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Sample records for olm revisited clinical

  1. Clinical ethics revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellegrino Edmund D

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A decade ago, we reviewed the field of clinical ethics; assessed its progress in research, education, and ethics committees and consultation; and made predictions about the future of the field. In this article, we revisit clinical ethics to examine our earlier observations, highlight key developments, and discuss remaining challenges for clinical ethics, including the need to develop a global perspective on clinical ethics problems.

  2. The clinical encounter revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattner, Ami

    2014-04-01

    The patient-physician encounter is the pivotal starting point of any healthcare delivery, but it is subject to multiple process breakdowns and prevalent suboptimal performance. An overview of the techniques and components of a successful encounter valid for every setting and readily applicable is presented, stressing 7 rules: (1) ensuring optimal environment, tools, and teamwork; (2) viewing each encounter not only as a cognitive/biomedical challenge, but also as a personal one, and a learning opportunity; (3) adopting an attitude of curiosity, concentration, compassion, and commitment, and maintaining a systematic, orderly approach; (4) "simple is beautiful"-making the most of the basic clinical data and their many unique advantages; (5) minding "the silent dimension"-being attentive to the patient's identity and emotions; (6) following the "Holy Trinity" of gathering all information, consulting databases/colleagues, and tailoring gained knowledge to the individual patient; and (7) using the encounter as a "window of opportunity" to further the patient's health-not just the major problem, by addressing screening and prevention; promoting health literacy and shared decision-making; and establishing proper follow-up. Barriers to implementation identified can be overcome by continuous educational interventions. A high-quality encounter sets a virtuous cycle of patient-provider interaction and results in increasing satisfaction, adherence, and improved health outcomes.

  3. Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Piyush; Dewan, Pooja; Singh, Tejinder

    2010-11-01

    Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) was introduced in 1975 as a standardized tool for objectively assessing clinical competencies - including history-taking, physical examination, communication skills, data interpretation etc. It consists of a circuit of stations connected in series, with each station devoted to assessment of a particular competency using pre-determined guidelines or checklists. OSCE has been used as a tool for both formative and summative evaluation of medical graduate and postgraduate students across the globe. The use of OSCE for formative assessment has great potential as the learners can gain insights into the elements making up clinical competencies as well as feedback on personal strengths and weaknesses. However, the success of OSCE is dependent on adequacy of resources, including the number of stations, construction of stations, method of scoring (checklists and or global scoring), the number of students assessed, and adequate time and money. Lately, OSCE has drawn some criticism for its lack of validity, feasibility, practicality, and objectivity. There is evidence to show that many OSCEs may be too short to achieve reliable results. There are also currently no clear cut standards set for passing an OSCE. It is perceived that OSCEs test the students knowledge and skills in a compartmentalized fashion, rather than looking at the patient as a whole. This article focuses on the issues of validity, objectivity, reliability, and standard setting of OSCE. Presently, the Indian experiences with OSCE are limited and there is a need to sensitise the Indian faculty and students. A cautious approach is desired before it is considered as a supplementary tool to other methods of assessment for the summative examinations in Indian settings.

  4. OLM interneurons differentially modulate CA3 and entorhinal inputs to hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Richardson N; Mikulovic, Sanja; Leão, Katarina E; Munguba, Hermany; Gezelius, Henrik; Enjin, Anders; Patra, Kalicharan; Eriksson, Anders; Loew, Leslie M; Tort, Adriano B L; Kullander, Klas

    2012-11-01

    The vast diversity of GABAergic interneurons is believed to endow hippocampal microcircuits with the required flexibility for memory encoding and retrieval. However, dissection of the functional roles of defined interneuron types has been hampered by the lack of cell-specific tools. We identified a precise molecular marker for a population of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons known as oriens lacunosum-moleculare (OLM) cells. By combining transgenic mice and optogenetic tools, we found that OLM cells are important for gating the information flow in CA1, facilitating the transmission of intrahippocampal information (from CA3) while reducing the influence of extrahippocampal inputs (from the entorhinal cortex). Furthermore, we found that OLM cells were interconnected by gap junctions, received direct cholinergic inputs from subcortical afferents and accounted for the effect of nicotine on synaptic plasticity of the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results suggest that acetylcholine acting through OLM cells can control the mnemonic processes executed by the hippocampus.

  5. Deletion analysis of oligomycin PKS genes (olmA) in Streptomyces avermitilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaolin; CHEN Zhi; ZHAO Jinlei; SONG Yuan; WEN Ying; LI Jilun

    2004-01-01

    Gene deletion vector pXL05(pKC1139∷△olmA1 +△olmA4) was used to disrupt oligomycin PKS encoding genes (olmA) in Streptomyces avermitilis CZ8-73, the producer of anthelmintic avermectins B and the cell growth inhibitor oligomycin. olmA gene cluster in the chromosome was displaced by deletion allele on the plasmid via double crossover. Four of disruptants were confirmed by Southern blotting. Shaking flask experiments and HPLC analyses showed that the four mutants no longer produced the toxic oligomycin, but only made four components of avermectins B, which were avermectin B1a, B1b, B2a, B2b. The yields of avermectins B in these mutants were separately equal to those in CZ8-73. This revealed that olmA genes deletion did not affect the biosynthesis of avermectins. The deletion mutants were proved to be genetically stable, and thus might be promising strains in industrial production of avermectins B.

  6. Bulk flow and diffusion revisited, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reulen, Hans-J

    2010-01-01

    and diffusion in the development and resolution of brain edema will be revisited, then some recent examples will be shown as to how this knowledge of diffusion and bulk flow can be transferred into clinical applications.A great part of the work on bulk flow and diffusion was done during a stay in I. Klatzo's laboratory in Bethesda in 1973/1974 (Fig. 1). Since then a long collaboration developed with I. Klatzo and M. Spatz. Due to given limits, I will concentrate on the studies of our group. Unfortunately it will not be possible to mention all the important groups who have contributed by essential studies.

  7. From Interactive Open Learner Modelling to Intelligent Mentoring: STyLE-OLM and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Vania; Brna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    STyLE-OLM (Dimitrova 2003 "International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education," 13, 35-78) presented a framework for interactive open learner modelling which entails the development of the means by which learners can "inspect," "discuss" and "alter" the learner model that has been jointly…

  8. 75 FR 27366 - OLMS Listens: Office of Labor-Management Standards Stakeholder Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of Labor-Management Standards OLMS Listens: Office of Labor-Management Standards Stakeholder Meeting...). The meeting will provide an opportunity for stakeholders and other interested parties to...

  9. Clinical refraction in three-dimensional dioptric space revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasch, T

    1997-06-01

    The traditional clinical designation of spherocylindrical power unambiguously specifies the refractive properties of a thin lens or refractive surface. This representation of dioptric power is not, however, optimum in mathematical terms, as is apparent when, for example, two spherocylindrical lens powers are added. Alternative systems have been described which are not subject to this same type of difficulty, and the essential feature of these other systems is that spherocylindrical power is defined in terms of a three-dimensional dioptric space in which the axes are usually orthogonal. The advantages of this orthogonality can be exploited in the practice of clinical refraction, provided lens powers in these three dimensions can be physically implemented. Systems using these characteristics have been introduced in the past, but the clinical community has not adopted them on a widespread basis. However, systems which take advantages of these features do have unique advantages relative to traditional clinical refraction procedures. These characteristics, and refractive procedures which exploit their advantages, are described.

  10. Basic and clinical researches of parasitosis in China revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ci-peng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Two years ago, an editorial regarding basic or clinical studies of several parasitosis in China was published.1 As is known to all, some parasitic diseases, especially schistosomiasis and echino-coccosis, are still prevalent in the south and west of China, respectively. Therefore, it is significant to review a few research papers in the field of medical parasitology and write another editorial.

  11. Imaging of a clinically relevant stroke model: glucose hypermetabolism revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnberg, Fabian; Grafström, Jonas; Lundberg, Johan; Nikkhou-Aski, Sahar; Little, Philip; Damberg, Peter; Mitsios, Nicholas; Mulder, Jan; Lu, Li; Söderman, Michael; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Holmin, Staffan

    2015-03-01

    Ischemic stroke has been shown to cause hypermetabolism of glucose in the ischemic penumbra. Experimental and clinical data indicate that infarct-related systemic hyperglycemia is a potential therapeutic target in acute stroke. However, clinical studies aiming for glucose control in acute stroke have neither improved functional outcome nor reduced mortality. Thus, further studies on glucose metabolism in the ischemic brain are warranted. We used a rat model of stroke that preserves collateral flow. The animals were analyzed by [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging during 90-minute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and during 60 minutes after reperfusion. Results were correlated to magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral blood flow, diffusion of water, lactate formation, and histological data on cell death and blood-brain barrier breakdown. We detected an increased [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake within ischemic regions succumbing to infarction and in the peri-infarct region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed impairment of blood flow to ischemic levels in the infarct and a reduction of cerebral blood flow in the peri-infarct region. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed lactate in the ischemic region and absence of lactate in the peri-infarct region. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed apoptosis and blood-brain barrier breakdown within the infarct. The increased uptake of [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose in cerebral ischemia most likely reflects hypermetabolism of glucose meeting increased energy needs of ischemic and hypoperfused brain tissue, and it occurs under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions measured by local lactate production. Infarct-related systemic hyperglycemia could serve to facilitate glucose supply to the ischemic brain. Glycemic control by insulin treatment could negatively influence this mechanism. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Revisiting ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome: Towards OHSS free clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Banker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid development and application of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs and ovulation-induction drugs may lead to ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS. Young age, low body mass index (BMI, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS, previous OHSS, high follicle count, and elevated serum estradiol (E2 are the certain factors that predispose women to OHSS. Many strategies have been used to reduce or avoid OHSS. Use of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG increases ovarian vascular permeability and is responsible for activating the vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF pathway and thus the entire cascade, leading to symptomatic OHSS. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonists are used as a replacement for hCG for final oocyte maturation in antagonist cycles. Reducing or eliminating the use of hCG and use of GnRH agonist triggered GnRH antagonist cycles and cryopreservation of oocytes or embryos is the most promising approach in making OHSS free clinic a reality.

  13. Revisiting the clinical anatomy of the alar ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmotherly, Peter G; Rivett, Darren A; Mercer, Susan R

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of the alar ligaments has been inconsistently described, particularly with regard to the existence of an atlantal portion. Despite these inconsistencies, these descriptions have been used to develop physical tests for the integrity of these ligaments in patients with cervical spine problems. The purpose of this study was to describe the detailed macrostructure of the alar ligaments. The alar ligaments of 11 cervical spine specimens from embalmed adult cadavers were examined by fine dissection. A detailed description of the macrostructure of these ligaments and their attachment sites was recorded. Measurements were performed with respect to ligament dimensions and relations with selected bony landmarks. No atlantal portion of the alar ligament was viewed in any specimen. The attachment of the ligaments on the odontoid process occurred on its lateral and posterolateral aspects, frequently below the level of the apex. The occipital attachment was on the medial surface of the occipital condyles in close proximity to the atlanto-occipital joints. The orientation of the ligaments was primarily horizontal. The presence of transverse bands extending occiput to occiput with minimal or no attachment to the odontoid process was a common variant. The absence of findings with respect to the atlantal portion of the alar ligament suggests that it may be considered an anatomical variant, not an essential component for stability of the craniocervical complex. These findings may inform the use and interpretation of clinical tests for alar ligament integrity.

  14. Niacin revisited: clinical observations on an important but underutilized drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Y; Oberman, A; Hurst, D C; Segrest, J P

    1991-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and side effects of niacin therapy in dyslipidemic individuals. A retrospective analysis of patients' charts. An outpatient referral-based clinic specializing in the treatment of lipid disorders. All patients with dyslipidemia treated by niacin (n = 82) at the Atherosclerosis Detection and Prevention Clinic during 1987 to 1990, including a subgroup of 17 dyslipidemic heart transplant recipients. Niacin was well tolerated in 83% of the nontransplant group (n = 65) at an average dose of 2.5 +/- 0.9 g/day. Similar beneficial lipoprotein effects were found in the transplant and nontransplant patients. The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) response to niacin therapy was independent of the baseline (HDL-C level. In the transplant group, 11 patients (65%) discontinued treatment, primarily because of hyperglycemia; this was especially prominent in those patients with pretreatment diabetes mellitus. Of the 15 patients using sustained-release niacin, eight cases of hepatitis were recorded, some during therapy with relatively low niacin doses. Several different sustained-release preparations were responsible for this phenomenon, suggesting that the cause was not a contaminant in the preparation. No cases of hepatitis were documented in the 67 patients using regular niacin. One case of hepatitis was recently observed in a patient who switched from one type to regular niacin to another; however, we have data to suggest that the substituted preparation was not an immediate-release niacin. A familial predisposition to hepatitis is suggested by the occurrence of this side effect in identical twin brothers and two sisters. A pharmacy survey disclosed that most pharmacists are unaware of the relationship of sustained-release niacin to hepatitis, have a negative impression of regular niacin, and do not stock this formulation. Finally, we found that in this small sample of patients, niacin used with lovastatin is a particularly effective drug

  15. PNH revisited: Clinical profile, laboratory diagnosis and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is characterized by intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, nocturnal hemoglobinuria and thrombophila. This acquired disease caused by a deficiency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins on the hematopoietic cells is uncommon in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year were collected. Clinical data (age, gender, various presenting symptoms, treatment information and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results of relevant diagnostic tests were documented i.e., urine analysis, Ham′s test, sucrose lysis test and sephacryl gel card test (GCT for CD55 and CD59. Results: A total of 5 patients were diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year. Presenting symptoms were hemolytic anemia (n=4 and bone marrow failure (n=1. A GCT detected CD59 deficiency in all erythrocytes in 4 patients and CD55 deficiency in 2 patients. A weak positive PNH test for CD59 was seen in 1 patient and a weak positive PNH test for CD55 was seen in 3 patients. All patients were negative by sucrose lysis test. Ham′s test was positive in two cases. Patients were treated with prednisolone and/or androgen and 1 patient with aplastic anemia was also given antithymocyte globulin. A total of 4 patients responded with a partial recovery of hematopoiesis and 1 patient showed no recovery. None of the patients received a bone marrow transplant. Conclusion: The study highlights the diagnostic methods and treatment protocols undertaken to evaluate the PNH clone in a developing country where advanced methods like flowcytometry immunophenotyping (FCMI and bone marrow transplants are not routinely available.

  16. OLM interneurons are transiently recruited into field gamma oscillations evoked by brief kainate pressure ejections onto area CA1 in mice hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipiani, E

    2009-02-01

    Oscillations (30-100 Hz) are correlated with the cognitive functions of the brain. In the hippocampus interactions between perisomatic and trilaminar interneurons with pyramidal cells are thought to underlie generation of field gamma oscillations. In area CA3 OLM interneurons receive synaptic input in gamma range but generate action potential (AP) output in theta band and are involved in theta oscillations synchronized along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. In slice preparations of CA3 area the spike timing of OLM cells could be modulated by carbachole induced gamma oscillations, although their firing rates are limited to theta frequency. Normally, OLM interneurons are somatostatin positive cells. In this study we tested whether parvalbumin (PV) containing OLM interneurons in area CA1 limit AP output during kainate pressure ejection also to theta frequency. We used focal short applications of kainate in area CA1 to induce filed gamma oscillations with an average frequency of about 44.7+/-4.4 Hz. The duration of field gamma was on average 8.9+/-3.5 s. During such oscillations CA1 PV positive OLM interneurons of mice hippocampus received excitatory synaptic input at gamma frequency. Moreover, their AP output was in gamma range as well. Thus, we show that beside the somatostatin containing OLM interneurons, which generate theta rhythm there are PV containing OLM cells, which could synchronize the distal dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells to the field gamma oscillations.

  17. Revisiting the continuum model of tendon pathology: what is its merit in clinical practice and research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Rio, E; Purdam, C R; Docking, S I

    2016-10-01

    The pathogenesis of tendinopathy and the primary biological change in the tendon that precipitates pathology have generated several pathoaetiological models in the literature. The continuum model of tendon pathology, proposed in 2009, synthesised clinical and laboratory-based research to guide treatment choices for the clinical presentations of tendinopathy. While the continuum has been cited extensively in the literature, its clinical utility has yet to be fully elucidated. The continuum model proposed a model for staging tendinopathy based on the changes and distribution of disorganisation within the tendon. However, classifying tendinopathy based on structure in what is primarily a pain condition has been challenged. The interplay between structure, pain and function is not yet fully understood, which has partly contributed to the complex clinical picture of tendinopathy. Here we revisit and assess the merit of the continuum model in the context of new evidence. We (1) summarise new evidence in tendinopathy research in the context of the continuum, (2) discuss tendon pain and the relevance of a model based on structure and (3) describe relevant clinical elements (pain, function and structure) to begin to build a better understanding of the condition. Our goal is that the continuum model may help guide targeted treatments and improved patient outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Action potential modulation in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons facilitates OLM interneuron activation in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits of rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooyun Kim

    Full Text Available Oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM interneurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus play a key role in feedback inhibition and in the control of network activity. However, how these cells are efficiently activated in the network remains unclear. To address this question, I performed recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons, the presynaptic fibers that provide feedback innervation of these interneurons. Two forms of axonal action potential (AP modulation were identified. First, repetitive stimulation resulted in activity-dependent AP broadening. Broadening showed fast onset, with marked changes in AP shape following a single AP. Second, tonic depolarization in CA1 pyramidal neuron somata induced AP broadening in the axon, and depolarization-induced broadening summated with activity-dependent broadening. Outside-out patch recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons revealed a high density of α-dendrotoxin (α-DTX-sensitive, inactivating K+ channels, suggesting that K+ channel inactivation mechanistically contributes to AP broadening. To examine the functional consequences of axonal AP modulation for synaptic transmission, I performed paired recordings between synaptically connected CA1 pyramidal neurons and O-LM interneurons. CA1 pyramidal neuron-O-LM interneuron excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs showed facilitation during both repetitive stimulation and tonic depolarization of the presynaptic neuron. Both effects were mimicked and occluded by α-DTX, suggesting that they were mediated by K+ channel inactivation. Therefore, axonal AP modulation can greatly facilitate the activation of O-LM interneurons. In conclusion, modulation of AP shape in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons substantially enhances the efficacy of principal neuron-interneuron synapses, promoting the activation of O-LM interneurons in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits.

  19. Action potential modulation in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons facilitates OLM interneuron activation in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits of rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooyun

    2014-01-01

    Oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus play a key role in feedback inhibition and in the control of network activity. However, how these cells are efficiently activated in the network remains unclear. To address this question, I performed recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons, the presynaptic fibers that provide feedback innervation of these interneurons. Two forms of axonal action potential (AP) modulation were identified. First, repetitive stimulation resulted in activity-dependent AP broadening. Broadening showed fast onset, with marked changes in AP shape following a single AP. Second, tonic depolarization in CA1 pyramidal neuron somata induced AP broadening in the axon, and depolarization-induced broadening summated with activity-dependent broadening. Outside-out patch recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons revealed a high density of α-dendrotoxin (α-DTX)-sensitive, inactivating K+ channels, suggesting that K+ channel inactivation mechanistically contributes to AP broadening. To examine the functional consequences of axonal AP modulation for synaptic transmission, I performed paired recordings between synaptically connected CA1 pyramidal neurons and O-LM interneurons. CA1 pyramidal neuron-O-LM interneuron excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) showed facilitation during both repetitive stimulation and tonic depolarization of the presynaptic neuron. Both effects were mimicked and occluded by α-DTX, suggesting that they were mediated by K+ channel inactivation. Therefore, axonal AP modulation can greatly facilitate the activation of O-LM interneurons. In conclusion, modulation of AP shape in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons substantially enhances the efficacy of principal neuron-interneuron synapses, promoting the activation of O-LM interneurons in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits.

  20. Action Potential Modulation in CA1 Pyramidal Neuron Axons Facilitates OLM Interneuron Activation in Recurrent Inhibitory Microcircuits of Rat Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Sooyun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus play a key role in feedback inhibition and in the control of network activity. However, how these cells are efficiently activated in the network remains unclear. To address this question, I performed recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons, the presynaptic fibers that provide feedback innervation of these interneurons. Two forms of axonal action potential (AP) modulation were identified. First, repetitive ...

  1. Using multi-compartment ensemble modeling as an investigative tool of spatially distributed biophysical balances: application to hippocampal oriens-lacunosum/moleculare (O-LM) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulić, Vladislav; Lawrence, J Josh; Skinner, Frances K

    2014-01-01

    Multi-compartmental models of neurons provide insight into the complex, integrative properties of dendrites. Because it is not feasible to experimentally determine the exact density and kinetics of each channel type in every neuronal compartment, an essential goal in developing models is to help characterize these properties. To address biological variability inherent in a given neuronal type, there has been a shift away from using hand-tuned models towards using ensembles or populations of models. In collectively capturing a neuron's output, ensemble modeling approaches uncover important conductance balances that control neuronal dynamics. However, conductances are never entirely known for a given neuron class in terms of its types, densities, kinetics and distributions. Thus, any multi-compartment model will always be incomplete. In this work, our main goal is to use ensemble modeling as an investigative tool of a neuron's biophysical balances, where the cycling between experiment and model is a design criterion from the start. We consider oriens-lacunosum/moleculare (O-LM) interneurons, a prominent interneuron subtype that plays an essential gating role of information flow in hippocampus. O-LM cells express the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih). Although dendritic Ih could have a major influence on the integrative properties of O-LM cells, the compartmental distribution of Ih on O-LM dendrites is not known. Using a high-performance computing cluster, we generated a database of models that included those with or without dendritic Ih. A range of conductance values for nine different conductance types were used, and different morphologies explored. Models were quantified and ranked based on minimal error compared to a dataset of O-LM cell electrophysiological properties. Co-regulatory balances between conductances were revealed, two of which were dependent on the presence of dendritic Ih. These findings inform future experiments that differentiate between

  2. Using multi-compartment ensemble modeling as an investigative tool of spatially distributed biophysical balances: application to hippocampal oriens-lacunosum/moleculare (O-LM cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Sekulić

    Full Text Available Multi-compartmental models of neurons provide insight into the complex, integrative properties of dendrites. Because it is not feasible to experimentally determine the exact density and kinetics of each channel type in every neuronal compartment, an essential goal in developing models is to help characterize these properties. To address biological variability inherent in a given neuronal type, there has been a shift away from using hand-tuned models towards using ensembles or populations of models. In collectively capturing a neuron's output, ensemble modeling approaches uncover important conductance balances that control neuronal dynamics. However, conductances are never entirely known for a given neuron class in terms of its types, densities, kinetics and distributions. Thus, any multi-compartment model will always be incomplete. In this work, our main goal is to use ensemble modeling as an investigative tool of a neuron's biophysical balances, where the cycling between experiment and model is a design criterion from the start. We consider oriens-lacunosum/moleculare (O-LM interneurons, a prominent interneuron subtype that plays an essential gating role of information flow in hippocampus. O-LM cells express the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih. Although dendritic Ih could have a major influence on the integrative properties of O-LM cells, the compartmental distribution of Ih on O-LM dendrites is not known. Using a high-performance computing cluster, we generated a database of models that included those with or without dendritic Ih. A range of conductance values for nine different conductance types were used, and different morphologies explored. Models were quantified and ranked based on minimal error compared to a dataset of O-LM cell electrophysiological properties. Co-regulatory balances between conductances were revealed, two of which were dependent on the presence of dendritic Ih. These findings inform future experiments that

  3. Clinical Drug Development in Epilepsy Revisited: A Proposal for a New Paradigm Streamlined Using Extrapolation

    OpenAIRE

    Wadsworth, Ian; Jaki, Thomas; Sills, Graeme J; Appleton, Richard; Cross, J Helen; Marson, Anthony G; Martland, Tim; McLellan, Ailsa; Smith, Philip E. M.; Pellock, John M; Hampson, Lisa V.

    2016-01-01

    Data from clinical trials in adults, extrapolated to predict benefits in paediatric patients, could result in fewer or smaller trials being required to obtain a new drug licence for paediatrics. This article outlines the place of such extrapolation in the development of drugs for use in paediatric epilepsies. Based on consensus expert opinion, a proposal is presented for a new paradigm for the clinical development of drugs for focal epilepsies. Phase I data should continue to be collected in ...

  4. Revisiting photodynamic therapy dosimetry: reductionist & surrogate approaches to facilitate clinical success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Maytin, Edward V.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be a highly complex treatment, with many parameters influencing treatment efficacy. The extent to which dosimetry is used to monitor and standardize treatment delivery varies widely, ranging from measurement of a single surrogate marker to comprehensive approaches that aim to measure or estimate as many relevant parameters as possible. Today, most clinical PDT treatments are still administered with little more than application of a prescribed drug dose and timed light delivery, and thus the role of patient-specific dosimetry has not reached widespread clinical adoption. This disconnect is at least partly due to the inherent conflict between the need to measure and understand multiple parameters in vivo in order to optimize treatment, and the need for expedience in the clinic and in the regulatory and commercialization process. Thus, a methodical approach to selecting primary dosimetry metrics is required at each stage of translation of a treatment procedure, moving from complex measurements to understand PDT mechanisms in pre-clinical and early phase I trials, towards the identification and application of essential dose-limiting and/or surrogate measurements in phase II/III trials. If successful, identifying the essential and/or reliable surrogate dosimetry measurements should help facilitate increased adoption of clinical PDT. In this paper, examples of essential dosimetry points and surrogate dosimetry tools that may be implemented in phase II/III trials are discussed. For example, the treatment efficacy as limited by light penetration in interstitial PDT may be predicted by the amount of contrast uptake in CT, and so this could be utilized as a surrogate dosimetry measurement to prescribe light doses based upon pre-treatment contrast. Success of clinical ALA-based skin lesion treatment is predicted almost uniquely by the explicit or implicit measurements of photosensitizer and photobleaching, yet the individualization of treatment

  5. Revisiting photodynamic therapy dosimetry: reductionist & surrogate approaches to facilitate clinical success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W; Elliott, Jonathan T; Kanick, Stephen C; Davis, Scott C; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Maytin, Edward V; Pereira, Stephen P; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be a highly complex treatment, with many parameters influencing treatment efficacy. The extent to which dosimetry is used to monitor and standardize treatment delivery varies widely, ranging from measurement of a single surrogate marker to comprehensive approaches that aim to measure or estimate as many relevant parameters as possible. Today, most clinical PDT treatments are still administered with little more than application of a prescribed drug dose and timed light delivery, and thus the role of patient-specific dosimetry has not reached widespread clinical adoption. This disconnect is at least partly due to the inherent conflict between the need to measure and understand multiple parameters in vivo in order to optimize treatment, and the need for expedience in the clinic and in the regulatory and commercialization process. Thus, a methodical approach to selecting primary dosimetry metrics is required at each stage of translation of a treatment procedure, moving from complex measurements to understand PDT mechanisms in pre-clinical and early phase I trials, towards the identification and application of essential dose-limiting and/or surrogate measurements in phase II/III trials. If successful, identifying the essential and/or reliable surrogate dosimetry measurements should help facilitate increased adoption of clinical PDT. In this paper, examples of essential dosimetry points and surrogate dosimetry tools that may be implemented in phase II/III trials are discussed. For example, the treatment efficacy as limited by light penetration in interstitial PDT may be predicted by the amount of contrast uptake in CT, and so this could be utilized as a surrogate dosimetry measurement to prescribe light doses based upon pre-treatment contrast. Success of clinical ALA-based skin lesion treatment is predicted almost uniquely by the explicit or implicit measurements of photosensitizer and photobleaching, yet the individualization of treatment

  6. Reduction of Clinical Culture Contamination in an Inpatient Medical Unit by Revisiting Microbiology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Bona; Irmler, Monica; Faselis, Charles; Liappis, Angelike P

    2016-10-01

    Clinical culture contaminations delay the correct diagnosis, result in repeat testing, and may extend the length of a hospital stay. A simple educational session reminding providers of the ubiquitous presence of bacteria on the skin and in our environment, led to a significant decrease in contaminated cultures (16.9% versus 10.9%, p = 0.03). J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(10):446-448. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Revisiting Cotard’s Syndrome: Illustration of Two Psychiatric Clinical Cases

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    Lídia Sousa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cotard’s Syndrome (CS is a rare and severe neuropsychiatric condition in which the central feature is the existence of nihilistic delusions. Controversy has ensued about the precise clinical picture Jules Cotard meant to describe and attempts have been made, more recently, not only to clarify the terminology, but also to define different types of this syndrome and explore its biological basis. Aims: We intend to briefly review the terminology, etiology, epidemiology and differential diagnosis of this syndrome, based on two clinical cases. Methods: Bibliographic search conducted through the electronic databases Medline and Gallica (French National Library, consultation of clinical records and direct interviews with the patients. Results and Conclusions: Typically the patients diagnosed with CS manifest the delusional idea that they are dying or already dead. However, it is also possible that they deny the existence of only some parts of their own body, or the functioning of some organs, and they may even sometimes deny the existence of the external world. We illustrate the case of a 66-year-old woman, diagnosed with bipolar affective disorder, admitted in the context of a severe depressive episode with psychotic symptoms, compatible with CS type II and the case of a young male aged 22, admitted due to a first  psychotic episode with schizophrenia like characteristics, presenting with nihilistic delusions compatible with CS type I.

  8. An old problem in a new age: Revisiting the clinical dilemma of misattributed paternity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Hercher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical genetics has wrestled with the problem of misattributed paternity for decades. While there are no clear directives on policy, surveys suggest that genetics professionals are inclined to avoid disclosure when possible. Changes associated with the increased use of genomic testing will alter the context and may limit the benefits of non-disclosure. Multi-site testing will preclude the uncertainty often associated with single-gene testing. Increased use of genetic testing in clinical and non-clinical settings will create new opportunities for the subsequent unmasking of misattributed relationships, as will the presence of test results in the electronic medical record. Family health history information will become more valuable as it is used more often and to better effect in risk assessment, diagnosis, treatment and reproductive decision-making. These changes associated with genomic testing increase the risks and decrease the benefits associated with the nondisclosure of misattributed paternity. For ethical and practical reasons, genetics professionals, and those who advise them, should consider a greater emphasis on the value of carefully planned disclosure.

  9. Conventional rapid latex agglutination in estimation of von Willebrand factor: method revisited and potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Marianor; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Hussin, Che Maraina Che

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF : Ag) levels is usually performed in a specialised laboratory which limits its application in routine clinical practice. So far, no commercial rapid test kit is available for VWF : Ag estimation. This paper discusses the technical aspect of latex agglutination method which was established to suit the purpose of estimating von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels in the plasma sample. The latex agglutination test can be performed qualitatively and semiquantitatively. Reproducibility, stability, linearity, limit of detection, interference, and method comparison studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of this test. Semiquantitative latex agglutination test was strongly correlated with the reference immunoturbidimetric assay (Spearman's rho = 0.946, P agglutination test and the reference assay. Using the scoring system for the rapid latex test, no agglutination is with 0% VWF : Ag (control negative), 1+ reaction is equivalent to 150% VWF : Ag (when comparing with immunoturbidimetric assay). The findings from evaluation studies suggest that latex agglutination method is suitable to be used as a rapid test kit for the estimation of VWF : Ag levels in various clinical conditions associated with high levels and low levels of VWF : Ag.

  10. Physician recruitment of patients to non-therapeutic oncology clinical trials: ethics revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee eBlack

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tailoring medical treatment to individual patients requires a strong foundation in research to provide the data necessary to understand the relationship between the disease, the patient, and the type of treatment advocated for. Non-therapeutic oncology clinical trials studying therapeutic resistance require the participation of patients, yet only a small percentage enroll. Treating physicians are often relied on to recruit patients, but they have a number of ethical obligations that might be perceived as barriers to recruiting. Concepts such as voluntariness of consent and conflicts of interest can have an impact on whether physicians will discuss clinical trials with their patients and how patients perceive the information. However, these ethical obligations should not be prohibitive to physician recruitment of patients—precautions can be taken to ensure that patients’ consent to research participation is fully voluntary and devoid of conflict, such as the use of other members of the research team than the treating physician to discuss the trial and obtain consent, and better communication between researchers, clinicians and patients. These can ensure that research benefits are maximized for the good of patients and society.

  11. Conventional Rapid Latex Agglutination in Estimation of von Willebrand Factor: Method Revisited and Potential Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianor Mahat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF : Ag levels is usually performed in a specialised laboratory which limits its application in routine clinical practice. So far, no commercial rapid test kit is available for VWF : Ag estimation. This paper discusses the technical aspect of latex agglutination method which was established to suit the purpose of estimating von Willebrand factor (VWF levels in the plasma sample. The latex agglutination test can be performed qualitatively and semiquantitatively. Reproducibility, stability, linearity, limit of detection, interference, and method comparison studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of this test. Semiquantitative latex agglutination test was strongly correlated with the reference immunoturbidimetric assay (Spearman’s rho = 0.946, P150% VWF : Ag (when comparing with immunoturbidimetric assay. The findings from evaluation studies suggest that latex agglutination method is suitable to be used as a rapid test kit for the estimation of VWF : Ag levels in various clinical conditions associated with high levels and low levels of VWF : Ag.

  12. Translating dosages from animal models to human clinical trials--revisiting body surface area scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Otis L; Smoliga, James M

    2015-05-01

    Body surface area (BSA) scaling has been used for prescribing individualized dosages of various drugs and has also been recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as one method for using data from animal model species to establish safe starting dosages for first-in-human clinical trials. Although BSA conversion equations have been used in certain clinical applications for decades, recent recommendations to use BSA to derive interspecies equivalents for therapeutic dosages of drug and natural products are inappropriate. A thorough review of the literature reveals that BSA conversions are based on antiquated science and have little justification in current translational medicine compared to more advanced allometric and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. Misunderstood and misinterpreted use of BSA conversions may have disastrous consequences, including underdosing leading to abandonment of potentially efficacious investigational drugs, and unexpected deadly adverse events. We aim to demonstrate that recent recommendations for BSA are not appropriate for animal-to-human dosage conversions and use pharmacokinetic data from resveratrol studies to demonstrate how confusion between the "human equivalent dose" and "pharmacologically active dose" can lead to inappropriate dose recommendations. To optimize drug development, future recommendations for interspecies scaling must be scientifically justified using physiologic, pharmacokinetic, and toxicology data rather than simple BSA conversion.

  13. The determinants of the growth expectations of the early-stage entrepreneurs (TEA using the ordinal logistic model (OLM: the case of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Özçam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses the Ordinal Logistic Model (OLM to analyze the determinants of the growth expectations of total early-stage entrepreneurship activity (TEA expressed in terms of new jobs to be created within their firms in four categories. Specifically, given the increasing importance of entrepreneurship in job creation, innovation and economic growth, we try to inquire into the question of why some of the new entrepreneurs and not the others expect a rapid development of their ventures. The data from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM for the years 2006-2008 for Turkey were employed. Our findings indicate that the personal characteristics of the early-stage Turkish entrepreneurs such as gender, education and household income, in addition to their motivation and current size of their businesses are important factors in resolving the prevalence of high-expectation new firms. Moreover, some scenarios particular to some sub-groups or population cells of Turkish developing entrepreneurs which may create the bulk of high-expectation entrepreneurial pursuit were conducted using OLM. As far as the policy implications are concerned, the availability and access of capital funding to early-stage entrepreneurs and an education system more relevant to today’s competitive world might both contribute better to Turkish economy’s prosperity, and seems to be very important for policy considerations.

  14. Lakatos Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Revisits and reviews Imre Lakatos' ideas on "Falsification and the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes." Suggests that Lakatos' framework offers an insightful way of looking at the relationship between theory and research that is relevant not only for evaluating research programs in theoretical physics, but in the social…

  15. Prostate alpha/beta revisited - an analysis of clinical results from 14 168 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasu, Alexandru [Dept. of Radiation Physics UHL, County Council of Oestergoetland, Linkoeping (Sweden); Radiation Physics, Dept. of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping Univ., Linkoeping (Sweden); Toma-Dasu, Iuliana [Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm Univ. and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose. To determine the dose response parameters and the fractionation sensitivity of prostate tumours from clinical results of patients treated with external beam radiotherapy. Material and methods. The study was based on five-year biochemical results from 14 168 patients treated with external beam radiotherapy. Treatment data from 11 330 patients treated with conventional fractionation have been corrected for overall treatment time and fitted with a logit equation. The results have been used to determine the optimum {alpha}/{beta} values that minimise differences in predictions from 2838 patients treated with hypofractionated schedules. Results. Conventional fractionation data yielded logit dose response parameters for all risk groups and for all definitions of biochemical failures. The analysis of hypofractionation data led to very low {alpha}/{beta} values (1-1.7 Gy) in all mentioned cases. Neglecting the correction for overall treatment time has little impact on the derivation of {alpha}/{beta} values for prostate cancers. Conclusions. These results indicate that the high fractionation sensitivity is an intrinsic property of prostate carcinomas and they support the use of hypofractionation to increase the therapeutic gain for these tumours.

  16. Revisiting of etiology, clinical picture and diagnosis of the Kleine-Levin syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyanova О.V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to draw the attention to the Kleine - Levin syndrome (SKL, a rare, poorly understood disease, not only in Russia but throughout the world. We analyzed the case of the 23-year old patient M, with the Kleine — Levin syndrome. SKL belongs to the group of recurrent hypersomnia and is characterized by long bouts of sleep lasting an average of 10-14 days, beginning with the imperative and difficulty awakening. During bouts of sleep observed unusual behavior of patients: hyperphagia; hypersexuality in males; irritability, restlessness, impaired mental activity; aggression; feeling of unreality of it all; confusion, hallucinatory episodes and depression in females. During wakefulness, marked dyspho-ria, emotional stupefaction, loss of memory. The syndrome develops in 4 times more often in men than in women, aged 12-25 years. Etiological factors: brain tumor, head trauma, metabolic disorders, acute infectious diseases with fever. Often the development of the syndrome is preceded by hyperemia and hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction. The article discussed the etiology, diagnosis, and possible combinations of clinical manifestations in SKL.

  17. Van Wyk and Grumbach syndrome revisited: imaging and clinical findings in pre- and postpubertal girls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, Lorna P.; Guillerman, R.P. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Boswell, Hillary B. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Gynecology, Houston, TX (United States); Crotty, Eric J.; O' Hara, Sara M.; Birkemeier, Krista L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2008-05-15

    In 1960 Van Wyk and Grumbach described a syndrome of juvenile hypothyroidism, precocious puberty and ovarian enlargement. These findings undergo complete regression with thyroid hormone replacement therapy. This diagnosis can be made on the basis of imaging findings and thyroid function analysis, avoiding surgery. To relate the distinctive clinical and imaging features and putative pathophysiological mechanism of a series of patients with Van Wyk and Grumbach syndrome (VWGS). Patients with VWGS diagnosed at two large children's hospitals over a 6-year period beginning in 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. A literature review was also conducted. Five female patients were diagnosed with cystic ovarian enlargement and hypothyroidism at ages ranging from 9 to 17 years. Isosexual precocious puberty was found in prepubescent patients. Associated findings included delayed bone age, ascites, and pleural and pericardial effusions. Ovarian cyst involution occurred following treatment of the hypothyroidism. The association of primary hypothyroidism with cystic ovarian enlargement and precocious puberty is important to recognize. In the absence of suspected ovarian torsion, surgery is unnecessary, as cyst regression occurs after appropriate thyroid hormone replacement. Noncompliance with hormone replacement therapy should be considered when cystic ovarian enlargement is noted in patients with a history of hypothyroidism. (orig.)

  18. Association of Betel Nut with Carcinogenesis: Revisit with a Clinical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Rajeshwar N.; Mehrotra, Ravi; Choudhury, Yashmin; Asotra, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Betel nut (BN), betel quid (BQ) and products derived from them are widely used as a socially endorsed masticatory product. The addictive nature of BN/BQ has resulted in its widespread usage making it the fourth most abused substance by humans. Progressively, several additives, including chewing tobacco, got added to simple BN preparations. This addictive practice has been shown to have strong etiological correlation with human susceptibility to cancer, particularly oral and oropharyngeal cancers. The PUBMED database was searched to retrieve all relevant published studies in English on BN and BQ, and its association with oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Only complete studies directly dealing with BN/BQ induced carcinogenesis using statistically valid and acceptable sample size were analyzed. Additional relevant information available from other sources was also considered. This systematic review attempts to put in perspective the consequences of this widespread habit of BN/BQ mastication, practiced by approximately 10% of the world population, on oral cancer with a clinical perspective. BN/BQ mastication seems to be significantly associated with susceptibility to oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Addition of tobacco to BN has been found to only marginally increase the cancer risk. Despite the widespread usage of BN/BQ and its strong association with human susceptibility to cancer, no serious strategy seems to exist to control this habit. The review, therefore, also looks at various preventive efforts being made by governments and highlights the multifaceted intervention strategies required to mitigate and/or control the habit of BN/BQ mastication. PMID:22912735

  19. Association of betel nut with carcinogenesis: revisit with a clinical perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwar N Sharan

    Full Text Available Betel nut (BN, betel quid (BQ and products derived from them are widely used as a socially endorsed masticatory product. The addictive nature of BN/BQ has resulted in its widespread usage making it the fourth most abused substance by humans. Progressively, several additives, including chewing tobacco, got added to simple BN preparations. This addictive practice has been shown to have strong etiological correlation with human susceptibility to cancer, particularly oral and oropharyngeal cancers.The PUBMED database was searched to retrieve all relevant published studies in English on BN and BQ, and its association with oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Only complete studies directly dealing with BN/BQ induced carcinogenesis using statistically valid and acceptable sample size were analyzed. Additional relevant information available from other sources was also considered.This systematic review attempts to put in perspective the consequences of this widespread habit of BN/BQ mastication, practiced by approximately 10% of the world population, on oral cancer with a clinical perspective. BN/BQ mastication seems to be significantly associated with susceptibility to oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Addition of tobacco to BN has been found to only marginally increase the cancer risk. Despite the widespread usage of BN/BQ and its strong association with human susceptibility to cancer, no serious strategy seems to exist to control this habit. The review, therefore, also looks at various preventive efforts being made by governments and highlights the multifaceted intervention strategies required to mitigate and/or control the habit of BN/BQ mastication.

  20. Tardive Dyskinesia Revisited: A Clinical Priority Perspective-Diagnosis and Assessment (Part A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon M Neppe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this series of papers under the umbrella of tardive dyskinesia (TD, five major related issues are discussed pertaining to TD. These are integrated together. In Part A we evaluate how to diagnose, screen for physical signs and scales for tardive dyskinesia, and in Part B, we focus on the management. Tardive dyskinesia (TD is a relatively new condition associated with abnormal involuntary movements caused by or aggravated by so-called “neuroleptic” drugs. Neuroleptics are used to manage psychotic conditions, as well as nausea and acid reflux, and latterly are prescribed as adjunct medications to depression and anxiety. Tardive dyskinesia (TD has also become a major problem forensically, because of the challenge of management, the lack of patient’s being appropriately warned, and insufficient monitoring of patients at risk. In this Part A series of articles we examine several special important priorities in TD. a. First, what is tardive dyskinesia and how does one make the diagnosis? b. The second issue is the need to regularly evaluate patients on neuroleptics because they are at risk for tardive dyskinesia. Measuring and monitoring for symptoms of tardive dyskinesia allows ensuring early detection. The author’s clinical STRAW test has thus far been seldom used, but it may be the best way to monitor TD over time. It appears an improvement over the standard test, the AIMS, as it is broader in ranking (0-10 and is the only scale that measures both frequency and severity, so that monitoring of change is more sensitive. In the series that follows, Part B, we emphasize management and theory, particularly high dose buspirone management, justify the dopamine super sensitivity hypothesis, and re-evaluate the neuroleptics in that context. e1

  1. Intelligence Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    environment (i.e., culture , class, family, educational 2 Chapter 23 Intelligence Revisited opportunities, gender) shapes our intellect, and there are no...connectivity is going to be rather problematic, to say the least. A single nano-bot cruising this Disneyland of synaptic wonderment is certainly... cultures ). Embodiment – A sense of being anchored to our physical bodies. Agency – A sense of free will, wherein we are in charge of our own

  2. Rec.: "Sprachliche Säkularisierung. Semantik und Pragmatik", Hrsg. von Alicja Nagórko, Georg Olms Verlag, Hildesheim–Zürich–New York 2014, 466 S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zielińska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Review: Sprachliche Säkularisierung. Semantik und Pragmatik, ed. Alicja Nagórko, Georg Olms Verlag, Hildesheim–Zürich–New York 2014, 466 pp. The reviewed collective volume falls within the stream of research on the language of religion, yet – unlike theolinguistics, which deals with different varieties of religious texts – the presented studies focus on the use of religious vocabulary in secular contexts. The studies deal with the processes of linguistic secularisation, sociology of religion, and above all – linguistics. The volume consists of twenty-six studies by scholars for Germany, Poland and Slovakia.   Rec.: Sprachliche Säkularisierung. Semantik und Pragmatik, Hrsg. von Alicja Nagórko, Georg Olms Verlag, Hildesheim–Zürich–New York 2014, 466 S. Recenzowana monografia zbiorowa włącza się w nurt badań nad językiem religii, jednak w odróżnieniu od teolingwistyki, która zajmuje się różnymi wariantami tekstów religijnych, prezentowane badania koncentrują się na funkcjonowaniu religijnej leksyki w świeckich dyskursach. Tematyka tomu dotyczy procesów językowej sekularyzacji, badanych z perspektywy różnych dyscyplin humanistycznych: kulturoznawstwa, socjologii religii i przede wszystkim językoznawstwa. Tom składa się z 26 opracowań naukowych uczonych z Niemiec, Polski i Słowacji.

  3. 65 Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Pennebaker hat doch zurückgeblickt. In weiteren fünfundsechzig Minuten zeigt er mit 65 REVISITED neue und ergänzende Facetten von Bob Dylan auf seiner 1965er Tournee durch England aus bisher unveröffentlichtem und digital aufgearbeitetem Material. Couchman (2002, 94) betont, dass Dylan über vierzig Jahre nach DON‘T LOOK BACK (1965) noch immer nichts von seiner enigmatischen Ausstrahlung verloren habe. Das gleiche gilt auch für den Film und für seine Ergänzung.

  4. Reframing in dentistry: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child′s behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice.

  5. Revisiting QTL Affecting Clinical Mastitis by High-Density GWAS and Resequencing in the Finnish Ayrshire Dairy Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilkki, Johanna; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Schulman, Nina F;

    Mastitis is the most common disease of dairy cattle, causing high economic losses each year. Studies to locate QTL affecting clinical mastitis and milk somatic cell counts have been carried out to increase our understanding of the disease. As part of the EU FP7 Quantomics project, we have used most...... recent genomic tools to characterize QTL affecting mastitis incidence in the Finnish Ayrshire cattle. Clinical mastitis diagnoses from -15 to 50 days and 51 to 300 days of first lactation and SCC (geometric mean of SCS observations between 5 to 170 days of first lactation) were included. In total, 1920...

  6. Revisiting QTL Affecting Clinical Mastitis by High-Density GWAS and Resequencing in the Finnish Ayrshire Dairy Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilkki, Johanna; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Schulman, Nina F

    Mastitis is the most common disease of dairy cattle, causing high economic losses each year. Studies to locate QTL affecting clinical mastitis and milk somatic cell counts have been carried out to increase our understanding of the disease. As part of the EU FP7 Quantomics project, we have used most...... recent genomic tools to characterize QTL affecting mastitis incidence in the Finnish Ayrshire cattle. Clinical mastitis diagnoses from -15 to 50 days and 51 to 300 days of first lactation and SCC (geometric mean of SCS observations between 5 to 170 days of first lactation) were included. In total, 1920...... progeny tested bulls were genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 chip. After quality control, 38473 SNPs were analyzed using a mixed linear model (software package DMU). Associations (5% Bonferroni threshold) were detected in 9 peaks on 5 chromosomes. A set of 238 of the bulls were re...

  7. Traumatic hypovolemic shock revisited: the spectrum of contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography findings and clinical implications for its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hiroki; Kanki, Akihiko; Watanabe, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Akira; Noda, Yasufumi; Yasokawa, Kazuya; Higaki, Atsushi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Hypovolemic shock is often seen in patients with severe blunt trauma who have suffered from blood circulation inadequate to maintain oxygen delivery to multiple organs. The early recognition and prompt management of hypovolemic shock in patients with multiple injuries are mandatory to improving prognosis and patient conditions. The diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) as a primary diagnostic tool is well established. The abdominal organs show several common and classic appearances on contrast-enhanced CT in patients with trauma. The hypovolemic shock complex is reported in the previous literature as decreased enhancement of the viscera, increased mucosal enhancement and luminal dilation of the small bowel, mural thickening and fluid-filled loops of the small bowel, the halo sign and flattening of the inferior vena cava, reduced aortic diameter, and peripancreatic edema. However, there have been controversial CT reports with contradictory appearances. Physicians understanding these findings could prompt alternative approaches to the early assessment and management of hypovolemic shock. The aim of this article is to illustrate common and well-known abdominal CT features in patients with traumatic hypovolemic shock, to discuss controversial CT signs in the pancreas and adrenal gland, and to describe CT findings' clinical implications when managing hypovolemic shock.

  8. Hyperkalemia Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Parham, Walter A.; Mehdirad, Ali A.; Biermann, Kurt M.; Fredman, Carey S.

