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Sample records for oligozoospermic infertility patients

  1. Azoospermia factor microdeletion in infertile men with idiopathic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T. Atia

    2015-11-11

    Nov 11, 2015 ... Abstract. Objectives: To determine Y-chromosome microdeletion of azoospermia factor (AZF) loci and the concomi- tant testicular pathology in azoospermic and severely oligozoospermic infertile men. Patients and methods: DNA from blood and semen of 50 azoospermic and severely oligozoospermic infer-.

  2. Association between promoter methylation of MLH1 and MSH2 and reactive oxygen species in oligozoospermic men-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, S; Agarwal, A; Henkel, R; Mahmutoglu, A M; Sharma, R; Esteves, S C; Aljowair, A; Emirzeoglu, D; Alkhani, A; Pelegrini, L; Joumah, A; Sabanegh, E

    2018-04-01

    MLH1 and MSH2 are important genes for DNA mismatch repair and crossing over during meiosis and are implicated in male infertility. Therefore, the methylation patterns of the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 in oligozoospermic males were investigated. Ten oligozoospermic patients and 29 normozoospermic donors were analysed. Methylation profiles of the MLH1 and MSH2 promotors were analysed. In addition, sperm motility and seminal reactive oxygen species (ROS) were recorded. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was conducted to determine the accuracy of the DNA methylation status of MLH1 and MSH2 to distinguish between oligozoospermic and normozoospermic men. In oligozoospermic men, MLH1 was significantly (p = .0013) more methylated compared to normozoospermic men. Additionally, there was a significant positive association (r = .384; p = .0159) between seminal ROS levels and MLH1 methylation. Contrary, no association between MSH2 methylation and oligozoospermia was found. ROC curve analysis for methylation status of MLH1 was significant (p = .0275) with an area under the curve of 61.1%, a sensitivity of 22.2% and a specificity of 100.0%. This pilot study indicates oligozoospermic patients have more methylation of MLH1 than normozoospermic patients. Whether hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter plays a role in repairing relevant mismatches of sperm DNA strands in idiopathic oligozoospermia warrants further investigation. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. The value of chromosomal analysis in oligozoospermic men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegen, Çarcia; van Rumste, Minouche M. E.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Koks, Carolien A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in relation to sperm concentration in subfertile oligozoospermic men. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: Two teaching hospitals. Patient(s): We retrospectively studied all men who received chromosomal analysis prior to

  4. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility means not being able to become pregnant after a year of trying. If a woman can ... keeps having miscarriages or stillbirths, that's also called infertility. Infertility is fairly common. After one year of ...

  5. Prevalence of Infertility Problems among Iranian Infertile Patients Referred to Royan Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepidarkish, Mahdi; Almasi-Hashiani, Amir; Shokri, Fatemeh; Vesali, Samira; Karimi, Elaheh; Omani Samani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the infertility problems in Iran. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of infertility problems and related factors in Iranian infertile patients. In this cross sectional study, 405 infertile patients referred to Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between 2014 and 2015, were selected by simple random sampling. Participants completed the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI) including 46 questions in five domains (social concern, sexual concern, relationship concern, rejection of parenthood, and need for parenthood). Mean difference between male and female was verified using independent-samples Student's t test. A generalized linear model (GLM) was also used for testing the effect of variables on the fertility problems. Data was analyzed using Stata software version 13. The mean age (SD) of participants was 31.28 (5.42). Our results showed that 160 infertile men (95.23%) were classified as very high prevalence of infertility problems. Among infertile women, 83 patients (35.02%) were as very high prevalence of infertility problems, and 154 patients (64.98%) were as high prevalence. Age (Pmale with lower education level, history of abortion and history of previous treatments failure experienced more infertility problems.

  6. Prevalence of Infertility Problems among Iranian Infertile Patients Referred to Royan Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sepidarkish

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have been conducted on the infertility problems in Iran. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of infertility problems and related factors in Iranian infertile patients. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 405 infertile patients referred to Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between 2014 and 2015, were selected by simple random sampling. Participants completed the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI including 46 questions in five domains (social concern, sexual concern, relationship concern, rejection of parenthood, and need for parenthood. Mean difference between male and female was verified using independent-samples Student’s t test. A generalized linear model (GLM was also used for testing the effect of variables on the fertility problems. Data was analyzed using Stata software version 13. Results: The mean age (SD of participants was 31.28 (5.42. Our results showed that 160 infertile men (95.23% were classified as very high prevalence of infertility problems. Among infertile women, 83 patients (35.02% were as very high prevalence of infertility problems, and 154 patients (64.98% were as high prevalence. Age (P<0.001, sex (P<0.001, a history of abortion (P=0.009, failure of previous treatment (P<0.001, and education (P=0.014 had a significant relationship with FPI scores. Conclusion: Bases on the results of current study, an younger male with lower education level, history of abortion and history of previous treatments failure experienced more infertility problems.

  7. [Internet as a source of information about infertility among infertile patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarczyk, Joanna; Hauke, Jan; Poniewaz, Marta; Serdyńska-Szuster, Monika; Pawelczyk, Leszek; Jedrzejczak, Piotr

    2012-04-01

    Around one million couples in Poland suffer from infertility People in reproductive age are most active Internet users. The aim of the study was to assess Internet habits of infertile patients. We checked to what extent infertile patients seek information about infertility on-line and what is their approach to the information found. 85 female patients treated for infertility for at least one year were surveyed. The anonymous questionnaire was designed by the authors of the publication. It consisted of questions related to medical history of the patients and sources of information about infertility they used. It also checked Internet activity of the patients and contained Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). Chi-square test and Spearman's correlation test were used to evaluate the results. The majority of patients used Internet to find information about infertility (93%); 46% of the respondent declared Internet forums to be their main source of information about it. Patients used on-line sources of information more often than stricte medical sources. Internet influenced their relation with the physician. 64% of patients verified on-line information and treatment proposed by their doctor before using them. One third of the surveyed women claimed their knowledge about infertility comes more from the Internet than the specialist who treated them. There was a positive correlation between patients who checked diagnostic or therapeutic methods proposed by their physician with depression in BDI. Considering the great impact of Internet forums and web pages on patient approach to diagnostics and treatment of infertility there seems to be a need to create a professional Polish website and forum to provide the patients with reliable information about the disease.

  8. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF ENDOMETRIOSIS IN INFERTILE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Vogler

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Endometriosis is nowadays probably the most frequent cause of infertility or subfertility and is revealed in approximately 30–40% of infertile women. The association between fertility and minimal or mild endometriosis remains unclear and controversial. Moderate and severe forms of the disease distort anatomical relations in the minor pelvis, resulting in infertility. The goals of endometriosis treatment are relief of pain symptoms, prevention of the disease progression and fertility improvement. Treatment of stages I and II endometriosis (according to the R-AFS classification may be expectative, medical or surgical. In severely forms of the disease (stage III and IV the method of choice is surgical treatment. Combined medical and surgical treatment is justified only in cases, in which the complete endometriotic tissue removal is not possible or recurrence of pain symptoms occur. Nowadays, laparoscopic surgical treatment is the golden standard being the diagnostic and therapeutic tool during the same procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fertility rate after surgical treatment of different stages of endometriosis.Patients and methods. In prospectively designed study 100 infertile women were included. The only known cause of infertility was endometriosis. In group A there were 51 patients with stage I and II endometriosis, whereas in group B there were 49 patients with stage III and IV of the disease. Endometriosis was diagnosed and treated laparoscopically. Endometriotic implants were removed either with bipolar coagulation or CO2 laser vaporisation, whereas adhesions were sharp or blunt dissected, and endometriomas stripped out of ovaries. Pregnancy rates were calculated for both groups of patients, and statistically compared between the groups.Results. Mean age of patients was 29.25 (SD ± 4.08 years and did not significantly differ between the groups of patients (29.5 years in group A and 29 years in group B. In

  9. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... greatly after age 35 (and especially after age 40). The age when fertility starts to decline varies from woman to woman. Infertility problems and miscarriage rates increase significantly after 35 years of age. There are now options for early ...

  10. Correlation between adjusted late spermatid score and sperm count in normozoospermic and oligozoospermic men

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Fahmy; Yasser Elkhiat; Mohamed Saad; Hussein Ghanem

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To correlate late spermatid score and sperm count in men with normal semen analysis and oligozoospermia undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to set the average threshold of spermatids/tubule of testicular tissue needed for normal sperm count/ml of semen. Material and methods: This study was conducted on 24 normozoospermic subjects and 18 oligozoospermic patients who underwent wide bore needle biopsy because of failed sperm collection at the day of ICSI. Clinical da...

  11. Hysterosalpingography (HSG) findings: Of infertile patients in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose/Background: Infertility is a major gynecological complaint in Nigeria, constituting about fifty percent (50%) of gynecological clinic attendance1-3. Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is used as a first line investigative procedure for evaluating infertility cases. An analysis of HSG findings of patients with primary and ...

  12. Hysterosalpingographic Findings in Patients with Infertility in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is still an integral part of gynecological evaluation of infertile couple and its value has not been underestimated in modern gynecological practice, especially in developing countries. The study aims to evaluate the findings at HSG in patients presenting with infertility at the Ebonyi State ...

  13. Cytogenetic of Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfiye Ozpak

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility by definition, is not to get pregnant within one year of regular sexual relationship without protection, affects 15-20% of reproductive age couples. Approximately 30% of infertility cases are male originated. Male infertility is caused by endocrine-related genetic defects affecting urogenital system function. These defects adversely affect subsequent spermatogenesis, sexual function, fertility, early embryonic stage of sexual maturation. Autosomal and gonosomal, numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities and related syndromes rank at the top causes of male infertility. Similar chromosome abnormalities are detected in male infertility and as the rate of these abnormalities increase, it was found to reduce sperm count especially in azospermic and oligozoospermic men. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(4.000: 230-245

  14. Papillomavirus DNA in sperm from infertile patients

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    William Gennari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human Papillomaviruses (HPV are causative agents of sexually transmitted disease that affect both men and women (6, 7.The genus includes more than 150 types divided in according to different tropism for skin surfaces and paved mucosal epithelia. Although HPV infection has a very high incidence in both sexes, HPV infection in men is often neglected because of its transitory nature and its lack of clinical relevance.The HPV infection in males was found to be borne by the anal region, perineum, scrotum, urethra and glans. The persistence of the virus in these sites of infection has been linked both to male infertility and to the development of neoplasia in genital areas and not. In addition, several studies have documented the presence of HPV in the semen but with conflicting results regarding the location of the virus in the various components of semen (5, 9,10. The objective of this study was to highlight the presence of HPV DNA in the sperm of patients waiting for a Medically Assisted Procreation and to evaluate if there is a correlation between the semen parameters (motility, concentration and morphology of spermatozoa and HPV infection.

  15. 4977-bp mitochondrial DNA deletion in infertile patients with varicocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gashti, N G; Salehi, Z; Madani, A H; Dalivandan, S T

    2014-04-01

    Varicocele is the abnormal inflexion and distension of veins of the pampiniform plexus within spermatic cord and is one of the amendable causes of male infertility. It can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in semen and cause oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to analyse spermatozoa mtDNA 4977-bp deletion in infertile men with varicocele. To detect 4977-bp deletion in spermatozoa mtDNA, semen samples of 60 infertile patients with clinical varicocele and 90 normal men from northern Iran were prepared. After extraction of spermatozoa total DNA, Gap polymerase chain reaction (Gap PCR) was performed. 4977-bp deletion was observed in 81.66% of patients with varicocele, while approximately 15.55% of controls had this deletion. As spermatozoa from patients with varicocele had a high frequency of occurrence of 4977-bp deletion in mtDNA [OR = 24.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 10.15-57.57, P deletion in spermatozoa and cause infertility in north Iranian men. However, to determine the relation between sperm mtDNA 4977-bp deletion and varicocele-induced infertility, larger population-based studies are needed. It is concluded that there is an association between sperm mtDNA 4977-bp deletion and varicocele-induced infertility in the population studied. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Management of male neurologic patients with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of fertility rely on intact neurologic function and thus neurologic diseases can result in infertility. While research into general female fertility and alterations in male semen quality is limited, we have an abundance of knowledge regarding ejaculatory dysfunction following nerve...

  17. An epidemiologic survey on the causes of infertility in patients referred to infertility center in Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is considered as a major health care problem of different communities. The high prevalence of this issue doubled its importance. A significant proportion of infertility have been related to environmental conditions and also acquired risk factors. Different environmental conditions emphasized the need to study the different causes of infertility in each area. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency causes of infertility in infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional descriptive study 1200 infertile men and women that were referred to infertility clinic of Fatemieh Hospital during 2010 to 2011, were examined. This center is the only governmental center for infertility in Hamadan. Sampling was based on census method. Information about the patients was obtained from medical examinations and laboratory findings. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics such as frequencies and the mean were used. Results: The prevalence of primary and secondary infertility was 69.5% and 30.5% respectively. Among the various causes of infertility women factors (88.6% had the highest regard. In the causes of female infertility, menstrual disorders, diseases (obesity, thyroid diseases, and diabetes, ovulation dysfunction, uterine factor, fallopian tubes and cervical factor had the highest prevalence respectively. The causes of male infertility based on their frequency included semen fluid abnormalities, genetic factors, vascular abnormalities, and anti-spermatogenesis factors, respectively. Conclusion: Etiology pattern of infertility in our study is similar with the many other patterns that have been reported by the World Health Organization. However, frequency of menstrual disorders is much higher than other studies that require further consideration.

  18. Anti sperm antibodies detection in infertile patients by radioimmunometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELnabarawy, F.; Megahed, Y.M.; Tadrous, G.A.; Hamada, T.; Elbadry, A.

    1992-01-01

    Three different methods of testing for anti sperm antibodies were compared: complement cytotoxicity, sperm agglutination, and radiolabelled anti globulin antibody technique, for detection of anti sperm antibodies in serum and secretions (seminal plasma and cervical mucus). Sample from 120 patients with infertility were investigated by the previous three methods. The results of unexplained infertile patients revealed wide variations in figures, concerning the positivity of anti sperm antibody whether in their serum or secretions, by using the cytotoxicity or sperm agglutination tests. Using a specific radiolabelled anti globulin test, a subset of patients (44.9% in the serum of men and 50% in seminal plasma) with IgG anti sperm antibody was identified, and this antibody was present in 65.4% and 78,6% of infertile wives sera and cervical mucus, respectively. Therefore, this test has been used to identify and quantitate antibodies directed toward other human cell surfaces. It was concluded that this radiolabelled method is a clinically useful and a potentially versatile procedure that can be successfully applied to the diagnosis and management of patients with suspected immunologic infertility. 1 fig., 5 tab

  19. A Nutrition Screening Form for Female Infertility Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Susie

    2014-12-01

    A Nutrition Screening Form (NSF) was designed to identify lifestyle risk factors that negatively impact fertility and to provide a descriptive profile of 300 female infertility patients in a private urban infertility clinic. The NSF was mailed to all new patients prior to the initial physician's visit and self-reported data were assessed using specific criteria to determine if a nutrition referral was warranted. This observational study revealed that 43% of the women had a body mass index (BMI) nutrition-related lifestyle factors that may negatively impact fertility and identified weight, BMI, diet, exercise, and stress as modifiable risk factors deserving future research. NSF information can help increase awareness among health professionals and patients about the important link between nutrition, fertility, and successful reproductive outcomes.

  20. Effect of Mucuna pruriens on semen profile and biochemical parameters in seminal plasma of infertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad Kaleem; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Shukla, Kamla Kant; Islam, Najmul; Jaiswar, Shyam Pyari; Ahmad, Sohail

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the impact of Mucuna pruriens seeds on semen profiles and biochemical levels in seminal plasma of infertile men. Prospective study. Departments of Biochemistry and Obstetrics and Gynecology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India. Sixty normal healthy fertile men (controls) and 60 men undergoing infertility screening. High-performance liquid chromatography assay procedure for quantitation of vitamin A and E in seminal plasma. Biochemical parameters in seminal plasma, namely lipids, fructose, and vitamin C, were estimated by standard spectrophotometric procedures. Before and after the treatment, seminal plasma lipid profile, lipid peroxide, fructose, and antioxidant vitamin levels were measured. Treatment with M. pruriens significantly inhibited lipid peroxidation, elevated spermatogenesis, and improved sperm motility. Treatment also recovered the levels of total lipids, triglycerides, cholesterol, phospholipids, and vitamin A, C, and E and corrected fructose in seminal plasma of infertile men. Treatment with M. pruriens increased sperm concentration and motility in all the infertile study groups. Oligozoospermic patients recovered sperm concentration significantly, but sperm motility was not restored to normal levels in asthenozoospermic men. Furthermore, in the seminal plasma of all the infertile groups, the levels of lipids, antioxidant vitamins, and corrected fructose were recovered after a decrease in lipid peroxides after treatment. The present study is likely to open new vistas on the possible role of M. pruriens seed powder as a restorative and invigorating agent for infertile men.

  1. Treatment strategies for the infertile polycystic ovary syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannus, Samer; Burke, Yechiel Z; Kol, Shahar

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age. Infertility is a prevalent presenting feature of PCOS, and approximately 75% of these women suffer infertility due to anovulation. Lifestyle modification is considered the first-line treatment and is associated with improved endocrine profile. Clomiphene citrate (CC) should be considered as the first line pharmacologic therapy for ovulation induction. In women who are CC resistant, second-line treatment should be considered, as adding metformin, laparoscopic ovarian drilling or treatment with gonadotropins. In CC treatment failure, Letrozole could be an alternative or treatment with gonadotropins. IVF is considered the third-line treatment; the 'short', antagonist-based protocol is the preferred option for PCOS patients, as it is associated with lower risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (specifically by using a gonadotropin--releasing hormone agonist as ovulation trigger), but with comparable outcomes as the long protocol.

  2. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF POLYCYSTIC OVARIES IN INFERTILE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ribič Pucelj

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Polycystic ovaries (PCO are manifested either independently or as a syndrome (PCOS. They are one of the commonest endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age. Despite a variable clinical picture one of the leading symptoms is infertility for anovulation. Surgical treatment of the disease witnessed a revival after the introduction of minimally invasive operative laparoscopy. Various techniques of ovarian tissue destruction have been applied, the most common being laparoscopic electrocoagulation of the ovaries (LECO. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the pregnancy rates and pregnancy outcomes following LECO.Patients and methods. From 1993 and 2000 inclusive LECO was performed at the Reproductive Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Ljubljana in 222 infertile patients with PCO(S, in whom previous medical ovulation induction failed or in whom overreaction of the ovaries to gonadotropin treatment occurred. To the questionnaire, mailed to the patients, 185 (83.3% responded. The evaluation of the outcome of LECO treatment involved 157 patients, since the patients who underwent in vitro fertilization (IVF-ET treatment for other causes of infertility prior to LECO, were exclude from the analysis. LECO was performed under general endotracheal anesthesia using a 3-puncture technique. On each ovary 5– 15 (mean 10 punctures were made with a monopolar electric needle, energy of 300 W, and duration of 4 seconds. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test and odds ratios.Results. After LECO 99 (63.3% of the 157 patients conceived, 56 (54.6% spontaneously and 43 (45.4% after additional postoperative ovarian stimulation. Pregnancy was registered in 58 (59.0% patients with primary, and in 41 (41% patients with secondary infertility, in 20 (57% patients with PCO, 79 (65% with PCOS, in 71 (64.1% patients with a normal partner’s spermiogram, and in 28 (46.1% patients with the partner’s oligoasthenoteratospermia of

  3. Patient evaluation of infertility management in an ISO 9001:2008-certified centre for reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Uschi; Spiessens, Carl; Dancet, Eline; Bakelants, Els; Vrancken, Annelies; Demyttenaere, Koen; Enzlin, Paul; D'Hooghe, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Quality management according to ISO 9001:2008 guidelines includes infertility care quality assessment and improvement. This study aimed to describe the development process of a questionnaire for infertility management. A literature review, qualitative interviews with experts and patients resulted in a content-valid and face-valid questionnaire. Three cross-sectional surveys were performed in 2004, 2007 and 2008 in a tertiary university infertility centre. First (2004), the questionnaire – measuring eight a-priori dimensions of infertility management – was tested. Second (2007), improvement projects for infertility management were evaluated. Third (2008), factor analysis was performed and internal consistency was documented. The developed patient questionnaire to evaluate infertility management and pre-set desired levels of agreement served to set targets for and assess quality improvement projects. The final patient questionnaire to evaluate infertility management within an ISO framework was valid and reliable and contained 14 items covering four dimensions of infertility management: Telephone Access, Reception, Information and Patient-centeredness. ISO 9001:2008-certified infertility centres can evaluate infertility management with this 14-item questionnaire. This top-down approach to evaluate the patients’ perspective on quality aspects selected by health professionals can be complementary to the bottom-up approach evaluating the patients’ complete experiences of quality of care.

  4. Leptin levels in infertile males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, S.; Bibi, R.; Ahmed, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the leptin levels in the serum of normal, sub fertile and infertile men. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Animal Sciences Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad, National Institute of Health (NIH), Islamabad and Dr. Salma and Kafeel Medical Centre, Islamabad, from April to December 2009. Methodology: Serum leptin levels hormonal concentrations (LH, FSH and testosterone) were determined by EIA in 154 males including 24 (15.58%) fertile, 19 (12.34%) polyzoospermic (PZs), 26 (16.88%) teratozoospermic (TZs), 27 (17.53%) astheno-teratozoospermic (ATZs), 18 (11.69%) oligozoospermic (OZs), 18 (11.69%) oligo-astheno-teratozoospermic (OATZs), 11 (7.14%) obstructive azoospermic (OBST-AZOOs) and 11 (7.14%) non-obstructive azoospermic (NON-OBST-AZOOs). BMI was also determined, divided into groups of greater than 24. Hormonal concentrations were compared by ANOVA and correlation was performed by using Graph pad prism version 5. Results: Significantly high levels of leptin concentrations were found in fertile (p 24 compared to fertile and infertile male patients with BMI 24. Leptin showed a significant positive correlation with LH (p < 0.01) and FSH (p < 0.002) and a significant negative correlation with testosterone (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Abnormal leptin level was significantly associated with fertility problems in males. Providing a link between leptin and reproduction factors contributing in control of testosterone and gonadotropins secretion in many aspects depending on fertility status in male subjects. BMI appears to have significant association with serum leptin levels. (author)

  5. The Analysis of Sialylation, N-Glycan Branching, and Expression of O-Glycans in Seminal Plasma of Infertile Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa M. Kratz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are known to mediate some events involved in successful fertilization. Although some studies on the glycosylation of seminal plasma proteins are available, the total glycan profile was rarely analyzed as a feature influencing fertilization potential. In this work we aimed to compare some glycosylation traits in seminal plasma glycoproteins of fertile and infertile men. The following findings emerge from our studies: (1 in human seminal plasma the presence and alterations of O-linked glycans were observed; (2 the expression of SNA-reactive sialic acid significantly differs between asthenozoospermia and both normozoospermic (fertile and infertile groups; (3 the expression of PHA-L-reactive highly branched N-glycans was significantly lower in oligozoospermic patients than in both normozoospermic groups. Indication of the appropriate lectins that would enable the possibly precise determination of the glycan profile seems to be a good supplement to mass spectrum analysis. Extension of the lectin panel is useful for the further research.

  6. Patient evaluation of infertility management in an ISO 9001:2008-certified centre for reproductive medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Broeck, U.; Spiessens, C.; Dancet, E.; Bakelants, E.; Vrancken, A.C.; Demyttenaere, K.; Enzlin, P.; D'Hooghe, T.

    2012-01-01

    Quality management according to ISO 9001:2008 guidelines includes infertility care quality assessment and improvement. This study aimed to describe the development process of a questionnaire for infertility management. A literature review, qualitative interviews with experts and patients resulted in

  7. MTHFR C667T polymorphism association with male infertility risk in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, M.; Siddiqui, R.T.

    2012-01-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is one of the main regulatory enzymes involved in folate metabolism, DNA synthesis and remethylation reactions. The objective of this study was to analyze the distribution of the MTHFR C677T variants using PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) in a cross sectional study consisting of 160 infertile men including azoospermia, oligospermia, severe-oligospermia and normospermia infertile subjects compared to 90 ancestry-matched fertile normozoospermic controls. The genotype CT of C677T was highly significant frequency in controls and all infertility groups (28.75%; OR 1.983; 95% CI 1.117-3.522; P 0.012; chi-square 6.262) while TT homozygous variant is present statistically significant frequency in controls and azoospermic subjects and severe-oligozoospermic subjects with (P 0.065; chi-square 3.406 in azoosprimic) and ( P 0.071; chi-square 3.267 in severe-oligospermic). The prevalence of C677T genotypes TT between azoospermic and severeoligozoospermic patients and controls was almost similar 6.67% and 7.4% respectively but high as compared to controls (1.11%). In conclusion, this analysis supports that the MTHFR C677T polymorphism acts as a genetic mutation risk factor and is capable of causing male infertility susceptibility in Pakistani population. (author)

  8. An epidemiologic survey on the causes of infertility in patients referred to infertility center in Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumi, Seyedeh Zahra; Parsa, Parisa; Darvish, Nooshin; Mokhtari, Sahar; Yavangi, Mahnaz; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is considered as a major health care problem of different communities. The high prevalence of this issue doubled its importance. A significant proportion of infertility have been related to environmental conditions and also acquired risk factors. Different environmental conditions emphasized the need to study the different causes of infertility in each area. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency causes of infertility in infertile couples. ...

  9. Physician and patient use of and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Natalie A; Will, Matthew A; Moravek, Molly B; Xu, Xiao; Fisseha, Senait

    2013-09-01

    To determine use of and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among infertility patients and subspecialty physicians. Infertility patients were asked to complete anonymous written surveys at an academic infertility practice; members of the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility were electronically surveyed. Both groups were assessed regarding their use of and attitudes toward CAM. The response rate was 32.1% (115/358) among patients and 22.6% (225/995) among physicians (Pinfertility patients requires greater physician attention and justifies further study on the risks and benefits of integrating CAM into the biomedical treatment of infertility. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Characteristics of infertile patients with ovulatory dysfunction and their relation to body mass index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadia, S.; Waqar, F.; Akhtar, T.; Sultana, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ovulatory dysfunction is a group of disorders with variable clinical presentations occasionally having serious long-term adverse effects. It accounts for 30% of female fertility problems. Evidence suggests an association between an individual's weight and disorders of ovulation. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and hormonal profile of subfertile women with ovulatory dysfunction in relation to their body mass index (BMI). Methods: This prospective, descriptive study was carried out in Mother and Child Health Centre, PIMS, Islamabad and Railway hospital, Rawalpindi from April 2001 to March 2007. One hundred and thirty eight infertile patients with ovulatory dysfunction were included. The clinical data including BMI of each patient was recorded in addition to reports of investigations comprised of cervical smear, pelvic ultrasound and hormonal profile. Results: Primary infertility was found in 61% while secondary in 39% of the patients. The mean age was 29 years and mean duration of infertility was 6 years. Menstrual pattern was normal in 56.5%. BMI was normal in 30.4% while most patients were overweight and obese. Prolonged cycles, history of systemic endocrine disorders, abnormal vaginal discharge, hirsutism, polycystic ovarian morphology and hormonal abnormalities were more frequent in patients with increased BMI. During the study period, 21.7% of the women conceived. Conclusion: Infertile patients with ovulatory dysfunction present more frequently with primary infertility. They usually have higher than required BMI. Oligomenorrhoea amenorrhoea, hirsutism and hormonal abnormalities are more frequent in overweight than infertile patients with ovulatory dysfunction having a normal BMI. (author)

  11. Investigating the Problems and Needs of Infertile Patients Referring to Assisted Reproduction Centers: A Review Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fahimeh Hasanbeigi; Mitra Zandi; Zohreh Vanaki; Anoushirvan Kazemnejad

    2017-01-01

    Background: The provision of optimal care is the most important goal in nursing, the fulfillment of which requires the identification of clients’ problems and needs. However, based on the review of the literature, no review study has investigated the problems and needs of the infertile patients in Iran. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the problems and needs of the infertile patients referring to the assisted reproduction centers. Method: This review study was based on...

  12. RISK OF INFERTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: a meta-analysis of observational studies

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    Juan Sebastian LASA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with several extra-intestinal features, such as reproductive disorders. The relationship between celiac disease and infertility has been previously assessed, with conflicting results. Objectives We seek to determine the relationship between celiac disease and infertility. Methods Data was extracted from case-control or cohort design studies from 1966 to December 2013 using the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Library databases. We analyzed two kinds of trials: those assessing the risk of infertility in subjects with already diagnosed celiac disease, and those evaluating the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease in subjects with a diagnosis of infertility. Results The search yielded 413 potentially relevant studies for revision, 12 of which were finally included for analysis. A significant association was found between women with a diagnosis of infertility and undiagnosed celiac disease [OR 3.09 (95% CI 1.74-5.49]. When considering those studies assessing the occurrence of infertility in subjects with already-diagnosed celiac disease, no difference was found between celiac disease patients and control subjects [OR 0.99 (0.86-1.13]. Conclusions Undiagnosed celiac disease is a risk factor for infertility. Women seeking medical advice for this particular condition should be screened for celiac disease. Adoption of a gluten-free diet could have a positive impact on fertility in this group of patients.

  13. Glutathione content in sperm cells of infertile men

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    R. V. Fafula

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperproduction of reactive oxygen species can damage sperm cells and is considered to be one of the mechanisms of male infertility. Cell protection from the damaging effects of free radicals and lipid peroxidation products is generally determined by the degree of antioxidant protection. Glutathione is non-enzymatic antioxidant which plays an important protective role against oxidative damages and lipid peroxidation. The aim of the present work is to determine the content of reduced and oxidized glutathione in sperm cells of infertile men. Semen samples from 20 fertile men (normozoospermics and 72 infertile patients (12 oligozoospermics, 17 asthenozoospermics, 10 oligoasthenozoosper­mics and 33 leucocytospermic were used. The total, oxidized (GSSG and reduced (GSH glutathione levels were measured spectrophotometrically. The levels of total glutathione were significantly lower in the spermatozoa of patients with oligozoo-, asthenozoo- and oligoasthenozoospermia than in the control. Infertile groups showed significantly decreased values of reduced glutathione in sperm cells vs. fertile men, indicating an alteration of oxidative status. The oxidized glutathione levels in sperm cells of infertile men did not differ from those of normozoospermic men with proven fertility. The GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly decreased in the oligo-, astheno- and oligoasthenozoospermic groups compared to the normozoospermic group. In patients with leucocytospermia the GSH/GSSG ratio was lower but these changes were not significant. In addition, glutathione peroxidase activity in sperm cells was decreased in patients with oligozoo-, astenozoo-, oligoastenozoospermia and with leucocytospermia. The most significant changes in glutathione peroxidase activity were observed in infertile men with leucocytospermia. Decreased GSH/GSSG ratio indicates a decline in redox-potential of the glutathione system in sperm cells of men with decreased fertilizing potential

  14. Cultural factors contributing to health care disparities among patients with infertility in Midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missmer, Stacey A; Seifer, David B; Jain, Tarun

    2011-05-01

    To identify cultural differences in access to infertility care. Cross-sectional, self-administered survey. University hospital-based fertility center. Thirteen hundred fifty consecutive women who were seen for infertility care. None. Details about demographic characteristics, health care access, and treatment opinions based on patient race or ethnicity. The median age of participants was 35 years; 41% were white, 28% African American, 18% Hispanic, and 7% Asian. Compared with white women, African American and Hispanic women had been attempting to conceive for 1.5 years longer. They also found it more difficult to get an appointment, to take time off from work, and to pay for treatment. Forty-nine percent of respondents were concerned about the stigma of infertility, 46% about conceiving multiples, and 40% about financial costs. Disappointing one's spouse was of greater concern to African-American women, whereas avoiding the stigmatization of infertility was of greatest concern to Asian-American women. While the demand for infertility treatment increases in the United States, attention to cultural barriers to care and cultural meanings attributed to infertility should be addressed. Enhanced cultural competencies of the health care system need to be employed if equal access is to be realized as equal utilization for women of color seeking infertility care. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Anxiety and depression after failure of assisted reproductive treatment among patients experiencing infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroufizadeh, Saman; Karimi, Elaheh; Vesali, Samira; Omani Samani, Reza

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the impact of the number of previous infertility treatment failures on anxiety and depression. In a cross-sectional study, individuals (men and women, but not couples) aged at least 18 years who had a history of infertility and could read and write in Persian were enrolled at the Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between November 1, 2013, and February 28, 2014. Participants provided demographic and infertility information and completed the Persian version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Overall, 330 patients (122 men, 208 women) were included. Mean scores on the HADS anxiety and depression subscales (HADS-A and HADS-D) were 8.40±4.51 and 5.95±3.54, respectively. In multiple regression analysis, mean HADS-A scores were significantly higher for patients with one treatment failure (9.57±4.58) than for those without a history of treatment (7.79±4.13; P=0.003). HADS-D scores were significantly higher for patients with two failures (6.92±3.69) than for those with no previous treatment (5.59±3.79; P=0.019). Patients with infertility have increased depression and anxiety after infertility treatment failure. Counseling or treatment for these potential psychological effects should be considered after infertility treatment failure. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of the serum reproductive system related autoantibodies of infertility patients in Tianjin region of China

    OpenAIRE

    Huo, Yan; Xu, Yanying; Wang, Jianmei; Wang, Fang; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yujuan; Zhang, Bumei

    2015-01-01

    Object: Reproductive system related autoantibodies have been proposed to be associated with natural infertility. However, large scale systematic analysis of these of antibodies has not been conducted. The aim of this study is to analyze the positive rate of antisperm antibody (ASAb), anti-endometrium antibody (EMAb), anti-ovary antibody (AOAb), anti-zona pellucida antibody (AZP) and anticardiolipin antibody (ACA) in infertility patients in Tianjin region of China. Methods: 1305 male and 1711 ...

