutinin. Nectin-4 binds a hydrophobic groove located between blades 4 and 5 of the hemagglutinin β-propeller head. The mutated vaccine strain hemagglutinin binds in addition the ubiquitous protein CD46, which explains attenuation. The measles virus entry concert has four movements. Andante misterioso: the virus takes over the immune system. Allegro con brio: it rapidly spreads in the upper airway's epithelia. 'Targeting' fugue: the versatile orchestra takes off. Presto furioso: the virus exits the host with thunder. Be careful: music is contagious.

  3. Genetic characterization of measles virus strains isolated during an epidemic cluster in Puglia, Italy 2006–2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinelli Domenico

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic characterization of wild-type measles strains isolated during an epidemic cluster of measles occurred in Puglia (South Italy, between November 2006 and January 2007, was performed. Measles virus (MV detection was carried out by a nested RT-PCR on 8 of 18 total cases. The viruses were analyzed using the standard genotyping protocols. The N gene sequences of the strains from outbreak were identical to each other, and sequence analysis revealed that the viruses belonged to genotype B3, subgroup B3.1, never identified before in Italy. An importation of measles B3.1 strains from Africa was hypothesized. Molecular surveillance will help to monitor the progress in measles elimination.

  4. Rapid titration of measles and other viruses: optimization with determination of replication cycle length.

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    Boyan Grigorov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Measles virus (MV is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family and an important human pathogen causing strong immunosuppression in affected individuals and a considerable number of deaths worldwide. Currently, measles is a re-emerging disease in developed countries. MV is usually quantified in infectious units as determined by limiting dilution and counting of plaque forming unit either directly (PFU method or indirectly from random distribution in microwells (TCID50 method. Both methods are time-consuming (up to several days, cumbersome and, in the case of the PFU assay, possibly operator dependent. METHODS/FINDINGS: A rapid, optimized, accurate, and reliable technique for titration of measles virus was developed based on the detection of virus infected cells by flow cytometry, single round of infection and titer calculation according to the Poisson's law. The kinetics follow up of the number of infected cells after infection with serial dilutions of a virus allowed estimation of the duration of the replication cycle, and consequently, the optimal infection time. The assay was set up to quantify measles virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 using antibody labeling of viral glycoprotein, virus encoded fluorescent reporter protein and an inducible fluorescent-reporter cell line, respectively. CONCLUSION: Overall, performing the assay takes only 24-30 hours for MV strains, 12 hours for VSV, and 52 hours for HIV-1. The step-by-step procedure we have set up can be, in principle, applicable to accurately quantify any virus including lentiviral vectors, provided that a virus encoded gene product can be detected by flow cytometry.

  5. Evaluation of a new recombinant oncolytic vaccinia virus strain GLV-5b451 for feline mammary carcinoma therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Adelfinger

    Full Text Available Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV infection is a promising approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of a new preclinical model of feline mammary carcinoma (FMC using a recently established cancer cell line, DT09/06. In addition, we evaluated a recombinant vaccinia virus strain, GLV-5b451, expressing the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF single-chain antibody (scAb GLAF-2 as an oncolytic agent against FMC. Cell culture data demonstrate that GLV-5b451 virus efficiently infected, replicated in and destroyed DT09/06 cancer cells. In the selected xenografts of FMC, a single systemic administration of GLV-5b451 led to significant inhibition of tumor growth in comparison to untreated tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, tumor-specific virus infection led to overproduction of functional scAb GLAF-2, which caused drastic reduction of intratumoral VEGF levels and inhibition of angiogenesis. In summary, here we have shown, for the first time, that the vaccinia virus strains and especially GLV-5b451 have great potential for effective treatment of FMC in animal model.

  6. Regression of Human Prostate Tumors and Metastases in Nude Mice following Treatment with the Recombinant Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus GLV-1h68

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus strains is one of the most promising new strategies for cancer therapy. In the current study, we analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 against two human prostate cancer cell lines DU-145 and PC-3 in cell culture and in tumor xenograft models. By viral proliferation assays and cell survival tests, we demonstrated that GLV-1h68 was able to infect, replicate in, and lyse these prostate cancer cells in culture. In DU-145 and PC-3 tumor xenograft models, a single intravenous injection with GLV-1h68 resulted in a significant reduction of primary tumor size. In addition, the GLV-1h68-infection led to strong inflammatory and oncolytic effects resulting in drastic reduction of regional lymph nodes with PC-3 metastases. Our data documented that the GLV-1h68 virus has a great potential for treatment of human prostate carcinoma.

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors improve the replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus in breast cancer cells.

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    James J Cody

    Full Text Available New therapies are needed for metastatic breast cancer patients. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV is an exciting therapy being developed for use against aggressive tumors and established metastases. Although oHSV have been demonstrated safe in clinical trials, a lack of sufficient potency has slowed the clinical application of this approach. We utilized histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, which have been noted to impair the innate antiviral response and improve gene transcription from viral vectors, to enhance the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. A panel of chemically diverse HDAC inhibitors were tested at three different doses (LD50 for their ability to modulate the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. Several of the tested HDAC inhibitors enhanced oHSV replication at low multiplicity of infection (MOI following pre-treatment of the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and the oHSV-resistant cell line 4T1, but not in the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. Inhibitors of class I HDACs, including pan-selective compounds, were more effective for increasing oHSV replication compared to inhibitors that selectively target class II HDACs. These studies demonstrate that select HDAC inhibitors increase oHSV replication in breast cancer cells and provides support for pre-clinical evaluation of this combination strategy.

  8. Single Endemic Genotype of Measles Virus Continuously Circulating in China for at Least 16 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiling; Zhu, Zhen; Ji, Yixin; Liu, Chunyu; Zhang, Xiaojie; Sun, Liwei; Zhou, Jianhui; Lu, Peishan; Hu, Ying; Feng, Daxing; Zhang, Zhenying; Wang, Changyin; Fang, Xueqiang; Zheng, Huanying; Liu, Leng; Sun, Xiaodong; Tang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yan; Gao, Hui; Tian, Hong; Ma, Jiangtao; Gu, Suyi; Wang, Shuang; Feng, Yan; Bo, Fang; Liu, Jianfeng; Si, Yuan; Zhou, Shujie; Ma, Yuyan; Wu, Shengwei; Zhou, Shunde; Li, Fangcai; Ding, Zhengrong; Yang, Zhaohui; Rota, Paul A.; Featherstone, David; Jee, Youngmee; Bellini, William J.; Xu, Wenbo

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of measles in China from 1991 to 2008 was reviewed, and the nucleotide sequences from 1507 measles viruses (MeV) isolated during 1993 to 2008 were phylogenetically analyzed. The results showed that measles epidemics peaked approximately every 3 to 5 years with the range of measles cases detected between 56,850 and 140,048 per year. The Chinese MeV strains represented three genotypes; 1501 H1, 1 H2 and 5 A. Genotype H1 was the predominant genotype throughout China continuously circulating for at least 16 years. Genotype H1 sequences could be divided into two distinct clusters, H1a and H1b. A 4.2% average nucleotide divergence was found between the H1a and H1b clusters, and the nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid homologies of H1a viruses were 92.3%–100% and 84.7%–100%, H1b were 97.1%–100% and 95.3%–100%, respectively. Viruses from both clusters were distributed throughout China with no apparent geographic restriction and multiple co-circulating lineages were present in many provinces. Cluster H1a and H1b viruses were co-circulating during 1993 to 2005, while no H1b viruses were detected after 2005 and the transmission of that cluster has presumably been interrupted. Analysis of the nucleotide and predicted amino acid changes in the N proteins of H1a and H1b viruses showed no evidence of selective pressure. This study investigated the genotype and cluster distribution of MeV in China over a 16-year period to establish a genetic baseline before MeV elimination in Western Pacific Region (WPR). Continuous and extensive MeV surveillance and the ability to quickly identify imported cases of measles will become more critical as measles elimination goals are achieved in China in the near future. This is the first report that a single endemic genotype of measles virus has been found to be continuously circulating in one country for at least 16 years. PMID:22532829

  9. Single endemic genotype of measles virus continuously circulating in China for at least 16 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available The incidence of measles in China from 1991 to 2008 was reviewed, and the nucleotide sequences from 1507 measles viruses (MeV isolated during 1993 to 2008 were phylogenetically analyzed. The results showed that measles epidemics peaked approximately every 3 to 5 years with the range of measles cases detected between 56,850 and 140,048 per year. The Chinese MeV strains represented three genotypes; 1501 H1, 1 H2 and 5 A. Genotype H1 was the predominant genotype throughout China continuously circulating for at least 16 years. Genotype H1 sequences could be divided into two distinct clusters, H1a and H1b. A 4.2% average nucleotide divergence was found between the H1a and H1b clusters, and the nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid homologies of H1a viruses were 92.3%-100% and 84.7%-100%, H1b were 97.1%-100% and 95.3%-100%, respectively. Viruses from both clusters were distributed throughout China with no apparent geographic restriction and multiple co-circulating lineages were present in many provinces. Cluster H1a and H1b viruses were co-circulating during 1993 to 2005, while no H1b viruses were detected after 2005 and the transmission of that cluster has presumably been interrupted. Analysis of the nucleotide and predicted amino acid changes in the N proteins of H1a and H1b viruses showed no evidence of selective pressure. This study investigated the genotype and cluster distribution of MeV in China over a 16-year period to establish a genetic baseline before MeV elimination in Western Pacific Region (WPR. Continuous and extensive MeV surveillance and the ability to quickly identify imported cases of measles will become more critical as measles elimination goals are achieved in China in the near future. This is the first report that a single endemic genotype of measles virus has been found to be continuously circulating in one country for at least 16 years.

  10. Combination effect of oncolytic adenovirus therapy and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir in hepatic carcinoma animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei-qun ZHENG; Yin XU; Ren-jie YANG; Bin WU; Xiao-hua TAN; Yi-de QIN; Qun-wei ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Oncolytic adenovirus, also called conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAD), can selectively propagate in tumor cells and cause cell lysis. The released viral progeny can infect neighboring cancer cells, initiating a cascade that can lead to the ultimate destruction of the tumor. Suicide gene therapy using herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) and ganciclovir (GCV) offers a potential treatment strategy for cancer and is undergoing preclinical trials for a variety of tumors.We hypothesized that HSV-TK gene therapy combined with oncolytic adenoviral therapy would have an enhanced effect compared with the individual effects of the therapies and is a potential novel therapeutic strategy to treat liver cancer. Methods: To address our hypothesis, a novel CRAD was created, which consisted of a telomerase-dependent oncolytic adenovirus engineered to express E1A and HSV-TK genes (Ad-ETK). The combined effect of Ad-ETK and GCV was assessed both in vitro and in vivo in nude mice bearing HepG2 cell-derived tumors. Expression of the therapeutic genes by the transduced tumor cells was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting.Results: We confirmed that Ad-ETK had antitumorigenic effects on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) both in vitro and in vivo, and the TK/GCV system enhanced oncolytic adenoviral therapy. We confirmed that both E1A and HSV-TK genes were expressed in vivo.Conclusion: The Ad-ETK construct should provide a relatively safe and selective approach to killing cancer cells and should be investigated as an adjuvant therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  11. Morbillivirus Experimental Animal Models: Measles Virus Pathogenesis Insights from Canine Distemper Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Morbilliviruses share considerable structural and functional similarities. Even though disease severity varies among the respective host species, the underlying pathogenesis and the clinical signs are comparable. Thus, insights gained with one morbillivirus often apply to the other members of the genus. Since the Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes severe and often lethal disease in dogs and ferrets, it is an attractive model to characterize morbillivirus pathogenesis mechanisms and to evaluate the efficacy of new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. This review compares the cellular tropism, pathogenesis, mechanisms of persistence and immunosuppression of the Measles virus (MeV) and CDV. It then summarizes the contributions made by studies on the CDV in dogs and ferrets to our understanding of MeV pathogenesis and to vaccine and drugs development. PMID:27727184

  12. Morbillivirus Experimental Animal Models: Measles Virus Pathogenesis Insights from Canine Distemper Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata da Fontoura Budaszewski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Morbilliviruses share considerable structural and functional similarities. Even though disease severity varies among the respective host species, the underlying pathogenesis and the clinical signs are comparable. Thus, insights gained with one morbillivirus often apply to the other members of the genus. Since the Canine distemper virus (CDV causes severe and often lethal disease in dogs and ferrets, it is an attractive model to characterize morbillivirus pathogenesis mechanisms and to evaluate the efficacy of new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. This review compares the cellular tropism, pathogenesis, mechanisms of persistence and immunosuppression of the Measles virus (MeV and CDV. It then summarizes the contributions made by studies on the CDV in dogs and ferrets to our understanding of MeV pathogenesis and to vaccine and drugs development.

  13. Fatal measles virus infection prevented by brain-penetrant fusion inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Jeremy C; Talekar, Aparna; Mathieu, Cyrille; Pessi, Antonello; Moscona, Anne; Horvat, Branka; Porotto, Matteo

    2013-12-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute childhood disease that can include infection of the central nervous system and can rarely progress to severe neurological disease for which there is no specific treatment. We generated potent antiviral peptide inhibitors of MV entry and spreading and MV-induced cell fusion. Dimers of MV-specific peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat region of the MV fusion protein, conjugated to cholesterol, efficiently protect SLAM transgenic mice from fatal MV infection. Fusion inhibitors hold promise for the prophylaxis of MV infection in unvaccinated and immunocompromised people, as well as potential for the treatment of grave neurological complications of measles.

  14. Intratumoral modulation of the inducible co-stimulator ICOS by recombinant oncolytic virus promotes systemic anti-tumour immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Ricca, Jacob; Plitt, Tamar; Palese, Peter; Sharma, Padmanee; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Allison, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that locoregional cancer therapeutic approaches with oncolytic viruses can lead to systemic anti-tumour immunity, although the appropriate targets for intratumoral immunomodulation using this strategy are not known. Here we find that intratumoral therapy with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), in addition to the activation of innate immunity, upregulates the expression of T-cell co-stimulatory receptors, with the inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) being most notable. To explore ICOS as a direct target in the tumour, we engineered a recombinant NDV-expressing ICOS ligand (NDV-ICOSL). In the bilateral flank tumour models, intratumoral administration of NDV-ICOSL results in enhanced infiltration with activated T cells in both virus-injected and distant tumours, and leads to effective rejection of both tumours when used in combination with systemic CTLA-4 blockade. These findings highlight that intratumoral immunomodulation with an oncolytic virus expressing a rationally selected ligand can be an effective strategy to drive systemic efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:28194010

  15. External Quality Assessment for the Detection of Measles Virus by Reverse Transcription-PCR Using Armored RNA.

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    Dong Zhang

    Full Text Available In recent years, nucleic acid tests for detection of measles virus RNA have been widely applied in laboratories belonging to the measles surveillance system of China. An external quality assessment program was established by the National Center for Clinical Laboratories to evaluate the performance of nucleic acid tests for measles virus. The external quality assessment panel, which consisted of 10 specimens, was prepared using armored RNAs, complex of noninfectious MS2 bacteriophage coat proteins encapsulated RNA of measles virus, as measles virus surrogate controls. Conserved sequences amplified from a circulating measles virus strain or from a vaccine strain were encapsulated into these armored RNAs. Forty-one participating laboratories from 15 provinces, municipalities, or autonomous regions that currently conduct molecular detection of measles virus enrolled in the external quality assessment program, including 40 measles surveillance system laboratories and one diagnostic reagent manufacturer. Forty laboratories used commercial reverse transcription-quantitative PCR kits, with only one laboratory applying a conventional PCR method developed in-house. The results indicated that most of the participants (38/41, 92.7% were able to accurately detect the panel with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Although a wide range of commercially available kits for nucleic acid extraction and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were used by the participants, only two false-negative results and one false-positive result were generated; these were generated by three separate laboratories. Both false-negative results were obtained with tests performed on specimens with the lowest concentration (1.2 × 104 genomic equivalents/mL. In addition, all 18 participants from Beijing achieved 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Overall, we conclude that the majority of the laboratories evaluated have reliable diagnostic capacities for the detection

  16. Yeast lysates carrying the nucleoprotein from measles virus vaccine as a novel subunit vaccine platform to deliver Plasmodium circumsporozoite antigen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daria Jacob; Claude Ruffie; Chantal Combredet; Pauline Formaglio; Rogerio Amino; Robert Menard; Frederic Tangy; Monica Sala

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study, Pichia pastoris yeast lysates carrying the nucleoprotein (N) from the measles vaccine virus were evaluated as a novel subunit vaccine platform to deliver the circumsporozoite surface antigen (CS) of Plasmodium...

  17. The Influence of HIV-1 Exposure and Infection on Levels of Passively Acquired Antibodies to Measles Virus in Zambian Infants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susana Scott; William J. Moss; Simon Cousens; Judy A. Beeler; Susette A. Audet; Nanthalile Mugala; Thomas C. Quinn; Diane E. Griffin; Felicity T. Cutts

    2007-01-01

    .... Antibodies to measles virus were measured by plaque reduction neutralization assay in HIV-1-infected, HIV-seropositive but uninfected, and HIV-seronegative Zambian infants aged 6 weeks to 9 months...

  18. Spread of Measles Virus D4-Hamburg, Europe, 2008–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihneva, Zefira; Gold, Hermann; Baumgarte, Sigrid; Baillot, Armin; Helble, Rudolph; Roggendorf, Hedwig; Bosevska, Golubinka; Nedeljkovic, Jasminka; Makowka, Agata; Hutse, Veronik; Holzmann, Heidemarie; Aberle, Stefan W.; Cordey, Samuel; Necula, Gheorghe; Mentis, Andreas; Korukluoğlu, Gulay; Carr, Michael; Brown, Kevin E.; Hübschen, Judith M.; Muller, Claude P.; Mulders, Mick N.; Santibanez, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    A new strain of measles virus, D4-Hamburg, was imported from London to Hamburg in December 2008 and subsequently spread to Bulgaria, where an outbreak of >24,300 cases was observed. We analyzed spread of the virus to demonstrate the importance of addressing hard-to-reach communities within the World Health Organization European Region regarding access to medical care and vaccination campaigns. The D4-Hamburg strain appeared during 2009–2011 in Poland, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Austria, Greece, Romania, Turkey, Macedonia, Serbia, Switzerland, and Belgium and was repeatedly reimported to Germany. The strain was present in Europe for >27 months and led to >25,000 cases in 12 countries. Spread of the virus was prevalently but not exclusively associated with travel by persons in the Roma ethnic group; because this travel extends beyond the borders of any European country, measures to prevent the spread of measles should be implemented by the region as a whole. PMID:21801615

  19. Myxoma virus sensitizes cancer cells to gemcitabine and is an effective oncolytic virotherapeutic in models of disseminated pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennier, Sonia Tusell; Liu, Jia; Li, Shoudong; Rahman, Masmudur M; Mona, Mahmoud; McFadden, Grant

    2012-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a novel oncolytic virus that has been shown to replicate in pancreatic cancer cells, but its efficacy in animal models of pancreatic cancer has not been determined. The efficacy of MYXV as monotherapy or in combination with gemcitabine was evaluated in intraperitoneal dissemination (IPD) models of pancreatic cancer. The effects of an intact immune system on the efficacy of MYXV therapy was tested by comparing immunodeficient versus immunocompetent murine models and combination therapy with gemcitabine was also evaluated. In cell culture, MYXV replication was robust in a broad range of pancreatic cancer cells and also showed increased oncolysis in combination with gemcitabine. In animal models, MYXV treatment conferred survival benefits over control or gemcitabine-treated cohorts regardless of the cell line or animal model used. MYXV monotherapy was most effective in an immunocompetent IPD model, and resulted in 60% long-term survivors. In Pan02 engrafted immunocompetent IPD models, sequential treatment in which MYXV was administered first, followed by gemcitabine, was the most effective and resulted in 100% long-term survivors. MYXV is an effective oncolytic virus for pancreatic cancer and can be combined with gemcitabine to enhance survival, particularly in the presence of an intact host immune system.

  20. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Karoliina; Knuuttila, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Pesonen, Sari; Guse, Kilian; Parviainen, Suvi; Rajamäki, Minna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification.

  1. Absence of detectable measles virus genome sequence in blood of autistic children who have had their MMR vaccination during the routine childhood immunization schedule of UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, M A; Ozoemena, L C; O'Hare, A; Kidger, K A; Bentley, M L; Minor, P D

    2006-05-01

    Leukocyte preparations from children with documented evidence of MMR vaccination and confirmed diagnosis of autism were examined by several assays designed to target multiple regions of the measles virus genome sequence. No sample was found positive by any method. The assays applied were highly sensitive, specific and robust in nature, and were based on the amplification of measles virus RNA transcripts by real-time quantitative RT-PCR (QRT-PCR) as well as by conventional RT-PCR-nested PCR. The assays applied were potentially able to detect measles virus RNA down to single figure copy numbers per reaction. The amount of total nucleic acid extract of leukocytes subjected to various measles virus-specific investigations was several fold higher than minimally required of a sample where measles virus persistence is well documented. This study failed to substantiate reports of the persistence of measles virus in autistic children with development regression.

  2. Molecular evolution of measles viruses circulated in Taiwan 1992-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rota Paul A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic analyses of viral samples from 74 laboratory confirmed measles cases occurring in Taiwan during 1992-2008 identified six viral genotypes D3, D5, D9, G2, H1 and H2. The most frequently detected genotype, H1, was associated with outbreaks in 1994 and 2002, and was the likely indigenous genotype in 1992. In response to the outbreaks, two catch-up campaigns were launched and a routine second dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine at entry to elementary school was introduced. The vaccination campaigns successfully reduced the number of measles cases in Taiwan, and many of the more recent cases can be traced to importations, primarily from other Asian countries. A number of measles genotypes which were associated with outbreaks in other Asian countries were detected among the more recent cases. The more recent genotype H1 viruses had sequences that were identical to those currently circulating in China or associated with international importation of virus.

  3. Measles virus genetic evolution throughout an imported epidemic outbreak in a highly vaccinated population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Alía, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Casasnovas, José María; Porras-Mansilla, Rebeca; Serrano-Pardo, Ángela; Pagán, Israel; Ordobás, María; Ramírez, Rosa; Celma, María Luisa

    2015-01-22

    Measles virus circulates endemically in African and Asian large urban populations, causing outbreaks worldwide in populations with up-to-95% immune protection. We studied the natural genetic variability of genotype B3.1 in a population with 95% vaccine coverage throughout an imported six month measles outbreak. From first pass viral isolates of 47 patients we performed direct sequencing of genomic cDNA. Whilst no variation from index case sequence occurred in the Nucleocapsid gene hyper-variable carboxy end, in the Hemagglutinin gene, main target for neutralizing antibodies, we observed gradual nucleotide divergence from index case along the outbreak (0% to 0.380%, average 0.138%) with the emergence of transient and persistent non-synonymous and synonymous mutations. Little or no variation was observed between the index and last outbreak cases in Phosphoprotein, Nucleocapsid, Matrix and Fusion genes. Most of the H non-synonymous mutations were mapped on the protein surface near antigenic and receptors binding sites. We estimated a MV-Hemagglutinin nucleotide substitution rate of 7.28 × 10-6 substitutions/site/day by a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. The dN/dS analysis did not suggest significant immune or other selective pressures on the H gene during the outbreak. These results emphasize the usefulness of MV-H sequence analysis in measles epidemiological surveillance and elimination programs, and in detection of potentially emergence of measles virus neutralization-resistant mutants.

  4. Genetic characterization of measles virus in the Philippines, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Rex; Fuji, Naoko; Okamoto, Michiko; Dapat, Clyde; Saito, Mariko; Tandoc, Amado; Lupisan, Socorro; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-06-03

    Large outbreaks of measles occurred in the Philippines in 2010 and 2011. Genetic analysis was performed to identify the genotype of measles virus (MeV) that was responsible for the large outbreaks. A total of 114 representative MeVs that were detected in the Philippines from 2008 to 2011 were analyzed by sequencing the C-terminal region of nucleocapsid (N) gene and partial hemagglutinin (H) gene and by inferring the phylogenetic trees. Genetic analysis showed that genotype D9 was the predominant circulating strain during the 4-year study period. Genotype D9 was detected in 23 samples (92%) by N gene sequencing and 93 samples (94%) by H gene analysis. Sporadic cases of genotype G3 MeV were identified in 2 samples (8%) by N gene sequencing and 6 samples (6%) by H gene analysis. Genotype G3 MeV was detected mainly in Panay Island in 2009 and 2010. Molecular clock analysis of N gene showed that the recent genotype D9 viruses that caused the big outbreaks in 2010 and 2011 diverged from a common ancestor in 2005 in one of the neighboring Southeast Asian countries, where D9 was endemic. These big outbreaks of measles resulted in a spillover and were associated with genotype D9 MeV importation to Japan and the USA. Genotype D9 MeV became endemic and caused two big outbreaks in the Philippines in 2010 and 2011. Genotype G3 MeV was detected sporadically with limited geographic distribution. This study highlights the importance of genetic analysis not only in helping with the assessment of measles elimination program in the country but also in elucidating the transmission dynamics of measles virus.

  5. A Rare Case: Atypical Measles

    OpenAIRE

    Ümmü Sena Sarı; Figen Kaptan

    2016-01-01

    Atypical measles has been described in persons who were exposed to wild measles virus several years after they were immunized with killed measles vaccine. Occasionally, it can be caused by live measles vaccines also. It is a clinical picture different from typical measles. In this report, an adult patient with a history of immunization, who presented with high fever, maculopapular rash starting at the palms and soles, and pneumonia, is presented. Atypical measles that was ...

  6. Molecular characterization of wild-type measles viruses in Tamil Nadu, India, during 2005-2006: relationship of genotype D8 strains from Tamil Nadu to global strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraisamy, Raja; Rota, Paul A; Palani, Gunasekaran; Elango, Varalakshmi; Sambasivam, Mohana; Lowe, Luis; Lopareva, Elena; Ramamurty, Nalini

    2012-02-01

    Molecular characterization of measles viruses is a valuable tool for measuring the effectiveness of measles control and elimination programmes. WHO recommends that virological surveillance be conducted during all phases of measles control to document circulation of indigenous strains and trace future importation. This report describes the genetic characterization of wild type measles viruses from Tamil Nadu, India isolated between January 2005 and January 2006. In the study, 304 suspected measles cases (292 from 56 outbreaks and 12 sporadic cases) were investigated. Blood samples were collected from suspected measles outbreaks and 11 suspected sporadic cases and tested for the presence of measles and rubella specific IgM. Based on serological results, 53 outbreaks were confirmed as measles, 2 as a combination of measles and rubella, and 1 negative for both. Eight sporadic cases were confirmed as measles and one as rubella. Throat swab and urine samples were collected for virus isolation and 28 isolates were obtained. Sequencing and analysis showed that 3 isolates belonged to genotype D4 and 25 to genotype D8. Comparison of the genotype D8 sequences from Tamil Nadu with previously reported genotype D8 sequences from India and abroad showed six distinct clusters with Tamil Nadu strains forming two clusters. This study has established baseline molecular data and is the first report that describes genetic diversity of circulating measles strains in Tamil Nadu, a state in India. D8 has multiple lineages and this has been linked with importation of measles into the USA and UK.

  7. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Measles Virus Genotypes H1 and D8 During Outbreaks of Infection Following the 2010 Olympic Winter Games Reveals Viral Transmission Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardy, Jennifer L; Naus, Monika; Amlani, Ashraf; Chung, Walter; Kim, Hochan; Tan, Malcolm; Severini, Alberto; Krajden, Mel; Puddicombe, David; Sahni, Vanita; Hayden, Althea S; Gustafson, Reka; Henry, Bonnie; Tang, Patrick

    2015-11-15

    We used whole-genome sequencing to investigate a dual-genotype outbreak of measles occurring after the XXI Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, Canada. By sequencing 27 complete genomes from H1 and D8 genotype measles viruses isolated from outbreak cases, we estimated the virus mutation rate, determined that person-to-person transmission is typically associated with 0 mutations between isolates, and established that a single introduction of H1 virus led to the expansion of the outbreak beyond Vancouver. This is the largest measles genomics project to date, revealing novel aspects of measles virus genetics and providing new insights into transmission of this reemerging viral pathogen.

  8. IL-12 Expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus promotes anti-tumor activity and immunologic control of metastatic ovarian cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Eric D; Meza-Perez, Selene; Bevis, Kerri S; Randall, Troy D; Gillespie, G Yancey; Langford, Catherine; Alvarez, Ronald D

    2016-10-27

    Despite advances in surgical aggressiveness and conventional chemotherapy, ovarian cancer remains the most lethal cause of gynecologic cancer mortality; consequently there is a need for new therapeutic agents and innovative treatment paradigms for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Several studies have demonstrated that ovarian cancer is an immunogenic disease and immunotherapy represents a promising and novel approach that has not been completely evaluated in ovarian cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the anti-tumor activity of an oncolytic herpes simplex virus "armed" with murine interleukin-12 and its ability to elicit tumor-specific immune responses. We evaluated the ability of interleukin-12-expressing and control oncolytic herpes simplex virus to kill murine and human ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro. We also administered interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus to the peritoneal cavity of mice that had developed spontaneous, metastatic ovarian cancer and determined overall survival and tumor burden at 95 days. We used flow cytometry to quantify the tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell response in the omentum and peritoneal cavity. All ovarian cancer cell lines demonstrated susceptibility to oncolytic herpes simplex virus in vitro. Compared to controls, mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus demonstrated a more robust tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell immune response in the omentum (471.6 cells vs 33.1 cells; p = 0.02) and peritoneal cavity (962.3 cells vs 179.5 cells; p = 0.05). Compared to controls, mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus were more likely to control ovarian cancer metastases (81.2 % vs 18.2 %; p = 0.008) and had a significantly longer overall survival (p = 0.02). Finally, five of 6 mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oHSV had no evidence of metastatic tumor when euthanized at 6 months, compared to two of 4 mice treated

  9. Virotherapy of canine tumors with oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h109 expressing an anti-VEGF single-chain antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep S Patil

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV strains is one promising new strategy for cancer therapy. We have previously reported that oncolytic vaccinia virus strains expressing an anti-VEGF (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor single-chain antibody (scAb GLAF-1 exhibited significant therapeutic efficacy for treatment of human tumor xenografts. Here, we describe the use of oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h109 encoding GLAF-1 for canine cancer therapy. In this study we analyzed the virus-mediated delivery and production of scAb GLAF-1 and the oncolytic and immunological effects of the GLV-1h109 vaccinia virus strain against canine soft tissue sarcoma and canine prostate carcinoma in xenograft models. Cell culture data demonstrated that the GLV-1h109 virus efficiently infect, replicate in and destroy both tested canine cancer cell lines. In addition, successful expression of GLAF-1 was demonstrated in virus-infected canine cancer cells and the antibody specifically recognized canine VEGF. In two different xenograft models, the systemic administration of the GLV-1h109 virus was found to be safe and led to anti-tumor and immunological effects resulting in the significant reduction of tumor growth in comparison to untreated control mice. Furthermore, tumor-specific virus infection led to a continued production of functional scAb GLAF-1, resulting in inhibition of angiogenesis. Overall, the GLV-1h109-mediated cancer therapy and production of immunotherapeutic anti-VEGF scAb may open the way for combination therapy concept i.e. vaccinia virus mediated oncolysis and intratumoral production of therapeutic drugs in canine cancer patients.

  10. Measles 50 Years After Use of Measles Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, James L; Seward, Jane F

    2015-12-01

    In response to severe measles, the first measles vaccine was licensed in the United States in 1963. Widespread use of measles vaccines for more than 50 years has significantly reduced global measles morbidity and mortality. However, measles virus continues to circulate, causing infection, illness, and an estimated 400 deaths worldwide each day. Measles is preventable by vaccine, and humans are the only reservoir. Clinicians should promote and provide on-time vaccination for all patients and keep measles in their differential diagnosis of febrile rash illness for rapid case detection, confirmation of measles infection, isolation, treatment, and appropriate public health response.

  11. ET-46ONCOLYTIC VIRAL THERAPY FOR MALIGNANT GLIOMAS USING MYXOMA VIRUS DELETED FOR ANTI-APOPTOTIC M11L GENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisklakova, Alexandra; McKenzie, Brienne; Kenchappa, Rajappa; McFadden, Grant; Forsyth, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Brain Tumour Initiating Cells (BTICs) are stem-like cells hypothesized to mediate recurrence in high-grade gliomas. Myxoma virus (MyxV) is a promising oncolytic virus, which is highly effective in conventional long term resistant glioma cell lines and less effective in BTICs. We hypothesized that one possible factor limiting efficacy in BTICs is that cell death following infection with MyxV is inhibited by virally encoded anti-apoptotic proteins, such as the Bcl-2 structural homologue, M011L. To test this we evaluated and compared the efficacy of wtMYXV versus the viral construct MyxV-M011L-KO (in which the anti-apoptotic protein M11L has been deleted) in BTICs. We found that WT-MyxV does not induce significant level of apoptosis in infected BTICs, but that MyxV-M011L-KO induces dramatically more apoptosisas shown by caspase activation, PARP cleavage, and Cytochrome C release from the mitochondria M11L from the WT-MyxV localized to the mitochondrial membrane and prevented the association of Bax with the mitochondrial membrane. Finally, silencing of Bax using specific siRNAs significantly blocked the induction of apoptosis and cell death that occurs after infection with mutant MyxV-M011L-KO virus. Therefore MyxV-M011L-KO, which is has the anti-apoptotic virally derived gene M11L, dramatically improves the oncolytic efficacy in BTICs and this is dependent on the presence of the pro-apoptotic host protein, Bax. This is the first demonstration, that the MyxV mutant, genetically modified to promote apoptosis in tumor initiating cells, is significantly more efficacious than the wildtype virus. Strategies, such as this one, that promotes apoptosis in tumor initiating cells might be particularly effective.

  12. Implementation of a National Measles Elimination Program in Iran: Phylogenetic Analysis of Measles Virus Strains Isolated during 2010–2012 Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Vahid; Abbasi, Simin; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Fatemi-Nasab, Ghazal; Adjaminezhad-Fard, Fatemeh; Shadab, Azadeh; Ghavami, Nastaran; Zareh-Khoshchehre, Raziyeh; Soltanshahi, Rambod; Bont, Louis; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat

    2014-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) causes small and large outbreaks in Iran. Molecular assays allow identifying and the sources of measles imported from neighboring countries. We carried out a phylogenetic analysis of measles virus circulating in Iran over the period 2010–2012. Specimens from suspected cases of measles were collected from different regions of Iran. Virus isolation was performed on urine and throat swabs. Partial nucleoprotein gene segments of MV were amplified by RT-PCR. PCR products of 173 samples were sequenced and analyzed. The median age of confirmed cases was 2 years. Among all confirmed cases, 32% had unknown vaccination status, 20% had been vaccinated, and 48% had not been vaccinated. Genotypes B3 and D8 (for the first time), H1 and D4 were detected mainly in unvaccinated toddlers and young children. Genotype B3 became predominant in 2012 and was closely related to African strains. H1 strains were also found in small and large outbreaks during 2012 but were not identical to Iranian H1-2009 strains. A majority of the Iranian D4 strains during 2010–2012 outbreaks were linked to the D4 strain identified in the Pakistan in 2007. We identified a single case in 2010 belonging to D8 genotype with 99.7% identity to Indian isolates. Although the vaccination program is currently good enough to prevent nationwide epidemics and successfully decreased measles incidence in Iran, the fraction of protected individuals in the population was not high enough to prevent continuous introduction of cases from abroad. Due to increasing number of susceptible individuals in some areas, sustained transmission of the newly introduced viral genotype remains possible. PMID:24736720

  13. Implementation of a national measles elimination program in Iran: Phylogenetic analysis of measles virus strains isolated during 2010-2012 outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Salimi

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MV causes small and large outbreaks in Iran. Molecular assays allow identifying and the sources of measles imported from neighboring countries. We carried out a phylogenetic analysis of measles virus circulating in Iran over the period 2010-2012. Specimens from suspected cases of measles were collected from different regions of Iran. Virus isolation was performed on urine and throat swabs. Partial nucleoprotein gene segments of MV were amplified by RT-PCR. PCR products of 173 samples were sequenced and analyzed. The median age of confirmed cases was 2 years. Among all confirmed cases, 32% had unknown vaccination status, 20% had been vaccinated, and 48% had not been vaccinated. Genotypes B3 and D8 (for the first time, H1 and D4 were detected mainly in unvaccinated toddlers and young children. Genotype B3 became predominant in 2012 and was closely related to African strains. H1 strains were also found in small and large outbreaks during 2012 but were not identical to Iranian H1-2009 strains. A majority of the Iranian D4 strains during 2010-2012 outbreaks were linked to the D4 strain identified in the Pakistan in 2007. We identified a single case in 2010 belonging to D8 genotype with 99.7% identity to Indian isolates. Although the vaccination program is currently good enough to prevent nationwide epidemics and successfully decreased measles incidence in Iran, the fraction of protected individuals in the population was not high enough to prevent continuous introduction of cases from abroad. Due to increasing number of susceptible individuals in some areas, sustained transmission of the newly introduced viral genotype remains possible.

  14. Detection of measles, mumps and rubella viruses by immuno-colorimetric assay and its application in focus reduction neutralization tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Kumbhar, Neelakshi S; Bhide, Vandana S

    2014-12-01

    Measles, mumps and rubella are vaccine-preventable diseases; however limited epidemiological data are available from low-income or developing countries. Thus, it is important to investigate the transmission of these viruses in different geographical regions. In this context, a cell culture-based rapid and reliable immuno-colorimetric assay (ICA) was established and its utility studied. Twenty-three measles, six mumps and six rubella virus isolates and three vaccine strains were studied. Detection by ICA was compared with plaque and RT-PCR assays. In addition, ICA was used to detect viruses in throat swabs (n = 24) collected from patients with suspected measles or mumps. Similarly, ICA was used in a focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT) and the results compared with those obtained by a commercial IgG enzyme immuno assay. Measles and mumps virus were detected 2 days post-infection in Vero or Vero-human signaling lymphocytic activation molecule cells, whereas rubella virus was detected 3 days post-infection in Vero cells. The blue stained viral foci were visible by the naked eye or through a magnifying glass. In conclusion, ICA was successfully used on 35 virus isolates, three vaccine strains and clinical specimens collected from suspected cases of measles and mumps. Furthermore, an application of ICA in a neutralization test (i.e., FRNT) was documented; this may be useful for sero-epidemiological, cross-neutralization and pre/post-vaccine studies. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. [Effect of stimulation with the measles virus on expression of early activation markers on CD4+ T lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siennicka, Joanna; Cześcik, Agnieszka; Dunal, Milena; Trzcińska, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    Elimination of measles is one of the priority plans of WHO. The success of this plan depends on the development of long lasting, postvaccinal immune response. The aim of this study was to present the effect of stimulation with different strains of measles virus on the expression of T-helper cell (CD4+ T) early activation markers in people with different history of measles infection and to determine the correlation between the activation and dose of virus used for stimulation. The study was conducted using material derived from two patients: one seropositive due to natural infection and one vaccinated, with traces of anti-MeV IgG antibodies. In the CD4 T helper cells, the expression of CD69 receptor and the ability of the cells to produce INF after stimulation with the vaccine-derived or wild-type strain of measles virus was determined. For antigen-specific stimulation the virus suspension containing about 100 infectious particle, its tenfold and hundredfold dilutions was used. We found that the expression of T-helper cells early activation markers depended on the strain of the measles virus used for the stimulation, type of the immune response (postvaccinal, natural infection), and in the case of CD69 expression also on the dose of the virus used for the stimulation.

  16. Measles Virus-Specific Antibody Levels in Individuals in Argentina Who Received a One-Dose Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Argüelles, Marcelo H; Orellana, Mariana L.; Castello, Alejandro A.; Villegas, Guillermo A.; Masini, Matilde; Belizan, Alejandra L.; González Ayala,Silvia; Vera, Osmar D.; Glikmann, Graciela

    2006-01-01

    In spite of active measles virus (MV) vaccination strategies, reemergence continues to occur, impairing global eradication programs. The immune status against measles was evaluated in 350 vaccinated healthy Argentine children and teenagers who received a single dose of the MV Schwarz strain Lirugen vaccine (Aventis Pasteur). Sera were assessed for immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies by a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Enzygnost; Behring), an in-house EIA, and neutralization EIA. Results o...

  17. Expression of RNA interference triggers from an oncolytic herpes simplex virus results in specific silencing in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anesti Anna-Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA to tumours remains a major obstacle for the development of RNA interference (RNAi-based therapeutics. Following the promising pre-clinical and clinical results with the oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV OncoVEXGM-CSF, we aimed to express RNAi triggers from oncolytic HSV, which although has the potential to improve treatment by silencing tumour-related genes, was not considered possible due to the highly oncolytic properties of HSV. Methods To evaluate RNAi-mediated silencing from an oncolytic HSV backbone, we developed novel replicating HSV vectors expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA or artificial microRNA (miRNA against the reporter genes green fluorescent protein (eGFP and β-galactosidase (lacZ. These vectors were tested in non-tumour cell lines in vitro and tumour cells that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection both in vitro and in mice xenografts in vivo. Silencing was assessed at the protein level by fluorescent microscopy, x-gal staining, enzyme activity assay, and western blotting. Results Our results demonstrate that it is possible to express shRNA and artificial miRNA from an oncolytic HSV backbone, which had not been previously investigated. Furthermore, oncolytic HSV-mediated delivery of RNAi triggers resulted in effective and specific silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo, with the viruses expressing artificial miRNA being comprehensibly more effective. Conclusions This preliminary data provide the first demonstration of oncolytic HSV-mediated expression of shRNA or artificial miRNA and silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. The vectors developed in this study are being adapted to silence tumour-related genes in an ongoing study that aims to improve the effectiveness of oncolytic HSV treatment in tumours that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection and thus, potentially improve response rates seen

  18. Measles virus-substance P receptor interactions. Possible novel mechanism of viral fusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Harrowe, G; Mitsuhashi, M; Payan, D G

    1990-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) encodes the fusion protein (F) that mediates cell fusion and intercellular spread of the virus, and is homologous to the carboxy terminus of the neuropeptide substance P (SP). In addition, the oligopeptide Z-D-Phe-L-Phe-Gly, also homologous to F and SP, inhibits MV fusion with target cells. These observations raise the question of whether MV uses the SP receptor (SPR) during a specific phase of its infectious cycle. In this report, we examine the structural and functional c...