    2006-01-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can induce deadly cardiac arrhythmias. Electrocardiographic manifestations of hyperkalemia vary from the classic sine-wave rhythm, which occurs in severe hyperkalemia, to nonspecific repolarization abnormalities seen with mild elevations of serum potassium. We present a case of hyperkalemia, initially diagnosed as ventricular tachycardia, to demonstrate how difficult hyperkalemia can be to diagnose. An in-depth review of hyperkalemia is present...

  9. Tardive Dyskinesia Revisited-A Clinical Management Priority Perspective: A Voyage into High Dose Buspirone Part B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon M Neppe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss several major related and integrated issues in this two-part series of papers on tardive dyskinesia (TD. In this, the second paper, Part B, the management and mechanisms are emphasized; in Part A the diagnosis and assessment of tardive dyskinesia was discussed. In this Part B series of articles we examine several special important priorities in this condition associated with sometimes permanent involuntary abnormal movements associated with the neuroleptic drugs. We particularly examine the management of this enormously important condition. After the diagnosis and assessment of TD, comes the clinical approach to management and the options and theories behind that approach. There remain no approved medications for the management of tardive dyskinesia. Therefore, all treatments are “out of labeling”. The purpose of this paper is to shed light on high dose buspirone treatment, originally described by the author in 1989 [1], and which after more than a quarter century requires re-evaluation as it still appears, in the author’s opinion, to be the logical and most appropriate management for TD. A major issue focuses, on the updated experience of more than a quarter century with generally almost completely positive effects of high-dose buspirone (HDB treatment of tardive dyskinesia (TD and the next issue provides an important, major theoretical demonstration of the mechanism of tardive dyskinesia. The dopamine 2 or 2-3 supersensitivity hypothesis as a cause of TD is strongly supported by HDB. In Part B, the issue of choice of medication for psychosis and related medical conditions becomes pertinent. The choices relate to the newer second generation atypical neuroleptics (SGAs compared with the older typical, first generation neuroleptics (FGAs. The generally more expensive SGA drugs have become far the most used anti-psychotic agents in wealthy countries such as the United States, because of their efficacy and ostensible safety

  10. Mycetoma revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Iffat

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma or ‘Madura foot’ is a chronic infection of skin and subcutaneous tissues, fascia and bone. It may be caused by true fungi (eumycetoma or by filamentous bacteria (actinomycetoma. The lesions are composed of suppurating abscesses and draining sinuses with the presence of grains which are characteristic of the etiologic agents. The introduction of new broad spectrum antimicrobials and antifungals offers the hope of improved drug efficacy. This article discusses the historical aspects, epidemiology, clinical findings, laboratory diagnosis and treatment of mycetoma.

  11. Revisiting Cementoblastoma with a Rare Case Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Vijayanirmala; Narasimhan, Malathi; Ramalingam, Suganya; Anandan, Soumya; Ranganathan, Subhashini

    2017-01-01

    Cementoblastoma is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm which is characterized by the proliferation of cellular cementum. Diagnosis of cementoblastoma is challenging because of its protracted clinical, radiographic features, and bland histological appearance; most often cementoblastoma is often confused with other cementum and bone originated lesions. The aim of this article is to overview/revisit, approach the diagnosis of cementoblastoma, and also present a unique radiographic appearance of a cementoblastoma lesion associated with an impacted tooth.

  12. Revisiting Cementoblastoma with a Rare Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayanirmala Subramani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cementoblastoma is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm which is characterized by the proliferation of cellular cementum. Diagnosis of cementoblastoma is challenging because of its protracted clinical, radiographic features, and bland histological appearance; most often cementoblastoma is often confused with other cementum and bone originated lesions. The aim of this article is to overview/revisit, approach the diagnosis of cementoblastoma, and also present a unique radiographic appearance of a cementoblastoma lesion associated with an impacted tooth.

  13. Revisiting Okun's Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dixon, R.; Lim, G.C.; van Ours, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Our paper revisits Okun's relationship between observed unemployment rates and output gaps. We include in the relationship the effect of labour market institutions as well as age and gender effects. Our empirical analysis is based on 20 OECD countries over the period 1985-2013. We find that the

  14. Revisiting city connectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mans, U.

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a new perspective on city connectivity in order to analyze non-hub cities and their position in the world economy. The author revisits the different approaches discussed in the Global Commodity Chains (GCC), Global Production Networks (GPN) and World City Network (WCN) discou

  15. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  16. Concept Image Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingolbali, Erhan; Monaghan, John

    2008-01-01

    Concept image and concept definition is an important construct in mathematics education. Its use, however, has been limited to cognitive studies. This article revisits concept image in the context of research on undergraduate students' understanding of the derivative which regards the context of learning as paramount. The literature, mainly on…

  17. Revisiting the Okun relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dixon, R. (Robert); Lim, G.C.; J.C. van Ours (Jan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractOur article revisits the Okun relationship between observed unemployment rates and output gaps. We include in the relationship the effect of labour market institutions as well as age and gender effects. Our empirical analysis is based on 20 OECD countries over the period 1985–2013. We

  18. The Faraday effect revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series revisiting the (effect of) Faraday rotation. We formulate and prove the thermodynamic limit for the transverse electric conductivity of Bloch electrons, as well as for the Verdet constant. The main mathematical tool is a regularized magnetic and geometric...

  19. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  20. Fossil turbulence revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    1999-01-01

    A theory of fossil turbulence presented in the 11th Liege Colloquium on Marine turbulence is "revisited" in the 29th Liege Colloquium "Marine Turbulence Revisited". The Gibson (1980) theory applied universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as it is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Towed oceanic microstructure measurements of Schedvin (1979) confirmed the predicted universal constants. Universal constants, spectra, hydrodynamic phase diagrams (HPDs) and other predictions of the theory have been reconfirmed by a wide variety of field and laboratory observations. Fossil turbulence theory has many applications; for example, in marine biology, laboratory and field measurements suggest phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies differently by pattern recognition of several days of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times above thres...

  1. Revisiting the Role of Communication in Adolescent Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Adam M.; Rickert, Vaughn I.; Fry, Deborah A.; Lessel, Harriet; Davidson, Leslie L.

    2012-01-01

    A growing literature suggests that communication strategies can promote or inhibit intimate partner violence (IPV). Research on communication is still needed on a group ripe for early IPV intervention: high school-aged adolescents. This article revisits our previous analyses of young female reproductive clinic patients (Messinger, Davidson, &…

  2. Revisiting the Role of Communication in Adolescent Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Adam M.; Rickert, Vaughn I.; Fry, Deborah A.; Lessel, Harriet; Davidson, Leslie L.

    2012-01-01

    A growing literature suggests that communication strategies can promote or inhibit intimate partner violence (IPV). Research on communication is still needed on a group ripe for early IPV intervention: high school-aged adolescents. This article revisits our previous analyses of young female reproductive clinic patients (Messinger, Davidson, &…

  3. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the deterministic graphical games of Washburn. A deterministic graphical game can be described as a simple stochastic game (a notion due to Anne Condon), except that we allow arbitrary real payoffs but disallow moves of chance. We study the complexity of solving deterministic graphical...... games and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm for computing an equilibrium of such a game. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem....

  4. Reverse cholesterol transport revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Astrid; E; van; der; Velde

    2010-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport was originally described as the high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol flux from the periphery via the hepatobiliary tract to the intestinal lumen, leading to fecal excretion. Since the introduction of reverse cholesterol transport in the 1970s, this pathway has been intensively investigated. In this topic highlight, the classical reverse cholesterol transport concepts are discussed and the subject reverse cholesterol transport is revisited.

  5. Revisiting modern portfolio theory

    OpenAIRE

    Tenani, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    This paper revisits Modern Portfolio Theory and derives eleven properties of Efficient Allocations and Portfolios in the presence of leverage. With different degrees of leverage, an Efficient Portfolio is a linear combination of two portfolios that lie in different efficient frontiers - which allows for an attractive reinterpretation of the Separation Theorem. In particular a change in the investor risk-return preferences will leave the allocation between the Minimum Risk and Risk Portfolios ...

  6. Escitalopram dose-response revisited: an alternative psychometric approach to evaluate clinical effects of escitalopram compared to citalopram and placebo in patients with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Per; Tanghøj, Per; Cialdella, Philippe; Andersen, Henning Friis; Pedersen, Anders Gersel

    2004-09-01

    In continuation of a previous psychometric analysis of dose-response data for citalopram in depression, the corresponding study data for escitalopram is of interest, since escitalopram is the active enantiomer of citalopram and because citalopram was used as the active control. Revisiting those corresponding data, the psychometric properties of the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Scale (MADRS) and the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) were investigated by focusing on the unidimensional HAMD6 and MADRS6. Effect sizes were calculated and compared for two dosages of escitalopram (10 mg and 20 mg daily) and between each of these two dosages and 40 mg citalopram daily. The results showed that the three depression scales MADRS6, MADRS10 and HAMD6 were psychometrically acceptable (coefficient of homogeneity of 0.40 or higher). In the severely depressed patients (MADRS10> or =30) a rather clear dose-response relationship for escitalopram was seen on all three scales after 6 and 8 wk of therapy. Thus, the effect size for 10 mg escitalopram ranged from 0.28 to 0.38 while the effect sizes for 20 mg escitalopram ranged from 0.57 to 0.77. This difference was statistically significant (pescitalopram and 40 mg citalopram was seen after 8 wk of therapy for MADRS10 (effect size 0.71 vs. 0.37). An item analysis identified 'suicidal thoughts' to be the most discriminating item in this respect. These results for the severely depressed patients were confirmed by the patients self-reported quality of life evaluation. When all included patients were analysed, however, no clear dose-response relationship was seen. In conclusion, a dose-response relationship for escitalopram was seen in the severely depressed patients on all outcome scales after 6 and 8 wk of treatment. After 8 wk of treatment 20 mg escitalopram was superior to 40 mg citalopram, but not after 2 wk of treatment.

  7. Revisiting and Renegotiating Wars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Solveig

    2014-01-01

    Anri Sala’s film 1395 Days Without Red (2011) provides a kind of reenactment of an accidental day during the 1992-95 siege of Sarajevo. Shot in today’s Sarajevo, the film revisits and embodies some of the widely circulated images of the siege, such as inhabitants sprinting across so-called Sniper...... Alley in order to avoid the bullets of the Bosnian Serbian snipers positioned around the city. Based on a close reading of Sala’s work, this article will scrutinize how subjectivating techniques of power, during times of war, affectively work to create boundaries between those excluded from and those...

  8. Analogue Magnetism Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Osano, Bob

    2016-01-01

    In this article we revisit the significance of the often debated structural similarity between the equations of electromagnetism and fluid dynamics. Although the matching of the two sets of equations has successfully been done for non-dissipative forms of the equations, little has been done for cases where the dissipative terms are non-negligible. We consider the consequence of non-negligible viscosity and diffusivity, and how the fine-tuning of these parameters could allow fluid dynamics to be used to indirectly study certain properties of magnetic fields.

  9. Risk of hospitalisation after early-revisit in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Giorgio; Ghirardo, Sergio; Fiorese, Ilaria; Proietti, Ilaria; Monasta, Lorenzo; Minute, Marta; Barbi, Egidio; Calligaris, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    Early-revisits are frequent in the paediatric emergency department (ED) setting, but few data are available about early-revisited patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the hospitalisation rate of a population of early-revisited patients and to detect if an early-revisited patient was at risk of a more severe disease. Between June 2014 and January 2015, we conducted a retrospective cohort study, considering all patients presented to the ED of a tertiary level children's hospital in Italy. We selected all patients who were revisited within 72 h from the initial visit (study cohort), while all other patients accessed in the same period were considered the control cohort. The two cohorts were compared for age, gender, triage category, hospitalisation rate, diagnosis at admission and hospital length of stay. In the study period, we reviewed 10 750 visits, of which 430 (4%) were unplanned revisits for the same chief complaint within 72 h from the initial visit. Hospitalisation rate of early-revisited patients was significantly higher compared to control patients (8.4 vs. 2.9%). Hospitalisation rate increases in parallel with the number of revisits, but in many cases, it was not directly related to a worst triage category, neither to a longer hospital length of stay. Early revisited patients in the ED had a significantly higher risk of hospitalisation, but this risk was only partially related to their clinical conditions. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  10. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Klas Olof Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2012-01-01

    Starting from Zermelo’s classical formal treatment of chess, we trace through history the analysis of two-player win/lose/draw games with perfect information and potentially infinite play. Such chess-like games have appeared in many different research communities, and methods for solving them......, such as retrograde analysis, have been rediscovered independently. We then revisit Washburn’s deterministic graphical games (DGGs), a natural generalization of chess-like games to arbitrary zero-sum payoffs. We study the complexity of solving DGGs and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm...... for finding optimal strategies in such games. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem....

  11. The bar instability revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodi, Filippo; Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The river bar instability is revisited, using a hydrodynamical model based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results are contrasted with the standard analysis based on shallow water Saint-Venant equations. We first show that the stability of both transverse modes (ripples) and of small wavelength inclined modes (bars) predicted by the Saint-Venant approach are artefacts of this hydrodynamical approximation. When using a more reliable hydrodynamical model, the dispersion relation does not present any maximum of the growth rate when the sediment transport is assumed to be locally saturated. The analysis therefore reveals the fundamental importance of the relaxation of sediment transport towards equilibrium as it it is responsible for the stabilisation of small wavelength modes. This dynamical mechanism is characterised by the saturation number, defined as the ratio of the saturation length to the water depth Lsat/H. This dimensionless number controls the transition from ripples (transverse patte...

  12. Life quality index revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2004-01-01

    The derivation of the life quality index (LQI) is revisited for a revision. This revision takes into account the unpaid but necessary work time needed to stay alive in clean and healthy conditions to be fit for effective wealth producing work and to enjoyable free time. Dimension analysis...... consistency problems with the standard power function expression of the LQI are pointed out. It is emphasized that the combination coefficient in the convex differential combination between the relative differential of the gross domestic product per capita and the relative differential of the expected life...... at birth should not vary between countries. Finally the distributional assumptions are relaxed as compared to the assumptions made in an earlier work by the author. These assumptions concern the calculation of the life expectancy change due to the removal of an accident source. Moreover a simple public...

  13. Lorentz violation naturalness revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Belenchia, Alessio; Liberati, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We revisit here the naturalness problem of Lorentz invariance violations on a simple toy model of a scalar field coupled to a fermion field via a Yukawa interaction. We first review some well-known results concerning the low-energy percolation of Lorentz violation from high energies, presenting some details of the analysis not explicitly discussed in the literature and discussing some previously unnoticed subtleties. We then show how a separation between the scale of validity of the effective field theory and that one of Lorentz invariance violations can hinder this low-energy percolation. While such protection mechanism was previously considered in the literature, we provide here a simple illustration of how it works and of its general features. Finally, we consider a case in which dissipation is present, showing that the dissipative behaviour does not percolate generically to lower mass dimension operators albeit dispersion does. Moreover, we show that a scale separation can protect from unsuppressed low-en...

  14. Firewall Configuration Errors Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Wool, Avishai

    2009-01-01

    The first quantitative evaluation of the quality of corporate firewall configurations appeared in 2004, based on Check Point FireWall-1 rule-sets. In general that survey indicated that corporate firewalls were often enforcing poorly written rule-sets, containing many mistakes. The goal of this work is to revisit the first survey. The current study is much larger. Moreover, for the first time, the study includes configurations from two major vendors. The study also introduce a novel "Firewall Complexity" (FC) measure, that applies to both types of firewalls. The findings of the current study indeed validate the 2004 study's main observations: firewalls are (still) poorly configured, and a rule-set's complexity is (still) positively correlated with the number of detected risk items. Thus we can conclude that, for well-configured firewalls, ``small is (still) beautiful''. However, unlike the 2004 study, we see no significant indication that later software versions have fewer errors (for both vendors).

  15. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Klas Olof Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2012-01-01

    Starting from Zermelo’s classical formal treatment of chess, we trace through history the analysis of two-player win/lose/draw games with perfect information and potentially infinite play. Such chess-like games have appeared in many different research communities, and methods for solving them......, such as retrograde analysis, have been rediscovered independently. We then revisit Washburn’s deterministic graphical games (DGGs), a natural generalization of chess-like games to arbitrary zero-sum payoffs. We study the complexity of solving DGGs and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm...... for finding optimal strategies in such games. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem....

  16. Revisiting the Lambert's Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Izzo, Dario

    2014-01-01

    The orbital boundary value problem, also known as Lambert Problem, is revisited. Building upon Lancaster and Blanchard approach, new relations are revealed and a new variable representing all problem classes, under L-similarity, is used to express the time of flight equation. In the new variable, the time of flight curves have two oblique asymptotes and they mostly appear to be conveniently approximated by piecewise continuous lines. We use and invert such a simple approximation to provide an efficient initial guess to an Householder iterative method that is then able to converge, for the single revoltuion case, in only two iterations. The resulting algorithm is compared to Gooding's procedure revealing to be numerically as accurate, while having a smaller computational complexity.

  17. Klein's double discontinuity revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winsløw, Carl; Grønbæk, Niels

    2014-01-01

    mathematics courses which are mandatory to become a high school teacher of mathematics. To what extent does the “advanced” experience enable them to approach the high school calculus in a deeper and more autonomous way ? To what extent can “capstone” courses support such an approach ? How could it be hindered......Much effort and research has been invested into understanding and bridging the ‘gaps’ which many students experience in terms of contents and expectations as they begin university studies with a heavy component of mathematics, typically in the form of calculus courses. We have several studies...... of bridging measures, success rates and many other aspects of these “entrance transition” problems. In this paper, we consider the inverse transition, experienced by university students as they revisit core parts of high school mathematics (in particular, calculus) after completing the undergraduate...

  18. Seven Issues Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Whitehead, Jim; De Bra, Paul

    2002-01-01

    It has been 15 years since the original presentation by Frank Halasz at Hypertext'87 on seven issues for the next generation of hypertext systems. These issues are: Search and Query Composites Virtual Structures Computation in/over hypertext network Versioning Collaborative Work Extensibility...... and Tailorability Since that time, these issues have formed the nucleus of multiple research agendas within the Hypertext community. Befitting this direction-setting role, the issues have been revisited several times, by Halasz in his 1991 Hypertext keynote talk, and by Randy Trigg in his 1996 Hypertext keynote...... five years later. Additionally, over the intervening 15 years, many research systems have addressed the original seven issues, and new research avenues have opened up. The goal of this panel is to begin the process of developing a new set of seven issues for the next generation of hypertext system...

  19. Association of Clinical Benign Prostate Hyperplasia with Prostate Cancer Incidence and Mortality Revisited: A Nationwide Cohort Study of 3 009 258 Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, David Dynnes; Bojesen, Stig E; Nielsen, Sune F;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa) share features such as hormone-dependent growth and response to treatment with antiandrogen therapy, BPH is generally not considered a premalignant lesion. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether clinical BPH is associated...

  20. Seeing the unseen: Charles Bonnet syndrome revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Aditya Gopinathan; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Shah, Bharat R; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2015-09-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a rare condition that encompasses three clinical features: complex visual hallucinations, ocular pathology causing visual deterioration, and preserved cognitive status. Common associated ocular pathologies include age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and cataracts. Several theories have been proposed to try to explain the visual hallucinations. However, the pathophysiology remains poorly understood, and treatment is largely based on anecdotal data. The lack of awareness of CBS among medical professionals often leads to inappropriate diagnosis and medication. In a country like India, where awareness of mental health is not widespread, cultural myths and stigma prevent patients from seeking professional help. Here we describe two cases of CBS and revisit different ocular morbidities that have been reported to occur in conjunction with CBS. Psychiatrists and ophthalmologists alike must be sensitive to this clinical condition to ensure prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Significance and clinical value of the transitional zone volume (TZV or index (TZI in assessing the degree of lower urinary tract obstruction: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El Ghoneimy

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Estimating the transition zone volume during TRUS is a reasonable way to obtain the required information about the TZI. Calculating the TZI could not be directly correlated with any of the different parameters, making the clinical value of such an index questionable. The observation that the obstructed and the retention groups both had a TZI above 0.5 deserves further research that can help in the classification of patients into obstructed and non-obstructed.

  2. Revisiting current “barefoot doctors” in border areas of China: system of services, financial issue and clinical practice prior to introducing integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiuyun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under-5-years child mortality remains high in rural China. Integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI was introduced to China in 1998, but only a few rural areas have been included. This study aimed at assessing the current situation of the health system of rural health care and evaluating the clinical competency of village doctors in management of childhood illnesses prior to implementing IMCI programme in remote border rural areas. Methods The study was carried out in the border areas of Puer prefecture of Yunnan province. There were 182 village doctors in the list of the health bureau in these border areas. Of these, 154 (84.6% were recruited into the study. The local health system components were investigated using a qualitative approach and analyzed with triangulation of information from different sources. The clinical component was assessed objectively and quantitatively presented using descriptive statistics. Results The study found that the New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS coordinated the health insurance system and the provider service through 3 tiers: village doctor, township and county hospitals. The 30 RMB per person per year premium did not cover the referral cost, and thereby decreased the number of referrals. In contrast to available treatment facilities and drug supply, the level of basic medical education of village doctors and township doctors was low. Discontent among village doctors was common, especially concerning low rates of return from the service, exceptions being procedures such as injections, which in fact may create moral hazards to the patients. Direct observation on the assessment and management of paediatric patients by village doctors revealed inadequate history taking and physical examination, inability to detect potentially serious complications, overprescription of injection and antibiotics, and underprescription of oral rehydration salts and poor quality of counseling

  3. Lorentz violation naturalness revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belenchia, Alessio; Gambassi, Andrea; Liberati, Stefano [SISSA - International School for Advanced Studies, via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-06-08

    We revisit here the naturalness problem of Lorentz invariance violations on a simple toy model of a scalar field coupled to a fermion field via a Yukawa interaction. We first review some well-known results concerning the low-energy percolation of Lorentz violation from high energies, presenting some details of the analysis not explicitly discussed in the literature and discussing some previously unnoticed subtleties. We then show how a separation between the scale of validity of the effective field theory and that one of Lorentz invariance violations can hinder this low-energy percolation. While such protection mechanism was previously considered in the literature, we provide here a simple illustration of how it works and of its general features. Finally, we consider a case in which dissipation is present, showing that the dissipative behaviour does not percolate generically to lower mass dimension operators albeit dispersion does. Moreover, we show that a scale separation can protect from unsuppressed low-energy percolation also in this case.

  4. Dynamic causal modelling revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, K J; Preller, Katrin H; Mathys, Chris; Cagnan, Hayriye; Heinzle, Jakob; Razi, Adeel; Zeidman, Peter

    2017-02-17

    This paper revisits the dynamic causal modelling of fMRI timeseries by replacing the usual (Taylor) approximation to neuronal dynamics with a neural mass model of the canonical microcircuit. This provides a generative or dynamic causal model of laminar specific responses that can generate haemodynamic and electrophysiological measurements. In principle, this allows the fusion of haemodynamic and (event related or induced) electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, it enables Bayesian model comparison of competing hypotheses about physiologically plausible synaptic effects; for example, does attentional modulation act on superficial or deep pyramidal cells - or both? In this technical note, we describe the resulting dynamic causal model and provide an illustrative application to the attention to visual motion dataset used in previous papers. Our focus here is on how to answer long-standing questions in fMRI; for example, do haemodynamic responses reflect extrinsic (afferent) input from distant cortical regions, or do they reflect intrinsic (recurrent) neuronal activity? To what extent do inhibitory interneurons contribute to neurovascular coupling? What is the relationship between haemodynamic responses and the frequency of induced neuronal activity? This paper does not pretend to answer these questions; rather it shows how they can be addressed using neural mass models of fMRI timeseries. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Revisiting energy efficiency fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lombard, L.; Velazquez, D. [Grupo de Termotecnia, Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Seville (Spain); Ortiz, J. [Building Research Establishment (BRE), Garston, Watford, WD25 9XX (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Energy efficiency is a central target for energy policy and a keystone to mitigate climate change and to achieve a sustainable development. Although great efforts have been carried out during the last four decades to investigate the issue, focusing into measuring energy efficiency, understanding its trends and impacts on energy consumption and to design effective energy efficiency policies, many energy efficiency-related concepts, some methodological problems for the construction of energy efficiency indicators (EEI) and even some of the energy efficiency potential gains are often ignored or misunderstood, causing no little confusion and controversy not only for laymen but even for specialists. This paper aims to revisit, analyse and discuss some efficiency fundamental topics that could improve understanding and critical judgement of efficiency stakeholders and that could help in avoiding unfounded judgements and misleading statements. Firstly, we address the problem of measuring energy efficiency both in qualitative and quantitative terms. Secondly, main methodological problems standing in the way of the construction of EEI are discussed, and a sequence of actions is proposed to tackle them in an ordered fashion. Finally, two key topics are discussed in detail: the links between energy efficiency and energy savings, and the border between energy efficiency improvement and renewable sources promotion.

  6. Benjamin Franklin and Mesmerism, revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, Kevin M; Perry, Campbell

    2002-10-01

    The authors revisit and update their previous historiographical note (McConkey & Perry, 1985) on Benjamin Franklin's involvement with and investigation of animal magnetism or mesmerism. They incorporate more recent literature and offer additional comment about Franklin's role in and views about mesmerism. Franklin had a higher degree of personal involvement with and a more detailed opinion of mesmerism than has been previously appreciated.

  7. Leadership and Management Theories Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mona Toft

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to revisit and analyze key contributions to the understanding of leadership and management. As a part of the discussion a role perspective that allows for additional and/or integrated leader dimensions, including a change-centered, will be outlined. Seemingly, a major...

  8. A remote coal deposit revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen-Kofoed, Jørgen A.; Kalkreuth, Wolfgang; Petersen, Henrik I.

    2012-01-01

    In 1908, members of the “Danmark Expedition” discovered a coal deposit in a very remote area in western Germania Land, close to the margin of the inland ice in northeast Greenland. The deposit was, however, neither sampled nor described, and was revisited in 2009 for the first time since its disc...

  9. Revisiting Inter-Genre Similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.; Gouyon, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the idea of ``inter-genre similarity'' (IGS) for machine learning in general, and music genre recognition in particular. We show analytically that the probability of error for IGS is higher than naive Bayes classification with zero-one loss (NB). We show empirically that IGS does...

  10. ORAL GLUCOSE TOLERANCE TEST REVISITED

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determinant for the usefulness or otherwise of oral glucose tolerance test for the diagnosis ... personnel, poverty and poor economic management, 8'9 that are known to .... Symptoms of diabetes plus casual plasma glucose ... WHO 2-hr plasma glucose criteria of 1l.1mmol/L .... Diagnostic criteria and performance revisited.

  11. Double jeopardy revisited: clinical decision making in unstable patients with, thoraco-abdominal stab wounds and, potential injuries in multiple body cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Damian L; Gall, Tamara M H; Thomson, Sandie R

    2011-05-01

    In the setting of the hypovolaemic patient with a thoraco-abdominal stab wound and potential injuries in both the chest and abdomen, deciding which cavity to explore first may be difficult.Opening the incorrect body cavity can delay control of tamponade or haemorrhage and exacerbate hypothermia and fluid shifts. This situation has been described as one of double jeopardy. All stab victims from July 2007 to July 2009 requiring a thoracotomy and laparotomy at the same operation were identified from a database. Demographics, site and nature of injuries, admission observations and investigations as well as operative sequence were recorded. Correct sequencing was defined as first opening the cavity with most lethal injury. Incorrect sequencing was defined as opening a cavity and finding either no injury or an injury of less severity than a simultaneous injury in the unopened cavity. The primary outcome was survival or death. Sixteen stab victims underwent thoracotomy and laparotomy during the same operation. All were male with an age range of 18–40 (mean/median 27). Median systolic blood pressure on presentation was 90 mm Hg. (quartile range 80–90 mm Hg). Median base excess was 6.5 (quartile range 12 to 2.2). All the deaths were the result of cardiac injuries. Incorrect sequencing occurred in four patients (25%). In this group there were four negative abdominal explorations prior to thoracotomy with two deaths. There was one death in the correct sequencing group. Incorrect sequencing in stab victims who require both thoracotomy and laparotomy at the same sitting is associated with a high mortality. This is especially true when the abdomen is incorrectly entered first whilst the life threatening pathology is in the chest. Clinical signs may be confusing, leading to incorrect sequencing of exploration. The common causes for confusion include failure to appreciate that cardiac tamponade does not present with bleeding and difficulty in assessing peritonism in an

  12. Perekonnaseadus nõrgema kaitsel / Andra Olm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Olm, Andra

    2008-01-01

    Uuest perekonnaseaduse eelnõust. Ilmunud ka Lõunaleht 13. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Meie Maa 13. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Põhjarannik 13. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Narva Postiljon 15. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Koit 18. märts 2008, lk. 4 ; Vooremaa 18. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Sama ka Järva Teataja 25. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Kuulutaja 20. märts 2008, lk. 4 ; Vali Uudised 28. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Elva Postipoiss 29. märts 2008, lk. 4

  13. Perekonnaseadus nõrgema kaitsel / Andra Olm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Olm, Andra

    2008-01-01

    Uuest perekonnaseaduse eelnõust. Ilmunud ka Lõunaleht 13. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Meie Maa 13. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Põhjarannik 13. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Narva Postiljon 15. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Koit 18. märts 2008, lk. 4 ; Vooremaa 18. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Sama ka Järva Teataja 25. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Kuulutaja 20. märts 2008, lk. 4 ; Vali Uudised 28. märts 2008, lk. 2 ; Elva Postipoiss 29. märts 2008, lk. 4

  14. Nutational Damping Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. A.; Sharma, I.

    2000-10-01

    Motivated by the recent detection of complex rotational states for several asteroids and comets, as well as by the ongoing and planned spacecraft missions to such bodies, which should allow their rotational states to be accurately determined, we revisit the problem of the nutational damping of small solar system bodies. The nutational damping of asteroids has been approximately analyzed by Prendergast (1958), Burns and Safronov (1973), and Efroimsky and Lazarian (2000). Many other similar dynamical studies concern planetary wobble decay (e.g., Peale 1973; Yoder and Ward 1979), interstellar dust grain alignment (e.g., Purcell 1979; Lazarian and Efroimsky 1999) and damping of Earth's Chandler wobble (Lambeck 1980). Recall that rotational energy loss for an isolated body aligns the body's angular momentum vector with its axis of maximum inertia. Assuming anelastic dissipation, simple dimensional analysis determines a functional form of the damping timescale, on which all the above authors agree. However, the numerical coefficients of published results are claimed to differ by orders of magnitude. Differences have been ascribed to absent physics, to solutions that fail to satisfy boundary conditions perfectly, and to unphysical choices for the Q parameter. The true reasons for the discrepancy are unclear since, despite contrary claims, the full 3D problem (nutational damping of an anelastic ellipsoid) is analytically intractable so far. To move the debate forward, we compare the solution of a related 2D problem to the expressions found previously, and we present results from a finite element model. On this basis, we feel that previous rates for the decay of asteroidal tumbling (Harris 1994), derived from Burns and Safronov (1973), are likely to be accurate, at least to a factor of a few. Funded by NASA.

  15. Dynamic Topography Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresi, Louis

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic Topography Revisited Dynamic topography is usually considered to be one of the trinity of contributing causes to the Earth's non-hydrostatic topography along with the long-term elastic strength of the lithosphere and isostatic responses to density anomalies within the lithosphere. Dynamic topography, thought of this way, is what is left over when other sources of support have been eliminated. An alternate and explicit definition of dynamic topography is that deflection of the surface which is attributable to creeping viscous flow. The problem with the first definition of dynamic topography is 1) that the lithosphere is almost certainly a visco-elastic / brittle layer with no absolute boundary between flowing and static regions, and 2) the lithosphere is, a thermal / compositional boundary layer in which some buoyancy is attributable to immutable, intrinsic density variations and some is due to thermal anomalies which are coupled to the flow. In each case, it is difficult to draw a sharp line between each contribution to the overall topography. The second definition of dynamic topography does seem cleaner / more precise but it suffers from the problem that it is not measurable in practice. On the other hand, this approach has resulted in a rich literature concerning the analysis of large scale geoid and topography and the relation to buoyancy and mechanical properties of the Earth [e.g. refs 1,2,3] In convection models with viscous, elastic, brittle rheology and compositional buoyancy, however, it is possible to examine how the surface topography (and geoid) are supported and how different ways of interpreting the "observable" fields introduce different biases. This is what we will do. References (a.k.a. homework) [1] Hager, B. H., R. W. Clayton, M. A. Richards, R. P. Comer, and A. M. Dziewonski (1985), Lower mantle heterogeneity, dynamic topography and the geoid, Nature, 313(6003), 541-545, doi:10.1038/313541a0. [2] Parsons, B., and S. Daly (1983), The

  16. Enceladus' tidal dissipation revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobie, Gabriel; Behounkova, Marie; Choblet, Gael; Cadek, Ondrej; Soucek, Ondrej

    2016-10-01

    A series of chemical and physical evidence indicates that the intense activity at Enceladus' South Pole is related to a subsurface salty water reservoir underneath the tectonically active ice shell. The detection of a significant libration implies that this water reservoir is global and that the average ice shell thickness is about 20-25km (Thomas et al. 2016). The interpretation of gravity and topography data further predicts large variations in ice shell thickness, resulting in a shell potentially thinner than 5 km in the South Polar Terrain (SPT) (Cadek et al. 2016). Such an ice shell structure requires a very strong heat source in the interior, with a focusing mechanism at the SPT. Thermal diffusion through the ice shell implies that at least 25-30 GW is lost into space by passive diffusion, implying a very efficient dissipation mechanism in Enceladus' interior to maintain such an ocean/ice configuration thermally stable.In order to determine in which conditions such a large dissipation power may be generated, we model the tidal response of Enceladus including variable ice shell thickness. For the rock core, we consider a wide range of rheological parameters representative of water-saturated porous rock materials. We demonstrate that the thinning toward the South Pole leads to a strong increase in heat production in the ice shell, with a optimal thickness obtained between 1.5 and 3 km, depending on the assumed ice viscosity. Our results imply that the heat production in the ice shell within the SPT may be sufficient to counterbalance the heat loss by diffusion and to power eruption activity. However, outside the SPT, a strong dissipation in the porous core is required to counterbalance the diffusive heat loss. We show that about 20 GW can be generated in the core, for an effective viscosity of 1012 Pa.s, which is comparable to the effective viscosity estimated in water-saturated glacial tills on Earth. We will discuss the implications of this revisited tidal

  17. Remembered Experiences and Revisit Intentions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Stuart; Mattsson, Jan; Sørensen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Tourism is an experience-intensive sector in which customers seek and pay for experiences above everything else. Remembering past tourism experiences is also crucial for an understanding of the present, including the predicted behaviours of visitors to tourist destinations. We adopt a longitudinal...... approach to memory data collection from psychological science, which has the potential to contribute to our understanding of tourist behaviour. In this study, we examine the impact of remembered tourist experiences in a safari park. In particular, using matched survey data collected longitudinally and PLS...... path modelling, we examine the impact of positive affect tourist experiences on the development of revisit intentions. We find that longer-term remembered experiences have the strongest impact on revisit intentions, more so than predicted or immediate memory after an event. We also find that remembered...

  18. The Damped String Problem Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gesztesy, Fritz

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the damped string equation on a compact interval with a variety of boundary conditions and derive an infinite sequence of trace formulas associated with it, employing methods familiar from supersymmetric quantum mechanics. We also derive completeness and Riesz basis results (with parentheses) for the associated root functions under less smoothness assumptions on the coefficients than usual, using operator theoretic methods (rather than detailed eigenvalue and root function asymptotics) only.

  19. Revisiting SU(N) integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Zuber, Jean-Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In this note, I revisit integrals over $\\SU(N)$ of the form $ \\int DU\\, U_{i_1j_1}\\cdots U_{i_pj_p}\\Ud_{k_1l_1}\\cdots \\Ud_{k_nl_n}$. While the case $p=n$ is well known, it seems that explicit expressions for $p=n+N$ had not appeared in the literature. Similarities and differences, in particular in the large $N$ limit, between the two cases are discussed

  20. Cardiac Tamponade Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyarajah, Vignendra; Spodick, David H.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a life-threatening clinical syndrome that requires timely diagnosis. Herein, we present an instructive case of a patient who had cardiac tamponade. The condition went undiagnosed and resulted in the patient's death because almost all of the pathognomonic clinical findings of tamponade were unrecognized or not manifest. To better prepare health care professionals for similar challenges, we discuss the symptoms and clinical signs typical of cardiac tamponade, review the medical literature, and highlight current investigative methods that enable quick, efficient diagnosis and treatment. PMID:17948086

  1. Revisiting the Anatomy of the Living Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the complexity of cardiac anatomy is required by all who seek, in the setting of cardiac disease, to interpret the images confronting them. Although the mysteries of cardiac structure have been extensively addressed, significant gaps continue to exist between the descriptions provided by morphologists and by those working in the clinical setting. In part, this reflects the limitations in providing 3D visualization of such a complicated organ. Current 3D imaging technology now permits visualization of the cardiac components using datasets obtained in the living individual. These advances, furthermore, demonstrate the anatomy in the setting of the heart as imaged within the thorax. It has been failure to describe the heart as it lies within the thorax that remains a major deficiency of many morphologists relying on the dissecting room to provide the gold standard. Describing the heart in attitudinally appropriate fashion, a basic rule of clinical anatomy, creates the necessary bridges between anatomists and clinicians. The rapid progression of cardiac interventional techniques, furthermore, emphasizes the need to revisit cardiac anatomy using a multidisciplinary approach. In this review, therefore, we illustrate the advantages of an attitudinally correct approach to cardiac anatomy. We then focus on the morphology of the arterial roots, revealing the accuracy that can now be achieved by clinicians using datasets obtained during life.

  2. Parenteral nutrition: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koneru Veera Raghava Chowdary

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of malnutrition among critically ill patients, especially those with a protracted clinical course, has remained largely unchanged over the last two decades. The metabolic response to stress, injury, surgery, or inflammation cannot be accurately predicted and these metabolic alterations may change during the course of illness. Both underfeeding and overfeeding are common in intensive care units (ICU, resulting in large energy and other nutritional imbalances. Systematic research and clinical trials on various aspects of nutritional support in the ICU are limited and make it challenging to compile evidence-based practice guidelines.

  3. Jesus and the law revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R.G. Loader

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article revisited the issue of Jesus’ attitude towards the Torah on the basis of a critical discussion of the most recent extensive treatment of the theme by Meier in his A marginal Jew: Rethinking the historical Jesus: Volume four: Law and love (2009. It engaged Meier’s contribution in the light of contemporary research, concluding that, whilst Meier provided an erudite analysis, his thesis that Jesus’ teaching on divorce and oaths revoked Mosaic law did not convince, for it did not adequately consider the extent to which the contemporary interpretation of the Torah could encompass such radicalisation.

  4. STATIN SAFETY REVISITED DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Questions of statins use in liver diseases are discussed. Data from clinical studies on statins safety in cardiac patients with liver diseases are presented. Features of statins use in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis C are considered separately.

  5. McLean's second variation formula revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lê, Hông Vân; Vanžura, Jiří

    2017-03-01

    We revisit McLean's second variation formulas for calibrated submanifolds in exceptional geometries, and correct his formulas concerning associative submanifolds and Cayley submanifolds, using a unified treatment based on the (relative) calibration method and Harvey-Lawson's identities.

  6. Radiation synovectomy revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, E. (Mallinckrodt Medical, Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States)); Brodack, J.W. (Mallinckrodt Medical, Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States)); Deutsch, K.F. (Mallinckrodt Medical, Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Radiation synovectomy is a potential weapon in the therapeutic armamentarium of nuclear medicine. It is an attractive alternative to surgical or chemical synovectomy for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this article the clinical results obtained with radiation synovectomy from the 1950s through 1992 are summarized and reviewed. Even after taking into account the paucity of well-controlled trials and rigorous clinical follow-up, it is clear that radiation synovectomy is efficacious in controlling the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. However, the procedure is not widely used because of concerns about leakage of radioactivity from the treated joint, and the resulting high doses that can be delivated to nontarget organs. New approaches to the preparation of radiolabeled particles for use in radiation synovectomy promise to minimize this leakage and thus allows the full potential of this important radiotherapy to be realized. (orig.)

  7. Brodie's abscess revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornaat, P R; Camerlinck, M; Vanhoenacker, F M; De Praeter, G; Kroon, H M

    2010-01-01

    Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis of a Brodie's abscess, as can be difficult for a clinician to identify the disease using clinical information alone. A Brodie's abscess is clinically difficult to diagnose because patients typically have mild local symptoms, few or no constitutional symptoms, and near normal laboratory values. Furthermore, a Brodie's abscess may mimic various benign and malignant conditions, resulting in delayed diagnosis and treatment. The most frequently made incorrect diagnosis is that of a primary bone tumor. The present pictorial review summarizes imaging clues to the diagnosis of a Brodie's abscess, such as the serpentine sign on conventional radiographs and the penumbra sign seen on Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. A Brodie's abscess is difficult to diagnose, however, once diagnosed, it is a curable disease with a 100% cure rate.

  8. Genital herpes: Heisenberg revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Goldmeier, D

    1998-01-01

    In the confirmation of recurrences of genital herpes, patient defined disease reactivation and virological data hold the scientific high ground. The influence of the psyche on recurrence rates and perception of recurrences has been largely neglected and marginalised up to the present, possibly because research work in that area has been and continues to be of poor calibre. However, neglected psychological variables may render otherwise relevant clinical trials uninterpretable. Psycholog...

  9. Angelman syndrome revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paprocka, Justyna; Jamroz, Ewa; Szwed-Białozyt, Barbara; Jezela-Stanek, Aleksandra; Kopyta, Ilona; Marszał, Elzbieta

    2007-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe mental retardation, epilepsy, absent speech, dysmorphic facial features, and a characteristic behavioral phenotype. It is caused by deficiency of gene expression from maternally derived chromosome 15q11-q13. The authors present the clinical picture of 9 children (median age, 4.9 years; range, 1 to 10 years) with confirmed Angelman syndrome. The patients complied with the international consensus criteria for AS and were consecutively investigated for psychomotor development, epilepsy, and electroencephalogram (EEG) profiles. The median age at diagnosis was 3.9 years. The motor milestones were delayed. Median developmental quotient level was 26. All patients but 1 experienced predominantly polymorphic seizures. In 4 cases, the epilepsy was refractory to treatment. The EEG of all patients displayed an abnormal sleep pattern and generalized abnormalities, with a maximum over the posterior areas. Milder or less typical phenotypes of AS may remain undiagnosed, leading to an overall underdiagnosis of the disease. The EEG shows no clear relation to genotype, clinical picture, or to the presence and severity of epilepsy. AS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with severe cryptogenic epilepsy and a characteristic configuration of clinical features.

  10. Genital herpes: Heisenberg revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmeier, D.

    1998-01-01

    In the confirmation of recurrences of genital herpes, patient defined disease reactivation and virological data hold the scientific high ground. The influence of the psyche on recurrence rates and perception of recurrences has been largely neglected and marginalised up to the present, possibly because research work in that area has been and continues to be of poor calibre. However, neglected psychological variables may render otherwise relevant clinical trials uninterpretable. Psychological aspects of counselling before testing for serum herpes simplex type 2 antibodies are also discussed. 




 PMID:9849561

  11. Lithium nephrotoxicity revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Rossier, Bernard C

    2009-05-01

    Lithium is widely used to treat bipolar disorder. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is the most common adverse effect of lithium and occurs in up to 40% of patients. Renal lithium toxicity is characterized by increased water and sodium diuresis, which can result in mild dehydration, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis and renal tubular acidosis. The concentrating defect and natriuretic effect develop within weeks of lithium initiation. After years of lithium exposure, full-blown nephropathy can develop, which is characterized by decreased glomerular filtration rate and chronic kidney disease. Here, we review the clinical and experimental evidence that the principal cell of the collecting duct is the primary target for the nephrotoxic effects of lithium, and that these effects are characterized by dysregulation of aquaporin 2. This dysregulation is believed to occur as a result of the accumulation of cytotoxic concentrations of lithium, which enters via the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) on the apical membrane and leads to the inhibition of signaling pathways that involve glycogen synthase kinase type 3beta. Experimental and clinical evidence demonstrates the efficacy of the ENaC inhibitor amiloride for the treatment of lithium-induced NDI; however, whether this agent can prevent the long-term adverse effects of lithium is not yet known.

  12. Narcissistic rage revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizan, Zlatan; Johar, Omesh

    2015-05-01

    Narcissists are thought to exhibit "narcissistic rage," an explosive mix of anger and hostility arising from threats to narcissists' fractured sense of self. Building on clinical views of narcissism, we present empirical evidence on the nature and sources of narcissistic rage. Findings from 4 studies reveal narcissistic vulnerability (but not grandiosity) as a powerful driver of rage, hostility, and aggressive behavior, fueled by suspiciousness, dejection, and angry rumination. Consistent with theorizing about narcissistic rage, Study 1 showed that vulnerable (but not grandiose) narcissism predicted more anger internalization and externalization, as well as poorer anger control. Study 2 revealed vulnerable narcissism as a stronger indicator of shame and aggressiveness, especially hostility and anger. Study 3 identified distrust of others and angry rumination as key factors accounting for vulnerable narcissists' reactive and displaced aggression. Study 4 provided behavioral evidence that vulnerable (but not grandiose) narcissism amplifies reactive and displaced aggression in the face of provocation. Taken together, the findings not only establish narcissistic vulnerability as a key source of narcissistic rage but also reveal an important pathway to narcissistic aggression that does not involve competitiveness or exploitativeness. In addition, the results support clinical views of narcissistic aggression and implicate deficient self-esteem as an important driver of aggressive behavior. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Radionuclide therapy revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefnagel, C.A. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1991-06-01

    Apart from its use in endocrinology and rheumatology, therapeutic nuclear medicine is developing rapidly as an additional treatment modality in oncology. Many different specific tumour-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are being applied both for diagnostic scintigraphy and treatment, using multiple routes and mechanisms to target radionuclides at tumours. After a brief introduction of some basic principles of radionuclide targeting, the therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals available are reviewed according to the accumulation site in relation to the cell nucleus; the results of their current clinical use for therapy are also reviewed. The response observed to a number of these applications, the non-invasiveness of the procedure and the relative lack of toxicity and late effects in comparison with chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy make radionuclide therapy an attractive and realistic alternative in the management of malignant disease, as well as in the treatment of a few benign disorders. (orig.).

  14. Pancreaticopleural Fistula: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Oneil Machado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreaticopleural fistula is a rare complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. This usually presents with chest symptoms due to pleural effusion, pleural pseudocyst, or mediastinal pseudocyst. Diagnosis requires a high index of clinical suspicion in patients who develop alcohol-induced pancreatitis and present with pleural effusion which is recurrent or persistent. Analysis of pleural fluid for raised amylase will confirm the diagnosis and investigations like CT. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ECRP or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP may establish the fistulous communication between the pancreas and pleural cavity. The optimal treatment strategy has traditionally been medical management with exocrine suppression with octreotide and ERCP stenting of the fistulous pancreatic duct. Operative therapy considered in the event patient fails to respond to conservative management. There is, however, a lack of clarity regarding the management, and the literature is reviewed here to assess the present view on its pathogenesis, investigations, and management.

  15. Occult pneumothorax, revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangar Devanand

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pneumothorax is a recognized cause of preventable death following chest wall trauma where a simple intervention can be life saving. In cases of trauma patients where cervical spine immobilization is mandatory, supine AP chest radiograph is the most practical initial study. It is however not as sensitive as CT chest for early detection of a pneumothorax. "Occult" pneumothorax is an accepted definition of an existing but usually a clinically and radiologically silent disturbance that in most patients can be tolerated while other more urgent trauma needs are attended to. However, in certain patients, especially those on mechanical ventilation (with subsequent increase of intrapleural air with positive pressure ventilation, missing the diagnosis of pneumothorax can be deleterious with fatal consequences. This review will discuss the occult pneumothorax in the context of 3 radiological examples, which will further emphasize the entity. Because a negative AP chest radiograph can dangerously delay its recognition, we recommend that any trauma victim presenting to the emergency department with symptoms of respiratory distress should be screened with either thoracic ultrasonography or chest CT scan to avoid missing a pneumothorax.

  16. Economics of vaccines revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Maarten J; Standaert, Baudouin A

    2013-05-01

    Performing a total health economic analysis of a vaccine newly introduced into the market today is a challenge when using the conventional cost-effectiveness analysis we normally apply on pharmaceutical products. There are many reasons for that, such as: the uncertainty in the total benefit (direct and indirect) to be measured in a population when using a cohort model; (1) appropriate rules about discounting the long-term impact of vaccines are absent jeopardizing therefore their value at the initial investment; (2) the presence of opposite contexts when introducing the vaccine in developed vs. the developing world with high benefits, low initial health care investment for the latter vs. marginal benefit and high cost for the former; with a corresponding paradox for the vaccine becoming very cost-effective in low income countries but rather medium in middle low to high middle income countries; (3) and the type of trial assessment for the newer vaccines is now often performed with immunogenicity reaction instead of clinical endpoints which still leaves questions on their real impact and their head-to-head comparison. (4.)

  17. The power reinforcement framework revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jeppe; Andersen, Kim Normann; Danziger, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Whereas digital technologies are often depicted as being capable of disrupting long-standing power structures and facilitating new governance mechanisms, the power reinforcement framework suggests that information and communications technologies tend to strengthen existing power arrangements within...... public organizations. This article revisits the 30-yearold power reinforcement framework by means of an empirical analysis on the use of mobile technology in a large-scale programme in Danish public sector home care. It explores whether and to what extent administrative management has controlled decision......-dominated and centrally controlled technologies that were the main focus of the 1970s and 1980s studies. Yet this study concludes that there is general support for the reinforcement framework in the contemporary application of mobile technology in public sector home care....