  17. Evaluation of factors associated with the anxiety and depression of female infertility patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Mariko; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi; Horiguchi, Fumi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Because the primary aim of infertility treatment is to achieve pregnancy, mental health care during this treatment is often neglected. However, the inability to conceive children is stressful for couples throughout the world. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate factors related to the anxiety and depression of female infertility patients. Methods Participants included 83 Japanese women who initially visited the Reproduction Center of the Tokyo Dental College ...

  18. Moderate aerobic exercise training for improving reproductive function in infertile patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh Maleki, Behzad; Tartibian, Bakhtyar

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated for the first time the changes in seminal markers of inflammation, oxidative stress status, semen parameters, sperm DNA integrity as well as pregnancy rate following 24weeks of moderate aerobic exercise in infertile patients. A total of 1026 sedentary men (aged 25-40years) attending the infertility clinic with history of more than one year of infertility, were screened and 419 were randomized to either exercise (EX, n=210) or non-exercise (NON-EX, n=209) groups. Exercise training favorably attenuated seminal markers of both inflammation (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) and oxidative stress (ROS, MDA, 8-Isoprostane) as well as enhanced antioxidant defense system (SOD, catalase and TAC) (Paerobic exercise training as a treatment option for male factor infertility. The 4-week detraining period was not enough to reverse all benefits promoted by exercise intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A radiologic analysis and comparative evaluation of hysterosalpingographic and laparoscopic findings in infertile patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hang Young; Kim, Soo Won; Chung, Hye Kyung; Yu, Yun Jeong

    1984-01-01

    Hystreosalpingogram of 375 patients with infertility were reviewed with reference to radiological feature of each pathology and a comparative study of hysterosalpingography and laparoscopy in 36 patients was presented. This results were as follows;1. In 375 cases of infertility, 191 cases (50.9%) were primary infertility and 181 cases (49.1%) were secondary infertility. 2. The peak age distribution was 26 to 30 year old group in 211 cases (56.3%), and the peak duration of infertility was less than 3 years in 256 cases (68.3%). 3. Abnormal uterine findings were 115 cases (30.7%) and there were 73 cases of filling defects, 13 cases of irregularity, 12 cases of uterine flexion, 11 cases of congenital anomaly, and 9 cases of hypoplasia among them. 4. Abnormal tubal findings were 196 cases (52.3%) and there were 103 cases of simple obstruction, 69 cases of hydrosalpinx, and 50 cases of peritubal adhesion among them. 5. Intravasation of contrast media was noted in 42 cases (11.2%). 6. In 36 cases of laparoscopy, 23 cases (63.7%) was agreed to hysterosalpingography. 7. Although laparoscopy was better than hysterosalpingography in external anatomy of salpinx and relationship to ovary, hysterosalpingography should be important for fundamental study of infertile women because of lower failure rate, lower risk of complications, therapeutic effect, and lower cost.

  20. Follow up of infertile patients after failed ART cycles: a preliminary report from Iran and Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Kahraman, Semra; Ugur, Mete Gurol; Agha-Rahimi, Azam; Tabibnejad, Nasim

    2012-03-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) has become an established and increasingly successful form of treatment for infertility. However, significant numbers of cycles fail after embryo transfer (ET) and it becomes necessary to follow up the infertile couples after failed ART treatments. The main goal was to follow up the infertile patients after failed IVF/ICSI+ET treatments in Iran and Turkey. 198 infertile couples from Iran and 355 infertile couples from Turkey were followed up after IVF/ICSI failures. The patients' demographic data, the couples' decisions about continuation of treatment and the spontaneous pregnancy rates were compared in the two countries. The drop-out rate was higher in Iran (28.3%) than in Turkey (23.4%). The reasons for treatment discontinuation in Iran and Turkey were: financial problem (33.9% vs. 41%), hopeless (10.7% vs. 22.9%), fear of drug side-effects (7.1% vs. 12%), achieving pregnancy (37.5% vs. 19.6%), child adoption (5.4% vs. 2.4%), lack of spouse cooperation (5.4% vs. 2.4%), and divorce (0% vs. 2.4%). Spontaneous pregnancy was significantly higher in Iran (10.1%) than in Turkey (3.9%). There was correlation between duration of infertility and female factor infertility with spontaneous pregnancy. Since the majority of couples that discontinued treatment had financial problems, it is essential for health professionals to support infertile couples during their childlessness crisis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cytogenetic and molecular screening of the DAZ gene family in a population of infertile males

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    Nubia Amparo Ruiz Suárez

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evalúate the frequency of Y chromosome structural, numerical, chromosomal and genetic abnormalities, as well as DAZ gene microdeletions in the Y chromosome in a population of infertile males. Genetic abnormalities have been established to date in up to 24% of males having severe abnormalities in their sperm (Dohle et al. 2002; deletion of the DAZ gene family (deleted in azoospermia is the most common cause. It has been found in 6% of the oligozoospermias and in 12% of the azoospermias (Van Landuyt et al. 2000. A popula­tion of 20 azoospermic and 10 oligozoospermic males was studied. Five males having normal sperm parameters were used as controls. Each sample was karyotyped (QFQ banding and underwent sY254, sY255 and sY257 mo­lecular amplification. Genetic study revealed alterations in 16.6% of the cases: 6.6% at chromosome level and 10% at molecule level. No chromosomal or molecular gene alterations were detected in control males. The frequencies found lead to a broader population-based study being recommended. They confirmed the need for performing judicious genetic counselling in infertile couples with male factor infertility to avoid or minimise the risks of trans-mitting these abnormalities to offspring and provide better prognosis for assisted reproductive techniques in such patients. Key words: azoospermia; oligozoospermia; microdeletions; ICSI

  2. Ultrasound characterization of the seminal vesicles in infertile patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Vignera, Sandro; Vicari, Enzo; Condorelli, Rosita; D'Agata, Rosario; Calogero, Aldo E.

    2011-01-01

    Male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) may experience infertility because the disease affects negatively many aspects of reproduction, including seminal vesicle (SV) function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ultrasound characteristics of the SVs of infertile patients with DM because no such data are available in these patients. To accomplish this, 25 infertile patients with type 2 DM and no other known causes of sperm parameter abnormalities were selected. Two different control groups were also enrolled: healthy men with idiopathic infertility (n = 25) and infertile patients with male accessory gland infections (MAGI) (n = 25), a well-studied clinical model of SV inflammation. Patients and controls underwent prostate-vesicular transrectal ultrasonography after 1 day of sexual abstinence before and 1 h after ejaculation. The following SV ultrasound parameters were recorded: (1) body antero-posterior diameter (ADP); (2) fundus APD; (3) parietal thickness of the right and left SVs; (4) number of polycyclic areas within both SVs; (5) fundus/body ratio; (6) difference of the parietal thickness between the right and the left SV; and (7) pre- and post-ejaculatory APD difference. Patients with DM had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher F/B ratio compared to controls and patients with MAGI. Only patients with MAGI had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher number of polycyclic areas. Controls and MAGI patients have a similar pre- and post-ejaculatory difference of the body SV APD, whereas this difference was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in patients with DM. In conclusion, this study showed that infertile patients with DM have peculiar SV ultrasound features suggestive of functional atony.

  3. Ultrasound characterization of the seminal vesicles in infertile patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Vignera, Sandro; Vicari, Enzo; Condorelli, Rosita; D' Agata, Rosario [Section of Endocrinology, Andrology and Internal Medicine and Master in Andrological, Human Reproduction and Biotechnology Sciences, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Calogero, Aldo E., E-mail: acaloger@unict.it [Section of Endocrinology, Andrology and Internal Medicine and Master in Andrological, Human Reproduction and Biotechnology Sciences, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) may experience infertility because the disease affects negatively many aspects of reproduction, including seminal vesicle (SV) function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ultrasound characteristics of the SVs of infertile patients with DM because no such data are available in these patients. To accomplish this, 25 infertile patients with type 2 DM and no other known causes of sperm parameter abnormalities were selected. Two different control groups were also enrolled: healthy men with idiopathic infertility (n = 25) and infertile patients with male accessory gland infections (MAGI) (n = 25), a well-studied clinical model of SV inflammation. Patients and controls underwent prostate-vesicular transrectal ultrasonography after 1 day of sexual abstinence before and 1 h after ejaculation. The following SV ultrasound parameters were recorded: (1) body antero-posterior diameter (ADP); (2) fundus APD; (3) parietal thickness of the right and left SVs; (4) number of polycyclic areas within both SVs; (5) fundus/body ratio; (6) difference of the parietal thickness between the right and the left SV; and (7) pre- and post-ejaculatory APD difference. Patients with DM had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher F/B ratio compared to controls and patients with MAGI. Only patients with MAGI had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher number of polycyclic areas. Controls and MAGI patients have a similar pre- and post-ejaculatory difference of the body SV APD, whereas this difference was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in patients with DM. In conclusion, this study showed that infertile patients with DM have peculiar SV ultrasound features suggestive of functional atony.

  4. Increased Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Patients with Unexplained Infertility in the United States: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Wang, Jeffrey; Lee, Susie K.; Murray, Joseph A.; Sauer, Mark V.; Green, Peter H. R.

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder which can present with a variety of non-gastrointestinal manifestations. In women, it may manifest with an assortment of gynecologic or obstetric disorders. Some reports have linked female infertility with undiagnosed celiac disease. Though there are a number of studies from Europe and the Middle East, only two prior American studies have examined the prevalence of “silent” celiac disease in a female infertility population. We prospectively performed serologic screening for celiac disease in 188 infertile women (ages 25–39). While we did not demonstrate an increased prevalence of celiac disease in our overall infertile female population, we were able to detect a significantly increased prevalence (5.9%) of undiagnosed celiac disease among women presenting with unexplained infertility (n=51). Our findings suggest the importance of screening infertile female patients, particularly those with unexplained infertility, for celiac disease. PMID:21682114

  5. Psychologic and sexual dysfunction in primary and secondary infertile male patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytac Sahin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare depression and sexual dysfunctions observed in primary and secondary infertile patients. Material and method: The study was performed in 39 primary and 31 secondary infertile male patients. Male sexual health was evaluated using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF score and depression with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: Mean age of the participants and their partners were 31.54 ± 5.37 (range, 24-48 yrs, and 28.16 ± 5.58 (range, 20- 46 yrs years, respectively. Mean duration of their marriage ranged between 1 and 17 years (mean, 5.06 ± 4.15 yrs. A statistically significant intergroup difference was detected between groups as for BDI scores (p = 0.015; p < 0. 05. BDI scores of the primary group were significantly lower than those of the secondary group. A statistically and extremely significant difference was detected between IIEF scores of the groups (p = 0.006; p < 0.01. IIEF scores of the primary infertile group were higher than those of the secondary group. Conclusion: Our study, frequency of the depression and erectile dysfunction seen in the patients with secondary infertility was seen significantly higher than the patients with primary infertility.

  6. Defining Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  7. Classification of Patients Treated for Infertility Using the IVF Method

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    Malinowski Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most effective methods of infertility treatment is in vitro fertilization (IVF. Effectiveness of the treatment, as well as classification of the data obtained from it, is still an ongoing issue. Classifiers obtained so far are powerful, but even the best ones do not exhibit equal quality concerning possible treatment outcome predictions. Usually, lack of pregnancy is predicted far too often. This creates a constant need for further exploration of this issue. Careful use of different classification methods can, however, help to achieve that goal.

  8. Vitality of oligozoospermic semen samples is improved by both swim-up and density gradient centrifugation before cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counsel, Madeleine; Bellinge, Rhys; Burton, Peter

    2004-05-01

    To ascertain whether washing sperm from oligozoospermic and normozoospermic samples before cryopreservation improves post-thaw vitality. Normozoospermic (n = 18) and oligozoospermic (n = 16) samples were divided into three aliquots. The first aliquot remained untreated and the second and third aliquots were subjected to the swim-up and discontinuous density gradient sperm washing techniques respectively. Vitality staining was performed, samples mixed with cryopreservation media and frozen. Spermatozoa were thawed, stained, and vitality quantified and expressed as the percentage of live spermatozoa present. Post-thaw vitality in untreated aliquots from normozoospermic samples (24.9% +/- 2.3; mean +/- SEM) was significantly higher (unpaired t-tests; P vitality was significantly higher after swim-up in normozoospermic samples (35.6% +/- 2.1; P vitality in oligozoospermic (22.4% +/- 1.0; P vitality in cryopreserved oligozoospermic samples was improved by both the swim-up and density gradient centrifugation washing techniques prior to freezing.

  9. Thyroxine treatment may be useful for subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Waka; Amino, Nobuyuki; Ide, Akane; Kang, Shino; Kudo, Takumi; Nishihara, Eijun; Ito, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Miyauchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Infertile women sometimes associated with subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH). The guidelines of the American Endocrine Society, and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American Thyroid Association recommend treatment with thyroxine (T4) for patients with SCH who want to have children. We examined 69 female infertile patients with SCH and the effects of levothyroxine (l-T4) therapy on pregnancy rates and pregnancy outcomes were observed. Fifty-eight (84.1%) patients successfully conceived during the T4 treatment period (Group A), although 17 patients (29.3%) had miscarriage afterward. The remaining 11 patients continued to be infertile (Group B). The median TSH value in Group A before the T4 treatment was 5.46 μIU/mL (range 3.1-13.3) and this significantly decreased to 1.25 μIU/mL (range 0.02-3.75) during the treatment (ptreatment was 2.8±1.7 years and the duration until pregnancy after the treatment was significantly shorter at 0.9±0.9 years (ptreatment strongly suggest that T4 enhanced fertility in infertile patients with SCH.

  10. An evaluation of multimedia and online support groups (OSG) contents and application of information by infertile patients: Mixed method study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiweko, Budi; Narasati, Shabrina; Agung, Prince Gusti; Zesario, Aulia; Wibawa, Yohanes Satrya; Maidarti, Mila; Harzif, Achmad Kemal; Pratama, Gita; Sumapradja, Kanadi; Muharam, Raden; Hestiantoro, Andon

    2018-02-01

    Background: The presence of Online Support Groups (OSG) is expected to empower patients with infertility, thus allowing patients to be the focus of healthcare services. This study will evaluate multimedia content, OSG, and utilization of information for decision-making by patients using infertility services. This study is a mixed method study conducted from January - June 2016 at Yasmin IVF Clinic, Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital; and SMART IVF Clinic, Jakarta. The subjects are patients with infertility who sought treatment at the clinics. Data was collected through a structured interview in the form of a questionnaire. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study. All procedures that performed in studies were by the ethical standards of the institutional. The result from 72 respondents showed quantitative analysis did not reveal any association between multimedia and OSG information sources with patient knowledge regarding infertility management. However, qualitative analysis highlighted three issues: the information regarding infertility services in the available multimedia and the OSG; use of the available information by patients when deciding to use infertility services. The level of awareness of respondents on searching information regarding infertility on the clinic website is still limited. It happened because most of the patients in the clinic are unaware of clinic website existence which provided the infertility information. Therefore, the clinic website needs to be promoted so the usage of this website will increase in the future.

  11. Clonality and distribution of clinical Ureaplasma isolates recovered from male patients and infertile couples in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Ruan

    Full Text Available Ureaplasma spp. have gained increasing recognition as pathogens in both adult and neonatal patients with multiple clinical presentations. However, the clonality of this organism in the male population and infertile couples in China is largely unknown. In this study, 96 (53 U. parvum and 43 U. urealyticum of 103 Ureaplasma spp. strains recovered from genital specimens from male patients and 15 pairs of infertile couples were analyzed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST/expanded multilocus sequence typing (eMLST schemes. A total of 39 sequence types (STs and 53 expanded sequence types (eSTs were identified, with three predominant STs (ST1, ST9 and ST22 and eSTs (eST16, eST41 and eST82. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clusters that were highly congruent with the taxonomic differences between the two Ureaplasma species. We found significant differences in the distributions of both clusters and sub-groups between the male and female patients (P 0.80. However, this concordance was observed only for the detection of U. urealyticum within the infertile couples. In conclusion, the distributions of the clusters and sub-groups significantly differed between the male and female patients. U. urealyticum is more likely to transmit between infertile couples and be associated with clinical manifestations by the specific epidemic clonal lineages.

  12. Oxidative stress and acrosomal morphology: A cause of infertility in patients with normal semen parameters

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    Moustafa A. El-Taieb

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Percentages of MDA values and acrosomal anomalies were higher in infertile patients than normal subjects. The positive correlation between acrosomal anomalies and MDA values means association between OS and acrosomal anomalies which may indicate negative effects of OS on the acrosomal structure.

  13. Clonality and distribution of clinical Ureaplasma isolates recovered from male patients and infertile couples in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhi; Yang, Ting; Shi, Xinyan; Kong, Yingying; Xie, Xinyou; Zhang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Ureaplasma spp. have gained increasing recognition as pathogens in both adult and neonatal patients with multiple clinical presentations. However, the clonality of this organism in the male population and infertile couples in China is largely unknown. In this study, 96 (53 U. parvum and 43 U. urealyticum) of 103 Ureaplasma spp. strains recovered from genital specimens from male patients and 15 pairs of infertile couples were analyzed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST)/expanded multilocus sequence typing (eMLST) schemes. A total of 39 sequence types (STs) and 53 expanded sequence types (eSTs) were identified, with three predominant STs (ST1, ST9 and ST22) and eSTs (eST16, eST41 and eST82). Moreover, phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clusters that were highly congruent with the taxonomic differences between the two Ureaplasma species. We found significant differences in the distributions of both clusters and sub-groups between the male and female patients (P Ureaplasma spp. The present study also attained excellent agreement of the identification of both Ureaplasma species between paired urine and semen specimens from the male partners (k > 0.80). However, this concordance was observed only for the detection of U. urealyticum within the infertile couples. In conclusion, the distributions of the clusters and sub-groups significantly differed between the male and female patients. U. urealyticum is more likely to transmit between infertile couples and be associated with clinical manifestations by the specific epidemic clonal lineages.

  14. Definition of the microelemental contents in endometrium and hair of patients with various forms of infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazieva, Sh.S.; Danilova, E.A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Research of human's endometrium condition (a mucous membrane of a cavity of a uterus) is undoubtedly of interest for the solution of some problems of clinical medicine, in particular, infertility reasons. In spite of the fact that endometrium is one of the most accessible tissues to research, and the object of the numerous versatile researches, there are still many questions on its physiology and pathology, in particular, those connected with its preparation for implantation, processes of cellular interactions during implantation and placentation. Today the exclusive role of microcells (MC) in pathology development in human, since infantile age to old age is known. As a result of laborious researches it was possible to establish that MC are regulators of chemical processes of a metabolism, growth and reproduction, immunologic and hormonal activity, and life expectancy. In reproductology, the influence of the some people essential (vital) and toxic MC demands the further detailed studying. The purpose of the present research is studying microelement structure of endometrium and hair of women with various infertility forms, with the subsequent development of a technique aimed at correction of discovered microelementosis. We examined 20 patients with infertility. All patients apart from the traditional complex, general laboratory and endoscopic researches, passed the neutron-activation analysis of microelemental structure of endometrium and hair. The age of patients varied from 21 to 39 years. Duration of infertility (primary and secondary) has made up 3-11 years. The somatic status was complicated with diseases of digestion, endocrynologic, urinary, respiratory and cardiovascular systems, whereas the anemia was observed at 70 % of patients. Endoscopical examinations (laparo-, histero-, falloposcopy) have revealed presence of adhesive process of various degree of expressiveness in an abdominal cavity and a small basin cavity, peritubal adhesive process

  15. Communication at an online infertility expert forum: provider responses to patients' emotional and informational cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, J W M; van Oers, A M; Faber, M J; Cohlen, B J; Nelen, W L D M; Kremer, J A M; van Dulmen, A M

    2015-01-01

    Online patient-provider communication has become increasingly popular in fertility care. However, it is not known to what extent patients express cues or concerns and how providers respond. In this study, we investigated cues and responses that occur in online patient-provider communication at an infertility-specific expert forum. We extracted 106 threads from the multidisciplinary expert forum of two Dutch IVF clinics. We performed the following analyses: (1) thematic analysis of patients' questions; and (2) rating patients' emotional and informational cues and subsequent professionals' responses using an adaptation of the validated Medical Interview Aural Rating Scale. Frequencies of themes, frequencies of cues and responses, and sequences (what cue is followed by what response) were extracted. Sixty-five infertile patients and 19 providers participated. The most common themes included medication and lifestyle. Patients gave more informational than emotional cues (106 versus 64). Responses to informational cues were mostly adequate (61%). The most common response to emotional cues was empathic acknowledgment (72%). Results indicate that an online expert forum could have a positive effect on patient outcomes, which should guide future research. Offering infertile patients an expert forum to communicate with providers can be a promising supplement to usual care in both providing information and addressing patients' concerns.

  16. Assessment of reproductive results of infertile patients who had undergone operative hysteroscopy for intrauterine pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röyale Seferli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the reproductive outcomes of infertile patients who had undergone operative hysteroscopy (HS with the diagnoses of uterine septum, endometrial polyp, submucous myoma, and intrauterine adhesion. Methods: This retrospective study included 334 patients who had been diagnosed with primary and secondary infertility, aged between 18–35 years and diagnosed with uterine septum (group 1, endometrial polyp (group 2, submucous myoma (group 3, and intrauterine adhesion (group 4 by hysterosalpingography or office HS and who were treated via hysteroscopic operation between January 2009 and January 2013. Pregnancy results were obtained from the patients’ files and hospital database; when this was not possible, the patients were queried by phone calls. Groups were then compared in terms of characteristics, prognoses, and pregnancy outcomes. Results: The cumulative pregnancy rate was 58.7% in infertile patients who underwent operative HS due to intrauterine pathology. The mean length of time from operation to conception was 10.8±9.6 months in all groups. Mean age, infertility duration, infertility type, and smoking status were statistically different among the groups (p<0.05. Following surgery, 95 (66.4% of 143 patients in group 1 conceived and 57 (60% of these pregnancies resulted in term birth. There were 64 (54.2% pregnancies in group 2 and 34 (53.1% resulted in term birth. Sixteen (47.1% patients conceived in group 3, and 6 (37.5% of them had term birth. Twenty-one (53.8% patients conceived in group 4. Twelve out of 21 patients (57.1% had term birth. The most common mode of delivery was cesarean section in all groups. Conclusion: Thus, operative HS increases pregnancy rates in patients with intrauterine pathology. In future, large-scale prospective studies should be carried out to reveal the effects of the hysteroscopic method and compare this approach with other methods in order to achieve better pregnancy outcomes in

  17. Sperm, nuclear, phospholipid, and red blood cell antibodies and isotype RF in infertile couples and patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichorova, R; Nakov, L; Baleva, M; Nikolov, K; Gegova, I

    1996-12-01

    To determine if measuring of nonorgan-specific autoantibodies is useful for better understanding and management of unexplained infertility. Sera were obtained from 70 infertile couples, 57 rheumatic patients, and 76 fertile donors. Sperm antibodies (SA) were detected by the tests of Kibrick and Friberg, anti-histones, anti-cardiolipin antibodies, and RF isotypes by ELISA, antinuclear antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence, and anti-red blood cell antibodies by Capture-R. Multiple autoimmune reactivity (both partners positive and/or more than one type of autoantibody involved), higher than naturally occurring in fertile individuals, was found in 55% of the idiopathically infertile couples. IgA-RF was the dominant autoimmune marker. SA revealed similar rates in patients with rheumatic diseases and in infertiles with or without other autoantibodies. Although no single autoimmunity marker could predict occurrence of SA, the coincidence of enhanced polyclonal autoimmunity in both partners of infertile couples might potentiate their negative effect on reproduction.

  18. Investigating the Problems and Needs of Infertile Patients Referring to Assisted Reproduction Centers: A Review Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Hasanbeigi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The provision of optimal care is the most important goal in nursing, the fulfillment of which requires the identification of clients’ problems and needs. However, based on the review of the literature, no review study has investigated the problems and needs of the infertile patients in Iran. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the problems and needs of the infertile patients referring to the assisted reproduction centers. Method: This review study was based on the traditional review procedure developed by Cronin et al., which entails five steps including: 1 choosing the topic of the review, 2 searching the manuscripts, 3 collecting, reading, and analyzing the texts, 4 writing the review, and 5 providing references. The articles published within 2003-2017 were searched in such valid databases as Google Scholar, Pub Med, Science Direct, Ovid, and Cochran. The inclusion criteria in this study were articles in Persian and English with the keywords referring to problems and needs of clients. Out of the 350 original articles, 31 cases were finally selected for this review study. Results: In general, the infertile patients’ problems were placed under four domains of mental-psychological, social, marital, and financial factors. The needs of the infertile individuals were grouped into six domains of physical, care, informational, financial, mental-psychological, and spiritual factors. Implications for Practice: The identification of the patients’ problems and needs can lead to the conceptualization of strategic points targeted toward the delivery of effective interventions facilitating the provision of patient-centered infertility care. This can enhance the quality of life and lower the levels of stress during the course of treatment.

  19. A comparative study of hysterosalpingography and endoscopy/laparotomy in infertile patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, D.T.; Rasmussen, F.; Justesen, P.

    1987-01-01

    A comparison of hysterosalpingography (HSG), using Lipiodol ultrafluid as contrast medium, with endoscopy/laparotomy in the evaluation of the tubal function in 124 infertile women is presented. There was agreement between the results of both methods in 73.4% of the patients. The false-negative rate was 2.4% and the false-positive rate was 8.9%. Complications in the form of intravasation were seen in three patients but none of them had any symptoms. The conception rate was 35% in the subgroup of patients with normal HSG. The authors recommended the continuous use of HSG in the overall evaluation of infertile patients. It is recommended to use oil-soluble contrast media because of its high diagnostic accuracy, low frequency of complications and its therapeutic advantages. (orig.)

  20. Peritoneal fluid cytokines related to endometriosis in patients evaluated for infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Hilde; Hill, Abby S; Beste, Michael T; Kumar, Manu P; Chiswick, Evan; Fedorcsak, Peter; Isaacson, Keith B; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Griffith, Linda G; Qvigstad, Erik

    2017-05-01

    Our aim was to characterize peritoneal cytokine profiles in patients with infertility, with and without endometriosis, to illuminate potential differences in immune profiles that may reflect mechanistic differences between these two patient populations. Cross-sectional study. University hospital and research center. Women undergoing laparoscopy for infertility investigation (n = 107). Peritoneal fluid was collected during surgery. Clinical characteristics were registered preoperatively. We determined the concentration of 48 different cytokines from the peritoneal fluid with multiplex immunoassays. Associations between cytokines and clinical findings were assessed with logistic regression and partial least squares discriminant analyses (PLS-DA). Concentrations of SCGF-β, IL-8, HGF, and MCP-1 were significantly higher, while IL-13 was significantly lower in the endometriosis group compared with the group without endometriosis. Multiple stepwise logistic regression identified a combination of SCGF-β, IL-13, and G-CSF concentrations that predicted the presence of endometriosis with 86% sensitivity and 67% specificity. PLS-DA identified a class of 11 cytokines (SCGF-β, HGF, IL-13, MCP-1, CTACK, MCP-3, M-CSF, LIF, IL-5, IL-9, and IFN-a2) that were more characteristic of endometriosis than nonendometriosis patients. By combining univariate and multivariate analyses, profiles of cytokines more likely to be enriched or depleted in infertility patients with endometriosis compared with those without endometriosis were identified. These findings may inform future analyses of pathophysiological mechanisms of endometriosis in infertile patients, including dysregulated Th1/Th2 response and mobilization and proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oral antioxidant treatment partly improves integrity of human sperm DNA in infertile grade I varicocele patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gual-Frau, Josep; Abad, Carlos; Amengual, María J; Hannaoui, Naim; Checa, Miguel A; Ribas-Maynou, Jordi; Lozano, Iris; Nikolaou, Alexandros; Benet, Jordi; García-Peiró, Agustín; Prats, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Infertile males with varicocele have the highest percentage of sperm cells with damaged DNA, compared to other infertile groups. Antioxidant treatment is known to enhance the integrity of sperm DNA; however, there are no data on the effects in varicocele patients. We thus investigated the potential benefits of antioxidant treatment specifically in grade I varicocele males. Twenty infertile patients with grade I varicocele were given multivitamins (1500 mg L-Carnitine, 60 mg vitamin C, 20 mg coenzyme Q10, 10 mg vitamin E, 200 μg vitamin B9, 1 μg vitamin B12, 10 mg zinc, 50 μg selenium) daily for three months. Semen parameters including total sperm count, concentration, progressive motility, vitality, and morphology were determined before and after treatment. In addition, sperm DNA fragmentation and the amount of highly degraded sperm cells were analyzed by Sperm Chromatin Dispersion. After treatment, patients showed an average relative reduction of 22.1% in sperm DNA fragmentation (p = 0.02) and had 31.3% fewer highly degraded sperm cells (p = 0.07). Total numbers of sperm cells were increased (p = 0.04), but other semen parameters were unaffected. These data suggest that sperm DNA integrity in grade I varicocele patients may be improved by oral antioxidant treatment.

  2. Added value of involving patients in the first step of multidisciplinary guideline development: a qualitative interview study among infertile patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Breejen, Elvira M E; Hermens, Rosella P M G; Galama, Wienke H; Willemsen, Wim N P; Kremer, Jan A M; Nelen, Willianne L D M

    2016-06-01

    Patient involvement in scoping the guideline is emphasized, but published initiatives actively involving patients are generally limited to the writing and reviewing phase. To assess patients' added value to the scoping phase of a multidisciplinary guideline on infertility. Qualitative interview study. We conducted interviews among 12 infertile couples and 17 professionals. We listed and compared the couples' and professionals' key clinical issues (=care aspects that need improvement) to be addressed in the guideline according to four domains: current guidelines, professionals, patients and organization of care. Main key clinical issues suggested by more than three quarters of the infertile couples and/or at least two professionals were identified and compared. Overall, we identified 32 key clinical issues among infertile couples and 23 among professionals. Of the defined main key clinical issues, infertile couples mentioned eight issues that were not mentioned by the professionals. These main key clinical issues mainly concerned patient-centred (e.g. poor information provision and poor alignment of care) aspects of care on the professional and organizational domain. Both groups mentioned two main key clinical issues collectively that were interpreted differently: the lack of emotional support and respect for patients' values. Including patients from the first phase of the guideline development process leads to valuable additional main key clinical issues for the next step of a multidisciplinary guideline development process and broadens the scope of the guideline, particularly regarding patient-centredness and organizational issues from a patients' perspective. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  3. Predictors of chances to conceive in ovulatory patients during clomiphene citrate induction of ovulation in normogonadotropic oligoamenorrheic infertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Imani (Babak); M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); E.R. te Velde (Egbert); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe present prospective follow-up study was designed to identify whether clinical, endocrine, or ultrasound characteristics assessed by standardized initial screening of normogonadotropic oligo/amenorrheic infertile patients could predict conception in

  4. Singleton pregnancy outcomes after assisted and non-assisted reproductive technology in infertile patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Ryo; Fujimoto, Akihisa; Osuga, Yutaka; Ooi, Nagisa; Takemura, Yuri; Koizumi, Minako; Yano, Tetsu; Taketani, Yuji

    2012-07-01

    Singleton pregnancy after assisted reproductive technology (ART) has been associated with higher risks of adverse pregnancy outcome than naturally conceived singleton pregnancy. This study was to elucidate whether the ART procedure is responsible for abnormal pregnancy outcome comparing those after ART and non-ART in infertile patients. We compare the singleton pregnancy outcome of infertile patients in our university hospital between 2000 and 2008 following ART (351 pregnancies) and non-ART (213 pregnancies) procedures. Pregnancy outcome parameters were incidence of pregnancy induced hypertension, placenta previa, placental abruption, cesarean delivery, preterm birth, very preterm birth, stillbirth, low birth weight and very low birth weight. Most of the pregnancy outcome parameters were not significantly different between the ART group and the non-ART group. Only placenta previa was significantly higher in the ART group than in the non-ART group (odds ratio 4.0; 95 % CI 1.2-13.7). ART procedure may itself be a risk factor for the development of placenta previa. Some of the abnormal perinatal outcomes that had been previously attributed to ART, however, may be due to the baseline characteristics of infertile patients.