  19. Prime-boost using Separate Oncolytic Viruses in Combination with Checkpoint Blockade Improves Anti-tumor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilett, Elizabeth; Kottke, Timothy; Thompson, Jill; Rajani, Karishma; Zaidi, Shane; Evgin, Laura; Coffey, Matt; Ralph, Christy; Diaz, Rosa; Pandha, Hardev; Harrington, Kevin; Selby, Peter; Bram, Richard; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The anti-tumor effects associated with oncolytic virus therapy are mediated significantly through immune-mediated mechanisms which depends both on the type of virus and the route of delivery. Here, we show that intra-tumoral (i.t.) oncolysis by Reovirus induced the priming of a CD8+, Th1-type anti-tumor response. In contrast, systemically delivered VSV expressing a cDNA library of melanoma antigens (VSV-ASMEL) promoted a potent anti-tumor CD4+ Th17 response. Therefore, we hypothesised that combining the Reovirus-induced CD8+ T cell response, with the VSV-ASMEL CD4+ Th17 helper response, would produce enhanced anti-tumor activity. Consistent with this, priming with i.t. Reovirus, followed by an intra-venous VSV-ASMEL Th17 boost, significantly improved survival of mice bearing established subcutaneous (s.c.) B16 melanoma tumors. We also show that combination of either therapy alone with anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade augmented both the Th1 response induced by systemically delivered Reovirus in combination with GM-CSF, and also the Th17 response induced by VSV-ASMEL. Significantly, anti-PD-1 also uncovered an anti-tumor Th1 response following VSV-ASMEL treatment that was not seen in the absence of checkpoint blockade. Finally, the combination of all three treatments (priming with systemically delivered Reovirus, followed by double boosting with systemic VSV-ASMEL and anti-PD-1) significantly enhanced survival, with long-term cures, compared to any individual, or double, combination therapies, associated with strong Th1 and Th17 responses to tumor antigens. Our data show that it is possible to generate fully systemic, highly effective anti-tumor immunovirotherapy by combining oncolytic viruses, along with immune checkpoint blockade, to induce complimentary mechanisms of anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:27779616

  20. Antitumor effects of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 2 against colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin L

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lei Yin,1–3 Chunhong Zhao,3 Jixia Han,4 Zengjun Li,2 Yanan Zhen,3 Ruixue Xiao,3 Zhongfa Xu,3 Yanlai Sun2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, 2Department of Gastrointestinal Cancer Surgery, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, 3Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, 4Department of General Surgery, The Sixth People’s Hospital of Jinan, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Background: The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC is on the rise. Furthermore, late-stage diagnoses and limited efficacious treatment options make CRC a complex clinical challenge. Therefore, a new therapeutic regimen with a completely novel therapeutic mechanism is necessary for CRC. In the present study, the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 2 (oHSV2 in CRC was assessed in vitro and in vivo. oHSV2 is an oncolytic agent derived from herpes simplex virus type 2 that encodes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.Materials and methods: We investigated the cytopathic effects of oHSV2 in CRC cell lines using the MTT assay. Then, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of oHSV2 were examined by flow cytometry. We generated a model of CRC with mouse CRC cell CT26 in BALB/c mice. The antitumor effects and adaptive immune response of oHSV2 were assessed in tumor-bearing mice. The therapeutic efficacy of oHSV2 was compared with the traditional chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil.Results: The in vitro data showed that oHSV2 infected the CRC cell lines successfully and that the tumor cells formed a significant number of syncytiae postinfection. The oHSV2 killed cancer cells independent of the cell cycle and mainly caused tumor cells necrosis. The in vivo results showed that oHSV2 significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival of

  1. LIPOSOMES AS AN IMMUNOADJUVANT SYSTEM FOR STIMULATION OF MUCOSAL AND SYSTEMIC ANTIBODY-RESPONSES AGAINST INACTIVATED MEASLES-VIRUS ADMINISTERED INTRANASALLY TO MICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEHAAN, A; TOMEE, JFC; HUCHSHORN, JP; WILSCHUT, J

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the immune-stimulatory activity of liposomes in an inactivated whole measles virus vaccine preparation administered intranasally to mice. Liposomes, simply mixed with inactivated whole measles virus, significantly stimulated the serum IgG response relative to the response to th

  2. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2015-07-10

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts.

  3. Imaging characteristics, tissue distribution, and spread of a novel oncolytic vaccinia virus carrying the human sodium iodide symporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oncolytic viruses show promise for treating cancer. However, to assess therapy and potential toxicity, a noninvasive imaging modality is needed. This study aims to determine the in vivo biodistribution, and imaging and timing characteristics of a vaccinia virus, GLV-1h153, encoding the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS. METHODS: GLV-1h153 was modified from GLV-1h68 to encode the hNIS gene. Timing of cellular uptake of radioiodide (131I in human pancreatic carcinoma cells PANC-1 was assessed using radiouptake assays. Viral biodistribution was determined in nude mice bearing PANC-1 xenografts, and infection in tumors confirmed histologically and optically via Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP and bioluminescence. Timing characteristics of enhanced radiouptake in xenografts were assessed via (124I-positron emission tomography (PET. Detection of systemic administration of virus was investigated with both (124I-PET and 99m-technecium gamma-scintigraphy. RESULTS: GLV-1h153 successfully facilitated time-dependent intracellular uptake of (131I in PANC-1 cells with a maximum uptake at 24 hours postinfection (P<0.05. In vivo, biodistribution profiles revealed persistence of virus in tumors 5 weeks postinjection at 10(9 plaque-forming unit (PFU/gm tissue, with the virus mainly cleared from all other major organs. Tumor infection by GLV-1h153 was confirmed via optical imaging and histology. GLV-1h153 facilitated imaging virus replication in tumors via PET even at 8 hours post radiotracer injection, with a mean %ID/gm of 3.82 ± 0.46 (P<0.05 2 days after intratumoral administration of virus, confirmed via tissue radiouptake assays. One week post systemic administration, GLV-1h153-infected tumors were detected via (124I-PET and 99m-technecium-scintigraphy. CONCLUSION: GLV-1h153 is a promising oncolytic agent against pancreatic cancer with a promising biosafety profile. GLV-1h153 facilitated time-dependent hNIS-specific radiouptake in pancreatic

  4. Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Alemany

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic use of viruses against cancer has been revived during the last two decades. Oncolytic viruses replicate and spread inside tumors, amplifying their cytotoxicity and simultaneously reversing the tumor immune suppression. Among different viruses, recombinant adenoviruses designed to replicate selectively in tumor cells have been clinically tested by intratumoral or systemic administration. Limited efficacy has been associated to poor tumor targeting, intratumoral spread, and virocentric immune responses. A deeper understanding of these three barriers will be required to design more effective oncolytic adenoviruses that, alone or combined with chemotherapy or immunotherapy, may become tools for oncologists.

  5. Characterization of measles virus strains circulating in Southern Italy (Palermo area, Sicily) between 2010 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urone, Noemi; Colomba, Claudia; Ferraro, Donatella

    2016-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) was classified in 24 genotypes that show a distinct geographic distribution. Genotypes contain multiple distinct lineages. In 2011 large outbreaks of measles occurred in Italy and in many European countries. Aims of this study are to analyze the intra-genotype variability and to follow the importation and the spread of new MV strains in Sicily. A fragment of 450 bps of MV C-terminal nucleoprotein was sequenced from sera of 73 Sicilian patients with symptomatic measles infections, occurred between 2010 and 2011. Five MV strains were D4 genotype and 68 were D8 genotype. The MV/D4 sequences were related to MV/D4-Enfield variant. Two lineages of MV/D8 genotypes, related to MV/D8-Villupuram variant and to a strain found in Birmingham in 2006 respectively, were identified. This is the first study that reports the co-circulation of different MV genotypes and lineages in Sicily suggesting multiple origins of the outbreak that occurred during 2010 and 2011 years.

  6. Comparison of Immunoglobulin G Subclass Profiles Induced by Measles Virus in Vaccinated and Naturally Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, María Beatríz; Martínez, Laura; Giordano, Miguel; Passeggi, Carlos; de Wolff, María Cristina; Nates, Silvia

    2002-01-01

    A total of 258 human sera positive for measles antibodies were divided into four different groups: group 1 contained 54 sera from children after natural measles infection (immunoglobulin M [IgM] positive, early infection phase), group 2 contained 28 sera from children after measles vaccination (IgM positive, early infection phase), group 3 contained 100 sera from healthy adults (natural long-lasting immunity), and group 4 contained 76 sera from healthy children (postvaccinal long-lasting immunity). In the early phase of infection, the percent distributions of measles virus-specific IgG isotypes were similar between natural and postvaccinal immune responses. IgG1 and IgG4 were the dominant isotypes, with mean levels of detection of 100% (natural infection) and 100% (postvaccinal) for IgG1 and 96% (natural infection) and 92% (postvaccinal) for IgG4. In comparison, the IgG4 geometric mean titer (GMT) in the early phase of natural infection was significantly higher than the IgG4 GMT detected in the postvaccinal immune response (80 versus 13; 95% confidence interval). In the memory phase, IgG2 and IgG3 responses decreased significantly in both natural infection and postvaccinal groups, while IgG1 levels were maintained. In contrast, the IgG4 postvaccinal immune response decreased strongly in the memory phase, whereas IgG4 natural long-lasting immunity remained unchanged (9 versus 86%; P < 0.05). The results obtained suggest that IgG4 isotype could be used in the early phase of infection as a quantitative marker and in long-lasting immunity as a qualitative marker to differentiate between natural and postvaccinal immune responses. PMID:11986279

  7. Seroprevalence of measles and rubella virus antibodies in the population of the Community of Madrid, 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Comas, Luis; Sanz Moreno, J C; Ordobás Gavín, M; Barranco Ordóñez, D; García Gutiérrez, J; Ramos Blázquez, B; Rodero Garduño, I

    2015-01-01

    The seroprevalence (SP) of measles and rubella virus antibodies is presented by age groups obtained in the IV Serosurvey of the Region of Madrid (2008-2009). The target population is composed of residents with ages ranging between 2 and 60 years in the Region of Madrid. A two-stage cluster sample is used. The SP of measles virus antibodies is 97.8% (CI 95%: 97.3-98.2). The highest SP is observed in the 2-5 year and 41-60 year age groups. The point estimate does not reach 95% in the 16-20 and 21-30 year age groups. The SP of rubella virus antibodies is 97.2% (CI 95%: 96.5-97.7). The SP is over 95% in all of the age groups. In immigrant women between the ages of 16 and 49, the SP is 95.9% (CI 95%: 93.7-97.4). The identification of groups susceptible to the measles virus in young adults could lead to outbreaks as a result of importing the virus. The circulation of the rubella virus is possible among immigrant women aged between 16 and 49 years, which could lead to the appearance of SRC cases. Epidemiological surveillance will allow the impact on the measles and rubella elimination plan to be determined in the future.

  8. The measles virus N(TAIL)-XD complex: an illustrative example of fuzziness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, I focus on the biochemical and structural characterization of the complex between the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein (N(TAIL)) and the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein (P). I summarize the main experimental data available so far pointing out the prevalently disordered nature of N(TAIL) even after complex formation and the role of the flexible C-terminal appendage in the binding reaction. I finally discuss the possible functional role of these residual disordered regions within the complex in terms of their ability to capture other regulatory, binding partners.

  9. The Immune Response in Measles: Virus Control, Clearance and Protective Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Diane E

    2016-10-12

    Measles is an acute systemic viral infection with immune system interactions that play essential roles in multiple stages of infection and disease. Measles virus (MeV) infection does not induce type 1 interferons, but leads to production of cytokines and chemokines associated with nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) signaling and activation of the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein (NLRP3) inflammasome. This restricted response allows extensive virus replication and spread during a clinically silent latent period of 10-14 days. The first appearance of the disease is a 2-3 day prodrome of fever, runny nose, cough, and conjunctivitis that is followed by a characteristic maculopapular rash that spreads from the face and trunk to the extremities. The rash is a manifestation of the MeV-specific type 1 CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cell adaptive immune response with lymphocyte infiltration into tissue sites of MeV replication and coincides with clearance of infectious virus. However, clearance of viral RNA from blood and tissues occurs over weeks to months after resolution of the rash and is associated with a period of immunosuppression. However, during viral RNA clearance, MeV-specific antibody also matures in type and avidity and T cell functions evolve from type 1 to type 2 and 17 responses that promote B cell development. Recovery is associated with sustained levels of neutralizing antibody and life-long protective immunity.

  10. Insertion of the human sodium iodide symporter to facilitate deep tissue imaging does not alter oncolytic or replication capability of a novel vaccinia virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittra Arjun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oncolytic viruses show promise for treating cancer. However, to assess therapeutic efficacy and potential toxicity, a noninvasive imaging modality is needed. This study aimed to determine if insertion of the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS cDNA as a marker for non-invasive imaging of virotherapy alters the replication and oncolytic capability of a novel vaccinia virus, GLV-1h153. Methods GLV-1h153 was modified from parental vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 to carry hNIS via homologous recombination. GLV-1h153 was tested against human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 for replication via viral plaque assays and flow cytometry. Expression and transportation of hNIS in infected cells was evaluated using Westernblot and immunofluorescence. Intracellular uptake of radioiodide was assessed using radiouptake assays. Viral cytotoxicity and tumor regression of treated PANC-1tumor xenografts in nude mice was also determined. Finally, tumor radiouptake in xenografts was assessed via positron emission tomography (PET utilizing carrier-free 124I radiotracer. Results GLV-1h153 infected, replicated within, and killed PANC-1 cells as efficiently as GLV-1h68. GLV-1h153 provided dose-dependent levels of hNIS expression in infected cells. Immunofluorescence detected transport of the protein to the cell membrane prior to cell lysis, enhancing hNIS-specific radiouptake (P In vivo, GLV-1h153 was as safe and effective as GLV-1h68 in regressing pancreatic cancer xenografts (P 124I-PET. Conclusion Insertion of the hNIS gene does not hinder replication or oncolytic capability of GLV-1h153, rendering this novel virus a promising new candidate for the noninvasive imaging and tracking of oncolytic viral therapy.

  11. Electron cryotomography of measles virus reveals how matrix protein coats the ribonucleocapsid within intact virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeroos, Lassi; Huiskonen, Juha T; Ora, Ari; Susi, Petri; Butcher, Sarah J

    2011-11-01

    Measles virus is a highly infectious, enveloped, pleomorphic virus. We combined electron cryotomography with subvolume averaging and immunosorbent electron microscopy to characterize the 3D ultrastructure of the virion. We show that the matrix protein forms helices coating the helical ribonucleocapsid rather than coating the inner leaflet of the membrane, as previously thought. The ribonucleocapsid is folded into tight bundles through matrix-matrix interactions. The implications for virus assembly are that the matrix already tightly interacts with the ribonucleocapsid in the cytoplasm, providing a structural basis for the previously observed regulation of RNA transcription by the matrix protein. Next, the matrix-covered ribonucleocapsids are transported to the plasma membrane, where the matrix interacts with the envelope glycoproteins during budding. These results are relevant to the nucleocapsid organization and budding of other paramyxoviruses, where isolated matrix has been observed to form helices.

  12. Combination of Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viruses Armed with Angiostatin and IL-12 Enhances Antitumor Efficacy in Human Glioblastoma Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV can potentially spread throughout the tumor, reach isolated infiltrating cells, kill them, and deliver anticancer agents. However, the host responds to oHSV by inducing intratumoral infiltration of macrophages that can engulf the virus, limiting the potential of this therapeutic strategy. Hypervascularity is a pathognomonic feature of glioblastoma (GBM and is a promising therapeutic target. Antiangiogenic treatments have multiple benefits, including the capacity to increase oHSV efficacy by suppressing macrophage extravasation and infiltration into the tumor. Angiostatin is an antiangiogenic polypeptide, and interleukin-12 (IL-12 is an immunostimulatory cytokine with strong antiangiogenic effects. Clinical use of each has been limited by delivery issues and systemic toxicity.We tested a combination treatment strategy using oHSVs expressing angiostatin (G47Δ-mAngio and IL-12 (G47Δ-mIL12 in two orthotopic human GBMmodels. Intratumoral injection of G47Δ-mAngio and G47Δ-mIL12 in mice bearing intracranial U87 or tumors derived from glioblastoma stem cells significantly prolonged survival compared to each armed oHSV alone. This was associated with increased antiangiogenesis and virus spread and decreased macrophages. These data support the paradigm of using oHSV expressing different antiangiogenic agents and show for the first time that oHSVs expressing angiostatin and IL-12 can improve efficacy in human GBM models.

  13. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellular apoptosis while fully sparing normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The specificity of this elimination is based on strong binding of the virus to myeloma cells coupled with an inability of the virus to bind or infect CD34+ HSPCs. These two features allow myxoma to readily identify and distinguish even low levels of myeloma cells in complex mixtures. This ex vivo MYXV treatment also effectively inhibits systemic in vivo engraftment of human myeloma cells into immunodeficient mice and results in efficient elimination of primary CD138+ myeloma cells contaminating patient hematopoietic cell products. We conclude that ex vivo myxoma treatment represents a safe and effective method to selectively eliminate myeloma cells from hematopoietic autografts prior to reinfusion. PMID:22516053

  14. A recombinant measles vaccine expressing chikungunya virus-like particles is strongly immunogenic and protects mice from lethal challenge with chikungunya virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandler, Samantha; Ruffié, Claude; Combredet, Chantal; Brault, Jean-Baptiste; Najburg, Valérie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Habel, André; Tauber, Erich; Desprès, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric

    2013-08-12

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus, recently reemerged in the Indian Ocean, India and Southeast Asia, causing millions of cases of severe polyarthralgia. No specific treatment to prevent disease or vaccine to limit epidemics is currently available. Here we describe a recombinant live-attenuated measles vaccine (MV) expressing CHIKV virus-like particles comprising capsid and envelope structural proteins from the recent CHIKV strain La Reunion. Immunization of mice susceptible to measles virus induced high titers of CHIKV antibodies that neutralized several primary isolates. Specific cellular immune responses were also elicited. A single immunization with this vaccine candidate protected all mice from a lethal CHIKV challenge, and passive transfer of immune sera conferred protection to naïve mice. Measles vaccine is one of the safest and most effective human vaccines. A recombinant MV-CHIKV virus could make a safe and effective vaccine against chikungunya that deserves to be further tested in human trials.

  15. Comparative seroprevalence of measles virus immunoglobulin M antibodies in children aged 0–8 months and a control population aged 9–23 months presenting with measles-like symptoms in selected hospitals in Kaduna State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaitan AE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AE Olaitan, EE Ella, JB Ameh Department of Microbiology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria Background: Measles remains the leading cause of vaccine-preventable childhood mortality in developing countries, with its greatest incidence in children younger than 2 years of age. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of measles virus in children (aged 0–8 months and older children (aged 9–23 months presenting with measles-like symptoms. Methods: A total of 273 blood samples comprising 200 from children aged 0–8 months and 73 from children aged 9–23 months were collected and analyzed for measles virus IgM antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: An overall prevalence of 21.2% was obtained, with a prevalence of 6.5% in children aged 0–8 months and 61.6% in children aged 9–23 months. The prevalence of measles virus increased with age in children aged 0–8 months and decreased with age in older children (aged 9–23 months, showing a significant association between measles virus and age of the child (P=0.000. A higher prevalence was found in females (27.5% than in males (16.3% and this difference was significant (odds ratio 1.942, P=0.025. There was no significant association with the level of parental education, parental occupation, or number of children in the family (P>0.05. With respect to children's vaccination status and breastfeeding, there was a significant association (P<0.05. The marital status of the family, place of residence, and household size showed no significant association with the prevalence of measles virus. However, a significant association was observed in relation to maternal measles history (odds ratio 2.535, P=0.005 and maternal vaccination status (odds ratio 1.791, P=0.049, as well as between measles virus infection and all presenting symptoms, except for vomiting, malaria, typhoid, and pneumonia, which showed no significant association (P>0.05. Conclusion: The findings of

  16. Epidemiology of laboratory confirmed measles virus cases in the southern nations of Ethiopia, 2007–2014

    OpenAIRE

    Getahun, Mekonen; Beyene, Berhane; Ademe, Ayesheshem; Teshome, Birke; Tefera, Mesfin; Afework, Aklog; HaileMariam, Yoseph; Assefa, Esete; Hailegiorgis, Yonas; Asha, Anjelo

    2017-01-01

    Background In Ethiopia, measles case-based surveillance was introduced in 2004 as one strategy for measles control by laboratory confirmation of suspected cases. In this article, epidemiological distribution of laboratory-confirmed measles cases were reported from the Southern Nation Nationalities and Peoples Region (SNNPR) of Ethiopia between 2007 and 2014, as the region is one of the highly measles affected areas in Ethiopia. Method A serum sample was collected from all measles suspected ca...

  17. Protective immunity in macaques vaccinated with a modified vaccinia virus Ankara-based measles virus vaccine in the presence of passively acquired antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); L.S. Wyatt (Linda); R.L. de Swart (Rik); H.W. Vos (Helma); J. Groen (Jan); G. van Amerongen (Geert); R.S. van Binnendijk (Rob); S. Rozenblatt (Shmuel); B. Moss (Bernard); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractRecombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), encoding the measles virus (MV) fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) (MVA-FH) glycoproteins, was evaluated in an MV vaccination-challenge model with macaques. Animals were vaccinated twice in the absence or presence of passively transferred M

  18. Protective immunity in macaques vaccinated with a modified vaccinia virus Ankara-based measles virus vaccine in the presence of passively acquired antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); L.S. Wyatt (Linda); R.L. de Swart (Rik); H.W. Vos (Helma); J. Groen (Jan); R.S. van Binnendijk (Rob); S. Rozenblatt (Shmuel); B. Moss (Bernard); G. van Amerongen (Geert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractRecombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), encoding the measles virus (MV) fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) (MVA-FH) glycoproteins, was evaluated in an MV vaccination-challenge model with macaques. Animals were vaccinated twice in the absence or presence of passi

  19. Wild-type measles virus infection of primary epithelial cells occurs via the basolateral surface without syncytium formation or release of infectious virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ludlow (Martin); L.J. Rennick (Linda); S. Sarlang (Severine); G. Skibinski (Grzegorz); S. McQuaid (Stephen); T. Moore (Tara); R.L. de Swart (Rik); W.P. Duprex (Paul)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe lymphotropic and myelotropic nature of wild-type measles virus (wt-MV) is well recognized, with dendritic cells and lymphocytes expressing the MV receptor CD150 mediating systemic spread of the virus. Infection of respiratory epithelial cells has long been considered crucial for entr

  20. Assessment of the Utility of Whole Genome Sequencing of Measles Virus in the Characterisation of Outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raquel Penedos

    Full Text Available Measles is a highly infectious disease caused by measles virus (MeV. Despite the availability of a safe and cost-effective vaccine, measles is one of the world-leading causes of death in young children. Within Europe, there is a target for eliminating endemic measles in 2015, with molecular epidemiology required on 80% of cases for inclusion/exclusion of outbreak transmission chains. Currently, MeV is genotyped on the basis of a 450 nucleotide region of the nucleoprotein gene (N-450 and the hemagglutinin gene (H. However, this is not sufficiently informative for distinguishing endemic from imported MeV. We have developed an amplicon-based method for obtaining whole genome sequences (WGS using NGS or Sanger methodologies from cell culture isolates or oral fluid specimens, and have sequenced over 60 samples, including 42 from the 2012 outbreak in the UK.Overall, NGS coverage was over 90% for approximately 71% of the samples tested. Analysis of 32 WGS excluding 3' and 5' termini (WGS-t obtained from the outbreak indicates that the single nucleotide difference found between the two major groups of N-450 sequences detected during the outbreak is most likely a result of stochastic viral mutation during endemic transmission rather than of multiple importation events: earlier strains appear to have evolved into two distinct strain clusters in 2013, one containing strains with both outbreak-associated N-450 sequences. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis of each genomic region of MeV for the strains in this study suggests that the most information is acquired from the non-coding region located between the matrix and fusion protein genes (M/F NCR and the N-450 genotyping sequence, an observation supported by entropy analysis across genotypes.We suggest that both M/F NCR and WGS-t could be used to complement the information from classical epidemiology and N-450 sequencing to address specific questions in the context of measles elimination.

  1. Measles and Measles Vaccination: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, Johan Christiaan

    2016-12-01

    virus. Endemic transmission can be reestablished if rates of vaccination fall below the elimination threshold. Measles remains of high clinical importance. Health care professionals should be able to diagnose and manage an acute case and assist in prevention of the spread of measles during an outbreak. Health care professionals also play an important role in uptake of measles vaccination through establishing trusting relationships with parents, offering vaccination at indicated times, and engaging parents in discussion on facts and concerns about vaccination.

  2. Measles virus infection of SLAM (CD150) knockin mice reproduces tropism and immunosuppression in human infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Shinji; Ono, Nobuyuki; Seki, Fumio; Takeda, Makoto; Kura, Shinobu; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2007-02-01

    The human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM, also called CD150), a regulator of antigen-driven T-cell responses and macrophage functions, acts as a cellular receptor for measles virus (MV), and its V domain is necessary and sufficient for receptor function. We report here the generation of SLAM knockin mice in which the V domain of mouse SLAM was replaced by that of human SLAM. The chimeric SLAM had an expected distribution and normal function in the knockin mice. Splenocytes from the SLAM knockin mice permitted the in vitro growth of a virulent MV strain but not that of the Edmonston vaccine strain. Unlike in vitro infection, MV could grow only in SLAM knockin mice that also lacked the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR). After intraperitoneal or intranasal inoculation, MV was detected in the spleen and lymph nodes throughout the body but not in the thymus. Notably, the virus appeared first in the mediastinal lymph node after intranasal inoculation. Splenocytes from MV-infected IFNAR(-/-) SLAM knockin mice showed suppression of proliferative responses to concanavalin A. Thus, MV infection of SLAM knockin mice reproduces lymphotropism and immunosuppression in human infection, serving as a useful small animal model for measles.

  3. Sequence analysis of measles virus strains collected during the pre- and early-vaccination era in Denmark reveals a considerable diversity of ancient strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Schöller, S.; Schierup, M. H.

    2002-01-01

    A total of 199 serum samples from patients with measles collected in Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands from 1964 to 1983 were analysed by PCR. Measles virus (MV) RNA could be detected in 38 (19%) of the samples and a total of 18 strains were subjected to partial sequence analysis...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a Wild-Type Measles Virus Isolated during a 2016 Winter Outbreak in a Refugee Settlement in Calais, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Justine; Antona, Denise; Vabret, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles outbreaks are regularly reported in European countries despite efforts to improve vaccination coverage. In January 2016, an outbreak occurred in a refugee settlement in Calais, France. We report here the complete genome sequence of a wild-type measles virus isolated from a health care worker (MVi/Calais. FRA/01.16) infected during this outbreak. PMID:28280010

  5. Infection of lymphoid tissues in the macaque upper respiratory tract contributes to the emergence of transmissible measles virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ludlow (Martin); R. de Vries (René); K. Lemon (Ken); S. McQuaid (Stephen); E.L. Millar (Emma); G. van Amerongen (Geert); S. Yüksel (Selma); R.J. Verbugh (Joyce); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.L. de Swart (Rik); W.P. Duprex (Paul)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMeasles virus (MV), a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. MV is spread by aerosols but the mechanism(s) responsible for the high transmissibility of MV are largely unknown. We previously infected macaques with en

  6. Effect of multiple freeze-thaw cycles on detection of measles, mumps, and rubella virus antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Norman A; Huddleston, Jeanne M; Jacobson, Robert M; Wollan, Peter C; Poland, Gregory A

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effect of multiple freeze-thaw cycles on mumps, measles, and rubella virus serum antibody levels with whole-virus immunoglobulin G enzyme-linked immunoassays. Fresh serum samples from nine healthy adult volunteers were divided into six sets of five aliquots each. Samples were taken through a total of 10 freeze-thaw cycles and stored at 4 degrees C until assayed. Each assay measurement was done in replicates of five, and the mean value was reported. After completing 10 freeze-thaw cycles, we found no clinically or statistically significant effect on measured antibody levels and found no discernible detrimental effect on the ability to measure these antibodies by enzyme-linked immunoassays.

  7. HIV-1 infection in Zambian children impairs the development and avidity maturation of measles virus-specific immunoglobulin G after vaccination and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nitya; Moss, William J; Scott, Susana; Mugala, Nanthalile; Ndhlovu, Zaza M; Lilo, Kareem; Ryon, Judith J; Monze, Mwaka; Quinn, Thomas C; Cousens, Simon; Cutts, Felicity; Griffin, Diane E

    2009-10-01

    Endemic transmission of measles continues in many countries that have a high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) burden. The effects that HIV infection has on immune responses to measles and to measles vaccine can impact measles elimination efforts. Assays to measure antibody include the enzyme immunoassay (EIA), which measures immunoglobulin G (IgG) to all measles virus (MV) proteins, and the plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assay, which measures antibody to the hemagglutinin and correlates with protection. Antibody avidity may affect neutralizing capacity. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected Zambian children were studied after measles vaccination (n=44) or MV infection (n=57). Laboratory or wild-type MV strains were used to infect Vero or Vero/signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule (SLAM) cells in PRN assays. IgG to MV was measured by EIA, and avidity was determined by ammonium thiocyanate dissociation. HIV infection impaired EIA IgG responses after vaccination and measles but not PRN responses measured using laboratory-adapted MV. Avidity was lower among HIV-infected children 3 months after vaccination and 1 and 3 months after measles. Neutralization of wild-type MV infection of Vero/SLAM cells correlated with IgG avidity. Lower antibody quality and quantity in HIV-infected children after measles vaccination raise challenges for assuring the long-term protection of these children. Antibody quality in children receiving antiretroviral therapy requires assessment.

  8. Oncolytic targeting of androgen-sensitive prostate tumor by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV: consequences of deficient interferon-dependent antiviral defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbard Gene B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment utilizes viruses for selective infection and death of cancer cells without any adverse effect on normal cells. We previously reported that the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a novel oncolytic virus against androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. The present study extends the result to androgen-dependent prostate cancer, and explores the underlying mechanism that triggers RSV-induced oncolysis of prostate cancer cells. Methods The oncolytic effect of RSV on androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and on androgen-independent RM1 murine prostate cancer cells was studied in vitro in culture and in vivo in a xenograft or allograft tumor model. In vitro, cell viability, infectivity and apoptosis were monitored by MTT assay, viral plaque assay and annexin V staining, respectively. In vivo studies involved virus administration to prostate tumors grown in immune compromised nude mice and in syngeneic immune competent C57BL/6J mice. Anti-tumorogenic oncolytic activity was monitored by measuring tumor volume, imaging bioluminescent tumors in live animals and performing histopathological analysis and TUNEL assay with tumors Results We show that RSV imposes a potent oncolytic effect on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. RSV infectivity was markedly higher in LNCaP cells compared to the non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 human prostate cells. The enhanced viral burden led to LNCaP cell apoptosis and growth inhibition of LNCaP xenograft tumors in nude mice. A functional host immune response did not interfere with RSV-induced oncolysis, since growth of xenograft tumors in syngeneic C57BL/6J mice from murine RM1 cells was inhibited upon RSV administration. LNCaP cells failed to activate the type-I interferon (IFNα/β-induced transcription factor STAT-1, which is required for antiviral gene expression, although these cells could produce IFN in response to RSV infection. The

  9. Sickle Cells Abolish Melanoma Tumorigenesis in Hemoglobin SS Knockin Mice and Augment the Tumoricidal Effect of Oncolytic Virus In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chiang Wang; Willmon, Candice; Wu, Li-Chen; Knopick, Peter; Thoerner, Jutta; Vile, Richard; Townes, Tim M; Terman, David S

    2016-01-01

    Insights from the study of cancer resistance in animals have led to the discovery of novel anticancer pathways and opened new venues for cancer prevention and treatment. Sickle cells (SSRBCs) from subjects with homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA) have been shown to target hypoxic tumor niches, induce diffuse vaso-occlusion, and potentiate a tumoricidal response in a heme- and oxidant-dependent manner. These findings spawned the hypothesis that SSRBCs and the vasculopathic microenvironment of subjects with SCA might be inimical to tumor outgrowth and thereby constitute a natural antitumor defense. We therefore implanted the B16F10 melanoma into humanized hemoglobin SS knockin mice which exhibit the hematologic and vasculopathic sequelae of human SCA. Over the 31-day observation period, hemoglobin SS mice showed no significant melanoma outgrowth. By contrast, 68-100% of melanomas implanted in background and hemoglobin AA knockin control mice reached the tumor growth end point (p SS knockin mice also exhibited established markers of underlying vasculopathy, e.g., chronic hemolysis (anemia, reticulocytosis) and vascular inflammation (leukocytosis) that differed significantly from all control groups. Genetic differences or normal AA gene knockin do not explain the impaired tumor outgrowth in SS knockin mice. These data point instead to the chronic pro-oxidative vasculopathic network in these mice as the predominant cause. In related studies, we demonstrate the ability of the sickle cell component of this system to function as a therapeutic vehicle in potentiating the oncolytic/vasculopathic effect of RNA reovirus. Sickle cells were shown to efficiently adsorb and transfer the virus to melanoma cells where it induced apoptosis even in the presence of anti-reovirus neutralizing antibodies. In vivo, SSRBCs along with their viral cargo rapidly targeted the tumor and initiated a tumoricidal response exceeding that of free virus and similarly loaded normal RBCs without

  10. Toxicology and Biodistribution Studies for MGH2.1, an Oncolytic Virus that Expresses Two Prodrug-activating Genes, in Combination with Prodrugs

    OpenAIRE

    Kasai, Kazue; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Liu, Fang; Kerr, Samantha; Wang, Jiang, 1959-; Phelps, Mitch; Potter, Philip M.; Goins, William B; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Chiocca, E. Antonio

    2013-01-01

    MGH2.1 is a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) oncolytic virus that expresses two prodrug-activating transgenes: the cyclophosphamide (CPA)-activating cytochrome P4502B1 (CYP2B1) and the CPT11-activating secreted human intestinal carboxylesterase (shiCE). Toxicology and biodistribution of MGH2.1 in the presence/absence of prodrugs was evaluated in mice. MGH2.1 ± prodrugs was cytotoxic to human glioma cells, but not to normal cells. Pharmacokinetically, intracranial MGH2.1 did not significantl...

  11. Selective translation of the measles virus nucleocapsid mRNA by La protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa eInoue

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Measles, caused by measles virus (MeV infection, is the leading cause of death in children because of secondary infections attributable to MeV-induced immune suppression. Recently, we have shown that wild-type MeVs induce the suppression of protein synthesis in host cells (referred to as "shutoff" and that viral mRNAs are preferentially translated under shutoff conditions in infected cells. To determine the mechanism behind the preferential translation of viral mRNA, we focused on the 5 untranslated region (UTR of nucleocapsid (N mRNA. The La/SSB autoantigen (La was found to specifically bind to an N-5UTR probe. Recombinant La enhanced the translation of luciferase mRNA containing the N-5UTR (N-fLuc, and RNA interference of La suppressed N-fLuc translation. Furthermore, recombinant MeV lacking the La-binding motif in the N-5UTR displayed delayed viral protein synthesis and growth kinetics at an early phase of infection. These results suggest that La induced predominant translation of N mRNA via binding to its 5UTR under shutoff conditions. This is the first report on a cellular factor that specifically regulates paramyxovirus mRNA translation.

  12. Recombinant Measles Virus Vaccine Expressing the Nipah Virus Glycoprotein Protects against Lethal Nipah Virus Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Misako Yoneda; Marie-Claude Georges-Courbot; Fusako Ikeda; Miho Ishii; Noriyo Nagata; Frederic Jacquot; Hervé Raoul; Hiroki Sato; Chieko Kai

    2013-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study,...

  13. Measles outbreak reveals measles susceptibility among adults in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    implemented an accelerated measles control strategy that included ... To better understand the evolution ... history. The predominantly detected measles virus genotype was B3, circulating in concurrent ..... Global Measles and Rubella Strategic Plan ... dhsprogram.com/pubs/pdf/FR204/FR204c.pdf (accessed 25 August.

  14. Replication-competent, oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 mutants induce a bystander effect following ganciclovir treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chenhong; Mori, Isamu; Goshima, Fumi; Ushijima, Yoko; Nawa, Akihiro; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Yukihiro

    2007-10-01

    Cells expressing herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (tk) are killed by ganciclovir (GCV). Adjacent cells without HSV-tk also die, a phenomenon known as the 'bystander effect'. However, there is no evidence that replication-competent HSV induces a bystander effect in the presence of GCV. Therefore, we investigated the bystander effect in HEp-2 cells infected with replication-competent, oncolytic HSV-1 mutants, hrR3 and HF10. In cells infected at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 3, GCV did not induce apoptosis. At low MOIs of 0.3 and 0.03, however, a number of adjacent, uninfected cells apoptosed following GCV treatment. Irrespective of GCV treatment, HEp-2 cells expressed minimal levels of connexin 43 (Cx43). However, Cx43 expression was enhanced by GCV in response to infection with HF10 at an MOI of 0.3, but not at an MOI of 3. Expression of other proteins involved in gap junctions, including Cx26 and Cx40, was not augmented under these conditions. The PKA and PI3K signal transduction pathways are likely involved in enhanced Cx43 expression as inhibitors of these pathways prevented Cx43 upregulation. These results suggest that infection with replication-competent HSV-1 induces the bystander effect in cells treated with GCV because of efficient intercellular transport of active GCV through abundant gap junctions. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Ultrasound-induced cavitation enhances the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of an oncolytic virus in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Arvanitis, Costas D; Rifai, Bassel; Seymour, Leonard W; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-01-30

    We investigated whether ultrasound-induced cavitation at 0.5 MHz could improve the extravasation and distribution of a potent breast cancer-selective oncolytic adenovirus, AdEHE2F-Luc, to tumour regions that are remote from blood vessels. We developed a novel tumour-mimicking model consisting of a gel matrix containing human breast cancer cells traversed by a fluid channel simulating a tumour blood vessel, through which the virus and microbubbles could be made to flow. Ultrasonic pressures were chosen to maximize either broadband emissions, associated with inertial cavitation, or ultraharmonic emissions, associated with stable cavitation, while varying duty cycle to keep the total acoustic energy delivered constant for comparison across exposures. None of the exposure conditions tested affected cell viability in the absence of the adenovirus. When AdEHE2F-Luc was delivered via the vessel, inertial cavitation increased transgene expression in tumour cells by up to 200 times. This increase was not observed in the absence of Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor cell expression, discounting sonoporation as the mechanism of action. In the presence of inertial cavitation, AdEHE2F-Luc distribution was greatly improved in the matrix surrounding the vessel, particularly in the direction of the ultrasound beam; this enabled AdEHE2F-Luc to kill up to 80% of cancer cells within the ultrasound focal volume in the gel 24 hours after delivery, compared to 0% in the absence of cavitation.

  16. Systemic treatment of xenografts with vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 reveals the immunologic facet of oncolytic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hui

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GLV-1h68 is an attenuated recombinant vaccinia virus (VACV that selectively colonizes established human xenografts inducing their complete regression. Results Here, we explored xenograft/VACV/host interactions in vivo adopting organism-specific expression arrays and tumor cell/VACV in vitro comparing VACV replication patterns. There were no clear-cut differences in vitro among responding and non-responding tumors, however, tumor rejection was associated in vivo with activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs and innate immune host's effector functions (IEFs correlating with VACV colonization of the xenografts. These signatures precisely reproduce those observed in humans during immune-mediated tissue-specific destruction (TSD that causes tumor or allograft rejection, autoimmunity or clearance of pathogens. We recently defined these common pathways in the "immunologic constant of rejection" hypothesis (ICR. Conclusion This study provides the first prospective validation of a universal mechanism associated with TSD. Thus, xenograft infection by oncolytic VACV, beyond offering a promising therapy of established cancers, may represent a reliable pre-clinical model to test therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the central pathways leading to TSD; this information may lead to the identification of principles that could refine the treatment of cancer and chronic infection by immune stimulation or autoimmunity and allograft rejection through immune tolerance.

  17. Immunogenic Subviral Particles Displaying Domain III of Dengue 2 Envelope Protein Vectored by Measles Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira S. Harahap-Carrillo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines against dengue virus (DV are commercially nonexistent. A subunit vaccination strategy may be of value, especially if a safe viral vector acts as biologically active adjuvant. In this paper, we focus on an immunoglobulin-like, independently folded domain III (DIII from DV 2 envelope protein (E, which contains epitopes that elicits highly specific neutralizing antibodies. We modified the hepatitis B small surface antigen (HBsAg, S in order to display DV 2 DIII on a virus-like particle (VLP, thus generating the hybrid antigen DIII-S. Two varieties of measles virus (MV vectors were developed to express DIII-S. The first expresses the hybrid antigen from an additional transcription unit (ATU and the second additionally expresses HBsAg from a separate ATU. We found that this second MV vectoring the hybrid VLPs displaying DIII-S on an unmodified HBsAg scaffold were immunogenic in MV-susceptible mice (HuCD46Ge-IFNarko, eliciting robust neutralizing responses (averages against MV (1:1280 NT90, hepatitis B virus (787 mIU/mL, and DV2 (1:160 NT50 in all of the tested animals. Conversely, the MV vector expressing only DIII-S induced immunity against MV alone. In summary, DV2 neutralizing responses can be generated by displaying E DIII on a scaffold of HBsAg-based VLPs, vectored by MV.

  18. Granulomatous Vasculitis and Persistent Measles Virus Infection in Crohn’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Wakefield

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Based upon the recent observation of vasculitis in Crohn’s disease, a process that is more widespread than was recognized previously, the author investigated the possibility that this mechanism may provide an explanation for some of the clinical and histological idiosyncracies of this condition. In addition, it was suggested that the mesenteric microvascular endothelium may be a source of the persistent antigen that is responsible for ongoing cellular immunity in Crohn’s disease. This review discusses some of the studies designed to test these hypotheses, and discusses recent evidence for the presence of a measles-like virus in the endothelium in inflammatory foci, which may be relevant in the etiology of Crohn’s disease.

  19. In situ tumor vaccination with adenovirus vectors encoding measles virus fusogenic membrane proteins and cytokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dennis Hoffmann; Wibke Bayer; Oliver Wildner

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether intratumoral expression of measles virus fusogenic membrane glycoproteins H and "F (MV-FMG), encoded by an adenovirus vector Ad.MV-H/ F, alone or in combination with local coexpression of cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, IL-18, IL-21 or GM-CSF), can serve as a platform for inducing tumor-specific immune responses in colon cancer.METHODS: We used confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry to analyze cell-cell fusion after expression of MV-FMG by dye colocalization. In a syngeneic bilateral subcutaneous MC38 and Colon26 colon cancer model in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, we assessed the effect on both the directly vector-treated tumor as well as the contralateral, not directly vector-treated tumor. We assessed the induction of a tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response with a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay.RESULTS: We demonstrated in vitro that transduction of MC38 and Colon26 cells with Ad.MV-H/F resulted in dye colocalization, indicative of cell-cell fusion. In addition, in the syngeneic bilateral tumor model we demonstrated a significant regression of the directly vector-inoculated tumor upon intratumoral expression of MV-FMG alone or in combination with the tested cytokines. We observed the highest anti-neoplastic efficacy with MV-FMG and IL-21 coexpression. The degree of tumor regression of the not directly vector-treated tumor correlated with the anti-neoplastic response of the directly vector-treated tumor. This regression was mediated by a tumor-specific CTL response.CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that intratumoral expression of measles virus fusogenic membrane glycoproteins is a promising tool both for direct tumor treatment as well as for tumor vaccination approaches that can be further enhanced by cytokine coexpression.

  20. Oncolytic Viruses in Head and Neck Cancer: A New Ray of Hope in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and neck cancer, viruses, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and gene therapy. Revolutionary ..... Monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors alter regulatory .... administration of viruses to a patient with acute leukemia. A preliminary ...

  1. MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC MMR (Measles, Mumps, & Rubella) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc. ... Why get vaccinated? Measles, mumps, and rubella are serious ... common, especially among children. Measles Measles virus causes ...

  2. Nectin-4 Interactions Govern Measles Virus Virulence in a New Model of Pathogenesis, the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpeut, Sébastien; Sawatsky, Bevan; Wong, Xiao-Xiang; Frenzke, Marie; Cattaneo, Roberto; von Messling, Veronika

    2017-06-01

    In addition to humans, only certain nonhuman primates are naturally susceptible to measles virus (MeV) infection. Disease severity is species dependent, ranging from mild to moderate for macaques to severe and even lethal for certain New World monkey species. To investigate if squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus), which are reported to develop a course of disease similar to humans, may be better suited than macaques for the identification of virulence determinants or the evaluation of therapeutics, we infected them with a green fluorescent protein-expressing MeV. Compared to cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) infected with the same virus, the squirrel monkeys developed more-severe immunosuppression, higher viral load, and a broader range of clinical signs typical for measles. In contrast, infection with an MeV unable to interact with the epithelial receptor nectin-4, while causing immunosuppression, resulted in only a mild and transient rash and a short-lived elevation of the body temperature. Similar titers of the wild-type and nectin-4-blind MeV were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and lymph node homogenates, but only the wild-type virus was found in tracheal lavage fluids and urine. Thus, our study demonstrates the importance of MeV interactions with nectin-4 for clinical disease in the new and better-performing S. sciureus model of measles pathogenesis.IMPORTANCE The characterization of mechanisms underlying measles virus clinical disease has been hampered by the lack of an animal model that reproduces the course of disease seen in human patients. Here, we report that infection of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) fulfills these requirements. Comparative infection with wild-type and epithelial cell receptor-blind viruses demonstrated the importance of epithelial cell infection for clinical disease, highlighting the spread to epithelia as an attractive target for therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Herpes simplex virus type-1(HSV-1 oncolytic and highly fusogenic mutants carrying the NV1020 genomic deletion effectively inhibit primary and metastatic tumors in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Andrew T

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NV1020 oncolytic herpes simplex virus type-1 has shown significant promise for the treatment of many different types of tumors in experimental animal models and human trials. Previously, we described the construction and use of the NV1020-like virus OncSyn to treat human breast tumors implanted in nude mice. The syncytial mutation gKsyn1 (Ala-to-Val at position 40 was introduced into the OncSyn viral genome cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome using double-red mutagenesis in E. coli to produce the OncdSyn virus carrying syncytial mutations in both gB(syn3 and gK(syn1. Results The OncdSyn virus caused extensive virus-induced cell fusion in cell culture. The oncolytic potential of the OncSyn and OncdSyn viruses was tested in the highly metastatic syngeneic mouse model system, which utilizes 4T1 murine mammary cancer cells implanted within the interscapular region of Balb/c mice. Mice were given three consecutive intratumor injections of OncSyn, OncdSyn, or phosphate buffered saline four days apart. Both OncSyn and OncdSyn virus injections resulted in significant reduction of tumor sizes (p Conclusion These results show that the attenuated, but highly fusogenic OncSyn and OncdSyn viruses can effectively reduce primary and metastatic breast tumors in immuncompetent mice. The available bac-cloned OncSyn and OncdSyn viral genomes can be rapidly modified to express a number of different anti-tumor and immunomodulatory genes that can further enhance their anti-tumor potency.