  18. Orthopaedic service lines-revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This article revisits the application of orthopaedic service lines from early introduction and growth of this organizational approach in the 1980s, through the 1990s, and into the current decade. The author has experienced and worked in various service-line structures through these three decades, as well as the preservice-line era of 1970s orthopaedics. Past lessons learned during earlier phases and then current trends and analysis by industry experts are summarized briefly, with indication given of the future for service lines. Variation versus consistency of certain elements in service-line definitions and in operational models is discussed. Main components of service-line structures and typical processes are described briefly, along with a more detailed section on the service-line director/manager role. Current knowledge contained here will help guide the reader to more "out-of-the-box" thinking toward comprehensive orthopaedic centers of excellence.

  19. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Fraietta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired testicular function, i.e., hypogonadism, can result from a primary testicular disorder (hypergonadotropic or occur secondary to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (hypogonadotropic. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be congenital or acquired. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is divided into anosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (Kallmann syndrome and congenital normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The incidence of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is approximately 1-10:100,000 live births, and approximately 2/3 and 1/3 of cases are caused by Kallmann syndrome (KS and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, respectively. Acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be caused by drugs, infiltrative or infectious pituitary lesions, hyperprolactinemia, encephalic trauma, pituitary/brain radiation, exhausting exercise, abusive alcohol or illicit drug intake, and systemic diseases such as hemochromatosis, sarcoidosis and histiocytosis X. The clinical characteristics of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are androgen deficiency and a lack/delay/stop of pubertal sexual maturation. Low blood testosterone levels and low pituitary hormone levels confirm the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosis. A prolonged stimulated intravenous GnRH test can be useful. In Kallmann syndrome, cerebral MRI can show an anomalous morphology or even absence of the olfactory bulb. Therapy for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism depends on the patient's desire for future fertility. Hormone replacement with testosterone is the classic treatment for hypogonadism. Androgen replacement is indicated for men who already have children or have no desire to induce pregnancy, and testosterone therapy is used to reverse the symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Conversely, GnRH or gonadotropin therapies are the best options for men wishing to have children. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is one of the rare conditions in

  20. Revisiting Narcolepsy: The Practical Diagnosis and Mythology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon M Neppe

    2016-02-01

    : This might deprive many in the narcolepsy population of their essential life-sustaining treatment, even though they might have definite clinical features plus the gene expression, and often, already, response to wakefulness drugs. c Third, clinical evaluations must be standardized. At this stage, we, at the PNI b2 apply modifications of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale in conjunction with the Fatigue Severity Scale, and the Neppe Narcolepsy Questionnaire, as fundamental ways to evaluate narcolepsy clinically. These historical rankings and screens combined with proper HLA screening may be adequate for more than 90% of diagnoses. d Fourth, the comorbidities of narcolepsy might include psychosis, anxiety, depression, impaired functioning, and seizure phenomena. These may reflect multifactorial etiologies: some of these may be linked with narcolepsy, and others unassociated. I suggest a new model of hypocretin deficiency being slightly down-stream from the actual cause of narcolepsycataplexy. This accentuates the need for proposing two new terms, namely “primary narcolepsy” for the most common narcolepsy condition that appears to be hypothalamically linked to an auto-immune process involving hypocretin, and “symptomatic narcolepsy” due to infectious or tumor or trauma events involving the hypocretin / reticular activating system/ hypothalamus. On the others hand, some b “PNI” refers to the Pacific Neuropsychiatric Institute in Seattle, WA. “We” is used here to include application at the PNI; “we” is also used generically, for example, in broader recognitions of symptoms by researchers. Revisiting Narcolepsy: The Practical Diagnosis and Mythology 2/30 Copyright: ©2016 Neppe Citation: Neppe VM (2016 Revisiting Narcolepsy: The Practical Diagnosis and Mythology. J Psychol Clin Psychiatry 5(3: 00287. DOI: 10.15406/ jpcpy.2016.05.00287 old classifications have used the previous terms “Type 1 Narcolepsy” for narcolepsy with cataplexy, and “Type 2

  1. Revisiting tourist behavior via destination brand worldness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kayak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Taking tourists’ perspective rather than destination offerings as its core concept, this study introduces “perceived destination brand worldness” as a variable. Perceived destination brand worldness is defined as the positive perception that a tourist has of a country that is visited by tourists from all over the world. Then, the relationship between perceived destination brand worldness and intention to revisit is analyzed using partial least squares regression. This empirical study selects Taiwanese tourists as its sample, and the results show that perceived destination brand worldness is a direct predictor of intention to revisit. In light of these empirical findings and observations, practical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  2. Gravity current jump conditions, revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungarish, Marius; Hogg, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Consider the flow of a high-Reynolds-number gravity current of density ρc in an ambient fluid of density ρa in a horizontal channel z ∈ [ 0 , H ] , with gravity in - z direction. The motion is often modeled by a two-layer formulation which displays jumps (shocks) in the height of the interface, in particular at the leading front of the dense layer. Various theoretical models have been advanced to predict the dimensionless speed of the jump, Fr = U /√{g' h } ; g' , h are reduced gravity and jump height. We revisit this problem and using the Navier-Stokes equations, integrated over a control volume embedding the jump, derive balances of mass and momentum fluxes. We focus on understanding the closures needed to complete this model and we show the vital need to understand the pressure head losses over the jump, which we show can be related to the vorticity fluxes at the boundaries of the control volume. Our formulation leads to two governing equations for three dimensionless quantities. Closure requires one further assumption, depending on which we demonstrate that previous models for gravity current fronts and internal bores can be recovered. This analysis yield new insights into existing results, and also provides constraints for potential new formulae.

  3. Leukemia and ionizing radiation revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttler, J.M. [Cuttler & Associates Inc., Vaughan, Ontario (Canada); Welsh, J.S. [Loyola University-Chicago, Dept. or Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A world-wide radiation health scare was created in the late 19508 to stop the testing of atomic bombs and block the development of nuclear energy. In spite of the large amount of evidence that contradicts the cancer predictions, this fear continues. It impairs the use of low radiation doses in medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy. This brief article revisits the second of two key studies, which revolutionized radiation protection, and identifies a serious error that was missed. This error in analyzing the leukemia incidence among the 195,000 survivors, in the combined exposed populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, invalidates use of the LNT model for assessing the risk of cancer from ionizing radiation. The threshold acute dose for radiation-induced leukemia, based on about 96,800 humans, is identified to be about 50 rem, or 0.5 Sv. It is reasonable to expect that the thresholds for other cancer types are higher than this level. No predictions or hints of excess cancer risk (or any other health risk) should be made for an acute exposure below this value until there is scientific evidence to support the LNT hypothesis. (author)

  4. The mycorrhiza helper bacteria revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey-Klett, P; Garbaye, J; Tarkka, M

    2007-01-01

    In natural conditions, mycorrhizal fungi are surrounded by complex microbial communities, which modulate the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Here, the focus is on the so-called mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB). This concept is revisited, and the distinction is made between the helper bacteria, which assist mycorrhiza formation, and those that interact positively with the functioning of the symbiosis. After considering some examples of MHB from the literature, the ecological and evolutionary implications of the relationships of MHB with mycorrhizal fungi are discussed. The question of the specificity of the MHB effect is addressed, and an assessment is made of progress in understanding the mechanisms of the MHB effect, which has been made possible through the development of genomics. Finally, clear evidence is presented suggesting that some MHB promote the functioning of the mycorrhizal symbiosis. This is illustrated for three critical functions of practical significance: nutrient mobilization from soil minerals, fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, and protection of plants against root pathogens. The review concludes with discussion of future research priorities regarding the potentially very fruitful concept of MHB.

  5. Revisiting separation properties of convex fuzzy sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Separation of convex sets by hyperplanes has been extensively studied on crisp sets. In a seminal paper separability and convexity are investigated, however there is a flaw on the definition of degree of separation. We revisited separation on convex fuzzy sets that have level-wise (crisp) disjointne...

  6. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. For free electrons, the transverse...

  7. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. At zero temperature and zero frequency...

  8. The Future of Engineering Education--Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankat, Phillip C.; Bullard, Lisa G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper revisits the landmark CEE series, "The Future of Engineering Education," published in 2000 (available free in the CEE archives on the internet) to examine the predictions made in the original paper as well as the tools and approaches documented. Most of the advice offered in the original series remains current. Despite new…

  9. Revisiting Basic Counseling Skills with Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Velsor, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Counseling with children can be challenging for counselors whose training focused on adult clients. The purpose of this article is to offer information to counselors seeking to improve their skills with children, revisiting a topic discussed in an earlier Journal of Counseling & Development article by P. Erdman and R. Lampe (1996). Examples of…

  10. Revisiting three intellectual pillars of monetary policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    ... not. More specifically, I would like to revisit and question three deeply held beliefs that underpin current monetary policy received wisdom. The first belief is that it is appropriate to define equilibrium (or natural) rates as those consistent with output at potential and with stable prices (inflation) in any given period--the so-called Wi...

  11. Revisiting the Regenerative Possibilities of Ortiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duques, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article revisits Simon Ortiz's poem, "From Sand Creek," in which the latter can in so few words convey both the horrific tragedy of conquest and colonization, while at the same time find a space for possibility, a means for recovery that is never about forgetting but always occurs as a kind of recuperative remembering. Ortiz…

  12. Revisiting the 1761 Transatlantic Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Maria Ana; Wronna, Martin; Miranda, Jorge Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The tsunami catalogs of the Atlantic include two transatlantic tsunamis in the 18th century the well known 1st November 1755 and the 31st March 1761. The 31st March 1761 earthquake struck Portugal, Spain, and Morocco. The earthquake occurred around noontime in Lisbon alarming the inhabitants and throwing down ruins of the past 1st November 1755 earthquake. According to several sources, the earthquake was followed by a tsunami observed as far as Cornwall (United Kingdom), Cork (Ireland) and Barbados (Caribbean). The analysis of macroseismic information and its compatibility with tsunami travel time information led to a source area close to the Ampere Seamount with an estimated epicenter circa 34.5°N 13°W. The estimated magnitude of the earthquake was 8.5. In this study, we revisit the tsunami observations, and we include a report from Cadiz not used before. We use the results of the compilation of the multi-beam bathymetric data, that covers the area between 34°N - 38°N and 12.5°W - 5.5°W and use the recent tectonic map published for the Southwest Iberian Margin to select among possible source scenarios. Finally, we use a non-linear shallow water model that includes the discretization and explicit leap-frog finite difference scheme to solve the shallow water equations in the spherical or Cartesian coordinate to compute tsunami waveforms and tsunami inundation and check the results against the historical descriptions to infer the source of the event. This study received funding from project ASTARTE- Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe a collaborative project Grant 603839, FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3

  13. Revisiting the Diffusion Problem in a Capillary Tube Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The present work revisits the problem of modeling diffusion above a stagnant liquid interface in a capillary tube geometry. In this revisitation we elucidate a misconception found in the classical model proposed by Bird et. al. Furthermore, we propose alternative explanations for thermally forced diffusion and provide a description of natural convection in the absence of forcing terms.

  14. Hyperinflation in Brazil, Israel, and Nicaragua revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Szybisz, M A; Szybisz, L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to address the description of hyperinflation regimes in economy. The spirals of hyperinflation developed in Brazil, Israel, and Nicaragua are revisited. This new analysis of data indicates that the episodes occurred in Brazil and Nicaragua can be understood within the frame of the model available in the literature, which is based on a nonlinear feedback (NLF) characterized by an exponent $\\beta>0$. In the NLF model the accumulated consumer price index carries a finite ...

  15. Spine revisited: Principles and parlance redefined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A revised appreciation of the evolution and the nature of bone in general and of vertebrae in particular, allows revisiting the human spine to usher in some new principles and more rational parlance, that embody spine′s phylogeny, ontogeny, anatomy and physiology. Such an approach accords primacy to spine′s soft-tissues, and relegates to its bones a secondary place.

  16. The Actinide Transition Revisited by Gutzwiller Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhu; Lanata, Nicola; Yao, Yongxin; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the problem of the actinide transition using the Gutzwiller approximation (GA) in combination with the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, we compute the equilibrium volumes of the actinide series and reproduce the abrupt change of density found experimentally near plutonium as a function of the atomic number. We discuss how this behavior relates with the electron correlations in the 5 f states, the lattice structure, and the spin-orbit interaction. Our results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  17. BHQ revisited (2): Texture development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Rüdiger; Heilbronner, Renée

    2016-04-01

    appears that grains can be unfavourably oriented for glide despite their c-axis direction falling in those positions which were used in the "classical" interpretation. Additionally, it turns out that grain-scale dispersion axes can be used to describe the kinematic behaviour in a more consistent way compared to the rotations axes obtained from intragranular misorientations in the range of 2-10°. The implications derived from the experimental data set will be compared to data obtained from natural quartz mylonites which formed in a comparable recrystallization regime. This is the companion poster to "BHQ revisited (I) looking at grain size" where the development of the dynamically recrystallized grain size is addressed. Reference cited: Heilbronner, R., and J. Tullis (2006), Evolution of c axis pole figures and grain size during dynamic recrystallization: Results from experimentally sheared quartzite, J. Geophys. Res., 111, B10202, doi:10.1029/2005JB004194.

  18. The future of psychodiagnosis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, I B

    1983-10-01

    Convergence among theoretical perspectives in clinical psychology during the last decade has moderated many earlier disputes concerning the worth and propriety of personality assessment. Survey data indicate that traditional psychodiagnostic methods continue to be widely used and taught. New directions in professional practice, especially in relation to health and forensic concerns, are providing increasing opportunities for clinical psychologists to find rewarding roles as expert diagnostic consultants.

  19. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  20. Polynomial chaotic inflation in supergravity revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Nakayama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a polynomial chaotic inflation model in supergravity which we proposed soon after the Planck first data release. Recently some issues have been raised in Ref. [12], concerning the validity of our polynomial chaotic inflation model. We study the inflaton dynamics in detail, and confirm that the inflaton potential is very well approximated by a polynomial potential for the parameters of our interest in any practical sense, and in particular, the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio can be estimated by single-field approximation. This justifies our analysis of the polynomial chaotic inflation in supergravity.

  1. Seed dispersal effectiveness revisited: a conceptual review

    OpenAIRE

    Schupp, Eugene W.; JORDANO, Pedro; Gómez Reyes, José M.

    2010-01-01

    Growth in seed dispersal studies has been fast-paced since the seed disperser effec- tiveness (SDE) framework was developed 17 yr ago. Thus, the time is ripe to revisit the framework in light of accumulated new insight. Here, we first present an over- view of the framework, how it has been applied, and what we know and do not know. We then introduce the SDE landscape as the two-dimensional representa- tion of the possible combinations of the quantity and the quality of dispersal and with ele...

  2. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  3. Revisiting Fermat's Factorization for the RSA Modulus

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Sounak

    2009-01-01

    We revisit Fermat's factorization method for a positive integer $n$ that is a product of two primes $p$ and $q$. Such an integer is used as the modulus for both encryption and decryption operations of an RSA cryptosystem. The security of RSA relies on the hardness of factoring this modulus. As a consequence of our analysis, two variants of Fermat's approach emerge. We also present a comparison between the two methods' effective regions. Though our study does not yield a new state-of-the-art algorithm for integer factorization, we believe that it reveals some interesting observations that are open for further analysis.

  4. Quantum scattering on a cone revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, V. S.; Pitelli, J. P. M.

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the scattering of quantum test particles on the conical (2 +1 )-dimensional spacetime and find the scattering amplitude as a function of the boundary conditions imposed at the apex of the cone. We show that the boundary condition is responsible for a purely analytical term in the scattering amplitude, in addition to those coming from purely topological effects. Since it is possible to have nonequivalent physical evolutions for the wave packet (each one corresponding to a different boundary condition), it seems crucial to have an observable quantity specifying which evolution has been prescribed.

  5. Guessing Revisited: A Large Deviations Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hanawal, Manjesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The problem of guessing a random string is revisited. A close relation between guessing and compression is first established. Then it is shown that if the sequence of distributions of the information spectrum satisfies the large deviation property with a certain rate function, then the limiting guessing exponent exists and is a scalar multiple of the Legendre-Fenchel dual of the rate function. Other sufficient conditions related to certain continuity properties of the information spectrum are briefly discussed. This approach highlights the importance of the information spectrum in determining the limiting guessing exponent. All known prior results are then re-derived as example applications of our unifying approach.

  6. Horton Revisited: African Traditional Thought and Western Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Horton Revisited: African Traditional Thought and Western Science. ... he refers to as the 'continuity thesis' according to which there are theoretical similarities between African traditional thought and modern Western science. ... Article Metrics.

  7. Revisiting the importance of childhood activity | van Rensburg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Revisiting the importance of childhood activity. ... There has been a drastic increase in documented childhood morbidity and mortality relating to poor nutrition and ... such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, high blood cholesterol and hypertension.

  8. Ground Zero revisits shape outbreaks: Zika and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Manrique, Pedro D; Johnson, Neil F

    2016-01-01

    During an infection outbreak, many people continue to revisit Ground Zero - such as the one square mile of Miami involved in the current Zika outbreak- for work, family or social reasons. Public health planning must account for the counterintuitive ways in which this human flow affects the outbreak's duration, severity and time-to-peak. Managing this flow of revisits can allow the outbreak's evolution to be tailored.

  9. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Wigwamma spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, Jette B.; Heldal, Mikal

    2013-01-01

    A contingent of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions almost 40 years ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported enlarging the realm of some of the species. The genus Wigwamma is revisited here with the purpose of provi......A contingent of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions almost 40 years ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported enlarging the realm of some of the species. The genus Wigwamma is revisited here with the purpose...... of providing, based on additional sampling from both polar regions, an update on species morphology, life history events and biogeography that can serve as a reference for the future. A new genus, Pseudowigwamma gen. nov. is described to accommodate Wigwamma scenozonion, a species which critically deviates...... from a core group of five Wigwamma species in terms of coccolith morphology and life history events. Wigwamma armatura sp. nov. is described on the basis of material from the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. While fitting nicely into the Wigwamma generic concept, the species adds new dimensions to the overall...

  10. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or "empty") signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents.

  11. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or “empty”) signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents. PMID:26834664

  12. Muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naini, Ali; Toscano, Antonio; Musumeci, Olimpia;

    2009-01-01

    storage disease type X and novel mutations in the gene encoding the muscle subunit of PGAM (PGAM2). DESIGN: Clinical, pathological, biochemical, and molecular analyses. SETTING: Tertiary care university hospitals and academic institutions. Patients A 37-year-old Danish man of Pakistani origin who had...... PGAM deficiency, and molecular studies revealed 2 novel homozygous mutations, a nonsense mutation and a single nucleotide deletion. Pathological studies of muscle showed mild glycogen accumulation but prominent tubular aggregates in both patients. CONCLUSIONS: We found that glycogen storage disease...

  13. Triglycerides Revisited to the Serial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viecili, Paulo Ricardo Nazário; da Silva, Brenda; Hirsch, Gabriela E; Porto, Fernando G; Parisi, Mariana M; Castanho, Alison R; Wender, Michele; Klafke, Jonatas Z

    This review discusses the role of triglycerides (TGs) in the normal cardiovascular system as well as in the development and clinical manifestation of cardiovascular diseases. Regulation of TGs at the enzymatic and genetic level, in addition to their possible relevance as preclinical and clinical biomarkers, is discussed, culminating with a description of available and emerging treatments. Due to the high complexity of the subject and the vast amount of material in the literature, the objective of this review was not to exhaust the subject, but rather to compile the information to facilitate and improve the understanding of those interested in this topic. The main publications on the topic were sought out, especially those from the last 5 years. The data in the literature still give reason to believe that there is room for doubt regarding the use of TG as disease biomarkers; however, there is increasing evidence for the role of hypertriglyceridemia on the atherosclerotic inflammatory process, cardiovascular outcomes, and mortality. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. TMS and drugs revisited 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemann, Ulf; Reis, Janine; Schwenkreis, Peter; Rosanova, Mario; Strafella, Antonio; Badawy, Radwa; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian

    2015-10-01

    The combination of pharmacology and transcranial magnetic stimulation to study the effects of drugs on TMS-evoked EMG responses (pharmaco-TMS-EMG) has considerably improved our understanding of the effects of TMS on the human brain. Ten years have elapsed since an influential review on this topic has been published in this journal (Ziemann, 2004). Since then, several major developments have taken place: TMS has been combined with EEG to measure TMS evoked responses directly from brain activity rather than by motor evoked potentials in a muscle, and pharmacological characterization of the TMS-evoked EEG potentials, although still in its infancy, has started (pharmaco-TMS-EEG). Furthermore, the knowledge from pharmaco-TMS-EMG that has been primarily obtained in healthy subjects is now applied to clinical settings, for instance, to monitor or even predict clinical drug responses in neurological or psychiatric patients. Finally, pharmaco-TMS-EMG has been applied to understand the effects of CNS active drugs on non-invasive brain stimulation induced long-term potentiation-like and long-term depression-like plasticity. This is a new field that may help to develop rationales of pharmacological treatment for enhancement of recovery and re-learning after CNS lesions. This up-dated review will highlight important knowledge and recent advances in the contribution of pharmaco-TMS-EMG and pharmaco-TMS-EEG to our understanding of normal and dysfunctional excitability, connectivity and plasticity of the human brain.

  15. Central facial palsy revisited: a clinical-radiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Luigi; Saccani, Elena; De Giampaulis, Piero; Crisi, Girolamo; Pavesi, Giovanni

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the pattern of volitional facial motor deficits in acute stroke patients. We assessed the strength of single facial movements and correlated it to the site of infarct classified on computed tomography scans. Exclusion criteria were previous stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, and subcortical stroke. Results showed that weakness in eyelid closure was associated with anterior cerebral artery (ACA) stroke. Weakness in lip opening was associated with middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke. We suggest that sparing of upper facial movements in MCA stroke is due to the presence of an upper face motor representation in both the MCA and ACA territories.

  16. Hemangiopericytoma: long-term outcome revisited. Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiariti, Marco; Goetz, Pablo; El-Maghraby, Hussien; Tailor, Jignesh; Kitchen, Neil

    2011-03-01

    Hemangiopericytomas are rare tumors that behave aggressively with a high rate of local recurrence and distant metastases. With the aim of determining the outcome and response to various treatment modalities, a series of 39 patients who underwent microsurgical resection for primary meningeal hemangiopericytoma over a 24-year period is presented. Patients with hemangiopericytoma were identified from histopathology records and their medical records were analyzed retrospectively by 2 independent reviewers to collect data on surgical treatment, adjuvant therapy, postoperative course, local or distant recurrence, and follow-up. Of the 39 patients, 19 were male and 20 were female. Mean patient age was 44.1 years. Thirty-four tumors were intracranial and 5 were spinal. The mean follow-up period was 123 months. Twenty-eight patients developed local recurrence. The recurrence rate at 1, 5, and 15 years was 3.5%, 46%, and 92%, respectively. Extraneural metastasis occurred in 8 patients (26%) at an average of 123 months after initial surgery. Recurrences and metastases were treated by surgical excision, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), chemotherapy, and/or stereotactic radiosurgery. Adjuvant EBRT following initial surgery was found to extend the disease-free interval from 154 months to 254 months, although it did not prevent the development of metastasis. In those patients with EBRT and complete resection, the mean recurrence-free interval was found to be 126.3 months longer (p = 0.04) and overall survival 126 months longer than without EBRT. Furthermore, adjusting for resection, patients undergoing EBRT had 0.33 times increased risk of recurrence compared with those who did not (p = 0.03). A majority of patients remained able to live independently despite revision surgery for recurrence. The mean follow-up of this patient series represents the longest follow-up duration published to date and demonstrates extended survival in a significant number of patients with hemangiopericytoma. Gross-total resection followed by adjuvant EBRT provides patients with the highest probability of an increased recurrence-free interval and overall survival. Prolonged survival justifies long-term follow-up and aggressive treatment of initial, recurrent, and metastatic disease.

  17. Curved canals: Ancestral files revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Nidhi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to provide an insight into different techniques of cleaning and shaping of curved root canals with hand instruments. Although a plethora of root canal instruments like ProFile, ProTaper, LightSpeed ® etc dominate the current scenario, the inexpensive conventional root canal hand files such as K-files and flexible files can be used to get optimum results when handled meticulously. Special emphasis has been put on the modifications in biomechanical canal preparation in a variety of curved canal cases. This article compiles a series of clinical cases of root canals with curvatures in the middle and apical third and with S-shaped curvatures that were successfully completed by employing only conventional root canal hand instruments.

  18. Genetics of Hereditary Angioedema Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germenis, Anastasios E; Speletas, Matthaios

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary genetic research has provided evidences that angioedema represents a diverse family of disorders related to kinin metabolism, with a much greater genetic complexity than was initially considered. Convincing data have also recently been published indicating that the clinical heterogeneity of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (classified as C1-INH-HAE) could be attributed at least in part, either to the type of SERPING1 mutations or to mutations in genes encoding for enzymes involved in the metabolism and function of bradykinin. Alterations detected in at least one more gene (F12) are nowadays considered responsible for 25 % of cases of hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (type III hereditary angioedema (HAE), nlC1-INH-HAE). Interesting data derived from genetic approaches of non-hereditary angioedemas indicate that other immune pathways might be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAE. More than 125 years after the recognition of the hereditary nature of HAE by Osler, the heterogeneity of clinical expressions, the genetics of this disorder, and the genotype-phenotype relationships, still presents a challenge that will be discussed in this review. Large scale, in-depth genetic studies are expected not only to answer these emerging questions but also to further elucidate many of the unmet aspects of angioedema pathogenesis. Uncovering genetic biomarkers affecting the severity of the disease and/or the effectiveness of the various treatment modalities might lead to the prevention of attacks and the optimization of C1-INH-HAE management that is expected to provide a valuable benefit to the sufferers of angioedema.

  19. IgM nephropathy revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Muhammed; Kazi, Javed I

    2012-01-01

    IgM nephropathy (IgMN) is an idiopathic immune complex-mediated glomerulopathy that was first described as a distinct disease in a nephropathology literature in 1978. Here, a historical review and the current status of IgMN in the light of world literature and the current experience will be presented. The Pubmed (www.pubmed.gov) search was made for articles on IgMN as the sole subject of the study or where it constituted a significant number of cases in a biopsy series in the world literature written in English. A total of 41 articles were found. A critical review of the literature was made. Soon after 1978, a series of reports were published mostly from the western world, but the interest in the entity did not withstand the test of time. No substantial basic medical research was carried out and the disease was largely ignored by the western researchers. More recently, a flurry of articles have appeared in the literature on the topic, mostly from tropical countries, and have renewed the interest in the entity. However, most of the current literature on IgMN is based on clinical observations, and experimental models and mechanistic studies of IgMN are lacking. There is an urgent need to develop consensus based criteria for the diagnosis of the condition, as well as, to focus the research on mechanistic studies to understand the pathogenesis of the disease better.

  20. Pelvimetry revisited: Analyzing cephalopelvic disproportion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhard, Miriam S. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Johnson, Thorsten R.C., E-mail: thorsten.johnson@med.uni-muenchen.d [Department of Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Weckbach, Sabine; Nikolaou, Konstantin [Department of Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Friese, Klaus; Hasbargen, Uwe [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the clinical value of pelvimetry to predict dystocia due to cephalopelvic disproportion. 63 patients who had received an abdominal CT scan postpartum were included. Pelvimetry was performed retrospectively with these datasets on a 3D workstation; there were no CT examinations performed solely for pelvimetry, and there was no radiation exposure for study purposes. Patients were divided into three groups by the course of birth, i.e. normal vaginal delivery (A), dystocia due to cephalopelvic disproportion (B) and other patients (C). Previously described methods were evaluated for their accuracy in diagnosing cephalopelvic disproportion. The pelvimetric parameters did not show significant differences between groups A (n = 20) and B (n = 20) except for the sagittal mid-pelvic diameter (q) with 12.7 {+-} 0.6 cm vs. 11.9 {+-} 0.6 cm (p = 0.0001). The ROC analysis of the previously described methods showed areas under the curve between 0.50 and 0.67. The ROC curves for q had an area of 0.88, providing 85% sensitivity with 85% specificity. In conclusion, the sagittal mid-pelvic diameter shows potential to detect cephalopelvic disproportion with acceptable accuracy. With the information gained on the CT data, a prospective trial based on MR imaging can be set up to validate the diagnostic accuracy.

  1. Ecological caring-Revisiting the original ideas of caring science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, Helena; Ranheim, Albertine; Dahlberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this empirically grounded philosophical paper is to explore the notion of holistic care with the intention to expand it into a notion of ecological care and in such a way revisit the original ideas of caring science. The philosophical analysis, driven by lifeworld theory and especially Merleau-Ponty's philosophy, is firmly rooted in contemporary clinical care. We used interview data from patients in a study at an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden, which forms part of an ecological community with, for example, ecological agriculture. The empirical study is analysed according to reflective lifeworld research. Starting from the fact that illness can be defined as a loss of homelikeness in the body and in the familiar world, our findings illustrate how ecological care helps the patient to once again find one's place in a world that is characterized by interconnectedness. The task of ecological care is thus not only to see the patient within a world of relationships but to help the patient find his/her place again, to understand himself/herself and the world anew. Ecological care is not only about fighting an illness, but also recognizes a patient from inside a world that s/he is affected by and affects, that s/he is understood and understands from. Such care tries to restore this connection by making possible the rhythmical movement as well as the space in-between activity and rest, between being cared for and actively involving oneself in one's recovery and between closing oneself off from the world and once again going out into it.

  2. Ecological caring—Revisiting the original ideas of caring science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, Helena; Ranheim, Albertine; Dahlberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this empirically grounded philosophical paper is to explore the notion of holistic care with the intention to expand it into a notion of ecological care and in such a way revisit the original ideas of caring science. The philosophical analysis, driven by lifeworld theory and especially Merleau-Ponty's philosophy, is firmly rooted in contemporary clinical care. We used interview data from patients in a study at an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden, which forms part of an ecological community with, for example, ecological agriculture. The empirical study is analysed according to reflective lifeworld research. Starting from the fact that illness can be defined as a loss of homelikeness in the body and in the familiar world, our findings illustrate how ecological care helps the patient to once again find one's place in a world that is characterized by interconnectedness. The task of ecological care is thus not only to see the patient within a world of relationships but to help the patient find his/her place again, to understand himself/herself and the world anew. Ecological care is not only about fighting an illness, but also recognizes a patient from inside a world that s/he is affected by and affects, that s/he is understood and understands from. Such care tries to restore this connection by making possible the rhythmical movement as well as the space in-between activity and rest, between being cared for and actively involving oneself in one's recovery and between closing oneself off from the world and once again going out into it. PMID:27914196

  3. ADHM Revisited: Instantons and Wilson Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, David

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the well-studied D0-D4 system of D-branes and its relationship to the ADHM construction. It is well known that the D0-branes appear as instantons in the D4-brane worldvolume. We add a Wilson line to the D4-brane in the guise of an extended fundamental string and determine how this affects the D0-brane dynamics. As the D0-brane moves in the presence of the Wilson line, it experiences a Lorentz force, proportional to its Yang-Mills gauge connection. From the perspective of the D0-brane quantum mechanics, this force emerges through the ADHM construction of the self-dual gauge connection.

  4. Elluminate Article: Revisiting Mega-Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Rubin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The publisher of IRRODL, The Canadian Institute of Distance Education Research (CIDER, is pleased to link here to a series of eight online seminars that took place over Spring 2006, using Elluminate live e-learning and collaborative solutions. These interactive CIDER Sessions disseminate research emanating from Canada's vibrant DE research community, and we feel these archived recordings are highly relevant to many in the international distance education research community. To access these sessions, you must first download FREE software. Visit http://www.elluminate.com/support/ (Elluminate Support for details on how to download this FREE software. * Revisiting Mega-Universities Gene Rubin and Claudine SchWeber University of Maryland University College

  5. Resolution of Reflection Seismic Data Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Mosegaard, Klaus; Zunino, Andrea

    wavelength of the wavelet within the thin layer. Using a simple thin-layer parameterization Widess (1973) demonstrated that thin layers with thickness less that around λb/8 cannot be resolved from seismic data independent of the noise level. This has results since been widely adopted as a commonly accepted...... lower vertical resolution of reflection seismic data. In the following we will revisit think layer model and demonstrate that there is in practice no limit to the vertical resolution using the parameterization of Widess (1973), and that the vertical resolution is limited by the noise in the data....... In general, we discuss that the resolution of reflection seismic data is controlled by the noise level and the a priori information available...

  6. Visual Object Tracking Performance Measures Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čehovin, Luka; Leonardis, Aleš; Kristan, Matej

    2016-03-01

    The problem of visual tracking evaluation is sporting a large variety of performance measures, and largely suffers from lack of consensus about which measures should be used in experiments. This makes the cross-paper tracker comparison difficult. Furthermore, as some measures may be less effective than others, the tracking results may be skewed or biased toward particular tracking aspects. In this paper, we revisit the popular performance measures and tracker performance visualizations and analyze them theoretically and experimentally. We show that several measures are equivalent from the point of information they provide for tracker comparison and, crucially, that some are more brittle than the others. Based on our analysis, we narrow down the set of potential measures to only two complementary ones, describing accuracy and robustness, thus pushing toward homogenization of the tracker evaluation methodology. These two measures can be intuitively interpreted and visualized and have been employed by the recent visual object tracking challenges as the foundation for the evaluation methodology.

  7. Post-Inflationary Gravitino Production Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Olive, Keith A; Peloso, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We revisit gravitino production following inflation. As a first step, we review the standard calculation of gravitino production in the thermal plasma formed at the end of post-inflationary reheating when the inflaton has completely decayed. Next we consider gravitino production prior to the completion of reheating, assuming that the inflaton decay products thermalize instantaneously while they are still dilute. We then argue that instantaneous thermalization is in general a good approximation, and also show that the contribution of non-thermal gravitino production via the collisions of inflaton decay products prior to thermalization is relatively small. Our final estimate of the gravitino-to-entropy ratio is approximated well by a standard calculation of gravitino production in the post-inflationary thermal plasma assuming total instantaneous decay and thermalization at a time $t \\simeq 1.2/\\Gamma_\\phi$. Finally, in light of our calculations, we consider potential implications of upper limits on the gravitin...

  8. Seasonal dating of Sappho's 'Midnight Poem' revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Gurdemir, Levent; George, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Sappho was a Greek lyric poet who composed a significant array of pristine poetry. Although much of it has been lost, her reputation has endured thanks to numerous surviving fragments. One of her contributions includes the so-called 'Midnight Poem', which contains a line about the Pleiades, setting sometime before midnight, and supposedly observed from the island of Lesbos. This poem also refers to the setting of the Moon. Sappho's Midnight Poem thus represents a prime example of where ancient poetry and astronomy merge, and it also offers the possibility of seasonal dating. Previously, Herschberg and Mebius (1990) estimated that the poem was composed in late winter/early spring, a time frame that is not unusual for lyrics of an amorous nature. The aim of our paper is to revisit this earlier finding by using modern-day software. Our study confirms Herschberg and Mebius' result, but also conveys further information.

  9. Revisiting R-invariant Direct Gauge Mediation

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2015-01-01

    We revisit a special model of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking, the "R-invariant direct gauge mediation." We pay particular attention to whether the model is consistent with the minimal model of the \\mu-term, i.e., a simple mass term of the Higgs doublets in the superpotential. Although the incompatibility is highlighted in view of the current experimental constraints on the superparticle masses and the observed Higgs boson mass, the minimal \\mu-term can be consistent with the R-invariant gauge mediation model via a careful choice of model parameters. We derive an upper limit on the gluino mass from the observed Higgs boson mass. We also discuss whether the model can explain the 3\\sigma excess of the Z+jets+$E_T^{\\rm miss}$ events reported by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  10. Neutrino Dark Energy -- Revisiting the Stability Issue

    CERN Document Server

    Bjaelde, Ole Eggers; van de Bruck, Carsten; Hannestad, Steen; Mota, David F; Schrempp, Lily; Tocchini-Valentini, Domenico

    2007-01-01

    A coupling between a light scalar field and neutrinos has been widely discussed as a mechanism for linking (time varying) neutrino masses and the present energy density and equation of state of dark energy. However, it has been pointed out that the viability of this scenario in the non-relativistic neutrino regime is threatened by the strong growth of hydrodynamic perturbations associated with a negative adiabatic sound speed squared. In this paper we revisit the stability issue in the framework of linear perturbation theory in a model independent way. The criterion for the stability of a model is translated into a constraint on the scalar-neutrino coupling, which depends on the ratio of the energy densities in neutrinos and cold dark matter. We illustrate our results by providing meaningful examples both for stable and unstable models.

  11. The Species Problem in Myxomycetes Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Laura M; Stephenson, Steven L

    2016-08-01

    Species identification in the myxomycetes (plasmodial slime molds or myxogastrids) poses particular challenges to researchers as a result of their morphological plasticity and frequent alteration between sexual and asexual life strategies. Traditionally, myxomycete morphology has been used as the primary method of species delimitation. However, with the increasing availability of genetic information, traditional myxomycete taxonomy is being increasingly challenged, and new hypotheses continue to emerge. Due to conflicts that sometimes occur between traditional and more modern species concepts that are based largely on molecular data, there is a pressing need to revisit the discussion surrounding the species concept used for myxomycetes. Biological diversity is being increasingly studied with molecular methods and data accumulates at ever-faster rates, making resolution of this matter urgent. In this review, currently used and potentially useful species concepts (biological, morphological, phylogenetic and ecological) are reviewed, and an integrated approach to resolve the myxomycete species problem is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Revisiting Hafemeister's science and society tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecha, R. J.; Berney, R.; Craver, B.

    2007-10-01

    We revisit a series of papers on science and society issues by David Hafemeister in the 1970s and 1980s. The emphasis in the present work is on world oil production limits and some consequences of various possible scenarios for the near future. Some of the data and scenarios used by Hafemeister are updated for U.S. oil production in the past two decades, and extended to an analysis of a peak in world oil production in the future. We discuss some simple scenarios for future energy use patterns and look at the consequence of these scenarios as world oil production begins to decline. We also provide a list of resources for critical investigations of natural resource extraction and depletion patterns.

  13. Revisiting gravitino dark matter in thermal leptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Masahiro; Suzuki, Motoo; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we revisit the gravitino dark matter scenario in the presence of the bilinear R-parity violating interaction. In particular, we discuss a consistency with the thermal leptogenesis. For a high reheating temperature required for the thermal leptogenesis, the gravitino dark matter tends to be overproduced, which puts a severe upper limit on the gluino mass. As we will show, a large portion of parameter space of the gravitino dark matter scenario has been excluded by combining the constraints from the gravitino abundance and the null results of the searches for the superparticles at the LHC experiments. In particular, the models with the stau (and other charged slepton) NLSP has been almost excluded by the searches for the long-lived charged particles at the LHC unless the required reheating temperature is somewhat lowered by assuming, for example, a degenerated right-handed neutrino mass spectrum.

  14. Revisiting gravitino dark matter in thermal leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit the gravitino dark matter scenario in the presence of the bilinear $R$-parity violating interaction. In particular, we discuss a consistency with the thermal leptogenesis. For a high reheating temperature required for the thermal leptogenesis, the gravitino dark matter tends to be overproduced, which puts a severe upper limit on the gluino mass. As we will show, a large portion of parameter space of the gravitino dark matter scenario has been excluded by combining the constraints from the gravitino abundance and the null results of the searches for the superparticles at the LHC experiments. In particular, the models with the stau (and other charged slepton) NLSP has been almost excluded by the searches for the long-lived charged particles at the LHC unless the required reheating temperature is somewhat lowered by assuming, for example, a degenerated right-handed neutrino mass spectrum.

  15. Neutrino dark energy. Revisiting the stability issue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggers Bjaelde, O.; Hannestad, S. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Brookfield, A.W. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Dept. of Physics, Astro-Particle Theory and Cosmology Group; Van de Bruck, C. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics, Astro-Particle Theory and Cosmology Group; Mota, D.F. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik]|[Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, Oslo (Norway); Schrempp, L. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Tocchini-Valentini, D. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2007-05-15

    A coupling between a light scalar field and neutrinos has been widely discussed as a mechanism for linking (time varying) neutrino masses and the present energy density and equation of state of dark energy. However, it has been pointed out that the viability of this scenario in the non-relativistic neutrino regime is threatened by the strong growth of hydrodynamic perturbations associated with a negative adiabatic sound speed squared. In this paper we revisit the stability issue in the framework of linear perturbation theory in a model independent way. The criterion for the stability of a model is translated into a constraint on the scalar-neutrino coupling, which depends on the ratio of the energy densities in neutrinos and cold dark matter. We illustrate our results by providing meaningful examples both for stable and unstable models. (orig.)

  16. Revisiting Lepton Flavour Universality in B Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, Paride

    2017-04-01

    Lepton flavour universality (LFU) in B-decays is revisited by considering a class of semileptonic operators defined at a scale Λ above the electroweak scale v. The importance of quantum effects is emphasised [F. Feruglio, P. Paradisi and A. Pattori, arxiv:arXiv:1606.00524 [hep-ph], to appear in PRL]. We construct the low-energy effective Lagrangian taking into account the running effects from Λ down to v through the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGE) in the limit of exact electroweak symmetry and QED RGEs from v down to the 1 GeV scale. The most important quantum effects turn out to be the modification of the leptonic couplings of the vector boson Z and the generation of a purely leptonic effective Lagrangian. Large LFU breaking effects in Z and τ decays as well as visible lepton flavour violating (LFV) effects in τ decays are induced.

  17. "Frankie" Revisited: Foundational Concepts In Flux--An Introduction to the Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The author offers his own historical review of the celebrated "Frankie" case, contextualizing it within political as well as scientific challenges. In addition, he provides an introductory survey of the three contributions that are to follow in the section. Similarities and differences are underscored, as contemporary child analysts revisit this acknowledged "classic" reported more than sixty years ago. In the revisiting and even in one instance where it is surprisingly a first reading, similarities and differences between there-and-then as contrasted with here-and-now reflections prove quite illuminating. There is considerable lauding of the revolutionary nature of the original case on the one hand, along with some open criticisms on the other. Several of the scholars suggest that the technique and the theories of pathogenesis and therapeutic action might well benefit from some selective updating of cognitive stance to the organization of clinical data. In this regard, adding nonlinear thinking to the original reductionism bias gets a strong boost--although that proposal doesn't quite achieve the decisive definition that permits it to flourish.

  18. Assessment of Functioning of RTI-STI Clinics associated with A Tertiary Care Centre, Jaipur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Kapoor, Monika Rathore, Amita Kashyap, Abhinav Agrawal, Vaseem Naheed Baig

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: More female reported to these clinics than male. Condoms provision was practiced most regularly. Other components of counselling and services were not practiced consistently. Partner treatment and revisits were particularly lacking. Consistent presence of counsellor at clinic is vital for functioning of clinics."

  19. The Super-GUT CMSSM Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-01-01

    We revisit minimal supersymmetric SU(5) grand unification (GUT) models in which the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) are universal at some input scale, $M_{in}$, above the supersymmetric gauge coupling unification scale, $M_{GUT}$. As in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM), we assume that the scalar masses and gaugino masses have common values, $m_0$ and $m_{1/2}$ respectively, at $M_{in}$, as do the trilinear soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters $A_0$. Going beyond previous studies of such a super-GUT CMSSM scenario, we explore the constraints imposed by the lower limit on the proton lifetime and the LHC measurement of the Higgs mass, $m_h$. We find regions of $m_0$, $m_{1/2}$, $A_0$ and the parameters of the SU(5) superpotential that are compatible with these and other phenomenological constraints such as the density of cold dark matter, which we assume to be provided by the lightest neutralino. Typically, these allowed regions appear for $m_0$ and $m_{1/...

  20. Searle's"Dualism Revisited"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P., Henry

    2008-11-20

    A recent article in which John Searle claims to refute dualism is examined from a scientific perspective. John Searle begins his recent article 'Dualism Revisited' by stating his belief that the philosophical problem of consciousness has a scientific solution. He then claims to refute dualism. It is therefore appropriate to examine his arguments against dualism from a scientific perspective. Scientific physical theories contain two kinds of descriptions: (1) Descriptions of our empirical findings, expressed in an every-day language that allows us communicate to each other our sensory experiences pertaining to what we have done and what we have learned; and (2) Descriptions of a theoretical model, expressed in a mathematical language that allows us to communicate to each other certain ideas that exist in our mathematical imaginations, and that are believed to represent, within our streams of consciousness, certain aspects of reality that we deem to exist independently of their being perceived by any human observer. These two parts of our scientific description correspond to the two aspects of our general contemporary dualistic understanding of the total reality in which we are imbedded, namely the empirical-mental aspect and the theoretical-physical aspect. The duality question is whether this general dualistic understanding of ourselves should be regarded as false in some important philosophical or scientific sense.

  1. Revisiting the relaxation dynamics of isolated pyrrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montero, Raúl; Ovejas, Virginia; Fernández-Fernández, Marta; Longarte, Asier, E-mail: asier.longarte@ehu.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), Apart. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Peralta Conde, Álvaro [Centro de Láseres Pulsados (CLPU), Edificio M3, Parque Científico, 37185 Villamayor (Spain)

    2014-07-07

    Herein, the interpretation of the femtosecond-scale temporal evolution of the pyrrole ion signal, after excitation in the 267–217 nm interval, recently published by our group [R. Montero, A. Peralta Conde, V. Ovejas, M. Fernández-Fernández, F. Castaño, J. R. Vázquez de Aldana, and A. Longarte, J. Chem. Phys.137, 064317 (2012)] is re-visited. The observation of a shift in the pyrrole{sup +} transient respect to zero delay reference, initially attributed to ultrafast dynamics on the πσ{sup *} type state (3s a{sub 1} ← π 1a{sub 2}), is demonstrated to be caused by the existence of pump + probe populated states, along the ionization process. The influence of these resonances in pump-prone ionization experiments, when multi-photon probes are used, and the significance of a proper zero-time reference, is discussed. The possibility of preparing the πσ{sup *} state by direct excitation is investigated by collecting 1 + 1 photoelectron spectra, at excitation wavelengths ranging from 255 to 219 nm. No conclusive evidences of ionization through this state are found.

  2. Spin-orbit evolution of Mercury revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Noyelles, Benoit; Makarov, Valeri; Efroimsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mercury is a peculiar case, in that it is locked into the 3:2 spin-orbit resonance. Its rotation period, 58 days, is exactly two thirds of its orbital period. It is accepted that the eccentricity of Mercury (0.206) favours the trapping into this resonance. More controversial is how the capture took place. A recent study by Makarov has shown that entrapment into this resonance is certain if the eccentricity is larger than 0.2, provided that we use a realistic tidal model, based on the Darwin-Kaula expansion of the tidal torque, including both the elastic rebound and anelastic creep of solids. We here revisit the scenario of Mercury's capture into the supersynchronous spin-orbit resonances. The study is based on a realistic model of tidal friction in solids, that takes into account the rheology and the self-gravitation of the planet. Developed in Efroimsky, it was employed by Makarov et al. to determine the likely spin state of the planet GJ581d, with its eccentricity evolution taken into account. It was also u...

  3. [What mirror neurons have revealed: revisited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Akira; Maeda, Kazutaka

    2014-06-01

    The first paper on mirror neurons was published in 1992. In the span of over two decades since then, much knowledge about the relationship between social cognitive function and the motor control system has been accumulated. Direct matching of visual actions and their corresponding motor representations is the most important functional property of mirror neuron. Many studies have emphasized intrinsic simulation as a core concept for mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are thought to play a role in social cognitive function. However, the function of mirror neurons in the macaque remains unclear, because such cognitive functions are limited or lacking in macaque monkeys. It is therefore important to discuss these neurons in the context of motor function. Rizzolatti and colleagues have stressed that the most important function of mirror neurons in macaques is recognition of actions performed by other individuals. I suggest that mirror neurons in the Macaque inferior pariental lobule might be correlated with body schema. In the parieto-premotor network, matching of corollary discharge and actual sensory feedback is an essential neuronal operation. Recently, neurons showing mirror properties were found in some cortical areas outside the mirror neuron system. The current work would revisit the outcomes of mirror neuron studies to discuss the function of mirror neurons in the monkey.

  4. Seed dispersal effectiveness revisited: a conceptual review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Eugene W; Jordano, Pedro; Gómez, José María

    2010-10-01

    Growth in seed dispersal studies has been fast-paced since the seed disperser effectiveness (SDE) framework was developed 17 yr ago. Thus, the time is ripe to revisit the framework in light of accumulated new insight. Here, we first present an overview of the framework, how it has been applied, and what we know and do not know. We then introduce the SDE landscape as the two-dimensional representation of the possible combinations of the quantity and the quality of dispersal and with elevational contours representing isoclines of SDE. We discuss the structure of disperser assemblages on such landscapes. Following this we discuss recent advances and ideas in seed dispersal in the context of their impacts on SDE. Finally, we highlight a number of emerging issues that provide insight into SDE. Overall, the SDE framework successfully captures the complexities of seed dispersal. We advocate an expanded use of the term dispersal encompassing the multiple recruitment stages from fruit to adult. While this entails difficulties in estimating SDE, it is a necessary expansion if we are to understand the central relevance of seed dispersal in plant ecology and evolution.