  5. Ureaplasma serovars & their antimicrobial susceptibility in patients of infertility & genital tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Benu; Malhotra, Neena; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Rawre, Jyoti; Khanna, Neena; Chaudhry, Rama; Mittal, Suneeta

    2012-12-01

    Ureaplasmas have been implicated in a variety of clinical conditions. However, only certain serovars of ureaplasmas are disease associated. Only a few classes of antimicrobial agents are available for the treatment of mycoplasmal infections in humans. Increase of resistance of genital mycoplasmas to antimicrobials has been reported worldwide. The aim of the present study was to determine the occurrence of Ureaplasma serovars in patients with infertility and genital tract infections with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based serotyping. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of Ureaplasma spp. and Mycoplasma hominis were also assessed to determine the most suitable treatment strategy. Sexually active adults (n=147) with symptoms of genital tract infections and 115 infertile women were enrolled. Endocervical swabs from women and urethral swabs from men were subjected to culture and multiplex PCR for detection of genital mycoplasmas. Serotyping of Ureaplasma was done by PCR and antimicrobial susceptibility to doxycycline, azithromycin, josamycin and ofloxacin was done by microbroth dilution method. Ureaplasma was detected in 25.8 per cent patients with genital tract infections and 20.8 per cent in infertile women. Serovar 3/14 was the most frequent isolate followed by serovar 1 and serovar 6. The majority of Ureaplasma isolates were susceptible to doxycycline (91%) and josamycin (86%) followed by ofloxacin (77%) and azithromycin (71%). All the isolates of M. hominis were uniformly susceptible to doxycycline, josamycin and ofloxacin. The predominance of Ureaplasma serovar 3/14 suggests their possible pathogenic role in genital tract infections and infertility. For empirical treatment, doxycycline could be the drug of choice for genital mycoplasmas.

  6. The comparison between Intrauterine Insemination and Fallopian Tube Sperm Perfusion Using FAST® System in Patients with Unexplained Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Peivandi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Controlled ovarian stimulation (COH with intrauterine insemination (IUI is commonly offered to infertile couples with patent fallopian tubes because it is simple, non-invasive and cost-effective technique. Another non-invasive method is fallopian tube sperm perfusion (FSP. This study was performed to compare the relative efficacy between FSP using fallopian sperm transfer (FAST system and standard IUI in patients with unexplained infertility. Materials and Methods: This prospective randomized study was conducted at the IVF Unit, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran, from March 2011 to February 2012. A total of ninety patients with unexplained infertility underwent ovarian stimulation with clomiphene citrate and human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG. Patients were then randomly assigned into either group I (n=45 to undergo standard IUI or group II (n=45 to undergo FSP using FAST system. Results: The patients’ basic characteristics, including age, primary infertility and duration of infertility, were not significantly different between two study groups. In the group I, there were 9 pregnancies (a pregnancy rate per cycle of 20%, whereas in the group II, 8 pregnancies occurred (a pregnancy rate per cycle of 17.8%, p>0.05. Conclusion: FSP using FAST system offers no advantage over the standard IUI in order to increase pregnancy rate in patients with unexplained infertility.

  7. Structural findings at hysterosalpingography in patients with infertility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 289 consecutive patients who underwent hysterosalpingography using ionic water-soluble contrast media was done at 2 private x-ray units in Kampala. Clinical notes and radiological findings were analysed for demographic data, uterine status, tubal and pelvic pathology.

  8. Deficiency in memory B cell compartment in a patient with infertility and recurrent pregnancy losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, N; Byeon, H J; Garcia, M D Salazar; Skariah, A; Wu, L; Dambaeva, S; Beaman, K; Gilman-Sachs, A; Kwak-Kim, J

    2016-11-01

    Alterations in normal balance of B cell subsets have been reported in various rheumatic diseases. In this study, we report a woman with a history of recurrent pregnancy losses (RPL) and infertility who had low levels of memory B cells. A 35-year-old woman with a history of RPL and infertility was demonstrated to have increased peripheral blood CD19+ B cells with persistently low levels of memory B cell subsets. Prior to the frozen donor egg transfer cycle, prednisone and intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIg) treatment was initiated and patient achieved dichorionic diamniotic twin pregnancies. During pregnancy, proportion (%) of switched memory B cells CD27+IgD- increased, while percent of total CD19+ B cells and CD27-IgD+ naive B cells were gradually decreased with a high dose IVIg treatment. She developed cervical incompetence at 20 weeks of gestation, received a Cesarean section at 32 weeks of gestation due to preterm labor, and delivered twin babies. B cell subset abnormalities may be associated with infertility, RPL and preterm labor, and further investigation is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Efficacy of acupuncture as adjunctive treatment on infertility patients with polycystic ovary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Zuo, Yu

    2018-04-12

    To observe the efficacy differences between acupuncture combined with medication and medication alone for infertility patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). According to random number table, a total of 60 infertility patients with PCOS were randomly assigned into an observation group and a control group, 30 cases in each one. The patients in the control group were treated with diane-35 from the 3rd day into menstruation, and one menstrual cycle was taken as a session of treatment. At the same time of using diane-35, the patients in the observation group were treated with acupuncture at Guanyuan (CV 4), Qihai (CV 6), Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Zusanli (ST 36), Zigong (EX-CA 1), Shenshu (BL 23), Pishu (BL 20), Weishu (BL 21) and Ganshu (BL 18) during non-menstruation period; the acupuncture was given once every two days, three treatments per week. The patients in both groups were treated for two sessions. The basic sex hormone and body mass index (BMI) were compared between the two groups before and after treatment. After ovulation induction treatment, the endometrial thickness, amount of mature follicle, ovulation rate, clinical pregnancy rate, occurrence rate of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and the number of early spontaneous abortion were compared between the two groups during ovulation. After treatment, the luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone (T) and BMI reduced in the observation group (all P 0.05). Acupuncture as adjunctive treatment could improve BMI, reduce the levels of LH, E 2 and T, increase ovulation reaction and effectively shorten reproduction cycles in infertility patients with PCOS.

  10. Role of diagnostic hystero-laparoscopy in the evaluation of infertility: A retrospective study of 300 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanta K Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the role of diagnostic hysterolaparoscopy in the evaluation of infertility in tertiary care centres. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted at two tertiary care centres (the infertility clinics of Sriram Chandra Bhanj Medical College and Prachi hospital at Cuttack, Odisha throughout the year in 2008. Women aged 20-40 years with normal hormone profile without male factor infertility were included. Results: Out of 300 cases, 206 (69% patients had primary infertility. While laparoscopy detected abnormalities in 34% of the cases, significant hysteroscopy findings were noted in 18% of cases. Together, diagnostic hysterolaparoscopy detected abnormalities in 26% of the infertile patients in both groups. While the most common laparoscopic abnormality was endometriosis (14% and adnexal adhesion (12% in primary and secondary infertile patients, respectively, hysteroscopy found intrauterine septum as the most common abnormality in both groups. Conclusions: Hysterolaparoscopy is an effective diagnostic tool for evaluation of certain significant and correctable tubo-peritoneal and intrauterine pathologies like peritoneal endometriosis, adnexal adhesions, and subseptate uterus, which are usually missed by other imaging modalities.

  11. Aspects Psycho-Sociaux chez Patients Infertiles à la Maternite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les données ont été saisies sur un ordinateur après co- dage. L'analyse a été faite avec le logiciel SPSS 15.0. 3 Resultats. Cent quatre patientes ont étaient recrutés à la Ma- ternité Principale de l'Hôpital Central de Yaoundé, dont 12 hommes (11,5%) et 92 femmes (88,5%). Les ressortissants de la région du Centre et Sud ...

  12. Office hysteroscopy, transvaginal ultrasound and endometrial histology: a comparison in infertile patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devleta Balić

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate accuracy of transvaginal sonography (TVS and hysteroscopy in detection of intrauterine pathology in infertile women. Subjects and methods. This retrospective study was conducted in 56 infertile women with abnormal transvaginal ultrasound findings of the uterine cavity which was performed during the midfollicular phase as a part of routine infertility workup. Hysteroscopy was performed between 6th and 10th day of cycle. Results. The mean age of the subjects was 31.9±4.0. The most frequent ultrasound finding was endometrial polyp in 34 (60.7% patients, septate uterus in 8 (14.3% patients, submucosal myoma in 7 (12.5% patients, endometrial hyperplasia in 5 (8.9% patients and Syndroma Ascherman in 2 (3.6% patients. Hysteroscopy confirmed 20 (35.7% polyps, the same number of myomas, septate uterus and Syndroma Ascherman as detected by ultrasound, (7 (12.5%, 8 (14.3% and 2 (3.6%, respectively and 19 (33.9% endometrial hyperplasia. In 46 women with histological excamination, the sensitivity of TVS and hysteroscopy in the diagnosis of endometrial polyps were identical - 100%, while the specificity was higher in hysteroscopy than in TVS (92.3% versus 56.4%, p<0.001. The sensitivity of TVS in the diagnosis of endometrial hyperplasia was higher than that of hysteroscopy (86.4% versus 22.7%, p<0.001, while specificity was identical, of 100%. Accordance between hysteroscopy and histology was good (k=0.79, between ultrasound and histology was moderete (k=0.59. Conclusion. Hysteroscopy appeared to be more reliable in diagnosis than TVS. The use of a high frequency ultrasound probe leads us to a lack of diagnostic clarity between endometrial polyps and hyperplasia.

  13. The effectiveness of Korean medicine treatment in male patients with infertility: a study protocol for a prospective observational pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwan-Ii; Jo, Junyoung

    2018-01-01

    Male factor subfertility has increasingly been considered the cause of infertility in couples. Many men with male infertility have sperm problems such as oligozoospermia, asthenozoospermia, or teratozoospermia. Because abnormal semen parameters are idiopathic to some extent, no standard therapy has been established to date. Herbal medicine has been reported to have beneficial properties in the treatment of subfertility, especially in improving semen quality both in vivo and in human studies. Therefore, we intend to investigate the effectiveness and safety of treatment using Korean medicine (KM) for infertile male patients with poor semen quality.This will be a single-center, prospective, case-only observational pilot study. About 20 male patients with infertility who visit Conmaul Hospital of Korean Medicine will be recruited. We will follow the standard treatment protocol, which has shown good results in the treatment of male infertility. The protocol is composed mainly of a 10-week herbal decoction treatment; acupuncture and/or pharmacopuncture are added when needed. Semen samples, quality of life, and the scrotal temperatures of infertile men will be observed before and after the 10-week treatment with KM.The study has received ethical approval from the Public Institutional Review Board (approval number: P01-201708-21-008). The findings will be disseminated to appropriate audiences via peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations. Korean Clinical Trial Registry (CRIS), Republic of Korea: KCT0002611.

  14. Combined letrozole and clomiphene versus letrozole and clomiphene alone in infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajishafiha M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Masomeh Hajishafiha,1 Meisam Dehghan,2 Nazila Kiarang,1 Nahideh Sadegh-Asadi,1 Seyed Navid Shayegh,3 Mohammad Ghasemi-Rad2 1Department of Gynecology, Reproductive Health Research Center, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, 2Urmia University of Medical Sciences, 3Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder in women of childbearing age (6.8%–18%, is among the most common causes of infertility due to ovulation factors, and accounts for 55%–70% of infertility cases caused by chronic anovulation. In this study, we used a combination of letrozole and clomiphene in patients resistant to both drugs individually, and studied the effects of this combination in ovulation and pregnancy in resistant PCOS patients. Methods: The study population included infertile couples diagnosed as PCOS in the wife. The women used clomiphene for at least six cycles in order to ovulate after failure to form the dominant follicle, and were then put on letrozole for four cycles. Patients who were unable to form the dominant follicle were enrolled on letrozole and clomiphene combination therapy. Results: One hundred enrolled patients underwent 257 cycles of a combination of letrozole and clomiphene, in which 213 were able to form the dominant follicle (82.9% and 44 were unable to do so (17.1%. The number of mature follicles was 2.3±1.1. The mean endometrial thickness in patients on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin administration was 8.17±1.3 mm. The pregnancy rate was 42%. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, it can be proposed that in PCOS patients resistant to clomiphene and letrozole used as single agents, a combination of the two drugs can be administered before using more aggressive treatment that may have severe complications or surgery. This combination may also be used as a first-line therapy to induce ovulation in severe cases of PCOS in order to

  15. Does telomerase activity have an effect on infertility in patients with endometriosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofiyeva, Nigar; Ekizoglu, Seda; Gezer, Altay; Yilmaz, Handan; Kolomuc Gayretli, Tugba; Buyru, Nur; Oral, Engin

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of telomerase activity in the development of endometriosis-related infertility by evaluation of the serum telomerase in eutopic and ectopic endometrial tissue. Eutopic endometrium, cystic wall/ovarian cortex, and venous blood were assessed in forty-seven patients. The following groups of patients were identified: females with endometriosis requiring surgical intervention and healthy control females. Patients with histopathologically confirmed endometriosis were further subdivided in the infertile (n=14) and fertile (n=17) groups. Patients who underwent hysterectomy and oophorectomy for benign gynecological conditions were enrolled in the healthy control group (n=16). Telomerase activity was evaluated with three-group, endometriosis-based and fertility-based designs. Analyses were performed regardless the menstrual cycle phase (Phase G), in proliferative (Phase P) (n=22) and secretory phases (Phase S) (n=25). Telomeric Repeat Amplification Protocol PCR was applied for telomerase activity assessment. All statistical analyses were performed with STATA 14.2, GraphPad Prisma 7.01. In analyses of the eutopic endometrium, with three-group design, a significant difference was not found in Phase G and P (p=0.58 and p=0.33, respectively). However, a statistical difference was shown in Phase S (p=0.008). A significant difference was not established in Phase G, P and S of endometriosis-based design (p=0.35, p=1.0, p=0.13, respectively). No difference was detected in Phase G and P of fertility-based design (p=0.66 and p=0.14, respectively), whereas in secretory phase difference was approved (p=0,049). Telomerase activity was not established in ectopic endometrium and in serum assessment. Telomerase activity is useless as a biomarker in peripheric blood analysis. The absence of activity in cystic wall approves the high differentiation of endometriosis tissue, what is the possible reason of low malignancy risk. The high rate of telomerase

  16. Depression, anxiety and stress among female patients of infertility; A case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuf, Lamia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Infertility, in many ways, is a very distressing condition that can have its impact on social and marital life of a couple. Depression, anxiety and stress associated with infertility may affect treatment and outcomes for such couples. The purpose of this study was to find out prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress among females suffering from infertility. Methods: One hundred females suffering from infertility as study subjects and 100 females accompanying them as controls w...

  17. [Analysis of the demographic profile of patients treated for infertility using assisted reproductive techniques in 2005-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Robert; Milewska, Anna Justyna; Czerniecki, Jan; Leśniewska, Monika; Wołczyński, Sławomir

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of the demographic profile of patients, causes for infertility and effectiveness of infertility treatment methods in the years 2005-2010. Retrospective research was conducted to analyze data of 1705 randomly selected couples who underwent in vitro fertilization procedure at the Department of Reproduction and Gynecological Endocrinology Medical University of Bialystok, between 2005 and 2010. The analyzed data included mainly causes for infertility age of the female and male subjects, place of residence and final treatment results. The percentage of pregnancy rate increased significantly to approximately 40% in 2007. The contribution of male and female infertility factors remained at a similar level, but the idiopathic factor continued to steadily increase (to 20% in the last years of the study). We observed a greater prevalence of the male factor among couples living in cities compared to inhabitants of rural areas (42.3% vs. 34.3%, p = 0.004), whereas the tubal factor dominated among couples living in the countryside when compared to city dwellers (29.7% vs. 21.6%, p = 0.001). The average age of women entering treatment was significantly higher in cities than the countryside (p infertility revealed statistically significant differences only with regard to the idiopathic factor (p = 0.03). In the group of patients with idiopathic infertility the treatment efficacy was higher than in the rest of patients (40.2% vs. 33.8%). Apart from the idiopathic infertility only the presence of the male factor was associated with a higher (but statistically insignificant) pregnancy rate (36.2% vs. 33.9%). For the other factors, their presence was associated with a lower percentage of pregnancy and the greatest differences (but still statistically insignificant) were observed for the polycystic ovary syndrome (31.5% vs. 35.1%) and for other ovulation disorders (31.3% vs. 35%). Advances in assisted reproductive techniques led to an increase in the efficacy of infertility

  18. Epidemiological study of clinical characteristics of patients with PCOS attending infertility clinic and awareness of PCOS in a rural set up

    OpenAIRE

    Shubhada Jajoo; Riju Angik

    2013-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive age group. It is a common diagnosis in women presenting with infertility. All the dimensions of PCOS have not been completely explored. In this study we studied the clinical features of PCOS and comparing with non-PCOS infertility patients and simultaneously studied the prevalence of PCOS in infertility patients and its awareness in a rural set up. Methods: It is a prospect...

  19. Evaluating the factor structure, item analyses, and internal consistency of hospital anxiety and depression scale in Iranian infertile patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Amini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS is a common screening tool designed to measure the level of anxiety and depression in different factor structures and has been extensively used in non-psychiatric populations and individuals experiencing fertility problems. Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate the factor structure, item analyses, and internal consistency of HADS in Iranian infertile patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 651 infertile patients (248 men and 403 women referred to a referral infertility Center in Tehran, Iran between January 2014 and January 2015. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to determine the underlying factor structure of the HADS among one, two, and threefactor models. Several goodness of fit indices were utilized such as comparative, normed and goodness of fit indices, Akaike information criterion, and the root mean squared error of approximation. In addition to HADS, the Satisfaction with Life Scale questionnaires as well as demographic and clinical information were administered to all patients. Results: The goodness of fit indices through CFAs exposed that three and onefactor model provided the best and worst fit to the total, male and female datasets compared to the other factor structure models for the infertile patients. The Cronbach’s alpha for anxiety and depression subscales were 0.866 and 0.753 respectively. The HADS subscales significantly correlated with SWLS, indicating an acceptable convergent validity. Conclusion: The HADS was found to be a three-factor structure screening instrument in the field of infertility.

  20. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 Gene Polymorphisms and the Effectiveness of Infertility Treatment in Patients with Peritoneal Endometriosis

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    Ekaterina D. Dubinskaya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, infertility has become a global issue. WHO ranks it the fifth among the major diseases of those below 60 years, after alcoholism, depression, injuries and eyesight disorders. Numerous studies conducted on the problems of infertility in endometriosis still do not offer clear answers regarding the pathogenesis and mechanisms of this disease and its influences on fertility. According to the survey results, point mutations of the NAT2 gene (NAT2*5 and NAT2*6 have been identified in 75.6% of the patients with infertility problems and the peritoneal form of endometriosis, that create “slow” allelic variants, which exceed the average index in the population. The peculiarities of the NAT2 gene polymorphisms have been proven to be associated with the effectiveness of the infertility treatment of female patients with peritoneal endometriosis. In the group of non-pregnant patients, the presence of с.341Т>C, c.481C>T, c.590G>A and c.803A>G heterozygous point mutations are 73.2, 73.2, 5.4, and 62.5%, respectively. The significant difference in the comparison of the allelic polymorphism during the various stages of the endometriosis was not identified. At stage III-IV endometriosis the frequency of three and more point substitutions was significantly higher. NAT2 gene polymorphisms can find use as an additional criterion for predicting the effectiveness of the infertility treatment of patients with peritoneal endometriosis.

  1. Factors that affect infertility patients' decisions about disposition of frozen embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Anne Drapkin; Steinhauser, Karen; Namey, Emily; Tulsky, James A; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Sugarman, Jeremy; Walmer, David; Faden, Ruth; Wallach, Edward

    2006-06-01

    To describe factors that affect infertility patients' decision making regarding their cryopreserved embryos. Forty-six semistructured in-depth interviews of individuals and couples participating in IVF programs. Two major southeastern academic medical centers. Fifty-three individuals, including 31 women, 8 men, and 7 couples. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts. INTERVENTION (S): None. Seven broad themes informed participants' decisions about embryo disposition: family and personal issues, trust, definition of the embryo, prospective responsibility to the embryo, responsibility to society, adequacy of information, and lack of acceptable disposition options. Many wished for alternative options, such as a ceremony at the time of disposal or placement of embryos in the woman's body when pregnancy was unlikely. Recent debates regarding embryo disposition do not reflect the range of values that infertility patients consider when deciding about frozen embryos. In addition to questions about the embryo's moral status, decision making about embryos is informed by a range of factors in the lives of individuals who created them. These perspectives may have important implications for the content and timing of informed consent, facilitating embryo disposition, and advancing policy debates about the ethics of frozen embryo use.

  2. Is Coasting Valuable in All Patients with Any Cause of Infertility?

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    Tahereh Madani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the influence of coasting duration on the number and quality of oocytes and fertilization rate in male factor infertile women and those with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Methods: In this prospective observational follow-up study, 114 patients undergoing coasting (53 women with male factor infertility and 61 women with PCOS were evaluated at the Royan Institute Research Center, Iran, between 2010 and 2012. Results: The results were analyzed according to the coasting periods of 1–4 days. In normal females, the number of oocytes retrieved was significantly reduced after the second day (p = 0.004. In addition, a statistically significant drop was observed in the number of metaphase II oocytes and fertilization rate after the third day (p = 0.006 and p = 0.006, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the number and quality of oocytes retrieved and fertilization rate with regard to coasting days in PCOS patients. Conclusion: Coasting with duration of more than three days should be performed with caution in normal females who are at risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

  3. Association Between Seminal Plasma Copper and Magnesium Levels with Oxidative Stress in Iraqi Infertile Men

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    Omar F. Abdul-Rasheed

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the association between copper, magnesium and malondialdehyde levels in seminal plasma of oligozoospermic, azoospermic in relation to normozoospermic men.Methods: The present study was conducted at the Chemistry and Biochemistry department, College of Medicine, Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad-Iraq during September 2007 to February 2008 after obtaining approval from the research and ethics committee and obtaining written consent, 78 infertile men (age range 33.01±4.20 years were recruited at the institute of embryo research and infertility treatment, Al-Kadhimiya teaching hospital, Iraq and were categorized according to their seminal fluid parameters to oligozoospermia (n=43 and azoospermia (n=35. 41 fertile men (age range 30.29±2.30 years were selected as controls. Seminal plasma copper and magnesium were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Malondialdehyde was measured calorimetrically using thiobarbituric acid assay which detects thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Results: Seminal plasma copper level was decreased significantly (p=0.000 in the azoospermic group compared to the control group. Whereas, the level decreased non-significantly in the oligozoospermic group. Seminal plasma magnesium levels were decreased significantly (p=0.000 in all the infertility groups studied. On the other hand, malondialdehyde levels which is an end product of lipid peroxidation were significantly elevated (p=0.000 in all the infertility groups studied.Conclusion: Copper and magnesium work in different ways in order to maintain normal environment for spermatozoa for normal fertilization to occur.

  4. Effect of Pertubation on Pregnancy Rates before Intrauterine Insemination Treatment in Patients with Unexplained Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Yildiz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: In this prospective randomized study, a total of 180 patients were included in the study. Amongst these, pertubation of the uterine cavity was carried out in 79 patients prior to insemination. One patient in the pertubation group was later excluded because insemination could not be performed due to cycle cancellation. Results: There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics between the study and control groups. When the pregnancy rates of both groups were evaluated, 14(17.8% patients in the study group achieved pregancy. Three (3.8% had a biochemical pregnancy, 1(1.3% miscarried and 10(12.7% had live births. In the control group, a total of 24(23.8% pregnancies were achieved, amongst which one (1% had a biochemical pregnancy, 3(3% miscarried and 20(19.8% resulted in live births. There was no significant difference between groups in terms of total pregnancy and live birth rates (p>0.05. There was a 21% total pregnancy loss rate. There was no significant difference between the control and study groups in terms of pregnancy loss rates (p>0.05. Conclusion: This study on a homogenous group of unexplained infertile patients determined that the addition of pertubation to a controlled ovarian hyperstimulation plus intrauterine insemination (COH+IUI treatment protocol did not affect pregnancy rates (Registration Number: NCT01999959.

  5. Investigating the Relationships among Stressors, Stress Level, and Mental Symptoms for Infertile Patients: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Yi Wang

    Full Text Available Patients with infertility are a high risk group in depression and anxiety. However, an existing theoretically and empirically validated model of stressors, stress, and mental symptoms specific for infertile patients is still a void. This study aimed to determine the related factors and their relational structures that affect the level of depressive and anxiety symptoms among infertile patients.A cross-sectional sample of 400 infertility outpatients seeking reproduction treatments in three teaching hospitals across Taiwan participated in the structured questionnaire survey in 2011. The hypothesized model comprising 10 latent variables was tested by Structural Equation Modeling using AMOS 17.Goodness-of-fit indexes, including χ2/DF = 1.871, PGFI = 0.746, PNFI = 0.764, and others, confirmed the modified model fit the data well. Marital stressor, importance of children, guilt-and-blame, and social stressor showed a direct effect on perceived stress. Instead of being a factor of stress, social support was directly and positively related to self-esteem. Perceived stress and self-esteem were the two major mediators for the relationships between stressors and mental symptoms. Increase in social support and self-esteem led to decrease in mental symptoms among the infertile patients.The relational structures were identified and named as the Stressors Stress Symptoms Model, clinically applied to predict anxiety and depression from various stressors. Assessing sources and level of infertility-related stress and implementing culturally-sensitive counseling with an emphasis on positive personal value may assist in preventing the severity of depression and anxiety.

  6. Investigating the Relationships among Stressors, Stress Level, and Mental Symptoms for Infertile Patients: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Li, Yi-Shan; Chen, Jen-De; Liang, Wen-Miin; Yang, Tung-Chuan; Lee, Young-Chang; Wang, Chia-Woei

    2015-01-01

    Patients with infertility are a high risk group in depression and anxiety. However, an existing theoretically and empirically validated model of stressors, stress, and mental symptoms specific for infertile patients is still a void. This study aimed to determine the related factors and their relational structures that affect the level of depressive and anxiety symptoms among infertile patients. A cross-sectional sample of 400 infertility outpatients seeking reproduction treatments in three teaching hospitals across Taiwan participated in the structured questionnaire survey in 2011. The hypothesized model comprising 10 latent variables was tested by Structural Equation Modeling using AMOS 17. Goodness-of-fit indexes, including χ2/DF = 1.871, PGFI = 0.746, PNFI = 0.764, and others, confirmed the modified model fit the data well. Marital stressor, importance of children, guilt-and-blame, and social stressor showed a direct effect on perceived stress. Instead of being a factor of stress, social support was directly and positively related to self-esteem. Perceived stress and self-esteem were the two major mediators for the relationships between stressors and mental symptoms. Increase in social support and self-esteem led to decrease in mental symptoms among the infertile patients. The relational structures were identified and named as the Stressors Stress Symptoms Model, clinically applied to predict anxiety and depression from various stressors. Assessing sources and level of infertility-related stress and implementing culturally-sensitive counseling with an emphasis on positive personal value may assist in preventing the severity of depression and anxiety.

  7. Priorities for family building among patients and partners seeking treatment for infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Elizabeth A; Cooper, Alexandra; Davis, Joseph B; Sandlow, Jay; Schoyer, Katherine D; Strawn, Estil; Flynn, Kathryn E

    2017-04-05

    Infertility treatment decisions require people to balance multiple priorities. Within couples, partners must also negotiate priorities with one another. In this study, we assessed the family-building priorities of couples prior to their first consultations with a reproductive specialist. Participants were couples who had upcoming first consultations with a reproductive specialist (N = 59 couples (59 women; 59 men)). Prior to the consultation, couples separately completed the Family-Building Priorities Tool, which tasked them with ranking from least to most important 10 factors associated with family building. We describe the highest (top three) and lowest (bottom three) priorities, the alignment of priorities within couples, and test for differences in prioritization between men and women within couples (Wilcoxon signed rank test). Maintaining a close and satisfying relationship with one's partner was ranked as a high priority by majorities of men and women, and in 25% of couples, both partners ranked this factor as their most important priority for family building. Majorities of men and women also ranked building a family in a way that does not make infertility obvious to others as a low priority, and in 27% of couples, both partners ranked this factor as the least important priority for family building. There were also differences within couples that involved either men or women ranking a particular goal more highly than their partners. More women ranked two factors higher than did their partners: 1) that I become a parent one way or another (p = 0.015) and 2) that I have a child in the next year or two (p maintain a close relationship with my partner (p = 0.034), and 4) that I avoid side effects from treatment (p building paths should be aware that: (1) patients balance multiple priorities as a part of, or beside, becoming a parent; and (2) patients and their partners may not be aligned in their prioritization of achieving parenthood. For

  8. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH ... Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets ...

  9. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH ... Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets ...

  10. Infertility with Testicular Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Kevin A; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer is one of the most curable cancers. Most patients are treated during their reproductive years, making infertility a significant quality of life issue after successful treatment. This focused review evaluates the factors that contribute to infertility and specific fertility risks with the various testicular cancer treatments. Timing of patient discussions and current fertility treatments are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multiple Determinations of Sperm DNA Fragmentation Show That Varicocelectomy Is Not Indicated for Infertile Patients with Subclinical Varicocele

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    Agustín García-Peiró

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicocele is one of the most common causes of low semen quality, which is reflected in high percentages of sperm cells with fragmented DNA. While varicocelectomy is usually performed to ameliorate a patient’s fertility, its impact on sperm DNA integrity in the case of subclinical varicocele is poorly documented. In this study, multiple DNA fragmentation analyses (TUNEL, SCD, and SCSA were performed on semen samples from sixty infertile patients with varicocele (15 clinical varicoceles, 19 clinical varicoceles after surgical treatment, 16 subclinical varicoceles, and 10 subclinical varicoceles after surgical treatment. TUNEL, SCD, and SCSA assays all showed substantial sperm DNA fragmentation levels that were comparable between subclinical and clinical varicocele patients. Importantly, varicocelectomy did improve sperm quality in patients with clinical varicocele; however, this was not the case in patients with subclinical varicocele. In summary, although infertile patients with clinical and subclinical varicocele have similar sperm DNA quality, varicocelectomy should only be advised for patients with clinical varicocele.

  12. Medical Imaging and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Rebecca

    2016-11-01

    Infertility affects many couples, and medical imaging plays a vital role in its diagnosis and treatment. Radiologic technologists benefit from having a broad understanding of infertility risk factors and causes. This article describes the typical structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, as well as congenital and acquired conditions that could lead to a couple's inability to conceive. Medical imaging procedures performed for infertility diagnosis are discussed, as well as common interventional options available to patients. © 2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  13. Ureaplasma Urealyticum in Male Infertility

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    L P Deodbar

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Semen examination with special reference to semen analysis and culture for Ureaplasma urealyticum was carried out in 50 male infertile patients in the age group of 25 to 40 years, attending a private infertility clinic. Isolation of Ureaplasma urealyticum in 14 (28% patients and the abnormalities in count and motility of spermatozoa suggest that ureaplasmas may play a role in human male infertility.

  14. High frequency of chronic bacterial and non-inflammatory prostatitis in infertile patients with prostatitis syndrome plus irritable bowel syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Enzo Vicari; Sandro La Vignera; Domenico Arcoria; Rosita Condorelli; Lucia O Vicari; Roberto Castiglione; Andrea Mangiameli; Aldo E Calogero

    2011-01-01

    Background Although prostatitis syndrome (PS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common disorders, information on the prevalence of IBS in infertile patients with PS is relatively scanty. Therefore, this study was undertaken to estimate the frequency of PS and IBS and to evaluate the prevalence of the various diagnostic categories of prostatitis. Methodology/Principal Findings This study enrolled 152 patients with PS, diagnosed by the NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) in an...