  4. Plasticity in structural and functional interactions between the phosphoprotein and nucleoprotein of measles virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yaoling; Habchi, Johnny; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Padilla, André; Brunel, Joanna; Gerlier, Denis; Oglesbee, Michael; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-04-06

    The measles virus (MeV) phosphoprotein (P) tethers the polymerase to the nucleocapsid template for transcription and genome replication. Binding of P to nucleocapsid is mediated by the X domain of P (XD) and a conserved sequence (Box-2) within the C-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein (N(TAIL)). XD binding induces N(TAIL) α-helical folding, which in turn has been proposed to stabilize the polymerase-nucleocapsid complex, with cycles of binding and release required for transcription and genome replication. The current work directly assessed the relationships among XD-induced N(TAIL) folding, XD-N(TAIL) binding affinity, and polymerase activity. Amino acid substitutions that abolished XD-induced N(TAIL) α-helical folding were created within Box-2 of Edmonston MeV N(TAIL). Polymerase activity in minireplicons was maintained despite a 35-fold decrease in XD-N(TAIL) binding affinity or reduction/loss of XD-induced N(TAIL) alpha-helical folding. Recombinant infectious virus was recovered for all mutants, and transcriptase elongation rates remained within a 1.7-fold range of parent virus. Box-2 mutations did however impose a significant cost to infectivity, reflected in an increase in the amount of input genome required to match the infectivity of parent virus. Diminished infectivity could not be attributed to changes in virion protein composition or production of defective interfering particles, where changes from parent virus were within a 3-fold range. The results indicated that MeV polymerase activity, but not infectivity, tolerates amino acid changes in the XD-binding region of the nucleoprotein. Selectional pressure for conservation of the Box-2 sequence may thus reflect a role in assuring the fidelity of polymerase functions or the assembly of viral particles required for optimal infectivity.

  5. Plasticity in Structural and Functional Interactions between the Phosphoprotein and Nucleoprotein of Measles Virus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yaoling; Habchi, Johnny; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Padilla, André; Brunel, Joanna; Gerlier, Denis; Oglesbee, Michael; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    The measles virus (MeV) phosphoprotein (P) tethers the polymerase to the nucleocapsid template for transcription and genome replication. Binding of P to nucleocapsid is mediated by the X domain of P (XD) and a conserved sequence (Box-2) within the C-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein (NTAIL). XD binding induces NTAIL α-helical folding, which in turn has been proposed to stabilize the polymerase-nucleocapsid complex, with cycles of binding and release required for transcription and genome replication. The current work directly assessed the relationships among XD-induced NTAIL folding, XD-NTAIL binding affinity, and polymerase activity. Amino acid substitutions that abolished XD-induced NTAIL α-helical folding were created within Box-2 of Edmonston MeV NTAIL. Polymerase activity in minireplicons was maintained despite a 35-fold decrease in XD-NTAIL binding affinity or reduction/loss of XD-induced NTAIL alpha-helical folding. Recombinant infectious virus was recovered for all mutants, and transcriptase elongation rates remained within a 1.7-fold range of parent virus. Box-2 mutations did however impose a significant cost to infectivity, reflected in an increase in the amount of input genome required to match the infectivity of parent virus. Diminished infectivity could not be attributed to changes in virion protein composition or production of defective interfering particles, where changes from parent virus were within a 3-fold range. The results indicated that MeV polymerase activity, but not infectivity, tolerates amino acid changes in the XD-binding region of the nucleoprotein. Selectional pressure for conservation of the Box-2 sequence may thus reflect a role in assuring the fidelity of polymerase functions or the assembly of viral particles required for optimal infectivity. PMID:22318731

  6. Lack of association between measles virus vaccine and autism with enteropathy: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mady Hornig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The presence of measles virus (MV RNA in bowel tissue from children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and gastrointestinal (GI disturbances was reported in 1998. Subsequent investigations found no associations between MV exposure and ASD but did not test for the presence of MV RNA in bowel or focus on children with ASD and GI disturbances. Failure to replicate the original study design may contribute to continued public concern with respect to the safety of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR vaccine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The objective of this case-control study was to determine whether children with GI disturbances and autism are more likely than children with GI disturbances alone to have MV RNA and/or inflammation in bowel tissues and if autism and/or GI episode onset relate temporally to receipt of MMR. The sample was an age-matched group of US children undergoing clinically-indicated ileocolonoscopy. Ileal and cecal tissues from 25 children with autism and GI disturbances and 13 children with GI disturbances alone (controls were evaluated by real-time reverse transcription (RT-PCR for presence of MV RNA in three laboratories blinded to diagnosis, including one wherein the original findings suggesting a link between MV and ASD were reported. The temporal order of onset of GI episodes and autism relative to timing of MMR administration was examined. We found no differences between case and control groups in the presence of MV RNA in ileum and cecum. Results were consistent across the three laboratory sites. GI symptom and autism onset were unrelated to MMR timing. Eighty-eight percent of ASD cases had behavioral regression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides strong evidence against association of autism with persistent MV RNA in the GI tract or MMR exposure. Autism with GI disturbances is associated with elevated rates of regression in language or other skills and may represent an endophenotype distinct

  7. Measles virus-induced immunosuppression in SLAM knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Ritsuko; Ohno, Shinji; Ikegame, Satoshi; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2010-05-01

    Measles virus (MV) causes transient severe immunosuppression in patients, which may lead to secondary viral and bacterial infections, largely accounting for measles-related morbidity and mortality. MV is known to infect immune cells by using the human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM; also called CD150) as a cellular receptor, but the mechanism by which MV causes immunosuppression is not well understood. We show that MV infection of SLAM knock-in mice, in which the V domain of mouse SLAM was replaced by the V domain of human SLAM, crossed with alpha/beta-interferon receptor knockout mice, reproduced many immunological alterations observed in human patients. These included lymphopenia, inhibition of T-cell proliferation and antibody production, increased production of the Th2 cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4) and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, and suppression of contact hypersensitivity. Gross redistribution of lymphocytes among lymphoid tissues was not apparent in infected mice, nor was an increase of regulatory T cells. The numbers of lymphocytes in lymph nodes remained almost unchanged after MV infection, despite enhanced apoptosis, suggesting that lymph nodes were replenished with lymphocytes from the peripheral blood, which may have contributed to the observed lymphopenia in the spleen. Blocking of IL-10 by use of an anti-IL-10 receptor antibody ameliorated suppression of contact hypersensitivity in infected mice. These results indicate that SLAM knock-in mice lacking the expression of the alpha/beta-interferon receptor serve as a useful small animal model with which to elucidate MV-induced immunosuppression.

  8. Changing faces in virology: The Dutch shift from oncogenic to oncolytic viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Belcaid (Zineb); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); V.W. Beusechem (Victor); R.C. Hoeben (Rob)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractViruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular transform

  9. A combinational therapy of EGFR-CAR NK cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 for breast cancer brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xilin; Han, Jianfeng; Chu, Jianhong; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Charlie; Chen, Luxi; Wang, Youwei; Wang, Hongwei; Yi, Long; Elder, J Bradley; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-05-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are common in patients with metastatic breast cancer and indicate a poor prognosis. These tumors are especially resistant to currently available treatments due to multiple factors. However, the combination of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has not yet been explored in this context. In this study, NK-92 cells and primary NK cells were engineered to express the second generation of EGFR-CAR. The efficacies of anti-BCBMs of EGFR-CAR NK cells, oHSV-1, and their combination were tested in vitro and in a breast cancer intracranial mouse model. In vitro, compared with mock-transduced NK-92 cells or primary NK cells, EGFR-CAR-engineered NK-92 cells and primary NK cells displayed enhanced cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and MCF-7. oHSV-1 alone was also capable of lysing and destroying these cells. However, a higher cytolytic effect of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells was observed when combined with oHSV-1 compared to the monotherapies. In the mice intracranially pre-inoculated with EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells, intratumoral administration of either EGFR-CAR-transduced NK-92 cells or oHSV-1 mitigated tumor growth. Notably, the combination of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells with oHSV-1 resulted in more efficient killing of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells and significantly longer survival of tumor-bearing mice when compared to monotherapies. These results demonstrate that regional administration of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells combined with oHSV-1 therapy is a potentially promising strategy to treat BCBMs.

  10. High Genetic Diversity of Measles Virus, World Health Organization European Region, 2005–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kevin E.; Jin, Li; Santibanez, Sabine; Shulga, Sergey V.; Aboudy, Yair; Demchyshyna, Irina V.; Djemileva, Sultana; Echevarria, Juan E.; Featherstone, David F.; Hukic, Mirsada; Johansen, Kari; Litwinska, Bogumila; Lopareva, Elena; Lupulescu, Emilia; Mentis, Andreas; Mihneva, Zefira; Mosquera, Maria M.; Muscat, Mark; Naumova, M.A.; Nedeljkovic, Jasminka; Nekrasova, Ljubov S.; Magurano, Fabio; Fortuna, Claudia; Rebelo de Andrade, Helena; Richard, Jean-Luc; Robo, Alma; Rota, Paul A.; Samoilovich, Elena O.; Sarv, Inna; Semeiko, Galina V.; Shugayev, Nazim; Utegenova, Elmira S.; van Binnendijk, Rob; Vinner, Lasse; Waku-Kouomou, Diane; Wild, T. Fabian; Brown, David W.G.; Mankertz, Annette; Muller, Claude P.; Mulders, Mick N.

    2008-01-01

    During 2005–2006, nine measles virus (MV) genotypes were identified throughout the World Health Organization European Region. All major epidemics were associated with genotypes D4, D6, and B3. Other genotypes (B2, D5, D8, D9, G2, and H1) were only found in limited numbers of cases after importation from other continents. The genetic diversity of endemic D6 strains was low; genotypes C2 and D7, circulating in Europe until recent years, were no longer identified. The transmission chains of several indigenous MV strains may thus have been interrupted by enhanced vaccination. However, multiple importations from Africa and Asia and virus introduction into highly mobile and unvaccinated communities caused a massive spread of D4 and B3 strains throughout much of the region. Thus, despite the reduction of endemic MV circulation, importation of MV from other continents caused prolonged circulation and large outbreaks after their introduction into unvaccinated and highly mobile communities. PMID:18258089

  11. Preclinical Evaluation of Oncolytic Δγ134.5 Herpes Simplex Virus Expressing Interleukin-12 for Therapy of Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Cody

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The metastasis of breast cancer to the brain and central nervous system (CNS is a problem of increasing importance. As improving treatments continue to extend patient survival, the incidence of CNS metastases from breast cancer is on the rise. New treatments are needed, as current treatments are limited by deleterious side effects and are generally palliative. We have previously described an oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV, designated M002, which lacks both copies of the γ134.5 neurovirulence gene and carries a murine interleukin 12 (IL-12 expression cassette, and have validated its antitumor efficacy in a variety of preclinical models of primary brain tumors. However, M002 has not been yet evaluated for use against metastatic brain tumors. Here, we demonstrate the following: both human breast cancer and murine mammary carcinoma cells support viral replication and IL-12 expression from M002; M002 replicates in and destroys breast cancer cells from a variety of histological subtypes, including “triple-negative” and HER2 overexpressing; M002 improves survival in an immunocompetent model more effectively than does a non-cytokine control virus. Thus, we conclude from this proof-of-principle study that a γ134.5-deleted IL-12 expressing oncolytic HSV may be a potential new therapy for breast cancer brain metastases.

  12. Complete genome sequence analysis of Seneca Valley virus-001, a novel oncolytic picornavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Laura M; Knowles, Nick J; Reddy, P Seshidar; Xu, Ling; Hay, Carl; Hallenbeck, Paul L

    2008-05-01

    The complete genome sequence of Seneca Valley virus-001 (SVV-001), a small RNA virus, was determined and was shown to have typical picornavirus features. The 7280 nt long genome was predicted to contain a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 666 nt, followed by a single long open reading frame consisting of 6543 nt, which encodes a 2181 aa polyprotein. This polyprotein could potentially be cleaved into 12 polypeptides in the standard picornavirus L-4-3-4 layout. A 3' UTR of 71 nt was followed by a poly(A) tail of unknown length. Comparisons with other picornaviruses showed that the P1, 2C, 3C and 3D polypeptides of SVV-001 were related most closely to those of the cardioviruses, although they were not related as closely to those of encephalomyocarditis virus and Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus as the latter were to each other. Most other regions of the polyprotein differed considerably from those of all other known picornaviruses. SVV-001 contains elements of an internal ribosome entry site reminiscent of that found in hepatitis C virus and a number of genetically diverse picornaviruses. SVV-001 is a novel picornavirus and it is proposed that it be classified as the prototype species in a novel genus named 'Senecavirus'.

  13. Preferential colonization of metastases by oncolytic vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68 in a human PC-3 prostate cancer model in nude mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Donat

    Full Text Available Recently, we showed that the oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 has a significant therapeutic potential in treating lymph node metastases of human PC-3 prostate carcinoma in tumor xenografts. In this study, underlying mechanisms of the virus-mediated metastases reduction were analyzed. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that virus-treatment resulted in a drastically decrease of blood and lymph vessels, representing essential routes for PC-3 cell migration, in both tumors and metastases. Thus, GLV-1h68 drastically reduced essential routes for the metastatic spread of PC-3 cells. Furthermore, analysis of viral distribution in GLV-1h68-injected tumor-bearing mice by plaque assays, revealed significantly higher virus titers in metastases compared to solid tumors. To elucidate conditions potentially mediating the preferential viral colonization and eradication of metastases, microenvironmental components of uninfected tumors and metastases were compared by microscopic studies. These analyses revealed that PC-3 lymph node metastases showed increased vascular permeability, higher proliferation status of tumor cells as determined by BrdU- and Ki-67 assays and lesser necrosis of PC-3 cells than solid tumors. Moreover, an increased number of immune cells (MHCII(+/CD68(+ macrophages, MHCII(+/CD19(+ B lymphocytes combined with an up-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was observed in metastases in comparison to primary PC-3 tumors. We propose that these microenvironmental components mediated the metastatic tropism of GLV-1h68. Therefore, vaccinia virus-based oncolytic virotherapy might offer a novel treatment of metastatic prostate carcinomas in humans.

  14. Vaccination against measles: a neverending story.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); R.L. de Swart (Rik); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractMeasles, a highly contagious viral disease, is a major childhood killer in developing countries, accounting for almost 1 million deaths every year globally. Measles virus normally does not cause a persistent infection, no animal reservoir for measles virus exists, no vector is involved

  15. Vaccination against measles: a neverending story.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); R.L. de Swart (Rik); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractMeasles, a highly contagious viral disease, is a major childhood killer in developing countries, accounting for almost 1 million deaths every year globally. Measles virus normally does not cause a persistent infection, no animal reservoir for measles virus exists, no vector is involved i

  16. Measles virus antibody responses in children randomly assigned to receive standard-titer edmonston-zagreb measles vaccine at 4.5 and 9 months of age, 9 months of age, or 9 and 18 months of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Cesario; Garly, May-Lill; Bale, Carlitos

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization recommends administration of measles vaccine (MV) at age 9 months in low-income countries. We tested the measles virus antibody response at 4.5, 9, 18, and 24 months of age for children randomly assigned to receive standard-titer Edmonston-Zagreb MV at 4.5 and 9 months......, at 9 months, or at 9 and 18 months of age. At 4.5 months of age, 75% had nonprotective measles virus antibody levels. Following receipt of MV at 4.5 months of age, 77% (316/408) had protective antibody levels at 9 months of age; after a second dose at 9 months of age, 97% (326/337) had protective...... than in the group that received MV at 9 months of age (P = .0001). In conclusion, an early 2-dose MV schedule was associated with protective measles virus antibody levels at 24 months of age in nearly all children. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00168558....

  17. Glial activation precedes seizures and hippocampal neurodegeneration in measles virus-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrmann, Elin; Guidetti, Paolo; Löve, Arthur; Williamson, John; Bertram, Edward H; Schwarcz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Intracerebral injection of hamster neurotropic (HNT) measles virus in weanling Balb/C mice leads to an encephalitis, which is characterized by glial activation, behavioral seizures, selective neurodegeneration, and, after approximately 7 days, death. To provide a better understanding of the underlying molecular pathology, we studied seizure evolution by continuously monitoring electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, examined neuroglia and neurons histologically, and measured the brain content of glia-derived neuroactive metabolites of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation. Microglia and astrocytes were activated as early as postinoculation day (PID) 1, with reactive microglia lining the extent of the alveus. This was followed by a more extensive microglial activation that specifically outlined hippocampal pyramidal neurons in areas CA1-CA3 and by increases in the hippocampal levels of the neurotoxins 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and quinolinic acid (QUIN). These changes preceded the onset of EEG seizures, which had a mean onset of 108 h after inoculation. Prominent hippocampal cell loss, demonstrated by Nissl- and silver staining, was apparent by PID 5. Thus, we speculate that early glial reactions to HNT inoculation result in the excess formation of 3-HK and QUIN, which in turn causes subclinical seizure activity, behavioral seizures, and, eventually, neurodegeneration. In addition to its conceptual implications, our study indicates that timely interventions modulating glial activation or 3-HK/QUIN synthesis may be of benefit in preventing or arresting seizure-induced neuronal damage.

  18. Synergistic Effects of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Mexican Seaweeds against Measles Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Morán-Santibañez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfated polysaccharides (SPs extracted from five seaweed samples collected or cultivated in Mexico (Macrocystis pyrifera, Eisenia arborea, Pelvetia compressa, Ulva intestinalis, and Solieria filiformis were tested in this study in order to evaluate their effect on measles virus in vitro. All polysaccharides showed antiviral activity (as measured by the reduction of syncytia formation and low cytotoxicity (MTT assay at inhibitory concentrations. SPs from Eisenia arborea and Solieria filiformis showed the highest antiviral activities (confirmed by qPCR and were selected to determine their combined effect. Their synergistic effect was observed at low concentrations (0.0274 μg/mL and 0.011 μg/mL of E. arborea and S. filiformis SPs, resp., which exhibited by far a higher inhibitory effect (96% syncytia reduction in comparison to the individual SP effects (50% inhibition with 0.275 μg/mL and 0.985 μg/mL of E. arborea and S. filiformis, resp.. Time of addition experiments and viral penetration assays suggest that best activities of these SPs occur at different stages of infection. The synergistic effect would allow reducing the treatment dose and toxicity and minimizing or delaying the induction of antiviral resistance; sulfated polysaccharides of the tested seaweed species thus appear as promising candidates for the development of natural antiviral agents.

  19. Heparin-like glycosaminoglycans prevent the infection of measles virus in SLAM-negative cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao-Muto, Yuri; Yoneda, Misako; Seki, Takahiro; Watanabe, Akira; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Fujita, Kentaro; Kai, Chieko

    2008-12-01

    The wide tissue tropism of the measles virus (MV) suggests that it involves ubiquitously expressed molecules. We have constructed a recombinant MV expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (rMV-EGFP) and demonstrated that the rMV-EGFP infected several cell types (HEK-293, HepG2, Hep3B, Huh7, and WRL68 cells) that do not express the human signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), which is known as a cellular receptor for morbilliviruses. MV infection of HEK-293 and HepG2 cells was not inhibited in an infectivity-inhibition assay using an anti-SLAM monoclonal antibody, indicating that MV could infect cells without using SLAM. Soluble heparin (HP) inhibited the rMV-EGFP infectivity in SLAM-negative cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Direct interaction between purified virions and HP was detected in a surface plasmon resonance assay. We also demonstrated that the hemagglutinin (H) protein, but not the fusion (F) protein is responsible for the interaction between the virions and HP. Taken together, our results suggest that HP-like glycosaminoglycans bind to the H protein of MV and play a key role in the infection of SLAM-negative cells.

  20. The measles virus phosphoprotein interacts with the linker domain of STAT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaux, Patricia, E-mail: devaux.patricia@mayo.edu; Priniski, Lauren; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2013-09-15

    The measles virus (MV) phosphoprotein (P) and V proteins block the interferon (IFN) response by impeding phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) by the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1). We characterized how STAT1 mutants interact with P and JAK1 phosphorylation. Certain mutants of the linker, the Src-homology 2 domain (SH2), or the transactivation domain had reduced or abolished phosphorylation through JAK1 after IFN treatment. Other mutants, mainly localized in the linker, failed to interact with P as documented by the lack of interference with nuclear translocation. Thus the functional footprint of P on STAT1 localizes mainly to the linker domain; there is also some overlap with the STAT1 phosphorylation functional footprint on the SH2 domain. Based on these observations, we discuss how the MV-P might operate to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway. - Highlights: • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for MV-P interaction. • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for STAT1 phosphorylation. • Residues interferring with both functions have similar location on STAT1. • The viral P and V proteins may operate in concert to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway.

  1. Synergistic Effects of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Mexican Seaweeds against Measles Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán-Santibañez, Karla; Cruz-Suárez, Lucia Elizabeth; Ricque-Marie, Denis; Robledo, Daniel; Freile-Pelegrín, Yolanda; Peña-Hernández, Mario A.; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) extracted from five seaweed samples collected or cultivated in Mexico (Macrocystis pyrifera, Eisenia arborea, Pelvetia compressa, Ulva intestinalis, and Solieria filiformis) were tested in this study in order to evaluate their effect on measles virus in vitro. All polysaccharides showed antiviral activity (as measured by the reduction of syncytia formation) and low cytotoxicity (MTT assay) at inhibitory concentrations. SPs from Eisenia arborea and Solieria filiformis showed the highest antiviral activities (confirmed by qPCR) and were selected to determine their combined effect. Their synergistic effect was observed at low concentrations (0.0274 μg/mL and 0.011 μg/mL of E. arborea and S. filiformis SPs, resp.), which exhibited by far a higher inhibitory effect (96% syncytia reduction) in comparison to the individual SP effects (50% inhibition with 0.275 μg/mL and 0.985 μg/mL of E. arborea and S. filiformis, resp.). Time of addition experiments and viral penetration assays suggest that best activities of these SPs occur at different stages of infection. The synergistic effect would allow reducing the treatment dose and toxicity and minimizing or delaying the induction of antiviral resistance; sulfated polysaccharides of the tested seaweed species thus appear as promising candidates for the development of natural antiviral agents. PMID:27419139

  2. Conformational Analysis of the Partially Disordered Measles Virus NTAIL-XD Complex by SDSL EPR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavalenka, Aleh; Urbančič, Iztok; Belle, Valérie; Rouger, Sabrina; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Kure, Sandra; Fournel, André; Longhi, Sonia; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Strancar, Janez

    2010-01-01

    To characterize the structure of dynamic protein systems, such as partly disordered protein complexes, we propose a novel approach that relies on a combination of site-directed spin-labeled electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and modeling of local rotation conformational spaces. We applied this approach to the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein (NTAIL) both free and in complex with the X domain (XD, aa 459–507) of the viral phosphoprotein. By comparing measured and modeled temperature-dependent restrictions of the side-chain conformational spaces of 12 SL cysteine-substituted NTAIL variants, we showed that the 490–500 region of NTAIL is prestructured in the absence of the partner, and were able to quantitatively estimate, for the first time to our knowledge, the extent of the α-helical sampling of the free form. In addition, we showed that the 505–525 region of NTAIL conserves a significant degree of freedom even in the bound form. The latter two findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the reported rather high affinity of the NTAIL-XD binding reaction. Due to the nanosecond timescale of X-band EPR spectroscopy, we were also able to monitor the disordering in the 488–525 region of NTAIL, in particular the unfolding of the α-helical region when the temperature was increased from 281 K to 310 K. PMID:20303863

  3. Measles Virus-Specific Immunoglobulin G Isotype Immune Response in Early and Late Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, María Beatríz; Martínez, Laura; Giordano, Miguel; Zapata, Marta; Passeggi, Carlos; De Wolff, María Cristina; Nates, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    A total of 154 human serum samples (32 acute-phase and 22 convalescent-phase serum samples obtained within a week and between days 8 and 26 after the onset of rash, respectively, and 100 samples drawn from healthy immune adults) were processed by an immunofluorescence assay for the detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM), total immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4 measles virus-specific antibodies. In the acute phase, IgG1 was seen first, followed by IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4 responses, the mean seropositivity of which gradually increased during convalescence, reaching 100% (standard deviation [SD], 84 to 100%), 57% (SD, 34 to 80%), 86% (SD, 66 to 100%), and 86% (SD, 66 to 100%), respectively. IgG2 rose and fell in connection with IgG3 subclass antibodies, showing a rate of detection of IgG2 and/or IgG3 subclass antibodies of 95.5% (range, 100 to 86.5%) in the convalescent phase of infection. The mean percentage of measles IgG2 and IgG3 seropositivity dropped significantly during the memory phase, to 2% (range, 2 to 6%) and 3% (range, 3 to 7%), respectively (P < 0.05); meanwhile IgG1 and IgG4 subclass responses remained relatively unmodified in samples obtained years after infection (mean 100% [SD, 96 to 100%] and 86% [SD, 79 to 93%], respectively). Results obtained defined two highly different immune isotypic response patterns. One pattern is restrictive to IgG2 and/or IgG3 in the convalescent phase and is kinetically similar to the IgM antibody response, so its detection could be referred to as a recent viral activity. On the other hand, IgG1 and IgG4 were detected in both the convalescent and memory phases of the immune response, but their isolated occurrence without IgG2 and IgG3 could be related to the long-lasting immunity. PMID:11136766

  4. Structure of Seneca Valley Virus-001: an oncolytic picornavirus representing a new genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Sangita; Reddy, Seshidhar P; Loo, Jackie; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Hallenbeck, Paul L; Reddy, Vijay S

    2008-10-01

    The crystal structure of Seneca Valley Virus-001 (SVV-001), the representative member of a new genus, Senecavirus, is reported at 2.3A resolution. SVV-001 is the first naturally occurring nonpathogenic picornavirus shown to mediate selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells with neuroendocrine cancer features. The nonsegmented (+) ssRNA genome of SVV-001 shares closest sequence similarity with the genomes of the members of Cardiovirus. The overall tertiary structure of VP1-VP4 subunits is conserved with the exception of loops, especially those of VP1 that show large deviations relative to the members of the cardioviruses. The surface loops of VP1 and VP2 are predicted to mediate cell tropism of SVV-001. In addition, the organization of the packaged nucleic acid density indicates that certain regions of VP2 and VP4 interact closely with the packaged nucleic acid.

  5. Measles Outbreak among Previously Immunized Adult Healthcare Workers, China, 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengyi Zhang; Yuan Zhao; Lili Yang; Changhong Lu; Ying Meng; Xiaoli Guan; Hongjin An; Meizhong Zhang; Wenqin Guo; Bo Shang; Jing Yu

    2016-01-01

    Measles is caused by measles virus belonging to genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. Vaccination has played a critical role in controlling measles infection worldwide. However, in the recent years, outbreaks of measles infection still occur in many developing countries. Here, we report an outbreak of measles among healthcare workers and among the 60 measles infected patients 50 were healthcare workers including doctors, nurses, staff, and medics. Fifty-one patients (85%) tested ...

  6. The combined effects of oncolytic reovirus plus Newcastle disease virus and reovirus plus parvovirus on U87 and U373 cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkassar, Muhannad; Gärtner, Barbara; Roemer, Klaus; Graesser, Friedrich; Rommelaere, Jean; Kaestner, Lars; Haeckel, Isabelle; Graf, Norbert

    2011-09-01

    Previous results had documented oncolytic capacity of reovirus, parvovirus and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) on several tumor cell types. To test whether combinations of these viruses may increase this capacity, human U87- and U373-glioblastoma cells, in vitro or xenografted into immuno-compromised mice, were subjected to simultaneous double infections and analyzed. Our results show that reovirus (serotype-3) plus NDV (Hitcher-B1) and reovirus plus parvovirus-H1 lead to a significant increase in tumor cell killing in vitro in both cell lines (Kruskal-Wallis test, P 95%) after combined infection. These data thus indicate that a synergistic anti-tumor effect can be achieved by the combined infection with oncolytic viruses.

  7. Utility of a Herpes Oncolytic Virus for the Detection of Neural Invasion By Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziv Gil

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Prostate, pancreatic, and head and neck carcinomas have a high propensity to invade nerves. Surgical resection is a treatment modality for these patients, but it may incur significant deficits. The development of an imaging method able to detect neural invasion (NI by cancer cells may guide surgical resection and facilitate preservation of normal nerves. We describe an imaging method for the detection of NI using a herpes simplex virus, NV1066, carrying tyrosine kinase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP. Infection of pancreatic (MiaPaCa2, prostate (PC3 and DU145, and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC3 cell lines with NV1066 induced a high expression of eGFP in vitro. An in vivo murine model of NI was established by implanting tumors into the sciatic nerves of nude mice. Nerves were then injected with NV1066, and infection was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Positron emission tomography with [18F]-2′-fluoro-2′-deoxyarabinofuranosyl-5-ethyluracil performed showed significantly higher uptake in NI than in control animals. Intraoperative fluorescent stereoscopic imaging revealed eGFP signal in NI treated with NV1066. These findings show that NV1066 may be an imaging method to enhance the detection of nerves infiltrated by cancer cells. This method may improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurotrophic cancers by reducing injury to normal nerves and facilitating identification of infiltrated nerves requiring resection.

  8. Measles virus nucleocapsid protein increases osteoblast differentiation in Paget’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramachi, Jumpei; Nagata, Yuki; Mohammad, Khalid; Inagaki, Yuji; Ohata, Yasuhisa; Guise, Theresa; Michou, Laëtitia; Brown, Jacques P.; Windle, Jolene J.; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Roodman, G. David

    2016-01-01

    Paget’s disease (PD) is characterized by focal and dramatic bone resorption and formation. Treatments that target osteoclasts (OCLs) block both pagetic bone resorption and formation; therefore, PD offers key insights into mechanisms that couple bone resorption and formation. Here, we evaluated OCLs from 3 patients with PD and determined that measles virus nucleocapsid protein (MVNP) was expressed in 70% of these OCLs. Moreover, transgenic mice with OCL-specific expression of MVNP (MVNP mice) developed PD-like bone lesions that required MVNP-dependent induction of high IL-6 expression levels in OCLs. In contrast, mice harboring a knockin of p62P394L (p62-KI mice), which is the most frequent PD-associated mutation, exhibited increased bone resorption, but not formation. Evaluation of OCLs from MVNP, p62-KI, and WT mice revealed increased IGF1 expression in MVNP-expressing OCLs that resulted from the high IL-6 expression levels in these cells. IL-6, in turn, increased the expression of coupling factors, specifically ephrinB2 on OCLs and EphB4 on osteoblasts (OBs). IGF1 enhanced ephrinB2 expression on OCLs and OB differentiation. Importantly, ephrinB2 and IGF1 levels were increased in MVNP-expressing OCLs from patients with PD and MVNP-transduced human OCLs compared with levels detected in controls. Further, anti-IGF1 or anti-IGF1R blocked Runx2 and osteocalcin upregulation in OBs cocultured with MVNP-expressing OCLs. These results suggest that in PD, MVNP upregulates IL-6 and IGF1 in OCLs to increase ephrinB2-EphB4 coupling and bone formation. PMID:26878170

  9. Cytosolic 5'-triphosphate ended viral leader transcript of measles virus as activator of the RIG I-mediated interferon response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Plumet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Double stranded RNA (dsRNA is widely accepted as an RNA motif recognized as a danger signal by the cellular sentries. However, the biology of non-segmented negative strand RNA viruses, or Mononegavirales, is hardly compatible with the production of such dsRNA. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During measles virus infection, the IFN-beta gene transcription was found to be paralleled by the virus transcription, but not by the virus replication. Since the expression of every individual viral mRNA failed to activate the IFN-beta gene, we postulated the involvement of the leader RNA, which is a small not capped and not polyadenylated RNA firstly transcribed by Mononegavirales. The measles virus leader RNA, synthesized both in vitro and in vivo, was efficient in inducing the IFN-beta expression, provided that it was delivered into the cytosol as a 5'-trisphosphate ended RNA. The use of a human cell line expressing a debilitated RIG-I molecule, together with overexpression studies of wild type RIG-I, showed that the IFN-beta induction by virus infection or by leader RNA required RIG-I to be functional. RIG-I binds to leader RNA independently from being 5-trisphosphate ended; while a point mutant, Q299A, predicted to establish contacts with the RNA, fails to bind to leader RNA. Since the 5'-triphosphate is required for optimal RIG-I activation but not for leader RNA binding, our data support that RIG-I is activated upon recognition of the 5'-triphosphate RNA end. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RIG-I is proposed to recognize Mononegavirales transcription, which occurs in the cytosol, while scanning cytosolic RNAs, and to trigger an IFN response when encountering a free 5'-triphosphate RNA resulting from a mislocated transcription activity, which is therefore considered as the hallmark of a foreign invader.

  10. 9 CFR 113.313 - Measles Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Vaccines § 113.313 Measles Vaccine. Measles Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Measles Vaccine. 113.313 Section 113.313 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  11. Oncolytic virotherapy in veterinary medicine: current status and future prospects for canine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Sandeep S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oncolytic viruses refer to those that are able to eliminate malignancies by direct targeting and lysis of cancer cells, leaving non-cancerous tissues unharmed. Several oncolytic viruses including adenovirus strains, canine distemper virus and vaccinia virus strains have been used for canine cancer therapy in preclinical studies. However, in contrast to human studies, clinical trials with oncolytic viruses for canine cancer patients have not been reported. An 'ideal' virus has yet to be identified. This review is focused on the prospective use of oncolytic viruses in the treatment of canine tumors - a knowledge that will undoubtedly contribute to the development of oncolytic viral agents for canine cancer therapy in the future.

  12. Application of the World Health Organization Programmatic Assessment Tool for Risk of Measles Virus Transmission-Lessons Learned from a Measles Outbreak in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jennifer B; Badiane, Ousseynou; Lam, Eugene; Nicholson, Jennifer; Oumar Ba, Ibrahim; Diallo, Aliou; Fall, Amadou; Masresha, Balcha G; Goodson, James L

    2016-09-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) African Region set a goal for regional measles elimination by 2020; however, regional measles incidence was 125/1,000,000 in 2012. To support elimination efforts, the WHO and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed a tool to assess performance of measles control activities and identify high-risk areas at the subnational level. The tool uses routinely collected data to generate district-level risk scores across four categories: population immunity, surveillance quality, program performance, and threat assessment. To pilot test this tool, we used retrospective data from 2006 to 2008 to identify high-risk districts in Senegal; results were compared with measles case-based surveillance data from 2009 when Senegal experienced a large measles outbreak. Seventeen (25%) of 69 districts in Senegal were classified as high or very high risk. The tool highlighted how each of the four categories contributed to the total risk scores for high or very high risk districts. Measles case-based surveillance reported 986 cases during 2009, including 368 laboratory-confirmed, 540 epidemiologically linked, and 78 clinically compatible cases. The seven districts with the highest numbers of laboratory-confirmed or epidemiologically linked cases were within the capital region of Dakar. All except one of these seven districts were estimated to be high or very high risk, suggesting that districts identified as high risk by the tool have the potential for measles outbreaks. Prospective use of this tool is recommended to help immunization and surveillance program managers identify high-risk areas in which to strengthen specific programmatic weaknesses and mitigate risk for potential measles outbreaks.

  13. Resistance to oncolytic myxoma virus therapy in nf1(-/-/trp53(-/- syngeneic mouse glioma models is independent of anti-viral type-I interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz J Zemp

    Full Text Available Despite promising preclinical studies, oncolytic viral therapy for malignant gliomas has resulted in variable, but underwhelming results in clinical evaluations. Of concern are the low levels of tumour infection and viral replication within the tumour. This discrepancy between the laboratory and the clinic could result from the disparity of xenograft versus syngeneic models in determining in vivo viral infection, replication and treatment efficacy. Here we describe a panel of primary mouse glioma lines derived from Nf1 (+/- Trp53 (+/- mice in the C57Bl/6J background for use in the preclinical testing of the oncolytic virus Myxoma (MYXV. These lines show a range of susceptibility to MYXV replication in vitro, but all succumb to viral-mediated cell death. Two of these lines orthotopically grafted produced aggressive gliomas. Intracranial injection of MYXV failed to result in sustained viral replication or treatment efficacy, with minimal tumour infection that was completely resolved by 7 days post-infection. We hypothesized that the stromal production of Type-I interferons (IFNα/β could explain the resistance seen in these models; however, we found that neither the cell lines in vitro nor the tumours in vivo produce any IFNα/β in response to MYXV infection. To confirm IFNα/β did not play a role in this resistance, we ablated the ability of tumours to respond to IFNα/β via IRF9 knockdown, and generated identical results. Our studies demonstrate that these syngeneic cell lines are relevant preclinical models for testing experimental glioma treatments, and show that IFNα/β is not responsible for the MYXV treatment resistance seen in syngeneic glioma models.

  14. Resistance to oncolytic myxoma virus therapy in nf1(-/-)/trp53(-/-) syngeneic mouse glioma models is independent of anti-viral type-I interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Maxwell, Lori; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical studies, oncolytic viral therapy for malignant gliomas has resulted in variable, but underwhelming results in clinical evaluations. Of concern are the low levels of tumour infection and viral replication within the tumour. This discrepancy between the laboratory and the clinic could result from the disparity of xenograft versus syngeneic models in determining in vivo viral infection, replication and treatment efficacy. Here we describe a panel of primary mouse glioma lines derived from Nf1 (+/-) Trp53 (+/-) mice in the C57Bl/6J background for use in the preclinical testing of the oncolytic virus Myxoma (MYXV). These lines show a range of susceptibility to MYXV replication in vitro, but all succumb to viral-mediated cell death. Two of these lines orthotopically grafted produced aggressive gliomas. Intracranial injection of MYXV failed to result in sustained viral replication or treatment efficacy, with minimal tumour infection that was completely resolved by 7 days post-infection. We hypothesized that the stromal production of Type-I interferons (IFNα/β) could explain the resistance seen in these models; however, we found that neither the cell lines in vitro nor the tumours in vivo produce any IFNα/β in response to MYXV infection. To confirm IFNα/β did not play a role in this resistance, we ablated the ability of tumours to respond to IFNα/β via IRF9 knockdown, and generated identical results. Our studies demonstrate that these syngeneic cell lines are relevant preclinical models for testing experimental glioma treatments, and show that IFNα/β is not responsible for the MYXV treatment resistance seen in syngeneic glioma models.

  15. TBK1 Mediates Critical Effects of Measles Virus Nucleocapsid Protein (MVNP) on Pagetic Osteoclast Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Quanhong; Sammut, Bénédicte; Wang, Feng-Ming; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Windle, Jolene J.; Roodman, G. David; Galson, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is characterized by abnormal osteoclasts with unique characteristics that include: increased sensitivity of osteoclast progenitors to 1,25(OH)2D3, RANKL and TNF-α, increased osteoclast numbers, increased expression of IL-6 and several transcription factors. We recently reported that measles virus nucleocapsid protein (MVNP) plays a key role in the development of these abnormal osteoclasts. MVNP can induce the pagetic osteoclast phenotype in vitro and in vivo in TRAP-MVNP transgenic mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which MVNP generates pagetic osteoclasts have not been determined. TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and IκB kinase-ɛ (IKKɛ) are IKK family members which complex with MVNP and activate both IRF3 and NF-κB pathways. MVNP increases the amount of TBK1 protein in bone marrow monocytes (BMM). Interestingly, we found that RANKL increased TBK1 and IKKɛ early in osteoclast differentiation, suggesting a possible role in normal osteoclastogenesis. However, only TBK1 is further increased in osteoclasts formed by TRAP-MVNP BMM due to increased TBK1 protein stability. TBK1 over-expression induced IL6 promoter reporter activity, and elevated endogenous IL6 mRNA and p65 NF-κB, TAF12 and ATF7 proteins in several cell lines. Over-expression of TBK1 was insufficient to induce pagetic osteoclasts from WT BMM, but synergized with MVNP to increase pagetic osteoclast formation from TRAP-MVNP BMM. BX795 inhibition of TBK1 impaired MVNP-induced IL-6 expression in both NIH3T3 cells and BMM, and shRNA knockdown of Tbk1 in NIH3T3 cells impaired IL-6 secretion induced by MVNP and decreased TAF12 and ATF7, factors involved in 1,25(OH)2D3 hypersensitivity of pagetic osteoclasts. Similarly, Tbk1 knockdown in BMM from TRAP-MVNP and WT mice specifically impaired development of the MVNP-induced osteoclast pagetic phenotype. These results demonstrate that TBK1 plays a critical role in mediating the effects of MVNP on osteoclast differentiation

  16. Oncolytic virotherapy: the questions and the promise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelian L

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Laure Aurelian Department of Pharmacology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is a new strategy to reduce tumor burden through selective virus replication in rapidly proliferating cells. Oncolytic viruses are members of at least ten virus families, each with its advantages and disadvantages. Here, I briefly review the recent advances and key challenges, as exemplified by the best-studied platforms. Recent advances include preclinical proof of feasibility, clinical evidence of tolerability and effectiveness, and the development of new strategies to improve efficacy. These include engineered tumor selectivity and expression of antitumorigenic genes that could function independently of virus replication, identification of combinatorial therapies that accelerate intratumoral virus propagation, and modification of immune responses and vascular delivery for treatment of metastatic disease. Key challenges are to select “winners” from the distinct oncolytic platforms that can stimulate anti-cancer immunity without affecting virus replication and can lyse cancer stem cells, which are most likely responsible for tumor maintenance, aggressiveness, and recurrence. Preventing the emergence of resistant tumor cells during virotherapy through the activation of multiple death pathways, the development of a better understanding of the mechanisms of cancer stem-cell lysis, and the development of more meaningful preclinical animal models are additional challenges for the next-generation of engineered viruses. Keywords: tumor cell lysis, virus replication, tumor selectivity, programmed cell death, immune response

  17. Modulation of Re-initiation of Measles Virus Transcription at Intergenic Regions by PXD to NTAIL Binding Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloyet, Louis-Marie; Brunel, Joanna; Dosnon, Marion; Hamon, Véronique; Erales, Jenny; Gruet, Antoine; Lazert, Carine; Bignon, Christophe; Roche, Philippe; Longhi, Sonia; Gerlier, Denis

    2016-12-01

    Measles virus (MeV) and all Paramyxoviridae members rely on a complex polymerase machinery to ensure viral transcription and replication. Their polymerase associates the phosphoprotein (P) and the L protein that is endowed with all necessary enzymatic activities. To be processive, the polymerase uses as template a nucleocapsid made of genomic RNA entirely wrapped into a continuous oligomer of the nucleoprotein (N). The polymerase enters the nucleocapsid at the 3'end of the genome where are located the promoters for transcription and replication. Transcription of the six genes occurs sequentially. This implies ending and re-initiating mRNA synthesis at each intergenic region (IGR). We explored here to which extent the binding of the X domain of P (XD) to the C-terminal region of the N protein (NTAIL) is involved in maintaining the P/L complex anchored to the nucleocapsid template during the sequential transcription. Amino acid substitutions introduced in the XD-binding site on NTAIL resulted in a wide range of binding affinities as determined by combining protein complementation assays in E. coli and human cells and isothermal titration calorimetry. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that XD binding to NTAIL involves a complex network of hydrogen bonds, the disruption of which by two individual amino acid substitutions markedly reduced the binding affinity. Using a newly designed, highly sensitive dual-luciferase reporter minigenome assay, the efficiency of re-initiation through the five measles virus IGRs was found to correlate with NTAIL/XD KD. Correlatively, P transcript accumulation rate and F/N transcript ratios from recombinant viruses expressing N variants were also found to correlate with the NTAIL to XD binding strength. Altogether, our data support a key role for XD binding to NTAIL in maintaining proper anchor of the P/L complex thereby ensuring transcription re-initiation at each intergenic region.