  5. Hyperinflation in Brazil, Israel, and Nicaragua revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szybisz, Martín A.; Szybisz, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to address the description of hyperinflation regimens in economy. The spirals of hyperinflation developed in Brazil, Israel, and Nicaragua are revisited. This new analysis of data indicates that the episodes occurred in Brazil and Nicaragua can be understood within the frame of the model available in the literature, which is based on a nonlinear feedback (NLF) characterized by an exponent β > 0. In the NLF model the accumulated consumer price index carries a finite time singularity of the type 1 /(tc - t) (1 - β) / β determining a critical time tc at which the economy would crash. It is shown that in the case of Brazil the entire episode cannot be described with a unique set of parameters because the time series was strongly affected by a change of policy. This fact gives support to the "so called" Lucas critique, who stated that model's parameters usually change once policy changes. On the other hand, such a model is not able to provide any tc in the case of the weaker hyperinflation occurred in Israel. It is shown that in this case the fit of data yields β → 0. This limit leads to the linear feedback formulation which does not predict any tc. An extension for the NLF model is suggested.

  6. Revisiting the cardiometabolic relevance of serum amylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munakata Hiromi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pancreas has dual functions as a digestive organ and as an endocrine organ, by secreting digestive enzymes and endocrine hormones. Some early studies have revealed that serum amylase levels are lower in individuals with chronic pancreatitis, severe long-term type 2 diabetes or type 1 diabetes. Regarding this issue, we recently reported that low serum amylase levels were associated with metabolic syndrome and diabetes in asymptomatic adults. In the light of this, we further investigated the fundamental relationship between serum amylase and cardiometabolic aspects by reanalyzing previous data which comprised subjects without diabetes treatment with oral hypoglycemic drugs or insulin (n = 2,344. Findings Serum amylase was inversely correlated with body mass index independently of age. Higher serum amylase levels were noted in older subjects aged 55 years old or more (n = 1,114 than in younger subjects (P P Conclusions Revisiting the cardiometabolic relevance of serum amylase may yield novel insight not only into glucose homeostasis and metabolic abnormalities related to obesity, but also possibly carbohydrate absorption in the gut.

  7. Coal consumption and economic growth revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolde-Rufael, Yemane [135 Carnwath Road, London SW6 3HR (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    This paper revisits the causal relationship between coal consumption and real GDP for six major coal consuming countries for the period 1965-2005 within a vector autoregressive (VAR) framework by including capital and labour as additional variables. Applying a modified version of the Granger causality test due to Toda and Yamamoto [Toda HY, Yamamoto T. Statistical inference in vector autoregressions with possibly integrated process. J Econom 1995;66:225-50], we found a unidirectional causality running from coal consumption to economic growth in India and Japan while the opposite causality running from economic growth to coal consumption was found in China and South Korea. In contrast there was a bi-directional causality running between economic growth and coal consumption in South Africa and the United States. Variance decomposition analysis seems to confirm our Granger causality results. The policy implication is that measures adopted to mitigate the adverse effects of coal consumption may be taken without harming economic growth in China and South Korea. In contrast, for the remaining four countries conservation measures can harm economic growth. (author)

  8. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-01-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  9. The super-GUT CMSSM revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [King' s College London, Theoretical Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Evans, Jason L. [KIAS, School of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Mustafayev, Azar; Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A. [University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We revisit minimal supersymmetric SU(5) grand unification (GUT) models in which the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) are universal at some input scale, M{sub in}, above the supersymmetric gauge-coupling unification scale, M{sub GUT}. As in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM), we assume that the scalar masses and gaugino masses have common values, m{sub 0} and m{sub 1/2}, respectively, at M{sub in}, as do the trilinear soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters A{sub 0}. Going beyond previous studies of such a super-GUT CMSSM scenario, we explore the constraints imposed by the lower limit on the proton lifetime and the LHC measurement of the Higgs mass, m{sub h}. We find regions of m{sub 0}, m{sub 1/2}, A{sub 0} and the parameters of the SU(5) superpotential that are compatible with these and other phenomenological constraints such as the density of cold dark matter, which we assume to be provided by the lightest neutralino. Typically, these allowed regions appear for m{sub 0} and m{sub 1/2} in the multi-TeV region, for suitable values of the unknown SU(5) GUT-scale phases and superpotential couplings, and with the ratio of supersymmetric Higgs vacuum expectation values tanβ

  10. The Fractional Langevin Equation: Brownian Motion Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Mainardi, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    We have revisited the Brownian motion on the basis of the fractional Langevin equation which turns out to be a particular case of the generalized Langevin equation introduced by Kubo on 1966. The importance of our approach is to model the Brownian motion more realistically than the usual one based on the classical Langevin equation, in that it takes into account also the retarding effects due to hydrodynamic backflow, i.e. the added mass and the Basset memory drag. On the basis of the two fluctuation-dissipation theorems and of the techniques of the Fractional Calculus we have provided the analytical expressions of the correlation functions (both for the random force and the particle velocity) and of the mean squared particle displacement. The random force has been shown to be represented by a superposition of the usual white noise with a "fractional" noise. The velocity correlation function is no longer expressed by a simple exponential but exhibits a slower decay, proportional to $t^{-3/2}$ as $t \\to \\infty...

  11. The drive revisited: Mastery and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Starting from the theory of the libido and the notions of the experience of satisfaction and the drive for mastery introduced by Freud, the author revisits the notion of the drive by proposing the following model: the drive takes shape in the combination of two currents of libidinal cathexis, one which takes the paths of the 'apparatus for obtaining mastery' (the sense-organs, motricity, etc.) and strives to appropriate the object, and the other which cathects the erotogenic zones and the experience of satisfaction that is experienced through stimulation in contact with the object. The result of this combination of cathexes constitutes a 'representation', the subsequent evocation of which makes it possible to tolerate for a certain period of time the absence of a satisfying object. On the basis of this conception, the author distinguishes the representations proper, vehicles of satisfaction, from imagos and traumatic images which give rise to excitation that does not link up with the paths taken by the drives. This model makes it possible to conciliate the points of view of the advocates of 'object-seeking' and of those who give precedence to the search for pleasure, and, further, to renew our understanding of object-relations, which can then be approached from the angle of their relations to infantile sexuality. Destructiveness is considered in terms of "mastery madness" and not in terms of the late Freudian hypothesis of the death drive.

  12. Revisiting the argument from fetal potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Bertha

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the most famous, and most derided, arguments against the morality of abortion is the argument from potential, which maintains that the fetus' potential to become a person and enjoy the valuable life common to persons, entails that its destruction is prima facie morally impermissible. In this paper, I will revisit and offer a defense of the argument from potential. First, I will criticize the classical arguments proffered against the importance of fetal potential, specifically the arguments put forth by philosophers Peter Singer and David Boonin, by carefully unpacking the claims made in these arguments and illustrating why they are flawed. Secondly, I will maintain that fetal potential is morally relevant when it comes to the morality of abortion, but that it must be accorded a proper place in the argument. This proper place, however, cannot be found until we first answer a very important and complex question: we must first address the issue of personal identity, and when the fetus becomes the type of being who is relevantly identical to a future person. I will illustrate why the question of fetal potential can only be meaningfully addressed after we have first answered the question of personal identity and how it relates to the human fetus.

  13. Pair Production Constraints on Superluminal Neutrinos Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Gardner, Susan; /Kentucky U.

    2012-02-16

    We revisit the pair creation constraint on superluminal neutrinos considered by Cohen and Glashow in order to clarify which types of superluminal models are constrained. We show that a model in which the superluminal neutrino is effectively light-like can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint. In summary, any model for which the CG pair production process operates is excluded because such timelike neutrinos would not be detected by OPERA or other experiments. However, a superluminal neutrino which is effectively lightlike with fixed p{sup 2} can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint because of energy-momentum conservation. The coincidence involved in explaining the SN1987A constraint certainly makes such a picture improbable - but it is still intrinsically possible. The lightlike model is appealing in that it does not violate Lorentz symmetry in particle interactions, although one would expect Hughes-Drever tests to turn up a violation eventually. Other evasions of the CG constraints are also possible; perhaps, e.g., the neutrino takes a 'short cut' through extra dimensions or suffers anomalous acceleration in matter. Irrespective of the OPERA result, Lorentz-violating interactions remain possible, and ongoing experimental investigation of such possibilities should continue.

  14. Scaling Relationships for Spherical Polymer Brushes Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Li, Hao; Das, Siddhartha

    2016-06-16

    In this short paper, we revisit the scaling relationships for spherical polymer brushes (SPBs), i.e., polymer brushes grafted to rigid, spherical particles. Considering that the brushes can be described to be encased in a series of hypothetical spherical blobs, we identify significant physical discrepancies in the model of Daoud and Cotton (Journal of Physics, 1982), which is considered to be the state of the art in scaling modeling of SPBs. We establish that the "brush" configuration of the polymer molecules forming the SPBs is possible only if the swelling ratio (which is the ratio of the end-to-end length of the blob-encased polymer segment to the corresponding coil-like polymer segment) is always less than unity-a notion that has been erroneously overlooked in the model of Daoud and Cotton. We also provide new scaling arguments that (a) establish this swelling (or more appropriately shrinking) ratio as a constant (less than unity) for the case of "good" solvent, (b) recover the scaling predictions for blob dimension and monomer number and monomer concentration distributions within the blob, and

  15. Revisiting the Survival Mnemonic Effect in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa N. S. Pand Eirada

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The survival processing paradigm is designed to explore the adaptive nature of memory functioning. The mnemonic advantage of processing information in fitness-relevant contexts, as has been demonstrated using this paradigm, is now well established, particularly in young adults; this phenomenon is often referred to as the “survival processing effect.” In the current experiment, we revisited the investigation of this effect in children and tested it in a new cultural group, using a procedure that differs from the existing studies with children. A group of 40 Portuguese children rated the relevance of unrelated words to a survival and a new moving scenario. This encoding task was followed by a surprise free-recall task. Akin to what is typically found, survival processing produced better memory performance than the control condition (moving. These data put on firmer ground the idea that a mnemonic tuning to fitness-relevant encodings is present early in development. The theoretical importance of this result to the adaptive memory literature is discussed, as well as potential practical implications of this kind of approach to the study of memory in children.

  16. The problem Of muscle hypertrophy: Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Samuel L; Dankel, Scott J; Mattocks, Kevin T; Jessee, Matthew B; Mouser, J Grant; Counts, Brittany R; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we revisit a topic originally discussed in 1955, namely the lack of direct evidence that muscle hypertrophy from exercise plays an important role in increasing strength. To this day, long-term adaptations in strength are thought to be primarily contingent on changes in muscle size. Given this assumption, there has been considerable attention placed on programs designed to allow for maximization of both muscle size and strength. However, the conclusion that a change in muscle size affects a change in strength is surprisingly based on little evidence. We suggest that these changes may be completely separate phenomena based on: (1) the weak correlation between the change in muscle size and the change in muscle strength after training; (2) the loss of muscle mass with detraining, yet a maintenance of muscle strength; and (3) the similar muscle growth between low-load and high-load resistance training, yet divergent results in strength. Muscle Nerve 54: 1012-1014, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Early-Transition Output Decline Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crt Kostevc

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we revisit the issue of aggregate output decline that took place in the early transition period. We propose an alternative explanation of output decline that is applicable to Central- and Eastern-European countries. In the first part of the paper we develop a simple dynamic general equilibrium model that builds on work by Gomulka and Lane (2001. In particular, we consider price liberalization, interpreted as elimination of distortionary taxation, as a trigger of the output decline. We show that price liberalization in interaction with heterogeneous adjustment costs and non-employment benefits lead to aggregate output decline and surge in wage inequality. While these patterns are consistent with actual dynamics in CEE countries, this model cannot generate output decline in all sectors. Instead sectors that were initially taxed even exhibit output growth. Thus, in the second part we consider an alternative general equilibrium model with only one production sector and two types of labor and distortion in a form of wage compression during the socialist era. The trigger for labor mobility and consequently output decline is wage liberalization. Assuming heterogeneity of workers in terms of adjustment costs and non-employment benefits can explain output decline in all industries.

  18. Is it time to revisit the role of psychedelic drugs in enhancing human creativity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, B

    2008-11-01

    Human creativity is difficult to define and measure, but it is undoubtedly an important cognitive process. This makes it an interesting challenge for modern neuroscientific exploration - especially given the current interest in developing cognitive enhancers for commercial and clinical uses. There are similarities between the typical traits of creative people and the subjective psychological characteristics of the psychedelic (hallucinogenic) drug experience. This phenomenon was studied in a number of small trials and case studies in the 1960s. Results were inconclusive, and the quality of these studies - by modern research standards - was merely anecdotal. Nevertheless, with today's current renaissance in psychedelic drug research and the growing interest in cognitive enhancing drugs, now may be the time to re-visit these studies with contemporary research methods.

  19. Revisiting the use of sPLA2-sensitive liposomes in cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pourhassan, Houman; Clergeaud Veiga, Gael; Hansen, Anders Elias

    2017-01-01

    The first developed secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) sensitive liposomal cisplatin formulation (LiPlaCis®) is currently undergoing clinical evaluation. In the present study we revisit and evaluate critical preclinical parameters important for the therapeutic potential and safety of platinum drugs......, here oxaliplatin (L-OHP), formulated in sPLA2 sensitive liposomes. We show the mole percentage of negatively charged phospholipid needed to obtain enzyme-sensitivity for saturated systems is ≥ 25% for 16-carbon chain lipid membranes, and > 40% for 18-chain lipid membranes, which was surprising as 25...... and the presence of serum proteins. We found that serum proteins did not affect the lipase activity of the enzyme towards the membranes but instead sequester the lysolipid byproducts consequently inhibiting their detergent-like cytotoxic properties. In vivo therapeutic potential and safety of the liposomes...

  20. The role of brand destination experience in determining revisit intention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Jan; Barnes, Stuart; Sørensen, Flemming

    experience, which provides a more holistic and unified view of the brand destination. The research uses a logistic regression model to determine the role of satisfaction and brand experience in determining revisit intentions. The study also examines differences among subgroups and four brand experience sub...

  1. Keep Moving! Revisiting Thumbnails for Mobile Video Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Hürst; C.G.M. Snoek; W.J. Spoel; M. Tomin

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the increasing popularity of video on handheld devices and the resulting importance for effective video retrieval, this paper revisits the relevance of thumbnails in a mobile video retrieval setting. Our study indicates that users are quite able to handle and assess small thumbnails on

  2. Antidote for Zero Tolerance: Revisiting a "Reclaiming" School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farner, Conrad D.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a revisit to the Frank Lloyd Wright Middle School, which implemented strategies to deal with disciplinary problems. The school continues to progress towards creating the type of reclaiming environment necessary to ensure the needs of all students. Strategies used include alternatives to zero tolerance policy; smaller teams of students;…

  3. The Polarized Structure Function $g_{2} A Lattice Study Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Göckeler, M; Kürzinger, W; Oelrich, H; Rakow, P; Schierholz, G

    1999-01-01

    A recent lattice calculation of the spin-dependent structure function g_2 is revisited. It has been recognized that the twist-three operator, which gives rise to d_2, mixes non-perturbatively with operators of lower dimensions under renormalization. This changes the results substantially.

  4. Pockets of Participation: Revisiting Child-Centred Participation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Myfanwy

    2011-01-01

    This article revisits the theme of the clash of interests and power relations at work in participatory research which is prescribed from above. It offers a possible route toward solving conflict between adult-led research carried out by young researchers, funding requirements and organisational constraints. The article explores issues of…

  5. Assesment of mucoadhesion using small deformation rheology revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harloff-Helleberg, Stine; Vissing, Karina Juul; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2017-01-01

    This work revisits the commonly used approach to assess mucoadhesion in drug delivery by small deformation rheology. The results show that biosimilar mucus serves as a more predictive mucus model system when compared to mucin suspensions. Data is fitted including error propagation, different from...

  6. Bohr’s ‘Light and Life’ revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    I revisit Niels Bohr’s famous 1932 ‘Light and Life’ lecture, confronting it with current knowledge. Topics covered include: life origin and evolution, quantum mechanics and life, brain and mind, consciousness and free will, and light as a tool for biology, with special emphasis on optical tweezers and their contributions to biophysics. Specialized knowledge of biology is not assumed.

  7. Intramolecular Amide Hydrolysis in N-Methylmaleamic Acid Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The intramolecular amide hydrolysis of N-methylmaleamic acid have been revisited by use of density functional theory and inclusion of solvent effects. The results indicate that concerted reaction mechanism is favored over stepwise reaction mechanism. This is in agreement with the previous theoretical study. Sovlent effects have significant influence on the reaction barrier.

  8. Coccolithophores in Polar Waters: Papposphaera arctica HET and HOL revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Heldal, Mikal; Østergaard, Jette B.

    2016-01-01

    It has been generally accepted based on the finding of combination coccospheres in field samples that Turrisphaera arctica and Papposphaera sarion are alternate life-cycle phases of a single species. However, while recently revisiting P. sarion it became evident that the Turrisphaera phase of thi...

  9. Dynamics of Shape Fluctuations of Quasi-spherical Vesicles Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miao, L.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Kleis, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of spontaneous shape fluctuations of a single, giant quasi-spherical vesicle formed from a single lipid species is revisited theoretically. A coherent physical theory for the dynamics is developed based on a number of fundamental principles and considerations, and a sy...

  10. Pockets of Participation: Revisiting Child-Centred Participation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Myfanwy

    2011-01-01

    This article revisits the theme of the clash of interests and power relations at work in participatory research which is prescribed from above. It offers a possible route toward solving conflict between adult-led research carried out by young researchers, funding requirements and organisational constraints. The article explores issues of…

  11. Revisiting Mental Simulation in Language Comprehension: Six Replication Attempts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Zwaan (Rolf); D. Pecher (Diane)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe notion of language comprehension as mental simulation has become popular in cognitive science. We revisit some of the original empirical evidence for this. Specifically, we attempted to replicate the findings from earlier studies that examined the mental simulation of object orientat

  12. Revisiting the Trust Effect in Urban Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Curt M.; Forsyth, Patrick B.

    2013-01-01

    More than a decade after Goddard, Tschannen-Moran, and Hoy (2001) found that collective faculty trust in clients predicts student achievement in urban elementary schools, we sought to identify a plausible link for this relationship. Our purpose in revisiting the trust effect was twofold: (1) to test the main effect of collective faculty trust on…

  13. Educational Administration and the Management of Knowledge: 1980 Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper revisits the thesis of a 1980 paper that suggested a new approach to educational administration based upon the New Sociology of Education. In particular it updates answers to the six key questions asked by that paper: what counts as knowledge; how is what counts as knowledge organised; how is what counts as knowledge transmitted; how is…

  14. The Importance of Being a Complement: CED Effects Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurka, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation revisits subject island effects (Ross 1967, Chomsky 1973) cross-linguistically. Controlled acceptability judgment studies in German, English, Japanese and Serbian show that extraction out of specifiers is consistently degraded compared to extraction out of complements, indicating that the Condition on Extraction domains (CED,…

  15. Revisiting Constructivist Teaching Methods in Ontario Colleges Preparing for Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    At the time of writing, the first community colleges in Ontario were preparing for transition to an accreditation model from an audit system. This paper revisits constructivist literature, arguing that a more pragmatic definition of constructivism effectively blends positivist and interactionist philosophies to achieve both student centred…

  16. Educational Administration and the Management of Knowledge: 1980 Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper revisits the thesis of a 1980 paper that suggested a new approach to educational administration based upon the New Sociology of Education. In particular it updates answers to the six key questions asked by that paper: what counts as knowledge; how is what counts as knowledge organised; how is what counts as knowledge transmitted; how is…

  17. Moral Judgment Development across Cultures: Revisiting Kohlberg's Universality Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, John C.; Basinger, Karen S.; Grime, Rebecca L.; Snarey, John R.

    2007-01-01

    This article revisits Kohlberg's cognitive developmental claims that stages of moral judgment, facilitative processes of social perspective-taking, and moral values are commonly identifiable across cultures. Snarey [Snarey, J. (1985). "The cross-cultural universality of social-moral development: A critical review of Kohlbergian research."…

  18. Faraday effect revisited: sum rules and convergence issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2010-01-01

    This is the third paper of a series revisiting the Faraday effect. The question of the absolute convergence of the sums over the band indices entering the Verdet constant is considered. In general, sum rules and traces per unit volume play an important role in solid-state physics, and they give...

  19. The Stern-Gerlach experiment revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Schmidt, Lothar; Lüdde, Hans Jürgen; Trageser, Wolfgang; Templeton, Alan; Sauer, Tilman

    2016-12-01

    experimental example for such directional quantization in scattering processes is shown. Last not least, the early history of the "almost" discovery of the electron spin in the SGE is revisited.

  20. The significance test controversy revisited the fiducial Bayesian alternative

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoutre, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this book is not only to revisit the “significance test controversy,”but also to provide a conceptually sounder alternative. As such, it presents a Bayesian framework for a new approach to analyzing and interpreting experimental data. It also prepares students and researchers for reporting on experimental results. Normative aspects: The main views of statistical tests are revisited and the philosophies of Fisher, Neyman-Pearson and Jeffrey are discussed in detail. Descriptive aspects: The misuses of Null Hypothesis Significance Tests are reconsidered in light of Jeffreys’ Bayesian conceptions concerning the role of statistical inference in experimental investigations. Prescriptive aspects: The current effect size and confidence interval reporting practices are presented and seriously questioned. Methodological aspects are carefully discussed and fiducial Bayesian methods are proposed as a more suitable alternative for reporting on experimental results. In closing, basic routine procedures...

  1. The contact of elastic regular wavy surfaces revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Yastrebov, Vladislav A

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the classic problem of an elastic solid with a two-dimensional wavy surface squeezed against an elastic flat half-space from infinitesimal to full contact. Through extensive numerical calculations and analytic derivations, we discover previously overlooked transition regimes. These are seen in particular in the evolution with applied load of the contact area and perimeter, the mean pressure and the probability density of contact pressure. These transitions are correlated with the contact area shape, which is affected by long range elastic interactions between contacting zones. Our analysis has implications for general random rough surfaces, as similar local transitions occur continuously at detached areas or coalescing contact zones. A key result is the deduction of the probability density of contact pressure at full contact. We discover that there is a non-zero probability of null contact pressures, which might suggest revisiting the conditions necessary for applying Persson's model at partial con...

  2. Zero-frequency magnetic fluctuations in homogeneous cosmic plasma revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic fluctuations in a non-magnetized gaseous plasma is revisited and calculated without approximations, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is argued that the present results are qualitative and quantitative different form previous one based on the same theorem. In particular, it is shown that it is not correct that the spectral intensity does not vary sensitively with $k_{cut}$. Also the simultaneous dependence of this intensity on the plasma and on the collisional frequencies are discussed.

  3. Zero-frequency magnetic fluctuations in homogeneous cosmic plasma revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Caruso, Francisco; Oguri, Vitor

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic fluctuations in a non-magnetized gaseous plasma is revisited and calculated without approximations, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is argued that the present results are qualitative and quantitative different form previous one based on the same theorem. In particular, it is shown that it is not correct that the spectral intensity does not vary sensitively with $k_{cut}$. Also the simultaneous dependence of this intensity on the plasma and on the collisional frequenc...

  4. Ligature-induced peri-implantitis in minipigs revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Stübinger, Stefan; Bucher, Ramon; Kronen, Peter W; Schlottig, Falko; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The ligature-induced defect model still remains the model of first choice to experimentally investigate the cause, effect and treatment approaches of periimplantitis. It was the aim of the present in-vivo trail to revisit the ligature-induced peri-implantitis minipig model regarding its current scientific value and ethical justification in implant research. Materials and methods: Six minipigs were used for the analysis of peri-implant hard and soft tissue structures. Animals were rand...

  5. Discussion of "Computational Electrocardiography: Revisiting Holter ECG Monitoring".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Christian; Caiani, Enrico G; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Kulikowski, Casimir A; Schiecke, Karin; van Bemmel, Jan H; Witte, Herbert

    2016-08-01

    This article is part of a For-Discussion-Section of Methods of Information in Medicine about the paper "Computational Electrocardiography: Revisiting Holter ECG Monitoring" written by Thomas M. Deserno and Nikolaus Marx. It is introduced by an editorial. This article contains the combined commentaries invited to independently comment on the paper of Deserno and Marx. In subsequent issues the discussion can continue through letters to the editor.

  6. Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammage, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

  7. Topological Twisted Sigma Model with H-flux Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Wu-yen

    2006-08-18

    In this paper we revisit the topological twisted sigma model with H-flux. We explicitly expand and then twist the worldsheet Lagrangian for bi-Hermitian geometry. we show that the resulting action consists of a BRST exact term and pullback terms, which only depend on one of the two generalized complex structures and the B-field. We then discuss the topological feature of the model.

  8. Hospital revisit rate after a diagnosis of conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkler, Alexander E; Parikh, Neal S; Chaudhry, Simriti; Chait, Alanna; Allen, Nicole C; Navi, Babak B; Kamel, Hooman

    2016-04-01

    To estimate the hospital revisit rate of patients diagnosed with conversion disorder (CD). Using administrative data, we identified all patients discharged from California, Florida and New York emergency departments (EDs) and acute care hospitals between 2005 and 2011 with a primary discharge diagnosis of CD. Patients discharged with a primary diagnosis of seizure or transient global amnesia (TGA) served as control groups. Our primary outcome was the rate of repeat ED visits and hospital admissions after initial presentation. Poisson regression was used to compare rates between diagnosis groups while adjusting for demographic characteristics. We identified 7946 patients discharged with a primary diagnosis of CD. During a mean follow-up of 3.0 (±1.6) years, patients with CD had a median of three (IQR, 1-9) ED or inpatient revisits, compared with 0 (IQR, 0-2) in patients with TGA and 3 (IQR, 1-7) in those with seizures. Revisit rates were 18.25 (95% CI, 18.10 to 18.40) visits per 100 patients per month in those with CD, 3.90 (95% CI, 3.84 to 3.95) in those with TGA and 17.78 (95% CI, 17.75 to 17.81) in those with seizures. As compared to CD, the incidence rate ratio for repeat ED visits or hospitalisations was 0.89 (95% CI, 0.86 to 0.93) for seizure disorder and 0.32 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.34) for TGA. CD is associated with a substantial hospital revisit rate. Our findings suggest that CD is not an acute, time-limited response to stress, but rather that CD is a manifestation of a broader pattern of chronic neuropsychiatric disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Radiative Corrections to Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, A B; Kalinovskaya, L V

    2005-01-01

    Radiative corrections to neutrino deep inelastic scattering are revisited. One-loop electroweak corrections are re-calculated within the automatic SANC system. Terms with mass singularities are treated including higher order leading logarithmic corrections. Scheme dependence of corrections due to weak interactions is investigated. The results are implemented into the data analysis of the NOMAD experiment. The present theoretical accuracy in description of the process is discussed.

  10. EGOTIATION IS THE NEW NEGOTIATION: THE CONCEPT OF NEGOTIATION REVISITED

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Jagodzinska

    2016-01-01

    The definition of negotiation has already been broadly examined in literature and varies from one author to another. However, there does not exist a complete conceptualization, which would grasp all the essential constituents of negotiation. This article aims to fill this niche by revisiting the concept of negotiation and broadening it by the elusive element that, if not properly addressed, too often causes negotiations to fail: the ego factor.Consequently, this paper introduces the novel ...

  11. N Level System with RWA and Analytical Solutions Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, K; Kato, R; Wada, Y; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Higashida, Kyoko; Kato, Ryosuke; Wada, Yukako

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we consider a model of an atom with n energy levels interacting with n(n-1)/2 external (laser) fields which is a natural extension of two level system, and assume the rotating wave approximation (RWA) from the beginning. We revisit some construction of analytical solutions (which correspond to Rabi oscillations) of the model in the general case and examine it in detail in the case of three level system.

  12. New Families in the Stable Homotopy of Spheres Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jin Kun

    2002-01-01

    This paper constructs a new family in the stable homotopy of spheres πt-6S representedby hngoγ3 ∈ E26,t in the Adams spectral sequence which revisits the bn-1g0γ3-elements ∈πt-7S con-structed in [3], where t = 2pn(p- 1) +6(p2 + p+ 1)(p- 1) and p ≥ 7 is a prime, n ≥ 4.

  13. How to Measure Recovery? Revisiting Concepts and Methods for Stroke Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Marc; Detante, Olivier; Favre, Isabelle; Touzé, Emmanuel; Jaillard, Assia

    2016-10-01

    In clinical trials, assessing efficacy is based on validated scales, and the primary endpoint is usually based on a single scale. The aim of the review is to revisit the concepts and methods to design and analyze studies focused on restoration, recovery and or compensation. These studies are becoming more frequent with the development of restorative medicine. After discussing the definitions of recovery, we address the concept of recovery as the regain of lost capabilities, when the patient reaches a new equilibrium. Recovery is a dynamic process which assessment includes information from initial and final status, their difference, the difference between the final status of the patient and normality, and the speed of restoration. Finally, recovery can be assessed either for a specific function (focal restoration) or for a more global restoration. A single scale is not able to assess all the facets of a skill or a function, therefore complementary information should be collected and analyzed simultaneously to be tested in a single analysis. We are suggesting that recovery should be considered as a latent variable and therefore cannot be measured in pure form. We are also suggesting to customize the data collection and analysis according to the characteristics of the subjects, the mechanisms of action and consequences of the intervention. Moreover, recovery trials should benefit from latent variable analysis methods. Structural equation modeling is likely the best candidate for this approach applicable in pre-clinical and clinical studies.

  14. Autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndrome revisited.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Guillard, M.; Lefeber, D.J.; Wevers, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of the autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndromes is highly heterogeneous with respect to organ involvement and severity. One of the major diagnostic criteria is to detect abnormal elastin fibers. In several other clinically similar autosomal recessive syndromes, however, the

  15. Hyponatremia revisited: Translating physiology to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); R. Zietse (Bob)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe complexity of hyponatremia as a clinical problem is likely caused by the opposite scenarios that accompany this electrolyte disorder regarding pathophysiology (depletional versus dilutional hyponatremia, high versus low vasopressin levels) and therapy (rapid correction to treat cereb

  16. Revisiting the concept of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis and its challenges using traditional and new tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Lambertucci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Different aspects of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis are revisited here. Manson's schistosomiasis causes periportal fibrosis and portal hypertension in approximately 6% of infected subjects, usually with preservation of their hepatic function. The assessment of liver involvement is of major importance in determining the prognosis and risk of complications from schistosomiasis, such as upper digestive bleeding secondary to variceal rupture. For many years, the diagnosis of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis and liver fibrosis was made by abdominal palpation and the finding of liver and/or spleen enlargement. However, there is no consensus regarding the clinical parameters of the liver and spleen to be considered in this physical evaluation. For the last three decades, abdominal ultrasound (US has become the best imaging technique to evaluate liver fibrosis caused by schistosomiasis mansoni. However, US is a subjective procedure and is therefore examiner-dependent. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings have provided valuable information in addition to ultrasound and clinical examination. The combination of a comprehensive history and physical examination, basic laboratory tests (a stool examination for Schistosoma mansoni eggs and a blood cell count, biomarkers for liver fibrosis/portal hypertension and imaging methods seem to offer the best approach for evaluating patients with this disease. In situations where research is involved or in patients with severe disease, MRI may be considered.

  17. L'Empire ottoman revisité The Ottoman Empire revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krikor Beledian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available L'Empire ottoman dans l'œuvre monumentale d’Hagop Sirouni (Djololian, Turquie 1890-Bucarest 1973, une image qui fascine et déchire. Poète, prosateur, théoricien de la littérature et historien, exilé en Roumanie en 1923, Sirouni édite la revue Nawasart (1924-25 et d'autres publications littéraires en langues arménienne et/ou roumaine. Arrêté en 1944 et condamné à dix ans de camp sibérien, Sirouni retourne à Bucarest au début des années cinquante. Obsédé par la nostalgie d'un pays perdu et hanté par l'épouvante des années 1915-1918, Sirouni entreprend l'évocation de la fin de l'Empire dans des récits et des pièces de théâtre des années vingt et trente. Il fait de l'art une modalité de la survie. Mais cette écriture se mue progressivement en mémoires et en reconstitution historique (Constantinople et son rôle, quatre volumes, comme si le regard tourné vers l'origine se refusait désormais les charmes de la fiction et de l'autobiographie pour s'adonner à un examen apparemment plus distancé, à une appropriation plus critique de la naissance et de la mort de l'Empire. Le récit historique se substitue au récit littéraire. On a parlé souvent d'un renoncement à la littérature, en ce qui concerne ce revirement. Et pourtant, l'Empire ottoman revisité dans ses archives ne cesse pas moins d'être l'objet désiré dont l'image fascine et déchire l'exilé doublement persécuté que fut Sirouni.This lecture is dedicated to the monumental works of Hagop Sirouni (Djololian, Turkey 1890-Bucarest 1973, a poet, novelist, litterary theorist and historian. Send in exile in Romania in 1923, he edited the periodical press « Nawasart » (1924-25 and other litterary publications in armenian and/or roumanian. Arrested in 1944 and condemned in a ten year sentence in a Siberian camp, Sirouni returns in Bucharest at the beginning of the fifties. Obsessed by the nostalgia of a country lost and haunted by the terror that came

  18. Small-angle scattering theory revisited: Photocurrent and spatial localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, N.P.; Zoletnik, S.; Michelsen, Poul

    2005-01-01

    In this paper theory on collective scattering measurements of electron density fluctuations in fusion plasmas is revisited. We present the first full derivation of the expression for the photocurrent beginning at the basic scattering concepts. Thereafter we derive detailed expressions for the auto...... laser based two-volume collective scattering instrument for spatially localized turbulence measurements,"Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 2579-2592 (2001)].......- and crosspower spectra obtained from measurements. These are discussed and simple simulations made to elucidate the physical meaning of the findings. In this context, the known methods of obtaining spatial localization are discussed and appraised. Where actual numbers are applied, we utilize quantities from two...

  19. Non linear evolution: revisiting the solution in the saturation region

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Carlos; Meneses, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we revisit the problem of the solution to Balitsky-Kovchegov equation deeply in the saturation domain. We find that solution has the form of Levin-Tuchin solution but it depends on variable $\\bar{z} = \\ln(r^2 Q^2_s) + \\mbox{Const}$ and the value of $\\mbox{Const}$ is calculated in this paper. We propose the solution for full BFKL kernel at large $z$ in the entire kinematic region that satisfies the McLerram-Venugopalan initial condition

  20. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    OpenAIRE

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and th...

  1. Sampling the equilibrium: the j-walking algorithm revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Rimas, Zilvinas

    2016-01-01

    The j-walking Monte-Carlo algorithm is revisited and updated to study the equilibrium properties of a system exhibiting broken ergodicity. The updated algorithm is tested on the Ising model and applied to the lattice-gas model for sorption in aerogel at low temperatures, when dynamics of the system is critically slowed down. It is demonstrated that the updated j-walking simulations are able to produce equilibrium isotherm which are typically hidden by the hysteresis effect within the standard single-flip simulations.

  2. Premises, principles, and practices in qualitative research: revisiting the foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaz, Kathy

    2004-09-01

    In this keynote address, the author focuses on what we bring to qualitative inquiry and how we conduct our research. What we do, why we do it, and how we do it remain contested issues. She proposes that we look at our methodological premises anew, revisit our principles, and revise our practices. Throughout this address, she draws on Goffman's methodological insights to provide a foundation for reassessing qualitative inquiry. She argues that researchers can build on Goffman's ideas to strengthen their methodological practices and research products. Last, she counters current institutional scrutiny of qualitative inquiry and suggests unacknowledged benefits of this work.

  3. Closed-set-based Discovery of Representative Association Rules Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Balcázar, José L

    2010-01-01

    The output of an association rule miner is often huge in practice. This is why several concise lossless representations have been proposed, such as the "essential" or "representative" rules. We revisit the algorithm given by Kryszkiewicz (Int. Symp. Intelligent Data Analysis 2001, Springer-Verlag LNCS 2189, 350-359) for mining representative rules. We show that its output is sometimes incomplete, due to an oversight in its mathematical validation, and we propose an alternative complete generator that works within only slightly larger running times.

  4. Revisiting a classic: the Parker-Moffatt problem

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzi, O; Servidio, S; Valentini, F; Vasconez, C L; Yang, Y; Malara, F; Matthaeus, W H; Veltri, P

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of two colliding Alfv\\'en wave packets is here described by means of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and hybrid kinetic numerical simulations. The MHD evolution revisits the theoretical insights described by Moffatt, Parker, Kraichnan, Chandrasekhar and Els\\"asser in which the oppositely propagating large amplitude wave packets interact for a finite time, initiating turbulence. However, the extension to include compressive and kinetic effects, while maintaining the gross characteristics of the simpler classic formulation, also reveals intriguing features which go beyond the pure MHD treatment.

  5. Revisiting a Classic: The Parker–Moffatt Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzi, O.; Parashar, T. N.; Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Vásconez, C. L.; Yang, Y.; Malara, F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Veltri, P.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of two colliding Alfvén wave packets is described here by means of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and hybrid kinetic numerical simulations. The MHD evolution revisits the theoretical insights described by Moffatt, Parker, Kraichnan, Chandrasekhar, and Elsässer in which the oppositely propagating large-amplitude wave packets interact for a finite time, initiating turbulence. However, the extension to include compressive and kinetic effects, while maintaining the gross characteristics of the simpler classic formulation, also reveals intriguing features that go beyond the pure MHD treatment.

  6. A control center design revisited: learning from users’ appropriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza da Conceição, Carolina; Cordeiro, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to present the lessons learned during a control center design project by revisiting another control center from the same company designed two and a half years before by the same project team. In light of the experience with the first project and its analysis, the designers...... and researchers had important feedback already used to suggest changes for the second project. The opportunity to learn from a previous project was unique, but the knowledge gotten out of it shows the importance of having this feedback from project to project instead of just ‘repeating’ previously used design...

  7. Revisiting the Logan plot to account for non-negligible blood volume in brain tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schain, Martin; Fazio, Patrik; Mrzljak, Ladislav; Amini, Nahid; Al-Tawil, Nabil; Fitzer-Attas, Cheryl; Bronzova, Juliana; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Sampaio, Christina; Halldin, Christer; Varrone, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    .... The bias extent depends on the amount of radioactivity in the blood vessels. In this study, we seek to revisit the well-established Logan plot and derive alternative formulations that provide estimation of distribution volume ratios (DVRs...

  8. HOBBES AND LOCKE REVISITED: ON UNDERSTANDING, NATURE AND THE SOVEREIGN IN THE 21st CENTURY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David Tneh Cheng Eng

    2015-01-01

      This paper would revisit Hobbes and Locke's work, namely Leviathan and The Essay Concerning Human Understanding so as to reconnect the work of the two philosophers to the present reading of politics and philosophy...

  9. Extradural spinal meningioma: Revisiting a rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guruprasad Bettaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal meningiomas are mostly intradural in location although at times these are associated with some extradural extensions. Purely extradural spinal meningiomas (EDSMs are however, extremely rare and when present, may cause diagnostic dilemma preoperatively. Only seven cases of pure EDSM have been reported till date. In this paper, we describe two cases of EDSM affecting the cervical spine and present their clinical profiles, radiological findings, operative management, and follow-up data, along with a review of the literature.

  10. Revisiting the neuropsychiatry of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lucio Teixeira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease classified under the choreas. Besides motor symptoms, HD is marked by cognitive and behavioral symptoms, impacting patients' functional capacity. The progression of cognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric symptoms occur in parallel with neurodegeneration. The nature of these symptoms is very dynamic, and the major clinical challenges include executive dysfunction, apathy, depression and irritability. Herein, we provide a focused updated review on the cognitive and psychiatric features of HD.

  11. A practice guideline revisited: screening for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littenberg, B

    1995-06-15

    In 1993, the Clinical Efficacy Assessment Subcommittee began evaluation of new topics and reevaluation of previous guidelines on common screening tests, which were published in Annals of Internal Medicine between 1988 and 1990 and republished as a collection in 1991 (Eddy DM, ed. Common Screening Tests. Philadelphia: American College of Physicians; 1991). Of the 11 guidelines contained in Common Screening Tests, only 3 (for breast, colon, and cholesterol screening) will be published with new data supporting new recommendations. Dr. Littenberg's analysis of the evidence that has appeared since the publication of the original paper on screening for hypertension (Littenberg B, Garber AM, Sox HC. Screening for Hypertension. Ann Intern Med. 1990;112:192-202) presents a new format for updating Clinical Efficacy Assessment Project (CEAP) guidelines that have not been altered by new evidence. This "updated guideline" reports on new published studies and its analysis affirms the approved American College of Physicians recommendations of 1990. The Clinical Efficacy Assessment Subcommittee carried out the Internal and external review procedures that are used for all CEAP guidelines. The plan is to keep all American College of Physicians guidelines updated in this way on a regular basis. Direct any comments or suggestions to Director, Scientific Policy, American College of Physicians, 6th Street at Race, Philadelphia, PA 19106.

  12. Postsurgical aortic false aneurysm: pathogenesis, clinical presentation and surgical strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Giuseppe M; Malvindi, Pietro G; Ornaghi, Diego; Basciu, Alessio; Barbone, Alessandro; Tarelli, Giuseppe; Settepani, Fabrizio

    2013-08-01

    Postsurgical aortic false aneurysm occurs in less than 0.5% of all cardiac surgical cases and its management is a challenge in terms of preoperative evaluation and surgical approach. Although infections are well recognized as risk factors, technical aspects of a previous operation may have a role in pseudoaneurysm formation. The risk factors and clinical presentation of pseudoaneurysms and the surgical strategy are revisited in this article.

  13. Revisiting the Decision of Death in Hurst v. Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Brian K; Ginory, Almari; Zedalis, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    The United States Supreme Court has considered the question of whether a judge or a jury must make the findings necessary to support imposition of the death penalty in several notable cases, including Spaziano v. Florida (1984), Hildwin v. Florida (1989), and Ring v. Arizona (2002). In 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court revisited the subject in Hurst v. Florida Florida Statute § 921.141 allows the judge, after weighing aggravating and mitigating circumstances, to enter a sentence of life imprisonment or death. Before Hurst, Florida's bifurcated sentencing proceedings included an advisory sentence from jurors and a separate judicial hearing without juror involvement. In Hurst, the Court revisited the question of whether Florida's capital sentencing scheme violates the Sixth Amendment, which requires a jury, not a judge, to find each fact necessary to impose a sentence of death in light of Ring In an eight-to-one decision, the Court reversed the judgment of the Florida Supreme Court, holding that the Sixth Amendment requires a jury to find the aggravating factors necessary for imposing the death penalty. The role of Florida juries in capital sentencing proceedings was thereby elevated from advisory to determinative. We examine the Court's decision and offer commentary regarding this shift from judge to jury in the final imposition of the death penalty and the overall effect of this landmark case.

  14. Review - Revisiting Rituals in a Changing Tibetan World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Kilby

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Katia Buffetrille (ed. 2012. Revisiting Rituals in a Changing Tibetan World. Leiden: Brill. Volume 31 in Brill's Tibetan Studies Library. Featuring Buddhist ritual life in its diverse manifestations across the Tibetan Plateau, this volume engages the task of defining 'ritual' by analyzing moments of ritual change. Whether political regime change, technological innovation, or social upheaval, external catalysts of religious transformation have been prominently visible in the Tibetan cultural world since the mid-twentieth century. This volume takes up the sociopolitical shifts of the recent period as a call to investigate how rituals change under fire, thereby furthering our understanding of the relationship between ritual structures and the historical contexts in which they find expression. Ritual's intertwinement with political events, symbols, and attitudes is the resounding theme presented herein, as each chapter makes efforts to disambiguate the complex causes and contours of ritual change in a particular case study. Several chapters seek to distinguish deep structural transformation in ritual from the harnessing of ritual elements for single instances of political or social action. Others debate the ambiguous role of spaces, practices, or ideas that are employed in ritual but also in political or economic contexts. Finally, each chapter challenges in some way the polarization of ritual conservatism and the 'invention of tradition' (Ranger and Hobsbawm 1983. Revisiting Rituals is an edited collection of conference papers...

  15. Benchmarking ventricular arrhythmias in the mouse--revisiting the 'Lambeth Conventions' 20 years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Catherine E; Bell, James R; Pepe, Salvatore; Delbridge, Lea M D

    2008-12-01

    The isolated Langendorff-mode perfused heart has become a valuable experimental model, used extensively to examine cardiac function, pathophysiology and pharmacology. For the clinical cardiologist an ECG is often a simple practicality, however in experimental circumstances, particularly with ex vivo murine hearts it is not always possible to obtain an ECG due to experimental recording constraints. However, the mechanical record of ventricular contractile function can be highly informative in relation to electrical state. It is difficult though to achieve consistency in these evaluations of arrhythmia as a validated common reference framework is lacking. In 1988, a group of investigators developed the 'Lambeth Conventions'--a standardised reference for the definition and classification of arrhythmias in animal experimental models of ischaemia, infarction and reperfusion in vivo. Now, two decades later it is timely to revisit the Lambeth Conventions, and to update the guidelines in the context of the marked increase in murine heart study in experimental cardiac pathophysiology. Here we describe an adjunct to the Lambeth Conventions for the reporting of ventricular arrhythmias post-ischaemia in ex vivo mouse hearts when ECG recordings are not employed. Of seven discrete and identifiable patterns of mechanical dysrhythmia observed in reperfusion, five could be classified using conventional ECG terminology: ventricular premature beat, bigeminy, trigeminy, ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Two additional rhythm variations detected from the pressure record are described (potentiated contraction and alternans).

  16. The enigma of Gerstmann's syndrome revisited: a telling tale of the vicissitudes of neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Elena; Pinel, Philippe; Dehaene, Stanislas; Kleinschmidt, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    Eighty years ago, the Austrian neurologist Josef Gerstmann observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe and suggested that it was due to damage of a common functional denominator. Ever since, these claims have been debated and an astute synopsis and sceptical discussion was presented 40 years ago by MacDonald Critchley in this journal. Nonetheless, Gerstmann's syndrome has continued to intrigue both clinical neurologists and researchers in neuropsychology, and more frequently than not is described in textbooks as an example of parietal lobe damage. In this review, we revisit the chequered history of this syndrome, which can be seen as a case study of the dialectic evolution of concepts in neuropsychology. In light of several modern era findings of pure cases we conclude that it is legitimate to label the conjunction of symptoms first described by Gerstmann as a 'syndrome', but that it is very unlikely that damage to the same population of cortical neurons should account for all of the four symptoms. Instead, we propose that a pure form of Gerstmann's syndrome might arise from disconnection, via a lesion, to separate but co-localized fibre tracts in the subcortical parietal white matter, a hypothesis for which we have recently provided evidence using combined imaging of functional and structural organization in the healthy brain.

  17. Meckel′s diverticulum-Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Ajaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Meckel′s diverticulum is a true intestinal diverticulum that results from the failure of the vitelline duct to obliterate during the fifth week of fetal development. In about 50% cases, it contains ectopic or heterotopic tissue which can be the cause of complications. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to study the history, incidence, embryoanatomy, clinical presentation, complication and management of Meckel′s diverticulum. Although Meckel′s diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract, it is often difficult to diagnose. It may remain asymptomatic or it may mimic disorders such as Crohn′s disease, appendicitis and peptic ulcer disease.

  18. Revisiting impressions using dual-arch trays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Bruce W

    2012-01-01

    Making routine perfect impressions is the goal of any restorative dentist. Using dual-arch trays is an easy, repeatable way to accomplish that goal, as long as each step is done before the next and each step is performed perfectly. This column reviewed several articles that support the metal dual-arch concept and provided some clinical tips that might help restorative dentists. The dual-arch technique does have its limits and is meant for one or two teeth in a quadrant when there are other teeth to occlude with. Also, if the case involves anterior guidance, a full-arch impression maybe advisable.

  19. Revisiting the Factors Underlying Maxillary Midline Diastema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Zakria Jaija

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study is to analyze the etiological factors underlying the presence of maxillary midline diastema in a sample of orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods. One hundred patients who fulfill the inclusion criteria were selected from 1355 patients seeking orthodontic treatment. The pretreatment orthodontic records were analyzed. The width of the maxillary midline diastema was measured clinically with a digital caliper at two levels: the mesioincisal angles of the central incisors and five millimeters from the incisal edge. The two measurements were averaged, and patients with diastema of more than 0.5 millimeter in width were enrolled. Results. Diastema is a multifactorial clinical finding with more than one underlying etiological cause. The interrelationship between the familial pattern of midline diastema and the microdontia, macroglossia, labial frenum, and alveolar cleft conforms was clear. The effect of a mesiodens and the upper lateral incisor whether bilaterally missing, unerupted, or peg shaped was minimal. Conclusion. Etiological factors underlying maxillary midline diastema are interconnected. Using a checklist as a guide during handling maxillary midline diastema is important in the different stages of treatment.

  20. Revisiting the Factors Underlying Maxillary Midline Diastema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaija, Abdullah M Zakria; El-Beialy, Amr Ragab; Mostafa, Yehya A

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to analyze the etiological factors underlying the presence of maxillary midline diastema in a sample of orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods. One hundred patients who fulfill the inclusion criteria were selected from 1355 patients seeking orthodontic treatment. The pretreatment orthodontic records were analyzed. The width of the maxillary midline diastema was measured clinically with a digital caliper at two levels: the mesioincisal angles of the central incisors and five millimeters from the incisal edge. The two measurements were averaged, and patients with diastema of more than 0.5 millimeter in width were enrolled. Results. Diastema is a multifactorial clinical finding with more than one underlying etiological cause. The interrelationship between the familial pattern of midline diastema and the microdontia, macroglossia, labial frenum, and alveolar cleft conforms was clear. The effect of a mesiodens and the upper lateral incisor whether bilaterally missing, unerupted, or peg shaped was minimal. Conclusion. Etiological factors underlying maxillary midline diastema are interconnected. Using a checklist as a guide during handling maxillary midline diastema is important in the different stages of treatment.