  15. Pregnancy and recurrence rates in infertile patients operated for ovarian endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luţuc, Monica Holicov; Nemescu, D; Onofriescu, Alina; Târnovanu, Mihaela; Moscalu, Mihaela; Onofriescu, M

    2015-01-01

    The study deals with the preoperative ultrasound diagnosis of ovarian endometriosis, postoperative ultrasound reassessment, laparoscopic surgical resolution of ovarian endometriosis, estimation of recurrence risk 12 months after surgery by ultrasound, reappearance of clinical symptoms (such as pain) or second-look laparoscopy, and pregnancy rate 2 years after surgery. 140 patients with en- dometriosis and infertility admitted to the Iasi "Cuza-Vodă" Clinical Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology between the years 2009-2011 were included in the study. The patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1-59 cases that refused in vitro fertilization procedures, did not afford in vitro fertilization (IVF) or had minimal endometriosis and young ages and thus a possibility of delaying treatment, and group 2--62 cases which underwent IVF procedures immediately after surgery. No significant differences in the chance of becoming pregnant were found between the two groups (χ2 = 2.06, p = 0.0891, 95% CI); in group 1, 11.86% pregnancies were obtained while in group 2 the pregnancy rate was 11.29%. Based on the nonparametric method of analysis of contingency tables we could estimate the odds of becoming pregnant in the study groups, obtaining an odds ratio (OR = 1.16, CI: 1.04-2.23, 95% CI). This result indicated that in group 1 the odds of becoming pregnant was not significantly higher, and the estimation was made for a confidence interval of 95%. The study had in view the assessment of pregnancies obtained in the study groups and the time interval (number of weeks) from the time of intervention until the occurrence of pregnancy. The Kaplan-Meier analysis enabled the assessment of the mean value and the median value of the number of weeks until becoming pregnant, and these values did not show significant differences (χ2 = 1.55, p = 0.212, 95% CI). For endometriosis associated with infertility, hormonal suppression does not improve fertility, and therefore surgery followed by

  16. Free radical scavenging window of infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome: correlation with embryo quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Li, Zhou; Ren, Xinling; Ai, Jihui; Zhu, Lixia; Jin, Lei

    2017-06-01

    The activity of free radicals in follicular fluid was related to ovarian responsiveness, in vitro fertilization (IVF), and embryo transfer success rate. However, studies analyzing the relationship between the free radical scavenging capacity and embryo quality of infertile women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) were lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the free radical scavenging window of women with PCOS and their embryo quality. The free radical scavenging capacity of follicular fluid from women with PCOS was determined by a,a-diphenyl-b-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) assay, superoxide radical, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay. In the DPPH and ROS assays, the follicular fluid from grades I and II embryos was significantly higher than the follicular fluid from grades III and IVembryos. The lower control limit of DPPH radical scavenging capacity and upper control limit of ROS level were 13.2% and 109.0 cps, respectively. The calculated lower control limit and upper control limit were further confirmed in the follicular fluid of embryos of all grades. These cut-off values of free radical scavenging activity of follicular fluid could assist embryologists in choosing the development of embryos in PCOS patients undergoing IVF.

  17. Male Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to have a baby? If treatment doesn’t work, what are our other options? Resources National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, What Causes Male Infertility? Last Updated: May 30, 2017 This ...

  18. Treating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem that leads to male infertility is the enlargement of a vein in the scrotum . It sometimes ... the testes. Sexual Intercourse: The act of the penis of the male entering the vagina of the ...

  19. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Analysis of Protamine Genes in Infertile Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamad Salamian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs are considered as one of the underlyingcauses of male infertility. Proper sperm chromatin packaging which involves replacement ofhistones with protamines has profound effect on male fertility. Over 20 SNPs have been reportedfor the protamine 1 and 2.Materials and Methods: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of two previouslyreported SNPs using polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP approach in 35, 96 and 177 normal, oligozoospermic and azoospermic individuals. TheseSNPs are: 1. A base pair substitution (G at position 197 instead of T in protamine type 1 Openreading frame (ORF including untranslated region, which causes an Arg residue change to Serresidue in a highly conserved region. 2. cytidine nucleotide change to thymidine in position of 248of protamine type 2 ORF which caused a nonsense point mutation.Results: The two mentioned SNPs were not present in the studied population, thus concluding thatthese SNPs can not serves as molecular markers for male infertility diagnosis.Conclusion: The results of our study reveal that in a selected Iranian population, the SNP G197Tand C248T are completely absent and are not associated with male infertility and therefore theseSNPs may not represent a molecular marker for genetic diagnosis of male infertility.

  20. Psychological assessment tool for patients diagnosed with absolute uterine factor infertility and planning to undergo uterine transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saso, S; Bracewell-Milnes, T; Ismail, L; Hamed, A H; Thum, M-Y; Ghaem-Maghami, S; Del Priore, G; Smith, J R

    2014-08-01

    Uterine transplantation (UTn) has been proposed as a treatment option for women diagnosed with absolute uterine factor infertility (AUFI) and who are willing to bear their own child. AUFI renders a woman 'unconditionally infertile'. For AUFI women in general, UTn may offer a way to re-discover their own femininity through the restoration of fertility. Thus, when faced with a patient who may undergo UTn, the 'holistic approach' takes on an extra meaning. This is because the psychological element is two-sided for these patients. On one side lies the psychology of infertility, and on the other and equally important, is the substantially higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders in transplant candidates and recipients than in the general population. However, the psychology of a potential recipient of a uterine graft in order to bring about fertility has not been adequately explored or reviewed scientifically. We have presented here an outline of the areas which should be included in a psychological assessment for patients wishing to undergo UTn.

  1. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  2. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  3. Ovarian Drilling for Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  4. Stress and Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  5. Smoking and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  6. Sperm DNA damage in male infertility: etiologies, assays, and outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Ryan T.; Ohl, Dana A.; Sigman, Mark; Smith, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    Male factor infertility is the sole cause of infertility in approximately 20% of infertile couples, with an additional 30% to 40% secondary to both male and female factors. Current means of evaluation of male factor infertility remains routine semen analysis including seminal volume, pH, sperm concentration, motility, and morphology. However, approximately 15% of patients with male factor infertility have a normal semen analysis and a definitive diagnosis of male infertility often cannot be m...

  7. Avaliação histeroscópica em pacientes com infertilidade Hysteroscopic evaluation in patients with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Bassil Lasmar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: descrever os achados da histeroscopia em pacientes com infertilidade. MÉTODOS: série retrospectiva de 953 pacientes com diagnóstico de infertilidade avaliadas por histeroscopia. As 957 pacientes em pesquisa de infertilidade foram submetidas à histeroscopia, preferencialmente na primeira fase do ciclo menstrual. Quando necessário, foram realizadas as biópsias, dirigida (sob visão direta durante o exame ou orientada, utilizando uma cureta de Novak após definir o local a ser biopsiado durante o exame histeroscópico. Foram utilizadas porcentagens para determinação da frequência dos desfechos e teste de χ2 para correlações. O programa estatístico EpiInfo 2000 (CDC foi utilizado para análise dos dados. RESULTADOS: cavidade uterina normal foi encontrada em 436 casos (45,8%. Esse foi o diagnóstico mais frequente em mulheres com infertilidade primária e naquelas com nenhum ou um aborto (pPURPOSE: to describe hysteroscopy findings in infertile patients. METHODS: this was a retrospective series of 953 patients with diagnosis of infertility evaluated by hysteroscopy. A total of 957 patients investigated for infertility were subjected to hysteroscopy, preferentially during the first phase of the menstrual cycle. When necessary, directed biopsies (under direct visualization during the exam or guided biopsies were obtained using a Novak curette after defining the site to be biopsied during the hysteroscopic examination. Outcome frequencies were determined as percentages, and the χ2 test was used for the correlations. The statistical software EpiInfo 2000 (CDC was used for data analysis. RESULTS: a normal uterine cavity was detected in 436 cases (45.8%. This was the most frequent diagnosis for women with primary infertility and for women with one or no abortion (p<0.05. Abnormal findings were obtained in 517 of 953 cases (54.2%, including intrauterine synechiae in 185 patients (19.4%, endometrial polyps in 115 (12.1%, endocervical

  8. Female infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, D.A.; Yoder, I.

    1984-01-01

    Infertility, defined as 1 year of unprotected intercourse without conception, is becoming of increasingly important medical concern. Fertility in both the male and the female is at its peak in the twenties. Many couples today have postponed marriage and/or childbearing into their 30s until careers are established, but at that point fertility may be diminished. The current epidemic of venereal disease has been associated with an increasing incidence of tubal scarring. In addition, the use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) and birth control pills for contraception have let to later problems with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and ovulation disturbances. The problem of infertility intensifies as the number of babies available for adoption decreases. Therefore, it is estimated that approximately 10-20% of couples will eventually seek medical attention for an infertility-related problem. Fortunately, marked improvements in the results of tubal surgery are concurrently occurring secondary to refinements in microsurgical techniques, and many medical alternatives to induce ovulation are being developed. The male factor causes infertility in 30-40 % of couples, and the female factor is responsible in approximately 50% of couples. No cause is found in 10-20% of couples. This chapter discusses the role of coordinated imaging in the diagnosis and therapy of infertility in the female

  9. A logistic regression analysis of factors related to the treatment compliance of infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Saijiao; He, Aiyan; Yang, Jing; Yin, TaiLang; Xu, Wangming

    2011-01-01

    To investigate factors that can affect compliance with treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in infertile patients and to provide a basis for clinical treatment, specialist consultation and health education. Patient compliance was assessed via a questionnaire based on the Morisky-Green test and the treatment principles of PCOS. Then interviews were conducted with 99 infertile patients diagnosed with PCOS at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University in China, from March to September 2009. Finally, these data were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that a total of 23 (25.6%) of the participants showed good compliance. Factors that significantly (p < 0.05) affected compliance with treatment were the patient's body mass index, convenience of medical treatment and concerns about adverse drug reactions. Patients who are obese, experience inconvenient medical treatment or are concerned about adverse drug reactions are more likely to exhibit noncompliance. Treatment education and intervention aimed at these patients should be strengthened in the clinic to improve treatment compliance. Further research is needed to better elucidate the compliance behavior of patients with PCOS.

  10. Is there a declining trend in ovarian function among infertility clinic patients?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobek Jr., A.; Tkadlec, Emil; Hladíková, B.; Sobek, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2010), s. 127-132 ISSN 0268-1161 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : ovarian function * decrease * infertility * IVF Subject RIV: FK - Gynaecology, Childbirth Impact factor: 4.357, year: 2010

  11. Long-term life and partnership satisfaction in infertile patients: a 5-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanz, Stefan; Reimer, Thorisa; Eichner, Martin; Hautzinger, Martin; Häfner, Hans-Martin; Fierlbeck, Gerhard

    2011-08-01

    To describe the long-term effects of infertility on life and partnership satisfaction. Longitudinal cohort study. A university outpatient andrology and gynecology infertility clinic. 275 men and 272 women treated for infertility between August 2000 and December 2001. None. The Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (FLZ), the Partnership Questionnaire (PFB), and sociodemographic items at baseline (T1) and 5 years later (T2). Compared with a representative sample, our male and female participants had higher Finance and Partnership scores and lower Health scores on the FLZ at T1. They also had markedly higher PFB scores, with the exception of Conflict Behavior. After 5 years (T2), 101 men and 113 women rated the Partnership and Sexuality FLZ subscales as well as all the PFB subscales statistically significantly lower than at baseline. Only the women rated the Self-esteem FLZ subscale lower than at baseline (T1). Participants who became parents had lower Leisure and Partnership FLZ subscale scores, and fathers had lower Finance FLZ subscale scores. Satisfaction declined over 5 years for both men and women, but only in the partnership-related domains. Women were more affected than men. The success of infertility treatment had only a minor influence on a couple's future satisfaction. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Characterisation of the bacterial community in expressed prostatic secretions from patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and infertile men: a preliminary investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dong-Sheng; Long, Wen-Min; Shen, Jian; Zhao, Li-Ping; Pang, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Chen

    2012-01-01

    The expressed prostatic secretions (EPSs) of men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), infertile men and normal men were subjected to microbiological study. EPSs were collected from the subjects, which included 26 normal men, 11 infertile patients and 51 CP/CPPS patients. DNA was extracted from each specimen, and the V3 regions of the 16S rRNA genes were amplified using universal bacterial primers. The results showed that the EPS 16S rRNA gene-positive rate in the CP/CPPS and infertile patients was much higher than in the normal men, but without any difference among the three patient groups. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method was used to characterize the EPS bacterial community structure of the prostate fluid from patients with CP/CPPS or infertility issues. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) analyses of PCR-DGGE profiles revealed that the EPS bacterial community structure differed among the three groups. Three bands were identified as the key factors responsible for the discrepancy between CP/CPPS patients and infertile patients (Pprostatitis patients (Pprostate and low urethra tract, when considered as a microenvironment, might play an important role in the maintenance of a healthy male reproductive tract. PMID:22635162

  13. Effect of different ultrasound contrast materials and temperatures on patient comfort during intrauterine and tubal assessment for infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenzl, Vanja

    2012-01-01

    Hysterosalpingo-contrast sonography (HyCoSy) is safe and easy to perform outpatient method in the evaluation of female infertility. During this procedure a certain level of discomfort and pain are experienced by patients. On the basis of reducing avoidable pain inductors the aim of this study was to compare pain sensation due to different warmth of applied contrasts (sterile saline and Echovist ® ). Prospective and randomized study was performed on patients requiring tubal and uterine assessment during standard infertility work up. One group of patients was examined using both contrasts at room temperature and the other group using preheated contrasts at body temperature. Pain experience of the procedure was rated by patients for each contrast by numerical scale (0–10) immediately after the procedure. There was significant statistical difference between pain scores during application of two contrasts in each group; Echovist induces significantly less pain in comparison to sterile saline at the same temperature (P = 0.002, 0.001). Between two groups there is also statistically significant difference in pain during introduction of the same contrast at different temperature (P < 0.001). The most tolerable for the patient is body temperature of the applied contrasts although their structure and concentrations can be another factor associated with tolerability of the procedure.

  14. Effect of different ultrasound contrast materials and temperatures on patient comfort during intrauterine and tubal assessment for infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenzl, Vanja, E-mail: vanja.radic@inet.hr [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital “Merkur”, Zajčeva 19 (Croatia); University of Applied Health Studies, Mlinarska Cesta 38, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-12-15

    Hysterosalpingo-contrast sonography (HyCoSy) is safe and easy to perform outpatient method in the evaluation of female infertility. During this procedure a certain level of discomfort and pain are experienced by patients. On the basis of reducing avoidable pain inductors the aim of this study was to compare pain sensation due to different warmth of applied contrasts (sterile saline and Echovist{sup ®}). Prospective and randomized study was performed on patients requiring tubal and uterine assessment during standard infertility work up. One group of patients was examined using both contrasts at room temperature and the other group using preheated contrasts at body temperature. Pain experience of the procedure was rated by patients for each contrast by numerical scale (0–10) immediately after the procedure. There was significant statistical difference between pain scores during application of two contrasts in each group; Echovist induces significantly less pain in comparison to sterile saline at the same temperature (P = 0.002, 0.001). Between two groups there is also statistically significant difference in pain during introduction of the same contrast at different temperature (P < 0.001). The most tolerable for the patient is body temperature of the applied contrasts although their structure and concentrations can be another factor associated with tolerability of the procedure.

  15. Laparoscopic evaluation of female infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haiderr, G.; Rani, S.; Zehra, N.; Munir, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sub-fertility is inability to ensure child bearing when it is wanted. Prevalence of sub-fertility in industrialised countries has been quoted as 20%, and seems to be on the rise. Traditional way to assess the uterine cavity, tubal structure and tubal patency was hysterosalpingography but it has now been largely superseded by laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. The objective of this study was to highlight the role of laparoscopy in establishing diagnosis of female infertility. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in Gynaecology Unit of Liaquat University of Medical Health Sciences, Hyderabad, Pakistan from August 28, 2000 to July 1, 2001. Total 200 sub-fertile patients attended the gynaecology OPD. Out of these 30 patients were selected for laparoscopy and dye test who were suspected cases of endometriosis, abnormal HSG and unexplained infertility. Those patients who had medical disorders and contraindication for laparoscopy were excluded from study. Detailed history of every patient was recorded on a proforma and physical examination was performed. Laparoscopy was scheduled in proliferative phase of menstrual cycle. Data were analysed using SPSS 11. Frequency and percentages were calculated to describe the results. Results: Out of 200 sub-fertile patients total 30 patients were selected for laparoscopy. Twenty (66%) patients were in primary infertility group while 10 (33%) patients were in secondary infertility group. Eleven (55%) patients of primary infertility belong to age group of 18-25 years while 6(60%) patients of secondary infertility belong to age group of 26- 33 years. Mean duration of sub fertility at time of presentation in primary infertility group was 1.95 years while in secondary infertility was 2.70 years. In primary infertility group main associated symptoms were dysmenorrhoeal in 8 (40%), irregular cycles 5 (25%), and dyspareunia in 4 (20%). In secondary infertility group 3 (30%) patients had dysmenorrhoeal and dyspareunia while 2

  16. Assessment of the expression of mir-29c, mir-200a and mir-145 in endometrial tissue and the downstream molecules in infertile patients with endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Mei Shu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the expression of mir-29c, mir-200a and mir-145 in endometrial tissue and analyze the downstream molecules in infertile patients with endometriosis. Methods: Female patients with infertility caused by endometriosis who were treated in Leshan Maternal and Child Health Hospital between May 2014 and February 2017 were selected as the infertility group of the research, and female patients with infertility caused by male factors over the same period were selected as the control group of the research. Endometrial tissue was collected to detect the expression of mir-29c, mir-200a, mir-145, HOXA-10 and HOXA-11 as well as downstream molecules and adhesion molecules. Results: mir-29c, mir-200a and mir-145 expression in endometrial tissue of infertility group were significantly higher than those of control group; HOXA-10, HOXA-11, integrin αvβ3, IGFBP-1, CD44V6, N-cadherin and FAK mRNA expression in endometrial tissue of infertility group were significantly lower than those of control group and negatively correlated with mir-29c, mir-200a and mir-145 expression while E-cadherin and FUT4 mRNA expression were significantly higher than those of control group and positively correlated with mir-29c, mir-200a and mir-145 expression. Conclusion: The highly expressed mir-29c, mir-200a and mir-145 in endometrial tissue can regulate the expression of HOXA-10 and HOXA-11 as well as downstream molecules and adhesion molecules, and influence the endometrial receptivity in infertile patients with endometriosis.

  17. Comparison of manual and automated measurements of monodominant follicle diameter with different follicle size in infertile patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Pan

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the consistency of manual and automated measurements of monodominant follicle diameter with different follicle size in infertile patients. Transvaginal two-dimensional (2D ultrasound and SonoAVC (Sonography-based Automated Volume Calculation were both performed in 226 infertile patients with monodominant follicle growth. 2D diameters were separately compared with SonoAVC-generated d(V and m-d values in different follicle category, i.e. >10 to 14 mm, >14 to 18 mm, >18 to 22 mm and >22 mm. There was moderate degree of consistency between 2D diameter and SonoAVC-generated parameters regardless of follicle size. The mean differences were 0.82 mm between 2D diameter and SonoAVC-generated d(V value, and 0.22 mm between 2D diameter and SonoAVC-generated m-d value, respectively. The discrepancy of manual and automated measurements tended to increase as follicle size increased. Our study suggested that compared with manual measurement, SonoAVC might underestimate follicle size. The absolute size of a follicle affected the consistency of two techniques.

  18. Coping with infertility: a transcultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Botao; Li, Min

    2014-09-01

    To review the most important and interesting articles in infertility published in the last year. This systematic review covers 60 studies published in journals or dissertations in Science Direct and PubMed in the last year, including those related to prevention and treatment as well as related psychosocial services in infertility. We also propose some suggestions about coping with infertility in China. Infertility is a multidisciplinary problem that requires medical, social, and political efforts to prevent and offer infertile patients the best diagnostic, therapeutic, and psychosocial services. Cultural factors should be taken into consideration when designing coping strategies.

  19. A logistic model to predict early pregnancy loss following in vitro fertilization based on 2601 infertility patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yan; Lu, Guangxiu; Ouyang, Yan; lin, Ge; Gong, Fei; Li, Xihong

    2016-03-31

    According to previous studies, even after embryonic cardiac activity is detected, the pregnancy loss rate remains 3-4 %. The objectives of this study were to investigate the differences in ultrasound parameters between a miscarriage group and an ongoing pregnancy group during the 1(st) trimester and to build a logistic model to predict early pregnancy loss (EPL) after the appearance of embryonic cardiac activity in patients who have undergone in vitro fertilization embryo transfer (IVF-ET) treatment. A total of 2601 patients with early singleton pregnancies with embryonic cardiac activity were retrospectively analyzed after IVF from January 2010 to June 2011. Transvaginal sonography (TVS) was performed at 6 to 10 weeks of gestational age (GA). The mean gestational sac diameter (MSD), crown-rump length (CRL), fetal heart rate (FHR), and yolk sac diameter (YSD) were measured by TVS. A total of 2400 patients had an ongoing pregnancy and an additional 201 (7.7 %) patients miscarried during the first trimester after fetal cardiac activity had been established. The maternal age (MA) and infertility duration were much greater, and the MSD, CRL, and FHR were much lower in the miscarriage group than in the ongoing pregnancy group after IVF (P model utilized the following equation: the possibility of EPL = exp(z)/(1 + exp(z)), where z = -21.456 + (0.114 × MA) + (4.305 × × GA) - (0.043 × MSD) - (0.359 × CRL) - (0.091 × FHR) + 2.243 (fluid collection present around the gestational sac (GS)) + 2.519 (when YSD  5.5). The MA, MSD, CRL, YSD, FHR, infertility duration, and fluid collection around the GS were each correlated with EPL after IVF in infertile patients. A logistic model is a useful tool for predicting EPL after the appearance of embryonic cardiac activity (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.909).

  20. Hysterosalpingographic evaluation in infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Sik; Shin, Ma Rie; Jung, Eun Mi; Yoon, Chong Hyun; Lee, Chang Joon; Whang, In Soon; Kim, Han Suk

    1984-01-01

    H.S.G. has been proven to be an important diagnostic method in clinical gynecology for under 50 yrs. It is valuable in the investigation of the uterine and tubal factors of female infertility. Hysterosalpingograms of 81 patients with infertility were analyzed and following brief results were obtained. Ratio between primary and secondary infertility was 3 : 5, secondary infertility was more frequent. 2. Age distribution was more frequent under 30 years of age than over 30 years of age. 3. Abnormal uterine findings was only seen in 18 cases, abnormal tubal finding was only seen in 25 cases and combined uterine and tubal abnormalities were seen in 14 cases. 4. Abnormal uterine findings were malposition (12 cases), filling defect (5), spastic uterus (5), irregular contour (3), arcuate uterus (3), didelphia (1), in order of frequency. 5. Abnormal tubal findings were hydrosalpinx (21 cases), occlusion (19), intravasation (6), beaded appearance (3), and diverticula (2), in order of frequency. 6. Negative finding in both uterus tube was seen in 23 cases. 7. In 2 cases, pregnancy after the H.S.G. examination was confirmed.

  1. Incorporating patient preference into the management of infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoroafor UC

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ugochi C Okoroafor, Emily S JungheimDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a heterogeneous condition characterized by anovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries. Because of the heterogeneous nature of PCOS, women affected by the condition often require a customized approach for ovulation induction when trying to conceive. Treating symptoms of PCOS in overweight and obese women should always incorporate lifestyle changes with the goal of weight-loss, as many women with PCOS will ovulate after losing 5%–10% of their body weight. On the other hand, other factors must be considered including the woman’s age, age-related decline in fertility, and previous treatments she may have already tried. Fortunately, multiple options for ovulation induction exist for women with PCOS. This paper reviews specific ovulation induction options available for women with PCOS, the benefits and efficacy of these options, and the related side effects and risks women can anticipate with the various options that may affect treatment adherence. The paper also reviews the recommended evidence-based strategies for treating PCOS-related infertility that allow for incorporation of the patient’s preference. Finally, it briefly reviews emerging data and ongoing studies regarding newer agents that have shown great promise as first-line agents for the treatment of infertility in women with PCOS.Keywords: polycystic ovary syndrome, anovulation, clomiphene citrate, letrozole, metformin, obesity

  2. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Donate ASRM Store Site Endowment Menu Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and ...

  3. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  4. The spectrum of renal involvement in male patients with infertility related to excretory-system abnormalities: phenotypes, genotypes, and genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieusset, Roger; Fauquet, Isabelle; Chauveau, Dominique; Monteil, Laetitia; Chassaing, Nicolas; Daudin, Myriam; Huart, Antoine; Isus, François; Prouheze, Cathy; Calvas, Patrick; Bieth, Eric; Bujan, Louis; Faguer, Stanislas

    2017-04-01

    While reproductive technologies are increasingly used worldwide, epidemiologic, clinical and genetic data regarding infertile men with combined genital tract and renal abnormalities remain scarce, preventing adequate genetic counseling. In a cohort-based study, we assessed the prevalence (1995-2014) and the clinical characteristics of renal disorders in infertile males with genital tract malformation. In a subset of 34 patients, we performed a detailed phenotype analysis of renal and genital tract disorders. Among the 180 patients with congenital uni- or bilateral absence of vas deferens (CU/BAVD), 45 (25 %) had a renal malformation. We also identified 14 infertile men with combined seminal vesicle (SV) and renal malformation but no CU/BAVD. Among the 34 patients with detailed clinical description, renal disease was unknown before the assessment of the infertility in 27 (79.4 %), and 7 (20.6 %) had chronic renal failure. Four main renal phenotypes were observed: solitary kidney (47 %); autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, 0.6 %); uni- or bilateral hypoplastic kidneys (20.6 %); and a complex renal phenotype associated with a mutation of the HNF1B gene (5.8 %). Absence of SV and azoospermia were significantly associated with the presence of a solitary kidney, while dilatation of SV and necroasthenozoospermia were suggestive of ADPKD. A dominantly inherited renal disease (ADPKD or HNF1B-related nephropathy) is frequent in males with infertility and combined renal and genital tract abnormalities (26 %). A systematic renal screening should be proposed in infertile males with CU/BAVD or SV disorders.

  5. Apoptosis is increased and cell proliferation is decreased in out-of-phase endometria from infertile and recurrent abortion patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irigoyen Marcela

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various endometrial abnormalities have been associated with luteal phase deficiency: a significant dyssynchrony in the maturation of the glandular epithelium and the stroma and a prevalence of out-of-phase endometrial biopsy specimens. Out-of phase endometrium is a controversial disorder related to failed implantation, infertility and early pregnancy loss. Given that the regulation of the apoptotic process in endometrium of luteal phase deficiency is still unknown, the aim of this study was to evaluate cell proliferation, apoptosis and the levels of the main effector caspase, caspase-3 in the luteal in-phase and out-of-phase endometrium. Methods Thirty-seven endometrial samples from sterile or recurrent abortion patients were included in this study: 21 in-phase samples (controls and 16 samples with out-of-phase endometrium. Biopsy specimens of eutopic endometrium were obtained from all subjects during days 21-25 of the menstrual cycle. The endometrium with endometrial maturity of cycle day 25 or less at the time of menstruation was considered out-of phase. Endometrial tissues were fixed in 10% buffered formaldehyde. For apoptosis quantification, sections were processed for in situ immunohistochemical localization of nuclei exhibiting DNA fragmentation, by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT-mediated dUTP digoxygenin nick-end labeling (TUNEL technique. Expressions of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA as a marker of cell proliferation, and of cleaved caspase-3 as a marker of apoptosis, were assessed by immunohistochemistry in the luteal in-phase and out-of-phase endometrium from infertile and recurrent abortion patients. Results Luteal out-of-phase endometrium had increased apoptosis levels compared to in-phase endometrium (p Conclusions this study represents the first report describing variations at the cell proliferation and cell death levels in the out-of-phase endometrium in comparison with in

  6. Characterisation of the bacterial community in expressed prostatic secretions from patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and infertile men: a preliminary investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Sheng Hou; Wen-Min Long; Jian Shen; Li-Ping Zhao; Xiao-Yan Pang; Chen XU

    2012-01-01

    The expressed prostatic secretions (EPSs) of men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS),infertile men and normal men were subjected to microbiological study.EPSs were collected from the subjects,which included 26 normal men,11 infertile patients and 51 CP/CPPS patients.DNA was extracted from each specimen,and the V3 regions of the 16S rRNA genes were amplified using universal bacterial primers.The results showed that the EPS 16S rRNA gene-positive rate in the CP/CPPS and infertile patients was much higher than in the normal men,but without any difference among the three patient groups.The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method was used to characterize the EPS bacterial community structure of the prostate fluid from patients with CP/CPPS or infertility issues.Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) analyses of PCR-DGGE profiles revealed that the EPS bacterial community structure differed among the three groups.Three bands were identified as the key factors responsible for the discrepancy between CP/CPPS patients and infertile patients (P<0.05).Two bands were identified as priority factors in the discrepancy of category ⅢA and category ⅢB prostatitis patients (P<0.05).According to this research,the ecological balance of the prostate and low urethra tract,when considered as a microenvironment,might play an important role in the maintenance of a healthy male reproductive tract.

  7. Bacteriospermia and Sperm Quality in Infertile Male Patient at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ibadin, O. K.; Ibeh, I. N.

    2008-01-01

    Male Urogenital tract infection plays an important role in men infertility. Asymptomtic bacteriospermia has been regarded as of the contributing factor to male infertility. In this study, 87 semen samples of infertile men attending the Human Reproduction Research Programme and Invitrofertilization unit (HRRP/IVF) of University Benin Teaching Hospital were evaluated Bacteriologically using standard Bacterial culture method. Standard semen analysis was performed according to WHO guidelines. Amo...

  8. High Frequency of Chronic Bacterial and Non-Inflammatory Prostatitis in Infertile Patients with Prostatitis Syndrome Plus Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Enzo; La Vignera, Sandro; Arcoria, Domenico; Condorelli, Rosita; Vicari, Lucia O.; Castiglione, Roberto; Mangiameli, Andrea; Calogero, Aldo E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although prostatitis syndrome (PS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common disorders, information on the prevalence of IBS in infertile patients with PS is relatively scanty. Therefore, this study was undertaken to estimate the frequency of PS and IBS and to evaluate the prevalence of the various diagnostic categories of prostatitis. Methodology/Principal Findings This study enrolled 152 patients with PS, diagnosed by the NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) in an andrological setting, and 204 patients with IBS, diagnosed according to the Rome III diagnostic criteria in a gastroenterological setting. The patients with PS were asked to fulfill the Rome III questionnaire for IBS, whereas patients with IBS were asked to complete the NIH-CPSI. The simultaneous presence of PS and IBS was observed in 30.2% and 31.8% of the patients screened by andrologists and gastroenterologists, respectively. Altogether, 111 patients had PS plus IBS (31.2%). They had a total NIH-CPSI and pain subscale scores significantly higher than patients with PS alone. Gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PS plus IBS were similar to those reported by patients with IBS alone and significantly greater in patients with PS alone. Patients with PS plus IBS had a significantly higher frequency of chronic bacterial prostatitis (category II) and lower of non-inflammatory prostatitis (category IIIB), compared to patients with PS alone. The frequency of inflammatory prostatitis (category IIIA) resulted similar. Conclusions/Significance Prostatitis syndromes and IBS are frequently associated in patients with PS- or IBS-related symptoms. These patients have an increased prevalence of chronic bacterial and non-inflammatory prostatitis. PMID:21494624

  9. High frequency of chronic bacterial and non-inflammatory prostatitis in infertile patients with prostatitis syndrome plus irritable bowel syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Vicari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although prostatitis syndrome (PS and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS are common disorders, information on the prevalence of IBS in infertile patients with PS is relatively scanty. Therefore, this study was undertaken to estimate the frequency of PS and IBS and to evaluate the prevalence of the various diagnostic categories of prostatitis.This study enrolled 152 patients with PS, diagnosed by the NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI in an andrological setting, and 204 patients with IBS, diagnosed according to the Rome III diagnostic criteria in a gastroenterological setting. The patients with PS were asked to fulfill the Rome III questionnaire for IBS, whereas patients with IBS were asked to complete the NIH-CPSI. The simultaneous presence of PS and IBS was observed in 30.2% and 31.8% of the patients screened by andrologists and gastroenterologists, respectively. Altogether, 111 patients had PS plus IBS (31.2%. They had a total NIH-CPSI and pain subscale scores significantly higher than patients with PS alone. Gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PS plus IBS were similar to those reported by patients with IBS alone and significantly greater in patients with PS alone. Patients with PS plus IBS had a significantly higher frequency of chronic bacterial prostatitis (category II and lower of non-inflammatory prostatitis (category IIIB, compared to patients with PS alone. The frequency of inflammatory prostatitis (category IIIA resulted similar.Prostatitis syndromes and IBS are frequently associated in patients with PS- or IBS-related symptoms. These patients have an increased prevalence of chronic bacterial and non-inflammatory prostatitis.

  10. Male infertility and its causes in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Tsujimura, Akira; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Namiki, Mikio; Sengoku, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings.

  11. Male Infertility and Its Causes in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Miyamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings.