  18. Toxicology and Biodistribution Studies for MGH2.1, an Oncolytic Virus that Expresses Two Prodrug-activating Genes, in Combination with Prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Kazue; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Liu, Fang; Kerr, Samantha; Wang, Jiang; Phelps, Mitch; Potter, Philip M; Goins, William B; Fernandez, Soledad A; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2013-08-06

    MGH2.1 is a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) oncolytic virus that expresses two prodrug-activating transgenes: the cyclophosphamide (CPA)-activating cytochrome P4502B1 (CYP2B1) and the CPT11-activating secreted human intestinal carboxylesterase (shiCE). Toxicology and biodistribution of MGH2.1 in the presence/absence of prodrugs was evaluated in mice. MGH2.1 ± prodrugs was cytotoxic to human glioma cells, but not to normal cells. Pharmacokinetically, intracranial MGH2.1 did not significantly alter the metabolism of intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered prodrugs in mouse plasma, brain, or liver. MGH2.1 did not induce an acute inflammatory reaction. MGH2.1 DNA was detected in brains of mice inoculated with 10(8) pfus for up to 60 days. However, only one animal showed evidence of viral gene expression at this time. Expression of virally encoded genes was restricted to brain. Intracranial inoculation of MGH2.1 did not induce lethality at 10(8) pfus in the absence of prodrugs and at 10(6) pfus in the presence of prodrugs. This study provides safety and toxicology data justifying a possible clinical trial of intratumoral injection of MGH2.1 with peripheral administration of CPA and/or CPT11 prodrugs in humans with malignant gliomas.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e113; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.38; published online 6 August 2013.

  19. Comparative sequence analysis of the P-, M- and L-coding region of the measles virus CAM-70 live attenuated vaccine strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.R. Santos

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus is a highly contagious agent which causes a major health problem in developing countries. The viral genomic RNA is single-stranded, nonsegmented and of negative polarity. Many live attenuated vaccines for measles virus have been developed using either the prototype Edmonston strain or other locally isolated measles strains. Despite the diverse geographic origins of the vaccine viruses and the different attenuation methods used, there was remarkable sequence similarity of H, F and N genes among all vaccine strains. CAM-70 is a Japanese measles attenuated vaccine strain widely used in Brazilian children and produced by Bio-Manguinhos since 1982. Previous studies have characterized this vaccine biologically and genomically. Nevertheless, only the F, H and N genes have been sequenced. In the present study we have sequenced the remaining P, M and L genes (approximately 1.6, 1.4 and 6.5 kb, respectively to complete the genomic characterization of CAM-70 and to assess the extent of genetic relationship between CAM-70 and other current vaccines. These genes were amplified using long-range or standard RT-PCR techniques, and the cDNA was cloned and automatically sequenced using the dideoxy chain-termination method. The sequence analysis comparing previously sequenced genotype A strains with the CAM-70 Bio-Manguinhos strain showed a low divergence among them. However, the CAM-70 strains (CAM-70 Bio-Manguinhos and a recently sequenced CAM-70 submaster seed strain were assigned to a specific group by phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method. Information about our product at the genomic level is important for monitoring vaccination campaigns and for future studies of measles virus attenuation.

  20. Global Transmission Dynamics of Measles in the Measles Elimination Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Yuki; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2017-04-16

    Although there have been many epidemiological reports of the inter-country transmission of measles, systematic analysis of the global transmission dynamics of the measles virus (MV) is limited. In this study, we applied phylogeographic analysis to characterize the global transmission dynamics of the MV using large-scale genetic sequence data (obtained for 7456 sequences) from 115 countries between 1954 and 2015. These analyses reveal the spatial and temporal characteristics of global transmission of the virus, especially in Australia, China, India, Japan, the UK, and the USA in the period since 1990. The transmission is frequently observed, not only within the same region but also among distant and frequently visited areas. Frequencies of export from measles-endemic countries, such as China, India, and Japan are high but decreasing, while the frequencies from countries where measles is no longer endemic, such as Australia, the UK, and the USA, are low but slightly increasing. The world is heading toward measles eradication, but the disease is still transmitted regionally and globally. Our analysis reveals that countries wherein measles is endemic and those having eliminated the disease (apart from occasional outbreaks) both remain a source of global transmission in this measles elimination era. It is therefore crucial to maintain vigilance in efforts to monitor and eradicate measles globally.

  1. Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    the rat model. The therapeutic effect of HSV-1 oncolysis on meningeal metastases was presented ( oral ) at the annual meeting of the World Molecular...Abstracts, and Presentations Presentations & Abstracts: 1. Oral Presentation at WMIC, Seoul. “Novel oncolytic HSV-1 therapeutics for breast cancer...tomography of herpes simplex virus 1 oncolysis. Cancer Research. 2007; 67(7): 3295. 3. Kuruppu D, Tanabe KK. Viral oncolysis by herpes simplex virus and

  2. A case study of a graphical misrepresentation: drawing the wrong conclusions about the measles, mumps and rubella virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Anthony R; Kirkham, Harold

    2007-01-01

    Graphs have been used in attempts to show a relationship between the measles, mumps and rubella virus (MMR) vaccine and autism. We examine the topic of graphical representation of data in general, and one of these graphs in particular: the one that appeared in a 1999 letter to The Lancet. That graph combined data from England and from California, USA. The author alleged that this graph illustrated a rise in autism rates linked to the use of the MMR vaccine. By examining the presentation closely, we are able to show how this graph misrepresented the data used. We give advice for both authors and publishers in the use of such graphical treatments of data.

  3. Poor immune responses of newborn rhesus macaques to measles virus DNA vaccines expressing the hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, Fernando P; Lydy, Shari L; Lee, Sok-Hyong; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J; Adams, Robert J; Robinson, Harriet L; Griffin, Diane E

    2013-02-01

    A vaccine that would protect young infants against measles could facilitate elimination efforts and decrease morbidity and mortality in developing countries. However, immaturity of the immune system is an important obstacle to the development of such a vaccine. In this study, DNA vaccines expressing the measles virus (MeV) hemagglutinin (H) protein or H and fusion (F) proteins, previously shown to protect juvenile macaques, were used to immunize groups of 4 newborn rhesus macaques. Monkeys were inoculated intradermally with 200 μg of each DNA at birth and at 10 months of age. As controls, 2 newborn macaques were similarly vaccinated with DNA encoding the influenza virus H5, and 4 received one dose of the current live attenuated MeV vaccine (LAV) intramuscularly. All monkeys were monitored for development of MeV-specific neutralizing and binding IgG antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. These responses were poor compared to the responses induced by LAV. At 18 months of age, all monkeys were challenged intratracheally with a wild-type strain of MeV. Monkeys that received the DNA vaccine encoding H and F, but not H alone, were primed for an MeV-specific CD8(+) CTL response but not for production of antibody. LAV-vaccinated monkeys were protected from rash and viremia, while DNA-vaccinated monkeys developed rashes, similar to control monkeys, but had 10-fold lower levels of viremia. We conclude that vaccination of infant macaques with DNA encoding MeV H and F provided only partial protection from MeV infection.

  4. Genetic characterization of measles virus caused the measles outbreak in Xinjiang%引起乌鲁木齐成人麻疹暴发的麻疹病毒基因特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    米吉提·买买提; 王慧玲; 许松涛; 毛乃颖; 许文波; 张燕

    2010-01-01

    目的 分析引起新疆乌鲁木齐市2008年成人麻疹暴发流行的麻疹野病毒的基因特征.方法 用Vero/Slam细胞从成人麻疹暴发患者的标本中分离出麻疹野病毒,应用逆转录-聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)对麻疹野病毒分离株扩增核蛋白N基因羧基末端676个核苷酸片段,再对扩增产物进行核苷酸序列测定和分析.以N基因羧基末端450个核苷酸片段构建基因亲缘性关系树,进行核苷酸变异分析.结果 共分离到11株麻疹野病毒,这些病毒N基因450个核苷酸之间的差异为0~0.2%,均为H1基因型中的H1a基因亚型.11株麻疹野病毒与H1基因型代表株(Chin9372)的核苷酸和氨基酸差异分别为:2.2%~2.4%之间和4.0%~4.6%之间.结论 引起新疆乌鲁木齐市2008年成人麻疹暴发流行的麻疹野病毒为H1a基因亚型.%Objective To analyze the genetic characterizations of wild type measles viruses caused the measles outbreak in Xinjiang. Methods Vero/Slam cell were used for measles viruses isolation from the specimens collected from measles outbreaks patients. Fragment of 676 nucleotide acids of the carboxylend of nucleoprotein gene were amplified using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reation (RT-PCR) method and then the PCR products were directly sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic tree was constructed based on 450 nucleotide acids of the N-terminus of nucleoprotein gene, and homological analysis was performed at nucleotide acid level. Results 11 measles viruses were sequenced and all belonged to H1a subgenotype.The nucleotide difference was 0-0. 2% between 11 Xinjiang isolates. And the nucleotide difference was 2.2%-2.4% between Xinjiang isolates and H1 genotype reference strain. Conclusion The Measles viruses causing the measles outbreak in Xinjiang were H1a subgenotype.

  5. A Review of Measles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardis, Melissa R.

    2012-01-01

    Measles, once a common childhood illness that many older school nurses could recognize without difficulty, needs review again after reemerging from Europe and other continents. A highly contagious disease, which has been referenced since the seventh century, the virus can cause serious illness and death, despite the fact that it is vaccine…

  6. A Review of Measles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardis, Melissa R.

    2012-01-01

    Measles, once a common childhood illness that many older school nurses could recognize without difficulty, needs review again after reemerging from Europe and other continents. A highly contagious disease, which has been referenced since the seventh century, the virus can cause serious illness and death, despite the fact that it is vaccine…

  7. Phase I Trial of Intratumoral Administration of NIS Expressing Strain of Measles Virus in Unresectable or Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    or Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dusica Babovic-Vuksanovic, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Mayo Clinic...20164. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Phase I Trial of Intratumoral Administration of NIS...Expressing Strain of Measles Virus in Unresectable or Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0115 5c. PROGRAM

  8. Measles & rubella outbreaks in Maharashtra State, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Kamble, Madhukar B; Chowdhury, Deepika T; Kumbhar, Neelakshi S

    2016-02-01

    Under the outbreak-based measles surveillance in Maharashtra State the National Institute of Virology at Pune receives 3-5 serum samples from each outbreak and samples from the local hospitals in Pune for laboratory diagnosis. This report describes one year data on the measles and rubella serology, virus isolation and genotyping. Maharashtra State Health Agencies investigated 98 suspected outbreaks between January-December 2013 in the 20 districts. Altogether, 491 serum samples were received from 20 districts and 126 suspected cases from local hospitals. Samples were tested for the measles and rubella IgM antibodies by commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA). To understand the diagnostic utility, a subset of serum samples (n=53) was tested by measles focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT). Further, 37 throat swabs and 32 urine specimens were tested by measles reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and positive products were sequenced. Virus isolation was performed in Vero hSLAM cells. Of the 98 suspected measles outbreaks, 61 were confirmed as measles, 12 as rubella and 21 confirmed as the mixed outbreaks. Four outbreaks remained unconfirmed. Of the 126 cases from the local hospitals, 91 were confirmed for measles and three for rubella. Overall, 93.6 per cent (383/409) confirmed measles cases were in the age group of 0-15 yr. Measles virus was detected in 18 of 38 specimens obtained from the suspected cases. Sequencing of PCR products revealed circulation of D4 (n=9) and D8 (n=9) strains. Four measles viruses (three D4 & one D8) were isolated. Altogether, 94 measles and rubella outbreaks were confirmed in 2013 in the State of Maharasthra indicating the necessity to increase measles vaccine coverage in the State.

  9. The Continued Promise and Many Disappointments of Oncolytic Virotherapy in Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Ahn

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy represents a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. Oncolytic viruses, including genetically engineered and naturally occurring viruses, can selectively replicate in and induce tumor cell apoptosis without harming normal tissues, thus offering a promising tool in the armamentarium for cancer therapy. While this approach has garnered much interest over the past several decades, there has not been significant headway across various tumor types. The recent approval of talimogene laherparepvec, a second-generation oncolytic herpes simplex virus type-1, for the treatment of metastatic melanoma, confirms the therapeutic potential of oncolytic viral therapy. Herein, we will highlight and review the role of oncolytic viral therapy in gastrointestinal malignancies while discussing its limitations and potential alternative mechanisms to improve its treatment efficacy.

  10. Measles Virus: Identification in the M Protein Primary Sequence of a Potential Molecular Marker for Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Kweder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis (SSPE, a rare lethal disease of children and young adults due to persistence of measles virus (MeV in the brain, is caused by wild type (wt MeV. Why MeV vaccine strains never cause SSPE is completely unknown. Hypothesizing that this phenotypic difference could potentially be represented by a molecular marker, we compared glycoprotein and matrix (M genes from SSPE cases with those from the Moraten vaccine strain, searching for differential structural motifs. We observed that all known SSPE viruses have residues P64, E89, and A209 (PEA in their M proteins whereas the equivalent residues for vaccine strains are either S64, K89, and T209 (SKT as in Moraten or PKT. Through the construction of MeV recombinants, we have obtained evidence that the wt MeV-M protein PEA motif, in particular A209, is linked to increased viral spread. Importantly, for the 10 wt genotypes (of 23 that have had their M proteins sequenced, 9 have the PEA motif, the exception being B3, which has PET. Interestingly, cases of SSPE caused by genotype B3 have yet to be reported. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that the PEA motif is a molecular marker for wt MeV at risk to cause SSPE.

  11. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy.

  12. Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus elicits anti-glioma immunity in an immunocompetent mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Jiang (Hao); K. Clise-Dwyer (Karen); K.E. Ruisaard (Kathryn); X. Fan (Xuejun); W. Tian (Weihua); J. Gumin (Joy); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); A. Kleijn (Anne); F.F. Lang (Frederick); S. Yung (Sun); L.M. Vence (Luis); C. Gomez-Manzano (Candelaria); J. Fueyo (Juan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Emerging evidence suggests anti-cancer immunity is involved in the therapeutic effect induced by oncolytic viruses. Here we investigate the effect of Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus on innate and adaptive anti-glioma immunity. Design: Mouse GL261-glioma model was set up in

  13. Oncolytic virotherapy for pediatric malignancies: future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters AM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Alicia M Waters,1 Gregory K Friedman,2 Eric K Ring,2 Elizabeth A Beierle1 1Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology-Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Pediatric solid tumors remain a major health concern, with nearly 16,000 children diagnosed each year. Of those, ~2,000 succumb to their disease, and survivors often suffer from lifelong disability secondary to toxic effects of current treatments. Countless multimodality ­treatment regimens are being explored to make advances against this deadly disease. One targeted treatment approach is oncolytic virotherapy. Conditionally replicating viruses can infect tumor cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. Four viruses have been advanced to pediatric clinical trials, including herpes simplex virus-1, Seneca Valley virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of each virus, pediatric preclinical studies conducted to date, past and ongoing pediatric clinical trials, and potential future direction for these novel viral therapeutics. Keywords: oncolytic virus, herpes simplex virus, Seneca Valley virus, reovirus, vaccinia

  14. Luciferase imaging for evaluation of oncolytic adenovirus replication in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guse, K; Dias, J D; Bauerschmitz, G J; Hakkarainen, T; Aavik, E; Ranki, T; Pisto, T; Särkioja, M; Desmond, R A; Kanerva, A; Hemminki, A

    2007-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses kill cancer cells by tumor-selective replication. Clinical data have established the safety of the approach but also the need of improvements in potency. Efficacy of oncolysis is linked to effective infection of target cells and subsequent productive replication. Other variables include intratumoral barriers, access to target cells, uptake by non-target organs and immune response. Each of these aspects relates to the location and degree of virus replication. Unfortunately, detection of in vivo replication has been difficult, labor intensive and costly and therefore not much studied. We hypothesized that by coinfection of a luciferase expressing E1-deleted virus with an oncolytic virus, both viruses would replicate when present in the same cell. Photon emission due to conversion of D-Luciferin is sensitive and penetrates tissues well. Importantly, killing of animals is not required and each animal can be imaged repeatedly. Two different murine xenograft models were used and intratumoral coinjections of luciferase encoding virus were performed with eight different oncolytic adenoviruses. In both models, we found significant correlation between photon emission and infectious virus production. This suggests that the system can be used for non-invasive quantitation of the amplitude, persistence and dynamics of oncolytic virus replication in vivo, which could be helpful for the development of more effective and safe agents.

  15. Biased hypermutation occurred frequently in a gene inserted into the IC323 recombinant measles virus during its persistence in the brains of nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otani, Sanae [Department of Virology and Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Ayata, Minoru, E-mail: maverick@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Virology and Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Takeuchi, Kaoru [Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Division of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Takeda, Makoto [Department of Virology 3, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Shintaku, Haruo [Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Ogura, Hisashi [Department of Virology and Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Measles virus (MV) is the causative agent of measles and its neurological complications, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and measles inclusion body encephalitis (MIBE). Biased hypermutation in the M gene is a characteristic feature of SSPE and MIBE. To determine whether the M gene is the preferred target of hypermutation, an additional transcriptional unit containing a humanized Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) gene was introduced into the IC323 MV genome, and nude mice were inoculated intracerebrally with the virus. Biased hypermutation occurred in the M gene and also in the hrGFP gene when it was inserted between the leader and the N gene, but not between the H and L gene. These results indicate that biased hypermutation is usually found in a gene whose function is not essential for viral proliferation in the brain and that the location of a gene in the MV genome can affect its mutational frequency. - Highlights: • Wild-type MV can cause persistent infections in nude mice. • Biased hypermutation occurred in the M gene. • Biased hypermutation occurred in an inessential gene inserted between the leader and the N gene.

  16. Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oncolytic Virotherapy: Friend or Foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. Denton

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy remains a challenge due to toxicity limitations of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oncolytic viruses that selectively replicate and destroy cancer cells are of increasing interest. In addition to direct cell lysis, these vectors stimulate an anti-tumor immune response. A key regulator of tumor immunity is the tumor-associated macrophage population. Macrophages can either support oncolytic virus therapy through pro-inflammatory stimulation of the anti-tumor response at the cost of hindering direct oncolysis or through immunosuppressive protection of virus replication at the cost of hindering the anti-tumor immune response. Despite similarities in macrophage interaction between adult and pediatric tumors and the abundance of research supporting macrophage modulation in adult tumors, there are few studies investigating macrophage modulation in pediatric cancers or modulation of immunotherapy. We review the current state of knowledge regarding macrophages in cancers and their influence on oncolytic virotherapy.

  17. The oncolytic virus dl922-947 reduces IL-8/CXCL8 and MCP-1/CCL2 expression and impairs angiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastolo, Viviana; Di Somma, Sarah; Scamardella, Eloise; Gigantino, Vincenzo; Franco, Renato; Marone, Gianni; Portella, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human solid tumor and current treatments are ineffective in increasing patients' survival. Thus, the development of new therapeutic approaches for ATC is needed. We have previously shown that the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 induces ATC cell death in vitro and tumor regression in vivo. However, the impact of dl922-947 on the pro-tumorigenic ATC microenvironment is still unknown. Since viruses are able to regulate cytokine and chemokine production from infected cells, we sought to investigate whether dl922-947 virotherapy has such effect on ATC cells, thereby modulating ATC microenvironment. dl922-947 decreased IL-8/CXCL8 and MCP-1/CCL2 production by the ATC cell lines 8505-c and BHT101-5. These results correlated with dl922-947-mediated reduction of NF-κB p65 binding to IL8 promoter in 8505-c and BHT101-5 cells and CCL2 promoter in 8505-c cells. IL-8 stimulates cancer cell proliferation, survival and invasion, and also angiogenesis. dl922-947-mediated reduction of IL-8 impaired ATC cell motility in vitro and ATC-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We also show that dl922-947-mediated reduction of the monocyte-attracting chemokine CCL2 decreased monocyte chemotaxis in vitro and tumor macrophage density in vivo. Interestingly, dl922-947 treatment induced the switch of tumor macrophages toward a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype, likely by increasing the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ. Altogether, we demonstrate that dl922-947 treatment re-shape the pro-tumorigenic ATC microenvironment by modulating cancer-cell intrinsic factors and the immune response. An in-depth knowledge of dl922-947-mediated effects on ATC microenvironment may help to refine ATC virotherapy in the context of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26625205

  18. Measles Outbreak among Previously Immunized Adult Healthcare Workers, China, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyi Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Measles is caused by measles virus belonging to genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. Vaccination has played a critical role in controlling measles infection worldwide. However, in the recent years, outbreaks of measles infection still occur in many developing countries. Here, we report an outbreak of measles among healthcare workers and among the 60 measles infected patients 50 were healthcare workers including doctors, nurses, staff, and medics. Fifty-one patients (85% tested positive for IgM antibodies against the measles virus and 50 patients (83.3% tested positive for measles virus RNA. Surprisingly, 73.3% of the infected individuals had been previously immunized against measles. Since there is no infection division in our hospital, the fever clinics are located in the Emergency Division. In addition, the fever and rash were not recognized as measles symptoms at the beginning of the outbreak. These factors result in delay in isolation and early confirmation of the suspected patients and eventually a measles outbreak in the hospital. Our report highlights the importance of following a two-dose measles vaccine program in people including the healthcare workers. In addition, vigilant attention should be paid to medical staff with clinical fever and rash symptoms to avoid a possible nosocomial transmission of measles infection.

  19. Measles Outbreak among Previously Immunized Adult Healthcare Workers, China, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengyi; Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Lili; Lu, Changhong; Meng, Ying; Guan, Xiaoli; An, Hongjin; Zhang, Meizhong; Guo, Wenqin; Shang, Bo; Yu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Measles is caused by measles virus belonging to genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. Vaccination has played a critical role in controlling measles infection worldwide. However, in the recent years, outbreaks of measles infection still occur in many developing countries. Here, we report an outbreak of measles among healthcare workers and among the 60 measles infected patients 50 were healthcare workers including doctors, nurses, staff, and medics. Fifty-one patients (85%) tested positive for IgM antibodies against the measles virus and 50 patients (83.3%) tested positive for measles virus RNA. Surprisingly, 73.3% of the infected individuals had been previously immunized against measles. Since there is no infection division in our hospital, the fever clinics are located in the Emergency Division. In addition, the fever and rash were not recognized as measles symptoms at the beginning of the outbreak. These factors result in delay in isolation and early confirmation of the suspected patients and eventually a measles outbreak in the hospital. Our report highlights the importance of following a two-dose measles vaccine program in people including the healthcare workers. In addition, vigilant attention should be paid to medical staff with clinical fever and rash symptoms to avoid a possible nosocomial transmission of measles infection. PMID:27366157

  20. Vaccine-induced measles virus-specific T cells do not prevent infection or disease but facilitate subsequent clearance of viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Hsuan W; Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Adams, Robert J; Laube, Beth L; Griffin, Diane E

    2014-04-15

    Infection with wild-type measles virus (MeV) induces lifelong protection from reinfection, and parenteral delivery of the live attenuated measles vaccine (LAV) also provides protection from measles. The level of neutralizing antibody is a good indicator of protection, but the independent roles of MeV-specific antibody and T cells have not been identified. In this study, macaques immunized with LAV through a nebulizer and a mouthpiece developed MeV-specific T-cell responses but not neutralizing antibodies. Upon challenge with wild-type MeV, these animals developed rashes and viremias similar to those in naive animals but cleared viral RNA from blood 25 to 40 days faster. The nebulizer-immunized animals also had more robust MeV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses than the naive animals after challenge, characterized by a higher number and better durability of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells. Induction of MeV-specific circulating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells capable of producing multiple cytokines correlated with clearance of viral RNA in the nebulizer-immunized macaques. These studies demonstrated that MeV-specific T-cell immunity alone did not prevent measles, but T-cell priming enhanced the magnitude, durability, and polyfunctionality of MeV-specific T cells after challenge infection and correlated with more rapid clearance of MeV RNA. IMPORTANCE The components of vaccine-induced immunity necessary for protection from infection and disease have not been clearly identified for most vaccines. Vaccine development usually focuses on induction of antibody, but T-cell-based vaccines are also under development. The live attenuated measles vaccine (LAV) given subcutaneously induces both T cells and neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection from infection. LAV delivered to the upper respiratory tract through a nebulizer and mouthpiece induced a T-cell response but no neutralizing antibody. These T-cell-primed macaques demonstrated no protection from

  1. Epidemiology of two large measles virus outbreaks in Catalonia: what a difference the month of administration of the first dose of vaccine makes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torner, Núria; Anton, Andres; Barrabeig, Irene; Lafuente, Sara; Parron, Ignasi; Arias, César; Camps, Neus; Costa, Josep; Martínez, Ana; Torra, Roser; Godoy, Pere; Minguell, Sofia; Ferrús, Glòria; Cabezas, Carmen; Domínguez, Ángela; Spain

    2013-03-01

    Measles cases in the European Region have been increasing in the last decade; this illustrates the challenge of what we are now encountering in the form of pediatric preventable diseases. In Catalonia, autochthonous measles was declared eliminated in the year 2000 as the result of high measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) coverage for first and second dose (15 mo and 4 y) since the mid-1990s. From then on, sporadic imported cases and small outbreaks appeared, until in 2006-2007 a large measles outbreak affecting mostly unvaccinated toddlers hit the Barcelona Health Region. Consequently, in January 2008, first dose administration of MMR was lowered from 15 to 12 mo of age. A new honeymoon period went by until the end of 2010, when several importations of cases triggered new sustained transmission of different wild measles virus genotypes, but this time striking young adults. The aim of this study is to show the effect of a change in MMR vaccination schedule policy, and the difference in age incidence and hospitalization rates of affected individuals between both outbreaks.   Epidemiologic data were obtained by case interviews and review of medical records. Samples for virological confirmation and genotyping of cases were collected as established in the Measles Elimination plan guidelines. Incidence rate (IR), rate ratio (RR) and their 95% CI and hospitalization rate (HR) by age group were determined. Statistic z was used for comparing proportions. Total number of confirmed cases was 305 in the 2010 outbreak and 381 in the 2006-2007 outbreak; mean age 20 y (SD 14.8 y; 3 mo to 51 y) vs. 15 mo (SD 13.1 y; 1 mo to 50 y). Highest proportion of cases was set in ≥ 25 y (47%) vs. 24.2% in 2006 (p < 0.001). Differences in IR for ≤ 15 mo (49/100,000 vs. 278.2/100,000; RR: 3,9; 95%CI 2,9-5.4) and in overall HR 29.8% vs. 15.7% were all statistically significant (p < 0.001). The change of the month of age for the administration of the first MMR dose proved successful to

  2. Identification of amino acid residues involved in the interaction between measles virus Haemagglutin (MVH) and its human cell receptor (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule, SLAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Zhang, Peng; Hu, Chunling; Liu, Xin; Qi, Yipeng; Liu, Yingle

    2006-07-31

    Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM; also known as CD150) is a newly identified cellular receptor for measles virus (MV). The interaction between MV Haemagglutin (MVH) and SLAM is an initial step for MV entry. We have identified several novel SLAM binding sites at residues S429, T436 and H437 of MVH protein and MVH mutants in these residues dramatically decrease the ability to interaction with the cell surface SLAM and fail to coprecipitation with SLAM in vivo as well as malfunction in syncytium formation. At the same time, K58, S59 and H61 of SLAM was also identified to be critical for MVH and SLAM binding. Further, these residues may be useful targets for the development of measles therapy.

  3. Molecular characterization of measles viruses in Turkey (2010-2011): first report of genotype D9 involved in an outbreak in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaycioglu, Atila T; Baykal, Atakan; Guldemir, Dilek; Bakkaloglu, Zekiye; Korukluoglu, Gulay; Coskun, Aslihan; Torunoglu, Mehmet Ali; Ertek, Mustafa; Durmaz, Riza

    2013-12-01

    Genetic characterization of measles viruses (MVs) combined with acquisition of epidemiologic information is essential for measles surveillance programs used in determining transmission pathways. This study describes the molecular characterization of 26 MV strains (3 from 2010, 23 from 2011) obtained from urine or throat swabs harvested from patients in Turkey. MV RNA samples (n = 26) were subjected to sequence analysis of 450 nucleotides comprising the most variable C-terminal region of the nucleoprotein (N) gene. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 20 strains from 2011 belonged to genotype D9, 3 to D4, 2 strains from 2010 to genotype D4 and 1 to genotype B3. This study represents the first report describing the involvement of MV genotype D9 in an outbreak in Turkey. The sequence of the majority of genotype D9 strains was identical to those identified in Russia, Malaysia, Japan, and the UK. Despite lack of sufficient epidemiologic information, the presence of variants observed following phylogenetic analysis suggested that exposure to genotype D9 might have occurred due to importation more than once. Phylogenetic analysis of five genotype D4 strains revealed the presence of four variants. Epidemiological information and phylogenetic analysis suggested that three genotype D4 strains and one genotype B3 strain were associated with importation. This study suggests the presence of pockets of unimmunized individuals making Turkey susceptible to outbreaks. Continuing molecular surveillance of measles strains in Turkey is essential as a means of acquiring epidemiologic information to define viral transmission patterns and determine the effectiveness of measles vaccination programs designed to eliminate this virus.

  4. Detection of Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Gene by RT-PCR%麻疹病毒H基因的特异性逆转录-聚合酶链反应检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅燕; 卢亦愚; 张严峻

    2001-01-01

    Using RT-PCR, we can detect measles virus hemagglutinin gene (H gene) of 635bp length directly from measles vaccine strain Shanghai-191, Edmonston strain, nasopharyngeal aspirates and throat swabs of the measles patients. The primers of RT-PCR based on H gene sequence of measles virus did not give the same products from rubella virus and influenza viruses (A1, A3, B). By second PCR amplification, the minimum quantity of measles virus required to give a positive signal was<0.01TCID50. Since the IgM antibody positive rate in early stage of measles patients is always low, the specificity and sensitivity of RT-PCR method may help diagnosing measles cases.%采用逆转录-聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)直接从麻疹疫苗沪191株、Edmonston株以及临床麻疹患者的含漱液和咽拭子中检测出635bp的特异性H基因目的条带;而对风疹病毒和流行性感冒甲1型、甲3型、乙型病毒均未检测到相应条带。通过对RT-PCR产物的第2次扩增,可以使检测的灵敏度达到0.01TCID50。针对麻疹患者发病初期血清中IgM抗体阳性率偏低的特点,可以利用该方法的特异性和敏感性对临床麻疹病例作辅助处理。

  5. Contributions of the Measles Virus Nucleocapsid Gene and the SQSTM1/p62P392L Mutation to Paget's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Hiruma, Yuko; Yamana, Kei; Michou, Laëtitia; Rousseau, Côme; Morissette, Jean; Galson, Deborah L.; Teramachi, Jumpei; Zhou, Hua; Dempster, David W.; Windle, Jolene J.; Brown, Jacques P.; Roodman, G. David

    2011-01-01

    Summary Paget's Disease (PD) is characterized by abnormal osteoclasts (OCL) that secrete high IL-6 levels and induce exuberant bone formation. Because measles virus nucleocapsid gene (MVNP) and the p62P392L mutation are implicated in PD, marrows from 12 PD patients harboring p62P392L and 8 normals were tested for MVNP expression and pagetic OCL formation. 8/12 patients expressed MVNP and formed pagetic OCL in vitro, which were inhibited by antisense-MVNP. 4/12 patients lacked MVNP and formed normal OCL that were hyper-responsive to RANKL but unaffected by antisense-MVNP. Similarly, mice expressing only p62P394L formed normal OCL, while mice expressing MVNP in OCL, with or without p62P394L, developed pagetic OCL and expressed high IL-6 levels dependent on p38MAPK activation. IL-6 deficiency in MVNP mice abrogated pagetic OCL development in vitro. Mice co-expressing MVNP and p62P394L developed dramatic Paget's-like bone lesions. These results suggest that p62P394L and IL-6 induction by MVNP play key roles in PD. PMID:21195346

  6. Contributions of the measles virus nucleocapsid gene and the SQSTM1/p62(P392L) mutation to Paget's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Hiruma, Yuko; Yamana, Kei; Michou, Laëtitia; Rousseau, Côme; Morissette, Jean; Galson, Deborah L; Teramachi, Jumpei; Zhou, Hua; Dempster, David W; Windle, Jolene J; Brown, Jacques P; Roodman, G David

    2011-01-05

    Paget's disease (PD) is characterized by abnormal osteoclasts (OCL) that secrete high IL-6 levels and induce exuberant bone formation. Because measles virus nucleocapsid gene (MVNP) and the p62(P392L) mutation are implicated in PD, marrows from 12 PD patients harboring p62(P392L) and eight normals were tested for MVNP expression and pagetic OCL formation. Eight out of twelve patients expressed MVNP and formed pagetic OCL in vitro, which were inhibited by antisense-MVNP. Four out of twelve patients lacked MVNP and formed normal OCL that were hyperresponsive to RANKL but unaffected by antisense-MVNP. Similarly, mice expressing only p62(P394L) formed normal OCL, while mice expressing MVNP in OCL, with or without p62(P394L), developed pagetic OCL and expressed high IL-6 levels dependent on p38MAPK activation. IL-6 deficiency in MVNP mice abrogated pagetic OCL development in vitro. Mice coexpressing MVNP and p62(P394L) developed dramatic Paget's-like bone lesions. These results suggest that p62(P394L) and IL-6 induction by MVNP play key roles in PD.

  7. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viral Therapy: A Stride toward Selective Targeting of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchala, Dhaval S; Bhatt, Lokesh K; Prabhavalkar, Kedar S

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic viral therapy, which makes use of replication-competent lytic viruses, has emerged as a promising modality to treat malignancies. It has shown meaningful outcomes in both solid tumor and hematologic malignancies. Advancements during the last decade, mainly genetic engineering of oncolytic viruses have resulted in improved specificity and efficacy of oncolytic viruses in cancer therapeutics. Oncolytic viral therapy for treating cancer with herpes simplex virus-1 has been of particular interest owing to its range of benefits like: (a) large genome and power to infiltrate in the tumor, (b) easy access to manipulation with the flexibility to insert multiple transgenes, (c) infecting majority of the malignant cell types with quick replication in the infected cells and (d) as Anti-HSV agent to terminate HSV replication. This review provides an exhaustive list of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 along with their genetic alterations. It also encompasses the major developments in oncolytic herpes simplex-1 viral therapy and outlines the limitations and drawbacks of oncolytic herpes simplex viral therapy.

  8. 高效价麻疹抗血清的制备及检定%Preparation and Quality Control of Hish Titer Antiserum against Measles Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙璐; 马昱; 张国强; 张丽君

    2011-01-01

    目的 制备高效价麻疹抗血清,用于疫苗检定中病毒鉴别、支原体检测、麻腮二联和麻腮风三联疫苗的联合滴定试验.方法 将麻疹病毒L4株于Vero细胞中传代培养,获得高滴度病毒原液,制备免疫抗原,分别经腹腔注射法、耳静脉注射法和背部皮下多点注射法免疫家兔,制备抗血清,并按规程要求对抗血清进行检定.结果 采用腹腔注射法、耳静脉注射法和背部皮下多点注射法免疫家兔所制备的抗血清的中和效价分别为1:960、1:2 560和1:3 840,经检定,3种方法制备的抗血清均达到疫苗检定的使用要求.结论 背部皮下多点注射法制备的麻疹抗血清效价最高,且操作简单,可作为制备高效价麻疹抗血清的最佳方案.%Objective To prepare high titer antiserum against measles virus and use for the virus identification, mycoplasma examination in control tests on vaccine as well as combined titration test on MM and MMR vaccines. Methods Measles virus L4 strain was subcultured in Vero cells to obtain high titer virus bulk and prepare the antigen for immunization. Rabbits were injected with the prepared antigen by i. p. , i.v. and s. c. routes respectively, and the obtained antisera were subjected to control tests according to the requirements in Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Results The neutralizing titers of antisera prepared by immunization of rabbits by i. p. , i.v. and s. c. routes were 1: 960, 1: 2 560 and 1: 3 840 respectively. All the antisera met the requirements for control tests on vaccine. Conclusion The preparation of antiserum against measles virus by s. c. injection in several sites on back of rabbits was simple, and the prepared serum reached the highest titer, which might be an optimal method for preparation of high titer antiserum against measles virus.

  9. Real-Time PCR for Measles Virus Detection on Clinical Specimens with Negative IgM Result in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benamar, Touria; Tajounte, Latifa; Alla, Amal; Khebba, Fatima; Ahmed, Hinda; Mulders, Mick N; Filali-Maltouf, Abdelkarim; El Aouad, Rajae

    2016-01-01

    Since the confirmation of measles cases represents an important indicator regarding the performance of the measles-elimination program, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the routine procedures followed in Morocco for the laboratory confirmation of measles cases. Suspected cases reported between January 2010 and December 2012 were assessed for the timeliness of the sample collection, occurrence of measles clinical symptoms, and the results of the laboratory diagnoses. For 88% of the 2,708 suspected cases, a clinical specimen was collected within 7d of rash onset, of which 50% were IgM-positive and 2.6% were equivocal. The measles symptoms were reported in 91.4% of the cases; the occurrence of symptoms showed a positive association with the serological results (odds ratio [OR] = 2.9883, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2238-4.0157). Of the negative samples, 52% (n = 116) tested positive by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These results are in favor of using molecular detection to complement serological diagnosis in the context of measles surveillance approach in Morocco. In addition, the introduction of additional laboratory methods for differential diagnosis is required for the final classification of suspected cases with maculopapular rash and fever in the context of the measles elimination program.

  10. 麻疹减毒活疫苗接种偶合麻疹野病毒感染病例的麻疹病毒基因特征分析%Genetic character of wild measles virus causing an accidental case after immunization with live attenuated measles vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张帆; 周剑惠; 陈超; 徐鑫; 王爽; 常新; 魏雷雷; 于佳动

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析1例接种麻疹减毒活疫苗第9天出现麻疹样症状病例的麻疹病毒基因特征,以确定是麻疹疫苗相关病例还是偶合麻疹野病毒感染.方法 提取该病例咽拭子标本核酸,采用RT-PCR法扩增麻疹病毒核蛋白(Nucleoprotein,NP)基因羧基末端450个核苷酸片段后测序,分析其与全球24个基因型麻疹野病毒代表株、中国疫苗株(Shanghai-191)基因的亲缘关系以及核苷酸、氨基酸序列同源性.结果 该病例感染的病毒属于H1a基因亚型麻疹野病毒.与中国H1基因型麻疹野病毒流行株代表株核苷酸和氨基酸序列的同源性较高,分别为97.5% ~ 99.5%和96.6%,而与麻疹病毒中国疫苗株(Shanghai- 191)核苷酸和氨基酸序列同源性较低,分别仅为91.2%和86.7%.结论 该例接种麻疹减毒活疫苗后出现麻疹样症状的病例为偶合H1基因型麻疹野病毒感染所致,非麻疹疫苗相关病例.%Objective To analyze the genetic character of measles virus causing a measles-like case on day 9 after immunization with live attenuated measles vaccine so as to confirm the case as vaccine-associated one or accidental one caused by wild measles virus. Methods Nucleic acids were extracted from the throat swab of the patient and sequenced after amplification of 450 nucleotides at C-terminus of measles virus nucleoprotein (NP) by RT-PCR, based on which the genetic relationship as well as homologies of nucleotides and amino acids of the strain to the representational strains of wild measles virus strains of all the 24 genotypes and Chinese vaccine strain (Shanghai-191) were analyzed. Results The virus causing the case was wild measles virus of subgenotype Hal, of which the homologies of nucleotides and amino acids were 97. 5% ~ 99. 5% and 96. 6% respectively to those of the representational strain of wild measles virus of genotype H1 epidemic in China, while were only 91. 2% and 86. 7% respectively to those of Shanghai-191

  11. Global eradication of measles: Are we poised?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra D; Ajantha, G S; Kiran, Aithal R; Pravinchandra, K R

    2017-01-01

    Measles, a highly infectious viral disease is the next target for eradication following poliovirus. Decades of experience with highly effective vaccination has invigorated us to take on this virus. The task is not only Titanic but is laced with intricate issues. Recently, an outbreak of fever with rash occurred on a tertiary care teaching hospital campus and was confirmed serologically as measles outbreak by IgMELISA. Therefore, we searched the literature related to outbreaks, transmission of the measles virus, age groups involved, vaccination strategies, vaccination failure and epidemiological features of the disease and reviewed the possible reasons for such outbreaks and problems in the global eradication of the virus.

  12. Global eradication of measles: Are we poised?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra D Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Measles, a highly infectious viral disease is the next target for eradication following poliovirus. Decades of experience with highly effective vaccination has invigorated us to take on this virus. The task is not only Titanic but is laced with intricate issues. Recently, an outbreak of fever with rash occurred on a tertiary care teaching hospital campus and was confirmed serologically as measles outbreak by IgMELISA. Therefore, we searched the literature related to outbreaks, transmission of the measles virus, age groups involved, vaccination strategies, vaccination failure and epidemiological features of the disease and reviewed the possible reasons for such outbreaks and problems in the global eradication of the virus.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL MEASLES VACCINES: A RESEARCH TOOL IN VACCINATION EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Liashenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The review article considers different variants of measles vaccine that may be classified into two groups, i.e., vaccines that do not contain viable measles virus, and attenuated measles vaccines which could be employed in unusual manner.The first group includes DNA-vaccines, recombinant vaccine strains encoding synthesis of measles hemagglutinin and fusion protein, as well as peptide vaccines containing molecular fragments of these proteins. The mentioned variants of vaccines were effective in animal experiments, but they have not been tested in humans. The second group includes live attenuated mucosal measles vaccins applied in combination with immunomodulator(s, as aerosol and intranasally. Efficiency of these vaccines was tested and confirmed by immunization of children and adults. Mucosal measles vaccine induces local production of IgA measles antibodies, along with induced synthesis of circulating IgM and IgG antibodies against measles. The latter experimental variant could be a live attenuated measles vaccine containing some immunity-modulating agent. Elaboration of these variant was based on the known data about transient immunosuppressive activity of measles vaccine. An appropriate experimental variant represents a mixture of attenuated measles vaccine and synthetic immunomodulating agent (MP-2 peptide which protects T-lymphocytes from inhibitory effect of the measles virus. In present revue, some data are presented concerning the mechanisms of immunogenic activity and adverse effects of measles vaccines.

  14. Oncolytic virotherapy for pediatric malignancies: future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Alicia M; Friedman, Gregory K; Ring, Eric K; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric solid tumors remain a major health concern, with nearly 16,000 children diagnosed each year. Of those, ~2,000 succumb to their disease, and survivors often suffer from lifelong disability secondary to toxic effects of current treatments. Countless multimodality treatment regimens are being explored to make advances against this deadly disease. One targeted treatment approach is oncolytic virotherapy. Conditionally replicating viruses can infect tumor cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. Four viruses have been advanced to pediatric clinical trials, including herpes simplex virus-1, Seneca Valley virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of each virus, pediatric preclinical studies conducted to date, past and ongoing pediatric clinical trials, and potential future direction for these novel viral therapeutics. PMID:27579298

  15. Measles update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Beginning May 19, 1998, and lasting through the middle of June, a follow-up vaccination campaign which used measles-mumps-rubella vaccine targeted 2,223,210 children, 1-4 years of age, in Venezuela. The vaccinations were performed at day care centers, health posts, and orphanages; door-to-door vaccination was conducted in rural areas. The measles epidemic began in 1992, with 22,321 confirmed cases of measles and 77 deaths; it lasted until early 1994, when there were 16,561 cases and 47 deaths. In 1994, the country launched a "catch-up" vaccination campaign which targeted all children between 9 months and 14 years of age; 98% coverage was reached. Between 1994 and 1996, when routine immunization services were used, the average coverage was 75%. Since the catch-up campaign, the number of confirmed measles cases decreased from 172 in 1995, to 89 in 1996, and to 27 in 1997. As of July 18, 1998, (epidemiological week 28), 452 suspected cases of measles were reported; none were confirmed. Another follow-up campaign will be conducted. In Bolivia, the measles outbreak began May 21, 1998, in areas bordering Argentina. The municipality of Yacuiba, in the department of Tarija, is primarily affected. The municipality, especially the localities of Yacuiba and Pocitos, borders the province of Salta in Argentina, and people cross the border often to shop. As of July 24, 1998, there were 49 suspected measles cases: 22 in Pocitos; 24 in Yacuiba; and 3 in El Palmar. 28 had serum samples taken, and 18 tested positive. The population group most affected were those between 1-4 years of age. A follow-up measles vaccination campaign, which targeted all children under 6 years of age regardless of their vaccination history, was conducted from June 1 to 21, 1998, in Salvador Masa (Argentina), in Pocitos, and in Yacuiba. As of August 10, 1998, in Argentina, 1874 confirmed measles cases and 11 deaths (6 under the age of 1 year) were reported. The first cases appeared in August 1997, in the

  16. Dose-Dependent Protection against or Exacerbation of Disease by a Polylactide Glycolide Microparticle-Adsorbed, Alphavirus-Based Measles Virus DNA Vaccine in Rhesus Macaques▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Nair, Nitya; Adams, Robert J.; Zink, M. Christine; Lee, Eun-Young; Polack, Fernando P.; Singh, Manmohan; O'Hagan, Derek T.; Griffin, Diane E.