  1. The reaction index and positivity ratio revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Andersen, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Assessing the quality of patch test preparations continues to be a challenge. 2 parameters, the reaction index (RI) and positivity ratio (PR), have been proposed as quality indicators by the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK). The value of these st......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Assessing the quality of patch test preparations continues to be a challenge. 2 parameters, the reaction index (RI) and positivity ratio (PR), have been proposed as quality indicators by the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK). The value...... of the IVDK and our department. Calculation of RI's and PR's for patch test allergens is of limited value as a measure of quality of the patch test materials, because it predominantly reflects differences in scoring and reading of patch test reactions. Further, questionable reactions (+?) may be clinically...... relevant and very important for the individual patient. Focus on standardization of patch test materials, patch test technique, and reading of patch test reactions is mandatory....

  2. Mycetoma revisited. Incidence of various radiographic signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Bagi, Mohamed E; Fahal, Ahmed H

    2009-04-01

    To define and quantitate various radiographic signs of mycetoma infection. A retrospective study of 516 randomly selected patients seen between December 1996 and December 2004 at the Mycetoma Research Centre of Khartoum University, Khartoum, Sudan. All cases were confirmed by clinical examination, initial pretreatment radiographs, and histopathology. The most common abnormalities in these 516 patients were soft tissue swelling (93%), bone sclerosis (56%), bone cavities (32%), and periosteal reaction (27%). The incidence of bone expansion (22%), extrinsic cortical scalloping (22%), and fanning of the rays in 10% were reported. Osteoporosis was seen in 19%. Only 3% of the patients had normal radiographs. Maximal scrutiny of radiographs alone by experienced radiologists is vital, as other imaging techniques are not available where mycetoma is prevalent.

  3. Normokalemic periodic paralysis revisited: does it exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnery, Patrick F; Walls, Timothy J; Hanna, Michael G; Bates, David; Fawcett, Peter R W

    2002-08-01

    Normokalemic periodic paralysis (normoKPP) is well established in the literature, but there are doubts as to whether it exists as a discrete entity. Retrospective clinical and molecular analysis has confirmed suspicions that most normoKPP families actually have a variant of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperKPP) due to a mutation of the muscle-specific sodium channel gene (SCN4A). However, the original normoKPP family described by Poskanzer and Kerr (Poskanzer DC, Kerr DNS. A third type of periodic paralysis, with normokalemia and favourable response to sodium chloride. Am J Med 1961;31:328-342) has remained unchallenged. We identified the Met1592Val mutation of SCN4A in an affected descendent of this original normoKPP family. This is the final piece in the puzzle: normoKPP is actually a variant of hyperKPP and is not a distinct disorder.

  4. Reflux Revisited: Advancing the Role of Pepsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karna Dev Bardhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease is mediated principally by acid. Today, we recognise reflux reaches beyond the esophagus, where pepsin, not acid, causes damage. Extraesophageal reflux occurs both as liquid and probably aerosol, the latter with a further reach. Pepsin is stable up to pH 7 and regains activity after reacidification. The enzyme adheres to laryngeal cells, depletes its defences, and causes further damage internally after its endocytosis. Extraesophageal reflux can today be detected by recognising pharyngeal acidification using a miniaturised pH probe and by the identification of pepsin in saliva and in exhaled breath condensate by a rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay. Proton pump inhibitors do not help the majority with extraesophageal reflux but specifically formulated alginates, which sieve pepsin, give benefit. These new insights may lead to the development of novel drugs that dramatically reduce pepsinogen secretion, block the effects of adherent pepsin, and give corresponding clinical benefit.

  5. Clinical issues in occlusion - Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mahul; Alani, Aws

    2015-12-01

    Occlusal diagnosis plays an important role in the planning and subsequent delivery of predictable functional and aesthetic restorations and prostheses. Once an occlusal problem is identified there are a number of techniques and materials that can be utilised to record occlusal relationships, subsequently analyse them and incorporate information obtained into the delivery of tooth restoration or replacement. This paper discusses the clinical and technical aspects of occlusal examination and analysis outlining contemporary and traditional techniques in their utilisation. Aspects of occlusal examination will be revisited; the identification and recording of centric occlusion as well as subsequent articulation will be discussed. The requirement for occlusal splint provision will also be discussed and illustrated.

  6. Revisiting the anticardiolipin test and its standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E N; Pierangeli, S S

    2002-01-01

    Although the importance of the anticardiolipin test in diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is widely accepted, there remains much misunderstanding about the strengths and weaknesses of this assay. Several disorders result in formation of low levels of the antibody, hence the anticardiolipin test is not specific when results are low positive. In general, the higher the anticardiolipin level the greater the likelihood of a diagnosis of APS. Hence there have been numerous efforts to enable reproducible measurement of anticardiolipin levels. Standard calibrators were introduced to construct calibration curves from which levels of unknown samples can be derived. Those standard calibrators were made by mixing varying quantities of high positive with normal sera. More recently, calibrators derived from monoclonal anticardiolipin antibodies have been introduced. There are advantages and disadvantages with both types of calibrators. Determination of a precise and reproducible anticardiolipin level is difficult, whatever the calibrators used, because the assay is dependent on several variable components, any of which may fail on any given day. Utilization of a semi-quantitative measure (low, medium, high) may suffice in most clinical settings and would be less subject to error. Validated ELISA kits may offer greater reproducibility, since there is less variability than bench assays set up in very different laboratories. Whether using a kit or a bench assay, meticulous attention to detail offers the best opportunity for precision and reproducibility.

  7. Posterior commissure of the human larynx revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, John A; Tucker, Sean T

    2010-05-01

    The existence of the posterior commissure (PC) of the human larynx has been disputed (Hirano M, Sato K, et al. The posterior glottis. Trans Am Laryngol Assoc. 1986;107:70-75). "The term posterior commissure has no relevance to anatomical structure. The term commissure means a joining together. The bilateral vocal folds never join at their posterior ends. The posterior aspect of the glottis is a wall. The posterior lateral aspect of the posterior glottis is also the lateral wall of the posterior glottis" (Hirano M, Sato K, et al. The posterior glottis. Trans Am Laryngol Assoc. 1986;107:70-75). This study is intended to clarify the development of anatomical and morphological aspects of the PC in conjunction with a clinical classification of the larynx in sagittal view. This study uses human embryo and fetal laryngeal sections from the Carnegie Collection of Human Embryos (the world standard) and whole organ laryngeal sections from the Tucker Laryngeal Fetal Collection. Correlation of histologic and gross anatomical structure is made with the Hirano et al atlas, the Vidić Photographic Atlas of the Human Body, and the O'Rahilly Embryonic Atlas. Embryologic data clearly describe and illustrate the posterior union of the cricoid cartilage with formation of the PC. The anatomical functional aspects of the posterior lateral cricoid lamina as the supporting buttress of the articulating arytenoid cartilages are illustrated.

  8. Whole body acid-base modeling revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Troels; Nielsen, Søren

    2017-04-01

    The textbook account of whole body acid-base balance in terms of endogenous acid production, renal net acid excretion, and gastrointestinal alkali absorption, which is the only comprehensive model around, has never been applied in clinical practice or been formally validated. To improve understanding of acid-base modeling, we managed to write up this conventional model as an expression solely on urine chemistry. Renal net acid excretion and endogenous acid production were already formulated in terms of urine chemistry, and we could from the literature also see gastrointestinal alkali absorption in terms of urine excretions. With a few assumptions it was possible to see that this expression of net acid balance was arithmetically identical to minus urine charge, whereby under the development of acidosis, urine was predicted to acquire a net negative charge. The literature already mentions unexplained negative urine charges so we scrutinized a series of seminal papers and confirmed empirically the theoretical prediction that observed urine charge did acquire negative charge as acidosis developed. Hence, we can conclude that the conventional model is problematic since it predicts what is physiologically impossible. Therefore, we need a new model for whole body acid-base balance, which does not have impossible implications. Furthermore, new experimental studies are needed to account for charge imbalance in urine under development of acidosis.

  9. Gospel, culture and mission: Revisiting an enduring problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.U. Kalu

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Gospel, culture and mission: Revisiting an enduring problem This article reflects on the 1996 Conference on World Mission and Evangelism. The relation between gospel, culture and mission is considered, especially from an Africa perspective, but not reserved to it in application. Apart from considering the problem of appropriate terminology to express the intricacies concerning the subject, a deeper search is conducted into the complex relationship between the believer, his mission to, and his distancing from divergent cultural sources and manifestations. Emerging perspectives are considered, which help to formulate mission strategies and historic viewpoints and attitudes. Knowledge of these perspectives is essential for a more responsible answering to the call made to all believers.

  10. Revisiting time reversal and holography with spacetime transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Bacot, Vincent; Eddi, Antonin; Fink, Mathias; Fort, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Wave control is usually performed by spatially engineering the properties of a medium. Because time and space play similar roles in wave propagation, manipulating time boundaries provides a complementary approach. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the relevance of this concept by introducing instantaneous time mirrors. We show with water waves that a sudden change of the effective gravity generates time-reversed waves that refocus at the source. We generalize this concept for all kinds of waves introducing a universal framework which explains the effect of any time disruption on wave propagation. We show that sudden changes of the medium properties generate instant wave sources that emerge instantaneously from the entire space at the time disruption. The time-reversed waves originate from these "Cauchy sources" which are the counterpart of Huygens virtual sources on a time boundary. It allows us to revisit the holographic method and introduce a new approach for wave control.

  11. Gadsup of Papua New Guinea revisited: a three decade view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, M

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share some highlights of the author's revisits to Papua New Guinea covering three decades (1962-1992) with focus on the Gadsup of the Eastern Highlands of New Guinea. In addition, some recent developments in the country are covered as well as special visits with members of the Papua New Guinea Nurses Association. A comparative analysis of the world view, social structure, and related factors is made with respect to the theory of Culture Care Diversity and Univers-ality with two Gadsup villages. In general, the researcher found limited progress and beneficial health care changes in the two villages. Rascalism with violence was discovered which had cultural functions to redress some of the socioeconomic inequities and dissatisfactions of the indigenous people. Major tenets of the Culture Care theory were supported with the Gadsup, especially related to diverse forms, meanings, and lifestyle processes.

  12. Downlink Transmission of Short Packets: Framing and Control Information Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trillingsgaard, Kasper Fløe; Popovski, Petar

    2017-01-01

    Cellular wireless systems rely on frame-based transmissions. The frame design is conventionally based on heuristics, consisting of a frame header and a data part. The frame header contains control information that provides pointers to the messages within the data part. In this paper, we revisit...... the principles of frame design and show the impact of the new design in scenarios that feature short data packets, which are central to various 5G and Internet of Things applications. We~treat framing for downlink transmission in an AWGN broadcast channel with $K$ users, where the sizes of the messages...... to the users are random variables. Using approximations from finite blocklength information theory, we establish a framework in which a message to a given user is not necessarily encoded as a single packet, but may be grouped with messages to other users and benefit from the improved efficiency of longer codes...

  13. Shuttle entry guidance revisited using nonlinear geometric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mease, Kenneth D.; Kremer, Jean-Paul

    1994-11-01

    The entry guidance law for the space shuttle orbiter is revisited using nonlinear geometric methods. The shuttle guidance concept is to track a reference drag trajectory that has been designed to lead a specified range and velocity. It is shown that the approach taken in the original derivation of the shuttle entry guidance has much in common with the more recently developed feedback linearization method of differential geometric control. Using the feedback linearization method, however, an alternative, potentially superior, guidance law was formulated. Comparing the two guidance laws based performance domains in state space, taking into account the nonlinear dynamics, the alternative guidance law achieves the desired performance over larger domains in state space; the stability domain of the laws are similar. With larger operating domain for the shuttle or some other entry vehicle, the alternative guidance law should be considered.

  14. Revisiting Neoclassical Growth Theory: A Survey in the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank GUPTA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the second half of the twentieth century economists have build newer models of economic growth that consider policy influences of growth and divergent outcomes among countries. These models addresses issues concerning economic growth, operation of financial markets, trade policy, government expenditures, and taxation. In this essay we have revisited the interdependence of political and economic institutions, taking the neoclassical growth model of Solow (1956 as a point of departure, which maintains that long run economic growth can be explained by capital accumulation, population growth and technological progress. We first discuss the evolution of the neoclassical school of economics in a historical context, and the role of various institutions in engendering economic growth. Subsequently the role of government spending, political stability, property rights and special interest groups (SIG's affect economic growth have been discussed, and how these institutions can explain different countries to grow at divergent rates and achieve different levels of wealth.

  15. Revisiting manufacturing strategy: contributions towards a new construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliciane Maria da Silva

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at revisiting and systematizing the literature on manufacturing strategy. Although this is a well consolidated theme broadly discussed in the last fifty years, manufacturing strategy practice grew on importance recently due to a more competitive environment the companies find themselves in. The review carried has systematized the existing literature into six lines of research dealing with competitive priorities, structural and infrastructural decision, best practices, performance indicators, production strategy formulation and generic manufacturing strategies. This article shows that four out of the six research areas are still receiving attention. A new construct which represents a global view of the lines of research mentioned is proposed. Gaps in the research field and suggestions for future works are described. Keywords: manufacturing strategy, content, formulation of manufacturing strategy, competitive priorities, best practices, performance indicators.

  16. Revisiting world energy intensity convergence for regional differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liddle, Brantley [Centre for Strategic Economic Studies, Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC 8001 (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    World convergence in energy intensity is revisited using two new large data sets: a 111-country sample spanning 1971-2006, and a 134-country sample spanning 1990-2006. Both data sets confirm continued convergence. However, the larger data set, which adds the former Soviet Union republics and additional Balkan countries, indicates greater convergence over its more recent time-frame. Further investigation of geographical differences reveals that the OECD and Eurasian countries have shown considerable, continued convergence, while the Sub-Saharan African countries have converged amongst themselves, but at a slower rate than the OECD and Eurasian countries; by contrast, Latin American and Caribbean and Middle East and North African countries have exhibited no convergence to divergence in energy intensity. (author)

  17. Revisiting Estrogen: Efficacy and Safety for Postmenopausal Bone Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Sacco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid decline in endogenous estrogen production that occurs during menopause is associated with significant bone loss and increased risk for fragility fracture. While hormone therapy (HT is an effective means to re-establish endogenous estrogen levels and reduce the risk of future fracture, its use can be accompanied by undesirable side effects such as stroke and breast cancer. In this paper, we revisit the issue of whether HT can be both safe and effective for the prevention of postmenopausal bone loss by examining standard and alternative doses and formulations of HT. The aim of this paper is to continue the dialogue regarding the benefits and controversies of HT with the goal of encouraging the dissemination of-up-to date evidence that may influence how HT is viewed and prescribed.

  18. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Takahashi

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  19. Revisiting the Performance of MACD and RSI Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence Tai-Leung Chong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Chong and Ng (2008 find that the Moving Average Convergence–Divergence (MACD and Relative Strength Index (RSI rules can generate excess return in the London Stock Exchange. This paper revisits the performance of the two trading rules in the stock markets of five other OECD countries. It is found that the MACD(12,26,0 and RSI(21,50 rules consistently generate significant abnormal returns in the Milan Comit General and the S&P/TSX Composite Index. In addition, the RSI(14,30/70 rule is also profitable in the Dow Jones Industrials Index. The results shed some light on investors’ belief in these two technical indicators in different developed markets.

  20. Neuroticism and vigilance revisited: A transcranial doppler investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Arielle R; Becker, Alexandra; VanAndel, Aaron; Nelson, Andrew; Shaw, Tyler H

    2015-11-01

    Selecting for vigilance assignments remains an important factor in human performance research. The current study revisits the potential relationship between vigilance performance and trait neuroticism, in light of two possible theories. The first theory suggests that neuroticism impairs vigilance performance by competing for available resources. The second theory, attentional control theory, posits that high neuroticism can result in similar or superior performance levels due to the allocation of compensatory effort. In the present study, Transcranial Doppler Sonography was used to investigate the neurophysiological underpinnings of neuroticism during a 12-min abbreviated vigilance task. Performance results were not modified by level of neuroticism, but high neuroticism was associated with higher initial CBFV levels and a greater CBFV decrement over time. These findings indicate that participants higher in neuroticism recruited additional cognitive resources in order to achieve similar performance, suggesting that there is more of an effect on processing efficiency than effectiveness.

  1. Grid generation: Algebraic and partial differential equations techniques revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Bharat K.

    A systematic procedure for grid generation which can provide compuational grids for a wide range of geometries related to internal/external flow configuration is developed by combining the best features of algebraic and elliptic grid generation systems. The algebraic and elliptic grid generation system are well developed in the literature. A revisit to these techniques is given in this paper in view of economy and efficiency of the grid generation process. A technique to automatically calculate slopes and twist vectors required in hermite transfinite interpolation is developed. The weighted transfinite interpolation is combined with automatically created Bezier, B-spline curves, and Non-Uniform Rational B-spline (NURB) curves to generate well-distributed, smooth and near orthogonal grid patches (sub-blocks). A novel approach to evaluate control functions for elliptic generation systems is developed. This approach allows a quick refinement utilizing elliptic system. Computational examples are presented to demonstrate the success of these methodologies.

  2. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yokota, Ryo; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  3. Revisiting constraints on uplifts to de Sitter vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Bizet, Nana Cabo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the issue of uplifting the potential to de Sitter (dS) vacua in type IIB flux compactifications of Kachru, Kallosh, Linde and Trivedi (KKLT). We shed light on some tension between two constraints on dS vacua in type IIB string theory. One is the well-known and much-discussed constraint which leads to the no-go theorem that can in principle be evaded. The other follows from 4-dimensional Einstein's equations, which has, however, been much less discussed in connection with the former constraint. In addition to the challenges previously posed, it is suggested that the uplifting scenarios, in particular, obstruct the evasion of the no-go theorem more strongly than one might have assumed.

  4. Revisiting Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we revisit Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows. The oblique collision between a particle and a flat wall is analyzed by adopting the classic rigid-body theory and a more realistic semianalytical model. Based on the kinetic granular theory, the input parameter for the partial-slip boundary conditions, specularity coefficient, which is not measurable in experiments, is then interpreted as a function of the particle-wall restitution coefficient, the frictional coefficient, and the normalized slip velocity at the wall. An analytical expression for the specularity coefficient is suggested for a flat, frictional surface with a low frictional coefficient. The procedure for determining the specularity coefficient for a more general problem is outlined, and a working approximation is provided.

  5. Revisiting the scattering greenhouse effect of CO2 ice clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kitzmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide ice clouds are thought to play an important role for cold terrestrial planets with thick CO2 dominated atmospheres. Various previous studies showed that a scattering greenhouse effect by carbon dioxide ice clouds could result in a massive warming of the planetary surface. However, all of these studies only employed simplified two-stream radiative transfer schemes to describe the anisotropic scattering. Using accurate radiative transfer models with a general discrete ordinate method, this study revisits this important effect and shows that the positive climatic impact of carbon dioxide clouds was strongly overestimated in the past. The revised scattering greenhouse effect can have important implications for the early Mars, but also for planets like the early Earth or the position of the outer boundary of the habitable zone.

  6. Energy in synthetic fertilizers and pesticides: Revisited. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, M.G.; English, B.C.; Turhollow, A.F.; Nyangito, H.O. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology

    1994-01-01

    Agricultural chemicals that are derived from fossil-fuels are the major energy intensive inputs in agriculture. Growing scarcity of the world`s fossil resources stimulated research and development of energy-efficient technology for manufacturing these chemicals in the last decade. The purpose of this study is to revisit the energy requirements of major plant nutrients and pesticides. The data from manufacturers energy survey conducted by The Fertilizer Institute are used to estimate energy requirements of fertilizers. Energy estimates for pesticides are developed from consulting previously published literature. The impact of technical innovation in the fertilizer industry to US corn, cotton, soybean and wheat producers is estimated in terms of energy-saving.

  7. Revisiting a Classic Study of the Molecular Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lauren M; Boland, Joseph R; Braverman, John M

    2016-03-01

    A constant rate of molecular evolution among homologous proteins and across lineages is known as the molecular clock. This concept has been useful for estimating divergence times. Here, we revisit a study by Richard Dickerson (J Mol Evol 1:26-45, 1971), wherein he provided striking visual evidence for a constant rate of amino acid changes among various evolutionary branch points. Dickerson's study is commonly cited as support of the molecular clock and a figure from it is often reproduced in textbooks. Since its publication, however, there have been updates made to dates of common ancestors based on the fossil record that should be considered. Additionally, collecting the accession numbers and carefully outlining Dickerson's methods serves as a resource to students of the molecular clock hypothesis.

  8. Revisiting the thermodynamic relations in AdS /CMT models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Seungjoon; Park, Sang-A.; Yi, Sang-Heon

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by the recent unified approach to the Smarr-like relation of anti-de Sitter (AdS) planar black holes in conjunction with the quasilocal formalism on conserved charges, we revisit the quantum statistical and thermodynamic relations of hairy AdS planar black holes. By extending the previous results, we identify the hairy contribution in the bulk and show that the holographic computation can be improved so that it is consistent with the bulk computation. We argue that the first law can be retained in its universal form and that the relation between the on-shell renormalized Euclidean action and its free energy interpretation in gravity may also be undeformed even with the hairy contribution in hairy AdS black holes.

  9. EGOTIATION IS THE NEW NEGOTIATION: THE CONCEPT OF NEGOTIATION REVISITED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jagodzinska

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The definition of negotiation has already been broadly examined in literature and varies from one author to another. However, there does not exist a complete conceptualization, which would grasp all the essential constituents of negotiation. This article aims to fill this niche by revisiting the concept of negotiation and broadening it by the elusive element that, if not properly addressed, too often causes negotiations to fail: the ego factor.Consequently, this paper introduces the novel concept of egotiation. The new conceptual framework provides a straightforward and user-friendly reference that can be used when preparing for a negotiation or at any time during a negotiation to help better understand all the dynamics behind the negotiation process.Furthermore, this article unravels what negotiation really is based on the responses collected from a multicultural audience, and shows how these results align with the novel concept of negotiation.

  10. Revisiting the Design of a Fusion Development Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, V. S.; Stambaugh, R. D.; Garofalo, A. M.; Smith, J. P.; Wong, C. P. C.

    2009-11-01

    A Fusion Development Facility (FDF) is proposed to make possible a DEMO of the ARIES-AT type as the next step after ITER. The mission of the FDF should be to carry forward advanced tokamak physics and enable development of fusion nuclear science and technology. We have added more realism to the initial FDF concept [1] including inner and outer gaps from the plasma to the first wall; an improved estimate of the inboard/outboard blanket/shield thickness to protect the magnets/insulators; control coil positions; and realistic divertor geometry. Optimizing the mix of heating and current drive power has high leverage on the operating power. We have also revisited the assumed impurity fraction and the density profile peakedness. 8pt [1] R.D. Stambaugh, et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 259 (2008).

  11. Online haemodiafiltration: definition, dose quantification and safety revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, James E; Ward, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    The general objective assigned to the EUropean DIALlysis (EUDIAL) Working Group by the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) was to enhance the quality of dialysis therapies in Europe in the broadest possible sense. Given the increasing interest in convective therapies, the Working Group has started by focusing on haemodiafiltration (HDF) therapies. Several reports suggest that those therapies potentially improve the outcomes for end-stage renal disease patients. Europe is the leader in the field, having introduced the concept of ultra-purity for water and dialysis fluids and with notified bodies of the European Community having certified water treatment systems and online HDF machines. The prevalence of online HDF-treated patients is steadily increasing in Europe, averaging 15%. A EUDIAL consensus conference was held in Paris on 13 October 2011 to revisit terminology, safety and efficacy of online HDF. This is the first report of the expert group arising from that conference.

  12. Impulsive Spot Heating and Thermal Explosion of Interstellar Grains Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, A V; Vasyunin, A; Caselli, P

    2015-01-01

    The problem of impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically, with the aim to better understand leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. It is rigorously shown that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., heating of mantles by cosmic rays), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number $\\lambda$. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: When $\\lambda$ exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosion is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain -- this regime is commonly known as the whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of the physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, the calculations suggest tha...

  13. Star\\/Galaxy Separation Revisited Into the Zone of Avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    Naim, A

    1997-01-01

    The problem of automated separation of stars and galaxies on photographic plates is revisited with two goals in mind : First, to separate galaxies from everything else (as opposed to most previous work, in which galaxies were lumped together with all other non-stellar images). And second, to search optically for galaxies at low Galactic latitudes (an area that has been largely avoided in the past). This paper demonstrates how an artificial neural network can be trained to achieve both goals on Schmidt plates of the Digitised Sky Survey. Here I present the method while its application to large numbers of plates is deferred to a later paper. Analysis is also provided of the way in which the network operates and the results are used to counter claims that it is a complicated and incomprehensible tool.

  14. Hyperparathyroidism revisited - Old wine in new bottles!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Arcot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hyperparathyroidism (HPT is a condition that occurs due to exacerbated activity of the parathyroid glands. According to the etiology it may be primary, secondary or tertiary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT, sHPT, tHPT. This is a study done to document and evaluate the presentations of primary and secondary HPT, with the associated complications and the approach to management in these patients, at our hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with HPT were encountered at Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute between January 2000 and January 2010. Operative notes, histopathology files, and medical records were used for the retrospective analysis of the patients with HPT. Parathormone, calcium, and phosphate levels were estimated on all the patients, to determine the primary or secondary etiology of this endocrine abnormality. Furthermore, these patients were subjected to ultrasonography (USG of the neck and Technetium (99 mTc scan of the neck to identify the parathyroid gland. Results: This study revealed that about 76, 19, and 5% of the patients suffered from pHPT, sHPT, and tHPT, respectively, with a female preponderance (62%.The neoplasm in all patients with pHPT was parathyroid adenoma. The patients presented with renal, bony, and menstrual abnormalities. Cases with sHPT had a 15 - 20 year history of chronic kidney disease and they subsequently developed bony abnormalities. Even as all the patients with pHPT were managed with parathyroidectomy, individuals with sHPT were treated conservatively. Postoperative features of hypocalcemia were noted in only one patient. Conclusion: This study re-emphasizes that pHPT is more common and is often due to an adenoma. Recent advances in parathormone sampling operatively and minimal access surgery, along with accurate and prompt clinical diagnosis, is necessary for the cure of these patients presenting with obscure abdominal, bony, and renal ailments.

  15. The HIV RNA setpoint theory revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Jean-Baptiste

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of plasma viral load after HIV infection has been described as reaching a setpoint, only to start rising again shortly before AIDS diagnosis. In contrast, CD4 T-cell count is considered to show a stable decrease. However, characteristics of marker evolution over time depend on the scale that is used to visualize trends. In reconsidering the setpoint theory for HIV RNA, we analyzed the evolution of CD4 T-cell count and HIV-1 RNA level from HIV seroconversion to AIDS diagnosis. Follow-up data were used from two cohort studies among homosexual men (N = 400, restricting to the period before highly active antiretroviral therapy became widely available (1984 until 1996. Individual trajectories of both markers were fitted and averaged, both from seroconversion onwards and in the four years preceding AIDS diagnosis, using a bivariate random effects model. Both markers were evaluated on a scale that is directly related to AIDS risk. Results Individuals with faster AIDS progression had higher HIV RNA level six months after seroconversion. For CD4 T-cell count, this ordering was less clearly present. However, HIV RNA level and CD4 T-cell count showed qualitatively similar evolution over time after seroconversion, also when stratified by rate of progression to AIDS. In the four years preceding AIDS diagnosis, a non-significant change in HIV RNA increase was seen, whereas a significant biphasic pattern was present for CD4 T-cell decline. Conclusion HIV RNA level has more setpoint behaviour than CD4 T-cell count as far as the level shortly after seroconversion is concerned. However, with respect to the, clinically more relevant, marker evolution over time after seroconversion, a setpoint theory holds as much for CD4 T-cell count as for HIV RNA level.

  16. Electromyographic analysis: shoulder muscle activity revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberer, Philipp; Kranzl, Andreas; Laky, Brenda; Anderl, Werner; Wurnig, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Restoring optimal strength and biomechanics of a pathologic shoulder knowledge of activity patterns of healthy glenohumeral muscles is mandatory. Yet, data on normal shoulder muscle activity are not always conclusive. The study was undertaken (a) to evaluate muscle activity patterns in the healthy shoulder using surface and fine-wire electromyography (EMG), and (b) to assess method's suitability in the clinical setting especially regarding painfulness and practicability. Surface and fine-wire EMG was performed on 11 healthy subjects (2f/9 m, Ø age 28 years) to assess 14 muscles including rotator cuff muscles during 8 planar standardised shoulder movements (abduction, forward flexion, internal and external rotation in neutral, 45° and 90° abduction). Pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale before testing, after inserting the fine-wire electrodes, after maximal voluntary contraction, before and after exercises, and after electrode removal. The most important finding regarding EMG activity patterns in the healthy shoulder was that the subscapularis activity was found to play a major role in abduction and forward flexion. Furthermore, this study was able to show that EMG measurements, especially fine-wire EMG, is prone to high failure rates (up to 32%); however, pain was not a limiting factor. The present study (1) revealed a new insight, especially finding the subscapularis activity playing a major role in abduction and forward flexion of the healthy shoulder; and (2) motion analysis system and the use of fine-wire electrodes were prone to failure; however, pain was not a limiting factor. Basic Science, Electrodiagnostic Study.

  17. PhotoPrev:Unifying Context and Content Cues to Enhance Personal Photo Revisitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jin; Gang-Li Liu; Liang Zhao; Ling Feng; Senior Member; IEEE

    2015-01-01

    Personal photo revisitation on smart phones is a common yet uneasy task for users due to the large volume of photos taken in daily life. Inspired by the human memory and its natural recall characteristics, we build a personal photo revisitation tool, PhotoPrev, to facilitate users to revisit previous photos through associated memory cues. To mimic users’ episodic memory recall, we present a way to automatically generate an abundance of related contextual metadata (e.g., weather, temperature) and organize them as context lattices for each photo in a life cycle. Meanwhile, photo content (e.g., object, text) is extracted and managed in a weighted term list, which corresponds to semantic memory. A threshold algorithm based photo revisitation framework for context-and content-based keyword search on a personal photo collection, together with a user feedback mechanism, is also given. We evaluate the scalability on a large synthetic dataset by crawling users’ photos from Flickr, and a 12-week user study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of our photo revisitation strategies.

  18. Heparin and cancer revisited: Mechanistic connections involving platelets, P-selectin, carcinoma mucins, and tumor metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsig, Lubor; Wong, Richard; Feramisco, James; Nadeau, David R.; Varki, Nissi M.; Varki, Ajit

    2001-03-01

    Independent studies indicate that expression of sialylated fucosylated mucins by human carcinomas portends a poor prognosis because of enhanced metastatic spread of tumor cells, that carcinoma metastasis in mice is facilitated by formation of tumor cell complexes with blood platelets, and that metastasis can be attenuated by a background of P-selectin deficiency or by treatment with heparin. The effects of heparin are not primarily due to its anticoagulant action. Other explanations have been suggested but not proven. Here, we bring together all these unexplained and seemingly disparate observations, showing that heparin treatment attenuates tumor metastasis in mice by inhibiting P-selectin-mediated interactions of platelets with carcinoma cell-surface mucin ligands. Selective removal of tumor mucin P-selectin ligands, a single heparin dose, or a background of P-selectin deficiency each reduces tumor cell-platelet interactions in vitro and in vivo. Although each of these maneuvers reduced the in vivo interactions for only a few hours, all markedly reduce long-term organ colonization by tumor cells. Three-dimensional reconstructions by using volume-rendering software show that each situation interferes with formation of the platelet "cloak" around tumor cells while permitting an increased interaction of monocytes (macrophage precursors) with the malignant cells. Finally, we show that human P-selectin is even more sensitive to heparin than mouse P-selectin, giving significant inhibition at concentrations that are in the clinically acceptable range. We suggest that heparin therapy for metastasis prevention in humans be revisited, with these mechanistic paradigms in mind.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF DESTINATION IMAGE AND TOURIST SATISFACTION TOWARD REVISIT INTENTION OF SETU BABAKAN BETAWI CULTURAL VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setyo Ferry Wibowo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research are: 1 To find out the description of destination image, tourist satisfaction, and revisit intention of Betawi cultural village Setu Babakan, 2 test empirically the influence of destination image toward revisit intention of Betawi cultural village Setu Babakan, 3 test empirically the influence of tourist satisfaction toward revisit intention of Betawi cultural village Setu Babakan, 4 test empirically the influence of destination image toward revisit intention of Betawi cultural village Setu Babakan. The object of this research was 200 respondents who have ever visit to Betawi cultural village Setu Babakan at one time. The results of descriptive test explained that the destination image provided is good according to the tourist, so that the tourist is satisfied and want to revisit intention of Betawi cultural village Setu Babakan. The hypothesis test shows: 1 the influence of destination image toward revisit intention by -30%, 2 the influence of tourist satisfaction toward revisit intention by 118%, 3 the influence of destination image toward tourist satisfaction by 92%.

  20. The Effects of Korean Medical Service Quality and Satisfaction on Revisit Intention of the United Arab Emirates Government Sponsored Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoyoung; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate medical service quality, satisfaction and to examine factors influencing hospital revisit intention of the United Arab Emirates government sponsored patients in Korea. A total of 152 UAE government sponsored patients who visited Korean hospitals participated in the questionnaire survey from August to November 2016. Stepwise multiple regression was used to identify the factors that affected the revisit intention of the participants. The mean scores of medical service quality, satisfaction, and revisit intention were 5.72 out of 7, 88.88 out of 100, 4.59 out of 5, respectively. Medical service quality and satisfaction, Medical service quality and revisit intention, satisfaction and revisit intention were positively correlated. Medical service of physician, visiting routes and responsiveness of medical service quality explained about 23.8% of revisit intention. There are needs for physicians to communicate with patients while ensuring sufficient consultation time based on excellent medical skills and nurses to respond immediately for the patients' needs through an empathic encounter in order to improve medical service quality and patient satisfaction so that to increase the revisit intention of the United Arab Emirates government sponsored patients. Further, it is necessary for the hospitals to have support plans for providing country specialized services in consideration of the UAE culture to ensure that physicians' and nurses' competencies are not undervalued by non-medical service elements such as interpreters and meals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Intrauterine device quo vadis? Why intrauterine device use should be revisited particularly in nulliparous women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildemeersch D

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dirk Wildemeersch,1 Norman Goldstuck,2 Thomas Hasskamp,3 Sohela Jandi,4 Ansgar Pett4 1Gynecological Outpatient Clinic and IUD Training Center, Ghent, Belgium; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Hospital, Western Cape, South Africa; 3GynMünster, Münster, 4Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Berlin, Germany Background: Long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC methods, including intrauterine devices (IUDs and the contraceptive implant, are considered the best methods for preventing unintended pregnancies, rapid repeat pregnancy, and abortion in young women. An opinion paper of 2012 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends Mirena and Paragard for use in nulliparous and adolescent women. However, these IUDs are not designed for young women and are not optimal as they often lead to early discontinuation. Objective: This article was written with the objective to respond to the urgent need to improve intrauterine contraception as it is likely that the objectives of LARC will not be met without significant improvement of IUD design. Anatomical variations in size and shape of the uterus are not sufficiently considered, producing harm and suffering, which often lead to early removal of the IUD. Proposed problem solving: The article describes why IUDs should be revisited to meet the challenge of LARC and proposes how to solve these problems. The opinion statement presented here may be considered provocative but is based on hundreds of women with IUD problems who consult or are referred to the practices of the authors of this article due to the disproportion between the IUD and their small uterine cavity. The solution is simple but requires a revision of the current design of IUDs. One-dimensional (longitudinal IUDs are likely to be the first option. Framed devices with shortened transverse arm and IUDs which adapt to the width of the given

  2. V838 Monocerotis revisited: Space phenomenon imitates art

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    V838 Monocerotis revisited: Space phenomenon imitates art hi-res Size hi-res: 558 Kb Credits: NASA, the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI) and ESA V838 Monocerotis revisited: Space phenomenon imitates art "Starry Night", Vincent van Gogh's famous painting, is renowned for its bold whorls of light sweeping across a raging night sky. Although this image of the heavens came only from the artist's restless imagination, a new picture from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope bears remarkable similarities to the van Gogh work, complete with never-before-seen spirals of dust swirling across trillions of kilometres of interstellar space. This image, obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on February 8, 2004, is Hubble's latest view of an expanding halo of light around a distant star, named V838 Monocerotis (V838 Mon). The illumination of interstellar dust comes from the red supergiant star at the middle of the image, which gave off a flashbulb-like pulse of light two years ago. V838 Mon is located about 20,000 light-years away from Earth in the direction of the constellation Monoceros, placing the star at the outer edge of our Milky Way galaxy V838 Monocerotis revisited: Space phenomenon imitates art hi-res Size hi-res: 1989 kb Credits: NASA, the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI) and ESA V838 Monocerotis revisited: Space phenomenon imitates art "Starry Night", Vincent van Gogh's famous painting, is renowned for its bold whorls of light sweeping across a raging night sky. Although this image of the heavens came only from the artist's restless imagination, a new picture from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope bears remarkable similarities to the van Gogh work, complete with never-before-seen spirals of dust swirling across trillions of kilometres of interstellar space. This image, obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on February 8, 2004, is Hubble's latest view of an expanding halo of light around a distant star, named V838 Monocerotis (V838 Mon). The

  3. The angular momentum of baryons and dark matter halos revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Kimm, Taysun; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive mesh refinement, we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r=0.1rvir. In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/rvir>0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its ...

  4. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-10-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  5. Leber′s hereditary optic neuropathy: The mitochondrial connection revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled K Abu-Amero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of Leber′s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON-mitochondrial connection falls short of comprehensive. Twenty years of intensive investigation have yielded a wealth of information about mitochondria, the mitochondrial genome, the metabolism of the optic nerve and other structures, and the phenotypic variability of classic LHON. However, we still cannot completely explain how primary LHON mutations injure the optic nerve or why the optic nerve is particularly at risk. We cannot explain the incomplete penetrance or the male predominance of LHON, the typical onset in young adult life without warning, or the synchronicity of visual loss. Moreover, primary LHON mutations clearly are not present in every family with the LHON phenotype (including multigenerational maternal inheritance, and they are present in only a minority of individuals who have the LHON optic neuropathy phenotype without a family history. All lines of evidence point to abnormalities of the mitochondria as the direct or indirect cause of LHON. Therefore, the mitochondria-LHON connection needs to be revisited and examined closely. This review will attempt to do that and provide an update on various aspects of LHON.

  6. Background frequencies for residue variability estimates: BLOSUM revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reš I

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shannon entropy applied to columns of multiple sequence alignments as a score of residue conservation has proven one of the most fruitful ideas in bioinformatics. This straightforward and intuitively appealing measure clearly shows the regions of a protein under increased evolutionary pressure, highlighting their functional importance. The inability of the column entropy to differentiate between residue types, however, limits its resolution power. Results In this work we suggest generalizing Shannon's expression to a function with similar mathematical properties, that, at the same time, includes observed propensities of residue types to mutate to each other. To do that, we revisit the original construction of BLOSUM matrices, and re-interpret them as mutation probability matrices. These probabilities are then used as background frequencies in the revised residue conservation measure. Conclusion We show that joint entropy with BLOSUM-proportional probabilities as a reference distribution enables detection of protein functional sites comparable in quality to a time-costly maximum-likelihood evolution simulation method (rate4site, and offers greater resolution than the Shannon entropy alone, in particular in the cases when the available sequences are of narrow evolutionary scope.

  7. Whistler oscillitons revisited: the role of charge neutrality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Verheest

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available When studying transverse modes propagating parallel to a static magnetic field, an apparent contradiction arises between the weakly nonlinear results obtained from the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation, predicting envelope solitons (where the amplitude is stationary in the wave frame, but the phase is not, and recent results for whistler oscillitons, indicating that really stationary structures of large amplitude are possible. Revisiting this problem in the fluid dynamic approach, care has been taken not to introduce charge neutrality from the outset, because this not only neglects electric stresses compared to magnetic stresses, which is reasonable, but could also imply from Poisson's equation a vanishing of the wave electric field. Nevertheless, the fixed points of the remaining equations are the same, whether charge neutrality is assumed from the outset or not, so that the solitary wave solutions at not too large amplitudes will be very similar. This is borne out by numerical simulations of the solutions under the two hypotheses, showing that the lack of correspondence with the DNLS envelope solitons indicates the limitations of the reductive perturbation approach, and is not a consequence of assuming charge neutrality.

  8. Solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive interactions revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navascués, G.; Velasco, E.; Mederos, L.

    2016-10-01

    We revisit a problem already studied 15 years ago by us in collaboration with Stell and Hemmer: the isostructural solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive particle interactions exhibited by classical systems interacting via the Stell-Hemmer potentials. The full phase diagram in the crystal region is obtained by applying a perturbation theory for classical solids used during our collaboration with Stell. Also, the performance of such a theory is now tested by comparing the perturbative phase diagram with that obtained from computer simulations. The latter was calculated using a recently refined method to obtain the free-energy of crystals by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The perturbation theory captures the correct topology and correctly identifies the stable, fcc and bcc, phases. In addition, the theory predicts the occurrence of special points: a point where the two stable structures coexist at the same density, and two critical points terminating the corresponding isostructural phase transitions for fcc and bcc phases. The location of some of these features in the phase diagram is predicted almost quantitatively. However, phase boundaries involving the non-compact bcc phase are much less accurate, a problem that can be traced to the poor representation used for the bcc phase of the reference, hard-sphere, system.

  9. IMPULSIVE SPOT HEATING AND THERMAL EXPLOSION OF INTERSTELLAR GRAINS REVISITED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivlev, A. V.; Röcker, T. B.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P., E-mail: ivlev@mpe.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2015-05-20

    The problem of the impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically with the aim of better understanding the leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. We rigorously show that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., the heating of mantles by cosmic rays (CRs)), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number λ. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: when λ exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosion is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain—this regime is commonly known as whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, our calculations suggest that heavy CR species (e.g., iron ions) colliding with dust are able to trigger the explosion. Based on recently calculated local CR spectra, we estimate the expected rate of explosive desorption. The efficiency of the desorption, which in principle affects all solid species independent of their binding energy, is shown to be comparable to other CR desorption mechanisms typically considered in the literature. Also, the theory allows us to estimate the maximum abundances of reactive species that may be stored in the mantles, which provides important constraints on the available astrochemical models.

  10. Revisiting Link Prediction: Evolving Models and Real Data Findings

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The explosive growth of Web 2.0, which was characterized by the creation of online social networks, has reignited the study of factors that could help us understand the growth and dynamism of these networks. Various generative network models have been proposed, including the Barabasi-Albert and Watts-Strogatz models. In this study, we revisit the problem from a perspective that seeks to compare results obtained from these generative models with those from real networks. To this end, we consider the dating network Skout Inc. An analysis is performed on the topological characteristics of the network that could explain the creation of new network links. Afterwards, the results are contrasted with those obtained from the Barabasi-Albert and Watts-Strogatz generative models. We conclude that a key factor that could explain the creation of links originates in its cluster structure, where link recommendations are more precise in Watts-Strogatz segmented networks than in Barabasi-Albert hierarchical networks. This re...

  11. Mirror Instability in the Solar Wind: The Theory Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, A.

    1995-01-01

    "Magnetic holes", localized depressions in the interplanetary magnetic field, have been identified in Ulysses data over a range of several AU and as far as 23 degrees south in latitude by Winterhalter et al., who concluded that these structures are most likely the remnants of structures caused by occasional mirror-mode instability in the solar wind. However, these authors, like a number of previous investigators, used the mirror stability criterion derived from the kinetic theory under very special assumptions. On the other hand, theoretical investigations using the fully self-consistent kinetic theory (Vlasov-Maxwell equations) have shown that the mirror stability criterion is more complicated when electrons and ions have different anisotropies, as is normally the case in the solar wind. Winterhalter et al used an instability criterion of the form R is greater than 1, where R is a function of the thermal anisotropy; the correct criterion (for bi-Maxwellian distributions) is R R is greater than 1 - x(exp 2), where x is a real quantity that depends on both the proton anisotropy and electron anisotropy. So nonzero x would modify the Winterhalter et al results in the direction of reinforcing their conclusions. We have revisited the instability criterion in its most general form, allowing for (a) non-Maxwellian velocity distributions, (b) multiple ion species, and (c) interparticle streaming. These results should give sound theoretical grounding for future observational studies related to the mirror instability, by Ulysses and other spacecraft.

  12. Introduction to special section: Regional Climate Modeling Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Filippo; Mearns, Linda O.

    1999-03-01

    This paper provides an introduction to the special issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research on "New Developments and Applications With the NCAR Regional Climate Model (RegCM)." In the first part of the paper we revisit and discuss outstanding issues in regional climate modeling in view of the progress achieved in this area of research during the last decade. We discuss issues of simulation length, spin-up, model physics, domain and resolution, lateral boundary conditions, multiple and two way nesting, and variable resolution approaches. In the second part we introduce the papers included in this issue. Among the primary model developments that occurred in the last few years are inclusions of the radiative transfer package and cumulus convection scheme from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) global model CCM3, a simplified explicit moisture scheme including direct interaction with cloud radiation, testing of a variable resolution model configuration, improvements in the coupled lake model, and interactive coupling with radiatively active atmospheric aerosols. The papers in the issue illustrate a wide range of applications over different regions, such as the United States, East Asia, central Asia, eastern Africa. The main model limitations and areas in need of improvement are indicated.

  13. SUSY effects in Rb: Revisited under current experimental constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Yang, Jin Min

    2016-06-01

    In this note we revisit the SUSY effects in Rb under current experimental constraints including the LHC Higgs data, the B-physics measurements, the dark matter relic density and direct detection limits, as well as the precision electroweak data. We first perform a scan to figure out the currently allowed parameter space and then display the SUSY effects in Rb. We find that although the SUSY parameter space has been severely restrained by current experimental data, both the general MSSM and the natural-SUSY scenario can still alter Rb with a magnitude sizable enough to be observed at future Z-factories (ILC, CEPC, FCC-ee, Super Z-factory) which produce 109-1012Z-bosons. To be specific, assuming a precise measurement δRb = 2.0 ×10-5 at FCC-ee, we can probe a right-handed stop up to 530 GeV through chargino-stop loops, probe a sbottom to 850 GeV through neutralino-sbottom loops and a charged Higgs to 770 GeV through the Higgs-top quark loops for a large tan ⁡ β. The full one-loop SUSY correction to Rb can reach 1 ×10-4 in natural SUSY and 2 ×10-4 in the general MSSM.

  14. The interaction of atoms with LiF(001) revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Miraglia, J E

    2016-01-01

    Pairwise additive potentials for multielectronic atoms interacting with a LiF(001) surface are revisited by including an improved description of the electron density associated with the different lattice sites, as well as non-local electron density contributions. Within this model, the electron distribution around each ionic site of the crystal is described by means of an onion approach that accounts for the influence of the Madelung potential. From such densities, binary interatomic potentials are then derived by using well-known non-local functionals for the kinetic, exchange and correlation terms. Rumpling and long-range contributions due to projectile polarization and van der Waals forces are also included in an analogous fashion. We apply this pairwise additive approximation to evaluate the interaction potential between closed-shell - He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe - and open-shell - N, S, and Cl - atoms and the LiF surface, analyzing the relative importance of the different contributions. The performance of the...

  15. Revisitation: a trans phenomenology of the media image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cael M Keegan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available How might certain moving images move us into transgender becoming? The recent proliferation of transgender images in the media of the Global North has been widely regarded as supporting transgender political and social equality. But do these images do justice to the complexity of transgender lives? Who are images of transgender identity made for, and whose interests do they serve? Instead of discussing media that produce a transgender object for public consumption, this essay’s author is interested in theorizing a trans point of media reception for the popular image. This essay illustrates how transgender subjects might fashion their own archives of becoming through encounters with media that unintentionally support transgender embodiment as a possibility in the world. Revisiting his phenomenological encounters with the film Under the Skin and the “Milk: It Does a Body Good” ad campaign, the author analyzes how certain media objects have the unexpected power to “move” the transgender subject into becoming.

  16. Revisiting Supernova 1987A Constraints on Dark Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Jae Hyeok; McDermott, Samuel D

    2016-01-01

    We revisit constraints on dark photons with masses below ~ 100 MeV from the observations of Supernova 1987A. If dark photons are produced in sufficient quantity, they reduce the amount of energy emitted in the form of neutrinos, in conflict with observations. For the first time, we include the effects of finite temperature and density on the kinetic-mixing parameter, epsilon, in this environment. This causes the constraints on epsilon to weaken with the dark-photon mass below ~ 15 MeV. For large-enough values of epsilon, it is well known that dark photons can be reabsorbed within the supernova. Since the rates of reabsorption processes decrease as the dark-photon energy increases, we point out that dark photons with energies above the Wien peak can escape without scattering, contributing more to energy loss than is possible assuming a blackbody spectrum. Furthermore, we estimate the systematic uncertainties on the cooling bounds by deriving constraints assuming one analytic and four different simulated temper...