  12. Diminished Frequency of Menstrual and Peripheral Blood NKT-Like Cells in Patients With Unexplained Recurrent Spontaneous Abortion and Infertile Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Samira; Shokri, Fazel; Pour, Soheila Ansari; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2018-01-01

    Systemic monitoring of immune system may not precisely outline the local immune status in the uterus. This survey is a continuation of our previous studies on potential usefulness of menstrual blood (MB) immunophenotyping as a tool for investigation of immunological disturbances in pregnancy-related disorders. Peripheral blood (PB) and MB from healthy fertile (n = 15), unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (URSA; n = 15), and unexplained infertile women (n = 8) were collected simultaneously in the second day of their menstrual cycle and frequency of natural killer T (NKT)-like cell subpopulations were assessed by flow cytometry. Menstrual blood of all experimental groups contained higher percentage of TCRαβ + , CD45RO + , and CD16 - NKT-like cells compared to corresponding PB. Frequency of MB NKT-like cells in unexplained infertile participants was lower than fertile and URSA groups. Compared to normal participants, patients with URSA had lower frequency of PB TCRαβ + and higher CD16 + , while in infertile woman frequencies of PB CD45RO + , CD45RO - , CD16 - , IL17 + , and MB CD45RO + NKT-like cells were lower. Although, PB and MB seemingly have the same histological nature, our results showed that MB contained different composition of NKT-like subsets with different cytokine profiles and could be viewed as one potential biological sample for evaluation of patients with infertility and URSA.

  13. Low Birth Weight Is Associated with a Decreased Overall Adult Health Status and Reproductive Capability - Results of a Cross-Sectional Study in Primary Infertile Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Boeri

    Full Text Available Individuals born with low birth weight (LBW risk cardiometabolic complications later in life. However the impact of LBW on general health status and male reproductive function has been scantly analysed. We investigated the clinical and seminal impact of different birth weights (BW in white-European men presenting for primary couple's infertility. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from 827 primary infertile men were compared with those of 373 consecutive fertile men. Patients with BW ≤2500, 2500-4200, and ≥4200gr were classified as having LBW, normal (NBW, and high BW (HBW, respectively. Health-significant comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI. Testicular volume was assessed with a Prader orchidometer. Semen analysis values were assessed based on 2010 WHO reference criteria. Descriptive statistics and regression models tested associations between semen parameters, clinical characteristics and BW categories. LBW, NBW and HBW were found in 71 (8.6%, 651 (78.7% and 105 (12.7% infertile men, respectively. LBW was more frequent in infertile patients than fertile men (p = 0.002. Infertile patients with LBW had a higher rate of comorbidities (p = 0.003, lower mean testicular volume (p = 0.007, higher FSH (p = 0.02 and lower tT levels (p = 0.04 compared to other BW groups. Higher rates of asthenozoospermia (p = 0.02 and teratozoospermia (p = 0.03 were also found in LBW men. At logistic regression models, LBW was univariably associated with pathologic progressive motility (p≤0.02 and pathologic sperm morphology (p<0.005. At multivariable logistic regression analysis, LBW achieved independent predictor status for both lower sperm motility and pathologic sperm morphology (all p≤0.04. Only LBW independently predicted higher CCI values (p<0.001. In conclusion, we found that LBW was more frequent in infertile than in fertile men. Infertile individuals with LBW showed a higher rate of comorbidities and significantly

  14. Diagnostic Testing for Female Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  15. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC HYSTEROLAPAROSCOPY IN EVALUATION OF FEMALE INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM To evaluate the role of hysterolaparoscopy in female infertility. SETTINGS AND DESIGN Patients with female infertility presenting to outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Kempegowda Institute of Medical sciences, Bengaluru were evaluated for infertility by hysterolaparoscopy and chromopertubation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy consenting subjects excluding male factor infertility with normal hormonal profile and no contraindication to laparoscopy underwent ultra-sonography. Then all patients were subjected to combined hysterolaparoscopy including chromopertubation and the results were recorded. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED T-test. RESULTS We studied 70 patients comprising of 40(57.1% cases of primary infertility and 30(42.9% patients of secondary infertility. In our study most commonly found pathologies were PCOD, endometriosis and tubal blockage. CONCLUSIONS Results show that hysterolaparoscopy has a promising role in diagnosing and treating infertility. hysterolaparoscopy has emerged as a new hope for infertile couples before they proceed to time-consuming and expensive assisted reproduction techniques.

  16. Immunologic mechanism at infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Aydın, İlknur; Erci, Behice

    2006-01-01

    Infertility has been serious problem for couples that want to have a child. It is estimated that %10-15 of marriages are involuntary childless; that is, there is the serious problem of infertility. In more than 40% of infertility couples that is the reason of their infertility was unknown. In those couples, probably immunological factors were found to be responsible for the infertility. In the article, it was aimed to review the immunologic causes of male and female infertility in the light o...

  17. Patient predictors for outcome of gonadotrophin ovulation induction in women with normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertility: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S.E. Laven (Joop); M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); E.G. Hughes; B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); A.G.M.G.J. Mulders (Annemarie)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA systematic review was conducted to determine whether initial screening characteristics of women with normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertility predict clinically significant outcomes of ovulation induction with gonadotrophins, and to obtain pooled estimates of their

  18. Experiencing Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmée Hanna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the qualitative research literature that exists in relation to men’s experiences of male infertility. Since men have often been marginalized in the realm of reproduction, including academic research on infertility, it is important to focus on any qualitative research that gives voices to male perspectives and concerns. Given the distress documented by studies of infertile women, we focus in particular on the emotive responses and lived experiences of men in relation to infertility. In this article then, we present an analysis of the core themes across 19 qualitative articles, which include “infertility as crisis”; “emoting infertility- men as “being strong”’ “infertility as a source of stigma”; and the “desire for fatherhood.” In light of these insights, we identify key areas for future research and development including men’s emotional responses to infertility, how men seek support for infertility, the intersection between masculinity and infertility, the relationship between the desire to father and infertility, and the outcomes of infertility for men in terms of other aspects of their lives. We suggest that such research would facilitate making the experiences of men more central within our understandings of infertility within a field that has primarily been female focused.

  19. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among patients attending infertility and sexually transmitted diseases clinic (STD) in Kano, North Western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, E O; Sadiq, Magaji N

    2014-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the world with severe complications. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and possible risk factors of C. trachomatis in Kano. There is dearth of information on this subject in this locality. Urine samples, Endocervical swabs and Urethral swab were collected from consecutive patients attending the Infertility and STD clinics in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH) between June and December 2012, after administering a questionnaire by the attending physician and also obtaining an informed consent.Samples were analyzed using Diaspot Chlamydia kit, a rapid immunoassay test for the detection of genital chlamydial antigen in urinogenital samples. A total of 125 consecutive samples were collected, comprising 69 females and 56 males aged between 14 - 55 years. Twelve samples tested positive for C. trachomatis antigen giving a prevalence rate of 9.6%. The age group prevalence were as follows 25 - 29 yrs (17.1%), 20 - 24 (16.7%), 15 - 19 (12.5%), 30 - 34 (11.1%) and > 49 years (9.0%). Married patients were associated with higher infection rate than single (8.3%), and divorced patients (33.3%). A higher percentage of the patients (95.2%) were not aware of the existence of C. trachomatis infection and its complications. Previous STD exposure was associated with increased risk of Chlamydia infection. C. trachomatis infection if unchecked will continue to pose a threat to reproductive life with its established complications. Since asymptomatic cases are common in the population regular screening should be encouraged for every adult especially before commencement of marital life.

  20. Two cases of Robertsonian translocations in oligozoospermic males and their consequences for pregnancies induced by intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. In't Veld (Peter); R.F.A. Weber (Rob); F.J. Los; N.S. den Hollander (Nicolette); M. Dhont; M.H.E.C. Pieters (Math H. E.); J.O.V. Hemel (Jan O. Van)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractTwo case histories are presented documenting structural chromosome abnormalities in infertile males. The abnormalities were detected only after application of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was repeatedly unsuccessful or resulted in an abnormal pregnancy. A mosaic Robertsonian

  1. Two cases of Robertsonian translocations in oligozoospermic males and their consequences for pregnancies induced by intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.F.A. Weber (Robert); F.J. Los; N.S. den Hollander (Nicolette); M. Dhont; M.H. Pieters; J.O. van Hemel; P.A. in 't Veld

    1997-01-01

    textabstractTwo case histories are presented documenting structural chromosome abnormalities in infertile males. The abnormalities were detected only after application of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was repeatedly unsuccessful or resulted in an abnormal

  2. Infertility and Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infertility. Although there may be some overlap, the causes of pregnancy loss, recurrent pregnancy loss, and stillbirth are often different from the causes of infertility. Citations Open Citations Practice Committee of ...

  3. Primary infertility (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  4. Aetiological Factors in Female Infertility: The ABSUTH Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the prevalence of infertility in a traditional Ibo society using Abia State University Teaching Hospital Aba as a case study and to identify the common causes of female infertility in Aba, a retrospective study of patient investigated and treated for infertility from 1st January to 31st December 1996 was done. A total ...

  5. Patients' attitudes to medical and psychosocial aspects of care in fertility clinics: Findings from the Copenhagen Multi-centre Psychosocial Infertility (COMPI) Research Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J

    2003-01-01

    among infertile people. METHODS: We conducted an epidemiological study based on questionnaires among all new couples attending five fertility clinics with a response rate of 80.0% and a total of 2250 patients. RESULTS: The vast majority of both men and women considered a high level of medical......BACKGROUND: The aims were (i) to identify gender differences in motivations to seek assisted reproduction and gender differences in expectations about medical and psychosocial services and (ii) to examine factors that predict the perceived importance of, and intention to use, psychosocial services...... services for both men and women was high infertility-related stress in the marital, personal and social domain. CONCLUSIONS: A supportive attitude from medical staff and the provision of both medical and psychosocial information and support should be integral aspects of medical care in fertility clinics...

  6. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

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    Andrea Brazdova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility.

  7. Uterine adenomyosis in infertile patients: MR imaging findings and clinical conclusions; MRT der uterinen Adenomyose bei infertilen Patientinnen: Ergebnisse und klinische Rueckschluesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangos, S.; Eichler, K.; Herzog, C.; Marquardt, F.; Peters, J.; Jacobi, V.; Mack, M.G.; Vogl, T.J. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, J.W. Goethe-Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Kissler, S.; Mueller, A.; Siebzehnruebl, E.; Kaufmann, M. [Klinik fuer Gynaekologie und Geburtshilfe, J. W. Goethe-Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Hamscho, N.; Gruenwald, F. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, J. W. Goethe-Univ. Frankfurt (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the uterus and the pelvis in infertile female with symptomatic endometriosis for the assessment of uterine morphology and function. Materials and Methods: Forty-one infertile women (mean age: 33.2 years) with symptomatic endometriosis documented by laparoscopy were evaluated with highfield MRI (Sonata, Siemens) using T2- and T1-weighted sequences. In addition, the patients underwent hysterosalpingoscintigraphy (HSSG) for evaluation of the uterotubal transport capacity. Pathologic findings of the uterine junction zone were correlated with the laparoscopic results, clinical symptoms and uterotubal transport capacity. Results: Adenomyosis was diagnosed on T2-weighted MR-images in 35 (85.4%) patients (focal adenomatosis in 26 patients and diffuse adenomatosis in 9). Patients showing signs of adenomyosis tended to be older than patients without adenomyosis (mean age 34.1 years vs. 30.1 years) and showed a longer history of symptomatic endometriosis. A positive transport capacity in HSSG was observed in 73.1% (19/26) of the patients with focal adenomyosis and only 22.2% (2/9) of patients with diffuse adenomyosis. In 83.3% (5/6) of the patients without signs of adenomyosis, a positive uterotubal transport was documented. Conclusion: MRI of the uterus is a helpful diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of adenomyosis and for planning further therapies. Patients with the diagnosis of adenomyosis showed a reduced uterotubal transport capacity that depended on the severity of adenomyotic changes and might be a possible cause of infertility. (orig.)

  8. Predictors of patients remaining anovulatory during clomiphene citrate induction of ovulation in normogonadotropic oligoamenorrheic infertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Imani (Babak); M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); E.R. te Velde (Egbert); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe diagnostic criteria used to identify patients suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome remain controversial. The present prospective longitudinal follow-up study was designed to identify whether certain criteria assessed during standardized initial

  9. A comparison of heterosexual and LGBTQ cancer survivors' outlooks on relationships, family building, possible infertility, and patient-doctor fertility risk communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Russell, Andrea; Galvin, Kathleen M; Harper, Maya M; Clayman, Marla L

    2016-10-01

    Little research about cancer-related infertility has examined the experiences and needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) cancer survivors. This research seeks to understand how LGBTQ survivors are similar to or different from heterosexual survivors with respect to cancer treatments' effects on relationships, plans for parenthood, and fertility preservation decision making. Semi-structured telephone interviews conducted with adolescent or young adult (AYA) cancer survivors (n = 56) were coded for themes. Interviews consisted of questions about pre- and post-diagnosis thoughts about relationships, parenthood, possible infertility, and how information about fertility risks was received. While LGBTQ (n = 22) and heterosexual (n = 34) survivors reported similar challenges when dating post-diagnosis, heterosexual survivors were more likely to report fertility concerns as affecting romantic relationships (p LGBTQ survivors seemed more open to raising non-biological children or not becoming a parent than heterosexual survivors. LGBTQ survivors generally reported being satisfied with or indifferent to the information that they were given regarding fertility loss, despite reporting receiving similar amounts of information as compared to heterosexual patients (p LGBTQ patients' views on relationships, parenthood, and family building seemed to result in less distress when faced with infertility. However, interventions facilitating information exchange about dating, fertility risks, and family building options may be valuable to LGBTQ and heterosexual cancer survivors. LGBTQ cancer survivors may display more adaptive coping with respect to relationships and fertility loss. Oncology professionals may want to proactively introduce positive coping strategies to reduce distress among AYA cancer survivors at risk for infertility.

  10. Bacteriospermia and Sperm Quality in Infertile Male Patient at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibadin, O. K.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Male Urogenital tract infection plays an important role in men infertility. Asymptomtic bacteriospermia has been regarded as of the contributing factor to male infertility. In this study, 87 semen samples of infertile men attending the Human Reproduction Research Programme and Invitrofertilization unit (HRRP/IVF of University Benin Teaching Hospital were evaluated Bacteriologically using standard Bacterial culture method. Standard semen analysis was performed according to WHO guidelines. Among the total cases, 36 (41.4% showed at least one pathogen. Staphylococcus aureus (16.1%, Staphylococcus Saprophyticus (9.1%, Escherichia Coli (6.9% Proteus mirabilis (3.4% Klebsiella spp (2.3% Pseudomonas aerouginosa (1.1% and Proteus vulgaris (2.3%. There was a significant relation between bacteriospermia and the rate of number of total motility and morphologically abnormal sperms (p 0.05. It seems that leukocytopermia is not a good maker to predict bacteriospermia.

  11. Exploration of Infertile Couples’ Support Requirements: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to high prevalence of infertility, increasing demand for infertility treatment, and provision of high quality of fertility care, it is necessary for healthcare professionals to explore infertile couples’ expectations and needs. Identification of these needs can be a prerequisite to plan the effective supportive interventions. The current study was, therefore, conducted in an attempt to explore and to understand infertile couples’ experiences and needs. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative study based on a content analysis approach. The participants included 26 infertile couples (17 men and 26 women and 7 members of medical personnel (3 gynecologists and 4 midwives as the key informants. The infertile couples were selected from patients attending public and private infertility treatment centers and private offices of infertility specialists in Isfahan and Rasht, Iran, during 2012-2013. They were selected through purposive sampling method with maximum variation. In-depth unstructured interviews and field notes were used for data gathering among infertile couples. The data from medical personnel was collected through semi-structured interviews. The interview data were analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: Data analysis revealed four main categories of infertile couples’ needs, including: i. Infertility and social support, ii. Infertility and financial support, iii. Infertility and spiritual support and iv. Infertility and informational support. The main theme of all these categories was assistance and support. Conclusion: The study showed that in addition to treatment and medical needs, infertile couples encounter various challenges in different emotional, psychosocial, communicative, cognitive, spiritual, and economic aspects that can affect various areas of their life and lead to new concerns, problems, and demands. Thus, addressing infertile couples’ needs and expectations alongside their

  12. Quality indicators for all dimensions of infertility care quality: consensus between professionals and patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dancet, E.A.; D'Hooghe, T.M.; Spiessens, C.; Sermeus, W.; Neubourg, D. De; Karel, N.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the relative importance of the six dimensions of quality of care according to different stakeholders and can a quality indicator set address all six quality dimensions and incorporate the views from professionals working in different disciplines and from patients? SUMMARY

  13. General aspects of fertility and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damario, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Fertility rates have been declining in most Western nations over the past several decades, although it is not entirely clear if an increased rate of infertility substantially contributes to this. As compared to other species, the reproductive efficiency of humans is relatively low. Factors related to fertility include age, exposure to sexually transmitted diseases, frequency of intercourse, coital timing, as well as diet and lifestyle habits. Infertility is considered a disease due to its major disruption of major organ systems and life functions. An infertility evaluation is recommended after 12 months or more of regular, unprotected intercourse and may be considered after 6 months for those female patients over the age of 35 or with other known abnormalities. A proper infertility evaluation is a comprehensive examination of possibly identifiable infertility factors of both female and male partners, lending itself to the most appropriate and potentially effective treatment.

  14. Interventional prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in infertility patients with polycystic ovaries syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Weixiang; Chen Zhiyi; Yuan Wenlin; Chen Xia; Cai Kuan; Wang Weiqun; Zhu Junlin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of aspiration of small follicles(ASF) guided by trans-vaginal ultra- sound (TVS) in preventing moderate and severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) in women with polycystic ovaries syndrome (PCOS). Methods: ASF was undertaken by trans-vaginally during artificial cycles in 25 women with PCOS who had early signs of OHSS during the early period of the cycle according to the ovaries and follicles detected by TVS. Small follicles(≤ 12 mm in diameter) were aspirated at the early period of gonadotropin therapy according to the follicle testing, three or less excellent follicles were reserve. All the patients were followed up for symptoms and signs of OHSS. Results: None of the patients developed moderate or severe OHSS. Successful intrauterine pregnancy were found in 7 cases (28%). Conclusion: ASF after gonadotropin injections is of significance to prevent moderate and severe OHSS and obtain a higher pregnancy rate in susceptible patients with PCOS during the early period of the cycles. Time of ASF is the main factor to prevent OHSS. TVS may be an important tool in the detection of early period of follicles development. (authors)

  15. Psychosocial Consequences of Infertility on Infertile Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, P; Rahman, D; Hossain, H B; Hossain, H N; Mughi, C R

    2015-10-01

    This study explores to find out the qualitative and quantitative psychosocial consequences of infertility in women coming for infertility treatment in tertiary infertility center. A total of 400 infertile couples who agreed to participate in the study were asked to fill up the questionnaires and later interviewed to access the psychosocial consequences of infertility on their personal life in a tertiary infertility clinic in Dhaka at Center for Assisted Reproduction (CARe Hospital), Dhaka from June 2011 to December 2011 and agreed to participate in the study were included in the study. The data was analyzed and the quantitative and qualitative psychosocial factors were evaluated. Four hundred infertile couple who filled the questionnaires was included in the study. Sixty three percent of the women belonged to age group >20 30 years at the time of interview. Regarding age at marriage 43.8% of the women were married by 20 years, 51.3% were married between 20 30 years. Mean±SD duration of present married life was 7.20±4.45 (range 1 to 28) years and 74.4% of the women were living with their husbands. Of them 75.5% women were housewife. When asked whether they knew what was the reason of infertility in the couple, 32.5% knew the cause was in the female partner, 14.5%, knew the cause was in the male partner, 10.3% knew the cause was in both partners, 21.5% knew cause of infertility was not in any of the partners, and 21.3% had no idea about the cause of infertility. The male partner's response about the issue of prognosis and outcome of couple's infertility revealed 37.3% believed their wives will conceive someday, 31.3% had no intention for a second marriage, 13% were indifferent, 11.3% blamed their wives for infertility and 4.8% threatened for a second marriage. Only 2.5% of the male partners were suggested on consulting and continuing treatment by specialist. The family pressure by in-laws and relatives towards their infertility was that 57.3% insisted on consulting

  16. Testicular cancer and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduch, Darius A

    2006-11-01

    Testicular cancer and infertility affect a similar age group of patients and have common biologic, epidemiologic, and environmental backgrounds. In this review, we provide current literature on links between infertility and testicular cancer, and new developments in the management of testicular cancer aimed at improving quality of life in men with testicular cancer. In-utero environmental exposure to endocrine disruptors modulates the genetically determined fate of primitive gonad and results in testicular dysgenesis syndrome, which may result in infertility and testicular cancer. Excellent response of testicular cancer to radiation and chemotherapy results in over 90% of survival and quality of life--fertility and sexual function--is of significant concern to patients and clinicians. The testicular-sparing management of testicular masses emerges as a sound alternative to radical orchiectomy and allows for preservation of spermatogenesis and hormonal function, and at the same time achieving similar survival rates. Secondary malignancies, pulmonary, and cardiovascular complications are recognized as late complications of treatment for testicular cancer. Better understanding of common mechanisms involved in infertility and testicular cancer, and scientifically driven evidence-based treatment options should improve quality of life in young men faced with this potentially life-threatening disease.

  17. [Changes of serum TOS and TAS levels and their association with apolipoprotein(a) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, An-Su; Zhong, Ying; Mao, Xi-Guang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate changes of serum total oxidation status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) and their association with apolipoprotein (a) [Apo(a)] in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) combined with infertility. Ninety patients with PCOS and infertility were selected as the study group, including 45 patients treated with antioxidants combined with Diane-35(group A) and 45 with Diane-35 therapy only (group B), with 45 healthy volunteers with normal menstruation and normal dual phase basic body temperatures as the control group. Serum TOS of the participants was determined by dual xylenol orange method, and serum TAS was determined with ABTS method; plasma Apo(a) level was determined by dual wavelength immune transmission turbidity method. Before treatment, serum TOS, OSI, and Apo(a) levels were significantly higher and TAS level was significantly lower in the study group than in the control group (P<0.05). Serum TOS, OSI, and Apo (a) were significantly lowered and TAS was significantly increased in group A after the therapy as compared with the levels before therapy and the levels in group B. The rate of natural recovery of menstruation was significantly higher and the incidence of cardiovascular disease was significantly lower in group A than in group B (P<0.05). Pearson correlation analysis showed that serum TOS and OSI were positively correlated with plasma Apo(a) (r=0.524 and 0.531, P<0.05), and serum TAS was negatively correlated with plasma Apo(a) (r=-0.519, P<0.05). Antioxidant therapy can lower TOS, OSI and Apo(a) levels and increase TAS level to lessen oxidative stress, improve the prognosis, and reduce the risks of cardiovascular disease in patients with PCOS and infertility.

  18. Influence of promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis combined with laparoscopy on serum MCP-1, RANTES, oxidative stress and hormones in infertile patients with endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Sha Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the influence of promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis combined with laparoscopy on serum MCP-1, RANTES, oxidative stress and hormones in infertile patients with endometriosis. Methods: A total of 60 infertile patients with endometriosis were randomly divided into observation group (30 cases and control group (30 cases. Observation group: promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis combined with laparoscopy; control group: patients were treated only by laparoscopy. Recording and comparing the levels of MCP-1, RANTES, oxidative stress and hormones before and after treatment. Results: (1 Before treatment, there was no statistically significant difference in the serum MCP-1, RANTES, AOPP, MDA, SOD, levels between the two groups. After treatment, compared with the same group before treatment, the serum RANTES, AOPP, MDA levels of the two groups were significantly lower, the serum SOD level of the two groups were significantly higher, and those levels of observation group were significantly better than the control group, there was significant difference between the two groups. (2 Before treatment, there was no statistically significant difference in the serum FSH, LH, E2, P, PRL levels between the two groups. After treatment, compared with the same group before treatment, the serum FSH, LH, P, PRL levels of the two groups were significantly higher, the serum E2 level of the two groups were significantly lower, and those levels of observation group were significantly better than the control group, there was significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis combined with laparoscopy for infertile patients with endometriosis can reduce the levels of serum MCP-1, RANTES, oxidative stress, hormones and be beneficial to protect their uterine function.

  19. Out-of-pocket fertility patient expense: data from a multicenter prospective infertility cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Alex K; Odisho, Anobel Y; Washington, Samuel L; Katz, Patricia P; Smith, James F

    2014-02-01

    The high costs of fertility care may deter couples from seeking care. Urologists often are asked about the costs of these treatments. To our knowledge previous studies have not addressed the direct out-of-pocket costs to couples. We characterized these expenses in patients seeking fertility care. Couples were prospectively recruited from 8 community and academic reproductive endocrinology clinics. Each participating couple completed face-to-face or telephone interviews and cost diaries at study enrollment, and 4, 10 and 18 months of care. We determined overall out-of-pocket costs, in addition to relationships between out-of-pocket costs and treatment type, clinical outcomes and socioeconomic characteristics on multivariate linear regression analysis. A total of 332 couples completed cost diaries and had data available on treatment and outcomes. Average age was 36.8 and 35.6 years in men and women, respectively. Of this cohort 19% received noncycle based therapy, 4% used ovulation induction medication only, 22% underwent intrauterine insemination and 55% underwent in vitro fertilization. The median overall out-of-pocket expense was $5,338 (IQR 1,197-19,840). Couples using medication only had the lowest median out-of-pocket expenses at $912 while those using in vitro fertilization had the highest at $19,234. After multivariate adjustment the out-of-pocket expense was not significantly associated with successful pregnancy. On multivariate analysis couples treated with in vitro fertilization spent an average of $15,435 more than those treated with intrauterine insemination. Couples spent about $6,955 for each additional in vitro fertilization cycle. These data provide real-world estimates of out-of-pocket costs, which can be used to help couples plan for expenses that they may incur with treatment. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sexual dysfunction in infertile couples: evaluation and treatment of infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayar, U.; Arikan, I.I.; Barut, A.; Harma, M.; Harma, M.; Atasoy, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic and the predictive value of Arizona Sexual Experience Scale among primary infertile couples regarding sexual dysfunction. Methods: The cross-sectional and prospective pre, post study comprising primary infertile patients was carried out at Bulent Ecevit University Hospital, Zonguldak, Turkey. Fifty consecutive primary infertile couples not treated previously were investigated between 2003 and 2007 for the presence of sexual dysfunction by a psychiatrist. Arizona Sexual Experience Scale scoring was self-administered to determine sexual dysfunction among couples before treatment and also 3 months after the initiation of the treatment. Results: Pretreatment mean values of the index parametres in both women and men were significantly increased after treatment. Statistically significant positive correlation was observed between pre- and post-treatment total scores in both women (r=0.83; p 14 (Sensitivity: 57%; Specificity: 90%) and >13 (Sensitivity: 83%; Specificity: 93%), respectively. Pre- and post-treatment scores in men were >10 (Sensitivity: 65%; Specificity: 61%), >11 (Sensitivity: 83%; Specificity: 62%), respectively. Binary logistic regression analyses revealed women's pre-treatment and post-treatment scores as a significant factor for prediction of sexual dysfunction independent of sociodemographic factors (p=0.001 and p=0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Evaluation and treatment of infertility is an important risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Pre- and post-treatment Arizona Sexual Experience Scale score could be used as a screening test for sexual dysfunction and might be used to decide pre/post-treatment consultation of couples with a specialist. (author)

  1. Prostatitis and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahrani, Saad; McGill, John; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-11-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction. Inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis) is a common health problem affecting many young and middle aged men. Prostatitis is considered a correctable cause of male infertility, but the pathophysiology and appropriate treatment options of prostatitis in male infertility remain unclear. This literature review will focus on current data regarding prostatitis and its impact on male infertility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RESOURCES Overview Infographic Gallery Educational Videos State Infertility Insurance Laws Protect Your Fertility Campaign Find a Health Professional ABOUT ASRM Vision of ASRM ASRM's Mission ...

  3. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

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  4. Male infertility, azoozpermia and cryptozoospermia incidence among three infertility clinics in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, İlknur; Kutlu, Pelin; Delikara, Nuri; Atvar, Özhan; Öztürk, Metin İ.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Semen parameters are directly correlated with the infertility of the male. Incidence rates of male factor infertility, azoospermia and cryptozoospermia differ according to many factors such as geographic region, age, occupation and body weight. The aim of the present study is to determine the incidence of male factor infertility, azoospermia and cryptozoospermia among patients who have been admitted to three separate infertility clinics in Turkey for infertility investigation and analyze the outcomes of these patients. Material and methods A total of 9733 men, who have been admitted to 3 infertility clinics in Turkey due to infertility between March 2011 and October 2016, were included in the study. Male infertility, azoozpermia and cryptozoospermia incidence were calculated according to WHO criteria. Results Male factor infertility was determined in 3114 (32%) of the patients including cases with azoospermia and cryptozoospermia. Azoospermia cases were observed in 570 (5.85%) and cryptozoospermia in 850 (8.73%) men. Azoospermic, and cryptozoospermic patients constitute 18.3%, and 27.2% of the male infertility cases. Sperm retrieval rates in diagnostic or oocyte pick-up plus testicular sperm extraction groups were found to be comparable (16.39%, and 41.3%, respectively). Conclusion The data obtained may help to estimate the number of in vitro fertilization cycles and testicular sperm extraction cases, to determine social security policies, and reproductive potential, and in the light of these data to establish social insurance policies. These data will help patients to decide on treatment alternatives, and guide the urologists about the issue. PMID:29511578

  5. Frequency of endometrial tuberculosis in female infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, A.; Zaman, G.; Sultana, N.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of endometrial tuberculosis in infertility patients. Design: an observational analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital Rawalpindi and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi from August 1998 to April 1999. Subjects and Methods: Endometrial biopsies were taken from 50 cases of infertility and subjected to culture on BACTEC 460 TB instrument. Results: Tuberculous endometritis was found in 10 % (n=5) of cases. Conclusion: It was concluded that endometrial tuberculosis is not an infrequent cause of infertility in our setup. (author)

  6. [Benefits of nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic to self-cycle-management and self-efficiency of infertility patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Chao-Feng; Guo, Mei

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the benefits of nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic to self-cycle-management and self-efficiency of the outpatients with infertility. We randomly divided 600 females preliminarily diagnosed with infertility into a control and an experimental group, 288 in the former and 285 in the latter group excluding those whose husbands had azoospermia. For the women patients of the experimental group, we conducted nursing care intervention concerning related knowledge, skills, diet, excise, medication, and psychology, by one-to-one consultation, individualized or group communication, establishing files, telephone follow-up, and wechat guidance. After 3 months of intervention, we compared the compliance of medical visits, effectiveness of cycle management, sense of self-efficiency, satisfaction, and anxiety score between the two groups of patients. In comparison with the controls, the patients of the experimental group showed significantly better knowledge about assisted reproduction and higher effectiveness of self-cycle-management, self-efficiency, and satisfaction (P <0.05), but a markedly lower degree of anxiety (P <0.05). Nursing care service in the assisted reproduction clinic can improve the compliance of medical visits, effectiveness of self-cycle-management, self-efficiency, and satisfaction and reduce the anxiety of the patients.

  7. Aspects pertinent to the usefulness of a solid phase radio-immuno-sorbent assay for the detection of spermatozoa antibodies in sera of infertility patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinrichs-Reiche, I.

    1987-01-01

    The solid phase Radio-Immuno-Sorbent Assay (RISA) is a highly sensitive and valid test to detect 125-iodinetagged antibodies to spermatozoa that allows qualitative and quantitative evaluations of sperm-incapacitating immunglobulin Ig G in sera from patients believed to be infertile for immunological reasons. The study failed to reveal any correlations between the results of RISA and those of micro-sperm-agglutination or micro-sperm-immobilisation tests. There was a major body of evidence pointing to possible links between female isoimmunity and male autoimmunity. (TRV) [de

  8. Structured exercise training programme versus hypocaloric hyperproteic diet in obese polycystic ovary syndrome patients with anovulatory infertility: a 24-week pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, S; Giallauria, F; Falbo, A; Russo, T; Oppedisano, R; Tolino, A; Colao, A; Vigorito, C; Zullo, F; Orio, F

    2008-03-01

    Lifestyle modifications are successfully employed to treat obese and overweight women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The aims of the current pilot study were (i) to compare the efficacy on reproductive functions of a structured exercise training (SET) programme with a diet programme in obese PCOS patients and (ii) to study their clinical, hormonal and metabolic effects to elucidate potentially different mechanisms of action. Forty obese PCOS patients with anovulatory infertility underwent a SET programme (SET group, n = 20) and a hypocaloric hyperproteic diet (diet group, n = 20). Clinical, hormonal and metabolic data were assessed at baseline, and at 12- and 24-week follow-ups. Primary endpoint was cumulative pregnancy rate. The two groups had similar demographic, anthropometric and biochemical parameters. After intervention, a significant improvement in menstrual cycles and fertility was noted in both groups, with no differences between groups. The frequency of menses and the ovulation rate were significantly (P diet group but the increased cumulative pregnancy rate was not significant. Body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, insulin resistance indexes and serum levels of sex hormone-binding globulin, androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate changed significantly (P diet interventions improve fertility in obese PCOS patients with anovulatory infertility. We hypothesize that in both interventions an improvement in insulin sensitivity is the pivotal factor involved in the restoration of ovarian function but potentially acting through different mechanisms.