    2008-01-01

    Measles remains an important cause of vaccine-preventable child mortality. Development of a low-cost, heat-stable vaccine for infants under the age of 6 months could improve measles control by facilitating delivery at the time of other vaccines and by closing a window of susceptibility prior to immunization at 9 months of age. DNA vaccines hold promise for development, but achieving protective levels of antibody has been difficult and there is an incomplete understanding of protective immunity. In the current study, we evaluated the use of a layered alphavirus DNA/RNA vector encoding measles virus H (SINCP-H) adsorbed onto polylactide glycolide (PLG) microparticles. In mice, antibody and T-cell responses to PLG-formulated DNA were substantially improved compared to those to naked DNA. Rhesus macaques received two doses of PLG/SINCP-H delivered either intramuscularly (0.5 mg) or intradermally (0.5 or 0.1 mg). Antibody and T-cell responses were induced but not sustained. On challenge, the intramuscularly vaccinated monkeys did not develop rashes and had lower viremias than vector-treated control monkeys. Monkeys vaccinated with the same dose intradermally developed rashes and viremia. Monkeys vaccinated intradermally with the low dose developed more severe rashes, with histopathologic evidence of syncytia and intense dermal and epidermal inflammation, eosinophilia, and higher viremia compared to vector-treated control monkeys. Protection after challenge correlated with gamma interferon-producing T cells and with early production of high-avidity antibody that bound wild-type H protein. We conclude that PLG/SINCP-H is most efficacious when delivered intramuscularly but does not provide an advantage over standard DNA vaccines for protection against measles. PMID:18287579

  17. The HDAC Inhibitors Scriptaid and LBH589 Combined with the Oncolytic Virus Delta24-RGD Exert Enhanced Anti-Tumor Efficacy in Patient-Derived Glioblastoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte M E Berghauser Pont

    Full Text Available A phase I/II trial for glioblastoma with the oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD was recently completed. Delta24-RGD conditionally replicates in cells with a disrupted retinoblastoma-pathway and enters cells via αvβ3/5 integrins. Glioblastomas are differentially sensitive to Delta24-RGD. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi affect integrins and share common cell death pathways with Delta24-RGD. We studied the combination treatment effects of HDACi and Delta24-RGD in patient-derived glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSC, and we determined the most effective HDACi.SAHA, Valproic Acid, Scriptaid, MS275 and LBH589 were combined with Delta24-RGD in fourteen distinct GSCs. Synergy was determined by Chou Talalay method. Viral infection and replication were assessed using luciferase and GFP encoding vectors and hexon-titration assays. Coxsackie adenovirus receptor and αvβ3 integrin levels were determined by flow cytometry. Oncolysis and mechanisms of cell death were studied by viability, caspase-3/7, LDH and LC3B/p62, phospho-p70S6K. Toxicity was studied on normal human astrocytes. MGMT promotor methylation status, TCGA classification, Rb-pathway and integrin gene expression levels were assessed as markers of responsiveness.Scriptaid and LBH589 acted synergistically with Delta24-RGD in approximately 50% of the GSCs. Both drugs moderately increased αvβ3 integrin levels and viral infection in responding but not in non-responding GSCs. LBH589 moderately increased late viral gene expression, however, virus titration revealed diminished viral progeny production by both HDACi, Scriptaid augmented caspase-3/7 activity, LC3B conversion, p62 and phospho-p70S6K consumption, as well as LDH levels. LBH589 increased LDH and phospho-p70S6K consumption. Responsiveness correlated with expression of various Rb-pathway genes and integrins. Combination treatments induced limited toxicity to human astrocytes.LBH589 and Scriptaid combined with Delta24-RGD revealed synergistic anti

  18. Whole Pichia pastoris yeast expressing measles virus nucleoprotein as a production and delivery system to multimerize Plasmodium antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Jacob

    Full Text Available Yeasts are largely used as bioreactors for vaccine production. Usually, antigens are produced in yeast then purified and mixed with adjuvants before immunization. However, the purification costs and the safety concerns recently raised by the use of new adjuvants argue for alternative strategies. To this end, the use of whole yeast as both production and delivery system appears attractive. Here, we evaluated Pichia pastoris yeast as an alternative vaccine production and delivery system for the circumsporozoite protein (CS of Plasmodium, the etiologic agent of malaria. The CS protein from Plasmodium berghei (Pb was selected given the availability of the stringent C57Bl/6 mouse model of infection by Pb sporozoites, allowing the evaluation of vaccine efficacy in vivo. PbCS was multimerized by fusion to the measles virus (MV nucleoprotein (N known to auto-assemble in yeast in large-size ribonucleoprotein rods (RNPs. Expressed in P. pastoris, the N-PbCS protein generated highly multimeric and heterogenic RNPs bearing PbCS on their surface. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence analyses revealed the shape of these RNPs and their localization in peripheral cytoplasmic inclusions. Subcutaneous immunization of C57Bl/6 mice with heat-inactivated whole P. pastoris expressing N-PbCS RNPs provided significant reduction of parasitemia after intradermal challenge with a high dose of parasites. Thus, in the absence of accessory adjuvants, a very low amount of PbCS expressed in whole yeast significantly decreased clinical damages associated with Pb infection in a highly stringent challenge model, providing a proof of concept of the intrinsic adjuvancy of this vaccine strategy. In addition to PbCS multimerization, the N protein contributed by itself to parasitemia delay and long-term mice survival. In the future, mixtures of whole recombinant yeasts expressing relevant Plasmodium antigens would provide a multivalent formulation applicable for antigen

  19. Interaction between the C-terminal domains of measles virus nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein: a tight complex implying one binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocquel, David; Habchi, Johnny; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Doizy, Anthony; Oglesbee, Michael; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-10-01

    The intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain (N(TAIL) ) of the measles virus (MeV) nucleoprotein undergoes α-helical folding upon binding to the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the phosphoprotein. The N(TAIL) region involved in binding coupled to folding has been mapped to a conserved region (Box2) encompassing residues 489-506. In the previous studies published in this journal, we obtained experimental evidence supporting a K(D) for the N(TAIL) -XD binding reaction in the nM range and also showed that an additional N(TAIL) region (Box3, aa 517-525) plays a role in binding to XD. In striking contrast with these data, studies published in this journal by Kingston and coworkers pointed out a much less stable complex (K(D) in the μM range) and supported lack of involvement of Box3 in complex formation. The objective of this study was to critically re-evaluate the role of Box3 in N(TAIL) -XD binding. Since our previous studies relied on N(TAIL) -truncated forms possessing an irrelevant Flag sequence appended at their C-terminus, we, herein, generated an N(TAIL) devoid of Box3 and any additional C-terminal residues, as well as a form encompassing only residues 482-525. We then used isothermal titration calorimetry to characterize the binding reactions between XD and these N(TAIL) forms. Results effectively argue for the presence of a single XD-binding site located within Box2, in agreement with the results by Kingston et al., while providing clear experimental support for a high-affinity complex. Altogether, the present data provide mechanistic insights into the replicative machinery of MeV and clarify a hitherto highly debated point. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  20. Conformational analysis of the partially disordered measles virus N(TAIL)-XD complex by SDSL EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavalenka, Aleh; Urbancic, Iztok; Belle, Valérie; Rouger, Sabrina; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Kure, Sandra; Fournel, André; Longhi, Sonia; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Strancar, Janez

    2010-03-17

    To characterize the structure of dynamic protein systems, such as partly disordered protein complexes, we propose a novel approach that relies on a combination of site-directed spin-labeled electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and modeling of local rotation conformational spaces. We applied this approach to the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein (N(TAIL)) both free and in complex with the X domain (XD, aa 459-507) of the viral phosphoprotein. By comparing measured and modeled temperature-dependent restrictions of the side-chain conformational spaces of 12 SL cysteine-substituted N(TAIL) variants, we showed that the 490-500 region of N(TAIL) is prestructured in the absence of the partner, and were able to quantitatively estimate, for the first time to our knowledge, the extent of the alpha-helical sampling of the free form. In addition, we showed that the 505-525 region of N(TAIL) conserves a significant degree of freedom even in the bound form. The latter two findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the reported rather high affinity of the N(TAIL)-XD binding reaction. Due to the nanosecond timescale of X-band EPR spectroscopy, we were also able to monitor the disordering in the 488-525 region of N(TAIL), in particular the unfolding of the alpha-helical region when the temperature was increased from 281 K to 310 K. Copyright 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 一例麻疹病例的实验室确诊及病毒种系进化分析%Detection, Genotyping and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Measles Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈力; 王华洪

    2012-01-01

    目的 对一例疑似麻疹病例进行实验室诊断,同时对病毒种系进化进行分析. 方法 应用Measles IgM试剂盒(μ-capture)对疑似患者血清进行病毒IgM抗体的检测,采集咽拭子标本,提取总RN,合成麻疹病毒核蛋白基因特异性扩增引物,应用RT-PCR及Real-time PCR进行扩增,回收阳性扩增产物,进行序列测定,将所测序列与国内外麻疹病毒株序列进行核苷酸同源性分析,应用MEGA5.0软件构建核蛋白基因种系进化树. 结果 疑似病例血清麻疹病毒IgM抗体为阳性;RT-PCR法扩增病毒核蛋白基因可见一约330bp大小的条带;与Genbank报道的国内Mvi Hunan strain 1、Mvi Hunan strain 2、Mvi Hunan strain 3的同源性最高;种系进化分析表明Mvi Hunan Yueyang strain同所有H1型的麻疹病毒聚集在进化树的B组内,为麻疹病毒H型H1亚型. 结论 分离的病毒为麻疹病毒H1型,基因分型技术能进一步对病毒亚型进行鉴定.%Objective To make laboratory diagnosis of a suspected measles patient and to make a phylogenetic analysis on the measles virus. Methods The IgM antibody of measles virus in the suspected patient was detected by measles IgM diagnose kit (μ - capture method). Total RNA was extracted from the throat swab sample before the nucleoprotein gene of the measles virus was amplified by RT - PCR and Real - time PCR with specific primers designed. The PCR positive product was recycled and purified before being sequenced. The nucleotide homology was analyzed by comparing the obtained sequence with the measles virus sequences from the Genbank. The phylogenetic tree was constructed by MEGA5.0 software. Results The IgM antibody of the measles virus in the suspected patient was positive. The PCR product of the nucleoprotein gene was a band about 330 bp, which had a high hotnology with the Mvi Hunan strain 1, Mvi Hunan strain 2 and Mvi Hunan strain 3 reported in the Genbank. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolated Mvi Hunan

  2. Potential of vesicular stomatitis virus as an oncolytic therapy for recurrent and drug-resistant ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua F. Heiber; Xiang-Xi Xu; Glen N. Barber

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade,we have gained significant understanding of the mechanism by which vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) specifically kills cancer cells.Dysregulation of translation and defective innate immunity are beth thought to contribute to VSV oncolysis.Safety and efficacy are important objectives to consider in evaluating VSV as a therapy for malignant disease.Ongoing efforts may enable VSV virotherapy to be considered in the near future to treat drug-resistant ovarian cancer when other options have been exhausted.In this article,we review the development of VSV as a potential therapeutic approach for recurrent or drug-resistant ovarian cancer.

  3. [Measles in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antona, Denise; Baudon, Claire; Freymuth, François; Lamy, Mathieu; Maine, Catherine; Parent du Chatelet, Isabelle; Lévy-Bruhl, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    From January 2008 to May 2012, over 22,000 cases of measles were reported in France. The highest incidence rate was observed in children below one year of age. Over 50% of cases were reported in young adults. Almost 5,000 patients were hospitalised including 1,023 with severe pneumonia, 27 with encephalitis and/or myelitis : 10 died. This situation is linked to insufficient and heterogeneous vaccination coverage with pockets of susceptible people allowing virus circulation. Although the vaccine coverage in children has now improved for both doses, the issue of convincing young susceptible adults to catch up for measles vaccination remains critical, if the elimination target is to be met, and in order to protect the most vulnerable population unable to benefit from this vaccination (children below 1 year, immunodeficient people, pregnant women).

  4. Facts about Measles for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Glance Adolescent Vaccination Recommendation: MMR About Measles Facts about Measles for Adults What is measles? Measles ... are pregnant or severely immunosuppressed. Disease and vaccine facts FACT: Measles can be prevented with a safe ...

  5. In Vivo Efficacy of Measles Virus Fusion Protein-Derived Peptides Is Modulated by the Properties of Self-Assembly and Membrane Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, T N; Palermo, L M; Veiga, A S; Huey, D; Alabi, C A; Santos, N C; Welsch, J C; Mathieu, C; Horvat, B; Niewiesk, S; Moscona, A; Castanho, M A R B; Porotto, M

    2017-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection is undergoing resurgence and remains one of the leading causes of death among young children worldwide despite the availability of an effective measles vaccine. MV infects its target cells by coordinated action of the MV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) envelope glycoproteins; upon receptor engagement by H, the prefusion F undergoes a structural transition, extending and inserting into the target cell membrane and then refolding into a postfusion structure that fuses the viral and cell membranes. By interfering with this structural transition of F, peptides derived from the heptad repeat (HR) regions of F can inhibit MV infection at the entry stage. In previous work, we have generated potent MV fusion inhibitors by dimerizing the F-derived peptides and conjugating them to cholesterol. We have shown that prophylactic intranasal administration of our lead fusion inhibitor efficiently protects from MV infection in vivo We show here that peptides tagged with lipophilic moieties self-assemble into nanoparticles until they reach the target cells, where they are integrated into cell membranes. The self-assembly feature enhances biodistribution and the half-life of the peptides, while integration into the target cell membrane increases fusion inhibitor potency. These factors together modulate in vivo efficacy. The results suggest a new framework for developing effective fusion inhibitory peptides. Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute illness that may be associated with infection of the central nervous system (CNS) and severe neurological disease. No specific treatment is available. We have shown that fusion-inhibitory peptides delivered intranasally provide effective prophylaxis against MV infection. We show here that specific biophysical properties regulate the in vivo efficacy of MV F-derived peptides. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at Each Vaccine: MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) Vaccine Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP): Learn about measles, how ... Disease Control and Prevention AAP Urges Parents to Vaccinate Children to Protect Against Measles (1/23/15) American ...

  7. Measles: Information for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PARENTS | DISEASES and the VACCINES THAT PREVENT THEM | Measles and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It Last ... July 2015 The best way to protect against measles is to get the measles-mumps-rubella shot ( ...

  8. Measles, mumps, and rubella virus vaccine (M-M-R™II): a review of 32 years of clinical and postmarketing experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievano, Fabio; Galea, Susan A; Thornton, Michele; Wiedmann, Richard T; Manoff, Susan B; Tran, Trung N; Amin, Manisha A; Seminack, Margaret M; Vagie, Kristen A; Dana, Adrian; Plotkin, Stanley A

    2012-11-06

    M-M-R™II (measles, mumps, and rubella virus vaccine live; Merck, Sharp, & Dohme Corp.) is indicated for simultaneous vaccination against measles, mumps, and rubella in individuals ≥ 12 months of age. Before the vaccine era, these viruses infected most exposed individuals, with subsequent morbidity and mortality. One of the greatest achievements of public health has been to eliminate these 3 diseases in large geographic areas. The safety profile of M-M-R™II is described using data from routine global postmarketing surveillance. Postmarketing surveillance has limitations (including incomplete reporting of case data), but allows collection of real-world information on large numbers of individuals, who may have concurrent medical problems excluding them from clinical trials. It can also identify rare adverse experiences (AEs). Over its 32-year history, ≈ 575 million doses of M-M-R™II have been distributed worldwide, with 17,536 AEs voluntarily reported for an overall rate of 30.5 AEs/1,000,000 doses distributed. This review provides evidence that the vaccine is safe and well-tolerated.

  9. Changes in Measles Serostatus Among HIV-Infected Zambian Children Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy Before and After the 2010 Measles Outbreak and Supplemental Immunization Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainwater-Lovett, Kaitlin; Nkamba, Hope C.; Mubiana-Mbewe, Mwangelwa; Bolton-Moore, Carolyn; Moss, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. In 2010, Zambia had a large measles outbreak, providing an opportunity to measure changes in measles serostatus following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), exposure to measles virus, and revaccination among children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods. A prospective cohort study of 169 HIV-infected Zambian children aged 9–60 months with a history of measles vaccination was conducted to characterize the effects of HAART and revaccination on measles immunoglobulin G (IgG) serostatus by enzyme immunoassay. Results. Prior to the measles outbreak, only 23% of HIV-infected children were measles IgG seropositive at HAART initiation. After adjusting for 6-month changes in baseline age and 5% changes in nadir CD4+ T-cell percentage, HAART was not associated with measles IgG seroconversion. However, 18 of 19 children seroconverted after revaccination. Eight children seroconverted during the outbreak without revaccination and were likely exposed to wild-type measles virus, but none were reported to have had clinical measles. Conclusions. Immune reconstitution after HAART initiation did not restore protective levels of measles IgG antibodies, but almost all children developed protective antibody levels after revaccination. Some previously vaccinated HIV-infected children had serological evidence of exposure to wild-type measles virus without a reported history of measles. PMID:23911708

  10. First Isolation and Identification of Wild-type Measles Viruses in Anhui Province%安徽省麻疹野毒株的首次分离和鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何维宽; 余文周; 周淑洁; 张莲芝; 沈永刚; 戴振威; 李业强; 许文波

    2001-01-01

    为了监测安徽省现流行的麻疹野毒株,在1998、1999年的2起麻疹暴发中,用绒猴淋巴母细胞(B95a)分离到4株麻疹野病毒,通过血凝试验、血吸附试验、中和试验对分离到的麻疹病毒进行特性鉴定。该4株病毒无血凝和血球吸附活性,我国人类疫苗免疫后,血清能中和这4株病毒,但中和此野毒株的滴度低于中和疫苗株滴度的2倍。逆转录聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)和其产物的基因序列分析提示,该4株病毒属于麻疹病毒第八基因组(H group)。继续监测我国各省麻疹流行株的基因和抗原变异,对我国强化麻疹控制及麻疹消除、消灭十分必要%This study was to survey the current wild-type measles virus that circulated in Anhui Province. 4 wild-type measles viruses were isolated in B95a cells from 2 outbreaks during 1998 and 1999. The virus characteristics were identified by hemagglutination test, haemadsorption test and neutralization test. The results showed that the 4 wild-type measles viruses did not have hemagglutination and haemadsorption activities and the sera against Chinese vaccine (S191) could neutralize all of the 4 wild-type measles virus strains, but the neutralizing titer was two times lower compared with that of S191. RT-PCR and its product sequence analysis indicated that the 4 wild-type measles virus strains belong to H genetic group. In order to control and eliminate measles, it is important to survey continually the genetic and antigenic shifts of the prevalent measles viruses circulating in China.

  11. Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms), but not measles virus iscoms, protect dogs against CDV infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. de Vries (Petra); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe potential of immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms), a novel form of antigenic presentation, for the induction of protective immunity against morbillivirus infection was shown by immunizing dogs with canine distemper virus (CDV) iscoms, which contained the fusion (F) protein and a min

  12. 青海省2000-2011年麻疹病毒的分子流行病学研究%Molecular epidemiological study of measles viruses isolated in Qinghai Province during 2000-2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范丽霞; 巴卓玛; 赵生仓; 易虎; 姜双应; 张燕; 王慧玲; 许文波

    2013-01-01

    Objective To carry out the molecular epidemiological study of the wild-type measles virus isolated in Qinghai Province during 2000-2011,and provide a scientific basis for the measles elimination.Methods Measles viruses were isolated using B95a cell line or Vero/SLAM cell line from throat swabs collected from suspected measles cases during measles outbreak and sporadic in 6 prefectures during 2000-2011.The fragment of 696 nucleotides of N gene carboxy terminal was amplified by using RTPCR methods.The PCR products were sequenced and analyzed.The phylogenetic tree was conducted with the viruses isolated in viruses from other province.Results Total 19 measles viruses were isolated during 2000-2011 in Qinghai province and all belong to genotype H1 a.The results of phylogenetic tree showed that viruses in 2000-2005 and in 2009-2011 were distributed in two different lineages,and it revealed that these strains belonged to at least 2 viral transmission chains and the viruses circulated during 2000-2005 were not detected after 2005.Conclusion Genotype H1a was the predominant genotype circulated in Qinghai province during 2000-2011.Qinghai measles virus strains had not evolved independently,but coevolved with the measles virus strains in other provinces in mainland China.The variation of important amino acid sites of measles virus should be continuous monitored and provide the scientific strategy for the measles elimination.%目的 对青海省2000-2011年流行麻疹野病毒进行分子流行病学研究,为消除麻疹提供科学依据.方法 使用B95a细胞或Vero/SLAM细胞从2000-2011年青海省6个地市麻疹暴发和散发病例的咽拭子标本中分离的麻疹病毒,用RT-PCR方法扩增N基因羧基末端676个核苷酸片段,再对扩增产物进行核苷酸序列测定和分析,并与我国其他省份流行的麻疹病毒代表株基于N基因羧基末端450个核苷酸片段构建基因亲缘性关系树.结果 青海省2000-2011年共分离到19

  13. Chronic Activation of Innate Immunity Correlates With Poor Prognosis in Cancer Patients Treated With Oncolytic Adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, Kristian; Liikanen, Ilkka; Juhila, Juuso; Turkki, Riku; Tähtinen, Siri; Kankainen, Matti; Vassilev, Lotta; Ristimäki, Ari; Koski, Anniina; Kanerva, Anna; Diaconu, Iulia; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Oksanen, Minna; Linder, Nina; Joensuu, Timo; Lundin, Johan; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-02-01

    Despite many clinical trials conducted with oncolytic viruses, the exact tumor-level mechanisms affecting therapeutic efficacy have not been established. Currently there are no biomarkers available that would predict the clinical outcome to any oncolytic virus. To assess the baseline immunological phenotype and find potential prognostic biomarkers, we monitored mRNA expression levels in 31 tumor biopsy or fluid samples from 27 patients treated with oncolytic adenovirus. Additionally, protein expression was studied from 19 biopsies using immunohistochemical staining. We found highly significant changes in several signaling pathways and genes associated with immune responses, such as B-cell receptor signaling (P immunity before treatment is associated with inferior survival in patients treated with oncolytic adenovirus. Conversely, lack of chronic innate inflammation at baseline may predict improved treatment outcome, as suggested by good overall prognosis.

  14. Measles virus selectively blind to signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM; CD150) is attenuated and induces strong adaptive immune responses in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Vincent H J; Hodge, Gregory; Reyes-Del Valle, Jorge; McChesney, Michael B; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2010-04-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM; CD150) is the immune cell receptor for measles virus (MV). To assess the importance of the SLAM-MV interactions for virus spread and pathogenesis, we generated a wild-type IC-B MV selectively unable to recognize human SLAM (SLAM-blind). This virus differs from the fully virulent wild-type IC-B strain by a single arginine-to-alanine substitution at amino acid 533 of the attachment protein hemagglutinin and infects cells through SLAM about 40 times less efficiently than the isogenic wild-type strain. Ex vivo, this virus infects primary lymphocytes at low levels regardless of SLAM expression. When a group of six rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) was inoculated intranasally with the SLAM-blind virus, no clinical symptoms were documented. Only one monkey had low-level viremia early after infection, whereas all the hosts in the control group had high viremia levels. Despite minimal, if any, viremia, all six hosts generated neutralizing antibody titers close to those of the control monkeys while MV-directed cellular immunity reached levels at least as high as in wild-type-infected monkeys. These findings prove formally that efficient SLAM recognition is necessary for MV virulence and pathogenesis. They also suggest that the selectively SLAM-blind wild-type MV can be developed into a vaccine vector.

  15. Evaluating the impact of the HIV pandemic on measles control and elimination.

    OpenAIRE

    Helfand, RF; Moss, WJ; Harpaz, R; Scott, S; Cutts, F.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the impact of the HIV pandemic on vaccine-acquired population immunity to measles virus because high levels of population immunity are required to eliminate transmission of measles virus in large geographical areas, and HIV infection can reduce the efficacy of measles vaccination. METHODS: A literature review was conducted to estimate key parameters relating to the potential impact of HIV infection on the epidemiology of measles in sub-Saharan Africa; parameters include...

  16. The use of microwave irradiation as a pretreatment to in situ hybridization for the detection of measles virus and chicken anaemia virus in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, J.; McQuaid, S. [Royal Group of Hospitals, Belfast (United Kingdom). Neuropathology Lab.]|[Queen`s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    Microwave irradiation was investigated as a pretreatment to in situ hybridization on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Two probe/tissue systems were used: a single-stranded RNA probe for the detection of measles virus nucleocapsid genome in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis brain tissue, and a double stranded DNA probe for chicken anaemia virus in thymus of chicken infected with the virus. Microwaving, when used as sold pretreatment, was not as effective as the more traditional enzyme pretreatments for in situ hybridization. However, when used in combination with existing pretreatments, a significant increase was found in hybridization signal in both brain and thymus tissue. This was emphasized when combination enzyme/microwave pretreatments were used prior to detection of measles virus by in situ hybridization in a series of five archival subacute sclerosing panencephalitis cases. The use of microwave irradiation would be recommended as a means of supplementing in situ hybridization methods, especially when using long-term formalin fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. (Author).

  17. Photos of Measles and People with Measles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Photos of Measles and People with Measles Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... be unsuitable for children. Viewing discretion is advised. Measles Clinical Features Video CDC’s Dr. Raymond Strikas, MD, ...

  18. Rubella (German Measles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Rubella (German Measles) KidsHealth > For Parents > Rubella (German Measles) Print A A A What's in this article? ... Rubéola About Rubella Rubella — commonly known as German measles or 3-day measles — is an infection that ...

  19. Stem Cell-Based Cell Carrier for Targeted Oncolytic Virotherapy: Translational Opportunity and Open Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Janice; Hall, Robert R; Lesniak, Maciej S; Ahmed, Atique U

    2015-11-27

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer is an innovative therapeutic option where the ability of a virus to promote cell lysis is harnessed and reprogrammed to selectively destroy cancer cells. Such treatment modalities exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical and clinical settings and appear to be well tolerated when tested in clinical trials. However, the clinical success of oncolytic virotherapy has been significantly hampered due to the inability to target systematic metastasis. This is partly due to the inability of the therapeutic virus to survive in the patient circulation, in order to target tumors at distant sites. An early study from various laboratories demonstrated that cells infected with oncolytic virus can protect the therapeutic payload form the host immune system as well as function as factories for virus production and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic virus. While a variety of cell lineages possessed potential as cell carriers, copious investigation has established stem cells as a very attractive cell carrier system in oncolytic virotherapy. The ideal cell carrier desire to be susceptible to viral infection as well as support viral infection, maintain immunosuppressive properties to shield the loaded viruses from the host immune system, and most importantly possess an intrinsic tumor homing ability to deliver loaded viruses directly to the site of the metastasis-all qualities stem cells exhibit. In this review, we summarize the recent work in the development of stem cell-based carrier for oncolytic virotherapy, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of cell carriers, especially focusing on why stem cells have emerged as the leading candidate, and finally propose a future direction for stem cell-based targeted oncolytic virotherapy that involves its establishment as a viable treatment option for cancer patients in the clinical setting.

  20. Cotreatment of Congenital Measles with Vitamin A and Intravenous Immunoglobulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Ozsurekci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the measles vaccine has been part of routine national childhood vaccination programs throughout Europe, measles remains a public health concern. High numbers of cases and outbreaks have occurred throughout the European continent since 2011, and an increasing number of cases have been reported in Turkey since 2012. During a recent measles outbreak in Turkey, 2 pregnant women contracted measles prior to delivering preterm infants at Hacettepe University Hospital. Measles virus genomic RNA and IgM antibodies against measles were detected in the cord blood of infants and mothers in both cases. The infants were treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and vitamin A. Transient thrombocytopenia was present in 1 infant and treated with an additional dose of IVIG and vitamin A. The infants were discharged, without complications, within 10 days of birth. The successful treatment of these cases suggests that infants who have been exposed to, or infected with, measles may benefit from cotreatment of vitamin A and IVIG.

  1. Resistance to Oncolytic Myxoma Virus Therapy in Nf1−/−/Trp53−/− Syngeneic Mouse Glioma Models Is Independent of Anti-Viral Type-I Interferon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Franz J.; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Lun, Xueqing; Maxwell, Lori; Reilly, Karlyne M.; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V. Wee; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical studies, oncolytic viral therapy for malignant gliomas has resulted in variable, but underwhelming results in clinical evaluations. Of concern are the low levels of tumour infection and viral replication within the tumour. This discrepancy between the laboratory and the clinic could result from the disparity of xenograft versus syngeneic models in determining in vivo viral infection, replication and treatment efficacy. Here we describe a panel of primary mouse glioma lines derived from Nf1+/−Trp53+/− mice in the C57Bl/6J background for use in the preclinical testing of the oncolytic virus Myxoma (MYXV). These lines show a range of susceptibility to MYXV replication in vitro, but all succumb to viral-mediated cell death. Two of these lines orthotopically grafted produced aggressive gliomas. Intracranial injection of MYXV failed to result in sustained viral replication or treatment efficacy, with minimal tumour infection that was completely resolved by 7 days post-infection. We hypothesized that the stromal production of Type-I interferons (IFNα/β) could explain the resistance seen in these models; however, we found that neither the cell lines in vitro nor the tumours in vivo produce any IFNα/β in response to MYXV infection. To confirm IFNα/β did not play a role in this resistance, we ablated the ability of tumours to respond to IFNα/β via IRF9 knockdown, and generated identical results. Our studies demonstrate that these syngeneic cell lines are relevant preclinical models for testing experimental glioma treatments, and show that IFNα/β is not responsible for the MYXV treatment resistance seen in syngeneic glioma models. PMID:23762429

  2. Remarkable similarity in genome nucleotide sequences between the Schwarz FF-8 and AIK-C measles virus vaccine strains and apparent nucleotide differences in the phosphoprotein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Chie; Ohgimoto, Shinji; Kato, Seiichi; Sharma, Luna Bhatta; Ayata, Minoru; Komase, Katsuhiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Ihara, Toshiaki; Ogura, Hisashi

    2011-07-01

    The Schwarz FF-8 (FF-8) and AIK-C measles virus vaccine strains are currently used for vaccination in Japan. Here, the complete genome nucleotide sequence of the FF-8 strain has been determined and its genome sequence found to be remarkably similar to that of the AIK-C strain. These two strains are differentiated only by two nucleotide differences in the phosphoprotein gene. Since the FF-8 strain does not possess the amino acid substitutions in the phospho- and fusion proteins which are responsible for the temperature-sensitivity and small syncytium formation phenotypes of the AIK-C strain, respectively, other unidentified common mechanisms likely attenuate both the FF-8 and AIK-C strains.

  3. Use of surface plasmon resonance for the measurement of low affinity binding interactions between HSP72 and measles virus nucleocapsid protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xinsheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The 72 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 is a molecular chaperone that binds native protein with low affinity. These interactions can alter function of the substrate, a property known as HSP-mediated activity control. In the present work, BIAcore instrumentation was used to monitor binding reactions between HSP72 and naturally occurring sequence variants of the measles virus (MV nucleocapsid protein (N, a structural protein regulating transcription/replication of the viral genome. Binding reactions employed synthetic peptides mimicking a putative HSP72 binding motif of N. Sequences were identified that bound HSP72 with affinities comparable to well-characterized activity control reactions. These sequences, but not those binding with lesser affinity, supported HSP72 activity control of MV transcription/replication. BIAcore instrumentation thus provides an effective way to measure biologically relevant low affinity interactions with structural variants of viral proteins.

  4. Elevated levels of measles antibodies in children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijendra K; Jensen, Ryan L

    2003-04-01

    Virus-induced autoimmunity may play a causal role in autism. To examine the etiologic link of viruses in this brain disorder, we conducted a serologic study of measles virus, mumps virus, and rubella virus. Viral antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the serum of autistic children, normal children, and siblings of autistic children. The level of measles antibody, but not mumps or rubella antibodies, was significantly higher in autistic children as compared with normal children (P = 0.003) or siblings of autistic children (P molecular weight. The antibody to this antigen was found in 83% of autistic children but not in normal children or siblings of autistic children. Thus autistic children have a hyperimmune response to measles virus, which in the absence of a wild type of measles infection might be a sign of an abnormal immune reaction to the vaccine strain or virus reactivation.

  5. HIV-1 infection ex vivo accelerates measles virus infection by upregulating signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) in CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuki, Yu-ya; Terahara, Kazutaka; Shibusawa, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Tsuchiya, Takatsugu; Mizukoshi, Fuminori; Ishige, Masayuki; Okada, Seiji; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Morikawa, Yuko; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Takeda, Makoto; Yanagi, Yusuke; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2012-07-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection in children harboring human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is often fatal, even in the presence of neutralizing antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between HIV-1 and wild-type MV (MVwt) or an MV vaccine strain (MVvac) during dual infection. The results showed that the frequencies of MVwt- and MVvac-infected CD4(+) T cells within the resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were increased 3- to 4-fold after HIV-1 infection, and this was associated with a marked upregulation of signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) expression on CD4(+) T cells but not on CD8(+) T cells. SLAM upregulation was induced by infection with a replication-competent HIV-1 isolate comprising both the X4 and R5 types and to a lesser extent by a pseudotyped HIV-1 infection. Notably, SLAM upregulation was observed in HIV-infected as well as -uninfected CD4(+) T cells and was abrogated by the removal of HLA-DR(+) cells from the PBMC culture. Furthermore, SLAM upregulation did not occur in uninfected PBMCs cultured together with HIV-infected PBMCs in compartments separated by a permeable membrane, indicating that no soluble factors were involved. Rather, CD4(+) T cell activation mediated through direct contact with dendritic cells via leukocyte function-associated molecule 1 (LFA-1)/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and LFA-3/CD2 was critical. Thus, HIV-1 infection induces a high level of SLAM expression on CD4(+) T cells, which may enhance their susceptibility to MV and exacerbate measles in coinfected individuals.

  6. A prominent role for DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells in initiation and dissemination of measles virus infection in non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies W Mesman

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MV is a highly contagious virus that is transmitted by aerosols. During systemic infection, CD150(+ T and B lymphocytes in blood and lymphoid tissues are the main cells infected by pathogenic MV. However, it is unclear which cell types are the primary targets for MV in the lungs and how the virus reaches the lymphoid tissues. In vitro studies have shown that dendritic cell (DC C-type lectin DC-SIGN captures MV, leading to infection of DCs as well as transmission to lymphocytes. However, evidence of DC-SIGN-mediated transmission in vivo has not been established. Here we identified DC-SIGN(hi DCs as first target cells in vivo and demonstrate that macaque DC-SIGN functions as an attachment receptor for MV. Notably, DC-SIGN(hi cells from macaque broncho-alveolar lavage and lymph nodes transmit MV to B lymphocytes, providing in vivo support for an important role for DCs in both initiation and dissemination of MV infection.

  7. Biological characterization of clones derived from the edmonston strain of measles virus in comparison with schwarz and CAM-70 vaccine strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Beatriz Junqueira Borges

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Four virus clones were derived from the Edmonston strain of measles virus by repeated plaque purification. These clones were compared with the vaccine strains Schwarz and CAM-70 in terms of biological activities including plaque formation, hemagglutination, hemolysis and replication in Vero cells and chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF. Two clones of intermediate plaque yielded mixed plaque populations on subcultivation whereas the other two, showing small and large plaque sizes, showed stable plaque phenotypes. The vaccine strains showed consistent homogeneous plaque populations. All the Edmonston clones showed agglutination of monkey erythrocytes in isotonic solution while both vaccine strains hemagglutinated only in the presence of high salt concentrations. Variation in the hemolytic activity was observed among the four clones but no hemolytic activity was detected for the vaccine virus strains. Vaccine strains replicated efficiently both in Vero cells and CEF. All four clones showed efficient replication in Vero cells but different replication profiles in CEF. Two of them replicated efficiently, one was of intermediate efficiency and the other showed no replication in CEF. Two of the clones showed characteristics similar to vaccine strains. One in terms of size and homogeneity of plaques, the other for a low hemolytic activity and both for the efficiency of propagation in CEF.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of measles in India, 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wairagkar, Niteen; Chowdhury, Deepika; Vaidya, Sunil; Sikchi, Sarika; Shaikh, Naseem; Hungund, Laxman; Tomar, R S; Biswas, D; Yadav, K; Mahanta, J; Das, V N R; Yergolkar, Prasanna; Gunasekaran, P; Raja, D; Jadi, R; Ramamurty, Nalini; Mishra, A C

    2011-07-01

    Measles is a childhood disease that causes great morbidity and mortality in India and worldwide. Because measles surveillance in India is in its infancy, there is a paucity of countrywide data on circulating Measles virus genotypes. This study was conducted in 21 of 28 States and 2 of 7 Union Territories of India by MeaslesNetIndia, a national network of 27 centers and sentinel practitioners. MeaslesNetIndia investigated 52 measles outbreaks in geographically representative areas from 2005 through June 2010. All outbreaks were serologically confirmed by detection of antimeasles virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in serum or oral fluid samples. Molecular studies, using World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended protocols obtained 203 N-gene, 40 H-gene, and 4 M-gene sequences during this period. Measles genotypes D4, D7, and D8 were found to be circulating in various parts of India during the study period. Further phylogenetic analysis revealed 4 lineages of Indian D8 genotypes: D8a, D8b, D8c, and D8d. This study generated a large, countrywide sequence database that can form the baseline for future molecular studies on measles virus transmission pathways in India. This study has created support and capabilities for countrywide measles molecular surveillance that must be carried forward.

  9. An extremely low body weight infant born to a mother with measles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, H; Hashimoto, K; Imamura, T; Sato, M; Kawasaki, Y; Momoi, N; Hosoya, M

    2010-02-01

    The incidence of measles epidemics has decreased recently owing to the development and widespread use of measles vaccine in the United States of America and Europe. However, repeated measles epidemics have been reported in Japan. Here, the authors report a case of an extremely low body weight infant (ELBWI) whose mother had a measles virus infection. Real-time PCR was performed on the infant's blood and urine samples and skin, nasal secretion, and anal swabs, as well as on the mother's breast milk, blood samples and throat swabs. The infant was found to be positive for measles virus by PCR, but not immunoglobulin M positive. An earlier report showed that there were no such cases in which the patient was found to be positive for measles virus by real-time PCR but was not infected by the measles virus.

  10. Going viral: a review of replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Christopher; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Fanger, Gary R; Stirn, Meaghan; Oronsky, Arnold; Reid, Tony R

    2015-08-21

    Oncolytic viruses have had a tumultuous course, from the initial anecdotal reports of patients having antineoplastic effects after natural viral infections a century ago to the development of current cutting-edge therapies in clinical trials. Adenoviruses have long been the workhorse of virotherapy, and we review both the scientific and the not-so-scientific forces that have shaped the development of these therapeutics from wild-type viral pathogens, turning an old foe into a new friend. After a brief review of the mechanics of viral replication and how it has been modified to engineer tumor selectivity, we give particular attention to ONYX-015, the forerunner of virotherapy with extensive clinical testing that pioneered the field. The findings from those as well as other oncolytic trials have shaped how we now view these viruses, which our immune system has evolved to vigorously attack, as promising immunotherapy agents.

  11. Measles incidence rate and a phylogenetic study of contemporary genotype H1 measles strains in China: is an improved measles vaccine needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingwei; Zheng, Jingtong; Huang, Honglan; Hu, Yu; Bian, Jiang; Xu, Deqi; Li, Fan

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of measles in China has increased over the last decade. To evaluate the genetic variation of measles strains, 16 measles wild-type virus strains were isolated from 14 vaccinated cases and 2 nonvaccinated cases in Jilin Province during 2005-2006, and their nucleoprotein (N) and hemagglutinin (H) genes were amplified by RT-PCR. The amplified products were sequenced and compared with the Edmonston virus and the existing vaccine strains (Changchun-47 and Shanghai-191). The results showed that the variation rate between the vaccine and wild-type strains was 9.8-12.0% in the N gene and 5.9-6.9% in the H gene, respectively. In addition, cross-neutralization assays revealed that although sera obtained from infants following primary vaccination effectively neutralized vaccine strains, the capacity in neutralizing H1 wild-type measles virus isolates was decreased fourfold. Antigenic ratios testing revealed that the antigenic relatedness between wild-type measles viruses and existing vaccine strains was notably low. These data suggest that the increased incidence of measles in Jilin Province may be attributed to the antigenic drift between wild-type and vaccine strains. Our findings strengthen the recommendation of supplemental immunization with existing vaccines and also strongly suggest a need for developing new vaccines to better control measles virus outbreaks.

  12. Measles in Sudan: Diagnosis, Epidemiology and Humoral Immune Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.S. El Mubarak

    2004-01-01

    textabstractDespite the availability of safe and effective live attenuated vaccines, measles remains endemic in many developing countries. Little is known about the pathogenesis of measles virus (MV) infections in the areas of itsendemicity, largely due to the limited infrastructure and political

  13. Measles in Sudan: Diagnosis, Epidemiology and Humoral Immune Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.S. El Mubarak

    2004-01-01

    textabstractDespite the availability of safe and effective live attenuated vaccines, measles remains endemic in many developing countries. Little is known about the pathogenesis of measles virus (MV) infections in the areas of itsendemicity, largely due to the limited infrastructure and political in

  14. FastStats: Measles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... for the U.S. Morbidity Reported number of new measles (rubeola) cases: 667 (2015) Reported number of new ...

  15. Oncolytic vaccinia therapy of squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yong A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel therapies are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC of the head and neck. Historically, vaccinia virus was administered widely to humans as a vaccine and led to the eradication of smallpox. We examined the therapeutic effects of an attenuated, replication-competent vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68 as an oncolytic agent against a panel of six human head and neck SCC cell lines. Results All six cell lines supported viral transgene expression (β-galactosidase, green fluorescent protein, and luciferase as early as 6 hours after viral exposure. Efficient transgene expression and viral replication (>150-fold titer increase over 72 hrs were observed in four of the cell lines. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1, GLV-1h68 was highly cytotoxic to the four cell lines, resulting in ≥ 90% cytotoxicity over 6 days, and the remaining two cell lines exhibited >45% cytotoxicity. Even at a very low MOI of 0.01, three cell lines still demonstrated >60% cell death over 6 days. A single injection of GLV-1h68 (5 × 106 pfu intratumorally into MSKQLL2 xenografts in mice exhibited localized intratumoral luciferase activity peaking at days 2–4, with gradual resolution over 10 days and no evidence of spread to normal organs. Treated animals exhibited near-complete tumor regression over a 24-day period without any observed toxicity, while control animals demonstrated rapid tumor progression. Conclusion These results demonstrate significant oncolytic efficacy by an attenuated vaccinia virus for infecting and lysing head and neck SCC both in vitro and in vivo, and support its continued investigation in future clinical trials.