  17. Biogas from Macroalgae: is it time to revisit the idea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Adam D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The economic and environmental viability of dedicated terrestrial energy crops is in doubt. The production of large scale biomass (macroalgae for biofuels in the marine environment was first tested in the late 1960’s. The culture attempts failed due to the engineering challenges of farming offshore. However the energy conversion via anaerobic digestion was successful as the biochemical composition of macroalgae makes it an ideal feedstock. The technology for the mass production of macroalgae has developed principally in China and Asia over the last 50 years to such a degree that it is now the single largest product of aquaculture. There has also been significant technology transfer and macroalgal cultivation is now well tried and tested in Europe and America. The inherent advantage of production of biofuel feedstock in the marine environment is that it does not compete with food production for land or fresh water. Here we revisit the idea of the large scale cultivation of macroalgae at sea for subsequent anaerobic digestion to produce biogas as a source of renewable energy, using a European case study as an example.

  18. Photoevaporation of Circumstellar Disks Revisited: The Dust-Free Case

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Kei E I; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Photoevaporation by stellar ionizing radiation is believed to play an important role in the dispersal of disks around young stars. The mass loss model for dust-free disks developed by Hollenbach et al. is currently regarded as a conventional one and has been used in a wide variety of studies. However, the rate in this model was derived by the crude so-called 1+1D approximation of ionizing radiation transfer, which assumes that diffuse radiation propagates in a direction vertical to the disk. In this study, we revisit the photoevaporation of dust-free disks by solving the 2D axisymmetric radiative transfer for steady-state disks. Unlike that solved by the conventional model, we determine that direct stellar radiation is more important than the diffuse field at the disk surface. The radial density distribution at the ionization boundary is represented by the single power-law with an index -3/2 in contrast to the conventional double power-law. For this distribution, the photoevaporation rate from the entire disk...

  19. An Adaptive and Hybrid Approach for Revisiting the Visibility Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ícaro Lins Leitão da Cunha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the visibility problem, which is traditionally known in Computer Graphics and Vision fields as the process of computing a (potentially visible set of primitives in the computational model of a scene. We propose a hybrid solution that uses a dry structure (in the sense of data reduction, a triangulation of the type J1a, to accelerate the task of searching for visible primitives. We came up with a solution that is useful for real-time, on-line, interactive applications as 3D visualization. In such applications the main goal is to load the minimum amount of primitives from the scene during the rendering stage, as possible. For this purpose, our algorithm executes the culling by using a hybrid paradigm based on viewing-frustum, back-face culling and occlusion models. Results have shown substantial improvement over these traditional approaches if applied separately. This novel approach can be used in devices with no dedicated processors or with low processing power, as cell phones or embedded displays, or to visualize data through the Internet, as in virtual museums applications.

  20. ISLAM, ADAT, AND THE STATE: Matrifocality in Aceh Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Srimulyani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Matrifocality has been a rooted tradition in the social history of the community in Aceh. The principles of matrifocality have also affected on how women are positioned in the community, and the socio-gender relation within the community. The fact that Aceh has strongly associated to the Islamic values that claimed to support the paternal traditions. Apparently, the Islamic values and the local matrifocality practices juxtaposed through the roles of adat, which considered as inseparable to Islamic law or teaching, or in local term known as zat ngeun sifeut. Another point in revisiting matrifocality in Aceh in Aceh is an examination of how gender state ideology, particularly during the New Order Regime disregarded some local gender practices across some ethnics in the archipelago. Meanwhile, the state also hegemonied and promoted particular gender state ideology such as state ibuism. Nonetheless, the modernity and social changes have also contributed to the shifting of some matrifocality practices in contemporary Acehnese society. However, since the matrifocality has a strong root in the social life of the community, the principles of the matrifocality still survived until currently, although it transformed into ‘new matrifocality’ practices. Keywords: matrifocality, Aceh, gender, shari‘a law

  1. Rim curvature anomaly in thin conical sheets revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin W

    2011-12-01

    This paper revisits one of the puzzling behaviors in a developable cone (d-cone), the shape obtained by pushing a thin sheet into a circular container of radius R by a distance η. The mean curvature was reported to vanish at the rim where the d-cone is supported. We investigate the ratio of the two principal curvatures versus sheet thickness h over a wider dynamic range than was used previously, holding R and η fixed. Instead of tending toward 1 as suggested by previous work, the ratio scales as (h/R)(1/3). Thus the mean curvature does not vanish for very thin sheets as previously claimed. Moreover, we find that the normalized rim profile of radial curvature in a d-cone is identical to that in a "c-cone" which is made by pushing a regular cone into a circular container. In both c-cones and d-cones, the ratio of the principal curvatures at the rim scales as (R/h)(5/2)F/(YR(2)), where F is the pushing force and Y is the Young's modulus. Scaling arguments and analytical solutions confirm the numerical results.

  2. Revisiting Acceleration of Charged Grains in Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem; Schlickeiser, R

    2011-01-01

    We study the acceleration of charged grains by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM). We begin with revisiting gyroresonance acceleration by taking into account fluctuations of the grain guiding center along a uniform magnetic field (i.e. non-linear theory, NLT). We calculate grain velocity due to gyroresonance acceleration by fast modes using the NLT for different phases of the ISM, and compare with results obtained using quasi-linear theory (QLT). We find that the fluctuations of the grain guiding center reduce the grain velocity by less than 15 percent, but large grains are still accelerated to super-Alfvenic speed. For such super-Alfvenic grains, we investigate the effect of transit time damping (TTD) by fast modes. We find that due to the broadening of resonance condition in the NLT, the TTD acceleration is not only important for the cosine pitch angle $\\mu>V_{A}/v$, but also for $\\mu

  3. Revisiting the first fluid interface experiment in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongkang; Weislogel, Mark; Masica, William; Kohl, Fred; Green, Robert

    2016-11-01

    This year marks the 54th anniversary of the first fluid physics experiment performed aboard a spacecraft during the Mercury-Atlas 7 mission (MA7). The MA7 experiment test cell served as an early model for a spacecraft liquid fuel tank consisting of a circular standpipe mounted within a spherical container. The low-g free surface configuration was dependent on contact angle, fluid fill fraction, standpipe dimensions, and initial conditions. Well-behaved symmetric equilibrium interfaces in the symmetric tank were expected and observed during the historic flight. We revisit the problem here employing a modern numerical tool and discover a rich variety of asymmetric fluid interface configurations that were not observed during the experiment. Interestingly, experimental support for these newly-computed outcomes may be found in 54 year old drop tower data collected by the original NASA investigator team. In short, rotationally symmetric nodoidal surfaces are unstable in a certain domain giving rise to highly asymmetric surfaces with significant shifts in the mass center of the liquid. The NASA team selected a fluid fill level for MA7 that 'fortunately' fell outside this domain. NASA NNX12A047A.

  4. Leptogenesis in the two right-handed neutrino model revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Antusch, S; Jones, D A; King, S F

    2011-01-01

    We revisit leptogenesis in the minimal non-supersymmetric type I see-saw mechanism with two right-handed (RH) neutrinos, including flavour effects and allowing both RH neutrinos N_1 and N_2 to contribute, rather than just the lightest RH neutrino N_1 that has hitherto been considered. By performing scans over parameter space in terms of the single complex angle z of the orthogonal matrix R, for a range of PMNS parameters, we find that in regions around z \\sim \\pm \\pi/2, for the case of a normal mass hierarchy, the N_2 contribution can dominate the contribution to leptogenesis, allowing the lightest RH neutrino mass to be decreased by about an order of magnitude in these regions, down to M_1 \\sim 7*10^10 GeV for initial thermal N_2-abundance, with the numerical results supported by analytic estimates. We show that the regions around z \\sim \\pm \\pi /2 correspond to light sequential dominance, so the new results in this paper may be relevant to unified model building.

  5. Large-scale Filamentary Structures around the Virgo Cluster Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Bureau, Martin; Yoon, Hyein; Chung, Aeree; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Jeong, Hyunjin; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Lee, Woong; Chung, Jiwon

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the filamentary structures of galaxies around the Virgo cluster, exploiting a larger data set, based on the HyperLeda database, than previous studies. In particular, this includes a large number of low-luminosity galaxies, resulting in better sampled individual structures. We confirm seven known structures in the distance range 4 h -1 Mpc fundamental axis of the Virgo cluster is smoothly connected to two of these filaments (Leo II A and B). Behind the Virgo cluster (16 h -1 Mpc < SGY < 27 h -1 Mpc), we also identify a new filament elongated toward the NGC 5353/4 group (“NGC 5353/4 filament”) and confirm a sheet that includes galaxies from the W and M clouds of the Virgo cluster (“W-M sheet”). In the Hubble diagram, the NGC 5353/4 filament galaxies show infall toward the NGC 5353/4 group, whereas the W-M sheet galaxies do not show hints of gravitational influence from the Virgo cluster. The filamentary structures identified can now be used to better understand the generic role of filaments in the build-up of galaxy clusters at z ≈ 0.

  6. Large-scale filamentary structures around the Virgo cluster revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Suk; Bureau, Martin; Yoon, Hyein; Chung, Aeree; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Jeong, Hyunjin; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Lee, Woong; Chung, Jiwon

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the filamentary structures of galaxies around the Virgo cluster, exploiting a larger dataset based on the HyperLeda database than previous studies. In particular, this includes a large number of low-luminosity galaxies, resulting in better sampled individual structures. We confirm seven known structures in the distance range 4~$h^{-1}$~Mpc~$<$ SGY~$<$ 16~$h^{-1}$ Mpc, now identified as filaments, where SGY is the axis of the supergalactic coordinate system roughly along the line of sight. The Hubble diagram of the filament galaxies suggests they are infalling toward the main-body of the Virgo cluster. We propose that the collinear distribution of giant elliptical galaxies along the fundamental axis of the Virgo cluster is smoothly connected to two of these filaments (Leo~II~A and B). Behind the Virgo cluster (16~$h^{-1}$~Mpc~$<$ SGY~$<$ 27~$h^{-1}$~Mpc), we also identify a new filament elongated toward the NGC 5353/4 group ("NGC 5353/4 filament") and confirm a sheet that includes galaxi...

  7. Revisiting the WMAP - NVSS angular cross correlation. A skeptic view

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    In the context of the study of the ISW, we revisit the angular cross correlation of WMAP CMB data with the NVSS radio survey. We compute 2-point cross functions between the two surveys in real and in Fourier space, paying particular attention on the dependence of results on the flux of NVSS radio sources, the angular scales where correlations arise and the comparison with theoretical expectations. We reproduce previous results that claim an excess of correlation in the angular correlation function (ACF), and we also find some (low significance) similarity between the CMB and radio galaxy data in the multipole range $\\el \\in $ [10, 25]. However, the S/N in the ACFs increases with higher flux thresholds for NVSS sources, but drops a $\\sim$ 30 - 50% in separations of the order of a pixel size, suggesting some residual point source contribution. When restricting our analyses to multipoles $\\el \\gt $60, we fail to find any evidence for cross correlation in the range $\\el \\in [2,10]$, where according to the model p...

  8. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Haswani Embong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  9. Revisiting the target-constrained interference-minimized filter (TCIMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chein-I.; Ren, Hsuan; Hsueh, Mingkai; Du, Qian; D"Amico, Francis M.; Jensen, James O.

    2003-12-01

    The Orthogonal Subspace Projection (OSP) and Constrained Energy Minimization (CEM) have been used in hyperpsectral target detection and classification. A target-constrained interference-minimized filter (TCIMF) was recently proposed to extend the CEM to improve signal detectability to annihilating undesired target signal sources as the way carried out in the OSP. In this paper, we revisit the TCIMF from a signal processing viewpoint where signals can be characterized by three types of information sources, desired target sources and undesired target sources, both of which are provided a priori, and interferers which are unknown interfering sources. By virtue of such signal decomposition, we chan show that the TCIMF is actually a generalization of the OSP and CEM. In particular, we investigate assumptions made for the OSP and CEM in terms of these three types of signal sources and exploit insights into their filter design. As will be shown in this paper, the OSP and the CEM perform the same tasks by operating different levels of information and both can be viewed as special cases of the TCIMF.

  10. Revisiting the OH-CH correlation in diffuse clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Mookerjea, Bhaswati

    2016-01-01

    Based on the analysis of available published data and archival data along 24 sightlines (5 of which are new) we derive more accurate estimates of the column densities of OH and CH towards diffuse/translucent clouds and revisit the typically observed correlation between the abundances of these species. The increase in the sample size was possible because of the equivalence of the column densities of CH derived from a combination of the transitions at 3137 & 3143 Angstrom, and a combination of transitions at 3886 & 3890 Angstrom, which we have demonstrated here. We find that with the exception of four diffuse clouds, the entire source sample shows a clear correlation between the column densities of OH and CH similar to previous observations. The analysis presented also verifies the theoretically predicted oscillator strengths of the OH A--X (3078 & 3082 Angstrom), CH B--X (3886 & 3890 Angstrom) and C--X (3137 & 3143 Angstrom) transitions. We estimate N(H) and N(H2) from the observed E(B-V) a...

  11. Cation dyshomeostasis and cardiomyocyte necrosis: the Fleckenstein hypothesis revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Brian J.; Cheema, Yaser; Shahbaz, Atta U.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    An ongoing loss of cardiomyocytes to apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways contributes to the progressive nature of heart failure. The pathophysiological origins of necrotic cell loss relate to the neurohormonal activation that accompanies acute and chronic stressor states and which includes effector hormones of the adrenergic nervous system. Fifty years ago, Albrecht Fleckenstein and coworkers hypothesized the hyperadrenergic state, which accompanies such stressors, causes cardiomyocyte necrosis based on catecholamine-initiated excessive intracellular Ca2+ accumulation (EICA), and mitochondrial Ca2+ overloading in particular, in which the ensuing dysfunction and structural degeneration of these organelles leads to necrosis. In recent years, two downstream factors have been identified which, together with EICA, constitute a signal–transducer–effector pathway: (i) mitochondria-based induction of oxidative stress, in which the rate of reactive oxygen metabolite generation exceeds their rate of detoxification by endogenous antioxidant defences; and (ii) the opening of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition pore (mPTP) followed by organellar swelling and degeneration. The pathogenesis of stress-related cardiomyopathy syndromes is likely related to this pathway. Other factors which can account for cytotoxicity in stressor states include: hypokalaemia; ionized hypocalcaemia and hypomagnesaemia with resultant elevations in parathyroid hormone serving as a potent mediator of EICA; and hypozincaemia with hyposelenaemia, which compromise antioxidant defences. Herein, we revisit the Fleckenstein hypothesis of EICA in leading to cardiomyocyte necrosis and the central role played by mitochondria. PMID:21398641

  12. On the ionospheric perturbation for the 1995 Kobe earthquake: revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Hayakawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of seismo-lower ionospheric perturbation for the Kobe earthquake (EQ has been revisited with a relatively new phenomenon of ULF (ultra-low-frequency magnetic field depression effect. By using the ULF data in Japan only at Kakioka belonging to Japan Meteorological Agency (because data from Memambetsu and Kanoya were not available, we have found that a very clear ULF depression was observed at Kakioka on 14 January 1995. A comparison with our former result on subionospheric VLF (very low frequency propagation anomaly indicates that the occurrence of ULF depression exhibits a temporal coincidence (synchronization with that of subionospheric VLF anomaly. This may be acceptable because the ULF depression can be explained in terms of enhanced absorption of magnetospheric ULF waves through the disturbed lower ionosphere prior to an EQ. The result of ULF magnetic field depression in this paper is likely to provide a further support to the presence of the lower ionospheric perturbation before the Kobe EQ.

  13. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: The Mitochondrial Connection Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K

    2011-01-01

    Our current understanding of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)-mitochondrial connection falls short of comprehensive. Twenty years of intensive investigation have yielded a wealth of information about mitochondria, the mitochondrial genome, the metabolism of the optic nerve and other structures, and the phenotypic variability of classic LHON. However, we still cannot completely explain how primary LHON mutations injure the optic nerve or why the optic nerve is particularly at risk. We cannot explain the incomplete penetrance or the male predominance of LHON, the typical onset in young adult life without warning, or the synchronicity of visual loss. Moreover, primary LHON mutations clearly are not present in every family with the LHON phenotype (including multigenerational maternal inheritance), and they are present in only a minority of individuals who have the LHON optic neuropathy phenotype without a family history. All lines of evidence point to abnormalities of the mitochondria as the direct or indirect cause of LHON. Therefore, the mitochondria-LHON connection needs to be revisited and examined closely. This review will attempt to do that and provide an update on various aspects of LHON.

  14. Revisiting human nose anatomy: phylogenic and ontogenic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Roger

    2011-11-01

    This review suggests revisiting nose anatomy by considering the ethmoidal labyrinths as part of the olfactory nose and not as paranasal sinuses. Phylogenetically, the olfactory and respiratory organs of the most primitive vertebrates are separated. Exaptation, a mechanism of evolution, may explain the fusion of the olfactory and respiratory organs in dipnoi. The respiratory and olfactory noses remain anatomically separated by the transverse lamina in most mammals, whose olfactory labyrinth is a blind recess housing the ethmoturbinates. In humans, the partitioning between the olfactory cleft and the ethmoid labyrinth seems to be a consequence of ethmoid bone remodeling induced by the acquisition of an upright posture. The ethmoid bone is derived from the cartilaginous nasal capsule of primitive vertebrates and considered to be a highly conserved region among the bony elements of the skull base. It appears to be involved only in housing and protecting the olfactory function. During the early stages of human fetal development, rupture of the oronasal membrane leads to the integration of the primary olfactory sac in the future respiratory organ. The cartilaginous nasal capsule appears in the tissue under the brain and around the olfactory channels. Its early fetal development is classically regarded as the beginning of paranasal sinus formation. From phylogenic and ontogenic perspectives, it may be regarded as the development of the olfactory labyrinth as modified by the remodeling process of the human face and skull base. The endochondral bony origin of the ethmoid labyrinths makes them substantially different from the other paranasal sinuses.

  15. REVISITING THE SIMILAR PROCESS TO ENGINEER THE CONTEMPORARY SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Luísa RAMOS; José Vasconcelos FERREIRA; Jaume BARCEL(O)

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the present-day context of Systems Engineering,revisiting and setting up an updated framework for the SIMILAR process in order to use it to engineer the contemporary systems.The contemporary world is crowded of large interdisciplinary complex systems made of other systems,personnel,hardware,softare,information,processes,and facilities.An integrated holistic approach is crucial to develop these systems and take proper account of their multifaceted nature and numerous interrelationships.As the system's complexity and extent grow,the number of parties involved(stakeholders and shareholders)usually also raises,bringing to the interaction a considerable amount of points of view,skills,responsibilities,and interests.The Systems Engineering approach aims to tackle the complex and interdisciplinary whole of those socio-technical systems,providing the means to enable their successful realization.Its exploitation in our modern world is assuming an increasing relevance noticeable by emergent standards,academic papers,international conferences,and post-graduate programmes in the field.This work aims to provide"the picture"of modern Systems Engineering,and to update the context of the SIMILAR process model in order to use this renewed framework to engineer the challenging contemporary systems.The emerging trends in the field are also pointed-out with particular reference to the Model-Based Systems Engineering approach.

  16. Distant future of the Sun and Earth revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Schroder, Klaus-Peter

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the distant future of the Sun and the solar system, based on stellar models computed with a thoroughly tested evolution code. For the solar giant stages, mass-loss by the cool (but not dust-driven) wind is considered in detail. Using the new and well-calibrated mass-loss formula of Schroder & Cuntz (2005, 2007), we find that the mass lost by the Sun as an RGB giant (0.332 M_Sun, 7.59 Gy from now) potentially gives planet Earth a significant orbital expansion, inversely proportional to the remaining solar mass. According to these solar evolution models, the closest encounter of planet Earth with the solar cool giant photosphere will occur during the tip-RGB phase. During this critical episode, for each time-step of the evolution model, we consider the loss of orbital angular momentum suffered by planet Earth from tidal interaction with the giant Sun, as well as dynamical drag in the lower chromosphere. We find that planet Earth will not be able to escape engulfment, despite the positive effect o...

  17. Cauchy-perturbative matching revisited: tests in spherical symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Zink, B L; Pazos, E; Tiglio, M; Diener, Peter; Pazos, Enrique; Tiglio, Manuel; Zink, Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    During the last few years progress has been made on several fronts making it possible to revisit Cauchy-perturbative matching (CPM) in numerical relativity in a more robust and accurate way. This paper is the first in a series where we plan to analyze CPM in the light of these new results. Here we start by testing high-order summation-by-parts operators, penalty boundaries and contraint-preserving boundary conditions applied to CPM in a setting that is simple enough to study all the ingredients in great detail: Einstein's equations in spherical symmetry, describing a black hole coupled to a massless scalar field. We show that with the techniques described above, the errors introduced by Cauchy-perturbative matching are very small, and that very long term and accurate CPM evolutions can be achieved. Our tests include the accretion and ring-down phase of a Schwarzschild black hole with CPM, where we find that the discrete evolution introduces, with a low spatial resolution of \\Delta r = M/10, an error of 0.3% a...

  18. Revisiting scaling relations for giant radio halos in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Cassano, R; Brunetti, G; Giacintucci, S; Pratt, G W; Venturi, T; Kale, R; Dolag, K; Markevitch, M

    2013-01-01

    Many galaxy clusters host Megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck SZ catalog, to revisit the correlations between the power of halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power of halos at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1--2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R_500 as P_1.4 L_500^2.0. Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L_500 > 5x10^44 erg/s) clusters branch into two populations --- radio halos lie on the correlation,...

  19. Revisiting Discrete Dark Matter Model:\\theta_{13}\

    CERN Document Server

    Hamada, Yuta; Ogasahara, Atsushi; Omura, Yuji; Takayama, Fumihiro; Yasuhara, Daiki

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the discrete dark matter model with $A_4$ flavor symmetry originally introduced by M.Hirsch {\\it et.al}. We show that radiative corrections can lead to non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ and non-zero mass for the lightest neutrino. We find an interesting relation among neutrino mixing parameters and it indicates the sizable deviation of $s_{23}$ from the maximal angle $s_{23}^2=1/2$ and the degenerate mass spectrum for neutrinos. Also we study the possibilities that the right-handed neutrino is a dark matter candidate. Assuming the thermal freeze-out explains observed dark matter abundance, TeV-scale right-handed neutrino and flavored scalar bosons are required. In such a case, flavor symmetry plays an important role for the suppression of lepton flavor violating processes as well as for the stability of dark matter. We show that this scenario can be viable against currently existing constraints from collider, low energy experiments and cosmological observations.

  20. Trade Unions, immigration and immigrants in Europe revisited: Unions’ attitudes and actions under new conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marino, S.; Penninx, R.; Roosblad, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the comparative approach used by Penninx and Roosblad (Trade Unions, Immigration and Immigrants in Europe, 1960-1993. New York: Berghahn Books) to study trade unions’ attitudes and actions in relation to immigrant workers in seven Western European countries. It reassesses that ap

  1. The Best and the Rest: Revisiting the Norm of Normality of Individual Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Ernest, Jr.; Aguinis, Herman

    2012-01-01

    We revisit a long-held assumption in human resource management, organizational behavior, and industrial and organizational psychology that individual performance follows a Gaussian (normal) distribution. We conducted 5 studies involving 198 samples including 633,263 researchers, entertainers, politicians, and amateur and professional athletes.…

  2. The solution of an open XXZ chain with arbitrary spin revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Murgan, Rajan; Silverthorn, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Bethe ansatz solutions for an open XXZ spin chain with arbitrary spin with N sites and nondiagonal boundary terms are revisited. The anisotropy parameter, for cases considered here, has values \\eta = i \\pi r/q, where r and q are positive integers with q restricted to odd integers. Numerical results are presented to support the solutions.

  3. Resampling Methods Revisited: Advancing the Understanding and Applications in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haiyan; Pan, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Resampling methods including randomization test, cross-validation, the jackknife and the bootstrap are widely employed in the research areas of natural science, engineering and medicine, but they lack appreciation in educational research. The purpose of the present review is to revisit and highlight the key principles and developments of…

  4. The skeptical green consumer revisited: testing the relationship between green consumerism and skepticism toward advertising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthes, J.; Wonneberger, A.

    2014-01-01

    This article revisits the widely believed notion of the skeptical green consumer, in other words, that green consumers tend to distrust green advertising. Study 1, a survey of U.S. consumers, found no positive relationship between green consumerism and general ad skepticism. However, green consumeri

  5. Teacher Communication Concerns Revisited: Calling into Question the Gnawing Pull towards Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannels, Deanna P.

    2015-01-01

    This study revisits the long-standing teacher communication concerns framework originating over three decades ago. Analysis of 10 years of contemporary GTA teacher communication concerns reveals a typology of 10 concerns, which taken together construct teaching as a process of negotiating relationships, managing identities, and focusing attention.…

  6. Revisiting "Grutter" and "Gratz" in the Wake of "Fisher": Looking Back to Move Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the University of Michigan's 2003 affirmative action cases, "Grutter v. Bollinger" and "Gratz v. Bollinger." Through the aid of critical textual analysis and critical race theory, the author looks back at the predominant narratives that framed the challenge to, and defense of, race-conscious affirmative…

  7. Revisiting the Gun Ownership and Violence Link; a multi- level analysis of victimisation survey data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, J.N.

    2014-01-01

    The link between gun ownership victimisation by violent crime remains one of the most contested issues in criminology. Some authors claim that high gun availability facilitates serious violence. Others claim that gun ownership prevents crime. This article revisits these issues using individual and

  8. Parentocracy Revisited: Still a Relevant Concept for Understanding Middle Class Educational Advantage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett DeWiele, Corinne E.; Edgerton, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit Brown's ("Br J Soc Educ" 14: 65-85, 1990) concept of "parentocracy" which has been informatively applied in educational research in a number of studies in various countries internationally--but almost none in North America. We provide an expanded conceptualization of parentocracy and suggest that it…

  9. Revisiting the Metaphor of the Island: Challenging "World Culture" from an Island Misunderstood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappleye, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This article revisits the newly "discovered" island that world culture theorists have repeatedly utilised to explain their theoretical stance, conceptual preferences and methodological approach. Yet, it seeks to (re)connect world culture with the real world by replacing their imagined atoll with a real one--the island-nation of Japan. In…

  10. The solution of an open XXZ chain with arbitrary spin revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Murgan, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    The Bethe ansatz solution for an open XXZ spin chain with arbitrary spin with N sites and nondiagonal boundary terms is revisited. The anisotropy parameter has values \\eta = i \\pi r/q, where r and q are positive integers with q restricted to odd integers. Numerical results are presented to support the solution.

  11. A Gender Lens on Pedagogical Choice in Academia: Revisiting Hartlaub and Lancaster's Study on Teaching Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigfall, Patricia Moss; Hall, Paula Quick

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of gender in faculty choice of teaching methodologies at colleges and universities in North Carolina. We replicate research conducted by Hartlaub and Lancaster who examined pedagogical preference among a national sample of political science instructors. In revisiting that inquiry, published in 2008, we have explored…

  12. Revisiting the Gun Ownership and Violence Link; a multi- level analysis of victimisation survey data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, J.N.

    2014-01-01

    The link between gun ownership victimisation by violent crime remains one of the most contested issues in criminology. Some authors claim that high gun availability facilitates serious violence. Others claim that gun ownership prevents crime. This article revisits these issues using individual and a

  13. Increasing the Degrees of Freedom in Future Group Randomized Trials: The "df*" Method Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David M.; Blitstein, Jonathan L.; Hannan, Peter J.; Shadish, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This article revisits an article published in Evaluation Review in 2005 on sample size estimation and power analysis for group-randomized trials. With help from a careful reader, we learned of an important error in the spreadsheet used to perform the calculations and generate the results presented in that article. As we studied the…

  14. The Relationship between Undergraduate Attendance and Performance Revisited: Alignment of Student and Instructor Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, James W.; Perez-Batres, Luis A.; Coffey, Betty S.; Pouder, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the relationship between attendance and performance in the undergraduate university setting and apply agency theory in the instructor-student context. Building on agency theory propositions in the educational setting advanced by Smith, Zsidisin, and Adams (2005), we propose that the student and instructor must align goals to promote the…

  15. Revisiting "Grutter" and "Gratz" in the Wake of "Fisher": Looking Back to Move Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the University of Michigan's 2003 affirmative action cases, "Grutter v. Bollinger" and "Gratz v. Bollinger." Through the aid of critical textual analysis and critical race theory, the author looks back at the predominant narratives that framed the challenge to, and defense of, race-conscious affirmative…

  16. Re-Visit to the School Nurse and Adolescents' Medicine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borup, Ina K.; Andersen, Anette; Holstein, Bjorn E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine if students who re-visit the school nurse use medicines differently than other students when exposed to aches and psychological problems. Methods: The study includes all 11-, 13- and 15-year-old students from a random sample of schools in Denmark, response rate 87 per cent, n = 5,205. The data collection followed the…

  17. Revisiting "Grutter" and "Gratz" in the Wake of "Fisher": Looking Back to Move Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the University of Michigan's 2003 affirmative action cases, "Grutter v. Bollinger" and "Gratz v. Bollinger." Through the aid of critical textual analysis and critical race theory, the author looks back at the predominant narratives that framed the challenge to, and defense of, race-conscious affirmative action policy in the…

  18. Revisiting First-Year College Students' Mattering: Social Support, Academic Stress, and the Mattering Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, Andrea Dixon; Chung, Kuo-Yi

    2008-01-01

    In this study, Nancy Schlossberg's (1989) theory of college students' mattering to others was revisited. Mattering is the experience of others depending on us, being interested in us, and being concerned with our fate. The relationships of gender, mattering to college friends and the college environment, and friend and family social support with…

  19. Commentary on "Distributed Revisiting: An Analytic for Retention of Coherent Science Learning"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The article, "Distributed Revisiting: An Analytic for Retention of Coherent Science Learning" is an interesting study that operates at the intersection of learning theory and learning analytics. The authors observe that the relationship between learning theory and research in the learning analytics field is constrained by several…

  20. Revisiting Individual Creativity Assessment: Triangulation in Subjective and Objective Assessment Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Namgyoo K.; Chun, Monica Youngshin; Lee, Jinju

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the significant development of creativity studies, individual creativity research has not reached a meaningful consensus regarding the most valid and reliable method for assessing individual creativity. This study revisited 2 of the most popular methods for assessing individual creativity: subjective and objective methods. This study…

  1. The solution of an open XXZ chain with arbitrary spin revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgan, Rajan; Silverthorn, Chris

    2015-02-01

    The Bethe ansatz solutions for an open XXZ spin chain with arbitrary spin with N sites and nondiagonal boundary terms are revisited. The anisotropy parameter, for cases considered here, has values η = iπ \\frac{r}{q} , where r and q are positive integers with q restricted to odd integers. Numerical results are presented to support the solutions.

  2. The Best and the Rest: Revisiting the Norm of Normality of Individual Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Ernest, Jr.; Aguinis, Herman

    2012-01-01

    We revisit a long-held assumption in human resource management, organizational behavior, and industrial and organizational psychology that individual performance follows a Gaussian (normal) distribution. We conducted 5 studies involving 198 samples including 633,263 researchers, entertainers, politicians, and amateur and professional athletes.…

  3. Sunday School Revisited: An Alternative to Christian Education of the Church Today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nam Soon

    2013-01-01

    This article attempts to demonstrate similarities between the socioeconomic, cultural, and religious contexts of 18th-century England and 21st-century Canada. Revisiting the Sunday School movement in 18th-century England provides insights for the development of renewed Sunday School models in the current Canadian context of transnational…

  4. Re-Visit to the School Nurse and Adolescents' Medicine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borup, Ina K.; Andersen, Anette; Holstein, Bjorn E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine if students who re-visit the school nurse use medicines differently than other students when exposed to aches and psychological problems. Methods: The study includes all 11-, 13- and 15-year-old students from a random sample of schools in Denmark, response rate 87 per cent, n = 5,205. The data collection followed the…

  5. Strong and weak family ties revisited: reconsidering European family structures from a network perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mönkediek, B.; Bras, H.

    2014-01-01

    Family systems appear to be an important factor framing people's individual behavior. Thus far, family systems have been primarily addressed on a macro regional level with indirect measures. Revisiting Reher (1998) and the family ties criterion, the main question of this paper is to examine to what

  6. Revisiting Interpretation of Canonical Correlation Analysis: A Tutorial and Demonstration of Canonical Commonality Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimon, Kim; Henson, Robin K.; Gates, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    In the face of multicollinearity, researchers face challenges interpreting canonical correlation analysis (CCA) results. Although standardized function and structure coefficients provide insight into the canonical variates produced, they fall short when researchers want to fully report canonical effects. This article revisits the interpretation of…

  7. The skeptical green consumer revisited: testing the relationship between green consumerism and skepticism toward advertising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthes, J.; Wonneberger, A.

    2014-01-01

    This article revisits the widely believed notion of the skeptical green consumer, in other words, that green consumers tend to distrust green advertising. Study 1, a survey of U.S. consumers, found no positive relationship between green consumerism and general ad skepticism. However, green

  8. Revisiting the Didactic Triangle in the Case of an Adaptive Learning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine Zaoui Seghroucheni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we revisit the classical approach of the didactic triangle designed for the classical learning situation (face to face and adapt it to the situation of an adaptive learning system, we discuss also the different components involved in this didactic triangle and how they interact and influence the learning process in an adaptive learning system.

  9. Kensington Revisited: Two Key Years of Context from the Milford Chronicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Louis M.; And Others

    In introducing a symposium on Kensington School (Missouri), an innovative elementary school in Milford School District, this paper discusses the origins of the restudy of Kensington 15 years after its creation and narrates the story of 2 key years in the district's history. The authors describe how a revisit to the district uncovered new…

  10. Making Productive Use of Four Models of School English: A Case Study Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macken-Horarik, Mary

    2014-01-01

    At a time when political leaders and media pundits seek to narrow the English curriculum and reduce its knowledge structure to the "basics," it is helpful to revisit the potential of different approaches to learning in English that have evolved over time. In this paper I reflect on the semantic features of personal growth, cultural…

  11. Service-Learning in Crisis Communication Education: Revisiting Coombs' Objectives for the Crisis Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresh-Fuehrer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to revisit Coombs' suggestions for teaching the crisis communication course using service-learning as a framework. The author sought to assess the effectiveness of using this method in terms of the benefits to both students and the partnering organization and students' perceptions of whether they met the learning…

  12. DMPD: TLR signalling and activation of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-kappaBpathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16006187 TLR signalling and activation of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-...kappaBpathway. Moynagh PN. Trends Immunol. 2005 Sep;26(9):469-76. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show TLR signalling and activation... of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-kappaBpathway. PubmedID 16006187 Title TLR signalling and activati...on of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-kappaBpat

  13. Feste - Opern - Prozessionen, hrg. von Katharina Hottmann und Christine Siegert, Hildesheim: Olms 2008

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarah Manthey

    2010-01-01

    ...)Theaterwissenschaft und der Performance-Forschung einiger Popularität erfreut, und so wird auch von den Herausgeberinnen Katharina Hottmann und Christine Siegert interdisziplinäre Öffnung groß geschrieben...

  14. The Effects of Korean Medical Service Quality and Satisfaction on Revisit Intention of the United Arab Emirates Government Sponsored Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seoyoung Lee; Eun-Kyung Kim

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate medical service quality, satisfaction and to examine factors influencing hospital revisit intention of the United Arab Emirates government sponsored patients in Korea...

  15. Examining Relationships of Destination Image, Service Quality, e-WOM, and Revisit Intention to Sabang Island, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangga Restu Prayogo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to study the relationship among destination image, service quality, e-WOM, and revisit intentions in the tourism industry. A questionnaire given to tourists who visit one of the farrest island in western part of Indonesia, Sabang Island and using sampling through the convenience sampling. A structural equation model (SEM test with WarpPLS 3.0 was used to test the relationship between research variables. This research gathered from 150 respondents. The empirical results from PLS-SEM showed that; the destination image positive affect e-WOM and revisit intention; service quality affect e-WOM and revisit intention; e-WOM positive affect to revisit intention tourists. The implications and future research issues were discussed.

  16. Revisiting the biology of infant t(4;11)/MLL-AF4+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Clara; Prieto, Cristina; Acha, Pamela; Stam, Ronald W.; Marschalek, Rolf; Menéndez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Infant B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) accounts for 10% of childhood ALL. The genetic hallmark of most infant B-ALL is chromosomal rearrangements of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. Despite improvement in the clinical management and survival (∼85-90%) of childhood B-ALL, the outcome of infants with MLL-rearranged (MLL-r) B-ALL remains dismal, with overall survival leukemia latency. Despite its aggressiveness and short latency, current progress on its etiology, pathogenesis, and cellular origin is limited as evidenced by the lack of mouse/human models recapitulating the disease phenotype/latency. We propose this is because infant cancer is from an etiologic and pathogenesis standpoint distinct from adult cancer and should be seen as a developmental disease. This is supported by whole-genome sequencing studies suggesting that opposite to the view of cancer as a “multiple-and-sequential-hit” model, t(4;11) alone might be sufficient to spawn leukemia. The stable genome of these patients suggests that, in infant developmental cancer, one “big-hit” might be sufficient for overt disease and supports a key contribution of epigenetics and a prenatal cell of origin during a critical developmental window of stem cell vulnerability in the leukemia pathogenesis. Here, we revisit the biology of t(4;11)+ infant B-ALL with an emphasis on its origin, genetics, and disease models. PMID:26463423

  17. The Lumbar Lordosis in Males and Females, Revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ori Hay

    Full Text Available Whether differences exist in male and female lumbar lordosis has been debated by researchers who are divided as to the nature of variations in the spinal curve, their origin, reasoning, and implications from a morphological, functional and evolutionary perspective. Evaluation of the spinal curvature is constructive in understanding the evolution of the spine, as well as its pathology, planning of surgical procedures, monitoring its progression and treatment of spinal deformities. The aim of the current study was to revisit the nature of lumbar curve in males and females.Our new automated method uses CT imaging of the spine to measure lumbar curvature in males and females. The curves extracted from 158 individuals were based on the spinal canal, thus avoiding traditional pitfalls of using bone features for curve estimation. The model analysis was carried out on the entire curve, whereby both local and global descriptors were examined in a single framework. Six parameters were calculated: segment length, curve length, curvedness, lordosis peak location, lordosis cranial peak height, and lordosis caudal peak height.Compared to males, the female spine manifested a statistically significant greater curvature, a caudally located lordotic peak, and greater cranial peak height. As caudal peak height is similar for males and females, the illusion of deeper lordosis among females is due partially to the fact that the upper part of the female lumbar curve is positioned more dorsally (more backwardly inclined.Males and females manifest different lumbar curve shape, yet similar amount of inward curving (lordosis. The morphological characteristics of the female spine were probably developed to reduce stress on the vertebral elements during pregnancy and nursing.

  18. Revisiting the Interpretation of Thorium Abundances at Hansteen Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, D. J.; Hawke, B. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Prettyman, T. H.; Vaniman, D. T.

    2004-01-01

    Hansteen Alpha is one of the few remaining locations on the Moon thought to be formed by highlands volcanism. Hansteen Alpha is a triangular shaped feature located in the southern portion of Oceanus Procellarum (12 degrees W, 50 degrees S) and its size is approximately 25 km on each side. As described by Hawke et al., there is clear evidence that: 1) Hansteen Alpha was emplaced by extrusive volcanic processes; and 2) it was formed by a viscous lava that should be enriched in Th. However, in the study of Hawke et al. using available Lunar Prospector (LP) Th data, it was concluded that the Hansteen Alpha region was not greatly enriched in Th as would be expected for a highly evolved, viscous lava. It was further concluded based on other compositional data that the magma that formed Hansteen Alpha did not correspond to any known rock type. Here we revisit the interpretation of Th abundances at Hansteen Alpha for a couple of reasons. First, the size of Hansteen Alpha is smaller than the spatial resolution of the LP Gamma-ray Spectrometer (LP-GRS) from which the Th abundances were derived. Therefore, the LP-GRS pixels covering Hansteen Alpha may not truly represent the Th abundance of the Hansteen Alpha feature. Second, recent work has led to a much greater understanding of the Th spatial distribution for small-area features on the lunar surface. In particular, using forward modeling techniques, we have developed the ability to obtain information about Th abundances for features that are at or smaller than the FWHM spatial resolution (approximately [80 square kilometers]) of the LP-GRS data.

  19. The Lumbar Lordosis in Males and Females, Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Ori; Dar, Gali; Abbas, Janan; Stein, Dan; May, Hila; Masharawi, Youssef; Peled, Nathan; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Whether differences exist in male and female lumbar lordosis has been debated by researchers who are divided as to the nature of variations in the spinal curve, their origin, reasoning, and implications from a morphological, functional and evolutionary perspective. Evaluation of the spinal curvature is constructive in understanding the evolution of the spine, as well as its pathology, planning of surgical procedures, monitoring its progression and treatment of spinal deformities. The aim of the current study was to revisit the nature of lumbar curve in males and females. Our new automated method uses CT imaging of the spine to measure lumbar curvature in males and females. The curves extracted from 158 individuals were based on the spinal canal, thus avoiding traditional pitfalls of using bone features for curve estimation. The model analysis was carried out on the entire curve, whereby both local and global descriptors were examined in a single framework. Six parameters were calculated: segment length, curve length, curvedness, lordosis peak location, lordosis cranial peak height, and lordosis caudal peak height. Compared to males, the female spine manifested a statistically significant greater curvature, a caudally located lordotic peak, and greater cranial peak height. As caudal peak height is similar for males and females, the illusion of deeper lordosis among females is due partially to the fact that the upper part of the female lumbar curve is positioned more dorsally (more backwardly inclined). Males and females manifest different lumbar curve shape, yet similar amount of inward curving (lordosis). The morphological characteristics of the female spine were probably developed to reduce stress on the vertebral elements during pregnancy and nursing.

  20. Revisiting the observed surface climate response to large volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Fabian; Mitchell, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    In light of the range in presently available observational, reanalysis and model data, we revisit the surface climate response to large tropical volcanic eruptions from the end of the 19th century until present. We focus on the dynamically driven response of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the radiative-driven tropical temperature response. Using 10 different reanalysis products and the Hadley Centre Sea Level Pressure observational dataset (HadSLP2) we confirm a positive tendency in the phase of the NAO during boreal winters following large volcanic eruptions, although we conclude that it is not as clear cut as the current literature suggests. While different reanalyses agree well on the sign of the surface volcanic NAO response for individual volcanoes, the spread in the response is often large (˜ 1/2 standard deviation). This inter-reanalysis spread is actually larger for the more recent volcanic eruptions, and in one case does not encompass observations (El Chichón). These are all in the satellite era and therefore assimilate more atmospheric data that may lead to a more complex interaction for the surface response. The phase of the NAO leads to a dynamically driven warm anomaly over northern Europe in winter, which is present in all datasets considered. The general cooling of the surface temperature due to reduced incoming shortwave radiation is therefore disturbed by dynamical impacts. In the tropics, where less dynamically driven influences are present, we confirm a predominant cooling after most but not all eruptions. All datasets agree well on the strength of the tropical response, with the observed and reanalysis response being statistically significant but the modelled response not being significant due to the high variability across models.

  1. Revisiting noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Thomas G.; Verschelde, Henri; Zakharov, Valentin I.

    2016-05-01

    We revisit noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space by summing over fields in the spectrum. In field theory, the total partition function splits in a natural way into a piece that does not contain surface terms and a piece consisting of solely the so-called edge states. For open strings, we illustrate that surface contributions to the higher-spin fields correspond to open strings piercing the Rindler origin, unifying the higher-spin surface contributions in string language. For closed strings, we demonstrate that the string partition function is not quite the same as the sum over the partition functions of the fields in the spectrum: an infinite overcounting is present for the latter. Next we study the partition functions obtained by excluding the surface terms. Using recent results of He et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 05 (2015) 106], this construction, first done by Emparan [arXiv:hep-th/9412003], can be put on much firmer ground. We generalize to type II and heterotic superstrings and demonstrate modular invariance. All of these exhibit an IR divergence that can be interpreted as a maximal acceleration close to the black hole horizon. Ultimately, since these partition functions are only part of the full story, divergences here should not be viewed as a failure of string theory: maximal acceleration is a feature of a faulty treatment of the higher-spin fields in the string spectrum. We comment on the relevance of this to Solodukhin's recent proposal [Phys. Rev. D 91, 084028 (2015)]. A possible link with the firewall paradox is apparent.

  2. Revisiting four scientific debates in ocean acidification research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Andersson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ocean acidification has gained continuously increasing attention from scientists and a number of stakeholders and has raised serious concerns about its effects on marine organisms and ecosystems. With the increase in interest, funding resources, and the number of scientific investigations focusing on this environmental problem, increasing amounts of data and results have been produced, and a progressively growing and more rigorous understanding of this problem has begun to develop. Nevertheless, there are still a number of scientific debates, and in some cases misconceptions, that keep reoccurring at a number of forums in various contexts. In this article, we revisit four of these topics that we think require further thoughtful consideration including: (1 surface seawater CO2 chemistry in shallow water coastal areas, (2 experimental manipulation of marine systems using CO2 gas or by acid addition, (3 net versus gross calcification and dissolution, and (4 CaCO3 mineral dissolution and seawater buffering. As a summation of these topics, we emphasize that: (1 many coastal environments experience seawater pCO2 that is significantly higher than expected from equilibrium with the atmosphere and is strongly linked to biological processes; (2 addition of acid, base or CO2 gas to seawater can all be useful techniques to manipulate seawater chemistry in ocean acidification experiments; (3 estimates of calcification or CaCO3 dissolution based on present techniques are measuring the net of gross calcification and dissolution; and (4 dissolution of metastable carbonate mineral phases will not produce sufficient alkalinity to buffer the pH and carbonate saturation state of shallow water environments on timescales of decades to hundreds of years to the extent that any potential negative effects on marine calcifiers will be avoided.

  3. The residence time of water in the atmosphere revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ent, Ruud J.; Tuinenburg, Obbe A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper revisits the knowledge on the residence time of water in the atmosphere. Based on state-of-the-art data of the hydrological cycle we derive a global average residence time of 8.9 ± 0.4 days (uncertainty given as 1 standard deviation). We use two different atmospheric moisture tracking models (WAM-2layers and 3D-T) to obtain atmospheric residence time characteristics in time and space. The tracking models estimate the global average residence time to be around 8.5 days based on ERA-Interim data. We conclude that the statement of a recent study that the global average residence time of water in the atmosphere is 4-5 days, is not correct. We derive spatial maps of residence time, attributed to evaporation and precipitation, and age of atmospheric water, showing that there are different ways of looking at temporal characteristics of atmospheric water. Longer evaporation residence times often indicate larger distances towards areas of high precipitation. From our analysis we find that the residence time over the ocean is about 2 days less than over land. It can be seen that in winter, the age of atmospheric moisture tends to be much lower than in summer. In the Northern Hemisphere, due to the contrast in ocean-to-land temperature and associated evaporation rates, the age of atmospheric moisture increases following atmospheric moisture flow inland in winter, and decreases in summer. Looking at the probability density functions of atmospheric residence time for precipitation and evaporation, we find long-tailed distributions with the median around 5 days. Overall, our research confirms the 8-10-day traditional estimate for the global mean residence time of atmospheric water, and our research contributes to a more complete view of the characteristics of the turnover of water in the atmosphere in time and space.

  4. Memory Revisited in Julian Barnes's The Sense of an Ending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Oró Piqueras

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An accumulation of years brings with it an accumulation of experiences. The revision of such experiences usually becomes more recurrent after retirement, a transition time from one period of life to another and, as such, a time in which we, human beings, have a tendency to take stock of our lives. This is actually one of the main issues present in Julian Barnes's last novel The Sense of an Ending (2011. When the main protagonist, a retired man quite comfortable and contented with his present life, receives an unexpected inheritance from the mother of a girlfriend from his university years, he is forced to track down a part of his life that he had left at the back of his mind a long time ago. As he explains his story, the protagonist and narrator of the novel raises a number of questions related to the quality and function of memory as one gets into old age. He experiments the unreliability of memory and questions to what extent memory is constructed through the remembered emotions that invaded him over that episode of his life rather than through the events as they actually took place. On the other hand, the act of revisiting and revising that specific episode, brings with it feelings of guilt and remorse as the protagonist realises that his past acts were not as noble as he remembered them to be. However, these acts are part of the past and they cannot be changed; thus, another question that the novel raises is how to account for those actions of which one does not feel proud and, more importantly, how to manage those bad memories as one gets older

  5. Mental health and poverty in developing countries: revisiting the relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jishnu; Do, Quy-Toan; Friedman, Jed; McKenzie, David; Scott, Kinnon

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between poverty and mental health has received considerable attention in the recent literature. However, the associations presented in existing studies typically rely on limited samples of individuals and on proxy indicators for poverty such as education, the lack of tap water, or being unemployed. We revisit the relationship between poverty and mental health using data from nationally representative household surveys in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Indonesia and Mexico, along with special surveys from India and Tonga. As in previous studies, we find that individuals who are older, female, widowed, and in poor health are more likely to report worse mental health outcomes. Individuals living with others with poor mental health are significantly more likely to report worse mental health themselves. The size of the coefficients and their significance are comparable across the five countries. In contrast to previous studies, the relationship between higher education and better mental health is weak or non-existent. Furthermore, there is no consistent association between consumption poverty and mental health - in two countries mental health measures are marginally worse for the poor; in two countries there is no association; and in one country mental health measures are better for the poor compared to the non-poor. Moreover, the sizes of the coefficients for both education and consumption poverty are small compared to other factors considered here. While the lack of an association between consumption poverty and mental health implies that poor mental health is not a "disease of affluence", neither is it a disease of poverty. Changes in life circumstances brought on, for instance, by illness may have a greater impact on mental health than levels of poverty. Effective public health policy for mental health should focus on protecting individuals and households from adverse events and on targeted interventions following such adverse changes.