  9. Varicocele and male infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Fuglesang S.; Østergren, Peter; Dupree, James M.

    2017-01-01

    The link between varicoceles and male infertility has been a matter of debate for more than half a century. Varicocele is considered the most common correctable cause of male infertility, but some men with varicoceles are able to father children, even without intervention. In addition, improvements...... if the male partner has a clinically palpable varicocele and affected semen parameters....

  10. Características gerais dos espermatozóides em homens varicocele clínica General characteristics of the spermatozoa in oligozoospermic men with and without clinical varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.T. Andrade-Rocha

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Pacientes com oligozoospermia apresentam uma redução na qualidade do sêmen, independente da etiologia do distúrbio. OBJETIVO. Investigar o papel da varicocele na redução da qualidade do sêmen, em homens oligozoospérmicos. MÉTODOS. Foram estudados dez pacientes portadores de varicocele clínica esquerda (PCV e 21 pacientes não-portadores desta entidade (PSV, atendidos em um laboratório privado, em Petrópolis, RJ. Foram analisados os seguintes parâmetros seminais: contagem de espermatozóides, vitalidade, motilidade e morfologia espermática. PCV e PSV foram comparados entre si e com um grupo-controle (n=15 de pacientes sem varicocele clínica e com espermograma normal. RESULTADOS. PCV e PSV apresentaram uma redução significativa na vitalidade (43,9% e 34,9% versus 73,0% no grupo-controle, nos graus (a (5,3% e 2,4% versus 32,4 % e (d (76,7% e 83,8% versus 44,9% de progressão espermática e nos percentuais de espermatozóides ovais (25,5% e 22,9% versus 61,2%, amorfos (25,4% e 23,8% versus 12,5% e outras anomalias (23,8% e 30,5% versus 13,0%. PCV ainda apresentou diferença significativa no percentual de espermatozóides fusiformes (10,9% versus 1,3% e PSV no grau (b de progressão espermática (11,0% versus 22,0%, em relação ao grupo-controle. Entre PCV e PSV, não foram encontradas diferenças significativas. CONCLUSÃO. A varicocele reduz a qualidade de semens oligozoospérmicos, mas esta redução também ocorre em oligozoospermias de outras etiologias.Patients with oligozoospermia show a reduction in the semen quality, independent of the etiology of the disturbance. PURPOSE - To investigate the role of the varicocele in the decrease of the semen quality in oligozoospermic men. METHODS - Ten patients with left clinical varicocele (termed PCV and 21 patients without this entity (termed PSV attended in a private laboratory from Petrópolis, RJ, were investigated. Sperm count, vitality, motility, and morphology of spermatozoa

  11. Kisspeptin, unexplained infertility and embryo implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaida Mumtaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Kisspeptin (KP is a neuropeptide that causes the release of the gonadotropin releasing hormone, which controls hypothalamo pituitary ovarian axis and exerts a number of peripheral effects on reproductive organs. The primary objective of this study was to compare baseline KP levels in females with different types of infertility and identify possible correlations with risk of failure to conceive, preclinical abortion and pregnancy after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Materials and Methods A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from August 2014 until May 2015 by recruiting 124 female patients undergoing ICSI, after obtaining ethical approval from the Australian Concept Infertility Medical Center. Cause of infertility due to male, female and unexplained factors was at a frequency of 32 (24%, 33 (31% and 59 (45% among the individuals respectively. KP levels were measured by ELISA assay before the initiation of the ICSI treatment protocol. Outcome of ICSI was categorized into three groups of non-pregnant with beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG25 mIU/ml and no cardiac activity, and clinical pregnancy declared upon confirmation of cardiac activity. Results based on cause of infertility and outcome groups were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results Females with unexplained infertility had significantly lower levels of KP when compared with those with male factor infertility (176.69 ± 5.03 vs. 397.6 ± 58.2, P=0.001. Clinical pregnancy was observed in 28 (23% females of which 17 (71% had a female cause of infertility. In the non-pregnant group of 66 (53% females, common cause of infertility was unexplained 56(85%. A weak positive correlation of KP levels with fertilized oocytes and endometrial thickness was observed (P=0.04 and 0.01 respectively. Conclusion Deficiency of KP in females with unexplained infertility was associated with reduced chances of implantation after ICSI.

  12. [Polymorphisms of KITLG, SPRY4, and BAK1 genes in patients with testicular germ cell tumors and individuals with infertility associated with AZFc deletion of the Y chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsova, M V; Ivkin, E V; Simonova, O A; Rudenko, V V; Chernykh, V B; Mikhaylenko, D S; Loran, O B

    2016-01-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common form of solid cancer in young men. Testicular cancer is represented by testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) derived from embryonic stem cells with different degrees of differentiation in about 95% of cases. The development of these tumors is related to the formation of a pool of male germ cells and gametogenesis. Clinical factors that are predisposed to the development of germ-cell tumors include cryptorchidism and testicular microlithiasis, as well as infertility associated with the gr/gr deletion within the AZFс locus. KITLG, SPRY4, and BAK1 genes affect the development of the testes and gametogenesis; mutations and polymorphisms of these genes lead to a significant increase in the risk of the TGCT development. To determine the relationship between gene polymorphisms and the development of TGCTs, we developed a system for detection and studied the allele and genotype frequencies of the KITLG (rs995030, rs1508595), SPRY4 (rs4624820, rs6897876), and BAK1 (rs210138) genes in fertile men, patients with TGCTs, and patients with infertility that have the AZFс deletion. A significant association of rs995030 of the KITLG gene with the development of TGCTs (p = 0.029 for the allele G, p = 0.0124 for the genotype GG) was revealed. Significant differences in the frequencies of the studied polymorphisms in patients with the AZFc deletion and the control group of fertile men were not found. We showed significant differences in the frequencies for the combination of all high-risk polymorphisms in the control group, patients with the AZFc deletion and patients with TGCTs (p (TGCTs-AZF-control) = 0.0207). A fivefold increase in the frequency of the combination of all genotypes in the TGCT group (p = 0.0116; OR = 5.25 [1.44-19.15]) and 3.7-fold increase was identified in patients with the AZFc deletion (p = 0.045; OR = 3.69 [1.11-12.29]) were revealed. The genotyping of patients with infertility caused by the AZFc deletion can be used to

  13. Patients' attitudes to medical and psychosocial aspects of care in fertility clinics: Findings from the Copenhagen Multi-centre Psychosocial Infertility (COMPI) Research Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J

    2003-01-01

    among infertile people. METHODS: We conducted an epidemiological study based on questionnaires among all new couples attending five fertility clinics with a response rate of 80.0% and a total of 2250 patients. RESULTS: The vast majority of both men and women considered a high level of medical......BACKGROUND: The aims were (i) to identify gender differences in motivations to seek assisted reproduction and gender differences in expectations about medical and psychosocial services and (ii) to examine factors that predict the perceived importance of, and intention to use, psychosocial services...... information and patient-centred care as important. Fewer respondents (women 10.0-20.8%, men 4.1-8.9%) felt that professional psychosocial services were important and/or had the intention to use these services. The main predictor of perceived importance of patient-centred care and professional psychosocial...

  14. Bacterial vaginosis and infertility: cause or association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Rasheed M; Allam, Abdelmonem M; Magdy, Amin M; Mohamed, Abeer Sh

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) in infertile women and evaluate the effect of treatment of BV on the pregnancy rate in patients with polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) and unexplained infertility. Cohort study conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in collaboration with the Microbiology Department of Sohag University Hospital, Egypt. All eligible women with female factor infertility (n=874) were enrolled and all asymptomatic fertile women (n=382) attending the family planning clinic of the study hospital were recruited as a control group. The study was in two phases: the first included screening all participants for BV after Gram-staining of the vaginal discharge. The second phase was concerned with evaluating the effect of treatment of BV on the cumulative pregnancy rate (CPP) in patients with PCOD (group I; n=278) and unexplained infertility (group II; n=170). Each group was divided into three sub-groups: groups Ia (n=129) and IIa (n=73) were BV positive and treated for BV; groups Ib (n=61) and IIb (n=49) were BV positive and did not receive treatment for BV, and groups Ic (n=88) and IIc (n=48) were BV negative. The prevalence of BV was compared using the Chi-square. The long rank test of Kaplan-Meier life table analysis was used to compare the CPR. A multivariate regression model was designed to define the most significant variable which affected the pregnancy rate in patients with PCOD. The prevalence of BV was significantly higher in infertile than fertile women (45.5% vs 15.4%). The highest prevalence was found in patients with PCOD (60.1%) and unexplained infertility (37.4%). The CPR in both patients with PCOD and unexplained infertility were significantly higher in the patients who were treated for BV. Regression model showed that BV was one of the significant factors interfering with pregnancy. BV is strongly implicated in female infertility and is probably an underestimated cause of unexplained infertility

  15. Diagnostic methods in finding out the causes of infertility, results of HSG examination and laparoscopy in infertile women examined at the Gynecological Ward of the City Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwasniewski, S.; Kukulski, P.; Szymanski, J.; Kwasniewska, A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents diagnostic methods and the results of hysterosalpingography (HSG) and laparoscopy examination, with special attention being drawn to the usefulness of these methods in finding out the causes of infertility. 51 patients with primary and second infertility were examined. HSG and laparoscopy make it possible to diagnose correctly the cause of infertility. They also enable adequate and early classification of patients for further diagnosis and treatment at highly specialized centers dealing with the problems of infertility. (author)

  16. Infertility, infertility treatment, and fetal growth restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Hammer Bech, Bodil

    2007-01-01

    mortality and SGA among infertile couples (treated and untreated), but the odds ratios (ORs) of perinatal mortality among infertile couples were attenuated after adjustment for maternal age and body mass index (1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95-1.84 among untreated and 1.26, 95% CI 0.86-1.85 among......OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between infertility, with or without treatment, and fetal growth, as well as perinatal and infant mortality. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51,041 singletons born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy 12 months or less...... treated couples). The elevated risk of SGA among infertile couples persisted after adjustment for maternal age, parity, and smoking (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.10-1.40 among untreated, and OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.23-1.60 among treated). The risk of SGA increased with time to pregnancy, and a longer time to pregnancy...

  17. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  18. Infertility: Inability or Disability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Khetarpal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Disability is a complex phenomenon. It reflects an interaction between features of a person’s body and features of the society in which he or she lives. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, lays stress on the functional as well as the structural problem of a person. All the definitions of disability also include the disorders of the reproductive and endocrine system. So infertility and impotency should also be included in the category of disability. It affects the participation in areas of life and can have a disabling affect on an individual. Like any other disability the couple has to adapt and integrate infertility in their sense of self thus infertility comes as a major life crisis. Medically, infertility, in most cases, is considered to be the result of a physical impairment or a genetic abnormality. Socially, couples are incapable of their reproductive or parental roles. On social level, infertility in most cultures remains associated with social stigma and taboo just like the social model of disability. Couples who are unable to reproduce may be looked down upon due to social stigmatisation. Infertility can lead to divorces and separation leading to a broken family life. Without labelling infertility as a disability, it is difficult for the people to access services and welfare benefits offered by the government. Infertility treatments are highly sophisticated so they are very expensive and are even not covered by insurance and government aid.In the light of all this it becomes imperative to categorise infertility as disability.

  19. Endometrial sampling in infertility: the Ilorin, Nigeria, experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to determine the diagnosis value of endometrium sampling in detecting endometrial pathology and presence or absence of ovulation in infertility patients. A retrospective study of endometrial tissues histopathological slides of infertility patients as recorded in the register of the department of Pathology, ...

  20. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE ... Discrimination Policy ASRM Web Site Terms & Conditions of Use

  1. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE ... Discrimination Policy ASRM Web Site Terms & Conditions of Use

  2. The Fertility Problem Inventory: measuring perceived infertility-related stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, C R; Sherrard, W; Glavac, I

    1999-07-01

    To develop a reliable, valid instrument to evaluate perceived infertility-related stress. Prospective study. University-affiliated teaching hospital. Consecutively referred patients (1,153 women and 1,149 men) seen for infertility treatment. None. Participants' infertility-related stress was assessed by written questionnaire using the Fertility Problem Inventory. Current levels of anxiety, depression, and marital satisfaction also were determined. Women described greater global stress than men and higher specific stress in terms of social concerns, sexual concerns, and need for parenthood. Both men and women facing male infertility reported higher global stress and more social and sexual concerns than men and women experiencing female infertility. Social, sexual, and relationship concerns related to infertility were more effective predictors of depression and marital dissatisfaction than expressed needs for parenthood or attitudes toward child-free living. The Fertility Problem Inventory provides a reliable measure of perceived infertility-related stress and specific information on five separate domains of patient concern. Patterns of infertility-related stress differed depending on gender, fertility history, and infertility diagnosis. Among patients receiving treatment, social, sexual, and relationship concerns appear central to current distress. Counseling interventions that target these domains appear likely to offer maximal therapeutic benefit.

  3. Do alterations in follicular fluid proteases contribute to human infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookingham, Lisa Marii; Van Voorhis, Bradley J; Ascoli, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1 are known to play critical roles in follicular rupture, ovulation, and fertility in mice. Similar studies in humans are limited; however, both are known to increase during the periovulatory period. No studies have examined either protease in the follicular fluid of women with unexplained infertility or infertility related to advanced maternal age (AMA). We sought to determine if alterations in cathepsin L and/or ADAMTS-1 existed in these infertile populations. Patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) for unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility were prospectively recruited for the study; patients with tubal or male factor infertility were recruited as controls. Follicular fluid was collected to determine gene expression (via quantitative polymerase chain reaction), enzyme concentrations (via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), and enzymatic activities (via fluorogenic enzyme cleavage assay or Western blot analysis) of cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1. The analysis included a total of 42 patients (14 per group). We found no statistically significant difference in gene expression, enzyme concentration, or enzymatic activity of cathepsin L or ADAMTS-1 in unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility as compared to controls. We also found no statistically significant difference in expression or concentration with advancing age. Cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1 are not altered in women with unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility undergoing IVF, and they do not decline with advancing age. It is possible that differences exist in natural cycles, contributing to infertility; however, our findings do not support a role for protease alterations as a common cause of infertility.

  4. Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  5. Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

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  6. in the Upper and Lower Genital Tracts of Fertile and Infertile Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark G. Martens

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The genital mycoplasmas (Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum and Chlamydia trachomatis have been implicated as possible etiologic factors in infertility. Their role in patients with infertility needs to be further defined.

  7. Male infertility workup needs additional testing of expressed prostatic secretion and/or post-massage urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margus Punab

    Full Text Available The male factor accounts for almost 50% of infertility cases. Inflammation may reduce semen quality via several pathways, including oxidative stress (OxS. As male infertility routinely is assessed using semen analysis only, the possible presence of non-leukocytospermic asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis may be overlooked. We compared local and systemic OxS levels in male partners of infertile couples with different inflammation patterns in their genital tract and/or oligospermia. Subjects (n=143 were grouped according to inflammation in their semen, expressed prostatic secretion (EPS, and/or post-massage urine (post-M. Systemic (8-isoprostanes in urine and local (diene conjugates and total antioxidant capacity in seminal plasma OxS was measured The levels of OxS markers were significantly elevated in both severe inflammation groups--leukocytospermic men and subjects whose inflammation was limited only to EPS and/or post-M. Comparison between oligospermic and non-oligospermic men with genital tract inflammation, and oligozoospermic men with or without inflammation in the genital tract indicated that inflammation but not oligospermia status had significant impact on the measured OxS markers. Hence, a high leukocyte count in prostate-specific materials (EPS, post-M, even in absence of clear leukocytopsermia, is an important source of local and systemic OxS that may be associated with male infertility and affect general health. We suggest including the tests for detection of inflammation of the prostate into the workup of infertile men as was suggested in the WHO 1993 recommendation.

  8. Transrectal Ultrasonographic Findings of Obstructive Male Infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Il; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Park, Heung Il; Park, Kwang Seong

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the transrectal ultrasound in infertile men with suspected obstructive lesions of sperm transport system. We performed transrectal US in 26 infertile patients in whom obstructive lesions of sperm transport system were suspected in physical examination and laboratory data. 7.0 MHz transrectal transducer was used and the content of analysis of sonographic findings was the presence of vas deferens, seminal vesicle and ejaculatory duct. Also, we measured the width of seminal vesicle and diameter of ejaculatory duct. Transrectal US revealed an accurate diagnosis in 12 infertile men who had obstructive lesions and associated abnormalities in distal sperm transport system, two of congenital bilateral absence of the vasa deferentia and seminal vesicles, two of congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens and seminal vesicle, three of dilatation of seminal vesicles, and five of dilatation of ejaculatory ducts and proximal ducts. The other 14 patients who had normal findings on transrectal US were revealed to have testicular failure (10 patients) and obstruction of proximal sperm transport system (4 patients) which were beyond the field-of-view of transrectal US. Transrectal US is the useful diagnostic method for the evaluation of infertile men with suspected obstructive lesions of sperm transport system. It can possibly decrease the need for the invasive vasography and may be helpful in the guidance of appropriate management of male infertility

  9. Changes in serum sexual hormone levels in women with infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Mingjiang; Zhu Benxing; Xu Yujie

    2001-01-01

    In order to understand the clinical effects of serum sexual hormone level changes on infertility, 84 women with infertility were divided into four groups. With the use of RIA, levels of FSH, LH, PRL, E 2 , t and P in serum of 84 women with infertility were measured in their follicular phase. It was showed that the serum levels of FSH, LH, PRL, E 2 , T and P in four infertility groups were all higher than the given normal standards respectively. Except E 2 (P 2 and P coincided with the percentages of the patients with the higher ratio of FSH to LH

  10. OVARIAN AGING AND INFERTILITY TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Meden Vrtovec

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to changes in the socio-economic environment the first pregnancy is being more often postponed to advanced age; an increasing number of women seek medical help for infertility in their late thirties. Degenerative processes in the ovary start as early as after 35 years of age. When the woman is over 38, the signs of hormonal changes occur (FSH, inhibin, the menstrual cycle changes, and fertility is being increasingly reduced. Infertility treatment by assisted reproduction technology (ART has proved less efficient in older than in younger women.Material and methods. In a retrospective analysis we evaluated the success rates achieved with homologous intrauterine insemination (IUI, in vitro fertilization and embryo-transfer (IVF-ET, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, and compared them in regard to the women > 38 years vs. < 38 years.Results. After IUI the pregnancy rate in the women over 38 was 3.7% per patient (1.5% per cycle and 28.0% (9.9% in the women younger than 38 years. After IVF-ET the pregnancy rate in the over 38-year group was 16% per patient (14% per cycle, and 28% per patient (25% per cycle in the less than 38-year group. After ICSI, the pregnancy rate in the group over 38 years was 11% per patient (9% per cycle, and 25% per patient (22% per cycle in the less than 38-year group. In the analysed population, the spontaneous abortion rate was 26.0% in the group of women aged over 38 years, and 14.0% in the group of women aged less than 38 years.Conclusions. Before introduction of an ART procedure the woman with advanced age should be properly counselled and well informed about poor success of their infertility treatment and high spontaneous abortion rate.

  11. Influência do período de abstinência sexual sobre as características seminais de homens inférteis Influence of abstinence period on seminal characteristics in infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Firmbach Pasqualotto

    2006-01-01

    December 2004. We excluded men with a normal semen analysis or women with abnormalities suggestive of infertility. Each man produced two semen samples in a short period of time (30 min to 1 h. We evaluated semen volume, total motile sperm count and percentage sperm motility. Comparisons were made between the first and second semen samples. After pooling the samples, we compared the total motile sperm count between the first sample and the pooled samples. Statistical evaluation was performed by Student's t test and the chi2 test. RESULTS: in oligozoospermic men, there were no differences in the semen characteristics between the first and the second seminal samples (p>0.05. The total motile sperm count increased significantly in the second sample in comparison to the first sample in asthenozoospermic (42.4±6.8 vs 51.5±7.2x10(6 sperm/mL and oligoasthenozoospermic men (11.1±7.4 vs 14.35±7.2x10(6 sperm/mL (p<0.05. The pool of two ejaculates increased the total motile sperm count in comparison to the first sample (p<0.05 in oligozoospermic, asthenozoospermic and oligoasthenozoospermic men by 110.5, 110.3 and 136.03%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: a short period of abstinence is associated with higher sperm motility in infertile men. The pool of two semen samples is a way to increase the total motile sperm count in this group of patients whose wives want to undergo an intrauterine insemination instead of in vitro fertilization.

  12. Coital frequency and infertility: which male factors predict less frequent coitus among infertile couples?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Nathan; Lo, Kirk C; Grober, Ethan D; Spencer, Leia; Jarvi, Keith

    2013-08-01

    To determine the coital frequency among infertile couples and which factors are associated with less frequent coitus. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary-level male infertility clinic. A total of 1,298 infertile men. Administration of computer-based survey, semen analysis, and serum hormone evaluation. Monthly coital frequency. A total of 1,298 patients presented to clinic for infertility consultation and completed the computer-based survey. The median male age was 35 years (interquartile range [IQR] 32-39 years) and the median duration of infertility was 2 years (IQR 1-4 years) before consultation. Median monthly coital frequency was seven (IQR 5-10; range 0-40); 24% of couples were having intercourse ≤ 4 times per month. Overall, 0.6%, 2.7%, 4.8%, 5.8%, and 10.8% of the men reported having intercourse 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 times per month, respectively. When simultaneously taking into account the influence of age, libido, erectile function, and semen volume on coital frequency, older patients had 1.05 times higher odds (per year of age) of less frequent coitus (odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.08). In addition, patients with better erectile function had 1.12 times higher odds (per point on Sexual Health Inventory for Men scale) of more frequent coitus (odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.09-1.18). Similar to the general population, most infertile couples report having coitus more than four times per month. Older male age and erectile dysfunction are independent risk factors for less frequent coitus among infertile men, which could have an impact on fertility. Coital frequency should be considered in infertility assessments. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Epigenetics of reproductive infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Laxmidhar; Parbin, Sabnam; Pradhan, Nibedita; Kausar, Chahat; Patra, Samir K

    2017-06-01

    Infertility is a complex pathophysiological condition. It may caused by specific or multiple physical and physiological factors, including abnormalities in homeostasis, hormonal imbalances and genetic alterations. In recent times various studies implicated that, aberrant epigenetic mechanisms are associated with reproductive infertility. There might be transgenerational effects associated with epigenetic modifications of gametes and studies suggest the importance of alterations in epigenetic modification at early and late stages of gametogenesis. To determine the causes of infertility it is necessary to understand the altered epigenetic modifications of associated gene and mechanisms involved therein. This review is devoted to elucidate the recent mechanistic advances in regulation of genes by epigenetic modification and emphasizes their possible role related to reproductive infertility. It includes environmental, nutritional, hormonal and physiological factors and influence of internal structural architecture of chromatin nucleosomes affecting DNA and histone modifications in both male and female gametes, early embryogenesis and offspring. Finally, we would like to emphasize that research on human infertility by gene knock out of epigenetic modifiers genes must be relied upon animal models.

  14. Hormonal evaluation of the infertile male: has it evolved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Ernest M; Chudnovsky, Aleksander; Niederberger, Craig S

    2008-05-01

    An endocrinologic evaluation of patients who have male-factor infertility has clearly evolved and leads to specific diagnoses and treatment strategies in a large population of infertile men. A well-considered endocrine evaluation is especially essential with the ever-growing popularity of assisted reproductive techniques and continued refinements with intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  15. Frequency of depression among fertile and infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kanwal, S.; Ishfaq, Y.; Hassan, H.; Waheed, N.

    2014-01-01

    To compare the frequency of depression among fertile and infertile women reporting in CMH Abbottabad. Study Design: A case control study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted in Combined Military Hospital Abbottabad, over a period of six months from January 2013 to June 2013. Patients and Methods: The inclusion criteria were all those patients who were married. All the cases were selected from the women reporting in the obstetrics and gynecology department of CMH Abbottabad for investigation and treatment of infertility. A total of 200 patients, 100 fertile and 100 infertile women were included. Patients were given questionnaire form with their consent for research. Beck depression inventory (BDI) was used to assess depression among fertile and infertile women. Other factors such as age, educational level, and duration of infertility, pressure from family members, miscarriages, and support from husband were studied. Results: Depression was significantly higher in infertile women as compared to fertile women i.e. 95% vs. 63% (p < 0.001). It was higher among women with more than 1 year of duration of marriage as compared to those with infertility of one year duration or less. Conclusion: Infertility is associated with depression. (author)

  16. Cross-border reproductive care for law evasion: should physicians be allowed to help infertility patients evade the law of their own country?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Wannes; Pennings, Guido; De Sutter, Petra

    2016-07-01

    There are fundamental differences between countries with regard to legislation on assisted reproduction. Many infertility patients are looking to evade the law of their own country and make use of reproductive services abroad. The role of the local physician in cross-border reproductive care for law evasion has been characterized as "channeling local patients to foreign medical establishments" and "against the spirit and essence of the law". The logical view is that by supporting CBRC for law evasion, physicians are essentially supporting immoral behavior. We will tackle this position on two levels. First, we will argue that governments should generally be tolerant toward people with different positions on assisted reproduction. Second, we will show that contributing to cross-border reproductive care for law evasion is not necessarily immoral, because the prima facie wrongness of complicity in law evasion can be outweighed by the fact that physicians should act in the best interest of the patient. Several countries have tried to prevent local physicians from helping patients to make use of reproductive services abroad, but they should rather leave it up to the individual physicians to decide whether or not to support a particular patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between blood groups and male infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.; Naeem, M.; Samad, A.; Nasir, A.; Aman, Z.; Ahmed, S.; Manan, F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Blood is man's complete and unchangeable identity. The ABO and Rh groups are recognised as major and clinically significant blood groups. Blood group antigens are not only important in relation to blood transfusion and organ transplantation, but also have been utilised in genetic research, anthropology and tracing ancestral relation of humans. The objective the present study is to examine the blood group antigens in infertile men for assessing the relationship to male infertility and to know the frequency of various blood groups among infertile males in our population. Method: A total of 1,521 patients along with 460 proven fathers as controls were recruited for the present study from both rural and urban areas of Pakistan and referred to Department of Reproductive Physiology/Health, Public Health Divisions, NIH, Islamabad, during 2002 to 2006. Blood grouping (ABO) and Rhesus factors (Rh) was done by the antigen antibody agglutination test. Results: Overall distribution of blood groups in the studied population of 1,521 subjects was 35.50%, 28.27%, 26.89% and 9.34% for blood groups O, B, A and AB respectively. The ratio of control to patient was 1:3.3. Conclusions: The present preliminary study revealed that in our population the prevalence of male infertility in blood group O is invariably higher than in all other ABO blood groups, showing a strong relationship between blood group O and male infertility. (author)

  18. Disease spectrum and treatment patterns in a local male infertility clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K L; Tsu, James H L; Tam, P C; Yiu, M K

    2015-02-01

    To review disease spectrum and treatment patterns in a local male infertility clinic. Case series. Male infertility clinic in a teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Patients who were seen as new cases in a local male infertility clinic between January 2008 and December 2012. Infertility assessment and counselling on treatment options. Disease spectrum and treatment patterns. A total of 387 new patients were assessed in the male infertility clinic. The mean age of the patients and their female partners was 37.2 and 32.1 years, respectively. The median duration of infertility was 3 years. Among the patients, 36.2% had azoospermia, 8.0% had congenital absence of vas deferens, and 48.3% of patients had other abnormalities in semen parameters. The commonest causes of male infertility were unknown (idiopathic), clinically significant varicoceles, congenital absence of vas deferens, mumps after puberty, and erectile or ejaculatory dysfunction. Overall, 66.1% of patients chose assisted reproductive treatment and 12.4% of patients preferred surgical correction of reversible male infertility conditions. Altogether 36.7% of patients required either surgical sperm retrieval or correction of male infertility conditions. The present study provided important local data on the disease spectrum and treatment patterns in a male infertility clinic. The incidences of azoospermia and congenital absence of vas deferens were much higher than those reported in the contemporary literature. A significant proportion of patients required either surgical sperm retrieval or correction of reversible male infertility conditions.

  19. Revised criteria for PCOS in WHO Group II anovulatory infertility – a revival of hypothalamic amenorrhoea?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Mette Petri; Pinborg, Anja; Loft, Anne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate revised criteria for polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in anovulatory infertility. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: WHO Group II anovulatory infertile women (n = 75). MEASUREMENTS: Clinical, sonographic......, but according to AMH levels, the ovaries remain multifollicular. PERSPECTIVES: A better distinction between hypothalamic amenorrhoea and PCOS could improve treatment strategies for anovulatory infertility....

  20. Infertility: Medical and Social Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report illustrates a range of options for Congressional action in nine principal areas of public policy related to infertility: (1) collecting data on reproductive health; (2) preventing infertility; (3) information to inform and protect consumers; (4) providing access to infertility services; (5) reproductive health of veterans; (6) transfer…

  1. Pathways: patient-centred decision counselling for women at risk of cancer-related infertility: a protocol for a comparative effectiveness cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Terri Lynn; Hoffman, Aubri S; Crocker, Laura C; Holman, Deborah A; Hoffman, Derek B; Ma, Jusheng; Bassett, Roland L; Leal, Viola B; Volk, Robert J

    2018-02-21

    National guidelines recommend that all reproductive-age women with cancer be informed of their fertility risks and offered referral to fertility specialists to discuss fertility preservation options. However, reports indicate that only 5% of patients have consultations, and rates of long-term infertility-related distress remain high. Previous studies report several barriers to fertility preservation; however, initial success has been reported using provider education, patient decision aids and navigation support. This protocol will test effects of a multicomponent intervention compared with usual care on women's fertility preservation knowledge and decision-making outcomes. This cluster-randomised trial will compare the multicomponent intervention (provider education, patient decision aid and navigation support) with usual care (consultation and referral, if requested). One hundred newly diagnosed English-speaking women of reproductive age who are at risk of cancer-related infertility will be recruited from four regional oncology clinics.The Pathways patient decision aid website provides (1) up-to-date evidence and descriptions of fertility preservation and other family-building options, tailored to cancer type; (2) structured guidance to support personalising the information and informed decision-making; and (3) a printable summary to help women prepare for discussions with their oncologist and/or fertility specialist. Four sites will be randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. Participants will be recruited after their oncology consultation and asked to complete online questionnaires at baseline, 1 week and 2 months to assess their demographics, fertility preservation knowledge, and decision-making process and quality. The primary outcome (decisional conflict) will be tested using Fisher's exact test. Secondary outcomes will be assessed using generalised linear mixed models, and sensitivity analyses will be conducted, as appropriate. The University of

  2. Validation of the German version of the 'Hypogonadism Related Symptom Scale' (HRS) in andrological patients with infertility, HIV infection and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidjanov, J; Wolf, J; Schuppe, H-C; Weidner, W; Diemer, T; Linn, T; Halefeldt, I; Wagenlehner, F; Wiltink, J; Pilatz, A

    2014-12-01

    As commonly used self-reported screening instruments for male hypogonadism demonstrated lack of specificity, a Hypogonadism Related Symptom Scale (HRS) was developed in 2009 as a novel self-rating screening tool. As the questionnaire has not been validated, the purpose of our study was to perform a validation in patients presenting with different disorders (e.g. infertility, HIV infection or metabolic syndrome) and disease-related risk to develop hypogonadism. Two hundred and eighteen patients aged 19-71 years (40.1 ± 9.5) who completed the HRS and other common questionnaires [International Index Of Erectile Function (IIEF), National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), short form (SF)-12] were included. In all patients, blood levels of total testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, oestradiol and sex hormone-binding globulin were determined and free testosterone was calculated. Cronbach's α for the scale was 0.896, split-half 0.871 for the 1st half and 0.807 for the 2nd half. Spearman-Brown coefficient was 0.767, and Guttman split-half coefficient was 0.759. Consistent correlations were found between HRS and IIEF5 (ρ = 0.57, P males with suspected hypogonadism. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. [Effects of the combined therapy of heat sensitive moxibustion and acupoint injection on endometrial receptivity of hypdrosalphinx infertility in the patients after hysteroscopy and laparoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanling; Pan, Lizhen; Wang, Ying

    2018-01-12

    To explore the effects of the combined therapy of heat sensitive moxibustion and acupoint injection on endometrial receptivity of hypdrosalphinx infertility in the patients after hysteroscopy and laparoscopy on the base of routine post-operative anti-inflammation. A total of 210 patients of hypdrosalphinx infertility after hysteroscopy and laparoscopy were divided into a combined therapy group, a heat sensitive moxibustion group and a control group, 70 cases in each one according to the random number table. In the control group, the intravenous drip of cefoxitin sodium was adopted, and the anti-inflammation treatment was given for 1 week after operation. In the heat sensitive moxibustion group, on the basis of the treatment as the control group, the heat sensitive moxibustion was applied after vaginal bleeding stopped. The acupoints were Yaoyangguan (GV 3), Guanyuan (CV 4), Qihai (CV 6), Shenshu (BL 23), Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Yinlingquan (SP 9) and Zigong (EX-CA1). The acupoints were modified according to the different syndromes. In the combined therapy group, on the basis of the regimen as the heat sensitive moxibustion group, after vaginal bleeding stopped, the acupoint injection was given alternatively at bilateral Tiangong (extra, 1.0 cm inferior and bilateral to the cervix) with lidocaine 1 mL, amikacin 2 mL and salvia injection 2 mL. The treatment was given once every day, the treatment for 10 times as one course and a total of 3 courses were required. The endometrial type, thickness, uterine arterial plusatility index (PI) and resistance index (RI) were observed in the patients of each group. After treatment, the numbers of A-type endometrial type in the combined therapy group and the heat sensitive moxibustion group were remarkably higher than those of the control group [57.1% (40/7) vs 31.4% (22/70), 50.0% (35/70) vs 31.4% (22/70), both P <0.05]. The endometrial thickness after treatment was all increased as compared with that before treatment in each group

  4. Is There a Relationship between Ovarian Epithelial Dysplasia and Infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier Chene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Ovarian epithelial dysplasia was initially described in material from prophylactic oophorectomies performed in patients at genetic risk of ovarian cancer. Similar histopathological abnormalities have been revealed after ovulation stimulation. Since infertility is also a risk factor for ovarian neoplasia, the aim of this study was to study the relationship between infertility and ovarian dysplasia. Methods. We blindly reviewed 127 histopathological slides of adnexectomies or ovarian cystectomies according to three groups—an exposed group to ovulation induction (n = 30, an infertile group without stimulation (n = 35, and a spontaneously fertile control group (n = 62—in order to design an eleven histopathological criteria scoring system. Results. The ovarian dysplasia score was significantly higher in exposed group whereas dysplasia score was low in infertile and control groups (resp., 8.21 in exposed group, 3.69 for infertile patients, and 3.62 for the controls. In the subgroup with refractory infertility there was a trend towards a more severe dysplasia score (8.53 in ovulation induction group and 5.1 in infertile group. Conclusion. These results raise questions as to the responsibility of drugs used to induce ovulation and/or infertility itself in the genesis of ovarian epithelial dysplasia.