  16. Measles-associated encephalopathy in children with renal transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A; Jeyaratnam, D; Haworth, F; Sinha, M D; Hughes, E; Cohen, B; Jin, L; Kidd, I M; Rigden, S P A; MacMahon, E

    2006-06-01

    Two children, boys of 8 and 13 years, presented with measles-associated encephalopathy several years after kidney transplantation for congenital nephrotic syndrome. In the absence of prior clinical measles, the neurological symptoms initially eluded diagnosis, but retrospective analysis of stored samples facilitated the diagnosis of measles-associated encephalopathy without recourse to biopsy of deep cerebral lesions. Each had received a single dose of measles mumps and rubella vaccine before 12 months of age. Prior vaccination, reduction of immunosuppression and treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and ribavirin may have contributed to their survival. Persistent measles virus RNA shedding, present in one child, was not controlled by treatment with i.v. ribavirin. Two years later, both patients continue to have functioning allografts with only minimal immunosuppression. These cases illustrate the difficulty in diagnosing measles-associated encephalopathy in the immunocompromised host, even in the era of molecular diagnostics, and highlight the renewed threat of neurological disease in communities with incomplete herd immunity.

  17. Sensitive Detection of Measles Virus Infection in the Blood and Tissues of Humanized Mouse by One-step Quantitative RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota eIkeno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Live attenuated measles virus (MV has long been recognized as a safe and effective vaccine, and it has served as the basis for development of various MV-based vaccines. However, because MV is a human-tropic virus, the evaluation of MV-based vaccines has been hampered by the lack of a small-animal model. The humanized mouse, a recently developed system in which an immunodeficient mouse is transplanted with human fetal tissues or hematopoietic stem cells, may represent a suitable model. Here, we developed a sensitive one-step quantitative reverse transcription (qRT PCR that simultaneously measures nucleocapsid (N and human RNase P mRNA levels. The results can be used to monitor MV infection in a humanized mouse model. Using this method, we elucidated the replication kinetics of MV expressing EGFP both in vitro and in humanized mice in parallel with flow-cytometric analysis. Because our qRT-PCR system was sensitive enough to detect MV expression using RNA extracted from a small number of cells, it can be used to monitor MV infection in humanized mice by sequential blood sampling.

  18. Eradication of measles: remaining challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmann, Heidemarie; Hengel, Hartmut; Tenbusch, Matthias; Doerr, H W

    2016-06-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is an aerosol-borne and one of the most contagious pathogenic viruses known. Almost every MeV infection becomes clinically manifest and can lead to serious and even fatal complications, especially under conditions of malnutrition in developing countries, where still 115,000 to 160,000 patients die from measles every year. There is no specific antiviral treatment. In addition, MeV infections cause long-lasting memory B and T cell impairment, predisposing people susceptible to opportunistic infections for years. A rare, but fatal long-term consequence of measles is subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Fifteen years ago (2001), WHO has launched a programme to eliminate measles by a worldwide vaccination strategy. This is promising, because MeV is a human-specific morbillivirus (i.e. without relevant animal reservoir), safe and potent vaccine viruses are sufficiently produced since decades for common application, and millions of vaccine doses have been used globally without any indications of safety and efficacy issues. Though the prevalence of wild-type MeV infection has decreased by >90 % in Europe, measles is still not eliminated and has even re-emerged with recurrent outbreaks in developed countries, in which effective vaccination programmes had been installed for decades. Here, we discuss the crucial factors for a worldwide elimination of MeV: (1) efficacy of current vaccines, (2) the extremely high contagiosity of MeV demanding a >95 % vaccination rate based on two doses to avoid primary vaccine failure as well as the installation of catch-up vaccination programmes to fill immunity gaps and to achieve herd immunity, (3) the implications of sporadic cases of secondary vaccine failure, (4) organisation, acceptance and drawbacks of modern vaccination campaigns, (5) waning public attention to measles, but increasing concerns from vaccine-associated adverse reactions in societies with high socio-economic standards and (6) clinical

  19. The strategy for prevention of measles and rubella prevalence with measles-rubella (MR) vaccine in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Toshiaki

    2009-05-21

    To eliminate the indigenous measles and rubella virus by 2012 in Japan, the strategy fro prevention of measles and rubella prevalence with measles-rubella (MR) vaccine was proposed. Since the vast majority of 1-year old infants are susceptible to measles and rubella, the first MR vaccine, the first MR vaccine should be administered at 1-year old to sustain the herd immunity. Since significant elevation of measles and rubella antibody titers were eliminated in a half of children after the second dose, the second dose of of MR vaccine within 1 year before elementary school entry is the effective maneuver. Moreover, supplement MR vaccination to the teenage group and 20-29 years' group might be necessary, because the mean measles antibody titers in this group were significantly lower compared with those in the older individuals' groups.

  20. Phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis of measles outbreaks in Denmark, 2013 to 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Fonager, Jannik; Knudsen, Lisbet Krause

    2015-01-01

    Despite the introduction of safe, effective vaccines decades ago and joint global public health efforts to eliminate measles, this vaccine-preventable disease continues to pose threats to children's health worldwide. During 2013 and 2014, measles virus was introduced into Denmark through several...... independent importations. This resulted in a number of secondary cases (n = 7), with two clusters in 2013 and one in 2014. In total, there were 44 cases of measles. Most cases (n = 41) were laboratory confirmed by detection of measles virus genome by real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and IgM antibodies....... The viruses from confirmed cases were genotyped by sequencing. Only one genotype circulated each year, i.e. D8 and B3, respectively. Sequencing of measles virus from different clinical specimens from the same patients revealed that sequence variants of measles viruses might co-exist and co-transmit during...

  1. Sulfonimidamide analogs of oncolytic sulfonylureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, J E; Grindey, G B; Ehlhardt, W J; Ray, J E; Boder, G B; Bewley, J R; Klingerman, K K; Gates, S B; Rinzel, S M; Schultz, R M; Weir, L C; Worzalla, J F

    1997-03-14

    A series of sulfonimidamide analogs of the oncolytic diarylsulfonylureas was synthesized and evaluated for (1) in vitro cytotoxicity against CEM cells, (2) in vivo antitumor activity against subaxillary implanted 6C3HED lymphosarcoma, and (3) metabolic breakdown to the o-sulfate of p-chloroaniline. The separated enantiomers of one sulfonimidamide analog displayed very different activities in the in vivo screening model. In general, several analogs demonstrated excellent growth inhibitory activity in the 6C3HED model when dosed orally or intraperitoneally. A correlative structure-activity relationship to the oncolytic sulfonylureas was not apparent.

  2. Chemotherapy and Oncolytic Virotherapy: Advanced Tactics in the War against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eNguyen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a traitorous archenemy that threatens our survival. Its ability to evade detection and adapt to various cancer therapies means that it is a moving target that becomes increasingly difficult to attack. Through technological advancements we have developed sophisticated weapons to fight off tumor growth and invasion. However, if we are to stand a chance in this war against cancer, advanced tactics will be required to maximize the use of our available resources. Oncolytic viruses are multi-functional cancer-fighters that can be engineered to suit many different strategies; in particular, their retooling can facilitate increased capacity for direct tumor killing (oncolytic virotherapy and elicit adaptive antitumor immune responses (oncolytic immunotherapy. However, administration of these modified oncolytic viruses alone, rarely induces successful regression of established tumors. This may be attributed to host antiviral immunity that acts to eliminate viral particles, as well as the capacity for tumors to adapt to therapeutic selective pressure. It has been shown that various chemotherapeutic drugs with distinct functional properties can potentiate the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic viruses. In this review, we summarize the chemotherapeutic combinatorial strategies used to optimize virally-induced destruction of tumors. With a particular focus on pharmaceutical immunomodulators, we discuss how specific therapeutic contexts may alter the effects of these synergistic combinations and their implications for future clinical use.

  3. Effects of nanoparticle coatings on the activity of oncolytic adenovirus-magnetic nanoparticle complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresilwised, Nittaya; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Holm, Per Sonne; Schillinger, Ulrike; Plank, Christian; Mykhaylyk, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Limitations to adenovirus infectivity can be overcome by association with magnetic nanoparticles and enforced infection by magnetic field influence. Here we examined three core-shell-type iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles differing in their surface coatings, particle sizes and magnetic properties for their ability to enhance the oncolytic potency of adenovirus Ad520 and to stabilize it against the inhibitory effects of serum or a neutralizing antibody. It was found that the physicochemical properties of magnetic nanoparticles are critical determinants of the properties which govern the oncolytic productivities of their complexes with Ad520. Although high serum concentration during infection or a neutralizing antibody had strong inhibitory influence on the uptake or oncolytic productivity of the naked virus, one particle type was identified which conferred high protection against both inhibitory factors while enhancing the oncolytic productivity of the internalized virus. This particle type equipped with a silica coating and adsorbed polyethylenimine, displaying a high magnetic moment and high saturation magnetization, mediated a 50% reduction of tumor growth rate versus control upon intratumoral injection of its complex with Ad520 and magnetic field influence, whereas Ad520 alone was inefficient. The correlations between physical properties of the magnetic particles or virus complexes and oncolytic potency are described herein.

  4. Measles virus nucleocapsid protein, a key contributor to Paget’s disease, increases IL-6 expression via down-regulation of FoxO3/Sirt1signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Ming; Sarmasik, Aliye; Hiruma, Yuko; Sun, Quanhong; Sammut, Benedicte; Windle, Jolene J.; Roodman, G. David; Galson, Deborah L.

    2012-01-01

    Measles virus plays an important role as an environmental factor in the pathogenesis of Paget’s disease (PD). Previous studies have shown that IL-6 is increased in the bone marrow of Paget’s patients and that measles virus nucleocapsid protein (MVNP) induces IL-6 secretion by pagetic osteoclasts. Further, IL-6 plays a critical role in the development of pagetic osteoclasts and bone lesions induced by PD, but the mechanisms regulating IL-6 production by MVNP remain unclear. Our current studies revealed that MVNP expression in osteoclast precursors down-regulated Sirt1 mRNA and protein, a negative regulator of NF-κB activity, which is a key factor for IL-6 expression. MVNP expression in NIH3T3 cells also elevated Il-6 transcription and impaired the expression of Sirt1 mRNA both under basal conditions and upon activation of the Sirt1 upstream regulator FoxO3 by LY294002 (a PI3K/AKT inhibitor). Luciferase activity assays showed that constitutively active FoxO3 abolished the repressive effect of MVNP on reporters driven by either FoxO3 response elements or the Sirt1 promoter. Further, protein stability assays revealed that FoxO3 was degraded more rapidly in MVNP-expressing cells than in control cells following the addition of cycloheximide. Similarly, co-transfection of MVNP and FoxO3 into HEK293 cells demonstrated that MVNP decreased the protein levels of over-expressed FoxO3 in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, blocked the MVNP-triggered decrease of FoxO3, and the treatment with the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, Calyculin A, revealed that MVNP increased phosphorylation of FoxO3. Further, over-expression of Sirt1 or treatment with the Sirt1 activator resveratrol blocked the increase in Il-6 transcription by MVNP. Finally, resveratrol reduced the numbers of TRAP positive multi-nuclear cells in bone marrow cultures from TRAP-MVNP transgenic mice to wild type levels. These results indicate that MVNP decreases FoxO3

  5. Application of Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Method to Identify H1 Genotype of Measles Virus Infection and Measles Vaccine Related Cases%应用限制性片段长度多态性分析方法鉴别H1基因型麻疹野病毒感染病例和麻疹疫苗相关病例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立群; 余文; 赵智娴; 丁峥嵘

    2012-01-01

    Objective Application the method to rapid identify the wild measles strain and China measles vaccine strain in Yunnan province. Method To apply method of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RT-PCR-RFLP) and sequence analysis method to detect 8 strains of measles virus. Results The RT-PCR-RFLP method for H1 genotype was used for identifying 8 strains of measles virus, the 5 specimens of wild-type, measles viruses RT-PCR products were cut into 2 fragments, 408 bp and 159 bp, the results showed that 5 specimens of wild-type measles viruses were caused by H1 genotype. The RT-PCR-RFLP method for China vaccine strain identification was used for identifying 3 specimen of measles. 1 specimen RT-PCR products were cut into 2 fragments, 287 bp and 151 bp, which showed that this case was caused by China vaccine strain. 2 specimens of measles were non-H1 wild-type measles viruses. Conclusion The RT-PCR-RFLP method can be used to identify H1 genotype of measles virus and measles vaccine strain. The results are same as the method of nucleoprotein gene sequencing.%目的 在云南省应用H1基因型麻疹野病毒鉴定方法,鉴别H1基因型麻疹野病毒感染病例,应用中国麻疹疫苗株病毒鉴定方法,鉴别接种麻疹疫苗后出现的麻疹样病例是否为麻疹疫苗相关病例.方法 采用逆转录-聚合酶链反应-限制性片段长度多态性分析(Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism,RT-PCR-RFLP)方法、序列分析方法鉴别8株麻疹病毒.结果 应用H1基因型麻疹野病毒RT-PCR-RFLP方法对8份标本进行鉴定,其中5份标本RT-PCR产物经 Sal I酶切后,被切成两个片段,分别为408个碱基对(base pair,bp)和159bp,显示5个病例是由H1基因型麻疹野病毒引起的.应用中国麻疹疫苗株病毒RT-PCR-RFLP方法对3份标本进行鉴定,其中1份标本RT-PCR产物经Af1Ⅱ酶切,被切成两个片段,分别为287

  6. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viralmRNAexport, and cell cycle disruption.

  7. Measles Outbreak - Minnesota April-May 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Victoria; Banerjee, Emily; Kenyon, Cynthia; Strain, Anna; Griffith, Jayne; Como-Sabetti, Kathryn; Heath, Jennifer; Bahta, Lynn; Martin, Karen; McMahon, Melissa; Johnson, Dave; Roddy, Margaret; Dunn, Denise; Ehresmann, Kristen

    2017-07-14

    On April 10, 2017, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) was notified about a suspected measles case. The patient was a hospitalized child aged 25 months who was evaluated for fever and rash, with onset on April 8. The child had no history of receipt of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and no travel history or known exposure to measles. On April 11, MDH received a report of a second hospitalized, unvaccinated child, aged 34 months, with an acute febrile rash illness with onset on April 10. The second patient's sibling, aged 19 months, who had also not received MMR vaccine, had similar symptoms, with rash onset on March 30. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) testing of nasopharyngeal swab or throat specimens performed at MDH confirmed measles in the first two patients on April 11, and in the third patient on April 13; subsequent genotyping identified genotype B3 virus in all three patients, who attended the same child care center. MDH instituted outbreak investigation and response activities in collaboration with local health departments, health care facilities, child care facilities, and schools in affected settings. Because the outbreak occurred in a community with low MMR vaccination coverage, measles spread rapidly, resulting in thousands of exposures in child care centers, schools, and health care facilities. By May 31, 2017, a total of 65 confirmed measles cases had been reported to MDH (Figure 1); transmission is ongoing.

  8. Rubella (German Measles, Three-Day Measles) Photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rubella (German Measles, Three-Day Measles) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... child's back. Distribution is similar to that of measles, but the lesions are less intensely red. This ...

  9. About Rubella (German Measles, Three-Day Measles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rubella (German Measles, Three-Day Measles) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Q&A References & Resources Related Link Global Health – Measles, Rubella, and Congenital Rubella Syndrome (CRS) About Rubella ...

  10. Questing for an optimal, universal viral agent for oncolytic virotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Paiva, L R; Ferreira, S C

    2011-01-01

    One of the most promising strategies to treat cancer is attacking it with viruses designed to exploit specific altered pathways. Here, the effects of oncolytic virotherapy on tumors having compact, papillary and disconnected morphologies are investigated through computer simulations of a multiscale model coupling macroscopic reaction diffusion equations for the nutrients with microscopic stochastic rules for the actions of individual cells and viruses. The interaction among viruses and tumor cells involves cell infection, intracellular virus replication and release of new viruses in the tissue after cell lysis. The evolution in time of both viral load and cancer cell population, as well as the probabilities for tumor eradication were evaluated for a range of multiplicities of infection, viral entries and burst sizes. It was found that in immunosuppressed hosts, the antitumor efficacy of a virus is primarily determined by its entry efficiency, its replicative capacity within the tumor, and its ability to sprea...

  11. Measles virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer into quiescent lymphocytes requires binding to both SLAM and CD46 entry receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frecha, Cecilia; Lévy, Camille; Costa, Caroline; Nègre, Didier; Amirache, Fouzia; Buckland, Robin; Russell, Steven J; Cosset, François-Loïc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2011-06-01

    Gene transfer into quiescent T and B cells is of importance for gene therapy and immunotherapy approaches to correct hematopoietic disorders. Previously, we generated lentiviral vectors (LVs) pseudotyped with the Edmonston measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins (Hgps and Fgps) (H/F-LVs), which, for the first time, allowed efficient transduction of quiescent human B and T cells. These target cells express both MV entry receptors used by the vaccinal Edmonston strain, CD46 and signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). Interestingly, LVs pseudotyped with an MV Hgp, blind for the CD46 binding site, were completely inefficient for resting-lymphocyte transduction. Similarly, SLAM-blind H mutants that recognize only CD46 as the entry receptor did not allow stable LV transduction of resting T cells. The CD46-tropic LVs accomplished vector-cell binding, fusion, entry, and reverse transcription at levels similar to those achieved by the H/F-LVs, but efficient proviral integration did not occur. Our results indicate that both CD46 and SLAM binding sites need to be present in cis in the Hgp to allow successful stable transduction of quiescent lymphocytes. Moreover, the entry mechanism utilized appears to be crucial: efficient transduction was observed only when CD46 and SLAM were correctly engaged and an entry mechanism that strongly resembles macropinocytosis was triggered. Taken together, our results suggest that although vector entry can occur through the CD46 receptor, SLAM binding and subsequent signaling are also required for efficient LV transduction of quiescent lymphocytes to occur.

  12. Mutations in the H, F, or M Proteins Can Facilitate Resistance of Measles Virus to Neutralizing Human Anti-MV Sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Kweder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is currently no evidence of emerging strains of measles virus (MV that can resist neutralization by the anti-MV antibodies present in vaccinees, certain mutations in circulating wt MV strains appear to reduce the efficacy of these antibodies. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that resistance to neutralization by such antibodies could allow MV to persist. In this study, we use a novel in vitro system to determine the molecular basis of MV’s resistance to neutralization. We find that both wild-type and laboratory strain MV variants that escape neutralization by anti-MV polyclonal sera possess multiple mutations in their H, F, and M proteins. Cytometric analysis of cells expressing viral escape mutants possessing minimal mutations and their plasmid-expressed H, F, and M proteins indicates that immune resistance is due to particular mutations that can occur in any of these three proteins that affect at distance, rather than directly, the native conformation of the MV-H globular head and hence its epitopes. A high percentage of the escape mutants contain mutations found in cases of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis (SSPE and our results could potentially shed light on the pathogenesis of this rare fatal disease.

  13. Solution structure of the C-terminal X domain of the measles virus phosphoprotein and interaction with the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gely, Stéphane; Lowry, David F; Bernard, Cédric; Jensen, Malene R; Blackledge, Martin; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Darbon, Hervé; Daughdrill, Gary; Longhi, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    In this report, the solution structure of the nucleocapsid-binding domain of the measles virus phosphoprotein (XD, aa 459-507) is described. A dynamic description of the interaction between XD and the disordered C-terminal domain of the nucleocapsid protein, (N(TAIL), aa 401-525), is also presented. XD is an all alpha protein consisting of a three-helix bundle with an up-down-up arrangement of the helices. The solution structure of XD is very similar to the crystal structures of both the free and bound form of XD. One exception is the presence of a highly dynamic loop encompassing XD residues 489-491, which is involved in the embedding of the alpha-helical XD-binding region of N(TAIL). Secondary chemical shift values for full-length N(TAIL) were used to define the precise boundaries of a transient helical segment that coincides with the XD-binding domain, thus shedding light on the pre-recognition state of N(TAIL). Titration experiments with unlabeled XD showed that the transient alpha-helical conformation of N(TAIL) is stabilized upon binding. Lineshape analysis of NMR resonances revealed that residues 483-506 of N(TAIL) are in intermediate exchange with XD, while the 475-482 and 507-525 regions are in fast exchange. The N(TAIL) resonance behavior in the titration experiments is consistent with a complex binding model with more than two states.

  14. Differential regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ currents and metabotropic glutamate receptor activity by measles virus infection in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Christine; Laube, Mandy; Liebert, Uwe-Gerd; Kraft, Robert

    2012-01-06

    Measles virus (MV) infection may lead to severe chronic CNS disease processes, including MV-induced encephalitis. Because the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is a major determinant of the (patho-)physiological state in all cells we asked whether important Ca(2+) conducting pathways are affected by MV infection in cultured cortical rat neurons. Patch-clamp measurements revealed a decrease in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents during MV-infection, while voltage-gated K(+) currents and NMDA-evoked currents were unaffected. Calcium-imaging experiments using 50mM extracellular KCl showed reduced [Ca(2+)](i) increases in MV-infected neurons, confirming a decreased activity of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. In contrast, the group-I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist DHPG evoked changes in [Ca(2+)](i) that were increased in MV-infected cells. Our results show that MV infection conversely regulates Ca(2+) signals induced by group-I mGluRs and by voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, suggesting that these physiological impairments may contribute to an altered function of cortical neurons during MV-induced encephalitis.

  15. Ad5/48 hexon oncolytic virus expressing sTGFβRIIFc produces reduced hepatic and systemic toxicities and inhibits prostate cancer bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weidong; Zhang, Zhenwei; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Morgan, Melanie; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart; Guise, Theresa; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Brendler, Charles; Seth, Prem

    2014-08-01

    We are interested in developing oncolytic adenoviruses for the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) bone metastases. A key limitation of Adenovirus 5 (Ad5) is that upon systemic administration, it produces major liver and systemic toxicities. To address this issue, a chimaeric Ad5/48 adenovirus mHAd.sTβRFc was created. Seven hypervariable regions of Ad5 hexon present in Ad5-based Ad.sTβRFc expressing soluble transforming growth factor beta receptor II-Fc fusion protein (sTGβRIIFc), were replaced by those of Ad48. mHAd.sTβRFc, like Ad.sTβRFc, was replication competent in the human PCa cells, and produced high levels of sTGβRIIFc expression. Compared to Ad.sTβRFc, the systemic delivery of mHAd.sTβRFc in nude mice resulted in much reduced systemic toxicity, and reduced liver sequestration. Ad.sTβRFc produced significant liver necrosis, and increases in alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6 levels, while mHAd.sTβRFc produced much reduced responses of these markers. Intravenous delivery of Ad.sTβRFc or mHAd.sTβRFc (5 × 10(10) viral particles/mouse) in nude mice bearing PC-3-luc PCa bone metastases produced inhibition of bone metastases. Moreover, a larger dose of the mHAd.sTβRFc (4 × 10(11) viral particles /mouse) was also effective in inhibiting bone metastases. Thus, mHAd.sTβRFc could be developed for the treatment of PCa bone metastases.

  16. Acute measles encephalitis in partially vaccinated adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Fox

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of acute measles encephalitis (AME is poorly understood. Treatment with immune-modulators is based on theories that post-infectious autoimmune responses cause demyelination. The clinical course and immunological parameters of AME were examined during an outbreak in Vietnam. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Fifteen measles IgM-positive patients with confusion or Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score below 13, and thirteen with uncomplicated measles were enrolled from 2008-2010. Standardized clinical exams were performed and blood collected for lymphocyte and measles- and auto-antibody analysis. The median age of AME patients was 21 years, similar to controls. Eleven reported receiving measles vaccination when aged one year. Confusion developed a median of 4 days after rash. Six patients had GCS <8 and four required mechanical ventilation. CSF showed pleocytosis (64% and proteinorrhachia (71% but measles virus RNA was not detected. MRI revealed bilateral lesions in the cerebellum and brain stem in some patients. Most received dexamethasone +/- IVIG within 4 days of admission but symptoms persisted for ≥3 weeks in five. The concentration of voltage gated calcium channel-complex-reactive antibodies was 900 pM in one patient, and declined to 609 pM ∼ 3 months later. Measles-reactive IgG antibody avidity was high in AME patients born after vaccine coverage exceeded 50% (∼ 25 years earlier. AME patients had low CD4 (218/µl, p = 0.029 and CD8 (200/µl, p = 0.012 T-cell counts compared to controls. CONCLUSION: Young adults presenting with AME in Vietnam reported a history of one prior measles immunization, and those aged <25 years had high measles-reactive IgG avidity indicative of prior vaccination. This suggests that one-dose measles immunization is not sufficient to prevent AME in young adults and reinforces the importance of maintaining high coverage with a two-dose measles immunization schedule. Treatment with

  17. Immunosuppression enhances oncolytic adenovirus replication and antitumor efficacy in the Syrian hamster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Maria A; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Toth, Karoly; Sagartz, John E; Phillips, Nancy J; Wold, William S M

    2008-10-01

    We recently described an immunocompetent Syrian hamster model for oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) that permits virus replication in tumor cells as well as some normal tissues. This model allows exploration of interactions between the virus, tumor, normal organs, and host immune system that could not be examined in the immunodeficient or nonpermissive animal models previously used in the oncolytic Ad field. Here we asked whether the immune response to oncolytic Ad enhances or limits antitumor efficacy. We first determined that cyclophosphamide (CP) is a potent immunosuppressive agent in the Syrian hamster and that CP alone had no effect on tumor growth. Importantly, we found that the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic Ads was significantly enhanced in immunosuppressed animals. In animals that received virus therapy plus immunosuppression, significant differences were observed in tumor histology, and in many cases little viable tumor remained. Notably, we also determined that immunosuppression allowed intratumoral virus levels to remain elevated for prolonged periods. Although favorable tumor responses can be achieved in immunocompetent animals, the rate of virus clearance from the tumor may lead to varied antitumor efficacy. Immunosuppression, therefore, allows sustained Ad replication and oncolysis, which leads to substantially improved suppression of tumor growth.

  18. Post-vaccine measles in a child with concomitant influenza, Sicily, Italy, March 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramuto, F; Dones, P; D Angelo, C; Casuccio, N; Vitale, F

    2015-05-21

    We describe the occurrence of measles in an 18 month-old patient in Sicily, Italy, in March 2015, who received the first dose of a measles-containing vaccine seven days before onset of prodromal symptoms. Measles virus infection was confirmed by PCR and detection of specific immunoglobulin; viral genotyping permitted the confirmation of a vaccine-associated illness. The patient had a concurrent influenza virus infection, during a seasonal epidemic outbreak of influenza.

  19. Measles Outbreak among Unvaccinated Children in Bajura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sitaula

    2010-12-01

    CFR of this outbreak is higher than the national CFR. Vaccine efficacy of 50% points towards the need for investigation of vaccine logistics and cold chain system. Moreover, this laboratory test confirmed an outbreak showing that the measles virus could be imported from an endemic region and rapidly spread through a susceptible population who were previously not immunized.

  20. 2008-2012年湖北省麻疹野病毒分子流行病学研究%Molecular epidemiological study of measles viruses isolated in Hubei province during 2008-2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷亚克; 戴莹; 李静; 李国明; 张燕; 王慧玲; 许文波

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand the genetic characteristics of wild measles virus in Hubei province during 2008-2012.Methods To collect throat swab specimens from measles outbreak or sporadic cases in Hubei province during 2008-2012,and perform viral isolation using Vero/SLAM cell,then genotype identification and phylogenetic analysis were performed.Results 26 measles virus strains were isolated from clinical specimens collected in the 9 cities in Hubei province from 2008-2012,they all belong to H1a subgenotype within the wild type measles viruses of H1 genotype,no imported genotypes were found.The nucleotide and amino acid identities among 26 measles virus strains of H1 a subgenotype were for 97.1%-100% and 95.3%-100%,respectively.And compared with the Chinese vaccine strain (Shanghai191 strain),the nucleotide and amino acid identity were 91.8%-92.5% and 87.4%-90.0%,respectively.Genetic phylogenetic analysis showed that all 26 measles virus strains belong to two different evolutionary branches,represent two transmission chains,and close to the measles virus isolated in other provinces in genetic phylogeny and endemic time.Conclusion H la subgenotype of measles virus continues to spread in Hubei province from 2008-2012,the measles viruses in Hubei province co-evolved with the viruses in other provinces in China.This study provides an important scientific basis for measles elimination in Hubei province.%目的 了解2008-2012年湖北省流行麻疹野病毒的基因特征.方法 采集2008-2012年间麻疹暴发或散发病例的咽拭子标本,使用Vero/SLAM细胞进行病毒分离,并对分离到的麻疹病毒进行基因型的鉴定和基因亲缘关系分析.结果 2008-2012年从湖北省共9个地市采集的339份临床标本中分离到26株麻疹病毒株,均属于麻疹野病毒H1基因型中的H1a基因亚型,未发现输入基因型麻疹病毒.26株H1a基因亚型麻疹病毒株的核苷酸和氨基酸之间的同源性分别为97.1%~100

  1. Phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis of measles outbreaks in Denmark, 2013 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Fonager, Jannik; Knudsen, Lisbet Krause; Andersen, Peter Henrik Senten; Rønn, Jesper; Poulsen, Mille Weismann; Franck, Kristina Træholt; Fischer, Thea Kølsen

    2015-01-01

    Despite the introduction of safe, effective vaccines decades ago and joint global public health efforts to eliminate measles, this vaccine-preventable disease continues to pose threats to children's health worldwide. During 2013 and 2014, measles virus was introduced into Denmark through several independent importations. This resulted in a number of secondary cases (n=7), with two clusters in 2013 and one in 2014. In total, there were 44 cases of measles. Most cases (n=41) were laboratory confirmed by detection of measles virus genome by real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and IgM antibodies. The viruses from confirmed cases were genotyped by sequencing. Only one genotype circulated each year, i.e. D8 and B3, respectively. Sequencing of measles virus from different clinical specimens from the same patients revealed that sequence variants of measles viruses might co-exist and co-transmit during an outbreak. The majority of the cases were unvaccinated (n=27) or recipients of one dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine (n=7). In addition, two fully vaccinated adult cases were reported in 2014. We demonstrate the transmission of measles virus in a population in which the two-dose MMR vaccination coverage rate was 80% and how even vaccinated individuals may be at risk of contracting measles once transmission has been established.

  2. Patient-derived mesenchymal stem cells as delivery vehicles for oncolytic virotherapy: novel state-of-the-art technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Manuel; García-Castro, Javier; Melen, Gustavo J; González-Murillo, África; Franco-Luzón, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is gaining interest in the clinic as a new weapon against cancer. In vivo administration of oncolytic viruses showed important limitations that decrease their effectiveness very significantly: the antiviral immune response causes the elimination of the therapeutic effect, and the poor natural ability of oncolytic viruses to infect micrometastatic lesions significantly minimizes the effective dose of virus. This review will focus on updating the technical and scientific foundations of one of the strategies developed to overcome these limitations, ie, using cells as vehicles for oncolytic viruses. Among many candidates, a special type of adult stem cell, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have already been used in the clinic as cell vehicles for oncolytic viruses, partly due to the fact that these cells are actively being evaluated for other indications. MSC carrier cells are used as Trojan horses loaded with oncoviruses, are administered systemically, and release their cargos at the right places. MSCs are equipped with an array of molecules involved in cell arrest in the capillaries (integrins and selectins), migration toward specific parenchymal locations within tissues (chemokine receptors), and invasion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (proteases). In addition to anatomical targeting capacity, MSCs have a well-recognized role in modulating immune responses by affecting cells of the innate (antigen-presenting cells, natural killer cells) and adaptive immune system (effector and regulatory lymphocytes). Therefore, carrier MSCs may also modulate the immune responses taking place after therapy, ie, the antiviral and the antitumor immune responses.

  3. Epidemic Distribution Characteristics of Wild-type Measles Viruses Genotypes in Yunnan Province%云南省麻疹野病毒不同基因型的流行分布状况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立群; 庞颜坤; 王慧玲; 张杰; 彭敏; 余文; 罗梅; 丁峥嵘

    2012-01-01

    Objective To know the epidemic and distribution of wild-type measles viruses genotypes in Yunnan province. Methods Measles viruses were isolated from the specimens, which collected from measles outbreaks and sporadic patients by B95, cell[Epstein-Barr(EB)Virus-Transformed,Marmoset B Lymphoblastoid Cell Line]and Vero/SLAM cell[Vero Cell Transfected to Express the Human Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM ) ]. Fragment of 676 nucleotide acids of the carboxyl end of nucleoprotein gene were amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and then the PCR products were directly sequenced and analyzed. Besides, phylogenetic tree was constructed based on 450 nucleotide acids of the carboxyl end of nucleoprotein gene, and homological analysis was performed. Results 46 wild-type measles viruses and 2 nucleotide acids were isolated in Yunnan province from 2004 to 2011. 43 strains were identified as H, genotype, distributed in 14 counties and Puge county, Sichuan province. 4 strains were identified as dn genotype, distributed in Menglian county, Yunnan province and Bankang county, Myanmar. 1 strain was identified as A genotype, from Longling county. Conclusion H, genotype was predominant genotype of wild measles viruses circulated in Yunnan province. dn genotype currently has circulated in the border areas after imported from Myanmar. A genotype was the same with Chinese measles vaccine strain of Shanghai191.%目的 了解云南省麻疹野病毒不同基因型的流行分布状况.方法 用B95a细胞[Epstein-Barr( EB) Virus-Transformed,Marmoset B Lymphoblastoid Cell Line;埃泼斯坦-巴尔病毒转化的绒猴淋巴母细胞]和Vero/SLAM细胞[ Vero Cell Transfected to Express the Human Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM),淋巴信号激活因子转染的非洲绿猴肾细胞]从麻疹爆发和散发患者的标本中分离麻疹野病毒,用逆转录-聚合酶链反应扩增核蛋白(Nucleoprotein,N)基因羧基末端的676

  4. Progress toward measles elimination--Western Pacific Region, 2009-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    In 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Committee for the Western Pacific Region (WPR) resolved that WPR should aim to eliminate measles by 2012. The recommended measles elimination strategies in WPR include 1) achieving and maintaining high (≥95%) coverage with 2 doses of measles-containing vaccine (MCV) through routine immunization services and by implementing supplementary immunization activities (SIAs), when required; 2) conducting high-quality, case-based measles surveillance; 3) ensuring high-quality laboratory surveillance, with timely and accurate testing of specimens to confirm or discard suspected cases and detect measles virus for genotyping and molecular analysis; and 4) establishing and maintaining measles outbreak preparedness for rapid response and ensuring appropriate case management. This report updates the previous report and describes progress toward eliminating measles in WPR during 2009-2012. During this period, measles incidence reached a historic low, decreasing by 83%, from 34.0 to 5.9 cases per million population. However, to achieve measles elimination in WPR, additional efforts are needed to strengthen routine immunization services in countries and areas with measles-susceptible populations in countries and areas that have ongoing measles virus transmission.

  5. OUTBREAK OF MEASLES IN SOKOTO STATE NORTH-WESTERN NIGERIA, THREE MONTHS AFTER A SUPPLEMENTARY IMMUNIZATION CAMPAIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baffe Sule Ibrahim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measles is an acute, highly infectious viral disease caused by the measles virus. The measles virus belongs to the family Paramyxovirus and genus Morbillivirus. It is 120–250nm in diameter, with a core of single-stranded RNA. 1 Measles is transmitted through aerosols and droplets and can spread easily through the coughs and sneezes of those infected. It may also spread through contact with saliva or nasal secretions. Measles has an attack rate of more than 90 per cent among non-immune individuals.

  6. Following in the footsteps of smallpox: can we achieve the global eradication of measles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Oliver WC

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although an effective measles vaccine has been available for almost 40 years, in 2000 there were about 30 million measles infections worldwide and 777,000 measles-related deaths. The history of smallpox suggests that achieving measles eradication depends on several factors; the biological characteristics of the organism; vaccine technology; surveillance and laboratory identification; effective delivery of vaccination programmes and international commitment to eradication. Discussion Like smallpox, measles virus has several biological characteristics that favour eradication. Humans are the only reservoir for the virus, which causes a visible illness and infection leading to life-long immunity. As the measles virus has only one genetic serotype which is relatively stable over time, the same basic vaccine can be used world-wide. Vaccination provides protection against measles infection for at least 15 years, although efficacy may be reduced due to host factors such as nutritional status. Measles vaccination may also confer other non-specific health benefits leading to reduced mortality. Accurate laboratory identification of measles cases enables enhanced surveillance to support elimination programmes. The "catch-up, keep-up, follow-up" vaccination programme implemented in the Americas has shown that measles elimination is possible using existing technologies. On 17th October 2003 the "Cape Town Measles Declaration" by the World Health Organisation and the United Nations Childrens Fund called on governments to intensify efforts to reduce measles mortality by supporting universal vaccination coverage and the development of more effective vaccination. Summary Although more difficult than for smallpox, recent experience in the Americas suggests that measles eradication is technically feasible. Growing international support to deliver these programmes means that measles, like smallpox, may very well become a curiosity of history.

  7. Progress toward measles elimination—Philippines, 1998-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Yoshihiro; Schluter, W William; Mariano, Kayla Mae L; Diorditsa, Sergey; de Quiroz Castro, Maricel; Ou, Alan C; Ducusin, Maria Joyce U; Garcia, Luzviminda C; Elfa, Dulce C; Dabbagh, Alya; Rota, Paul; Goodson, James L

    2015-04-10

    In 2005, the Regional Committee for the World Health Organization (WHO) Western Pacific Region (WPR) established a goal to eliminate measles by 2012.The recommended elimination strategies in WPR include 1) ≥95% 2-dose coverage with measles-containing vaccine (MCV) through routine immunization services and supplementary immunization activities (SIAs); 2) high-quality case-based measles surveillance; 3) laboratory surveillance with timely and accurate testing of specimens to confirm or discard suspected cases and detect measles virus genotypes; and 4) measles outbreak preparedness, rapid response, and appropriate case management. In the WPR, the Philippines set a national goal in 1998 to eliminate measles by 2008. This report describes progress toward measles elimination in the Philippines during 1998-2014 and challenges remaining to achieve the goal. WHO-United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)-estimated coverage with the routine first dose of MCV (MCV1) increased from 80% in 1998 to 90% in 2013, and coverage with the routine second dose of MCV (MCV2) increased from 10% after nationwide introduction in 2010 to 53% in 2013. After nationwide SIAs in 1998 and 2004, historic lows in the numbers and incidence of reported measles cases occurred in 2006. Despite nationwide SIAs in 2007 and 2011, the number of reported cases and incidence generally increased during 2007-2012, and large measles outbreaks occurred during 2013-2014 that affected infants, young children, older children, and young adults and that were prolonged by delayed and geographically limited outbreak response immunization activities during 2013-2014. For the goal of measles elimination in WPR to be achieved, sustained investments are required in the Philippines to strengthen health systems, implement the recommended elimination strategies, and develop additional strategies to identify and reduce measles susceptibility in specific geographic areas and older age groups.

  8. Wild-Type Measles Virus with the Hemagglutinin Protein of the Edmonston Vaccine Strain Retains Wild-Type Tropism in Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Noriyo; Kato, Sei-ich; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sato, Yuko; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Mori, Kazuyasu; Van Nguyen, Nguyen; Kimura, Hideki; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-01-01

    A major difference between vaccine and wild-type strains of measles virus (MV) in vitro is the wider cell specificity of vaccine strains, resulting from the receptor usage of the hemagglutinin (H) protein. Wild-type H proteins recognize the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) (CD150), which is expressed on certain cells of the immune system, whereas vaccine H proteins recognize CD46, which is ubiquitously expressed on all nucleated human and monkey cells, in addition to SLAM. To examine the effect of the H protein on the tropism and attenuation of MV, we generated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing recombinant wild-type MV strains bearing the Edmonston vaccine H protein (MV-EdH) and compared them to EGFP-expressing wild-type MV strains. In vitro, MV-EdH replicated in SLAM+ as well as CD46+ cells, including primary cell cultures from cynomolgus monkey tissues, whereas the wild-type MV replicated only in SLAM+ cells. However, in macaques, both wild-type MV and MV-EdH strains infected lymphoid and respiratory organs, and widespread infection of MV-EdH was not observed. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that SLAM+ lymphocyte cells were infected preferentially with both strains. Interestingly, EGFP expression of MV-EdH in tissues and lymphocytes was significantly weaker than that of the wild-type MV. Taken together, these results indicate that the CD46-binding activity of the vaccine H protein is important for determining the cell specificity of MV in vitro but not the tropism in vivo. They also suggest that the vaccine H protein attenuates MV growth in vivo. PMID:22238320

  9. Expression and purification of chimeric peptide comprising EGFR B-cell epitope and measles virus fusion protein T-cell epitope in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meizhi; Zhao, Lin; Zhu, Lei; Chen, Zhange; Li, Huangjin

    2013-03-01

    Chimeric peptide MVF-EGFR(237-267), comprising a B-cell epitope from the dimerization interface of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and a promiscuous T-cell epitope from measles virus fusion protein (MVF), is a promising candidate antigen peptide for therapeutic vaccine. To establish a high-efficiency preparation process of this small peptide, the coding sequence was cloned into pET-21b and pET-32a respectively, to be expressed alone or in the form of fusion protein with thioredoxin (Trx) and His(6)-tag in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The chimeric peptide failed to be expressed alone, but over-expressed in the fusion form, which presented as soluble protein and took up more than 30% of total proteins of host cells. The fusion protein was seriously degraded during the cell disruption, in which endogenous metalloproteinase played a key role. Degradation of target peptide was inhibited by combined application of EDTA in the cell disruption buffer and a step of Source 30Q anion exchange chromatography (AEC) before metal-chelating chromatography (MCAC) for purifying His(6)-tagged fusion protein. The chimeric peptide was recovered from the purified fusion protein by enterokinase digestion at a yield of 3.0 mg/L bacteria culture with a purity of more than 95%. Immunogenicity analysis showed that the recombinant chimeric peptide was able to arouse more than 1×10(4) titers of specific antibody in BALB/c mice. Present work laid a solid foundation for the development of therapeutic peptide vaccine targeting EGFR dimerization and provided a convenient and low-cost preparation method for small peptides.

  10. Vaxfectin adjuvant improves antibody responses of juvenile rhesus macaques to a DNA vaccine encoding the measles virus hemagglutinin and fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Hsuan W; Vilalta, Adrian; Adams, Robert J; Rolland, Alain; Sullivan, Sean M; Griffin, Diane E

    2013-06-01

    DNA vaccines formulated with the cationic lipid-based adjuvant Vaxfectin induce protective immunity in macaques after intradermal (i.d.) or intramuscular (i.m.) delivery of 0.5 to 1 mg of codon-optimized DNA encoding the hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of measles virus (MeV). To characterize the effect of Vaxfectin at lower doses of H+F DNA, rhesus macaques were vaccinated twice with 20 μg of DNA plus Vaxfectin i.d., 100 μg of DNA plus Vaxfectin i.d., 100 μg of DNA plus Vaxfectin i.m. or 100 μg of DNA plus phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) i.m. using a needleless Biojector device. The levels of neutralizing (P = 0.036) and binding (P = 0.0001) antibodies were higher after 20 or 100 μg of DNA plus Vaxfectin than after 100 μg of DNA plus PBS. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing T cells were induced more rapidly than antibody, but were not improved with Vaxfectin. At 18 months after vaccination, monkeys were challenged with wild-type MeV. None developed rash or viremia, but all showed evidence of infection. Antibody levels increased, and IFN-γ- and interleukin-17-producing T cells, including cells specific for the nucleoprotein absent from the vaccine, were induced. At 3 months after challenge, MeV RNA was detected in the leukocytes of two monkeys. The levels of antibody peaked 2 to 4 weeks after challenge and then declined in vaccinated animals reflecting low numbers of bone marrow-resident plasma cells. Therefore, Vaxfectin was dose sparing and substantially improved the antibody response to the H+F DNA vaccine. This immune response led to protection from disease (rash/viremia) but not from infection. Antibody responses after challenge were more transient in vaccinated animals than in an unvaccinated animal.