  6. Profile of a woman clinic manager--revisited fifteen years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, S A

    1988-01-01

    Social changes in the past 15 years have had great influence on our nation's economy. Increased numbers of women in the workforce has been one of these changes. As organizations and the nation move forward in the next 15 years, women's positions in the work force and in leadership roles will have increasingly significant influence.

  7. Renal thrombotic microangiopathy revisited: When a lesion is not a clinical finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Serres Sacha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the field of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA and associated syndromes such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, they still leave several issues unresolved. For instance, actual diagnostic criteria on which therapeutic decisions rely are relatively narrow and focused on TTP-HUS, with the consequence that non-idiopathic and atypically-presenting TMA are overlooked. In addition, nosologic classifi-cations of TMA disorders have varied substantially over the years, but are still devised from historical rather than mechanistic data. As such, it is perhaps not surprising that even today TMA is erroneously used as an interchangeable term with TTP-HUS, and missed or inappropriately diagnosed on various occasions. Yet, recognizing TMA is of crucial importance given that this lesion often manifests with potentially reversible renal failure. In this editorial, which is presented from a Nephrologist′s perspective, we propose that TMA disorders need to be reclassified to include most types of presentations and confirmed or excluded through more elaborate diagnostic approaches.

  8. Whither the elephant?: the continuing development of clinical leadership in the UK National Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonstone, John Duncan

    2014-01-01

    The paper revisits the theme of clinical leadership in UK countries, following an earlier (2009) review. It examines the competency-based approach; considers the emerging voices of clinical leaders; explores the results of evaluation research studies; identifies learning from intra-UK and international comparisons and considers the issue of leader development versus leadership development. It concludes that there is little conceptual clarity; that there continues to be a major disconnect between clinicians and managers; that different approaches to developing clinical leaders are emerging in different parts of the UK and that the major challenge remains to develop leadership, rather than leaders.

  9. Ups and downs of Viagra: revisiting ototoxicity in the mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Au

    Full Text Available Sildenafil citrate (Viagra, a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor (PDE5i, is a commonly prescribed drug for erectile dysfunction. Since the introduction of Viagra in 1997, several case reports have linked Viagra to sudden sensorineural hearing loss. However, these studies are not well controlled for confounding factors, such as age and noise-induced hearing loss and none of these reports are based on prospective double-blind studies. Further, animal studies report contradictory data. For example, one study (2008 reported hearing loss in rats after long-term and high-dose exposure to sildenafil citrate. The other study (2012 showed vardenafil, another formulation of PDE5i, to be protective against noise-induced hearing loss in mice and rats. Whether or not clinically relevant doses of sildenafil citrate cause hearing loss in normal subjects (animals or humans is controversial. One possibility is that PDE5i exacerbates age-related susceptibility to hearing loss in adults. Therefore, we tested sildenafil citrate in C57BL/6J, a strain of mice that displays increased susceptibility to age-related hearing loss, and compared the results to those obtained from the FVB/N, a strain of mice with no predisposition to hearing loss. Six-week-old mice were injected with the maximum tolerated dose of sildenafil citrate (10 mg/kg/day or saline for 30 days. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs were recorded pre- and post injection time points to assess hearing loss. Entry of sildenafil citrate in the mouse cochlea was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis of a downstream target of the cGMP-PKG cascade. ABR data indicated no statistically significant difference in hearing between treated and untreated mice in both backgrounds. Results show that the maximum tolerated dose of sildenafil citrate administered daily for 4 weeks does not affect hearing in the mouse. Our study gives no indication that Viagra will negatively impact hearing and it emphasizes the need to revisit the issue

  10. Ups and downs of Viagra: revisiting ototoxicity in the mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Adrian; Stuyt, John Gerka; Chen, Daniel; Alagramam, Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Sildenafil citrate (Viagra), a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor (PDE5i), is a commonly prescribed drug for erectile dysfunction. Since the introduction of Viagra in 1997, several case reports have linked Viagra to sudden sensorineural hearing loss. However, these studies are not well controlled for confounding factors, such as age and noise-induced hearing loss and none of these reports are based on prospective double-blind studies. Further, animal studies report contradictory data. For example, one study (2008) reported hearing loss in rats after long-term and high-dose exposure to sildenafil citrate. The other study (2012) showed vardenafil, another formulation of PDE5i, to be protective against noise-induced hearing loss in mice and rats. Whether or not clinically relevant doses of sildenafil citrate cause hearing loss in normal subjects (animals or humans) is controversial. One possibility is that PDE5i exacerbates age-related susceptibility to hearing loss in adults. Therefore, we tested sildenafil citrate in C57BL/6J, a strain of mice that displays increased susceptibility to age-related hearing loss, and compared the results to those obtained from the FVB/N, a strain of mice with no predisposition to hearing loss. Six-week-old mice were injected with the maximum tolerated dose of sildenafil citrate (10 mg/kg/day) or saline for 30 days. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded pre- and post injection time points to assess hearing loss. Entry of sildenafil citrate in the mouse cochlea was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis of a downstream target of the cGMP-PKG cascade. ABR data indicated no statistically significant difference in hearing between treated and untreated mice in both backgrounds. Results show that the maximum tolerated dose of sildenafil citrate administered daily for 4 weeks does not affect hearing in the mouse. Our study gives no indication that Viagra will negatively impact hearing and it emphasizes the need to revisit the issue of Viagra

  11. SU-E-I-43: Photoelectric Cross Section Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, A; Nakagawa, K [The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kotoku, J [Teikyo University, Tokyo (Japan); Horikawa, Y [Juntendo University, Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The importance of the precision in photoelectric cross-section value increases for recent developed technology such as dual energy computed tomography, in which some reconstruction algorithms require the energy dependence of the photo-absorption in each material composition of human being. In this study, we revisited the photoelectric cross-section calculation by self-consistent relativistic Hartree-Fock (HF) atomic model and compared with that widely distributed as “XCOM database” in National Institute of Standards and Technology, which was evaluated with localdensity approximation for electron-exchange (Fock)z potential. Methods: The photoelectric cross section can be calculated with the electron wave functions in initial atomic state (bound electron) and final continuum state (photoelectron). These electron states were constructed based on the selfconsistent HF calculation, where the repulsive Coulomb potential from the electron charge distribution (Hartree term) and the electron exchange potential with full electromagnetic interaction (Fock term) were included for the electron-electron interaction. The photoelectric cross sections were evaluated for He (Z=2), Be (Z=4), C (Z=6), O (Z=8), and Ne (Z=10) in energy range of 10keV to 1MeV. The Result was compared with XCOM database. Results: The difference of the photoelectric cross section between the present calculation and XCOM database was 8% at a maximum (in 10keV for Be). The agreement tends to be better as the atomic number increases. The contribution from each atomic shell has a considerable discrepancy with XCOM database except for K-shell. However, because the photoelectric cross section arising from K-shell is dominant, the net photoelectric cross section was almost insensitive to the different handling in Fock potential. Conclusion: The photoelectric cross-section program has been developed based on the fully self-consistent relativistic HF atomic model. Due to small effect on the Fock

  12. Consensus Paper: Revisiting the Symptoms and Signs of Cerebellar Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodranghien, Florian; Bastian, Amy; Casali, Carlo; Hallett, Mark; Louis, Elan D; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter; Nowak, Dennis A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Serrao, Mariano; Steiner, Katharina Marie; Strupp, Michael; Tilikete, Caroline; Timmann, Dagmar; van Dun, Kim

    2016-06-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensorimotor operations, cognitive tasks and affective processes. Here, we revisit the concept of the cerebellar syndrome in the light of recent advances in our understanding of cerebellar operations. The key symptoms and signs of cerebellar dysfunction, often grouped under the generic term of ataxia, are discussed. Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are associated with lesions of the vestibulo-cerebellar, vestibulo-spinal, or cerebellar ocular motor systems. The cerebellum plays a major role in the online to long-term control of eye movements (control of calibration, reduction of eye instability, maintenance of ocular alignment). Ocular instability, nystagmus, saccadic intrusions, impaired smooth pursuit, impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and ocular misalignment are at the core of oculomotor cerebellar deficits. As a motor speech disorder, ataxic dysarthria is highly suggestive of cerebellar pathology. Regarding motor control of limbs, hypotonia, a- or dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria, grasping deficits and various tremor phenomenologies are observed in cerebellar disorders to varying degrees. There is clear evidence that the cerebellum participates in force perception and proprioceptive sense during active movements. Gait is staggering with a wide base, and tandem gait is very often impaired in cerebellar disorders. In terms of cognitive and affective operations, impairments are found in executive functions, visual-spatial processing, linguistic function, and affective regulation (Schmahmann's syndrome). Nonmotor linguistic deficits including disruption of articulatory and graphomotor planning, language dynamics, verbal fluency, phonological, and semantic word retrieval, expressive and receptive syntax, and various aspects of reading and writing may be impaired after cerebellar damage. The cerebellum is organized into (a) a primary sensorimotor region in the anterior lobe and adjacent part of lobule VI, (b) a second sensorimotor

  13. Revisiting Scaling Relations for Giant Radio Halos in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, R.; Ettori, S.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Dolag, K.; Markevitch, Maxim L.

    2013-01-01

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R(sub 500) as P(sub 1.4) approx. L(2.1+/-0.2) - 500). Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L(sub 500) > 5 × 10(exp 44) erg/s)) clusters branch into two populations-radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P(sub 1.4) scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R(sub 500), measured by Planck, as P(sub 1.4) approx. Y(2.05+/-0.28) - 500), in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that "SZ-luminous" Y(sub 500) > 6×10(exp -5) Mpc(exp 2) clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle acceleration.

  14. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  15. Tetra-Quark Interpretation of X(3872) and Z_c(3900) Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Terasaki, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    In relation to the newly observed bottom-strange X^{+,-}(5568) mesons, we revisit our tetra-quark interpretation of X(3872) and Z_c(3900). It is discussed that our assignment of X^{+,-}(5568) to charged components of iso-triplet bottom partners of D_{s0}^+(2317) is compatible with the revised version of our tetra-quark interpretation of X(3872) and Z_c(3900).

  16. Revisiting lesbians' and gay men's lives in Italy: generation, relationships, and gender

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Revisiting lesbians' and gay men's lives’ is a study on same-sex desiring individuals' changing life course in Italy from the mid 1990s to the early 2010s. Focused on sexual developmental trajectories, same-sex cohabiting couples, and parental desires, its main argument is that, even in a relatively short time period, Italian lesbians' and gay men's lives changed in ways that further sexual and relational pluralism and provide empowering narratives and resources to communities of sexually di...

  17. Edgeworth expansions and rates of convergence for normalized sums: Chung's 1946 method revisited

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In this paper we revisit, correct and extend Chung?s 1946 method for deriving higher order Edgeworth expansions with respect to t-statistics and generalized self-normalized sums. Thereby we provide a set of formulas which allows the computation of the approximation of any order and specify the first four polynomials in the Edgeworth expansion the first two of which are well known. It turns out that knowledge of the first four polynomials is necessary and sufficient for cha...

  18. Injuries and Illnesses of Vietnam War POWs Revisited: IV. Air Force Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-22

    Injuries and Illnesses of Vietnam War POWs Revisited: IV. Air Force Risk Factors LT Saima Raza, MSC, USN, Jeffrey L. Moore, John P. Albano, and A...nine years, began in February 1973. During the months that followed, enemy forces released 138 Navy, 26 Marine Corps, 77 Army, and 325 Air Force...Repatriated POWs (RPWs). As a part of O/H (Thirteenth Air Force, 1973), medical and psychological conditions of all repatriates were documented in

  19. Revisit boundary conditions for the self-adjoint angular flux formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gleicher, Frederick N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the boundary conditions for SAAF. We derived the equivalent parity variational form ready for coding up. The more rigorous approach of evaluating odd parity should be solving the odd parity equation coupled with the even parity. We proposed a symmetric reflecting boundary condition although neither positive definiteness nor even-odd decoupling is achieved. A simple numerical test verifies the validity of these boundary conditions.

  20. National park visitor segments and their interest in rural tourism services and intention to revisit

    OpenAIRE

    SIEVÄNEN TUIJA; NEUVONEN MARJO; POUTA EIJA

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to understand national park visitors’ interests to use tourism services provided in the vicinity of Linnansaari, Seitseminen and Repovesi national parks in Southern Finland. Separate visitor groups were identified based on their use of tourism services and their intention to revisit the area. Data were generated from a questionnaire survey of 736 visitors to the national parks. The analyses revealed five dimensions of interest in tourism services from which five visitor groups ...

  1. Effects of tourism image and experiential value on revisit intention in tourism industry

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Ya-Ping Chang

    2014-01-01

    Food, clothing, housing, transport and amusement are the necessities of a modern life, in which amusement is even a key element for modern people. Tourism, as the dynamic activity of amusement, allows people to experience a colorful life and tourist spots to acquire economic benefits. For this reason, the effects of Tourism Image and Experiential Value on Revisit Intention in tourism industry are studied. Aiming at the visitors to Yushan National Park, a total of 500 copies of questionnaires ...

  2. Explaining tourists satisfaction and intention to revisit Nha Trang, Viet Nam

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Thi Ai Cam

    2011-01-01

    The first purpose of the thesis is to find how visitors evaluate the quality of different facets or attributes of a destination image of Nha Trang, how satisfied they are with Nha Trang, loyalty intention to revisit and willingness to recommend Nha Trang to others. The second is to investigate what “image” is most important to explain global satisfaction with visiting Nha Trang. The third is to investigate how perceived quality, satisfaction and other motivational or dismotivational factors ...

  3. Revisiting the fundamental physical chemistry in heterogeneous photocatalysis : its thermodynamics and kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtani, Bunsho

    2014-01-01

    Although the history of photocatalysis research is not so long, many researchers have studied photocatalysis and a large number of papers on photocatalysis have been published. The objectives of this review paper are to revisit the fundamentals of photocatalysis, especially its thermodynamics and kinetics, which have not been reexamined in recent studies, to clarify the problems, if any, that prevent developments in the field of photocatalysis, and to present insights for future progress.

  4. Revisiting T2KK and T2KO physics potential and $\

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiwara, Kaoru; Okamura, Naotoshi; Takaesu, Yoshitaro

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the sensitivity study of the Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Korea (T2KK) and Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Oki (T2KO) proposals where a water Cerenkov detector with the 100 kton fiducial volume is placed in Korea ($L = 1000$ km) and Oki island ($L = 653$ km) in Japan, respectively, in addition to the Super-Kamiokande for determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and leptonic CP phase ($\\delta_{CP}$). We systematically study the running ratio of the $\

  5. Joint remote preparation of four-qubit cluster-type states revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Nguyen Ba; Bich, Cao Thi [Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics, 10 Dao Tan, Thu Le, Ba Dinh, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Van Don, Nung, E-mail: nban@iop.vast.ac.vn [Physics Department, Hanoi National University, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2011-07-14

    We revisit the protocols proposed recently (Zhan et al 2011 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44 095501) for joint remote preparation of four-qubit cluster-type states. We not only point out errors in those protocols but also make considerable improvements. Our protocols, for both the cases of real and complex coefficients of the state to be prepared, consume much less quantum resource as well as classical communication cost.

  6. (Modified) Fredholm Determinants for Operators with Matrix-Valued Semi-Separable Integral Kernels Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Gesztesy, Fritz; Makarov, Konstantin A.

    2003-01-01

    We revisit the computation of (2-modified) Fredholm determinants for operators with matrix-valued semi-separable integral kernels. The latter occur, for instance, in the form of Green's functions associated with closed ordinary differential operators on arbitrary intervals on the real line. Our approach determines the (2-modified) Fredholm determinants in terms of solutions of closely associated Volterra integral equations, and as a result offers a natural way to compute such determinants. We...

  7. Revisiting the fundamental physical chemistry in heterogeneous photocatalysis: its thermodynamics and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Bunsho

    2014-02-07

    Although the history of photocatalysis research is not so long, many researchers have studied photocatalysis and a large number of papers on photocatalysis have been published. The objectives of this review paper are to revisit the fundamentals of photocatalysis, especially its thermodynamics and kinetics, which have not been reexamined in recent studies, to clarify the problems, if any, that prevent developments in the field of photocatalysis, and to present insights for future progress.

  8. RNS derivation of N-point disk amplitudes from the revisited S-matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, Luiz Antonio, E-mail: luiz.a.barreiro@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, UNESP, Rio Claro, São Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Matemática e Computação, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Itajubá, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Medina, Ricardo, E-mail: rmedina50@gmail.com [Instituto de Matemática e Computação, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Itajubá, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Recently, in [7] we proposed a revisited S-matrix approach to efficiently find the bosonic terms of the open superstring low energy effective lagrangian (OSLEEL). This approach allows to compute the α{sup ′N} terms of the OSLEEL using open superstring n-point amplitudes in which n is considerably lower than (N+2) (which is the order of the required amplitude to obtain those α{sup ′N} terms by means of the conventional S-matrix approach). In this work we use our revisited S-matrix approach to examine the structure of the scattering amplitudes, arriving at a closed form for them. This is a RNS derivation of the formula first found by Mafra, Schlotterer and Stieberger [21], using the pure spinor formalism. We have succeeded doing this for the 5, 6 and 7-point amplitudes. In order to achieve these results we have done a careful analysis of the kinematical structure of the amplitudes, finding as a by-product a purely kinematical derivation of the BCJ relations (for N=4,5,6 and 7). Also, following the spirit of the revisited S-matrix approach, we have found the α{sup ′} expansions for these amplitudes up to α{sup ′6} order in some cases, by only using the well known open superstring 4-point amplitude, cyclic symmetry and tree level unitarity: we have not needed to compute any numerical series or any integral involving polylogarithms, at any moment.

  9. RNS derivation of N-point disk amplitudes from the revisited S-matrix approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Barreiro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, in [7] we proposed a revisited S-matrix approach to efficiently find the bosonic terms of the open superstring low energy effective lagrangian (OSLEEL. This approach allows to compute the α′N terms of the OSLEEL using open superstring n-point amplitudes in which n is considerably lower than (N+2 (which is the order of the required amplitude to obtain those α′N terms by means of the conventional S-matrix approach. In this work we use our revisited S-matrix approach to examine the structure of the scattering amplitudes, arriving at a closed form for them. This is a RNS derivation of the formula first found by Mafra, Schlotterer and Stieberger [21], using the pure spinor formalism. We have succeeded doing this for the 5, 6 and 7-point amplitudes. In order to achieve these results we have done a careful analysis of the kinematical structure of the amplitudes, finding as a by-product a purely kinematical derivation of the BCJ relations (for N=4,5,6 and 7. Also, following the spirit of the revisited S-matrix approach, we have found the α′ expansions for these amplitudes up to α′6 order in some cases, by only using the well known open superstring 4-point amplitude, cyclic symmetry and tree level unitarity: we have not needed to compute any numerical series or any integral involving polylogarithms, at any moment.

  10. Taï chimpanzees anticipate revisiting high-valued fruit trees from further distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Simone D; Boesch, Christophe; Janmaat, Karline R L

    2014-11-01

    The use of spatio-temporal memory has been argued to increase food-finding efficiency in rainforest primates. However, the exact content of this memory is poorly known to date. This study investigated what specific information from previous feeding visits chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus), in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, take into account when they revisit the same feeding trees. By following five adult females for many consecutive days, we tested from what distance the females directed their travels towards previously visited feeding trees and how previous feeding experiences and fruit tree properties influenced this distance. To exclude the influence of sensory cues, the females' approach distance was measured from their last significant change in travel direction until the moment they entered the tree's maximum detection field. We found that chimpanzees travelled longer distances to trees at which they had previously made food grunts and had rejected fewer fruits compared to other trees. In addition, the results suggest that the chimpanzees were able to anticipate the amount of fruit that they would find in the trees. Overall, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that chimpanzees act upon a retrieved memory of their last feeding experiences long before they revisit feeding trees, which would indicate a daily use of long-term prospective memory. Further, the results are consistent with the possibility that positive emotional experiences help to trigger prospective memory retrieval in forest areas that are further away and have fewer cues associated with revisited feeding trees.

  11. Klein, Ferenczi and the clinical diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Halton, Isabel

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this article is to revisit Ferenczi's Clinical Diary (1932) to investigate the influence he had on Melanie Klein's work. It starts from the position that insufficient recognition has been given to Ferenczi's contribution to Klein's body of work and her professional development. Her analysis with Ferenczi lasted 5 years, a relatively long analysis for the period. It explores his influence in three specific areas: the importance of raw and early emotion in the maternal bond, the importance of freedom and authenticity in the analytic relationship, and finally the use of transference and countertransference feelings. Ferenczi's ill-fated experiment with mutual analysis will be discussed as it opened up a route to explore the analytic relationship, with important consequences for the future development of psychoanalysis.

  12. Increased 30-Day Emergency Department Revisits Among Homeless Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Nok Lam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with mental health conditions frequently use emergency medical services. Many suffer from substance use and homelessness. If they use the emergency department (ED as their primary source of care, potentially preventable frequent ED revisits and hospital readmissions can worsen an already crowded healthcare system. However, the magnitude to which homelessness affects health service utilization among patients with mental health conditions remains unclear in the medical community. This study assessed the impact of homelessness on 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions among patients presenting with mental health conditions in an urban, safety-net hospital. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of administrative data on all adult ED visits in 2012 in an urban safety-net hospital. Patient demographics, mental health status, homelessness, insurance coverage, level of acuity, and ED disposition per ED visit were analyzed using multilevel modeling to control for multiple visits nested within patients. We performed multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate if homelessness moderated the likelihood of mental health patients’ 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions. Results: Study included 139,414 adult ED visits from 92,307 unique patients (43.5±15.1 years, 51.3% male, 68.2% Hispanic/Latino. Nearly 8% of patients presented with mental health conditions, while 4.6% were homeless at any time during the study period. Among patients with mental health conditions, being homeless contributed to an additional 28.0% increase in likelihood (4.28 to 5.48 odds of 30-day ED revisits and 38.2% increase in likelihood (2.04 to 2.82 odds of hospital readmission, compared to non-homeless, non-mental health (NHNM patients as the base category. Adjusted predicted probabilities showed that homeless patients presenting with mental health conditions have a 31.1% chance of returning to the ED within 30-day post discharge and a 3

  13. Tales of sociology and the nursing curriculum: revisiting the debates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Kay; Law, Kate

    2007-08-01

    . Sociology and the nursing curriculum; editorial. Nurse Education in Practice 4, 81-82; Mowforth, G., Harrison, J., Morris, M., 2005. An investigation into adult nursing students' experience of the relevance and application of behavioural sciences (biology, psychology and sociology) across two different curricula. Nurse Education Today 25, 41-48]. Much attention has been given to the role, utility and value of sociology mostly within pre-registration but also post-registration nursing curricula. Through an initial analysis of a series of letters appearing in The Nursing Times over a 12 week period in 2004, and using an analytical framework of four tales (realist, critical, deconstructive and reflexive) we revisit this relationship. Unlike previous debates our argument is that this relationship is more usefully viewed as emblematic of the legitimation crisis inherent in all modern projects. We argue that in order to move beyond the 'utility' discussion, an interrogation of the knowledge claims of both nursing and sociology is required.

  14. Professional nurses as reflective clinical learning facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chabell

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid changes taking place in the country, including the education system in general and nursing education in particular, the role of professional nurses as reflective clinical learning facilitators need to be re-visited in order to meet the changing health needs of the communtiy and to facilitate outcome- based nursing education and evidence-based quality nursing care. The purpose of this paper is to explore and describe the perceptions of professional nurses as reflective clinical learning facilitators in the clinical learning units, within the context of a specific health-care service in Gauteng. A phenomenological method using descriptive naïve sketches was used to collect data from twenty professional nurses complying with certain inclusion criteria. A content analysis was performed and eight categories (main concepts were identified in order of priority as follows: communication/collaboration; role-modelling; continuous assessment and evaluation; up-to-date knowledge; scientific approach; clinical teaching; management and professionalism. After a literature control was conducted, these main concepts were confirmed. It is recommended that a model to facilitate reflective thinking in clinical nursing education be developed, using these concepts as basis for the provisional conceptual framework.

  15. Metabolic parameters using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT correlate with occult lymph node metastasis in squamous cell lung carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Hong, Chae Moon; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jaetae; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Song, Bong-Il [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate predictability of occult lymph node metastasis (OLM) using metabolic parameters on pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in squamous cell non-small cell lung carcinoma (SC-NSCLC) patients who were clinically node negative (cN0) before surgery. A total of 63 cN0 SC-NSCLC patients (M/F = 61/2, mean age 64.1 ± 8.0) who underwent curative surgery with lymph node dissection were enrolled in this study. Metabolic tumor volume (MTV) of the primary tumor was obtained with a standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold of 2.5. Total lesion glycolysis (TLG) was calculated by multiplication of the MTV and its SUV{sub mean}. Metabolic parameters (SUV{sub max}, MTV, and TLG) and clinicopathological factors were analyzed for OLM. Of 63 patients, 12 (19.0 %) had OLM. Significantly higher SUV{sub max}, MTV, TLG, and pathological tumor size were observed in patients with OLM. The optimal cutoff values for prediction of OLM determined using a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve were 8.8 for SUV{sub max}, 18.9 cm{sup 3} for MTV, 88.4 for TLG, and 2.8 cm for pathological tumor size. Univariate analysis showed correlation of SUV{sub max}, MTV, and TLG with the rate of OLM. In multivariate analyses, high SUV{sub max} and MTV showed an association with an increased risk of OLM, after adjusting for age, sex, pathological tumor size, T stage, and location. Metabolic parameters on pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT were significant predictors for OLM in cN0 SC-NSCLC patients. Surgical planning can be tailored based on the parameters in order to reduce the risk of hidden residual lymph node metastases in patients. (orig.)

  16. The Vacuum Structure, Special Relativity Theory and Quantum Mechanics Revisited: A Field Theory-No-Geometry Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bogolubov, Nikolaj N; Taneri, Ufuk

    2008-01-01

    The main fundamental principles characterizing the vacuum field structure are formulated, the modeling of the related vacuum medium and point charged particle dynamics by means of devised field theoretic tools is analyzed. The Maxwell electrodynamic theory is revisited and newly derived from the suggested vacuum field structure principles, the classical special relativity theory relationship between the energy and the corresponding point particle mass is revisited and newly obtained. The Lorentz force expression with respect to arbitrary non-inertial reference frames is revisited and discussed in detail, some new interpretations of relations between the special relativity theory and quantum mechanics are presented. The famous quantum-mechanical Schr\\"{o}dinger type equation for a relativistic point particle in the external potential field within the quasiclassical approximation as the Plank constant $\\hbar \\to 0$ is obtained.

  17. Decision curve analysis revisited: overall net benefit, relationships to ROC curve analysis, and application to case-control studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zumbrunn Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision curve analysis has been introduced as a method to evaluate prediction models in terms of their clinical consequences if used for a binary classification of subjects into a group who should and into a group who should not be treated. The key concept for this type of evaluation is the "net benefit", a concept borrowed from utility theory. Methods We recall the foundations of decision curve analysis and discuss some new aspects. First, we stress the formal distinction between the net benefit for the treated and for the untreated and define the concept of the "overall net benefit". Next, we revisit the important distinction between the concept of accuracy, as typically assessed using the Youden index and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis, and the concept of utility of a prediction model, as assessed using decision curve analysis. Finally, we provide an explicit implementation of decision curve analysis to be applied in the context of case-control studies. Results We show that the overall net benefit, which combines the net benefit for the treated and the untreated, is a natural alternative to the benefit achieved by a model, being invariant with respect to the coding of the outcome, and conveying a more comprehensive picture of the situation. Further, within the framework of decision curve analysis, we illustrate the important difference between the accuracy and the utility of a model, demonstrating how poor an accurate model may be in terms of its net benefit. Eventually, we expose that the application of decision curve analysis to case-control studies, where an accurate estimate of the true prevalence of a disease cannot be obtained from the data, is achieved with a few modifications to the original calculation procedure. Conclusions We present several interrelated extensions to decision curve analysis that will both facilitate its interpretation and broaden its potential area of application.

  18. Differential Effects in Cardiovascular Markers between High-Dose Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Monotherapy and Combination Therapy of ARB with Calcium Channel Blocker in Hypertension (DEAR Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Kinouchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This study was conducted to determine the effect of olmesartan (OLM and azelnidipine (AZL on arterial stiffness using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI, which is a novel blood pressure (BP-independent marker for arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients. Methods. Fifty-two consecutive hypertensive patients were randomly assigned either to a group treated with OLM monotherapy or to a group treated with OLM and AZL combination therapy. Clinical and biological parameters were measured before and 12 months after the start of this study. Results. Both therapies significantly and similarly reduced BP, augmentation index, and plasma aldosterone levels. The combination therapy significantly decreased CAVI and serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C levels and these reductions were significantly greater than those produced with monotherapy. No significant differences in metabolic parameters were observed between the two therapies. Conclusion. The combination therapy with OLM and AZL had beneficial effects on arterial stiffness assessed by CAVI, LDL-C, and metabolism, despite the similar BP reduction, compared with OLM monotherapy. Since these markers are known to influence the future risk of cardiovascular events, combination therapy with OLM and AZL could be a useful choice for treating hypertensive patients.

  19. Un avenir ouvert pour une sociologie revisitée

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Voyé

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Si l’on peut louer le souci de réflexivité qui anime la sociologie, il convient toutefois de dépasser ce stade du questionnement pour arriver à développer une sociologie moins inquiète d’elle-même. Les raisons de ce malaise sont diverses. Outre l’absence d’accord « sur un socle élémentaire de compétences exigibles » (François Dubet et Alain Caillé, la spécificité de son champ et de ses apports, comparée, par exemple, à l’histoire ou à la géographie, serait aussi une exigence importante, dont la rencontre la rendrait moins fragile. La question des méthodes qu’elle emploie mériterait également l’attention car celles-ci peuvent pécher par leurs faiblesses mais aussi parfois par leurs excès. L’objet même que se donne la sociologie appelle lui aussi une réflexion : la sociologie n’est pas du travail social frotté de science. Pourquoi dès lors privilégier l’étude des « problèmes sociaux » au sens courant du terme et ne pas s’intéresser aussi aux populations sans problème ou tout au moins se considérant comme telles ? Comme en médecine, les personnes saines aident à comprendre les maladies. À une époque où les changements se multiplient dans tous les domaines, la sociologie doit s’atteler à peaufiner sa conceptualisation et à repenser ses paradigmes, pour assumer pleinement son rôle social.An Open Future for a Revisited SociologyIf we can praise the concern for reflexivity that drives sociology, it should however go beyond the stage of questioning in order to develop a sociology that is less worried about itself. The reasons for this discomfort are various. Besides the lack of agreement « on the basis of elementary required skills » (François Dubet et Alain Caillé, the specificity of its field and its contributions, compared for example to history or geography, should also be an important requirement whose meeting would make it less fragile. The question of its methods

  20. Revisiting 'Respiratory Function in Emphysema in Relation to Prognosis'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V Bates

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 1956 paper by DV Bates, JMS Knott and RV Christie, "Respiratory function in emphysema in relation to prognosis" Quart J Med 1956;97:137-157 is largely reprinted with a commentary by the first author, Dr David Bates. Although the pathology of emphysema was well recognized at the time, the clinical diagnosis and assessment of its severity were known to be imprecise; physiological measurements assessing and following the clinical course had not been established. The study aimed to follow systematically a group of patients, selected by clinical criteria using standardized clinical and physiological techniques, over four years and correlate physiological and clinical changes in relation to prognosis and eventually to postmortem findings. Fifty-nine patients were recruited to an emphysema clinic at St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, England. Inclusion criteria were dyspnea without other causes and no cor pulmonale present. Patients' symptoms were assessed by a standardized questionnaire, and measurements were taken of lung volumes, maximal ventilatory volume, carbon monoxide diffusing capacity at rest, exercise and oxygen saturation by oximetry.  During the four years of the study, 17 patients died (actuarial expected - four and 13 presented with signs of pulmonary heart failure. All postmortem examinations (n=9 showed advanced emphysema. A seasonal variation in dyspnea was established (the period included the infamous 1952 London smog. Four patients improved, and the remainder were unchanged or deteriorated. Close relationships were shown between dyspnea and function results, particularly for the diffusing capacity of lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO. A comparison among a group of patients with chronic bronchitis without dyspnea showed that the DLCO discriminated between them. A loss of the normal increase in DLCO during exercise was shown in emphysema.

  1. Case report: pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucencies revisited.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Counihan, K P

    2012-08-01

    Pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucency (PEIR) describes a radiolucent lesion located in the coronal dentine, just beneath the enamel-dentine junction of unerupted teeth. The prevalence of this lesion varies depending on the type and quality of radiographic exposure and age of patients used for assessment. The aetiology of pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucent lesions is not fully understood, but published clinical and histological evidence suggest that these lesions are resorptive in nature. Issues around the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of this lesion are explored using previously unreported cases.

  2. Psychosis as a disorder of reduced cathectic capacity: Freud's analysis of the Schreber case revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlashan, Thomas H

    2009-05-01

    Approximately 100 years ago, a prominent German public figure name Daniel Schreber wrote memoirs of his experiences in asylums. His case was diagnosed Dementia Praecox at times and Paranoia at others by his treaters. Freud analyzed Schreber's memoirs from the perspective of his "libido" theory of developmentally organized mental "cathexes" or ideational/emotional investments in self and others. Revisiting Freud's analysis of the Schreber case suggests that it may represent the first theoretical articulation that the pathophysiologic core of psychosis is one of deficit, i.e., of diminished (organic) cathectic capacity for normal mental and affective investments in life.

  3. The Tension between the Decision and Control Perspectives of Accounting Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, John

    2009-01-01

    The accounting system is a carefully managed information system which is used for multiple purposes. Traditionally, the uses are categorized using the main headings of decision and control. Numerous conflicts are the consequence of the multi-purpose accounting system. The easy way out is apparently...... to use different accounting systems for different purposes. That is not the norm. The tensions are managed within a single accounting system and that leads to trade-offs in the accounting system. I will revisit these conflicts of uses of accounting systems using product costing, transfer pricing and fair...

  4. Capital management and measuring intangible assets for public organizations, revisiting the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ramirez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Public administration is not alien to knowledge society or to the "new economy". Thus, it is transforming itself to these new requirements, improving its processes to meet the needs of citizens. In this context intangible assets play an important role and become a source of competitive advantage, but only if they are properly managed. Therefore, it is necessary to previously identify intangible assets. This paper revisited the literature in order to comprehend intellectual capital model reflecting different capitals which make up institutions. This study aims to propose an intellectual capital model that enables measurement and management of intangible assets in public administration, including specific issues of public entities.

  5. DNA as Genetic Material: Revisiting Classical Experiments through an Easy, Practical Class

    OpenAIRE

    W. J. Malagó; A. Soares-Costa; F. Henrique-Silva

    2009-01-01

    In 1928, Frederick Griffith demonstrated a process of transmission of genetic information by transforming  Pneumococcus. In 1944, Oswald Avery, Colin Munro MacLeod and Maclyn McCarty showed that Griffith´stransformation principle  is DNA. Here, we intend to revisit these classicalexperiments by reproducing them in easier adapted forms, for a practical class given to undergraduate students. The Griffith experiment was reproduced by mixing heat-killed, ampicillin - resistant  E. coliwith live a...

  6. The Tension between the Decision and Control Perspectives of Accounting Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, John

    2009-01-01

    The accounting system is a carefully managed information system which is used for multiple purposes. Traditionally, the uses are categorized using the main headings of decision and control. Numerous conflicts are the consequence of the multi-purpose accounting system. The easy way out is apparently...... to use different accounting systems for different purposes. That is not the norm. The tensions are managed within a single accounting system and that leads to trade-offs in the accounting system. I will revisit these conflicts of uses of accounting systems using product costing, transfer pricing and fair...

  7. Sample selection versus two-part models revisited: the case of female smoking and drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, David

    2008-03-01

    There is a well-established debate between Heckman sample selection and two-part models in health econometrics, particularly when no obvious exclusion restrictions are available. Most of this debate has focussed on the application of these models to health care expenditure. This paper revisits the debate in the context of female smoking and drinking, and evaluates the two approaches on three grounds: theoretical, practical and statistical. The two-part model is generally favoured but it is stressed that this comparison should be carried out on a case-by-case basis.

  8. Vestindien Revisited: I kølvandet på kuldampere og cruiseturister

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brichet, Nathalia Sofie; Hastrup, Frida; Ørstedholm, Maroe

    2017-01-01

    What traces did Denmark officially leave behind when the West Indies were sold to the United States in 1917? And how are the islands still affected today by Denmark’s presence on the islands? The M/S Maritime Museum tries to answer these questions in its special new exhibition, ‘U.S. VIRGIN ISLAN...... special exhibition “U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS REVISITED – in the wake of colliers and cruise tourists,” to commemorate the centennial anniversary of selling the West Indies to the United States of America....

  9. Gauge-covariant canonical formalism revisited with application to the proton spin decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the gauge-covariant canonical formalism by separating explicitly physical and gauge degrees of freedom. We show in particular that the gauge-invariant linear and angular momentum operators proposed by Chen et al. can consistently be derived from the standard procedure based on the Noether's theorem. Finally, we demonstrate that this approach is essentially equivalent to the gauge-invariant canonical formalism based on the concept of Dirac variables. Because of many similarities with the background field method, the formalism developed here should also be relevant to general relativity and any metric theories.

  10. Type II-P Supernovae as Standard Candles: The SDSS-II Sample Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Poznanski, Dovi; Nugent, Peter E.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the observed correlation between Hbeta and FeII velocities for Type II-P supernovae (SNe~II-P) using 28 optical spectra of 13 SNe II-P and demonstrate that it is well modeled by a linear relation with a dispersion of about 300 km/s. Using this correlation, we reanalyze the publicly available sample of SNe II-P compiled by D'Andrea et al. and find a Hubble diagram with an intrinsic scatter of 11% in distance, which is nearly as tight as that measured before their sample is added to ...

  11. Revisiting an open access monograph experiment: measuring citations and tweets 5 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijder, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    An experiment run in 2009 could not assess whether making monographs available in open access enhanced scholarly impact. This paper revisits the experiment, drawing on additional citation data and tweets. It attempts to answer the following research question: does open access have a positive influence on the number of citations and tweets a monograph receives, taking into account the influence of scholarly field and language? The correlation between monograph citations and tweets is also investigated. The number of citations and tweets measured in 2014 reveal a slight open access advantage, but the influence of language or subject should also be taken into account. However, Twitter usage and citation behaviour hardly overlap.

  12. Impact of CP-violation on neutrino lepton number asymmetries revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the effect of the (Dirac) CP-violating phase on neutrino lepton number asymmetries in both mass- and flavor-basis. We found that, even if there are sizable effects on muon- and tau-neutrino asymmetries, the effect on the asymmetry of electron-neutrinos is at most similar to the upper bound set by BBN for initial neutrino degeneracy parameters smaller than order unity. We also found that, for the asymmetries in mass-basis, the changes caused by CP-violation is of sub-\\% level which is unlikely to be accesible neither in the current nor in the forthcoming experiments.

  13. Predicting Results of the Research Excellence Framework using Departmental h-Index -- Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Mryglod, O; Holovatch, Yu; Berche, B

    2015-01-01

    We revisit our recent study [Predicting results of the Research Excellence Framework using departmental h-index, Scientometrics, 2014, 1-16; arXiv:1411.1996] in which we attempted to predict outcomes of the UK's Research Excellence Framework (REF~2014) using the so-called departmental $h$-index. Here we report that our predictions failed to anticipate with any accuracy either overall REF outcomes or movements of individual institutions in the rankings relative to their positions in the previous Research Assessment Exercise (RAE~2008).

  14. Marginalization: A Revisitation With Integration of Scholarship on Globalization, Intersectionality, Privilege, Microaggressions, and Implicit Biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joanne M; Carlson, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    In 1994, the concept of marginalization was explored in an article in Advances in Nursing Science. This is a revisitation of the concept incorporating new scholarship. This update is founded on feminism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, and discourse deconstruction, all viewpoints that have been explicated in nursing. The purpose of this analysis is to look at new scholarship and concepts useful to applying marginalization in nursing knowledge development from the standpoint of Bourdieu's macro, meso, and micro levels. New scholarship includes globalization, intersectionality, privilege, microaggressions, and implicit bias. Implications for decreasing health disparities through this new scholarship are discussed.

  15. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Fourier Transform–Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) Mass Spectrometry: Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Jared B.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2016-02-16

    We revisited the implementation of UVPD within the ICR cell of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer. UVPD performance characteristics were examined in the context of recent developments in the understanding of UVPD and in-cell tandem mass spectrometry. Efficient UVPD and photo-ECD of a model peptide and small protein within the ICR cell of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer are accomplished through appropriate modulation of laser pulse timing relative to ion magnetron motion and the potential applied to an ion optical element that photons impinge on. It is shown that UVPD yields efficient and extensive fragmentation resulting in excellent sequence coverage for model peptide and protein cations.

  16. Revisited: The South Dakota Board of Nursing theory-based regulatory decisioning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Gloria; Bunkers, Sandra Schmidt

    2012-07-01

    The authors of this column describe the South Dakota Board of Nursing's 11 year journey utilizing a humanbecoming theory-based regulatory decisioning model. The column revisits the model with an emphasis on the cocreation of a strategic plan guiding the work of the South Dakota Board of Nursing through 2014. The strategic plan was influenced by the latest refinements of the humanbecoming postulates and the humanbecoming community change concepts. A graphic picture of the decisioning model is presented along with future plans for the theory-based model.

  17. Revisiting the Magnetic and Spin Evolution of Two Young X-ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdman, Robert; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Archibald, Robert Frederic

    2014-08-01

    We present results from timing analysis of two young X-ray pulsars found in the large Magellanic Cloud: the Crab-like energetic pulsar PSR B0540-69 and the so-called "big glitcher", PSR J0537-6910. In both cases, we analyze data taken with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. This work extends the published data sets for these pulsars by approximately doubling their respective data spans. We revisit the glitching activity of these neutron stars, particularly that of PSR J0537-6910, determine more precise glitch and spin parameters, and discuss the implications for the spin and magnetospheric evolution of these interesting pulsars.

  18. Revisit on the thermodynamic stability of the noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng-Sen; Liu, Yan-Song; Li, Huai-Fan

    In two frameworks, we discuss the thermodynamic stability of noncommutative geometry inspired Schwarzschild black hole (NCSBH). Under the horizon thermodynamics of black holes, we show that the NCSBH cannot be thermodynamically stable if requiring positive temperature. We note the inconsistency in the work of Larrañaga et al. and propose an effective first law of black hole thermodynamics for the NCSBH to eliminate the inconsistency. Based on the effective first law, we recalculate the heat capacity and the thermodynamic curvature by means of geometrothermodynamics (GTD) to revisit the thermodynamic stability.

  19. Revisiting some “established facts” in the field of management

    OpenAIRE

    Herman Aguinis

    2014-01-01

    Although management is now becoming a mature scientific field and much theoretical and methodological progress has been made in the past few decades, management scholars are not immune to received doctrines and things we “just know to be true.” This article revisits an admittedly selected set of these “established facts” including how to deal with outliers, conducting field experiments with real entrepreneurs in real settings, the file-drawer problem in meta-analysis, and the distribution of ...

  20. The Allolobophora sturanyi species group revisited: Integrated taxonomy and new taxa (Clitellata: Megadrili

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szederjesi, T.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Allolobophora sturanyi Rosa, 1895 species group is revisited using DNA barcoding and morphology. Barcoding results corroborated the previous treatment of the Allolobophora sturanyi subspecies and furthermore proved that the morphologically similar Allolobophora gestroides Zicsi, 1970 species belong to this species group. Elaboration of new samples from the Apuseni Mts resulted in discovery of a new subspecies A. sturanyi biharica ssp. nov. from the summit of the Bihor range, and a new species A. zicsica from the Vladeasa range similar to A. gestroides described from Northern Hungary.

  1. Ortho/para ratio of H2O+ toward Sagittarius B2(M) revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilke, Peter; Lis, Dariusz C; Bergin, Edwin A; Higgins, Ronan; Comito, Claudia

    2013-10-03

    The HIFI instrument aboard the Herschel satellite has allowed the observation and characterization of light hydrides, the building blocks of interstellar chemistry. In this article, we revisit the ortho/para ratio for H2O(+) toward the Sgr B2(M) cloud core. The line of sight toward this star forming region passes through several spiral arms and the gas in the Bar potential in the inner Galaxy. In contrast to earlier findings, which used fewer lines to constrain the ratio, we find a ratio of 3, which is uniformly consistent with high-temperature formation of the species. In view of the reactivity of this ion, this matches the expectations.

  2. Non-equilibrium modeling of the PMSE Overshoot Effect revisited: A comprehensive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebricher, Alexander; Havnes, Ove

    2012-06-01

    Numerical investigations of the Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) Overshoot Effect have to date been undertaken under the premise of plasma neutrality and current equilibrium at any time. We find it necessary to revisit the calculations without these restrictions, since electrons and ions are attached to and absorbed by mesospheric dust particles at vastly different rates under PMSE conditions. We find that differences to earlier modeling might be so significant as to warrant further investigation. Furthermore, we conduct comprehensive studies of the PMSE Overshoot Effect and put the results in the context of experimental realities.

  3. Worn Down by Toothwear? Aetiology, Diagnosis and Management Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Pamela L; Barclay, Stewart C

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of toothwear in the population is increasing, as is the number of referrals regarding this problem to secondary care dental hospital consultants and specialists. This paper outlines current theories in aetiology, diagnosis and management of localized and generalized toothwear, as well as describing clinical tips for assessing such patients.

  4. Brief Report: The Level and Nature of Autistic Intelligence Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Sven; Dziobek, Isabel; Poustka, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    Owing to higher performance on the Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM) than on the Wechsler Intelligence Scales (WIS), it has recently been argued that intelligence is underestimated in autism. This study examined RPM and WIS IQs in 48 individuals with autism, a mixed clinical (n = 28) and a neurotypical (n = 25) control group. Average RPM IQ was…

  5. Revisiting beta thalassemia intermedia: past, present, and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, Naouel; Bou-Fakhredin, Rayan; Mellouli, Fethi; Taher, Ali T

    2017-06-07

    The spectrum of thalassemias is wide ranging from thalassemia minor, which consists of mild hypochromic microcytic anemia without obvious clinical manifestations, to thalassemia major (TM), which is characterized by severe anemia since the first years of life and is transfusion dependent. Thalassemia intermedia (TI) describes those patients with mild or moderate anemia. To describe the genetic features and major clinical complications of TI, and the therapeutic approaches available in the management of this disease. Publications from potentially relevant journals were searched on Medline. Over the past decade, the understanding of TI has increased with regard to pathophysiology and molecular studies. It is now clear that clinical presentation and specific complications make TI different from TM. It is associated with greater morbidity, a wider spectrum of organ dysfunction and more complications than previously thought. TI is not a mild disease. The interplay of three hallmark pathophysiologic factors (ineffective erythropoiesis, chronic anemia, and iron overload) leads to the clinical presentations seen in TI. New treatment modalities are currently being investigated to broaden the options available for TI management.

  6. Revisiting co-trimoxazole for the treatment of tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsaad, Noor Sabah Idan

    2016-01-01

    Firstly, we systematically reviewed in vitro, in vivo and clinical anti-TB activity of six drugs with antimicrobial activity, which are not listed in WHO guidelines on MDR-TB treatment but could be potential candidates for evaluation against M. tuberculosis. Co-trimoxazole seems most promising. Seco

  7. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure: Revisiting Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Julio; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney. Worsening renal function that occurs in patients with acute heart failure has been classified as cardiorenal syndrome type 1. In this setting, worsening renal function is a common finding and is due to complex, multifactorial, and not fully understood processes involving hemodynamic (renal arterial hypoperfusion and renal venous congestion) and nonhemodynamic factors. Traditionally, worsening renal function has been associated with worse outcomes, but recent findings have revealed mixed and heterogeneous results, perhaps suggesting that the same phenotype represents a diversity of pathophysiological and clinical situations. Interpreting the magnitude and chronology of renal changes together with baseline renal function, fluid overload status, and clinical response to therapy might help clinicians to unravel the clinical meaning of renal function changes that occur during an episode of heart failure decompensation. In this article, we critically review the contemporary evidence on the pathophysiology and clinical aspects of worsening renal function in acute heart failure. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Publications Data Sharing and Other Resources Research Clinical Trials & Clinical Research Skip sharing on social media links ... health care providers, and researchers. Find NICHD-Supported Clinical Trials Use this link to find a list of ...