  5. Incidence and prevalence of sexual dysfunction in infertile females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohina S. Aggarwal

    2013-09-01

    Results: In our study 170 (63.67% patients in the infertile group (n = 267 had female sexual dysfunction as compared to108 (46.35% in the fertile group (n = 233, which is statistically significant (P 0.0001. Most common dysfunction observed was arousal (70% in infertile patients. Common dysfunctions observed in fertile females were desire (40% and orgasm (40%. FSD was significantly higher in infertile females of the 31–37 years age group (P 0.002, while more common in fertile females of >42 years of age (P < 0.0001. Higher female sexual dysfunction was observed in illiterate infertile females (P 0.039. Among the pathological factors endometriosis was the statistically significant factor associated with female sexual dysfunction and infertility (P < 0.0001. No significant correlation in duration of infertility or type of infertility was observed with female sexual dysfunction. Female sexual dysfunction as the cause or the effect should be ascertained in infertility.

  6. [Knowledge and perception of medical students about infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Márta; Cserepes, Réka Eszter; Bugán, Antal

    2015-01-18

    The effectiveness of fertility treatments is influenced by the health care professionals' knowledge regarding infertility as well as their empathy. The aim of the study was to examine infertility-related knowledge and perceptions of emotional and mind/body consequences of infertility among medical students. A questionnaire design was used. Data were obtained from 112 medical university students (76 women, 36 men) who participated involuntary and compensation-free. Medical students' knowledge concerning infertility proved to be incomplete and ambiguous. Subjects underestimated the presence of mind/body and emotional symptoms caused by infertility in men particularly, and overestimated some emotional concerns in women, e.g. sadness. Medical students have gaps in their subject-specific knowledge, so that they need more (even practical) information regarding infertility during their studies. Students' conceptions about emotional and physical consequences of infertility are distorted by stereotypes. The risk of these biases is that it could make it difficult to perceive patients in a non-distorted way, especially infertile male patients.

  7. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos State Infertility Insurance Laws Protect Your Fertility Campaign Find a Health Professional ABOUT ASRM Vision of ASRM ASRM's Mission Statement Site Endowment ASRM Board of Directors ASRM Office of Public Affiars Social Media Contact Us Donate ASRM Cookie Policy Donate ASRM ...

  8. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos State Infertility Insurance Laws Protect Your Fertility Campaign Find a Health Professional ABOUT ASRM Vision of ASRM ASRM's Mission Statement Site Endowment ASRM Board of Directors ASRM Office of Public Affiars Social Media Contact Us Donate ASRM Cookie Policy Donate ASRM ...

  9. Fertility and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

    In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are…

  10. Parenting after Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  11. Female sexual distress in infertile Turkish women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Aydın

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of infertility on sexual distress in women attending the infertility clinic. 
 Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study we evaluated sexual distress among 88 women who attended the infertility clinic in our institute between January and June 2015. All women who were experiencing primary or secondary infertility during the study sampling were included in the sudy. Sexual distress was measured using the Female sexual distress scale-revised (FSDS-R, a cross-validated patient-reported outcomes measure. Correlations of FSDS-R with patient characteristics and laboratory measurements were calculated using Spearman’s rank correlation tests. Results: With the exceptions of the age of couples and serum anti-mullerian hormone (AMH levels, no predictor of high sexual distress was found in the univariate analysis when comparing groups with regard to the FSDS-R cut-off score. The mean age of the sexually distressed women (33.6±5.8 years vs. 29.3±5.1 years and their partners (35.4±4.8 years vs. 31.6±4.2 years was significantly higher than those of the non distressed women, according to a FSDS-R score over 11 (p<0.05. The serum level of AMH was significantly lower in infertile women with high total sexual distress scores (1.4 vs. 7.6 ng/mL (p<0.001. Conclusion: In infertile women, age of woman, age of partner, and serum AMH levels are related with the hope of women to have a child despite an association with sexual distress. Serum AMH, which is perceived as necessary for fertility, had a significant inverse correlation with levels of sexual stress.

  12. Infertility – prevention and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Emily C; Marder, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Summary Women with autoimmune diseases are more at risk for infertility and subfertility, menstrual irregularities and decreased parity due to multiple possible etiologies, including underlying inflammatory disease, gonadotoxic medications, and psychosocial issues related to living with chronic disease. An awareness of these issues, and the validation and support of patients going through fertility related issues, is important for providing comprehensive care to this patient population. In particular, an understanding of the expanding options for fertility preservation strategies during gonadotoxic medications is essential, including gonadotropin releasing hormone analogues (GnRH-a) co-therapy and oocyte cryopreservation. Referral to a reproductive endocrinology clinic is indicated in this patient population, in part to help manage symptoms of hypoestrogenism that may result from GnRH-a therapy. PMID:28390569

  13. Positive Effect of Acupuncture and Cupping in Infertility Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Xiang; Yang, Yang; Song, Yue; Ma, Liang-Xiao

    2018-04-01

    Background: Infertility is clinically defined as the failure to conceive after 12 months of unprotected sexual intercourse. Organic disorders and lifestyle factors are highly associated with infertility. Generally, acupuncture and its related methods can be applied for treating infertility, according to the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Successful cases of acupuncture-treated infertility without concomitant use of any medication are rare. This article presents a case of an infertile woman having a favorable response to acupuncture treatment. Case: A 39-year-old Mexican woman presented with infertility following right-side fallopian-tube obstruction. She had no significant physical feelings of discomfort apart from work-related stress. Her syndrome was first diagnosed as Deficiency of Spleen and Kidney Qi, accompanied by obstruction of channels due to accumulation of Dampness. Acupuncture, accompanied by cupping therapy, was primarily practiced for this patient. Results: After 28 treatment sessions, she was finally able to conceive. Conclusions: Acupuncture could help treat infertility. Further large-scale, randomized clinical trials are needed to verify the efficacy of acupuncture for treating female infertility.

  14. Infertility: Ongoing Global challenge of new millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantibhai Naranbhai Sonaliya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility tends to be the global challenge even in the second decade of the new millennium. Especially in developing countries like India, it is still one the most lethal social evil responsible for a big proportion of cases of psychological disturbances including suicide. Again, recently, few conditions other than communicable or Non-communicable diseases are given place among the categories of significant public health problems like Road Traffic Accidents, Burns, Poisoning, drowning and few more. But, for developing countries like India, the list is incomplete without inclusion of Infertility (there may be several others also. In public health, tuberculosis, leprosy and some other diseases are considered social diseases which produce social stigma for the patients and/or his family members.1 In same manner, Infertility is an important cause of social stigmatization since centuries for a couple suffering from, especially for woman involved. During a transitory phase of industrialization and socio-economic development, the situation is changed a minute smidgen at urban areas of India but at rural parts, sub-urban or even at urban slums (mainly among pockets of recent migrants the situation is as same as a few hundred years ago. A female of no religion, caste, social status or higher level of education are barred from some stringent mores related to infertility. Infertile females are still not allowed to take part in so many religious or social ceremonies; on the contrary, they have to face more harassment including domestic violence than their counterparts, who have given birth to the child. Due to social, psychological, economic disturbances, they are forced to take multiple sorts of treatments including religious quacks. So many infertile women are exploited physically and economically also in such weird ways of treatment to gain a pregnancy.

  15. Psychological determinants of life satisfaction in women undergoing infertility treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Anna Dembińska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Infertility treatment is a long-term process, spread out over months, or even years, and carries no guarantee of success. It generates an incessant state of uncertainty which becomes a chronic state of psychological discomfort. Each stage of treatment may become a source of more trouble. Women deciding to undergo infertility treatment are exposed to many negative feelings concerning different aspects of their life. Participants and procedure The present study was an attempt to understand psychological determinants of life satisfaction in women undergoing infertility treatment. The study group included 470 women treated for infertility. Results Patients perceiving more social support in general, as well as more of the support types used in the study, i.e. emotional, instrumental, informational and institutional support, and support from family and friends, have better self-esteem, higher acceptance of their infertility, higher satisfaction with life, higher hope as an emotional state, and lower levels of anxiety and depression. Three negative emotional states, i.e. anxiety, depression and irritation, are predictors influencing (lowering life satisfaction of women struggling with infertility. The strongest of these predictors is depression, which is also a factor lowering the acceptance of one’s own infertility. The conducted analyses revealed that predictors influencing the life satisfaction of patients treated for infertility are self-esteem and acceptance of one’s own infertility (apart from the aforementioned emotional state – anxiety, depression, irritation. It was found that the higher the self-esteem and acceptance of one’s own infertility, the higher was the satisfaction with life. Conclusions Knowledge of these determinants is extremely valuable for medical personnel conducting treatments, because, according to many studies, the psychological state of women suffering from procreation problems is connected not only with

  16. Laparoscopic evaluation of tubal pathology in cases of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maherunnessa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a public health problem in developed and developing countries. Diagnostic laparoscopy is a generally accepted procedure to detect pelvic organ pathologies affecting fertility. This study was undertaken to find out the tubal pathology contributing to primary and secondary infertility by laparoscopic examination. The study was carried out in the department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, BIRDEM during the period of January 2001 to December 2001. The study group comprised of 100 cases of infertile patients of age between 20 to 40 years. Sixty seven percent patients had primary infertility and 33% patients had secondary infertility. Size and shape of the uterus was normal in 69% cases and bicornuate uterus was found in 2% cases. Out of total cases, 71% and 69% had normal right and left fallopian tubes respectively. Patency of right and left fallopian tube was normal in 90% and 89% cases respectively while 11% and 10% had peritubal adhesions. Laparoscopy examination is an important tool for evaluation of tubal pathology contributing to infertility and might play a major role in infertility management. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2013; 7(2: 38-40

  17. Overtreatment in couples with unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, F A M; Hermens, R P G M; Braat, D D M; Hoek, A; Mol, B W J; Goddijn, M; Nelen, W L D M

    2015-01-01

    What is the percentage of overtreatment, i.e. fertility treatment started too early, in couples with unexplained infertility who were eligible for tailored expectant management? Overtreatment occurred in 36% of couples with unexplained infertility who were eligible for an expectant management of at least 6 months. Prognostic models in reproductive medicine can help to identify infertile couples that would benefit from fertility treatment. In couples with unexplained infertility with a good chance of natural conception within 1 year, based on the Hunault prediction model, an expectant management of 6-12 months, as recommended in international fertility guidelines, prevents unnecessary treatment. A retrospective cohort study in 25 participating clinics, with follow-up of all couples who were seen for infertility in 2011-2012. In all, 9818 couples were seen for infertility in the participating clinics. Couples were eligible to participate if they were diagnosed with unexplained infertility and had a good prognosis of natural conception (>30%) within 1 year based on the Hunault prediction model. Data to assess overtreatment were collected from medical records. Multilevel regression analyses were performed to investigate associations of overtreatment with patient and clinic characteristics. Five hundred and forty-four couples eligible for expectant management were included in this study. Among these, overtreatment, i.e. starting medically assisted reproduction within 6 months, occurred in 36%. The underlying quality indicators showed that in 34% no prognosis was calculated and that in 42% expectant management was not recommended. Finally, 16% of the couples for whom a correct recommendation of expectant management for at least 6 months was made, started treatment within 6 months anyway. Overtreatment was associated with childlessness, higher female age and a longer duration of infertility. No associations between overtreatment and clinic characteristics were found. The

  18. Knowledge, perception and attitude of infertile women in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With increasing utilization of Assisted Reproduction Technology (ART) in ... of 178 infertile patients attending the Human Reasearch and Reproduction (HRRP) unit ... Slightly more than half of the respondents (50.2%) perceived the cost of IVF ...

  19. Lycopene and male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Prashast, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inflicted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneficial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility—lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4–8 mg of lycopene daily for 3–12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility. PMID:24675655

  20. Microdeletions at DYS448 and DYS387S1 associate with increased risk of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanqing; Zhao, Qiurong; Liu, Hai

    2017-10-01

    Male infertility affects many people of reproductive age. Diagnosis and therapies based on descriptive semen parameters have helped some of the infertility patients; however, further progress in reproductive therapy demands a better understanding of the molecular and genetic causes for male infertility. Although Y chromosome microdeletions have been a hot subject of genetic studies on male infertility, the relationship between male infertility and microdeletions at Y chromosome loci DYS448, DYS387, and DYS627 remains unclear. Here we analyzed the microdeletions at these three loci in 200 infertility male patients and 200 healthy subjects and showed that microdeletions at DYS448 and DYS387 correlate with male infertility. Our results suggest that genetic analyses of Y chromosome loci DYS448 and DYS387 can be genetic markers for reproductive diagnosis and therapy.

  1. Pituitary gonodal axis in fertile and infertile human males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafiez, A.A.; Mahmoud, K.Z.; Abbas, E.Z.; Halawa, F.

    1984-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays of serum PRL, LH, FSH, testosterone and estradiol were performed in normal fertile subjects and infertile patients. The findings in the fertile group suggest that prolactin in human males has a role in steroidogenesis. Oligospermic and azospermic patients revealed hormonal patterns which were significantly higher than in the fertile group. Hyperprolactinemia was found in most cases of both infertile groups indicating that PRL has a significant role. (author)

  2. Laparohysteroscopy in female infertility: A diagnostic cum therapeutic tool in Indian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Suman; Jain, Dinesh; Puri, Sandeep; Kaushal, Sandeep; Deol, Satjeet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the role of laparohysteroscopy in female infertility andto study the effect of therapeutic procedures in achieving fertility. Patients with female infertility presenting to outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology were evaluated over a period of 18 months. Fifty consenting subjects excluding male factor infertility with normal hormonal profile and no contraindication to laparoscopy were subject to diagnostic laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. T-test. We studied 50 patients comprising of 24 (48%) cases of primary infertility and 26 (52%) patients of secondary infertility. The average age of active married life for 50 patients was between 8 and 9 years. In our study, the most commonly found pathologies were PCOD, endometroisis and tubal blockage. 11 (28.2) patients conceived after laparohysteroscopy followed by artificial reproductive techniques. This study demonstrates the benefit of laparohysteroscopy for diagnosis and as a therapeutic tool in patients with primary and secondary infertility. We were able to achieve a higher conception rate of 28.2%.

  3. Prospective evaluation of basal stromal Doppler studies in women with good ovarian reserve and infertility undergoing in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer treatment: patients with polycystic ovary syndrome versus ovulatory patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Johnny S; Jadaon, Jimmy E; Haddad, Sami; Izhaki, Ido; Ben-Ami, Moshe

    2011-04-01

    To gain insight into the ovarian stromal blood flow in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) as compared with women with normal ovulation, good ovarian reserve, and infertility and to evaluate the role of stromal flow in these patients to predict clinical pregnancy in an assisted reproductive technologies setting. A prospective observational cohort study. A university-affiliated reproductive medicine unit. Eighteen consecutive patients with PCOS (study) compared with 101 patients with normal ovulation and infertility (control), undergoing their first IVF-ET treatment at our unit. Women with low ovarian reserve were excluded a priori from evaluation. Basal ovarian reserve parameters and stromal flow studies were conducted as routinely performed in our unit, in a natural cycle before starting treatment. None. Basal ovarian endocrine, sonographic, and stromal flow studies were compared between the groups. After completion of treatment, the stromal flow studies were compared between conception and nonconception cycles. Patients' characteristics and basal ovarian reserve, including endocrine and sonographic parameters, were similar between the PCOS and control groups. Only antral follicle count and LH/FSH ratio were higher in the PCOS as compared with the control group, corresponding to 15.11 ± 6.05 versus 9.05 ± 4.77 and 1.14 ± 0.64 versus 0.79 ± 0.37, respectively. Basal stromal flow indices were similar between the PCOS group and the group with normal ovulation and good ovarian reserve. Clinical pregnancy rate per initiated cycle was 50.0% and 39.6% in the PCOS and control groups, respectively, with no significant difference. Flow indices were similar between conception cycles in the PCOS and control groups. As well, the indices did not differ significantly between conception and nonconception cycles within the PCOS and control groups. Basal ovarian stromal blood flow does not differ between women with PCOS and women with normal ovulation, good ovarian

  4. Fertility prognosis for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bostofte, E; Bagger, P; Michael, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a fertility prognosis model for infertile couples. DESIGN: Prospective follow-up study. PARTICIPANTS: In the period November 30, 1977 to June 1, 1985, 321 consecutive couples were investigated for infertility at Hvidovre University Hospital. Investigation of the female...... MEASURE: The Cox regression model was used to predict the time required to conceive based on informations provided by fertility investigations. RESULTS: Three of 16 prognostic variables (the period of infertility, the female infertility factor, and the P-test) possess significant prognostic information...

  5. Female Infertility: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prolactin blood test (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Female Infertility updates ... Serum progesterone Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Assisted Reproductive Technology Infertility Male Infertility National Institutes ...

  6. Male Infertility: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish Testicular biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Male Infertility updates ... analysis Sperm release pathway Testicular biopsy Related Health Topics Assisted Reproductive Technology Female Infertility Infertility National Institutes ...

  7. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of infertility among Saudi couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A; Alabdrabalnabi, Abdullah A; Albacker, Rehab B; Al-Jughaiman, Umar A; Hassan, Samar N

    2013-01-01

    Infertility places a huge psychological burden on infertile couples, especially for women. Greater knowledge of the factors affecting fertility may help to decrease the incidence of infertility by allowing couples to avoid certain risk factors. The aim of our study was (1) to assess the knowledge and attitudes of infertile and fertile Saudi participants on infertility, possible risk factors, and social consequences; and (2) to determine the practices of infertile Saudi couples to promote their fertility before having them attend an in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinic. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 277 fertile participants from outpatient clinics and 104 infertile patients from the IVF clinic at King Abdulaziz Medical City between June 24, 2012 and July 4, 2012, using a previously validated interview questionnaire. Descriptive and analytical statistics were applied with a significance threshold of P ≤ 0.05. A generally poor level of knowledge (59%) and a neutral attitude (76%) toward infertility were reported by participants. Mistaken beliefs commonly held by the study participants regarding the causes of infertility were Djinns and supernatural causes (58.8%), black magic (67.5%), intrauterine devices (71.3%), and contraceptive pills (42.9%). The healer/Sheikh was reported as the primary and secondary preference for infertility treatment by 6.7% and 44.2% of IVF patients, respectively. Compared with fertile patients, IVF patients were significantly less likely to favor divorce (38.5% versus 57.6%; P = 0.001) or marriage to a second wife (62.5% versus 86.2%; P < 0.001), if the woman could not have a baby. The patients with infertility had more favorable attitudes toward fertility drugs (87.5% versus 68.4%; P = 0.003) and having a test tube baby (92.4% versus 70.3%; P < 0.001). Child adoption was accepted as an option for treatment by the majority of IVF patients (60.6%) and fertile outpatients (71.5%). Alternative treatments previously practiced by the

  8. Infertility, infertility treatment and twinning: the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously observed that an increasing time to pregnancy (TTP) is associated with a reduced frequency of twin deliveries in couples not receiving infertility treatment. By using updated information, we assessed the frequencies of dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin...... deliveries as a function of infertility (TTP > 12 months), as well as infertility treatment. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51 730 fertile couples with TTP 12 months and 5163 infertile couples who conceived after treatment. Information on zygosity, available...... for part of the cohort (1997-2000), was based on standardized questions on the similarities between the twins at the age of 3-5 years. RESULTS: Compared with fertile couples, the frequency of DZ twin deliveries was lower for infertile couples conceiving naturally (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0...

  9. A survey of relationship between anxiety, depression and duration of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shariat Mamak

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cross sectional study was designed to survey the relationship between anxiety/depression and duration/cause of infertility, in Vali-e-Asr Reproductive Health Research Center, Tehran, Iran. Methods After obtaining their consents, 370 female patients with different infertility causes participated in, and data gathered by Beck Depression Inventory(BDI and Cattle questionnaires for surveying anxiety and depression due to the duration of infertility. This was studied in relation to patients' age, educational level, socio-economic status and job (patients and their husbands. Results Age range was 17–45 years and duration and cause of infertility was 1–20 years. This survey showed that 151 women (40.8% had depression and 321 women (86.8% had anxiety. Depression had a significant relation with cause of infertility, duration of infertility, educational level, and job of women. Anxiety had a significant relationship with duration of infertility and educational level, but not with cause of infertility, or job. Findings showed that anxiety and depression were most common after 4–6 years of infertility and especially severe depression could be found in those who had infertility for 7–9 years. Conclusions Adequate attention to these patients psychologically and treating them properly, is of great importance for their mental health and will improve quality of their lives.

  10. Counselling in infertility: individual, couple and group interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Uschi; Emery, Marysa; Wischmann, Tewes; Thorn, Petra

    2010-12-01

    Infertility is considered a biopsychosocial crisis and infertility counselling is recommended as an integral part of a multidisciplinary approach. This article will outline the theoretical background and describe common interventions used in infertility counselling for individuals, couples and in a group setting. This article summarizes the proceedings of the first campus workshop of the Special interest group of Psychology and Counselling of the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE). Infertility counselling offers the opportunity to explore, discover and clarify ways of living more satisfyingly and resourcefully when fertility impairments have been diagnosed. The Heidelberg Fertility Consultation Service is presented as a framework for individual and couples counselling and highlights important issues in counselling patients. For group work a number of steps to set up a group within an infertility framework are discussed. In recent years, infertility counselling has become a specialist form of counselling requiring professional expertise and qualification. Key issues and common interventions are presented to raise awareness for the specific counselling needs of individuals and couples experiencing infertility and undergoing medical treatment. Mental health professionals new to the field of reproductive technologies as well as those in other areas of mental health counselling clients with fertility disorders can benefit from the topics addressed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mesh hernia repair and male infertility: a retrospective register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallén, Magnus; Westerdahl, Johan; Nordin, Pär; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Sandblom, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the use of mesh in groin hernia repair may be associated with an increased risk for male infertility as a result of inflammatory obliteration of structures in the spermatic cord. In a recent study, we could not find an increased incidence of involuntary childlessness. The aim of this study was to evaluate this issue further. Men born between 1950 and 1989, with a hernia repair registered in the Swedish Hernia Register between 1992 and 2007 were cross-linked with all men in the same age group with the diagnosis of male infertility according to the Swedish National Patient Register. The cumulative and expected incidences of infertility were analyzed. Separate multivariate logistic analyses, adjusted for age and years elapsed since the first repair, were performed for men with unilateral and bilateral repair, respectively. Overall, 34,267 men were identified with a history of at least 1 inguinal hernia repair. A total of 233 (0.7%) of these had been given the diagnosis of male infertility after their first operation. We did not find any differences between expected and observed cumulative incidences of infertility in men operated with hernia repair. Men with bilateral hernia repair had a slightly increased risk for infertility when mesh was used on either side. However, the cumulative incidence was less than 1%. Inguinal hernia repair with mesh is not associated with an increased incidence of, or clinically important risk for, male infertility. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Infertile women below the age of 40 have similar anti-Müllerian hormone levels and antral follicle count compared with women of the same age with no history of infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidman, H. W.; Bentzen, J. G.; Thuesen, L. L.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Do infertile patients below the age of 40 years have a lower ovarian reserve, estimated by anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and total antral follicle count (AFC), than women of the same age with no history of infertility? SUMMARY ANSWER: Serum AMH and AFC were not lower in infertile p...

  13. Endometriosis and uterine malformations: infertility may increase severity of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujenah, Jeremy; Salakos, Eleonora; Pinto, Mélodie; Shore, Joanna; Sifer, Christophe; Poncelet, Christophe; Bricou, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    The aim of our study was to compare the stage and severity of endometriosis in fertile and infertile women with congenital uterine malformations. We performed an observational study from September 2007 to December 2015 in a tertiary care university hospital and assisted reproductive technology center. A total of 52 patients with surgically proven uterine malformations were included. We compared 41 infertile patients with uterine malformations with 11 fertile patients with uterine malformation. The main outcome was the stage, score and type of endometriosis in regard to infertility and class of uterine malformation. The rate of endometriosis did not differ between the two groups (43.9 vs. 36.4%). The mean revised American Fertility Society score was higher in infertile patients with uterine malformations (19.02 vs. 6, p endometriosis (43.9 vs. 37.5%). Endometrioma and deep infiltrating endometriosis were associated with uterine malformations in infertile women, respectively 14.6 and 0%. No difference in the characteristics of endometriosis was found regarding the class of malformation. The association of uterine malformations and infertility may increase the severity of endometriosis and raise the issue of their diagnosis and management. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. Association of increased total antioxidant capacity and anovulation in nonobese infertile patients with clomiphene citrate-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verit, Fatma Ferda; Erel, Ozcan; Kocyigit, Abdurrahim

    2007-08-01

    To investigate whether total antioxidant capacity (TAC) could predict the response to ovulation induction to clomiphene citrate (CC) in nonobese women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Prospective longitudinal follow-up study. Academic hospital. Fifty-five nonobese, oligomenorrheic women with polycystic ovary syndrome and normal indices of insulin sensitivity. None. Standard clinical examinations and ultrasonographic and endocrine screening, including FSH, LH, E(2), P, total T, sex hormone-binding globulin, DHEAS, and TAC were performed before initiation of CC medication. Within the total group, 27 (49%) of the patients did not ovulate at the end of follow-up. TAC, free androgen index, and ovarian volume were all significantly different in CC nonresponders from those in responders. Total antioxidant capacity was found to be the best predictor in univariate analysis (odds ratio, 171.55; 95% confidence interval, 10.61-2,772.93), and it had the highest area in the receiver operating characteristics analysis (0.91). In a multivariate prediction model, TAC, free androgen index, and ovarian volume showed good predictive power, with Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test of 0.80. Total antioxidant capacity was the strongest predictor of ovarian response during CC induction of ovulation in these patients. It can be concluded that TAC can be used as a routine screening test.

  15. Consanguinity and family clustering of male factor infertility in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Kobeissi, Loulou; Nassar, Zaher; Lakkis, Da'ad; Fakih, Michael H

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the influence of consanguineous marriage on male factor infertility in Lebanon, where rates of consanguineous marriage remain high (29.6% among Muslims, 16.5% among Christians). Clinic-based, case-control study, using reproductive history, risk factor interview, and laboratory-based semen analysis. Two IVF clinics in Beirut, Lebanon, during an 8-month period (January-August 2003). One hundred twenty infertile male patients and 100 fertile male controls, distinguished by semen analysis and reproductive history. None. Standard clinical semen analysis. The rates of consanguineous marriage were relatively high among the study sample. Patients (46%) were more likely than controls (37%) to report first-degree (parental) and second-degree (grandparental) consanguinity. The study demonstrated a clear pattern of family clustering of male factor infertility, with patients significantly more likely than controls to report infertility among close male relatives (odds ratio = 2.58). Men with azoospermia and severe oligospermia showed high rates of both consanguinity (50%) and family clustering (41%). Consanguineous marriage is a socially supported institution throughout the Muslim world, yet its relationship to infertility is poorly understood. This study demonstrated a significant association between consanguinity and family clustering of male factor infertility cases, suggesting a strong genetic component.

  16. Perspectives of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners in the support and treatment of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Erin; Sevigny, Marika; Sabarre, Kelley-Anne; Phillips, Karen P

    2014-10-14

    Infertility patients are increasingly using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to supplement or replace conventional fertility treatments. The objective of this study was to determine the roles of CAM practitioners in the support and treatment of infertility. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted in Ottawa, Canada in 2011 with CAM practitioners who specialized in naturopathy, acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, hypnotherapy and integrated medicine. CAM practitioners played an active role in both treatment and support of infertility, using a holistic, interdisciplinary and individualized approach. CAM practitioners recognized biological but also environmental and psychosomatic determinants of infertility. Participants were receptive to working with physicians, however little collaboration was described. Integrated infertility patient care through both collaboration with CAM practitioners and incorporation of CAM's holistic, individualized and interdisciplinary approaches would greatly benefit infertility patients.

  17. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Reza Khatami

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The androgen receptor (AR gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (NTAD. We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12 of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdeletions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12 patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 ± 0.35 (range, 11-26 and 19.96 ± 0.54 (range, 12-25 in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%, while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%. Conclusion: Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran.

  18. Effectiveness of low level laser therapy for treating male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirovich Moskvin, Sergey; Ivanovich Apolikhin, Oleg

    2018-01-01

    In half of the cases, the infertility of the couple is due to the disorder of the male fertility. The leading factors that cause male infertility are urogenital infections, disorders of the immune system, testicular and prostate pathology, as well as endocrine disorders. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is a very effective physical therapy method, used in many areas of medicine, including obstetrics and gynaecology, andrology and urology; and it is recommended as an integral part of the complex treatment of infertility. The literature review showed that LLLT is beneficial in treating male infertility. Laser can significantly improve the survival, motility and speed of movement of spermatozoa. Laser therapy of patients with prostatitis and vesiculitis can eliminate infiltrative-exudative changes, improve reproductive and copulatory functions. Local illumination of red (635 nm) and infrared (904 nm) spectra should be combined with intravenous laser blood illumination (ILBI) of red (635 nm) and ultraviolet (UV) (365 nm) spectra. PMID:29806585

  19. Indonesian infertility patients’ health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients’ patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. Methods An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Results Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women’s age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. Conclusions The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources in terms of the number and

  20. Protein intake and ovulatory infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarro, Jorge E; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Rosner, Bernard A; Willett, Walter C

    2008-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether intake of protein from animal and vegetable origin is associated with ovulatory infertility. A total of 18,555 married women without a history of infertility were followed up as they attempted a pregnancy or became pregnant during an 8 year period. Dietary assessments were related to the incidence of ovulatory infertility. During follow-up, 438 women reported ovulatory infertility. The multivariate-adjusted relative risk (RR) (95% confidence interval [CI]; P for trend) of ovulatory infertility comparing the highest to the lowest quintile of animal protein intake was 1.39 (1.01 to 1.90; 0.03). The corresponding RR (95% CI; P for trend) for vegetable protein intake was 0.78 (0.54 to 1.12; 0.07). Furthermore, consuming 5% of total energy intake as vegetable protein rather than as animal protein was associated with a more than 50% lower risk of ovulatory infertility (P =.007). Replacing animal sources of protein with vegetable sources of protein may reduce ovulatory infertility risk.