  11. The MyD88 pathway in plasmacytoid and CD4+ dendritic cells primarily triggers type I IFN production against measles virus in a mouse infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Hiromi; Takeda, Makoto; Tahara, Maino; Shingai, Masashi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2013-11-01

    Infection by measles virus (MV) induces type I IFN via the retinoic acid-inducible gene I/melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5/mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) pathway in human cells. However, the in vivo role of the MAVS pathway in host defense against MV infection remains undetermined. CD150 transgenic (Tg) mice, which express human CD150, an entry receptor for MV, with the disrupting IFNR gene (Ifnar(-/-)), are susceptible to MV and serve as a model for MV infection. In this study, we generated CD150Tg/Mavs(-/-) mice and examined MV permissiveness compared with that in CD150Tg/Ifnar(-/-) mice. MV replicated mostly in the spleen of i.p.-infected CD150Tg/Ifnar(-/-) mice. Strikingly, CD150Tg/Mavs(-/-) mice were not permissive to MV in vivo because of substantial type I IFN induction. MV barely replicated in any other organs tested. When T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells (DCs) isolated from CD150Tg/Mavs(-/-) splenocytes were cultured with MV in vitro, only the DCs produced type I IFN. In vitro infection analysis using CD150Tg/Mavs(-/-) DC subsets revealed that CD4(+) and plasmacytoid DCs, but not CD8α(+) and CD8α(-)CD4(-) double negative DCs, were exclusively involved in type I IFN production in response to MV infection. Because CD150Tg/Mavs(-/-) mice turned permissive to MV by anti-IFNAR Ab, type I IFN produced by CD4(+) DCs and plasmacytoid DCs plays a critical role in antiviral protection for neighboring cells expressing IFNAR. Induction of type I IFN in these DC subsets was abolished by the MyD88 inhibitory peptide. Thus, production of type I IFN occurs via the MyD88-dependent and MAVS-independent signaling pathway during MV infection.

  12. Mapping alpha-helical induced folding within the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein by site-directed spin-labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Valérie; Rouger, Sabrina; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Liquière, Elodie; Strancar, Janez; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Fournel, André; Longhi, Sonia

    2008-12-01

    Using site-directed spin-labeling EPR spectroscopy, we mapped the region of the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of measles virus nucleoprotein (N(TAIL)) that undergoes induced folding. In addition to four spin-labeled N(TAIL) variants (S407C, S488C, L496C, and V517C) (Morin et al. (2006), J Phys Chem 110: 20596-20608), 10 new single-site cysteine variants were designed, purified from E. coli, and spin-labeled. These 14 spin-labeled variants enabled us to map in detail the gain of rigidity of N(TAIL) in the presence of either the secondary structure stabilizer 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol or the C-terminal domain X (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein. Different regions of N(TAIL) were shown to contribute to a different extent to the binding to XD, while the mobility of the spin labels grafted at positions 407 and 460 was unaffected upon addition of XD; that of the spin labels grafted within the 488-502 and the 505-522 regions was severely and moderately reduced, respectively. Furthermore, EPR experiments in the presence of 30% sucrose allowed us to precisely map to residues 488-502, the N(TAIL) region undergoing alpha-helical folding. The mobility of the 488-502 region was found to be restrained even in the absence of the partner, a behavior that could be accounted for by the existence of a transiently populated folded state. Finally, we show that the restrained motion of the 505-522 region upon binding to XD is due to the alpha-helical transition occurring within the 488-502 region and not to a direct interaction with XD.

  13. Rapid identification of Beijing measles vaccine virus and wild virus by multiplex real-time fluorescent PCR%应用多重实时荧光PCR技术快速鉴别北京麻疹疫苗病毒与野病毒

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈萌; 黄芳; 陈维欣; 董梅; 张铁钢; 吴疆

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify wild measles virus and vaccine virus by detection nucleic acid of clinical samples from measles patients with immunization history circulating in Beijing through muhiplex real-time fluorescent PCR technology.Methods From July 2011 to Fetbruary 2012,10 throat swabs and 15 urine specimens were collected from 16 suspected measles patients who were 8 -9 months old infants with immunization history in Beijing.The specificity of multiplex real-time fluorescent PCR was firstly tested by measles vaccine virus,wild virus and other respiratory virus.Then the vaccine virus and wild virus were titrated and diluted to test the sensitivity of the PCR method.The result was then compared with it analyzed by PCR-RFLP method.Meanwhile,the clinical sample of the measles patients were tested and confirmed by sequencing method.Results The primer-probe sets of Fam,Joe and Cy5 showed great specificity of measles virus,and could distinguish the measles vaccine virus and wild virus well.The sensitivity of this method to detect measles vaccine virus reached 0.1 CCID50/0.1 ml:and the sensitivity to wild virus reached 0.006 CCID50/0.1 ml; which were both higher than the sensitivity of PCR-RFLP method.Out of the 16 measles patients with vaccination history,3 were negative and the other 13 all belonged to measles virus genotype A,and were confirmed to be vaccine virus by sequencing method.Conclusion Multiplex real-time PCR method is accurate,rapid and sensitive to identify measles vaccine virus and wild virus.The method could greatly help us to find measles patients and to identify the vaccine-related cases.%目的 应用多重实时荧光PCR技术对北京地区有免疫史麻疹患者临床样本进行核酸检测,鉴别麻疹野病毒和疫苗病毒.方法 于2011年7月至2012年2月在北京采集16例8~9月龄初免后疑似麻疹患者的10份咽拭子和15份尿液标本.先用麻疹疫苗病毒、野病毒和其他呼吸道病毒检测多重实时荧光PCR方

  14. [Epidemiologic Surveillance on Measles, Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome. Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masa Calles, Josefa; López Perea, Noemí; Torres de Mier, Maria de Viarce

    2015-01-01

    To achieve the goal of eliminating measles and rubella two key strategies have been defined: sustain very low level of population susceptibility and strengthen surveillance system by rigorous case investigation and rapid control measures implementation. Surveillance of measles, rubella and CRS are included into the Spanish Surveillance System (RENAVE); surveillance is mandatory, passive, nationwide and case-based with laboratory information integrated. Information flows from sub national to national level (National Centre for Epidemiology) and then, to the WHO-Europe through ECDC. In the final phase of elimination, good surveillance and documented evidences are keys. Information on epidemiology of measles, rubella and CRS cases and outbreaks, pattern of importation, genotypes circulating and performance of measles and rubella surveillance are required at national and international level. Also all investigated and discarded measles or rubella cases should be reported. Currently the system faces some challenges gathering needed information for documenting the elimination. As long as the disease incidence declines, increases difficulties in identifying clinical measles and rubella because of non-specific prodromal signs and atypical cases. Differential diagnosis for fever and rash including measles and rubella should be performed in all clinical settings. Three clinical specimens must be collected to confirm or discard cases and to allow the virus characterization in order to know the pattern of importation of measles and rubella.

  15. The cornea in measles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.W.H.M. Dekkers (Nico)

    1981-01-01

    textabstractThe involvement of the cornea in the acute stage of measles is the subject of the present study. The best study on the measles-keratitis now available is still the one by Trantas in 1903. It seems wo.:thwhile therefore to study this self-limiting keratitis with the investigative tools

  16. The cornea in measles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.W.H.M. Dekkers (Nico)

    1981-01-01

    textabstractThe involvement of the cornea in the acute stage of measles is the subject of the present study. The best study on the measles-keratitis now available is still the one by Trantas in 1903. It seems wo.:thwhile therefore to study this self-limiting keratitis with the investigative tools no

  17. Heterogeneous delivery is a barrier to the translational advancement of oncolytic virotherapy for treating solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller AC

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Amber C Miller,1,2 Stephen J Russell2,3 1Mayo Graduate School, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA; 2Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA; 3Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA Abstract: Oncolytic viruses are a promising experimental anticancer therapy currently undergoing clinical translation. The development of oncolytic virotherapy offers a potential solution to the elusive “one-shot”cancer cure by providing targeted therapy to selectively infect and kill cancer cells while provoking adaptive anticancer immune responses as protection against distant metastasis and recurrent tumor challenge. While this technology has overcome barriers to safety and efficacy through cancer-specific targeting techniques, in order to reach full therapeutic potential, oncolytic therapies must still overcome barriers to intratumoral delivery and spread that result in heterogeneous intratumoral delivery and nonuniform response. This review will discuss barriers to oncolytic virotherapy translation related to mechanisms of delivering virus via tumor vasculature and distributing virus throughout the tumor microenvironment. Barriers include extravasation into the tumor that is dependent on adequate blood flow, tissue perfusion, and tumoral enhanced permeability and retention for transvascular transport. Subsequently, virions must undergo interstitial transport against dense stromal barriers and high interstitial fluid pressure to initiate infection. In order to achieve massive tumor regression, infection must spread to cover large volumes of tumor mass. Furthermore, virus bioavailability is quickly dampened upon systemic administration due to neutralization and sequestration. These barriers to delivery limit the amount of virus that effectively reaches and spreads within the tumor, forcing dose increases that impinge upon limits of production and increase possibility of adverse

  18. Genetic characterization of measles vaccine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankamp, Bettina; Takeda, Makoto; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Wenbo; Rota, Paul A

    2011-07-01

    The complete genomic sequences of 9 measles vaccine strains were compared with the sequence of the Edmonston wild-type virus. AIK-C, Moraten, Rubeovax, Schwarz, and Zagreb are vaccine strains of the Edmonston lineage, whereas CAM-70, Changchun-47, Leningrad-4 and Shanghai-191 were derived from 4 different wild-type isolates. Nucleotide substitutions were found in the noncoding regions of the genomes as well as in all coding regions, leading to deduced amino acid substitutions in all 8 viral proteins. Although the precise mechanisms involved in the attenuation of individual measles vaccines remain to be elucidated, in vitro assays of viral protein functions and recombinant viruses with defined genetic modifications have been used to characterize the differences between vaccine and wild-type strains. Although almost every protein contributes to an attenuated phenotype, substitutions affecting host cell tropism, virus assembly, and the ability to inhibit cellular antiviral defense mechanisms play an especially important role in attenuation.

  19. CD4 T cell control primary measles virus infection of the CNS: regulation is dependent on combined activity with either CD8 T cells or with B cells: CD4, CD8 or B cells alone are ineffective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishon, Antoinette; Lewicki, Hanna; Andaya, Abegail; McGavern, Dorian; Martin, Lee; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2006-03-30

    Measles virus (MV), one of the most infectious of human pathogens, still infects over 30 million humans and causes over 500,000 deaths each year [Griffin, D., 2001. Measles virus. In: Fields, B., Knipe, D., Howley, P. (Eds.), Fields Virology. Lippincott-Raven, Philadelphia, pp. 1401-1442; ]. Death is primarily due to secondary microbial infections associated with the immunosuppression caused by MV. Studies of humans with genetic or acquired deficiencies of either the humoral or cellular arm of the immune system, and rodent models have implicated T cells in the control of the ongoing MV infection but the precise role and activities of the specific T cell subset or the molecules they produce is not clear. Using a transgenic mouse model in conjunction with depletion and reconstitution of individual B and T cell subsets alone or in combination, we show that neither CD4, CD8 nor B cells per se control acute MV infection. However, combinations of either CD4 T cells and B cells, or of CD4 and CD8 T cells are essential but CD8 T with B cells are ineffective. Interferon-gamma and neutralizing antibodies, but neither perforin nor TNF-alpha alone are associated with clearance of MV infection. TNF-alpha combined with interferon-gamma is more effective in protection than interferon alone. Further, the lack of an interferon-gamma response leads to persistence of MV.

  20. Measles (lecture, continuing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shostakovych-Koretsraya L.R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The second part of the article discusses differential diagnosis during different measles periods. Routine and confirmatory laboratory diagnosis, including cytological, serological and molecular genetic methods is outlined. Criteria of suspected, probable and proved diagnosis of measles cases are provided. Principles of diagnosis formulation according to WHO criteria are described. Complications of measles ac¬cording to cause (viral and bacterial, by different systems and particularities in high risk patients are considered. Complications of measles from central nervous system are described in details. Therapeutic management of measles is described in details, including indications for hospital admission, etiotropic therapy, strict indications for steroids and immunoglobulins prescription, vitamin A in dosages, therapy of complications, indications for antibiotics usage and other pathogenetic therapy. Specific therapy of measles complications from central nervous system is outlined. Active and passive immunization, anti-epidemic activities, patient follow-up after episode of measles and disease prognosis are described. The literature reference list consists of 121 items, including Cyrillic, Latin articles and electronic resources.

  1. Acute Measles Encephalitis in an Immigrant Syrian Child: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qayoudhi, Abdullah; Al-Kindi, Hanan; Meki, Nabil; Al-Maani, Amal

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of measles vaccination programs and broad coverage worldwide has meant this infection a rare encounter for pediatricians. In Oman, with almost 100% measles vaccination coverage for children, this infection disappeared from the list of fever and rash differential diagnoses. Encephalitis is a well-known complication of measles infection and sometimes can be the only manifestation especially in adults. We report a seven-year-old Syrian immigrant who was admitted to the Royal Hospital, Muscat, with acute encephalitis secondary to wild measles infection. Although she had a classical presentation of measle infection, the diagnosis was missed in the private and regional hospital she attended before getting referred to Royal Hospital. She was later identified to be exposed to an outbreak of the infection in an unvaccinated population. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal intensity of both basal ganglia suggestive of measles encephalitis. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of measles virus from her urine and blood, and a throat swab. The isolated measles virus was D8 serotype, which was prevalent in Syria around the same time. The child was treated with steroids and vitamin A. She achieved full recovery despite her severe presentation. A high degree of suspicion for measles infection should be maintained in unvaccinated children with a compatible presentation of the infection or its complications. There might be a role for steroid use in cases of acute measles encephalitis.

  2. Acute Measles Encephalitis in an Immigrant Syrian Child: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Qayoudhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of measles vaccination programs and broad coverage worldwide has meant this infection a rare encounter for pediatricians. In Oman, with almost 100% measles vaccination coverage for children, this infection disappeared from the list of fever and rash differential diagnoses. Encephalitis is a well-known complication of measles infection and sometimes can be the only manifestation especially in adults. We report a seven-year-old Syrian immigrant who was admitted to the Royal Hospital, Muscat, with acute encephalitis secondary to wild measles infection. Although she had a classical presentation of measle infection, the diagnosis was missed in the private and regional hospital she attended before getting referred to Royal Hospital. She was later identified to be exposed to an outbreak of the infection in an unvaccinated population. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal intensity of both basal ganglia suggestive of measles encephalitis. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of measles virus from her urine and blood, and a throat swab. The isolated measles virus was D8 serotype, which was prevalent in Syria around the same time. The child was treated with steroids and vitamin A. She achieved full recovery despite her severe presentation. A high degree of suspicion for measles infection should be maintained in unvaccinated children with a compatible presentation of the infection or its complications. There might be a role for steroid use in cases of acute measles encephalitis.

  3. Patterns of measles transmission among airplane travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, Paul J

    2012-09-01

    With advanced air handling systems on modern aircraft and the high level of measles immunity in many countries, measles infection in air travelers may be considered a low-risk event. However, introduction of measles into countries where transmission has been controlled or eliminated can have substantial consequences both for the use of public health resources and for those still susceptible. In an effort to balance the relatively low likelihood of disease transmission among largely immune travelers and the risk to the public health of the occurrence of secondary cases resulting from importations, criteria in the United States for contact investigations for measles exposures consider contacts to be those passengers who are seated within 2 rows of the index case. However, recent work has shown that cabin air flow may not be as reliable a barrier to the spread of measles virus as previously believed. Along with these new studies, several reports have described measles developing after travel in passengers seated some distance from the index case. To understand better the potential for measles virus to spread on an airplane, reports of apparent secondary cases occurring in co-travelers of passengers with infectious cases of measles were reviewed. Medline™ was searched for articles in all languages from 1946 to week 1 of March 2012, using the search terms "measles [human] or rubeola" and ("aircraft" or "airplane" or "aeroplane" or "aviation" or "travel" or "traveler" or "traveller"); 45 citations were returned. Embase™ was searched from 1988 to week 11 2012, using the same search strategy; 95 citations were returned. Papers were included in this review if they reported secondary cases of measles occurring in persons traveling on an airplane on which a person or persons with measles also flew, and which included the seating location of both the index case(s) and the secondary case(s) on the plane. Nine reports, including 13 index cases and 23 apparent secondary cases

  4. Measles Lymphadenopathy in a Child With PFAPA Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Jefferson; Brown, Kelly; Hiebert, Joanne; Al-Rawahi, Ghada N; Moxham, J Paul; Krajden, Mel; Jassem, Agatha N; Tucker, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome is a common cause of periodic fever in children. The pathogenesis of PFAPA is unknown but likely involves immune system dysregulation and may be initiated by an environmental trigger. Tonsillectomy resolves or improves symptoms in some patients, but the reason for this is unknown; moreover, specific abnormalities in tonsillectomy specimens from PFAPA patients have not been described. Here, we report measles virus in tonsil from a child with PFAPA. Measles-type viral cytopathic effect was discovered on histological examination of tonsillar tissue after therapeutic tonsillectomy for PFAPA. Molecular testing showed the left tonsil was positive for measles RNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) while the right tonsil was inconclusive (weakly positive). Real-time RT-PCR specific for measles vaccine strain RNA (genotype A) was weakly reactive in the left tonsil tissue when tested in 3 independent replicates, but this result could not be confirmed with conventional genotyping by sequencing. The relationship and clinical significance between measles virus and PFAPA in this case is unclear but may be related to PFAPA-associated immune dysregulation. Additional investigation of measles virus in PFAPA patients would be helpful in further exploring this potential association.

  5. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Targeting by Myxoma Virus In Vivo Depends on Cell Binding But Not Permissiveness to Infection In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Madlambayan, Gerard J.; Bartee, Eric; Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Meacham, Amy; Scott, Edward W.; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Some oncolytic viruses, such as myxoma virus (MYXV), can selectively target malignant hematopoietic cells, while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. This capacity for discrimination creates an opportunity to use oncolytic viruses as ex vivo purging agents of autologous hematopoietic cell grafts in patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses select malignant hematopoietic cells are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how MYXV specifi...

  6. Patient-derived mesenchymal stem cells as delivery vehicles for oncolytic virotherapy: novel state-of-the-art technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Manuel Ramírez,1 Javier García-Castro,2 Gustavo J Melen,1 África González-Murillo,1 Lidia Franco-Luzón1 1Oncohematología, Hospital Universitario Niño Jesús, 2Unidad de Biotecnología Celular, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is gaining interest in the clinic as a new weapon against cancer. In vivo administration of oncolytic viruses showed important limitations that decrease their effectiveness very significantly: the antiviral immune response causes the elimination of the therapeutic effect, and the poor natural ability of oncolytic viruses to infect micrometastatic lesions significantly minimizes the effective dose of virus. This review will focus on updating the technical and scientific foundations of one of the strategies developed to overcome these limitations, ie, using cells as vehicles for oncolytic viruses. Among many candidates, a special type of adult stem cell, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, have already been used in the clinic as cell vehicles for oncolytic viruses, partly due to the fact that these cells are actively being evaluated for other indications. MSC carrier cells are used as Trojan horses loaded with oncoviruses, are administered systemically, and release their cargos at the right places. MSCs are equipped with an array of molecules involved in cell arrest in the capillaries (integrins and selectins, migration toward specific parenchymal locations within tissues (chemokine receptors, and invasion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (proteases. In addition to anatomical targeting capacity, MSCs have a well-recognized role in modulating immune responses by affecting cells of the innate (antigen-presenting cells, natural killer cells and adaptive immune system (effector and regulatory lymphocytes. Therefore, carrier MSCs may also modulate the immune responses taking place after therapy, ie, the antiviral and the antitumor immune responses. Keywords: virotherapy

  7. Comparison of Liver Detargeting Strategies for Systemic Therapy with Oncolytic Adenovirus Serotype 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien V. Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses would ideally be of use for systemic therapy to treat disseminated cancer. To do this safely, this may require multiple layers of cancer specificity. The pharmacology and specificity of oncolytic adenoviruses can be modified by (1 physical retargeting, (2 physical detargeting, (3 chemical shielding, or (4 by modifying the ability of viral early gene products to selectively activate in cancer versus normal cells. We explored the utility of these approaches with oncolytic adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 in immunocompetent Syrian hamsters bearing subcutaneous HaK tumors. After a single intravenous injection to reach the distant tumors, the physically hepatocyte-detargeted virus Ad5-hexon-BAP was more effective than conditionally replicating Ad5-dl1101/07 with mutations in its E1A protein. When these control or Ad5 treated animals were treated a second time by intratumoral injection, prior exposure to Ad5 did not affect tumor growth, suggesting that anti-Ad immunity neither prevented treatment nor amplified anti-tumor immune responses. Ad5-dl1101/07 was next chemically shielded with polyethylene glycol (PEG. While 5 kDa of PEG blunted pro-inflammatory IL-6 production induced by Ad5-dl1101/07, this shielding reduced Ad oncolytic activity.

  8. Measles outbreak in the Children’s Hospital in Saint-Petersburg, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bichurina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Measles was imported to Saint-Petersburg from the Chechen Republic by the patient admitted to the Children’s Clinical Hospital where the measles focus out of 94 cases was formed within the period of January – March, 2012. The typical clinical form of infection was revealed for all measles cases. The general signs of the infection were fever, rash, cough, rhinitis, conjunctivitis. Children under 17 years old consisted three quarters of patients. Among measles patients 75% of cases were the non vaccinated children in the age of 5 months – 14 years. Measles was confirmed by detection of IgM antibodies to measles virus in ELISA in 93.6% of sera samples. Molecular studies of the biological samples from the patient who was the source of the infection as well as from the other patients revealed the measles virus genotype D4 “Iran 2010”. This genotype widely circulated in Iran, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan as well as in some regions of Russia in 2010–2012. The later diagnostic and isolation of the first measles patient in this hospital facilitated the transmission of measles virus infection in the Hospital where the most part of the non vaccinated children were also treated.

  9. Pediatric glioma stem cells: biologic strategies for oncolytic HSV virotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory K Friedman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common adult malignant brain tumor, GBMs in childhood represent less than 10% of pediatric malignant brain tumors and are phenotypically and molecularly distinct from adult GBMs. Similar to adult patients, outcomes for children with high-grade gliomas (HGGs remain poor. Furthermore, the significant morbidity and mortality yielded by pediatric GBM is compounded by neurotoxicity for the developing brain caused by current therapies. Poor outcomes have been attributed to a subpopulation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant cells, termed ‘glioma stem cells’ (GSCs, ‘glioma progenitor cells’, or ‘glioma-initiating cells', which have the ability to initiate and maintain the tumor and to repopulate the recurring tumor after conventional therapy. Future innovative therapies for pediatric HGGs must be able to eradicate these therapy-resistant GSCs. Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses, genetically engineered to be safe for normal cells and to express diverse foreign anti-tumor therapeutic genes, have been demonstrated in preclinical studies to infect and kill GSCs and tumor cells equally while sparing normal brain cells. In this review, we discuss the unique aspects of pediatric GSCs, including markers to identify them, the microenvironment they reside in, signaling pathways that regulate them, mechanisms of cellular resistance, and approaches to target GSCs, with a focus on the promising therapeutic, genetically engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV.

  10. Development of an artificial-antigen-presenting-cell-based assay for the detection of low-frequency virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in whole blood, with application for measles virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndhlovu, Zaza M; Angenendt, Monika; Heckel, Diana; Schneck, Jonathan P; Griffin, Diane E; Oelke, Mathias

    2009-07-01

    Evaluation of the immune responses induced by childhood vaccines requires measurement of T-cell, as well as antibody, responses. However, cellular immune responses are often not analyzed because of technical hurdles and the volume of blood required. Therefore, a sensitive and specific assay for antigen-specific T cells that utilizes a small volume of blood would facilitate new vaccine evaluation. We developed a novel assay for quantifying virus-specific CD8(+) T cells that combines the use of HLA-A2 immunoglobulin-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) for stimulation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in whole blood with quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to detect gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) mRNA. This assay was optimized using a well-established cytomegalovirus (CMV) CD8(+) T-cell system. The aAPC-qRT-PCR assay had comparable sensitivity to intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in detecting CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells with a detection limit of less than 0.004%. The assay was applied to the detection of low-frequency measles virus (MV)-specific CD8(+) T cells by stimulating blood from five MV-immune HLA-A*0201 donors with four different MV-specific peptides (MV peptide aAPCs). Stimulation with three of the MV peptide aAPCs resulted in significant increases in IFN-gamma mRNA ranging from 3.3- to 13.5-fold. Our results show that the aAPC-qRT-PCR assay is highly sensitive and specific and can be standardized for screening MV-specific CD8(+) T cells in vaccine trials. The technology should be transferable to analysis of CD8(+) T-cell responses to other antigens.

  11. Application of interferon modulators to overcome partial resistance of human ovarian cancers to VSV-GP oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dold

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we described an oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus variant pseudotyped with the nonneurotropic glycoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, VSV-GP, which was highly effective in glioblastoma. Here, we tested its potency for the treatment of ovarian cancer, a leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. Effective oncolytic activity of VSV-GP could be demonstrated in ovarian cancer cell lines and xenografts in mice; however, remission was temporary in most mice. Analysis of the innate immune response revealed that ovarian cancer cell lines were able to respond to and produce type I interferon, inducing an antiviral state upon virus infection. This is in stark contrast to published data for other cancer cell lines, which were mostly found to be interferon incompetent. We showed that in vitro this antiviral state could be reverted by combining VSV-GP with the JAK1/2-inhibitor ruxolitinib. In addition, for the first time, we report the in vivo enhancement of oncolytic virus treatment by ruxolitinib, both in subcutaneous as well as in orthotopic xenograft mouse models, without causing significant additional toxicity. In conclusion, VSV-GP has the potential to be a potent and safe oncolytic virus to treat ovarian cancer, especially when combined with an inhibitor of the interferon response.

  12. Genotyping of circulating measles strains in Italy in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Baggieri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The European Regional Office of the World Health Organization developed a strategic approach to stop the indigenous transmission of measles in its 53 Member States by 2015. In Italy, laboratory surveillance activity is implemented by the National Reference Laboratory for Measles and Rubella at the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome. The role of the National Reference Laboratory is to strengthen surveillance systems through rigorous case investigation and laboratory confirmation of suspected sporadic cases and outbreaks. Genetic characterization of wild-type measles virus is an essential component of the laboratory-based surveillance. This study describes the molecular characterization of measles virus strains isolated during 2010. METHODS: Dried blood spots, urine and oral fluid samples were collected from patients with a suspected measles infection. Serological tests were performed on capillary blood, and viral detection was performed on urine and oral fluid samples through molecular assay. Positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetically analysed. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The phylogenetic analysis showed a co-circulation of genotypes D4 and D8, and sporadic cases associated to genotypes D9 and B3. Then, molecular epidemiology of measles cases permitted to establish that D4 and D8 were the endemic genotypes in Italy during 2010.

  13. Aerosol measles vaccination in macaques: Preclinical studies of immune responses and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. de Swart (Rik); T. Kuiken (Thijs); J. Fernandez-de Castro (Jorge); M.J. Papania (Mark); J.V. Bennett (John); J.L. Valdespino (José); P.D. Minor; C.L. Witham (Clyde); S. Yüksel (Selma); H.W. Vos (Helma); G. van Amerongen (Geert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe comparative efficacy and safety of measles vaccination via the aerosol route versus subcutaneous injection has not been fully resolved. We vaccinated cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) with the live-attenuated Edmonston-Zagreb measles virus (MV) vaccine and compared different r

  14. Measles, mumps, rubella, and human parvovirus B19 infections and neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, James F

    2014-01-01

    While the systemic disorders associated with measles, mumps, and rubella viruses and human parvovirus B19 tend to be mild, each virus can produce potentially life-threatening neurologic disease in human hosts, especially when these viruses infect young children. Two of the viruses, rubella and parvovirus B19, can be vertically transmitted to fetuses during maternal infection and cause congenital infection. Neurologic complications are common after intrauterine infection with the rubella virus, a condition known as the congenital rubella syndrome. Two, measles and rubella viruses, can induce "slow viral" infections, serious, disorders that can occur several years after the initial exposure to the virus and typically have fatal outcomes.

  15. Measles vaccination using a microneedle patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Chris; Collins, Marcus L; Ayers, Jessica; Rota, Paul A; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2013-07-25

    Measles vaccination programs would benefit from delivery methods that decrease cost, simplify logistics, and increase safety. Conventional subcutaneous injection is limited by the need for skilled healthcare professionals to reconstitute and administer injections, and by the need for safe needle handling and disposal to reduce the risk of disease transmission through needle re-use and needlestick injury. Microneedles are micron-scale, solid needles coated with a dry formulation of vaccine that dissolves in the skin within minutes after patch application. By avoiding the use of hypodermic needles, vaccination using a microneedle patch could be carried out by minimally trained personnel with reduced risk of blood-borne disease transmission. The goal of this study was to evaluate measles vaccination using a microneedle patch to address some of the limitations of subcutaneous injection. Viability of vaccine virus dried onto a microneedle patch was stabilized by incorporation of the sugar, trehalose, and loss of viral titer was less than 1 log10(TCID50) after storage for at least 30 days at room temperature. Microneedle patches were then used to immunize cotton rats with the Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine strain. Vaccination using microneedles at doses equaling the standard human dose or one-fifth the human dose generated neutralizing antibody levels equivalent to those of a subcutaneous immunization at the same dose. These results show that measles vaccine can be stabilized on microneedles and that vaccine efficiently reconstitutes in vivo to generate a neutralizing antibody response equivalent to that generated by subcutaneous injection.

  16. Atypical measles syndrome: unusual hepatic, pulmonary, and immunologic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H M; Krugman, S

    1981-01-01

    The atypical measles syndrome is a relatively new disease that was first recognized 15 years ago. Initially, it occurred in children who were exposed to wild measles virus several years after they were immunized with killed measles vaccine. It was characterized by a two- to three-day prodrome of high fever, cough, headache, and myalgia followed by a rash that resembled Rocky Mountain spotted fever, scarlet fever, or varicella and associated with roentgenographic evidence of pneumonia with or without pleural effusion. This report highlights three unusual manifestations of this syndrome: 1) transient hepatitis, 2) persistence of pulmonary lesions for several years, and 3) occurrence of excessively high measles hemagglutination-inhibition antibody titers. Today, this syndrome occurs predominantly in adolescents and young adults.

  17. Measles outbreak investigation in Dwarahat block of District Almora, Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STM Hashmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report an assessment of measles outbreak during the months of February 2014 to April 2014 in Dwarahat block of district Almora and the response mounted to it. Materials and Methods: An intensive door-to-door search to six measles affected villages in Dwarahat block of district Almora, covering a population of 2,408 was carried out to identify the cases of measles by a rapid response team (RRT. A total of ten blood samples were randomly collected for detecting IgM antibody against measles. For all cases, information on personal details, place of residence, time of onset and status of immunization were obtained. Results: Overall attack rate (AR was 2.8%. AR among the population of age-group 0-16 was 7.2%. Statistically significant higher AR (16.26% was seen for the age-group of 0-5 years as compare to 6-10 and 11-16 years of age (AR-8.71, relative risk-0.53, 95% confidence interval-0.32-0.88, P value-0.012 and AR-0.57%, relative risk-0.035, 95% confidence interval-0.00-0.14, P value-0.000, respectively. Males were affected more often than females 35 [59.2%] vs. 24 [40.8%]. Measles-related complications were seen in three children. No death was reported. Of the 10 samples, nine were positive for measles IgM antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Conclusion: The recognition of early warning signals, timely investigation and application of specific control measures can contain the outbreak. The unvaccinated or partially protected human beings serve as the reservoir of measles virus. Hence, there is a need for sero surveillance for measles in Uttarakhand and one catch up measles immunisation campaign to prevent future outbreak.

  18. Establishing the lysine-rich protein CEST reporter gene as a CEST MR imaging detector for oncolytic virotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.T. Farrar (Christian T.); J.S. Buhrman (Jason); G. Liu (Guanshu); A. Kleijn (Anne); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); M.T. McMahon (Michael T.); A.A. Gilad (Assaf A.); G. Fulci (Giulia)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To (a) evaluate whether the lysine-rich protein (LRP) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging reporter gene can be engineered into G47Δ, a herpes simplex-derived oncolytic virus that is currently being tested in clinical trials, without disrupting its therapeutic effectiveness and (b) e

  19. Suscetibilidade da linhagem de células Vero a cepas vacinais do vírus do sarampo Susceptibility of Vero cell line to vaccine strains of the measles virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Sayoko Takata

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available A suscetibilidade da linhagem de células Vero ao vírus do sarampo é bem conhecida e sua utilização no controle da potência da vacina contra o sarampo é amplamente difundida. Com o objetivo de comparar a suscetibilidade de células Vero empregadas em titulações, amostras provenientes de dois laboratórios controladores (Vero IB e Vero INCQS, foram testadas frente a três cepas vacinais: Moraten, Schwarz e Biken CAM-70. Foram titulados 72 lotes de vacinas contra o sarampo, sendo 25 produzidos com a cepa Moraten, 24 com a cepa Schwarz e 23 com a cepa Biken CAM-70. A análise estatística dos resultados obtidos nas titulações, feita através dos testes Limites para uma Média e "t" de Student, mostrou que para as cepas Moraten e Biken CAM-70, as diferenças de títulos não foram estatisticamente significantes, o mesmo não ocorrendo com a cepa Schwarz, para a qual as células Vero IB se mostraram mais sensíveis.Vero cells used by distinct measles vaccine control laboratories had their susceptibility to Moraten, Schwarz and Biken CAM-70 vaccine strains assayed. Of a total of 72 lots of measles vaccine whose potency was titrated by microtechnique in two Vero cell samples (Vero IB and Vero INCQS, 25 had been produced with Moraten strain, 24 with Schwarz and 23 with Biken CAM-70. The statistical analysis of the results demonstrated that both Vero cells assayed presented comparable susceptibility to Moraten and Biken CAM-70 strains. As to the Schwarz strain, Vero IB cells were more susceptible than the other cell sample tested, thus confirming the existence of different sensitivities of Vero cells to some measles vaccine strains, or even to viruses derived from the same strain but with different passage histories. An altered cell susceptibility to virus replication may significantly alter the results in potency testing. Such alteration may be caused not only by the adoption of distinct protocols for the maintenance of cell cultures by

  20. MEASLES IN INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Timchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical observation and treatment of 36 children between the ages of 5 months up to 3 years old with measles. In 34 persons. (94.4% diagnosed with typical moderate forms, from 2 people (5.6% — atypical (mitigirovannaya a mild form of the disease. All children are vaccinated against measles. Typical measles char-acterized by moderate forms of cyclical flow with the change of the classical period and the presence of characteristic clinical syndromes. Pathognomonic symptom found: spots Belsky — Filatov — Koplik (67.7%, stages a rash (100%, stages of pigmentation (100%. Causal therapy was VIFERON®. Revealed the rapid disappearance of intoxication and normalization of body temperature, the early decline in the severity and duration of catarrhal syndrome, reducing the severity and frequency of complications, no stratification of SARS.

  1. Notes from the Field: Measles Outbreak of Unknown Source - Shelby County, Tennessee, April-May 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fill, Mary-Margaret A; Sweat, David; Morrow, Helen; Haushalter, Alisa; Martin, Judy C; Zerwekh, Tyler; Chakraverty, Tamal; Kmet, Jennifer; Morris, Kevin; Moore, Kelly; Kainer, Marion; Murphree, Rendi; Dunn, John R; Schaffner, William; Jones, Timothy F

    2016-09-30

    On April 15, 2016, local public health officials in Shelby County, Tennessee, were notified of a positive measles immunoglobulin M (IgM) test for a male aged 18 months (patient A). On April 18, 2016, a second positive measles IgM test was reported for a man aged 50 years (patient B). Both patients had rash onset on April 9, 2016. The Shelby County Health Department initiated an investigation, and confirmatory testing for measles virus on oropharyngeal swabs by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at CDC was positive for both patients. On April 21, 2016, public health officials were notified of a third suspected measles case in a female aged 7 months (patient C) who had developed a rash on April 14; PCR testing was positive. Genotyping conducted at CDC identified genotype B3 measles virus in all three cases. Genotype B3 is known to be circulating globally and has previously been associated with imported cases in the United States (1).

  2. Occurrence of measles genotype D8 during a 2014 outbreak in Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartoyo, Edi; Wiyatno, Ageng; Jaya, Ungke Anton; Ma'roef, Chairin Nisa; Monagin, Corina; Myint, Khin Saw; Safari, Dodi

    2017-01-01

    An outbreak of measles symptoms occurring in children in Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan, Indonesia in 2014 was investigated. Nasal swabs were collected from 23 children (median age 41 months) with fever and other symptoms of measles hospitalized in Ulin General Hospital and Islamic Hospital, Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan. Viral RNA was extracted for cDNA synthesis, followed by PCR and sequencing using paramyxovirus family consensus and N-gene primers. Sixteen measles-positive patients (70%) were identified. Fifteen virus strains belonged to genotype D8 and the remaining one strain was confirmed as belonging to genotype D9. Measles virus genotype D8 was detected in an outbreak of measles in South Kalimantan, Indonesia, in 2014. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between seroprevalence of measles and various social determinants in the year following a measles outbreak in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emek, M; Islek, D; Atasoylu, G; Ozbek, O A; Ceylan, A; Acikgoz, A; Tay, Z; Demiral, Y; Oktem, M A; Unal, B

    2017-06-01

    Despite an ongoing measles elimination programme, a measles outbreak occurred in 2013 in Turkey. Population-based seroprevalence studies are needed to determine seronegativity and explore the reasons for this outbreak. This study aimed to explore the seroprevalence of measles and its association with various social determinants in a provincial population in Turkey in the year following a measles outbreak. Cross-sectional study. This study was conducted in Manisa Province in 2014 in a sample of 1740 people aged >2 years. The dependent variable was the seroprevalence of measles. Independent variables were sex, age, migration, household size, household density, income, education level, existence of chronic disease and occupational class. Blood samples were collected from participants at family health centres. The presence of specific measles antibodies in serum samples was determined using an anti-measles virus IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. Chi-squared test and logistic regression analysis were performed. Overall, data from 1250 people were analysed. The seroprevalence of measles in the whole study population was 82.2% (95% confidence interval 80.0-84.2). Seroprevalence was 55.4% among subjects aged 2-9 years, 48.7% among subjects aged 10-19 years, 74.1% among subjects aged 20-29 years and 93.6% among subjects aged 30-39 years (P 40 years was >95%. The lowest seroprevalence was found in primary school children (40.2%), followed by those below the age for primary education (69.8%) and secondary school graduates (75.1%). The prevalence of measles seronegativity was not associated with any of the social determinants when adjusted for age. The seroprevalence of measles was lower than expected in the study population and was particularly low in subjects aged measles elimination targets, suggesting that it may be necessary to re-evaluate the need for an extra dose of measles vaccine. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier

  4. Biological Feasibility of Measles Eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strebel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in reducing global measles mortality has renewed interest in measles eradication. Three biological criteria are deemed important for disease eradication: (1) humans are the sole pathogen reservoir; (2) accurate diagnostic tests exist; and (3) an effective, practical intervention is available at reasonable cost. Interruption of transmission in large geographical areas for prolonged periods further supports the feasibility of eradication. Measles is thought by many experts to meet these criteria: no nonhuman reservoir is known to exist, accurate diagnostic tests are available, and attenuated measles vaccines are effective and immunogenic. Measles has been eliminated in large geographical areas, including the Americas. Measles eradication is biologically feasible. The challenges for measles eradication will be logistical, political, and financial. PMID:21666201

  5. Oncolytic virotherapy for treatment of breast cancer, including triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Simona; Koski, Anniina; Liikanen, Ilkka; Vassilev, Lotta; Oksanen, Minna; Siurala, Mikko; Heiskanen, Raita; Hakonen, Tiina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by several distinct biological subtypes, among which triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one associated with a poor prognosis. Oncolytic virus replication is an immunogenic phenomenon, and viruses can be armed with immunostimulatory molecules to boost virus triggered antitumoral immune responses. Cyclophosphamide (CP) is a chemotherapy drug that is associated with cytotoxicity and immunosuppression at higher doses, whereas immunostimulatory and anti-angiogenic properties are observed at low continuous dosage. Therefore, the combination of oncolytic immuno-virotherapy with low-dose CP is an appealing approach. We investigated the potency of oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF on a TNBC cell line and in vivo in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model, in combination with low-dose CP or its main active metabolite 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HP-CP). Furthermore, we summarized the breast cancer-specific human data on this virus from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP). Low-dose CP increased the efficacy of Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF in vitro and in a TNBC mouse model. In ATAP, treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. Thirteen out of 16 breast cancer patients treated were evaluable for possible benefits with modified RECIST 1.1 criteria: 1 patient had a minor response, 2 had stable disease (SD), and 10 had progressive disease (PD). One patient is alive at 1,771 d after treatment. Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF in combination with low-dose CP showed promising efficacy in preclinical studies and possible antitumor activity in breast cancer patients refractory to other forms of therapy. This preliminary data supports continuing the clinical development of oncolytic adenoviruses for treatment of breast cancer, including TNBC.

  6. 一起缅甸输入新型麻疹病毒(d11基因型)引发暴发疫情的调查分析%Investigation on an outbreak of measles caused by new virus (d11 genotype) imported from Myanmar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞颜坤; 李立群; 丁峥嵘; 彭敏; 朱元清; 王正有; 李艳

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the relevant factors on an measles outbreak caused by imported new virus (d11 genotype)from Myanmar and to develop effective strategies and measures.Methods On-site investigation on the outbreak was carried out. Results There were four townships (66%) in Menglian county reported 15 cases of measles, with 7 cases aged 6 months to 5 years old, 2 cases with the history of measles vaccination (MV). Another 8 cases were 21 to 49 year-olds but their histories on immunization were unclear. 14 of the measles cases with Myanmar citizenship came to China for treatment. They were aged 10 months to 13 years old, with only one case had ever received MV vaccination. For all the 29 cases, except for one case who did not adopt the sample case of Myanmar, the remaining 28 patients were positive for measles IgM antibodies. 6 cases of measles virus RNA were detected in the amplified sequence which showed genotype d11, and was considered Myanmar imported wild virus. 184 people received the MV inoculation, with a rate of 61.96% and the serum samples showed a measles IgG antibody positive rate of 87.50%. Manner MV emergency vaccination was carried out timely in that county so the measles outbreak was effectively controlled.Conclusion Imported measles cases from foreign countries might lead to epidemic, indicating the difficulty and challenge in the elimination of measles in our province. Emergent vaccination of MV could interrupt the transmission of the disease. Our experience showed that MV was effective in the prevention of d11 genotypes measles infection in the area.%目的 研究缅甸输入新型麻疹病毒(d11基因型)导致暴发疫情的相关因素及阻断传播的有效策略和措施.方法 应用流行病学方法进行现场暴发调查.结果 云南省孟连县4个乡镇(66%)报告麻疹15例,6月龄至5岁儿童7例,2例有麻疹疫苗(MV)免疫史;21~49岁8例,免疫史均不详.缅甸入境人员就诊14例,年龄10月龄至13岁,仅1

  7. Nosocomial measles cluster in Denmark following an imported case, December 2008-January 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, C; Bottiger, Be; Plesner, A

    2009-01-01

    A cluster of six confirmed cases with identical measles virus genotype was reported in Denmark between December 2008 and January 2009. The findings highlight the importance of vaccination before travelling and adherence to the routine vaccination schedule....

  8. Measles outbreaks: what does it represent for the elimination strategy in the region of the Americas? A call for the action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Aguero, María L; Camacho-Badilla, Kattia; Ulloa-Gutierrez, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    The US is experiencing a large multi-state measles outbreak that started in California in 2014. At this time, no source case for the outbreak has been identified. Measles was declared eliminated in the US in 2000, because at that time, there were high coverage rates with the two-dose schedule and these vaccines have been very immunogenic. Measles is still endemic in many parts of the world, and outbreaks can occur when unvaccinated groups are exposed to imported measles virus. The current multi-state outbreak underscores the ongoing risk of measles importation, the need for high measles vaccination coverage rates, and the importance of a prompt and appropriate public health response to individual cases and outbreaks. The US outbreak threatens measles control in the Americas. Strengthening immunization programs and keeping vaccination coverage rates above 95% with a two-dose schedule will be necessary for measles control strategies in the Americas.

  9. Don't Let Measles Be Your Travel Souvenir

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Past Emails Don’t Let Measles Be Your Travel Souvenir Language: English Español (Spanish) ... are not vaccinated are at risk of getting measles Facts about measles How is measles spread? Measles ...