  9. Clinical Competence/Clinical Credibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorapah, David

    1997-01-01

    In interviews with 10 nurse teachers and 10 clinicians, respondents could describe clinical competence more fluently than clinical credibility. Responses raised the question of whether nursing teachers must be clinically competent/credible to teach nursing. (SK)

  10. ULYSSES comes full circle, before revisiting the Sun's poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Ulysses discovered unusually strong magnetic waves in the polar regions. Another surprise concerns unexpected connections between the polar and equatorial regions. Rhythmic variations in the intensity of energetic particles and cosmic rays, recorded by Ulysses at high latitudes, originate in effects of the Sun's rotation much closer to the equator. Scientists are debating how their picture of the magnetic field in the heliosphere must change, to make sense of the Ulysses observations. Without this new knowledge of the solar wind's behaviour, and its widespread effects, shocks felt in the Earth's vicinity would remain incomprehensible. For two centuries, sketchy links between sunspots, auroras and magnetic storms have puzzled scientists. Results from Ulysses and other solar spacecraft, including ESA's SOHO and Cluster II, are expected to transform human understanding of solar-terrestrial events. The task is urgent because astronauts and technological systems are becoming ever more vulnerable to the stormy Sun. After the quiet Sun, a peak of activity When Ulysses conducted the first-ever investigation of the high-latitude heliosphere, the Sun was quiet, being near the minimum of solar activity. As scientists expected, the circumstances were ideal for revealing the underlying structure of the Sun's atmosphere and the solar wind, in their simplest form. With the first phase of the voyage safely and very productively completed, Ulysses faces a new challenge, as it continues along its unique path. Obeying a cycle of roughly eleven years, the Sun is once again becoming restless as sunspot activity builds towards the next peak around 2000. When Ulysses revisits the polar regions at that time it will encounter conditions vastly different from those of 1994-95. The international mission of exploration has already given a new and thought-provoking view of the heliosphere. Its findings at solar maximum are guaranteed to do the same, and to give new insights into the gusts and shocks

  11. Today's Teens, Their Problems, and Their Literature: Revisiting G. Robert Carlsen's "Books and the Teenage Reader" Thirty Years Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Pamela Sissi

    1997-01-01

    Revisits G. Robert Carlsen's call for the use of young adult literature in the classroom by looking specifically at the emotional and reading needs of older adolescents, those in the upper grades. Discusses problems associated with adolescence in the late twentieth century and lists recommended young adult books that touch on those issues. (TB)

  12. Revisiting the melting temperature of NpO2 and the challenges associated with high temperature actinide compound measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böhler, R.; Welland, M.J.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Janssen, A.; Eloirdi, R.; Konings, R.J.M.; Manara, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work revisits the melting behaviour of neptunium dioxide, an actinide compound which can be produced in the nuclear fuel during operation, and which has an important impact on the nuclear fuel and waste radioactivity especially on the very long term. The present experimental approach employs re

  13. Revisiting an Old Friend: The Practice and Promise of Cooperative Learning for the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schul, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative learning has long been at the disposal of school teachers. However, it is often misunderstood by some teachers as just another form of collaborative group work. This article revisits cooperative learning, including a sampling of its popular variations, with practical approaches toward effectively integrating it into classroom…

  14. An analytic algorithm for global coverage of the revisiting orbit and its application to the CFOSAT satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Huang, Li

    2014-08-01

    This paper addresses a new analytic algorithm for global coverage of the revisiting orbit and its application to the mission revisiting the Earth within long periods of time, such as Chinese-French Oceanic Satellite (abbr., CFOSAT). In the first, it is presented that the traditional design methodology of the revisiting orbit for some imaging satellites only on the single (ascending or descending) pass, and the repeating orbit is employed to perform the global coverage within short periods of time. However, the selection of the repeating orbit is essentially to yield the suboptimum from the rare measure of rational numbers of passes per day, which will lose lots of available revisiting orbits. Thus, an innovative design scheme is proposed to check both rational and irrational passes per day to acquire the relationship between the coverage percentage and the altitude. To improve the traditional imaging only on the single pass, the proposed algorithm is mapping every pass into its ascending and descending nodes on the specified latitude circle, and then is accumulating the projected width on the circle by the field of view of the satellite. The ergodic geometry of coverage percentage produced from the algorithm is affecting the final scheme, such as the optimal one owning the largest percentage, and the balance one possessing the less gradient in its vicinity, and is guiding to heuristic design for the station-keeping control strategies. The application of CFOSAT validates the feasibility of the algorithm.

  15. Pathway-specific regulation revisited: cross-regulation of multiple disparate gene clusters by PAS-LuxR transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Cláudia M; Payero, Tamara D; Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Barreales, Eva G; de Pedro, Antonio; Aparicio, Jesús F

    2015-06-01

    PAS-LuxR regulators are highly conserved proteins devoted to the control of antifungal production by binding to operators located in given promoters of polyene biosynthetic genes. The canonical operator of PimM, archetype of this class of regulators, has been used here to search for putative targets of orthologous protein PteF in the genome of Streptomyces avermitilis, finding 97 putative operators outside the pentaene filipin gene cluster (pte). The processes putatively affected included genetic information processing; energy, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism; DNA replication and repair; morphological differentiation; secondary metabolite biosynthesis; and transcriptional regulation, among others. Seventeen of these operators were selected, and their binding to PimM DNA-binding domain was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Strikingly, the protein bound all predicted operators suggesting a direct control over targeted processes. As a proof of concept, we studied the biosynthesis of the ATP-synthase inhibitor oligomycin whose gene cluster included two operators. Regulator mutants showed a severe loss of oligomycin production, whereas gene complementation of the mutant restored phenotype, and gene duplication in the wild-type strain boosted oligomycin production. Comparative gene expression analyses in parental and mutant strains by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction of selected olm genes corroborated production results. These results demonstrate that PteF is able to cross-regulate the biosynthesis of two related secondary metabolites, filipin and oligomycin, but might be extended to all the processes indicated above. This study highlights the complexity of the network of interactions in which PAS-LuxR regulators are involved and opens new possibilities for the manipulation of metabolite production in Streptomycetes.

  16. Closing the quality gap: revisiting the state of the science (vol. 2: the patient-centered medical home).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John W; Jackson, George L; Powers, Benjamin J; Chatterjee, Ranee; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Kemper, Alex R; Hasselblad, Vic; Dolor, Rowena J; Irvine, R Julian; Heidenfelder, Brooke L; Kendrick, Amy S; Gray, Rebecca

    2012-07-01

    As part of the Closing the Quality Gap: Revisiting the State of the Science series of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), this systematic review sought to identify completed and ongoing evaluations of the comprehensive patient-centered medical home (PCMH), summarize current evidence for this model, and identify evidence gaps. We searched PubMed®, CINAHL®, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for published English-language studies, and a wide variety of databases and Web resources to identify ongoing or recently completed studies. Two investigators per study screened abstracts and full-text articles for inclusion, abstracted data, and performed quality ratings and evidence grading. Our functional definition of PCMH was based on the definition used by AHRQ. We included studies that explicitly claimed to be evaluating PCMH and those that did not but which met our functional definition. Seventeen studies with comparison groups evaluated the effects of PCMH (Key Question [KQ] 1). Older adults in the United States were the most commonly studied population (8 of 17 studies). PCMH interventions had a small positive impact on patient experiences (including patient-perceived care coordination) and small to moderate positive effects on preventive care services (moderate strength of evidence [SOE]). Staff experiences were also improved by a small to moderate degree (low SOE). There were too few studies to estimate effects on clinical or most economic outcomes. Twenty-one of 27 studies reported approaches that addressed all 7 major PCMH components (KQ 2), including team-based care, sustained partnership, reorganized care or structural changes to care, enhanced access, coordinated care, comprehensive care, and a systems-based approach to quality. A total of 51 strategies were used to address the 7 major PCMH components. Twenty-two of 27 studies reported information on financial systems used to implement PCMH, implementation strategies, and

  17. Closing the quality gap: revisiting the state of the science (vol. 2: the patient-centered medical home).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John W; Jackson, George L; Powers, Benjamin J; Chatterjee, Ranee; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Kemper, Alex R; Hasselblad, Vic; Dolor, Rowena J; Irvine, R Julian; Heidenfelder, Brooke L; Kendrick, Amy S; Gray, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES As part of the Closing the Quality Gap: Revisiting the State of the Science series of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), this systematic review sought to identify completed and ongoing evaluations of the comprehensive patient-centered medical home (PCMH), summarize current evidence for this model, and identify evidence gaps. DATA SOURCES We searched PubMed®, CINAHL®, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for published English-language studies, and a wide variety of databases and Web resources to identify ongoing or recently completed studies. REVIEW METHODS Two investigators per study screened abstracts and full-text articles for inclusion, abstracted data, and performed quality ratings and evidence grading. Our functional definition of PCMH was based on the definition used by AHRQ. We included studies that explicitly claimed to be evaluating PCMH and those that did not but which met our functional definition. RESULTS Seventeen studies with comparison groups evaluated the effects of PCMH (Key Question [KQ] 1). Older adults in the United States were the most commonly studied population (8 of 17 studies). PCMH interventions had a small positive impact on patient experiences (including patient-perceived care coordination) and small to moderate positive effects on preventive care services (moderate strength of evidence [SOE]). Staff experiences were also improved by a small to moderate degree (low SOE). There were too few studies to estimate effects on clinical or most economic outcomes. Twenty-one of 27 studies reported approaches that addressed all 7 major PCMH components (KQ 2), including team-based care, sustained partnership, reorganized care or structural changes to care, enhanced access, coordinated care, comprehensive care, and a systems-based approach to quality. A total of 51 strategies were used to address the 7 major PCMH components. Twenty-two of 27 studies reported information on financial systems used to

  18. Gene therapy in dentistry: tool of genetic engineering. Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Khushboo; Singh, Saurabh; Garg, Kavita Nitish

    2015-03-01

    Advances in biotechnology have brought gene therapy to the forefront of medical research. The concept of transferring genes to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed nearly half a century, but the ability to manipulate genetic material via recombinant DNA technology has brought this goal to reality. The feasibility of gene transfer was first demonstrated using tumour viruses. This led to development of viral and nonviral methods for the genetic modification of somatic cells. Applications of gene therapy to dental and oral problems illustrate the potential impact of this technology on dentistry. Preclinical trial results regarding the same have been very promising. In this review we will discuss methods, vectors involved, clinical implication in dentistry and scientific issues associated with gene therapy.

  19. TUBERCULOUS OTITIS MEDIA – REVISITED WITH 3 INTERESTING CASE REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Tuberculous otitis media is a ra re disease that is clinically variable and nonspecific. Tuberculous otitis media can be difficult to diagnose because it can easily be confused with other acute or chronic middle ear conditions. The signs and symptoms are variable and nonspecific and ofte n differ from classic descriptions. Furthermore, no two cases may not necessarily present itself clinically in the same manner. Cases of chronic otitis media that are unresponsive to the usual therapy or show unexpected postoperative evolution should be in vestigated for tuberculosis. Tuberculous otitis media should be suspected after failure of current antibiotics or persistent effusion after tympanoplasty or mastoidectomy. Because of these factors, the diagnosis is often made during surgery or postoperati vely. Late diagnosis delays the start of treatment, thereby increasing the risk of complications

  20. Understanding tumor heterogeneity as functional compartments--superorganisms revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, Thomas G P; Herbst, Saskia M; Heinze, Jürgen; Burdach, Stefan

    2011-05-27

    Compelling evidence broadens our understanding of tumors as highly heterogeneous populations derived from one common progenitor. In this review we portray various stages of tumorigenesis, tumor progression, self-seeding and metastasis in analogy to the superorganisms of insect societies to exemplify the highly complex architecture of a neoplasm as a system of functional "castes."Accordingly, we propose a model in which clonal expansion and cumulative acquisition of genetic alterations produce tumor compartments each equipped with distinct traits and thus distinct functions that cooperate to establish clinically apparent tumors. This functional compartment model also suggests mechanisms for the self-construction of tumor stem cell niches. Thus, thinking of a tumor as a superorganism will provide systemic insight into its functional compartmentalization and may even have clinical implications.

  1. Revisiting the eye opening response of the Glasgow Coma Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taopheeq Bamidele Rabiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, introduced by Teasdale and Jenneth in 1974, has received tremendous acclaim from clinicians and has been extensively used in clinical practice for the evaluation of the level of consciousness. The author notes that some traumatic brain injury patients close eyes in response to painful stimuli as opposed to the eye opening response to pain of the GCS. A revision of the eye opening response subsection of the GCS is suggested.

  2. A tale of two "tails:" A curiosity revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishanth Sadashiva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A human tail or a caudal appendage is a rare condition with preconceived notions and stigmata. They could be either true tails or "pseudotails" based on their embryology. Clinically, they are considered as a marker of occult spinal dysraphism. We report two such cases with tethering of cord, one of which was associated with a lipomeningomyelocele. These patients are in need of meticulous evaluation and appropriate management.

  3. Phase-dependent audiometry with low-frequency masking revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahne, Torsten; Rasinski, Christine; Neumann, Kerstin

    2010-05-15

    Low-frequency masking is a psychoacoustical phenomenon, describing the modulation of a high-frequency probe tone burst by a low-frequency masker tone. The probe tone threshold is increased, if the probe tone is presented at a low-frequency phases around 90 degrees and 270 degrees . At these phases, the low-frequency masker tone induces a displacement of the basilar membrane of the inner ear which modulates the sensitivity of the inner hair cells. Measuring the modulation depth is partially applied in clinical routine to diagnose the endolymphatic hydrops. Although the modulation depth differs between normal ears and those which reveal an endolymphatic hydrops, the significance of these tests seems debatable. Here, we describe a new experimental setup, completely consisting of commercially available devices. Further, a user interface was developed to enable the application in the clinical routine. The experimental setup was approved with ten normal hearing listeners. All reveal a modulation of the probe stimulus threshold by different phases of the low-frequency masker stimulus. With this experimental setup, custom-made modifications of the essential parameters are feasible. This would be a contribution to solve open questions on the clinical relevance of the low-frequency masking phenomenon.

  4. Revisiting secondary normal pressure hydrocephalus: does it exist? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Badih; Klinge, Petra; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Jabbour, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE There are several etiologies that can lead to the development of secondary normal pressure hydrocephalus (sNPH). The aim of this study was to evaluate the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome in patients with sNPH and to highlight important differences between the separate etiologies. METHODS A comprehensive review of the literature was performed to identify studies conducted between 1965 and 2015 that included data regarding the etiology, treatment, diagnosis, and outcome in patients with sNPH. Sixty-four studies with a total of 1309 patients were included. The inclusion criteria of this study were articles that were written in English, included more than 2 patients with the diagnosis of sNPH, and contained data regarding the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, or outcome of NPH. The most common assessment of clinical improvement was based on the Stein and Langfitt grading scale or equivalent improvement on other alternative ordinal grading scales. RESULTS The main etiologies of sNPH were subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in 46.5%, head trauma in 29%, intracranial malignancies in 6.2%, meningoencephalitis in 5%, and cerebrovascular disease in 4.5% of patients. In 71.9% of patients the sNPH was treated with ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, and 24.4% had placement of a ventriculoatrial shunt. Clinical improvement after shunt placement was reported in 74.4% and excellent clinical improvement in 58% of patients with sNPH. The mean follow-up period after shunt placement was 13 months. Improvement was seen in 84.2% of patients with SAH, 83% of patients with head trauma, 86.4% of patients with brain tumors, 75% of patients with meningoencephalitis, and 64.7% of patients with NPH secondary to stroke. CONCLUSIONS Secondary NPH encompasses a diverse group of clinical manifestations associated with a subset of patients with acquired hydrocephalus. The most common etiologies of sNPH include SAH and traumatic brain injury. Secondary NPH does indeed exist, and

  5. RNS derivation of N-point disk amplitudes from the revisited S-matrix approach

    CERN Document Server

    Barreiro, Luiz Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In the past year, in arXiv:1208.6066 we proposed a revisited S-matrix approach to efficiently find the bosonic terms of the open superstring low energy effective lagrangian (OSLEEL). This approach allows to compute the ${\\alpha'}^N$ terms of the OSLEEL using open superstring $n$-point amplitudes in which $n$ is very much lower than $(N+2)$ (which is the order of the required amplitude to obtain those ${\\alpha'}^N$ terms by means of the conventional S-matrix approach). In this work we use our revisited S-matrix approach to examine the structure of the scattering amplitudes, arriving at a closed form for them. This is a RNS derivation of the formula first found by Mafra, Schlotterer and Stieberger in arXiv:1106.2645, using the Pure Spinor formalism. We have succeeded doing this for the 5, 6 and 7-point amplitudes. In order to achieve these results we have done a careful analysis of the kinematical structure of the amplitudes, finding as a by-product a purely kinematical derivation of the BCJ relations (for N=4,...

  6. Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Low-to-intermediate frequency regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2015-09-01

    A previous paper [P. H. Yoon, "Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Formal results," Phys. Plasmas 22, 082309 (2015)] revisited the second-order nonlinear kinetic theory for turbulence propagating in directions parallel/anti-parallel to the ambient magnetic field, in which the original work according to Yoon and Fang [Phys. Plasmas 15, 122312 (2008)] was refined, following the paper by Gaelzer et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 032310 (2015)]. The main finding involved the dimensional correction pertaining to discrete-particle effects in Yoon and Fang's theory. However, the final result was presented in terms of formal linear and nonlinear susceptibility response functions. In the present paper, the formal equations are explicitly written down for the case of low-to-intermediate frequency regime by making use of approximate forms for the response functions. The resulting equations are sufficiently concrete so that they can readily be solved by numerical means or analyzed by theoretical means. The derived set of equations describe nonlinear interactions of quasi-parallel modes whose frequency range covers the Alfvén wave range to ion-cyclotron mode, but is sufficiently lower than the electron cyclotron mode. The application of the present formalism may range from the nonlinear evolution of whistler anisotropy instability in the high-beta regime, and the nonlinear interaction of electrons with whistler-range turbulence.

  7. Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Low-to-intermediate frequency regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Peter H., E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    A previous paper [P. H. Yoon, “Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Formal results,” Phys. Plasmas 22, 082309 (2015)] revisited the second-order nonlinear kinetic theory for turbulence propagating in directions parallel/anti-parallel to the ambient magnetic field, in which the original work according to Yoon and Fang [Phys. Plasmas 15, 122312 (2008)] was refined, following the paper by Gaelzer et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 032310 (2015)]. The main finding involved the dimensional correction pertaining to discrete-particle effects in Yoon and Fang's theory. However, the final result was presented in terms of formal linear and nonlinear susceptibility response functions. In the present paper, the formal equations are explicitly written down for the case of low-to-intermediate frequency regime by making use of approximate forms for the response functions. The resulting equations are sufficiently concrete so that they can readily be solved by numerical means or analyzed by theoretical means. The derived set of equations describe nonlinear interactions of quasi-parallel modes whose frequency range covers the Alfvén wave range to ion-cyclotron mode, but is sufficiently lower than the electron cyclotron mode. The application of the present formalism may range from the nonlinear evolution of whistler anisotropy instability in the high-beta regime, and the nonlinear interaction of electrons with whistler-range turbulence.

  8. A ‘sparkling’ low-cost revisitation of the historical Hertz’s experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzo, G.; Bonanno, A.; Sapia, P.

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena involve abstract concepts and models that are particularly problematic for students, especially in the field of electromagnetic (EM) waves. In particular, for these abstract topics it is difficult to plan real experiments that offer the possibility to introduce the basic related concepts. A valid support might come from the revisitation of historical experiments, whose value have been demonstrated from an educational point of view. In this frontline we have planned an educational real-time experiment, which allows students to get in touch with the basic phenomenology of EM waves. It is a modern revisitation of the historical Hertz’s experiment that offers the possibility (from a qualitative point of view) to reproduce the Hertz’s ideas using low cost and easy to find materials, showing an easy way to generate and to detect an electromagnetic wave. Moreover, the same kind of low cost setup allows performing quantitative measures if coupled with a digital acquisition module, offering the possibility to characterise the main conceptual aspects of an electromagnetic wave, such as the signal’s dependence on the distance between transmitter and receiver or as the concept (otherwise abstract) of polarisation.

  9. Revisiting Riera's model about malevolent aircraft impinging against a rigid target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fei [School of Aeronautic Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Sun, Yuxin, E-mail: yxsun@buaa.edu.cn [School of Aeronautic Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Hua; Yang, Jialing [School of Aeronautic Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wen, Lijing [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Beijing 100082 (China); Duan, Zhuoping [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The Riera's model is revisited. • The impulse on rigid target is about equal to the initial momentum of aircraft. • Ratio of initial kinetic energy to the limit plastic strain energy is obtained. • Riera's model is improved by considering the reflection of debris. • Modification coefficient of the dynamic force is proposed. - Abstract: This paper revisited the Riera's model which is known as an important theoretical model of describing a malevolent aircraft impact on a rigid target for which the engineering background is against the crashworthiness design of the protecting shell in nuclear power plant subjected to terrorist attack. The relationship among the initial momentum of the aircraft, the total impulse exerted on the rigid target, the impulse of the crushing pressure, and the impulse of the dynamic pressure were studied. It was proved that the impulse exerted on the rigid target during the impact period is approximately equal to the initial momentum of aircraft. The expression of the ratio of the initial kinetic energy of the aircraft to the limit plastic strain energy that results in the crash of the aircraft was obtained. In addition, this study demonstrated that the reflection of a large number of debris increases the impulse exerted on the target and therefore the Riera's model needs to be improved by considering this effect and the modification coefficient of the dynamic force was proposed.

  10. Medical education for social justice: Paulo Freire revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DasGupta, Sayantani; Fornari, Alice; Geer, Kamini; Hahn, Louisa; Kumar, Vanita; Lee, Hyun Joon; Rubin, Susan; Gold, Marji

    2006-01-01

    Although social justice is an integral component of medical professionalism, there is little discussion in medical education about how to teach it to future physicians. Using adult learning theory and the work of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire, medical educators can teach a socially-conscious professionalism through educational content and teaching strategies. Such teaching can model non-hierarchical relationships to learners, which can translate to their clinical interactions with patients. Freirian teaching can additionally foster professionalism in both teachers and learners by ensuring that they are involved citizens in their local, national and international communities.

  11. What Is Inflammatory Breast Cancer? Revisiting the Case Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    d’orange 7 14% Warmth 6 12% Thick mass 3 6% Other 12 24% Initial clinical diagnoses for 10 women were infection , including nine diagnoses of mastitis...and one of cellulitis (Table 3). These 10 women were treated with antibiotic therapy for up to 5 months prior to a definitive diagnosis of breast...worry about 1 2% Fibrous mass 1 2% Cellulitis 1 2% Hematoma secondary to trauma 1 2% A discrete mass and thickening of the skin was the most

  12. Virtues and values in medicine revisited: individual and global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatar, Solomon; Upshur, Ross

    2014-10-01

    In response to the call from an international panel for 'much needed rethinking' about the goals and purposes of the education of healthcare professionals, we suggest that there must be an explicit account of the virtues and values that will inform healthcare practice in the 21st century. We propose that a renewed emphasis is needed on reviving the well-honed clinical skills and humanistic attributes in medicine as crucial for optimum affordable (and sustainable) care of individual patients. Analogous virtues should be linked to the quest for improving the health of whole populations, nationally and globally.

  13. Whole-body acid-base modeling revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring, Troels; Nielsen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The textbook account of whole-body acid-base balance in terms of endogenous acid production, renal net acid excretion and gastrointestinal alkali absorption which is the only comprehensive model around, has never been applied in clinical practice or been formally validated. In order to improve...... understanding of acid-base modeling, we managed to write up this conventional model as an expression solely on urine chemistry. Renal net acid excretion and endogenous acid production was already formulated in terms of urine chemistry, and we could from the literature also see gastrointestinal alkali absorption...

  14. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis: Pathology revisited with emphasis on perineural spread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumuluri Sravani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: To study the histopathological features with particular emphasis on perineural invasion in invasive rhinocerebral mucormycosis. Materials and Methods: Tissue sections from 30 patients with invasive rhinocerebral mucormycosis were included in the study. Demographic features, predisposing conditions, and clinical features were obtained from medical records. Tissue sections were reviewed with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E, Gomori′s methenamine silver (GMS, and periodic acid Schiff (PAS stains for (i the presence and type of inflammation (suppurative/granulomatous; sparse/absent, (ii invasion into soft tissues, and (iii type of spread (angio/perineural and presence of infarction/necrosis and fungal morphology. Results: The study material included 20 males and 10 females with age ranging from 15-84 years. The clinical syndromes included rhino-orbital in 15, rhinocerebral in 6, and rhino-orbito-cerebral in 9 patients. On histopathological examination, inflammation was suppurative with predominance of neutrophils in 25 biopsies. Suppurating granuloma with neutrophils, lymphocytes, and foreign body giant cells was seen in 3 biopsies. Invasion into soft tissues, muscles, and adipose tissues was seen in 20 biopsies. Angioinvasion was noted in 25 and soft tissue invasion in 20 biopsies. Peripheral nerves were identified in 19 and perineural spread was identified in 15 biopsies. In all, biopsies with perineural invasion, angioinvasion, and soft tissue invasion were seen. Conclusions: Perineural invasion is one of the important histological features of invasive rhinocerebral mucormycosis and it indicates advanced the extent of invasion.

  15. Traumatic ulcerative granuloma with stromal eosinophilia - Mystery of pathogenesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangarajan, R; Vaishnavi Vedam, V K; Sivadas, G; Sarangarajan, Anuradha; Meera, S

    2015-08-01

    Oral ulcers are a common symptom in clinical practice. Among various causative factors, different types of ulcers in oral cavity exist. Among this, traumatic ulcerative granuloma with stromal eosinophilia (TUGSE) appears to be quite neglected by the clinicians due to the limited knowledge and awareness. On reviewing with a detailed approach to titles and abstracts of articles eliminating duplicates, 40 relevant articles were considered. Randomized studies, review articles, case reports and abstracts were included while conference papers and posters were excluded. Of importance, TUGSE cases been reported only to a minimal extent in the literature. Lack of its awareness tends to lead clinicians to a misconception of cancer. Thus, this particular lesion needs to be differentiated from other malignant lesions to provide a proper mode of treatment. The present article reviews various aspects of the TUGSE with emphasis on the clinical manifestation, pathogenesis, histological, and immunohistochemical study. This study provides the clinician contemporaries, a humble expansion to their knowledge of the disease, based on the searched literature, enabling a more comprehensive management of this rare occurrence.

  16. Arthropathy and proteinuria: nail-patella syndrome revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albishri, Jamal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Nail-patella syndrome (NPS is a pleiotropic autosomal-dominant disorder due to mutations in the gene LMX1B. It has traditionally been characterized by a tetrad of dermatologic and musculoskeletal abnormalities. However, one of the most serious manifestations of NPS is kidney disease, which may be present in up to 40% of affected individuals. Although diagnosis can be made at birth, it is often missed, presumably due to the rarity of the condition. A 35-year-old female presented to our clinic with history of small joint pain of 6 months duration. In addition she complained of pedal edema off and on for the last 12 years. Prior to her current presentation she had been managed by a local doctor symptomatically. On evaluation, a nephrotic syndrome was obvious, but no secondary cause could be found. However, her physical examination was characteristic of NPS and keeping in view the autosomal dominant nature of the disorder all her three siblings were screened who too showed classical features of NPS. This rare syndrome as a cause of nephrotic range proteinuria is discussed in this report. The report underlines the importance of a good physical examination in a given clinical setting.

  17. Anosognosia as motivated unawareness: the 'defence' hypothesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Oliver H; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini; Solms, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Anosognosia for hemiplegia has seen a century of almost continuous research, yet a definitive understanding of its mechanism remains elusive. Essentially, anosognosic patients hold quasi-delusional beliefs about their paralysed limbs, in spite of all the contrary evidence, repeated questioning, and logical argument. We review a range of findings suggesting that emotion and motivation play an important role in anosognosia. We conclude that anosognosia involves (amongst other things) a process of psychological defence. This conclusion stems from a wide variety of clinical and experimental investigations, including data on implicit awareness of deficit, fluctuations in awareness over time, and dramatic effects upon awareness of psychological interventions such as psychotherapy, reframing of the emotional consequences of the paralysis, and first versus third person perspectival manipulations. In addition, we review and refute the (eight) arguments historically raised against the 'defence' hypothesis, including the claim that a defence-based account cannot explain the lateralised nature of the disorder. We argue that damage to a well-established right-lateralised emotion regulation system, with links to psychological processes that appear to underpin allocentric spatial cognition, plays a key role in anosognosia (at least in some patients). We conclude with a discussion of implications for clinical practice.

  18. Cranial CT revisited: do we really need contrast enhancement?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P.; Buelens, C.; Wilms, G.; Baert, A.L. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to define guidelines for intravenous contrast administration in cranial CT, as currently there are no recent guidelines based on a large series of patients. In 1900 consecutive patients (1480 adults and 420 children) pre- and post-contrast scan was analysed in order to assess the contribution of contrast enhancement to the diagnosis. The findings were grouped according to whether abnormalities were seen on the pre- and/or post-contrast scan, or whether no abnormalities were seen at all. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accurracy of a pre-contrast scan were used to determine validity. Intravenous contrast enhancement only contributes to the diagnosis if a suspicious abnormality is seen on the unenhanced scan or in the appropriate clinical setting (33.6 %). In the remaining patients (65.6 %) there is no diagnostic contribution, except for a small number of abnormalities (0.8 %). These are often anatomical variants and have no therapeutic impact. The number of contrast-enhanced cranial CT examinations can significantly be reduced by using four general guidelines for contrast administration resulting in considerable cost savings without affecting the quality of service to the patient. These guidelines are defined by the clinical findings/presentation or by the findings on the unenhanced scan. The number of contrast-related complications will be reduced, which may have medicolegal implications. These guidelines can be applied in any radiology department. (orig.) (orig.) With 2 tabs., 13 refs.

  19. Revisiting the differentiation paradigm in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablain, Julien; de The, Hugues

    2011-06-02

    As the result of intense clinical and basic research, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has progressively evolved from a deadly to a curable disease. Historically, efforts aimed at understanding the molecular bases for therapy response have repeatedly illuminated APL pathogenesis. The classic model attributes this therapeutic success to the transcriptional reactivation elicited by retinoic acid and the resulting overcoming of the differentiation block characteristic of APL blasts. However, in clinical practice, retinoic acid by itself only rarely yields prolonged remissions, even though it induces massive differentiation. In contrast, as a single agent, arsenic trioxide neither directly activates transcription nor triggers terminal differentiation ex vivo, but cures many patients. Here we review the evidence from recent ex vivo and in vivo studies that allow a reassessment of the role of differentiation in APL cure. We discuss alternative models in which PML-RARA degradation and the subsequent loss of APL cell self-renewal play central roles. Rather than therapy aimed at inducing differentiation, targeting cancer cell self-renewal may represent a more effective goal, achievable by a broader range of therapeutic agents.

  20. Cox’s Chair Revisited: Can Spinning Alter Mood States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta eWinter

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there is clinical and historical evidence for a vivid relation between the vestibular and emotional systems, the neuroscientific underpinnings are poorly understood. The spin doctors of the nineteenth century used spinning chairs (e.g. Cox’s chair to treat conditions of mania or elevated arousal. On the basis of a recent study on a hexapod motion simulator, in this prototypic investigation we explore the impact of yaw stimulation on a spinning chair on mood states.Using a controlled experimental stimulation paradigm on a unique 3-D-turntable at the University of Zurich we included 11 healthy subjects and assessed parameters of mood states and autonomic nervous system activity. The Multidimensional Mode State Questionnaire (MDMQ and Visual Analogue Rating Scales (VAS were used to assess changes of mood in response to a 100 sec yaw stimulation. In addition heart rate was continuously monitored during the experiment.Subjects indicated feeling less good, relaxed, comfortable, and calm and reported an increased alertness after vestibular stimulation. However, there were no objective adverse effects of the stimulation. Accordingly, heart rate did not significantly differ in response to the stimulation.This is the first study in a highly controlled setting using the historical approach of stimulating the vestibular system to impact mood states. It demonstrates a specific interaction between the vestibular system and mood states and thereby supports recent experimental findings with a different stimulation technique. These results may inspire future research on the clinical potential of this method.

  1. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  2. Laser-driven ion accelerators for tumor therapy revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Ute; Alonso, Jose

    2016-12-01

    Ten years ago, the authors of this report published a first paper on the technical challenges that laser accelerators need to overcome before they could be applied to tumor therapy. Among the major issues were the maximum energy of the accelerated ions and their intensity, control and reproducibility of the laser-pulse output, quality assurance and patient safety. These issues remain today. While theoretical progress has been made for designing transport systems, for tailoring the plumes of laser-generated protons, and for suitable dose delivery, today's best lasers are far from reaching performance levels, in both proton energy and intensity to seriously consider clinical ion beam therapy (IBT) application. This report details these points and substantiates that laser-based IBT is neither superior to IBT with conventional particle accelerators nor ready to replace it.

  3. The ABO blood group system revisited: a review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storry, J R; Olsson, M L

    2009-01-01

    The antigens of the ABO system were the first to be recognized as blood groups and actually the first human genetic markers known. Their presence and the realization of naturally occurring antibodies to those antigens lacking from the cells made sense of the erratic failure of blood transfusion hitherto and opened up the possibility of a safe treatment practice in life-threatening blood loss. Although initially apparently simple, the ABO system has come to grow in complexity over the years. The mass of knowledge relating to carbohydrate chemistry, enzymology, molecular genetics, and structural and evolutionary biology is now enormous thanks to more than a century of research using ABO as a principal model. This has provided us with data to form a solid platform of evidence-based transfusion and transplantation medicine used every day in laboratories and clinics around the globe. This review aims to summarize key findings and recent progress made toward further understanding of this surprisingly polymorphic system.

  4. [Alpha/beta ratio revisited in the era of hypofractionation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, C; Dubray, B

    2013-10-01

    Large doses per fraction are not recommended in daily radiotherapy due to a higher risk of late normal tissue injury. The technical refinements of modern radiotherapy and suggestions that some tumors could be sensitive to dose per fraction have renewed the interest in hypofractionated schedules. The estimation of α/β ratio value requires large samples of carefully evaluated patients in whom total and fractional doses have varied independently. Tumor repopulation has to be considered when the treatment duration is altered. Without setting aside conflicting publication, the α/β ratio values for prostate and breast (after lumpectomy) cancers could be as low as 2.5 Gy and 4 Gy, respectively. While it is too early to change our routine protocols, the time has come to conduct clinical trials comparing different fractionation schedules.

  5. Fibromyalgia revisited: the challenge to a diagnoses remains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Martinez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fibromyalgia is a clinical syndrome characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain associated with areas of the body known as tender points which, when pressured gently, cause an exaggerated pain response. The most accepted physiopathological theory is that the pain in fibromyalgia results from an unbalance between the pain transmission stimulus mechanism and the pain inhibition one. The symptoms range from widespread musculoskeletal pain; disruptive sleep patterns; fatigue; short-lived generalized stiffness (generally in the morning; edema sensation and paresthesia. There is a constant association with other functional syndrome such as: depression, anxiety, migraine and irritable bowel syndrome. In 1990 The American College of Rheumatology developed a set of criteria to diagnose fibromyalgia and include it in scientific studies so as to help with the upcoming of a patient´s diagnosis and its follow up.

  6. Langerhans cell histiocytosis revisited: Case report with review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Y. Pavan; Agrawal, Jayshree; Mohanlakshmi, J.; Kumar, P. Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a group of idiopathic disorders characterized by proliferation of bone marrow derived Langerhans cells and mature eosinophils. Their clinical features simulate common oral findings such as gingival enlargement, oral ulcers, and mobility of teeth, along with nonspecific radiographic features; hence, diagnosing such lesions becomes difficult for the oral physicians. These lesions are commonly seen in childhood; however, we are reporting a case of LCH in 29-year-old adult male. A provisional diagnosis of giant cell granuloma was considered based on history and examination, although the lesion was histologically proven to be LCH and was confirmed with immunohistochemical staining of S100 protein and CD1a antigen. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of diverse, nonpathognomical oral presentation of LCH that is easily misdiagnosed and overlooked by dentist. PMID:26321851

  7. Langerhans cell histiocytosis revisited: Case report with review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Pavan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a group of idiopathic disorders characterized by proliferation of bone marrow derived Langerhans cells and mature eosinophils. Their clinical features simulate common oral findings such as gingival enlargement, oral ulcers, and mobility of teeth, along with nonspecific radiographic features; hence, diagnosing such lesions becomes difficult for the oral physicians. These lesions are commonly seen in childhood; however, we are reporting a case of LCH in 29-year-old adult male. A provisional diagnosis of giant cell granuloma was considered based on history and examination, although the lesion was histologically proven to be LCH and was confirmed with immunohistochemical staining of S100 protein and CD1a antigen. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of diverse, nonpathognomical oral presentation of LCH that is easily misdiagnosed and overlooked by dentist.

  8. Revisiting immunosurveillance and immunostimulation: Implications for cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichim Christine V

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Experimental and clinical experience demonstrates that the resolution of a pathogenic challenge depends not only on the presence or absence of an immune reaction, but also on the initiation of the proper type of immune reaction. The initiation of a non-protective type of immune reaction will not only result in a lack of protection, but may also exacerbate the underlying condition. For example, in cancer, constituents of the immune system have been shown to augment tumor proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastases. This review discusses the duality of the role of the immune system in cancer, from the theories of immunosurveillance and immunostimulation to current studies, which illustrate that the immune system has both a protective role and a tumor-promoting role in neoplasia. The potential of using chemotherapy to inhibit a tumor-promoting immune reaction is also discussed.

  9. Infantile tremor syndrome: Role of Vitamin B12 revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the role of Vitamin B12 as an etiological factor in patients of infantile tremor syndrome (ITS. Methods: Twelve consecutive admissions of children diagnosed clinically as ITS were assessed. Assessment was done using a predefined pro forma to document patient demographic factors, general examination, systemic examination as well as relevant hematological and biochemical investigations. Results: Out of the 12 cases of ITS, 6 were males and 6 were females. Two cases had serum B12 levels below reference values, five had levels in low normal range, and remaining five had normal values. Conclusions: Role of Vitamin B12 deficiency as an etiological factor in the patients of ITS is inconclusive.

  10. The neuropsychology of attention: revisiting the "Mirsky model".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Leonard F; Joyce, Arthur W; Wurglitz, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 25 years ago, Mirsky and colleagues proposed a multiple-component model of attention. It was proposed that attention was characterized by several distinct elements that were organized into a system. A putative neuroanatomical substrate of this model of attention was proposed. This functional anatomy was primarily based upon inferences derived from brain lesion studies. Mirsky and colleagues developed a systematic clinical evaluation of this model by applying a group of neuropsychological tests. Since the introduction of what has been commonly referred to as the "Mirsky model," significant advances have been made in our understanding of brain-behavior relationships. This article applies current neuroscientific principles to "update" our understanding of attention and the "Mirsky model." We also demonstrate how the interpretation of neuropsychological tests can be modified according to principles of large-scale brain systems and patterns of brain network functional connectivity.

  11. The SAPHO syndrome revisited with an emphasis on spinal manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Antonio; Casale, Roberto; Magarelli, Nicola; Semprini, Alessia; Colosimo, Cesare [Catholic University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Shropshire, England (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    The synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome includes a group of chronic, relapsing, inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders with similar manifestations, in particular synovitis, hyperostosis, and osteitis, which may or may not be associated with neutrophilic skin eruptions such as palmoplantar pustulosis and acne conglobata. The syndrome occurs at any age, can involve any skeletal site, and its imaging appearances are variable, depending on the stage/age of the lesion and imaging method. The diagnosis is difficult if there is no skin disease. Awareness of the imaging appearances, especially in the spine, may help the radiologist in avoiding misdiagnosis (e.g., infection, tumor) and unnecessary invasive procedures, while facilitating early diagnosis and selection of an effective treatment. In this article, we provide an overview of the radiological appearances of SAPHO syndrome, focusing on the magnetic resonance imaging findings of vertebral involvement, and present relevant clinical and pathological features that assist early diagnosis. (orig.)

  12. The SAPHO syndrome revisited with an emphasis on spinal manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Antonio; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N; Casale, Roberto; Magarelli, Nicola; Semprini, Alessia; Colosimo, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    The synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome includes a group of chronic, relapsing, inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders with similar manifestations, in particular synovitis, hyperostosis, and osteitis, which may or may not be associated with neutrophilic skin eruptions such as palmoplantar pustulosis and acne conglobata. The syndrome occurs at any age, can involve any skeletal site, and its imaging appearances are variable, depending on the stage/age of the lesion and imaging method. The diagnosis is difficult if there is no skin disease. Awareness of the imaging appearances, especially in the spine, may help the radiologist in avoiding misdiagnosis (e.g., infection, tumor) and unnecessary invasive procedures, while facilitating early diagnosis and selection of an effective treatment. In this article, we provide an overview of the radiological appearances of SAPHO syndrome, focusing on the magnetic resonance imaging findings of vertebral involvement, and present relevant clinical and pathological features that assist early diagnosis.

  13. Revisiting cAMP signaling in the carotid body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita eNunes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic carotid body (CB activation is now recognized as being essential in the development of hypertension and promoting insulin resistance; thus, it is imperative to characterize the chemotransduction mechanisms of this organ in order to modulate its activity and improve patient outcomes. For several years, and although controversial, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP was considered an important player in initiating the activation of the CB. However, its relevance was partially displaced in the 90s by the emerging role of the mitochondria and molecules such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and O2-sensitive K+ channels. Neurotransmitters/neuromodulators binding to metabotropic receptors are essential to chemotransmission in the CB, and cAMP is central to this process. cAMP also contributes to raise intracellular Ca2+ levels, and is intimately related to the cellular energetic status (AMP/ATP ratio. Furthermore, cAMP signaling is a target of multiple current pharmacological agents used in clinical practice. This review provides an outline on 1 the classical view of the cAMP-signaling pathway in the CB that originally supported its role in the O2/CO2 sensing mechanism, 2 present recent evidence on CB cAMP neuromodulation and 3 discuss how CB activity is affected by current clinical therapies that modify cAMP-signaling, namely dopaminergic drugs, caffeine (modulation of A2A/A2B receptors and roflumilast (PDE4 inhibitors. cAMP is key to any process that involves metabotropic receptors and the intracellular pathways involved in CB disease states are likely to involve this classical second messenger. Research examining the potential modification of cAMP levels and/or interactions with molecules associated with CB hyperactivity is currently in its beginning and this review will open doors for future explorations.

  14. Capsular types of Klebsiella pneumoniae revisited by wzc sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jiun Pan

    Full Text Available Capsule is an important virulence factor in bacteria. A total of 78 capsular types have been identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae. However, there are limitations in current typing methods. We report here the development of a new genotyping method based on amplification of the variable regions of the wzc gene. Fragments corresponding to the variable region of wzc were amplified and sequenced from 76 documented capsular types of reference or clinical strains. The remaining two capsular types (reference strains K15 and K50 lacked amplifiable wzc genes and were proven to be acapsular. Strains with the same capsular type exhibited ≧94% DNA sequence identity across the variable region (CD1-VR2-CD2 of wzc. Strains with distinct K types exhibited <80% DNA sequence identity across this region, with the exception of three pairs of strains: K22/K37, K9/K45, and K52/K79. Strains K22 and K37 shared identical capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps genes except for one gene with a difference at a single base which resulted in frameshift mutation. The wzc sequences of K9 and K45 exhibited high DNA sequence similarity but possessed different genes in their cps clusters. K52 and K79 exhibited 89% wzc DNA sequence identity but were readily distinguished from each other at the DNA level; in contrast, strains with the same capsular type as K52 exhibited 100% wzc sequence identity. A total of 29 strains from patients with bacteremia were typed by the wzc system. wzc DNA sequences confirmed the documented capsular type for twenty-eight of these clinical isolates; the remaining strain likely represents a new capsular type. Thus, the wzc genotyping system is a simple and useful method for capsular typing of K. pneumoniae.

  15. Clinical Pharmacopsychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fava, Giovanni A; Tomba, Elena; Bech, Per

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this critical review was to outline emerging trends and perspectives of clinical pharmacopsychology, an area of clinical psychology that is concerned with the psychological effects of medications. The historical development of clinical pharmacopsychology is outlined, with discussion......, the vulnerabilities induced by treatment (side effects, behavioral toxicity, iatrogenic comorbidity), and the interactions between drug treatment and psychological variables. Its aim is to provide a comprehensive assessment of the clinical important changes that are concerned with (a) wanted and expected treatment...... of its most representative expressions and reference to current challenges of clinical research, with particular reference to clinimetrics. The domains of clinical pharmacopsychology encompass the clinical benefits of psychotropic drugs, the characteristics that predict responsiveness to treatment...

  16. Clinical trials in "emerging markets": regulatory considerations and other factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Romi; Wang, Ouhong

    2013-11-01

    Clinical studies are being placed in emerging markets as part of global drug development programs to access large pool of eligible patients and to benefit from a cost effective structure. However, over the last few years, the definition of "emerging markets" is being revisited, especially from a regulatory perspective. For purposes of this article, countries outside US, EU and the traditional "western countries" are discussed. Multiple factors are considered for placement of clinical studies such as adherence to Good Clinical Practice (GCP), medical infrastructure & standard of care, number of eligible patients, etc. This article also discusses other quantitative factors such as country's GDP, patent applications, healthcare expenditure, healthcare infrastructure, corruption, innovation, etc. These different factors and indexes are correlated to the number of clinical studies ongoing in the "emerging markets". R&D, healthcare expenditure, technology infrastructure, transparency, and level of innovation, show a significant correlation with the number of clinical trials being conducted in these countries. This is the first analysis of its kind to evaluate and correlate the various other factors to the number of clinical studies in a country.

  17. The Oedipus complex revisited: Oedipus abandoned, Oedipus adopted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinodoz, D

    1999-02-01

    The author considers that the Oedipus of Sophocles' drama, who kills his biological father and marries his biological mother, is an illustration of the failure to work through the complex named after him. She draws attention to the contrast between the obscurity that surrounds the hero's adoptive parents and the notoriety of their biological counterparts arguing that the former are equally important in the universal oedipal fantasy. In her view the fact that Oedipus has two sets of parents--abandoning and adopting respectively--is significant in that the resulting dichotomisation of the parental imago enables him seemingly to avoid a conflict of ambivalence in relation to a single object. The author further contends that the plague of Thebes represents the symptomatic return of repressed or disavowed aggression. Three clinical examples reveal the parental imago's division to be an unconscious defence against oedipal anxieties and the sense of solitude vis-à-vis the intimacy of the parental couple. The working through of the Oedipus complex is stated to require the synthesis of love and hate and of the abandoning and adoptive aspects of the parents whereby the formerly sadistic superego becomes protective. The author also argues that a useful distinction can be made between splitting and dichotomisation.

  18. Revisiting the Panopticon: professional regulation, surveillance and sousveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater, Dawn; Fisher, Pamela; Walsh, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we will consider how the regulation of populations is not just a feature of prisons, but of all institutions and organisations that control members though hierarchies, divisions and norms. While nurses and other allied health professionals are considered to be predominantly self-regulatory, practice is guided by a code of conduct and codes of ethics that act as rules that serve to uphold the safety of the patient, whether they are a sick person in a hospital bed or an inmate in a prison. The codes of conduct espouse a number of rules that to a certain extent govern the behaviour of individual and groups of practitioners through reciprocal rewards and punishments. Supervision is one method of monitoring the effectiveness of the codes of conduct and ethics while regulating both the minimum standard of individual practice and of training organisations. It is posited that one of the possible effects of clinical supervision is to make the person effectively self-regulatory as, an autonomous practitioner. We take the view that professional autonomy is a highly problematic concept requiring closer examination.

  19. On necessity and sufficiency in counseling and psychotherapy (revisited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Arnold A

    2007-09-01

    It seems to me that Carl Rogers (see record 2007-14639-002) was far too ambitious in trying to specify general conditions of necessity and sufficiency that would be relevant to the entire spectrum of problems and the diverse expectancies and personalities of the people who seek our help. Rogers' position and orientation almost totally overlook the array of problems under the rubric of "response deficits" that stem from misinformation and missing information and call for active correction, training, and retraining. Rogers also paid scant attention to problems with significant biological determinants. Nevertheless, as exemplified by his seminal 1957 article and many other articles and books, Rogers made major contributions within the domain of the therapeutic alliance. Today, the scientific emphasis looks at accountability, the need to establish various treatments of choice, and the need to understand their presumed mechanisms. Treatment efficacy and generalizability across different methodologies are now considered key issues. The efficacy narrowing and clinically self-limiting consequences of adhering to one particular school of thought are now self-evident to most. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana revisited: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kachlik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews in detail the superficial brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana superficialis, a very rare variant of the main arterial trunks of the upper limb. It branches either from the axillary artery or the brachial artery, descends superficially in the arm (similar to the course of the superficial brachial artery and continues across the cubital fossa, runs superficially in the forearm, approaches the median nerve and enters the carpal canal to reach the hand. It usually terminates in the superficial palmar arch. The first drawing was published, in 1830, and the first description was published, in 1844. Altogether, to our knowledge, only 31 cases of a true, superficial brachiomedian artery have been reported (Some cases are incorrectly reported as superficial brachioradiomedian artery or superficial brachioulnomedian artery. Based on a meta-analysis of known, available studies, the incidence is 0.23% in Caucasians and 1.48% in Mongolians. Knowing whether or not this arterial variant is present is important in clinical medicine and relevant for: The catheterization via the radial or ulnar artery; harvesting the vascular pedicle for a forearm flap based on the radial, ulnar or superficial brachiomedian arteries; the possible collateral circulation in cases of the arterial closure; and the surgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome. Its presence can elevate the danger of an injury to the superficially located variant artery or of an accidental injection.