  10. Oncolytic Viruses: Therapeutics With an Identity Crisis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Breitbach, Caroline J; Lichty, Brian D; Bell, John C

    2016-01-01

    .... OVs are unique therapeutics with multiple mechanisms of therapeutic activity. The exact path for their development and eventual uptake by pharmaceutical companies is somewhat clouded by an uncertain identity...

  11. Nosocomial measles cluster in Denmark following an imported case, December 2008-January 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, C; Bottiger, Be; Plesner, A

    2009-01-01

    A cluster of six confirmed cases with identical measles virus genotype was reported in Denmark between December 2008 and January 2009. The findings highlight the importance of vaccination before travelling and adherence to the routine vaccination schedule.......A cluster of six confirmed cases with identical measles virus genotype was reported in Denmark between December 2008 and January 2009. The findings highlight the importance of vaccination before travelling and adherence to the routine vaccination schedule....

  12. [An update on measles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseris, M; Burdet, C; Lepeule, R; Houhou, N; Yeni, P; Yazdanpanah, Y; Joly, V

    2015-05-01

    Measles is a highly contagious infectious disease, which needs more than 95% worldwide vaccination coverage of 2 doses to be eradicated. Despite an important involvement of the WHO for massive immunization, goals have not bean reached, and outbreaks can occur at any time in many countries, including Western Europe. In France, 22,000 cases were identified between 2009 and 2011, mainly in infants and young adults, which are not or not enough vaccinated (one dose). In 2012, even though the number of cases has drastically decreased, the outbreak is still going on, especially in South of France. That is why every clinician needs to be concerned about the clinical manifestations of the disease, and its complications. Besides a febrile rash, measles is often responsible of pneumonia and biologic hepatitis in adults. Hepatitis does not seem frequent in children. Clinicians need to be aware of specific complications, like encephalitis in case of cellular immunodepression, high risk of pneumonia in pregnant women. In patients previously vaccinated, incidence of complications is the same but patients are not contagious. Even if measles diagnosis is clinical, blood confirmation by serology is recommended in France when possible. Outcome is mainly favourable, but measles is not well-tolerated with high levels of hospitalisation even without any complication. Vaccination is the only way to protect against it.

  13. Measles Elimination Activities in the Western Pacific Region: Experience from the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Young June; Jee, Youngmee; Oh, Myoung-don; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2015-11-01

    We describe the global status of measles control and elimination, including surveillance and vaccination coverage data provided by the World Health Organization (WHO). Since 2000, two doses of measles vaccine (MCV2) became recommended globally and the achievement of high vaccination coverage has led to dramatic decrease in the measles incidence. Our finding indicates that, in the Western Pacific Region (WPR), substantial progress has been made to control measles transmission in some countries; however, the measles virus continues to circulate, causing outbreaks. The Republic of Korea (ROK) experienced a series of resurgence of measles due to the importation and healthcare-associated transmission in infants, however overall incidence and surveillance indicators met the WHO criteria for measles elimination. The ROK was verified to be measles-free along with Australia, Mongolia, and Macau, China in 2014. One of the effective elimination activities was the establishment of solid keep-up vaccination system in school settings. The lessons learnt from the measles elimination activities in Korea may contribute to enhancing the surveillance schemes and strengthening of vaccination programs in member countries and areas of WPR.

  14. MMR Vaccine (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenuvax® Measles Vaccine ... R-Vax® II (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine) ... M-R® II (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine)

  15. Two-year antibody persistence in children vaccinated at 12-15 months with a measles-mumps-rubella virus vaccine without human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Andrea A; Abu-Elyazeed, Remon; Diaz-Perez, Clemente; Mufson, Maurice A; Harrison, Christopher J; Leonardi, Michael; Twiggs, Jerry D; Peltier, Christopher; Grogg, Stanley; Carbayo, Antonio; Shapiro, Steven; Povey, Michael; Baccarini, Carmen; Innis, Bruce L; Henry, Ouzama

    2017-07-03

    One combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine without Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is currently licensed in the USA (M-M-R II; Merck, USA) and another has been developed (Priorix™ [MMR-RIT, GSK, Belgium]). In this follow-up study, children from USA or Puerto Rico, who had received one dose of M-M-R II or MMR-RIT at 12-15 months of age in the primary study (NCT00861744), were followed-up for 2 y post-vaccination. Anti-measles and anti-rubella antibodies were measured using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), and anti-mumps antibodies using ELISA and plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assays. Serious adverse events (SAEs) were recorded during the entire follow-up. The according-to-protocol (ATP) persistence cohort included 752 children (M-M-R II = 186, MMR-RIT = 566), who received primary vaccination at a mean age of 12.3 ( ± 0.67) months. 104 children were revaccinated with MMR-containing vaccines; therefore, serology results for timepoints after revaccination were excluded from the analysis. Seropositivity for measles (Year 1≥ 98.3%; Year 2≥ 99.4%) and rubella (Year 1≥ 98.9%; Year 2 = 100%) remained as high at Year 2 as at Day 42. Similarly, seropositivity for mumps determined by ELISA (Year 1≥ 90.1%; Year 2≥ 94.1%) and PRN assays (Year 1≥ 87.5%; Year 2≥ 91.7%) persisted. Thirty-three SAEs were recorded in 23 children; 2 SAEs (inguinal adenitis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura) and one SAE (febrile convulsion) were considered as potentially related to MMR-RIT and M-M-R II, respectively. This study showed that antibodies against measles, mumps and rubella persisted for up to 2 y post-vaccination with either MMR vaccine in children aged 12-15 months, and that both vaccines were well-tolerated during the follow-up period.

  16. Resurgence of measles in a country of elimination: interim assessment and current control measures in the Republic of Korea in early 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae Un; Kim, Ju Whi; Eom, Hye Eun; Oh, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Eun Seong; Kang, Hae Ji; Nam, Jeong-Gu; Kim, Ki Soon; Kim, Sung Soon; Lee, Chan Kyu; Park, Young-Joon; Park, Ok

    2015-04-01

    Since the beginning of 2014, the Republic of Korea has experienced a resurgence of measles cases. Among the 220 cases confirmed as measles during epidemiological weeks 1-20 (December 29, 2013 to May 17, 2014), 10 imported cases were identified. The predominant genotype was B3, which reflects the circulating measles virus in adjacent countries. Even with the verification of measles elimination in March 2014 by the World Health Organization, recent importation has been related to international travel. Targeted control measures have been implemented in addition to proper isolation and patient care. A vigilant surveillance system and high levels of vaccine coverage should be maintained to sustain the measles elimination status.

  17. Measles & rubella outbreaks in Maharashtra State, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil R Vaidya

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Altogether, 94 measles and rubella outbreaks were confirmed in 2013 in the State of Maharasthra indicating the necessity to increase measles vaccine coverage in the State.

  18. Predictive and Prognostic Clinical Variables in Cancer Patients Treated With Adenoviral Oncolytic Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, Kristian; Liikanen, Ilkka; Koski, Anniina; Heiskanen, Raita; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Otto; Oksanen, Minna; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Hemminki, Kari; Joensuu, Timo; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-08-01

    The development of oncolytic viruses has recently made great progress towards being available to cancer patients. With the breakthrough into clinics, it is crucial to analyze the existing clinical experience and use it as a basis for treatment improvements. Here, we report clinical data from 290 patients treated with oncolytic adenovirus. Using clinical variables and treatment characteristics, we constructed statistical models with regard to treatment response and overall survival (OS). Additionally, we investigated effects of neutralizing antibodies, tumor burden, and peripheral blood leucocyte counts on these outcomes. We found the absence of liver metastases to correlate with an improved rate of disease control (P = 0.021). In multivariate evaluation, patients treated with viruses coding for immunostimulatory granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor were linked to better prognosis (hazard ratio (HR) 0.378, P < 0.001), as well as women with any cancer type (HR 0.694, P = 0.017). In multivariate analysis for imaging response, patients treated via intraperitoneal injection were more likely to achieve disease control (odds ratio (OR) 3.246, P = 0.027). Patients with low neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio before treatment had significantly longer OS (P < 0.001). These findings could explain some of the variation seen in treatment outcomes after virotherapy. Furthermore, the results offer hypotheses for treatment optimization and patient selection in oncolytic adenovirus immunotherapy.

  19. Increasing the Efficacy of Oncolytic Adenovirus Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S. M. Wold

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenovirus (Ad vectors present a new modality to treat cancer. These vectors attack tumors via replicating in and killing cancer cells. Upon completion of the vector replication cycle, the infected tumor cell lyses and releases progeny virions that are capable of infecting neighboring tumor cells. Repeated cycles of vector replication and cell lysis can destroy the tumor. Numerous Ad vectors have been generated and tested, some of them reaching human clinical trials. In 2005, the first oncolytic Ad was approved for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer by the Chinese FDA. Oncolytic Ads have been proven to be safe, with no serious adverse effects reported even when high doses of the vector were injected intravenously. The vectors demonstrated modest anti-tumor effect when applied as a single agent; their efficacy improved when they were combined with another modality. The efficacy of oncolytic Ads can be improved using various approaches, including vector design, delivery techniques, and ancillary treatment, which will be discussed in this review.

  20. Assessment of the Na/I symporter as a reporter gene to visualize oncolytic adenovirus propagation in peritoneal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merron, Andrew; McNeish, Iain A. [Queen Mary' s School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Institute of Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Baril, Patrick; Tran, Lucile; Vassaux, Georges [CHU Hotel Dieu, INSERM, Nantes (France); CHU de Nantes, Institut des Maladies de l' Appareil Digestif, Nantes (France); Martin-Duque, Pilar [Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud, Zaragoza (Spain); Vieja, Antonio de la [Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Madrid (Spain); Briat, Arnaud [INSERM U877, Grenoble (France); Harrington, Kevin J. [Chester Beatty Laboratories, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    In vivo imaging of the spread of oncolytic viruses using the Na/I symporter (NIS) has been proposed. Here, we assessed whether the presence of NIS in the viral genome affects the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 following intraperitoneal administration, in a mouse model of peritoneal ovarian carcinoma. We generated AdAM7, a dl922-947 oncolytic adenovirus encoding the NIS coding sequence. Iodide uptake, NIS expression, infectivity and cell-killing activity of AdAM7, as well as that of relevant controls, were determined in vitro. In vivo, the propagation of this virus in the peritoneal cavity of tumour-bearing mice was determined using SPECT/CT imaging and its therapeutic efficacy was evaluated. In vitro infection of ovarian carcinoma IGROV-1 cells with ADAM7 led to functional expression of NIS. However, the insertion of NIS into the viral genome resulted in a loss of efficacy of the virus in terms of replication and cytotoxicity. In vivo, on SPECT/CT imaging AdAM7 was only detectable in the peritoneal cavity of animals bearing peritoneal ovarian tumours for up to 5 days after intraperitoneal administration. Therapeutic experiments in vivo demonstrated that AdAM7 is as potent as its NIS-negative counterpart. This study demonstrated that despite the detrimental effect observed in vitro, insertion of the reporter gene NIS in an oncolytic adenovirus did not affect its therapeutic efficacy in vivo. We conclude that NIS is a highly relevant reporter gene to monitor the fate of oncolytic adenovectors in live subjects. (orig.)

  1. 福建省麻疹野病毒分离及核蛋白基因特征分析%Genetic Characteristics of N Gene of Measles Virus Isolated in Fujian Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨秀惠; 周勇; 何爱华; 许江阳; 张红榕; 陈雅红; 张宏; 陈前进; 陈昌福; 吴春敏

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解福建省流行的麻疹野病毒基因型别及特征.方法 应用B95a细胞[Epstein-Barr(EB)Virus-Transformed,Marmoset B Lymphoblastoid Cell Line,埃泼斯坦-巴尔病毒转化的绒猴淋巴母细胞]或Vero/SLAM细胞[Vero Cells Transfected to Express the Human Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule(SLAM),淋巴信号激活因子转染的非洲绿猴肾细胞],从疑似麻疹病例的咽拭子或尿液标本分离麻疹病毒,用逆转录-聚合酶链反应(Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction,RT-PCR)扩增分离株病毒的核蛋白(Nucleoprotein,N)基因3′端450个核苷酸片段,分析其基因型别及遗传特征.结果 2002年、2006~2009年,共从6个设区的市分离了24株麻疹野病毒,均为H1基因型、H1a基因亚型,未分离到其他型别的毒株.福建株间核苷酸同源性为97.8%~100.0%,在遗传树图中属于4个独立分支谱系(Lineage),Lineage 4分支病毒出现了3个新的氨基酸突变位点.福建株中来自不同地区和年份的MV(Measles Virus,麻疹病毒)07-29FZ(Fuzhou,福州)、MV07-20ND(Ningde,宁德)、MV07-47ND和MV08-78QZ(Quanzhou,泉州)、MV06-32LY(Longyan,龙岩)、MV07-30FZ、MV07-39FZ和MV07-46ND的N基因3′端的450核苷酸同源性均为100.0%.福建株与H1基因型中国代表株、H2基因型及疫苗株S(Shanghai,上海)191相比,与S191疫苗株的A基因组差异最大(核苷酸同源性90.1%~93.3%,氨基酸同源性86.8%~91.4%).结论 H1a为福建省本土麻疹野病毒优势基因亚型,未发现其他基因亚型.近3年的分离株出现了新的氨基酸位点突变.不同地区或同一地区内存在多传播链同时循环,也存在同一野病毒株在不同地区、不同年份持续循环.%Objective To analyse of the characteristic of the indigenous measles virus (MV)in Fujian before 2012.Methods MV were isolated from the throat swabs or urine specimens of measles patients by the B95a or Veto/SLAM cell line and identified by RT-PCR.The 450

  2. Measles control: a global battle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Measles kills about 1.4 million children each year. To bring about reductions in measles cases and deaths, WHO has made some recommendations. Public health officials at the community, district, and national levels need to achieve at least 90% measles vaccine coverage. This coverage level reduces cases and deaths, but may not stop transmission. The primary goal should be that health workers deliver at least 1 dose of measles vaccine to all children at the scheduled age. Several complementary strategies are needed within each country to achieve this high coverage. In situations where there is a high incidence of measles in a defined subgroup of older children, older children should receive extra doses of vaccine when they enter school. In-service training of hospital and clinic staff should reduce the number of missed opportunities (i.e., children who visit health facilities but who are not screened and administered needed immunizations). Public health workers need to identify reasons for high drop-out rates and take corrective action. Limited resources should be directed to high risk areas: areas with high population density, low measles immunization coverage, known vitamin A deficiency, or high reported measles incidence or death rate. Unimmunized urban poor children, underserved ethnic minorities, refugees, people in underserved border areas, children admitted to the hospital, and infants of HIV positive mothers comprise high risk groups. Measles outbreaks occur even in areas where measles immunization coverage is high. Control measures are not always effective, especially if taken late in an epidemic. At the very least, health officials should gather data on cases and death (e.g., date of onset and immunization status). They should determine why the outbreak took place. If possible, they should conduct a vaccine efficacy study. To reduce deaths from measles by 95%, immunization, treatment of measles and its complications at an early stage, and vitamin A

  3. A Measles Outbreak in an Underimmunized Amish Community in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastañaduy, Paul A; Budd, Jeremy; Fisher, Nicholas; Redd, Susan B; Fletcher, Jackie; Miller, Julie; McFadden, Dwight J; Rota, Jennifer; Rota, Paul A; Hickman, Carole; Fowler, Brian; Tatham, Lilith; Wallace, Gregory S; de Fijter, Sietske; Parker Fiebelkorn, Amy; DiOrio, Mary

    2016-10-06

    Although measles was eliminated in the United States in 2000, importations of the virus continue to cause outbreaks. We describe the epidemiologic features of an outbreak of measles that originated from two unvaccinated Amish men in whom measles was incubating at the time of their return to the United States from the Philippines and explore the effect of public health responses on limiting the spread of measles. We performed descriptive analyses of data on demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory evaluations, and vaccination coverage. From March 24, 2014, through July 23, 2014, a total of 383 outbreak-related cases of measles were reported in nine counties in Ohio. The median age of case patients was 15 years (range, Amish households and more than 88% in the general (non-Amish) Ohio community. Containment efforts included isolation of case patients, quarantine of susceptible persons, and administration of the MMR vaccine to more than 10,000 persons. The spread of measles was limited almost exclusively to the Amish community (accounting for 99% of case patients) and affected only approximately 1% of the estimated 32,630 Amish persons in the settlement. The key epidemiologic features of a measles outbreak in the Amish community in Ohio were transmission primarily within households, the small proportion of Amish people affected, and the large number of people in the Amish community who sought vaccination. As a result of targeted containment efforts, and high baseline coverage in the general community, there was limited spread beyond the Amish community. (Funded by the Ohio Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.).

  4. Antecedent causes of a measles resurgence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scobie, Heather Melissa; Ilunga, Benoît Kebela; Mulumba, Audry; Shidi, Calixte; Coulibaly, Tiekoura; Obama, Ricardo; Tamfum, Jean-Jacques Muyembe; Simbu, Elisabeth Pukuta; Smit, Sheilagh Brigitte; Masresha, Balcha; Perry, Robert Tyrrell; Alleman, Mary Margaret; Kretsinger, Katrina; Goodson, James

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite accelerated measles control efforts, a massive measles resurgence occurred in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) starting in mid-2010, prompting an investigation into likely causes. Methods We conducted a descriptive epidemiological analysis using measles immunization and surveillance data to understand the causes of the measles resurgence and to develop recommendations for elimination efforts in DRC. Results During 2004-2012, performance indicator targets for case-based surveillance and routine measles vaccination were not met. Estimated coverage with the routine first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) increased from 57% to 73%. Phased supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) were conducted starting in 2002, in some cases with sub-optimal coverage (≤95%). In 2010, SIAs in five of 11 provinces were not implemented as planned, resulting in a prolonged interval between SIAs, and a missed birth cohort in one province. During July 1, 2010-December 30, 2012, high measles attack rates (>100 cases per 100,000 population) occurred in provinces that had estimated MCV1 coverage lower than the national estimate and did not implement planned 2010 SIAs. The majority of confirmed case-patients were aged measles virus strains that were previously identified in the region. Conclusion The resurgence was likely caused by an accumulation of unvaccinated, measles-susceptible children due to low MCV1 coverage and suboptimal SIA implementation. To achieve the regional goal of measles elimination by 2020, efforts are needed in DRC to improve case-based surveillance and increase two-dose measles vaccination coverage through routine services and SIAs. PMID:26401224

  5. Inhibitors of the interferon response enhance virus replication in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Stewart

    Full Text Available Virus replication efficiency is influenced by two conflicting factors, kinetics of the cellular interferon (IFN response and induction of an antiviral state versus speed of virus replication and virus-induced inhibition of the IFN response. Disablement of a virus's capacity to circumvent the IFN response enables both basic research and various practical applications. However, such IFN-sensitive viruses can be difficult to grow to high-titer in cells that produce and respond to IFN. The current default option for growing IFN-sensitive viruses is restricted to a limited selection of cell-lines (e.g. Vero cells that have lost their ability to produce IFN. This study demonstrates that supplementing tissue-culture medium with an IFN inhibitor provides a simple, effective and flexible approach to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice. We report that IFN inhibitors targeting components of the IFN response (TBK1, IKK2, JAK1 significantly increased virus replication. More specifically, the JAK1/2 inhibitor Ruxolitinib enhances the growth of viruses that are sensitive to IFN due to (i loss of function of the viral IFN antagonist (due to mutation or species-specific constraints or (ii mutations/host cell constraints that slow virus spread such that it can be controlled by the IFN response. This was demonstrated for a variety of viruses, including, viruses with disabled IFN antagonists that represent live-attenuated vaccine candidates (Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV, Influenza Virus, traditionally attenuated vaccine strains (Measles, Mumps and a slow-growing wild-type virus (RSV. In conclusion, supplementing tissue culture-medium with an IFN inhibitor to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice represents an approach, which is broadly applicable to research investigating the importance of the IFN response in controlling virus infections and has utility in a number of practical applications

  6. The measles outbreak in Bulgaria, 2009-2011: An epidemiological assessment and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscat, Mark; Marinova, Lili; Mankertz, Annette; Gatcheva, Nina; Mihneva, Zafira; Santibanez, Sabine; Kunchev, Angel; Filipova, Radosveta; Kojouharova, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Measles re-emerged in a nationwide outbreak in Bulgaria from 2009 to 2011 despite reported high vaccination coverage at national level. This followed an eight-year period since the last indigenous cases of measles were detected. The Bulgarian National Centre of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases collated measles surveillance data for 2009-2011. We analysed data for age group, sex, ethnicity, diagnosis confirmation, vaccination, hospitalisation, disease complications, and death and describe the outbreak control measures taken. The outbreak started in April 2009 following an importation of measles virus and affected 24,364 persons, predominantly Roma. Most cases (73%) were among children measles-containing vaccine. Twenty-four measles-related deaths were reported. The Roma ethnic group was particularly susceptible to measles. The magnitude of the outbreak resulted primarily from the accumulation of susceptible children over time. This outbreak serves as a reminder that both high vaccination coverage and closing of immunity gaps across all sections of the population are crucial to reach the goal of measles elimination.

  7. Measles Outbreak in a Roma Community in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALMA ROBO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Measles reporting is mandatory in Albania. Despite the very high immunization coverage for MMR a measles outbreak was reported by district epidemiologist to national public health institute in june 2006. All affected persons were from a Roma community living in the town of Elbasan. We report the epidemiological features of this epidemic. Method: Active surveillance was conducted and cases analyzed had to meet the national case definition “rash maculopapular with fever”. The diagnosis was established by clinical signs, confirmed by serologic results. Sera samples from all the suspected cases were tested for Measles IgM by ELISA and molecular genotyping of virus by the regional reference laboratory. Results: According to the case definition 16 cases were actively found, 13 (77% were female and 3 (23% male. The mean age was 7.1 years (range: three months to 23 years. Most of the patients had Koplik spots, coryza and conjunctivitis. All cases were unvaccinated. All patients recovered and no fatal cases. Conclusion: Gaps of low vaccine coverage facilitated the measles infection to spread. The vaccination of this community it difficult despite the commitement of the health staff. Families with their children are in ongoing migration all over the country and abroad. As a response to stop the spread of the measles outbreak, the district epidemiological service in Elbasan with the support from the national institute of public health, organised a mass vaccination campaign.

  8. [The measles are here again].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opstelten, W.; Ruijs, W.L.M.; Warris, A.; Binnendijk, R.S. van; Wolfs, T.F.; Hahne, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Since the vaccination of Dutch children against the measles through the National Immunisation Programme started in 1976, the incidence of measles has greatly decreased. Local epidemics do still occur, however; these are largely confined to minority groups of orthodox Protestants who object to

  9. [The measles are here again].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opstelten, W.; Ruijs, W.L.M.; Warris, A.; Binnendijk, R.S. van; Wolfs, T.F.; Hahne, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Since the vaccination of Dutch children against the measles through the National Immunisation Programme started in 1976, the incidence of measles has greatly decreased. Local epidemics do still occur, however; these are largely confined to minority groups of orthodox Protestants who object to vaccin

  10. Oncolytic parvoviruses: from basic virology to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchini, Antonio; Bonifati, Serena; Scott, Eleanor M; Angelova, Assia L; Rommelaere, Jean

    2015-01-29

    Accumulated evidence gathered over recent decades demonstrated that some members of the Parvoviridae family, in particular the rodent protoparvoviruses H-1PV, the minute virus of mice and LuIII have natural anticancer activity while being nonpathogenic to humans. These studies have laid the foundations for the launch of a first phase I/IIa clinical trial, in which the rat H-1 parvovirus is presently undergoing evaluation for its safety and first signs of efficacy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. After a brief overview of the biology of parvoviruses, this review focuses on the studies which unraveled the antineoplastic properties of these agents and supported their clinical use as anticancer therapeutics. Furthermore, the development of novel parvovirus-based anticancer strategies with enhanced specificity and efficacy is discussed, in particular the development of second and third generation vectors and the combination of parvoviruses with other anticancer agents. Lastly, we address the key challenges that remain towards a more rational and efficient use of oncolytic parvoviruses in clinical settings, and discuss how a better understanding of the virus life-cycle and of the cellular factors involved in virus infection, replication and cytotoxicity may promote the further development of parvovirus-based anticancer therapies, open new prospects for treatment and hopefully improve clinical outcome.

  11. Multigenic control of measles vaccine immunity mediated by polymorphisms in measles receptor, innate pathway, and cytokine genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard B; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Haralambieva, Iana H; O'Byrne, Megan M; Jacobson, Robert M; Pankratz, V Shane; Poland, Gregory A

    2012-03-09

    Measles infection and vaccine response are complex biological processes that involve both viral and host genetic factors. We have previously investigated the influence of genetic polymorphisms on vaccine immune response, including measles vaccines, and have shown that polymorphisms in HLA, cytokine, cytokine receptor, and innate immune response genes are associated with variation in vaccine response but do not account for all of the inter-individual variance seen in vaccinated populations. In the current study we report the findings of a multigenic analysis of measles vaccine immunity, indicating a role for the measles virus receptor CD46, innate pattern-recognition receptors (DDX58, TLR2, 4, 5, 7 and 8) and intracellular signaling intermediates (MAP3K7, NFKBIA), and key antiviral molecules (VISA, OAS2, MX1, PKR) as well as cytokines (IFNA1, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL12B) and cytokine receptor genes (IL2RB, IL6R, IL8RA) in the genetic control of both humoral and cellular immune responses. This multivariate approach provided additional insights into the genetic control of measles vaccine responses over and above the information gained by our previous univariate SNP association analyses.

  12. Progress towards Rapid Detection of Measles Vaccine Strains: a Tool To Inform Public Health Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Jill K

    2017-03-01

    Rapid differentiation of vaccine from wild-type strains in suspect measles cases is a valuable epidemiological tool that informs the public health response to this highly infectious disease. Few public health laboratories sequence measles virus-positive specimens to determine genotype, and the vaccine-specific real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) assay described by F. Roy et al. (J. Clin. Microbiol. 55:735-743, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01879-16) offers a rapid, easily adoptable method to identify measles vaccine strains in suspect cases.

  13. Viruses as nanomedicine for cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, So Young; Narayanasamy,Badrinath; Heo,Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Narayanasamy Badrinath,1 Jeong Heo,2 So Young Yoo1,3 1BIO-IT Foundry Technology Institute, 2Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan, 3Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Republic of Korea Abstract: Oncolytic virotherapy, a type of nanomedicine in which oncolytic viruses (OVs) are used to selectively infect and lyse cancer cells,...

  14. Effects of capsid-modified oncolytic adenoviruses and their combinations with gemcitabine or silica gel on pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangasniemi, Lotta; Parviainen, Suvi; Pisto, Tommi; Koskinen, Mika; Jokinen, Mika; Kiviluoto, Tuula; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Jalonen, Harry; Koski, Anniina; Kangasniemi, Anna; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-07-01

    Conventional cancer treatments often have little impact on the course of advanced pancreatic cancer. Although cancer gene therapy with adenoviruses is a promising developmental approach, the primary receptor is poorly expressed in pancreatic cancers which might compromise efficacy and thus targeting to other receptors could be beneficial. Extended stealth delivery, combination with standard chemotherapy or circumvention of host antiadenoviral immune response might improve efficacy further. In this work, capsid-modified adenoviruses were studied for transduction of cell lines and clinical normal and tumor tissue samples. The respective oncolytic viruses were tested for oncolytic activity in vitro and in vivo. Survival was studied in a peritoneally disseminated pancreas cancer model, with or without concurrent gemcitabine while silica implants were utilized for extended intraperitoneal virus delivery. Immunocompetent mice and Syrian hamsters were used to study the effect of silica mediated delivery on antiviral immune responses and subsequent in vivo gene delivery. Capsid modifications selectively enhanced gene transfer to malignant pancreatic cancer cell lines and clinical samples. The respective oncolytic viruses resulted in increased cell killing in vitro, which translated into a survival benefit in mice. Early proinfammatory cytokine responses and formation of antiviral neutralizing antibodies was partially avoided with silica implants. The implant also shielded the virus from pre-existing neutralizing antibodies, while increasing the pancreas/liver gene delivery ratio six-fold. In conclusion, capsid modified adenoviruses would be useful for testing in pancreatic cancer trials. Silica implants might increase the safety and efficacy of the approach.

  15. 麻疹病毒血凝素蛋白抗原表位的预测与分析%Prediction and analysis of epitopes of hemagglutinin of measles virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯燕; 钟淑玲; 徐昌平; 卢亦愚

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the antigenic change caused by the mutation of amino acid on the epitopes of the hemagglutinin of measles virus.Methods The B cell linear epitopes in the hemagglutinin were predicted with bioinformatics software.Peptide pairs,which located on the same region but originated from measles vaccine and wild-type virus respectively,were designed and synthesized.After detecting the immunogenicity of peptides with indirect ELISA assay,sera against each peptide was prepared.Antigenic specificity between the two peptides within each peptide pair were tested by using cross ELISA assay,and then antigen ratios were calculated.Results All the synthesized peptides could bind with immune sera against measles virus,of which the peptide pair CW23/CW22 designed on the epitope region (273-282 aa) possessed the highest binding ability,while the peptide pair CW150/CW151 designed on the non-epitope region (418-427 aa) showed the lowest binding ability.The difference in antigenic specificity between the two peptides from different sources was significant.The antigenic ratio was up to 16 between CW23 (vaccine-originated) and CW22 (wild-type originated),and 2.877 ± 0.583 between CW123 (vaccine-originated) and CW124 (wild-type originated) (236-246 aa).On the non-epitope regions,the antigenic ratios was only 1.631 ± 0.481 between peptide pair CW125 and CW126(356-364 aa),but reached to 10.367± 1.617 between CW150 and CW151.Conclusion Although there were several conservative epitopes,specific amino acid mutation on the predicted epitope or non-epitope regions might cause the antigenic change of wild-type measles virus.%目的 探讨麻疹病毒(MeV)流行株血凝素蛋白(H)抗原表位上氨基酸(aa)变异对病毒抗原性的可能影响.方法 利用生物信息学软件预测MeV H蛋白上B细胞线性表位,设计并合成来源于疫苗株和流行株表位以及同一区域非表位上的多肽对.间接ELISA法检测合成多肽的免疫原性,并制备多肽

  16. Low titers of measles antibody in mothers whose infants suffered from measles before eligible age for measles vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Qiaozhen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resurgence or outbreak of measles recently occurred in both developed and developing countries despite long-standing widespread use of measles vaccine. Measles incidence in China has increased since 2002, particularly in infants and in persons ≥ 15 years of age. It is speculated that infants may acquire fewer measles IgG from their mothers, resulting in the reduced duration of protection during their early months of life. This study aimed to clarify the reason of increased susceptibility to measles in young infants in China. Measles IgG in 24 measles infants ≤ 9 months of age and their vaccinated mothers was quantitatively measured. The mean measles neutralizing titer in the vaccinated mothers and in 13 age-match women with the histories of clinical measles were compared. Results All the mothers were confirmed to be vaccinated successfully by the presence of measles IgG. Six vaccinated mothers were positive for measles IgM and had high concentrations of measles IgG and the neutralizing antibody, indicating underwent natural boosting. The mean measles neutralizing titer in 18 vaccinated mothers without natural boosting were significantly lower than that in 13 age-match women with the histories of clinical measles (1:37 vs 1:182, P Conclusions Our results suggest that infants born to mothers who acquired immunity to measles by vaccination may get a relatively small amount of measles antibody, resulting in loss of the immunity to measles before the vaccination age. Measures to improve the immunity in young infants not eligible for measles vaccination would be critical to interrupt the measles transmission in China.

  17. Recombinant mumps virus as a cancer therapeutic agent

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Mumps virus belongs to the family of Paramyxoviridae and has the potential to be an oncolytic agent. Mumps virus Urabe strain had been tested in the clinical setting as a treatment for human cancer four decades ago in Japan. These clinical studies demonstrated that mumps virus could be a promising cancer therapeutic agent that showed significant antitumor activity against various types of cancers. Since oncolytic virotherapy was not in the limelight until the beginning of the 21st century, th...

  18. GP73-regulated oncolytic adenoviruses possess potent killing effect on human liver cancer stem-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Ma, Buyun; Liu, Tao; Yang, Yu; Xie, Wenjie; Liu, Xianglei; Huang, Fang; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Xiumei; Liu, Xinyuan; Wang, Yigang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, are highly metastatic, chemo-resistant and tumorigenic, and are critical for cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. Oncolytic adenovirus could targetedly kill CSCs and has been acted as a promising anticancer agent. Currently, a novel GP73-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 was constructed to specifically treat liver cancer and exhibited obvious cytotoxicity effect. However, there remains to be confirmed that whether GD55 could effectively eliminate liver CSCs. We first utilized the suspension culture to enrich the liver CSCs-like cells, which acquires the properties of liver CSCs in self-renewal, differentiation, quiescence, chemo-resistance and tumorigenicity. The results indicated that GD55 elicited more significant cytotoxicity and stronger oncolytic effect in liver CSC-like cells compared to common oncolytic virus ZD55. Additionally, GD55 possessed the greater efficacy in suppressing the growth of implanted tumors derived from liver CSC-like cells than ZD55. Furthermore, GD55 induced remarkable apoptosis of liver CSC-like cells in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the propogation of cells and angiogenesis in xenograft tumor tissues. Thus, GD55 may virtually represent an attractive therapeutic agent for targeting liver CSCs to achieve better clinical outcomes for HCC patients. PMID:27121064

  19. Optimizing patient derived mesenchymal stem cells as virus carriers for a Phase I clinical trial in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mader Emily K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC can serve as carriers to deliver oncolytic measles virus (MV to ovarian tumors. In preparation for a clinical trial to use MSC as MV carriers, we obtained cells from ovarian cancer patients and evaluated feasibility and safety of this approach. Methods MSC from adipose tissues of healthy donors (hMSC and nine ovarian cancer patients (ovMSC were characterized for susceptibility to virus infection and tumor homing abilities. Results Adipose tissue (range 0.16-3.96 grams from newly diagnosed and recurrent ovarian cancer patients yielded about 7.41×106 cells at passage 1 (range 4–9 days. Phenotype and doubling times of MSC were similar between ovarian patients and healthy controls. The time to harvest of 3.0×108 cells (clinical dose could be achieved by day 14 (range, 9–17 days. Two of nine samples tested had an abnormal karyotype represented by trisomy 20. Despite receiving up to 1.6×109 MSC/kg, no tumors were seen in SCID beige mice and MSC did not promote the growth of SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cells in mice. The ovMSC migrated towards primary ovarian cancer samples in chemotaxis assays and to ovarian tumors in athymic mice. Using non-invasive SPECT-CT imaging, we saw rapid co-localization, within 5–8 minutes of intraperitoneal administration of MV infected MSC to the ovarian tumors. Importantly, MSC can be pre-infected with MV, stored in liquid nitrogen and thawed on the day of infusion into mice without loss of activity. MV infected MSC, but not virus alone, significantly prolonged the survival of measles immune ovarian cancer bearing animals. Conclusions These studies confirmed the feasibility of using patient derived MSC as carriers for oncolytic MV therapy. We propose an approach where MSC from ovarian cancer patients will be expanded, frozen and validated to ensure compliance with the release criteria. On the treatment day, the cells will be thawed, washed, mixed with virus, briefly

  20. Travellers returning with measles from Thailand to Finland, April 2012: infection control measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantele, A; Valtonen, K; Davidkin, I; Martelius, T; Võželevskaja, N; Skogberg, K; Liesmaa, I; Lyytikäinen, O

    2012-05-31

    Countries with no autochthonous measles run the risk of the virus being imported by travellers and transmitted to unprotected citizens. In April 2012, two travellers from Finland and one from Estonia were diagnosed with measles after returning from Phuket, Thailand. They were contagious on their return flights and subsequently exposed several individuals, prompting extensive infection control measures. Two secondary cases were detected: one child who had received one vaccine dose and another who was fully vaccinated.

  1. Terminal Pregnancy Complicated by Measles and Premature Labor:a Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Measles infection in pregnant women is a very dangerous clinical condition. Patients usually had complicated pneumonia, and virus could pass through the placenta to the fetus and lead to premature delivery, stillbirth, miscarriage and neonatal measles. In this report, one such case, which was diagnosed by clinical signs and symptoms, clinical and laboratory examination was described. After proper therapeutic treatment, the infection was well-controlled and a baby was born by nature labor.

  2. Measles mimicking HIV seroconversion syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brook Gary

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Measles is on the rise in the United Kingdom and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient presenting with fever and rash. As a highly infectious disease, identified patients must be isolated in the hospital setting. Case presentation A 28-year-old Polish woman presented ill to the accident and emergency department of a district general hospital. She had painful genital ulceration, oral soreness, fever, and a facial rash. She became hypoxic within 24 hours of presentation and began to tire, thus requiring noninvasive ventilation. Her respiratory symptoms were out of proportion to the findings of her chest radiograph, which remained virtually normal. Human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion syndrome complicated by Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia was high among the differential diagnoses. She was given cotrimoxazole, high-dose steroids, broad spectrum antibiotics, and anti fungal cover. Human immunodeficiency virus polymerase chain reaction came back as negative and her symptoms resolved within 10 days of presentation. She was taken off all treatment and discharged home feeling well. Serological measles was confirmed as part of a viral screen, but its clinical suspicion was low. Conclusion The presentation of measles in this patient was unique and atypical. With its incidence rising in the United Kingdom, measles must be increasingly considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with fever and rash.

  3. Long-term treatment with the oncolytic ECHO-7 virus Rigvir of a melanoma stage IV M1c patient, a small cell lung cancer stage IIIA patient, and a histiocytic sarcoma stage IV patient-three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Pēteris; Olmane, Evija; Brokāne, Linda; Krastiņa, Zanda; Romanovska, Māra; Kupčs, Kārlis; Isajevs, Sergejs; Proboka, Guna; Erdmanis, Romualds; Nazarovs, Jurijs; Venskus, Dite

    2016-10-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a recent addition to cancer treatment. Here, we describe positive treatment outcomes in three patients using Rigvir virotherapy. One of the patients is diagnosed with melanoma stage IV M1c, one with small cell lung cancer stage IIIA, and one with histiocytic sarcoma stage IV. The diagnoses of all patients are verified by histology or cytology. All patients started Rigvir treatment within a few months after being diagnosed and are currently continuing Rigvir treatment. The degree of regression of the disease has been determined by computed tomography. Safety assessment of adverse events graded according to NCI CTCAE did not show any value above grade 1 during Rigvir(®) treatment. Using current standard treatments, the survival of patients with the present diagnoses is low. In contrast, the patients described here were diagnosed 3.5, 7.0, and 6.6 years ago, and their condition has improved and been stabile for over 1.5, 6.5, and 4 years, respectively. These observations suggest that virotherapy using Rigvir can successfully be used in long-term treatment of patients with melanoma stage IV M1c, small cell lung cancer stage IIIA, and histiocytic sarcoma stage IV and therefore could be included in prospective clinical studies.

  4. Trials of Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T G; Whittle, H; Mordhorst, Camilla

    1994-01-01

    In two trials of measles vaccination in Guinea-Bissau, children were randomized to receive either the Edmonston-Zagreb (EZ) virus at age 4-8 months or, as a control group, a standard dose (5000 p.f.u.) of the Schwarz (SW) virus at 9-12 months. In the first trial a medium dose of EZ virus (40,000 p....... Antibody levels in the EZ group, as measured by either method, were significantly lower than the levels in the SW group. The serological results of the present study suggest that lowering the age at measles vaccination to below 9 months is feasible. However, further studies are needed to determine which...... virus strain, dosage and age at vaccination will prove to be optimal in countries where severe measles is common before the age of 9 months....

  5. Measles immune suppression: lessons from the macaque model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory D de Vries

    Full Text Available Measles remains a significant childhood disease, and is associated with a transient immune suppression. Paradoxically, measles virus (MV infection also induces robust MV-specific immune responses. Current hypotheses for the mechanism underlying measles immune suppression focus on functional impairment of lymphocytes or antigen-presenting cells, caused by infection with or exposure to MV. We have generated stable recombinant MVs that express enhanced green fluorescent protein, and remain virulent in non-human primates. By performing a comprehensive study of virological, immunological, hematological and histopathological observations made in animals euthanized at different time points after MV infection, we developed a model explaining measles immune suppression which fits with the "measles paradox". Here we show that MV preferentially infects CD45RA(- memory T-lymphocytes and follicular B-lymphocytes, resulting in high infection levels in these populations. After the peak of viremia MV-infected lymphocytes were cleared within days, followed by immune activation and lymph node enlargement. During this period tuberculin-specific T-lymphocyte responses disappeared, whilst strong MV-specific T-lymphocyte responses emerged. Histopathological analysis of lymphoid tissues showed lymphocyte depletion in the B- and T-cell areas in the absence of apoptotic cells, paralleled by infiltration of T-lymphocytes into B-cell follicles and reappearance of proliferating cells. Our findings indicate an immune-mediated clearance of MV-infected CD45RA(- memory T-lymphocytes and follicular B-lymphocytes, which causes temporary immunological amnesia. The rapid oligoclonal expansion of MV-specific lymphocytes and bystander cells masks this depletion, explaining the short duration of measles lymphopenia yet long duration of immune suppression.

  6. Treatment of melanoma with a serotype 5/3 chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for GM-CSF: Results in vitro, in rodents and in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Simona; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Veckman, Ville; Liikanen, Ilkka; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Hemminki, Otto; Vassilev, Lotta; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Oksanen, Minna; Heiskanen, Raita; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Matikainen, Sampsa; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Koski, Anniina; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic melanoma is refractory to irradiation and chemotherapy, but amenable to immunological approaches such as immune-checkpoint-inhibiting antibodies or adoptive cell therapies. Oncolytic virus replication is an immunogenic phenomenon, and viruses can be armed with immunostimulatory molecules. Therefore, oncolytic immuno-virotherapy of malignant melanoma is an appealing approach, which was recently validated by a positive phase 3 trial. We investigated the potency of oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF on a panel of melanoma cell lines and animal models, and summarized the melanoma-specific human data from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP). The virus effectively eradicated human melanoma cells in vitro and subcutaneous SK-MEL-28 melanoma xenografts in nude mice when combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide. Furthermore, virally-expressed granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated the differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages. In contrast to human cells, RPMI 1846 hamster melanoma cells exhibited no response to oncolytic viruses and the chimeric 5/3 fiber failed to increase the efficacy of transduction, suggesting limited utility of the hamster model in the context of viruses with this capsid. In ATAP, treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. Four out of nine melanoma patients treated were evaluable for possible therapy benefit with modified RECIST criteria: one patient had minor response, two had stable disease, and one had progressive disease. Two patients were alive at 559 and 2,149 days after treatment. Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF showed promising efficacy in preclinical studies and possible antitumor activity in melanoma patients refractory to other forms of therapy. This data supports continuing the clinical development of oncolytic adenoviruses for treatment of malignant melanoma.

  7. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  8. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkko Ylösmäki

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5 in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  9. Measles and Rubella Seroprevalence Among HIV-infected and Uninfected Zambian Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, Catherine G; Searle, Kelly; Matakala, Hellen K; Greenman, Michelle P; Rainwater-Lovett, Kaitlin; Thuma, Philip E; Moss, William J

    2017-03-01

    Measles and congenital rubella syndrome remain significant causes of morbidity and mortality despite available vaccines. HIV-infected youth may be at increased risk of measles because of greater waning immunity after vaccination. At a population level, they constitute a potentially large pool of susceptibles to measles and rubella. More data among HIV-infected youth in sub-Saharan Africa are needed to guide vaccination policy and control strategies. This cross-sectional study was nested within 2 ongoing studies of malaria and HIV in Zambia. Dried blood spot cards from youth (5-15 years) in these studies from 2009 to 2013 were tested for IgG antibodies to measles and rubella viruses. HIV-uninfected youth, HIV-infected treatment-naive youth and HIV-infected youth receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) were compared. A total of 617 HIV-uninfected, 144 HIV-infected treatment-naive and 128 HIV-infected youth receiving ART were included in this study. The proportion seropositive for measles virus was significantly higher among HIV-uninfected youth (92.5%) compared with HIV-infected treatment-naive youth (74.1%) and HIV-infected youth receiving ART (71.9%). No differences by age were observed. The proportion seropositive for rubella virus was significantly higher among HIV-uninfected youth (54.7%) compared with HIV-infected treatment-naive youth (41.7%) and HIV-infected youth receiving ART (49.6%), with increases observed by age for all groups.