  1. Hysterosalpingographic (HSG pattern of infertility in women of reproductive age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinwe R Onwuchekwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a complex disorder with significant medical, psychological and economic problems. Aims: The aim of the study is to evaluate the structural abnormalities of the uterus and fallopian tubes in infertile women as elucidated by hysterosalpingography. Setting and Design: A retrospective study, conducted at the Radiology and Obstetric and Gynaecologic Departments of a tertiary health care institution. Materials and Methods: Evaluation of all consecutive patients in whom hysterosalpingographic (HSG was performed for infertility between July 2013 and June 2015 in the Department of Radiology. For the biodata, indications for the investigation and the HSG findings were obtained. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA for Windows, version 20 software. Results: A total of 299 patients were evaluated. Of these, 250 were for infertility with primary and secondary infertility constituting 18.4 and 81.6%, respectively. Seventy percent of the cases for infertility had abnormalities on the HSG. Normal uterine cavity was found in 123 (49.2% cases. Uterine filling defects were the most common uterine abnormality. Fallopian tube occlusion, loculated contrast material spillage and hydrosalpinx were more common on the right, and bilateral tubal occlusion was seen only in 11.2%. All cases of intravasation were associated with either unilateral or bilateral fallopian tube blockage or irregularity of the uterus. Conclusion: There was a high incidence of tubal disease in the women presenting with infertility. This was commonly as a result of infection and inflammatory process. This study showed that HSG is very vital in detecting birth canal pathologies; hence, the facility for this important procedure, especially fluoroscopy, should be made available in the health centres for adequate assessment of the women with infertility.

  2. Observations in infertile African males at an andrology clinic in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornman, M S; Schulenburg, G W; Boomker, D; Chauke, T R; Reif, S

    1994-01-01

    The major cause of infertility among black Africans is traditionally attributed to a female factor and few reports are available on the male factor. This study analyzed the clinical and seminal data obtained from a population of 1726 suspected infertile African men evaluated from July 1985 to June 1991. The possible cause of infertility was judged on the results of first semen analysis. Of these men, 49% were secondarily infertile and 36% had previously received treatment for a urethral discharge. Varicocoeles were present in 183 cases (11%) and 11% had serological evidence of previous exposure to syphilis. Azoospermia was present in 152 patients (9%), 5% had polizoospermia, 45% had hypospermia ( 6 mL) had hyperspermia. In 70% of patients a possible contributing male factor for infertility was found. It would appear that the male factor contributed significantly to infertility, and evaluation of the black African male can therefore be regarded as a rewarding venture.

  3. Infertility, infertility treatment, and congenital malformations: Danish national birth cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Bille, Camilla; Olsen, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether infertile couples (with a time to pregnancy of > 12 months), who conceive naturally or after treatment, give birth to children with an increased prevalence of congenital malformations. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Danish national birth cohort. Participants Three groups of liveborn children and their mothers: 50 897 singletons and 1366 twins born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy ≤ 12 months), 5764 singletons and 100 twins born of infertile couples who conceived naturally (time to pregnancy > 12 months), and 4588 singletons and 1690 twins born after infertility treatment. Main outcome measures Prevalence of congenital malformations determined from hospital discharge diagnoses. Results Compared with singletons born of fertile couples, singletons born of infertile couples who conceived naturally or after treatment had a higher prevalence of congenital malformations—hazard ratios 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.35) and 1.39 (1.23 to 1.57). The overall prevalence of congenital malformations increased with increasing time to pregnancy. When the analysis was restricted to singletons born of infertile couples, babies born after treatment had an increased prevalence of genital organ malformations (hazard ratio 2.32, 1.24 to 4.35) compared with babies conceived naturally. No significant differences existed in the overall prevalence of congenital malformations among twins. Conclusions Hormonal treatment for infertility may be related to the occurrence of malformations of genital organs, but our results suggest that the reported increased prevalence of congenital malformations seen in singletons born after assisted reproductive technology is partly due to the underlying infertility or its determinants. The association between untreated infertility and congenital malformations warrants further examination. PMID:16893903

  4. Toxoplasma gondii in women with bad obstetric history and infertility: a five-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abida Malik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the role of Toxoplasma gondii in women with bad obstetric (BOH history and in women with primary and secondary infertility. Methods: This study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College and Hospital for a period of 5 years from January 2004 to December 2009. Quantitative determination of IgM antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii infection was done by IgM capture ELISA in patients with history of BOH or infertility. Results: Out of a total of 441 subjects included in the study, 417 (94.6% had a BOH and 24 (5.4% subjects had infertility. Toxoplasma was found to be more common in females with two or more abortions 52 (76.5%. Similarly in patients with infertility due to Toxoplasma, secondary infertility (66.7% was more common than primary infertility. About 40.3% patients with BOH and 20% patients with infertility had healthy live issues after treatment with spiramycin. Conclusions: Toxoplasmosis is thus, an easily treatable cause of abortions and infertility. All antenatal females and females with infertility should be screened for toxoplasmosis.

  5. The efficiency of conventional microscopic selection is comparable to the hyaluronic acid binding method in selecting spermatozoa for male infertility patients

    OpenAIRE

    Meng-Ting Huang; Robert Kuo-Kuang Lee; Chung-Hao Lu; Ying-Jie Chen; Sheng-Hsiang Li; Yuh-Ming Hwu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate if hyaluronic acid (HA)-bound spermatozoa surpassed conventional microscopy-selected spermatozoa in the status of sperm DNA integrity by acridine orange (AO) fluorescence staining. Materials and methods: Spermatozoa obtained from couples with indication for the intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedure due to male infertility (n = 34) and control males with normal sperm parameters (n = 12) were analyzed using AO fluorescence staining after density-gradient ce...

  6. 'Mama and papa nothing': living with infertility among an urban population in Kigali, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, N; van de Wijgert, J; Coene, G; Gasarabwe, A; Temmerman, M

    2011-03-01

    Not being able to procreate has severe social and economic repercussions in resource-poor countries. The purpose of this research was to explore the consequences of female and/or male factor infertility for men and women in Rwanda. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Couples presenting with female and/or male factor infertility problems at the infertility clinic of the Kigali University Teaching Hospital (n = 312), and fertile controls who recently delivered (n = 312), were surveyed about domestic violence, current and past relationships and sexual functioning. In addition, five focus group discussions were held with a subsample of survey participants, who were either patients diagnosed with female- or male-factor fertility or their partners. Domestic violence, union dissolutions and sexual dysfunction were reported more frequently in the survey by infertile than fertile couples. The psycho-social consequences suffered by infertile couples in Rwanda are severe and similar to those reported in other resource-poor countries. Although women carry the largest burden of suffering, the negative repercussions of infertility for men, especially at the level of the community, are considerable. Whether the infertility was caused by a female factor or male factor was an important determinant for the type of psycho-social consequences suffered. In Rwanda, as in other resource-poor countries, infertility causes severe suffering. There is an urgent need to recognize infertility as a serious reproductive health problem and to put infertility care on the public health agenda.

  7. Infertility in Women: Hysterosalpingographic Assessment of the Fallopian Tubes in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Fabamwo, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Tubal disease constitutes a major factor in infertility especially in developing countries. This study was undertaken to assess the hysterosalpingographic patterns seen in infertile patients in an urban centre in Lagos. Two hundred and twenty patients who reported from the gynaecology clinic to the radiology department of Lagos State University…

  8. Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Website of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility? This fact sheet was ... with The Society of Reproductive Surgeons What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is when tissue is found outside the ...

  9. A radiologic analysis of hysterosalpinggographic finding in infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hae Young; Lee, Kyung Ja; Yoo, Seong Yul; Kim, Hee Seup

    1985-01-01

    Hysterosalpingography has been universally accepted and approved as valuable aid in the diagnosis and treatment of infertility. Radiologic and clinical analysis had been made on 200 cases of known infertile patient in Ewha Womans University Hospital from January, 1976 to August, 1979. The results are as followings: 1. In 200 cases of infertility, 90 cases (45.5%) are primary infertility and remaining 110 cases (55.5%) are secondary infertility. 2. The peak number of age distribution is 2nd decade group in 115 cases (57.5%). 3. The peak number of duration of infertility is less than 3 years in 107 cases (53,5%). 4. Abnormal uterine finding is 25 cases (12.5%) and there 4 cases (2.0%) of congenital anomaly among them. 5. Abnormal tubal finding is 120 cases (60.0%) and there are 84 cases (42.0%) of without spillage, 36 cases (18.0%) of with spillage, 51 cases (25.5%) of hydrosalpinx, 49 cases (24.5%) of simple obstruction among them. 6. Intravasation is noted in 66 cases (33.3%) among 200 cases. 7. There are significant results between the past history and the hysterosalpiingographic findings by the statistical approach. 8. Pregnancy after hysterosalpingography is noted in 16 cases (8.0%) among 200 cases.

  10. Cytogenetic studies among Iranian infertile men: The first 20-year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosomal aberrations have been postulated to be one of the principal genetic factors in male infertility and occur in about 2 to 3% of unselected patients with proven sub-fertility. This rate is estimated to be 5 to 7% in patients with oligospermia, increasing to 10 to 15% in patients with azoospermia. The aim of this study ...

  11. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary L Harton; Helen G Tempest

    2012-01-01

    infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family.Despite this,the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered.Nevertheless,more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified.This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically:chromosomal aneuploidy,structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions.Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans.Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin,but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts.Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm.Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed,as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases.Clinical recommendations where possible will be made,as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  12. Infertility Counseling and Support: When and Where to Find It

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  13. Unexplained infertility: identification of anti sperm antibodies using radiometric immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahed, Y.M.; Elnabarawy, F.; Hamada, T.; Ayiad, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Several methods have been employed to measure anti sperm antibodies with variable sensitivity and specificity in serum and secretion of infertile patients. All of them are not precise means for identification of the presence of anti sperm antibodies for patients with unexplained infertility (Haas et al, 1980). Therefore, the modified radiolabelled anti globulin test, that has been used successfully to identify and quantitate the antibodies directed towards other human cell surfaces, was applied. A total number of 128 subjects in different groups were studied to quantitate the circulating anti sperm antibodies using the modified procedure. The present data revealed that the highest and the most significant incidence were found in the patients secretions (semen and cervical mucus) with unexplained infertility, as well as in the group of males with varicocele. Therefore it is greatly advisable to use the modified radiolabelled technique as a quantitative assay, which will be helpful in management of infertility in patients with unexplained and mediated infertility.3 tab., 4 fig

  14. Clinical, genetic, biochemical, and testicular biopsy findings among 1,213 men evaluated for infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Inge Ahlmann; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Aksglaede, Lise

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the pathologic findings among men evaluated for infertility. DESIGN: A retrospective, single-center, cross-sectional study. SETTING: University hospital-based research center. PARTICIPANT(S): We included data from 1,213 medical records from infertile men referred for diagnostic......-only syndrome: n = 23; spermatogenic arrest: n = 7; impaired spermatogenesis and atrophy: n = 28). Additionally, in idiopathic infertile men and infertile men with additional symptoms of testicular dysgenesis syndrome, 22.5% presented with a degree of Leydig cell insufficiency, with the highest frequency (33.......1%) among patients with sperm concentration attention....

  15. The efficiency of conventional microscopic selection is comparable to the hyaluronic acid binding method in selecting spermatozoa for male infertility patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meng-Ting; Kuo-Kuang Lee, Robert; Lu, Chung-Hao; Chen, Ying-Jie; Li, Sheng-Hsiang; Hwu, Yuh-Ming

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate if hyaluronic acid (HA)-bound spermatozoa surpassed conventional microscopy-selected spermatozoa in the status of sperm DNA integrity by acridine orange (AO) fluorescence staining. Spermatozoa obtained from couples with indication for the intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedure due to male infertility (n = 34) and control males with normal sperm parameters (n = 12) were analyzed using AO fluorescence staining after density-gradient centrifugation (DGC), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-microscopic selection, and HA-binding selection to determine sperm DNA integrity. Percentages of DNA intact spermatozoa with green fluorescence were significantly higher in both PVP-microscopic selected spermatozoa (82.1 ± 24.0%) and HA-bound spermatozoa (83.9 ± 21.1%) than in spermatozoa prepared by DGC (66.8 ± 24.0%). However, there was no significant difference between the PVP-sperm and HA-sperm groups. When the percentage of green fluorescent spermatozoa prepared by DGC fell initially below 68%, both PVP-microscopic and HA-binding selection failed to select over 90% spermatozoa with intact DNA for ICSI in the male infertility group. Compared to control males with normal sperm parameters (99.3 ± 1.8%), the proportion of green fluorescence sperm after HA-binding selection from couples with male infertility (83.9 ± 21.1%) did not reach the range of > 99% reported by Yagci et al. The percentages of DNA intact spermatozoa between the PVP-sperm and HA-sperm groups were not significantly different. In an ICSI procedure, a well-trained embryologist will have the same ability to choose sperm with intact DNA by conventional microscopic selection as with HA-bound spermatozoa selection. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. 'Just because a doctor says something, doesn't mean that [it] will happen': self-perception as having a Fertility Problem among Infertility Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyser-Whalen, Ophra; Greil, Arthur L; McQuillan, Julia; Johnson, Katherine M; Shrefffler, Karina M

    2018-03-01

    Only some individuals who have the medically defined condition 'infertility' adopt a self-definition as having a fertility problem, which has implications for social and behavioural responses, yet there is no clear consensus on why some people and not others adopt a medical label. We use interview data from 28 women and men who sought medical infertility treatment to understand variations in self-identification. Results highlight the importance of identity disruption for understanding the dialectical relationship between medical contact and self-identification, as well as how diagnosis acts both as a category and a process. Simultaneously integrating new medical knowledge from testing and treatment with previous fertility self-perceptions created difficulty for settling on an infertility self-perception. Four response categories emerged for adopting a self-perception of having a fertility problem: (i) the non-adopters - never adopting the self-perception pre- or post-medical contact; (ii) uncertain - not being fully committed to the self-perception pre- or post-medical contact; (iii) assuming the label - not having prior fertility concerns but adopting the self-perception post-medical contact; and (iv) solidifying a tentative identity - not being fully committed to a self-perception pre-medical contact, but fully committed post-medical contact. (A virtual abstract of this paper can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_979cmCmR9rLrKuD7z0ycA). © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  17. Varicocele among infertile men in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElBardisi, H; Arafa, M; Rengan, A K; Durairajanayagam, D; AlSaid, S S; Khalafalla, K; AlRumaihi, K; Majzoub, A; Agarwal, A

    2017-05-01

    Objective of this retrospective study was to assess the presence and clinical grade of varicocele among Qatari and non-Qatari men evaluated for infertility. Diagnosis of varicocele was performed clinically and confirmed via colour Doppler ultrasonography. A total of 455 infertile male patients (mean age 36.3 ± 7.6 years) were divided into either Qatari (n = 91, mean age 37.3 ± 9.1 years) or non-Qatari (n = 364, mean age 36.0 ± 7.1 years) groups. Among all patients, 43.1% (n = 196) were confirmed to have varicocele, of which 40 were Qatari and 156 non-Qatari. Among all patients, 171 (37.6%) presented with left-sided varicocele and 25 (5.5%) with bilateral varicocele. Of the 196 patients with varicocele, grade I was given to 40 (20.4%), grade II to 68 (34.7%) and grade III to 88 (44.9%). Grade II and III varicocele were seen significantly more frequently than grade I among all patients and non-Qatari patients (p Qatar among both Qatari and non-Qatari men. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Cost-effective treatment for the couple with infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhis, B J; Syrop, C H

    2000-12-01

    Although the evaluation of cost-effective approaches to infertility treatment remains in its infancy, several important principles have emerged from the initial studies in this field. Currently, in treating couples with infertility without tubal disease or severe male-factor infertility, the most cost-effective approach is to start with IUI or superovulation-IUI treatments before resorting to IVF procedures. The woman's age and number of sperm present for insemination are significant factors influencing cost-effectiveness. The influence of certain diagnoses on the cost-effectiveness of infertility treatments requires further study. Even when accounting for the costs associated with multiple gestations and premature deliveries, the cost of IVF decreases within the range of other cost-effective medical procedures and decreases to less than the willingness to pay for these procedures. Indeed, for patients with severe tubal disease, IVF has been found to be more cost-effective than surgical repair. The cost-effectiveness of IVF will likely improve as success rates show continued improvements over the course of time. In addition, usefulness of embryo selection and practices to reduce the likelihood of high-order multiple pregnancies, without reductions in pregnancy rates, will significantly impact cost-effectiveness. The exclusion of infertility treatments from insurance plans is unfortunate and accentuates the importance of physicians understanding the economics of infertility treatment with costs that are often passed directly to the patient. The erroneous economic policies and judgments that have led to inequities in access to infertility health care should not be tolerated.

  19. The profile of infertility in a teaching Hospital in North West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar A Panti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a global health problem and a socially destabilizing condition for couples carrying several stigmas and a cause of marital disharmony. We determined the prevalence, causes, and clinical pattern of infertility at Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital (UDUTH, Sokoto. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study conducted at the Gynecological Department of UDUTH Sokoto between 1 st January, 2011 and 31 st July, 2011. All the patients that presented with infertility within the study period were recruited into the study. Relevant demographic, clinical, and laboratory/radiological data were documented using a structured questionnaire. The patients had their case folders tagged and followed up to 31 st December 2011 (6 months. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 11. Results: A total of 1,264 new gynecological cases were seen during the study period, and 198 infertile patients were evaluated. The prevalence of infertility was 15.7%. Primary infertility constituted 32.8%, while secondary infertility was 67.2%. Previous history of evidence of genital infection including lower abdominal pain (78.8% and vaginal discharge (76.6% were common. Female gender-related causes of infertility accounted for 42.9%; male causes accounted for 19.7%. Both partners contributed to infertility in 16.7%, while no cause was found in 20.7% of patients. Conclusion: The study shows a dominance of secondary infertility with probable genital tract infection being a major contributor. Early presentation and prompt treatments of genital tract infections may reduce the prevalence of infertility in the study population.

  20. Potential role of cadmium in varicocele-associated infertility and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: to study the possible role of cadmium in varicocele-associated infertility and its relation to smoking. Patients: the study was performed on twenty infertile men with clinically evident varicocele (grade II & III); half of them were smokers. In addition to another twenty fertile men without clinical varicocele and with ...

  1. Association of HSPA1B rs6457452 Genetic Variant with Idiopathic Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Kohan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Male infertility is a multifactorial disease resulting from the interaction between the genetic and environmental factors. Spermatogenic Failure accounts for more than half of male infertility cases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs are the molecular chaperones that are involved in different developmental stages of spermatogenesis. The current study was planned to investigate the role of HSPA1B rs6457452 genetic variants in male infertility. Material and Methods: This case control study was conducted on 516 subjects consisted of 308 patients with idiopathic male infertility and 208 control subjects. After DNA extraction from peripheral blood, genotype determination was done by Tetra-ARMS PCR method. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association between the polymorphism and male infertility. Results: A significant difference was observed in genotype distributions between cases and controls. Results showed individuals with TC (OR=1.552, 95%CI: 1.032-2.334, p=0.035 and TT (OR=2.746, 95%CI: 1.153-6.545, p=0.023 genotype had an increased risk of male infertility. Also, there was a significant association between T allele (OR=1.695, 95%CI: 1.220-2.355, p<0.001 and male infertility. Conclusion: This study showed for the first time that HSPA1B rs6457452 polymorphism is associated with infertility risk in Iranian men and the T allele may act as a dominant allele for increasing the risk of male infertility.

  2. Human parasitic protozoan infection to infertility: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiadeh, Malihe Nourollahpour; Niyyati, Maryam; Fallahi, Shirzad; Rostami, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Protozoan parasitic diseases are endemic in many countries worldwide, especially in developing countries, where infertility is a major burden. It has been reported that such infections may cause infertility through impairment in male and female reproductive systems. We searched Medline, PubMed, and Scopus databases and Google scholar to identify the potentially relevant studies on protozoan parasitic infections and their implications in human and animal model infertility. Literature described that some of the protozoan parasites such as Trichomonas vaginalis may cause deformities of the genital tract, cervical neoplasia, and tubal and atypical pelvic inflammations in women and also non-gonoccocal urethritis, asthenozoospermia, and teratozoospermia in men. Toxopalasma gondii could cause endometritis, impaired folliculogenesis, ovarian and uterine atrophy, adrenal hypertrophy, vasculitis, and cessation of estrus cycling in female and also decrease in semen quality, concentration, and motility in male. Trypanosoma cruzi inhibits cell division in embryos and impairs normal implantation and development of placenta. Decrease in gestation rate, infection of hormone-producing glands, parasite invasion of the placenta, and overproduction of inflammatory cytokines in the oviducts and uterine horns are other possible mechanisms induced by Trypanosoma cruzi to infertility. Plasmodium spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause damage in pituitary gland, hormonal disorders, and decreased semen quality. Entamoeba histolytica infection leads to pelvic pain, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess, and genital ulcers. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis can induce genital lesion, testicular amyloidosis, inflammation of epididymis, prostatitis, and sperm abnormality in human and animals. In addition, some epidemiological studies have reported that rates of protozoan infections in infertile patients are higher than healthy controls. The current review indicates that protozoan parasitic

  3. Sociodemographic Findings in an Infertile Male Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Güngör

    2008-08-01

    CONCLUSION: This study claims that the previously established risk factors which are considered to be associated with infertility might influence less or interfere with male infertility in more subtle ways.

  4. Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms associated with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Madon, Prochi F; Parikh, Firuza R

    2010-01-01

    with higher order organisation of chromatin in genes associated with infertility and pericentromeric regions of chromosomes, particularly 9 and Y, could further identify causes of idiopathic infertility. Determining the association between DNA methylation, chromatin state, and noncoding RNAs...

  5. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of infertility among Saudi couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfotouh MA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa A Abolfotouh,1 Abdullah A Alabdrabalnabi,2 Rehab B Albacker,3 Umar A Al-Jughaiman,4 Samar N Hassan5 1King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2University of Dammam, College of Medicine, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 3King Saud University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4King Faisal University, College of Medicine, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 5Division of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Introduction: Infertility places a huge psychological burden on infertile couples, especially for women. Greater knowledge of the factors affecting fertility may help to decrease the incidence of infertility by allowing couples to avoid certain risk factors. The aim of our study was (1 to assess the knowledge and attitudes of infertile and fertile Saudi participants on infertility, possible risk factors, and social consequences; and (2 to determine the practices of infertile Saudi couples to promote their fertility before having them attend an in vitro fertilization (IVF clinic. Methods and materials: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 277 fertile participants from outpatient clinics and 104 infertile patients from the IVF clinic at King Abdulaziz Medical City between June 24, 2012 and July 4, 2012, using a previously validated interview questionnaire. Descriptive and analytical statistics were applied with a significance threshold of P ≤ 0.05. Results: A generally poor level of knowledge (59% and a neutral attitude (76% toward infertility were reported by participants. Mistaken beliefs commonly held by the study participants regarding the causes of infertility were Djinns and supernatural causes (58.8%, black magic (67.5%, intrauterine devices (71.3%, and contraceptive pills (42.9%. The healer/Sheikh was reported as the primary and secondary preference for infertility

  6. Thyroid dysfunction in infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elahi, S.; Tanseem, A.; Nazir, I.; Nagra, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of thyroid dysfunction in infertile women referred for thyroid evaluation. Age matched infertile (n=140 each) and fertile women (n=152 each) referred to CENUM for thyroid evaluation were investigated for incidence of hyperthyroidism (TSH 20 IU/L). Serum free T4 (FT4), free T3 (FT3) and antithyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) was determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and TSH by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Most of the infertile women (89.3%), like control women (93.4%), were euthyroid. The difference of overall thyroid dysfunction was not statistically significant in infertile and control women (10.7% vs. 7.9%; p=0.395). The same was true for incidence of hyperthyroidism (4.3% vs. 5.3%; p=0.701) as well as hypothyroidism (6.4% vs. 2.6%; p=0.104). In infertile women, the incidence of hypothyroidism (6.4%) was slightly higher as compared to hyperthyroidism (4.3%). In euthyroid women of both groups, mean FT4, FT3 and TSH levels were significantly higher (p 2.5 mIU/L compared to fertile women (31.2% vs. 15.6%; p 20 IU/L) than control women (7.2% vs. 1.4%; p<0.05). Increased incidence of high normal TSH and raised TPO-Ab titer indicate relatively more frequent occurrence of compensated thyroid function in infertile women than normal women of reproductive age. This necessitates considering them a subgroup of women in which all aspects of pituitary-thyroid axis should be thoroughly investigated than merely TSH testing. (author)

  7. Dyadic dynamics of perceived social support in couples facing infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, M V; Peterson, B D; Almeida, V; Mesquita-Guimarães, J; Costa, M E

    2014-01-01

    Is perceived social support from partner, family, and friends associated with increased infertility-related stress? While men's perceived support did not seem to influence their partners' stress, women's perceptions of spousal and familial support can affect the way men deal with the challenge of infertility. Previous studies showed that low levels of social support are associated with poor psychosocial adjustment and treatment termination in women and men. Studies examining the impact of social support using the couple as unit of analysis are lacking. A cross-sectional sample of 613 Portuguese patients participated in the research, online over a 3-month period, and in a public fertility clinic over 11 months. The final sample comprised 213 married or cohabiting couples (191 from the fertility clinic) who were actively attempting to have a child, were seeking infertility treatment and had not undergone previous preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Perceived social support was assessed through the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and infertility-related stress was assessed with the fertility problem inventory. Hypotheses were tested by applying the actor-partner interdependence model using structural equation modeling. Couples had been living together for an average (±SD) of 6 ± 3.5 years, and attempting a pregnancy for 3.8 ± 2.6 years. Nearly half of the couples had undergone infertility treatment (41.3%). Infertility stress was found to be associated with low family support for women (β = -0.27, P = .003), and low partner support for both men (β = -0.29, P = .001) and women (β = -0.45, P = .006). Both women and men's perceived friend support were not significantly related to male or female infertility stress. Men infertility stress was also associated with their partners low levels of partner (β = -0.24, P = .049) and family support (β = -0.23, P family support), the explained variance of the model in women's fertility stress was greater (R

  8. Online negotiations of infertility: Knowledge production in (in)fertility blogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, K.

    2014-01-01

    to conceive, arguing that blogging helps women to renegotiate their experiences of femininity when motherhood is denied or difficult. To do this, I focus on blogs as a space for knowledge production, creating a new paradigm for fertility information which challenges both the doctor/patient power dynamic......Although now used for a wide range of functions such as education, marketing and political commentary, blogs were originally a space for narrating personal life stories and have much in common with autobiography and diary genres. This article examines (in)fertility blogs written by women trying...... and traditional discourses concerning fertility. I show how bloggers use their blogs to 'make sense' of their (in)fertility experiences by looking at the distinctive content, style and format of their blogs. Finally, the knowledge produced in the blogs is problematized by 'situating' them within a broader...

  9. Are severe depressive symptoms associated with infertility-related distress in individuals and their partners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Sejbæk, Camilla Sandal; Prritano, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    the individual and partner level. What is known already?: An infertility diagnosis, the stress of medical treatments and a prior history of depression are risk factors for future depression in those undergoing fertility treatments. Studies examining the impact of severe depressive symptoms on infertility-related......Study question: Are severe depressive symptoms in women and men associated with individual and dyadic infertility-related stress in couples undergoing infertility treatment? Summary answer: Severe depressive symptoms were significantly associated with increased infertility-related distress at both....../materials, setting, methods: Participants were consecutively referred patients undergoing a cycle of medically assisted reproduction treatment at five Danish public and private clinics specializing in treating fertility patients. Severe depressive symptoms were measured by the Mental Health Inventory 5 from...

  10. Clinical Outcomes of Varicocele Repair in Infertile Men: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Chiba

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Varicoceles are a major cause of impaired spermatogenesis and the most common correctable cause of male infertility. They are found in approximately 40% of men with primary infertility and 80% of men with secondary infertility, although they also occur in 12% of men with normal semen parameters. The presence of a varicocele does not always affect spermatogenesis, as it has been reported that only 20% of men with documented varicoceles suffer fertility problems. However, varicocele repair appears to have beneficial effects in men with impaired semen parameters and palpable varicoceles. Currently, the main procedures employed for varicocele repair are microsurgical subinguinal or inguinal varicocelectomy, laparoscopic varicocelectomy, and radiological percutaneous embolization. Microsurgical varicocelectomy appears to be the optimal treatment in most cases, whereas the other procedures are useful only in specific cases. After treatment, it typically takes 3 to 6 months for patients’ semen parameters to improve; thus, other therapies, including assisted reproductive technology, should be considered if infertility persists after this interval, especially in older couples. Controversies still remain regarding how varicoceles in certain subgroups, such as adolescents or men with azoospermia, should be treated. Due to their relatively high prevalence rate among the general population, varicoceles can occur concomitantly with other conditions that cause impaired spermatogenesis. Further studies are necessary in order to identify the patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment. In this review, we sought to summarize the issues currently associated with varicocele treatment in infertile men.

  11. [Infertility over forty: Pros and cons of IVF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaisch-Allart, J; Maget, V; Mayenga, J-M; Grefenstette, I; Chouraqui, A; Belaid, Y; Kulski, O

    2015-09-01

    The population attempting pregnancy and having babies is ageing. The declining fertility potential and the late age of motherhood are increasing significantly the number of patients over forty consulting infertility specialists. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) cannot compensate the natural decline in fertility with age. In France, in public hospital, ART is free of charge for women until 43 years, over 43, social insurance does not reimburse ART. Hence, 43 years is the usual limit, but between 40 and 42 is ART useful? The answer varies according to physicians, couples or society. On medical level, the etiology of the infertility must be taken into account. If there is an explanation to infertility (male or tubal infertility) ART is better than abstention. If the infertility is only due to age the question is raised. In France, the reimbursement by the society of a technique with very low results is discussed. However efficacy is not absolutely compulsory in Medicine. On the opposite to give false hopes may be discussed too. To obtain a reasonable consensus is rather difficult. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with Endometriosis in Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Ashrafi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endometriosis affects women’s physical and mental wellbeing. Symptoms include dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain, and infertility. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between some relevant factors and symptoms and risk of an endometriosis diagnosis in infertile women. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 1282 surgical patients in an infertility Institute, Iran between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated by laparoscopy. Of these, there were 341 infertile women with endometriosis (cases and 332 infertile women with a normal pelvis (comparison group. Chi-square and t tests were used to compare these two groups. Logistic regression was done to build a prediction model for an endometriosis diagnosis. Results: Gravidity [odds ratio (OR: 0.8, confidence interval (CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01], parity (OR: 0.7, CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01, family history of endometriosis (OR: 4.9, CI: 2.1-11.3, P0.05. Fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain and premenstrual spotting were more significant among late-stage endometriosis patients than in those with early-stage endometriosis and more prevalent among patients with endometriosis than that of the comparison group. In the logistic regression model, gravidity, family history of endometriosis, history of galactorrhea, history of pelvic surgery, dysmenorrhoea, pelvic pain, dysparaunia, premenstrual spotting, fatigue, and diarrhea were significantly associated with endometriosis. However, the number of pregnancies was negatively related to endometriosis. Conclusion: Endometriosis is a considerable public health issue because it affects many women and is associated with the significant morbidity. In this study, we built a prediction model which can be used to predict the risk of endometriosis in infertile women.

  13. Activity of LPO Processes in Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, L I; Kolesnikov, S I; Darenskaya, M A; Grebenkina, L A; Nikitina, O A; Lazareva, L M; Suturina, L V; Danusevich, I N; Druzhinina, E B; Semendyaev, A A

    2017-01-01

    Specific features of LPO processes and antioxidant defense were studied in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and infertility. Changes in LPO processes in patients with PCOS were compensatory, which manifested in increased α-tocopherol and retinol concentrations and moderate decrease in superoxide dismutase activity. Intensification of prooxidant processes was found in the group of patients with infertility without PCOS. The observed changes necessitate differentiated approach to the treatment of these patients.

  14. A randomised controlled trial of intra-uterine insemination versus in vitro fertilisation in patients with idiopathic or mild male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzeiny, Hossam; Garrett, Claire; Toledo, Manuela; Stern, Kate; McBain, John; Baker, Hugh William Gordon

    2014-04-01

    The cause of infertility is unexplained or poorly explained in 30-40% of couples undergoing standard investigations, and treatment ranges from expectant management to IUI and IVF. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical pregnancy rates and costs of intra-uterine insemination (IUI) and in vitro fertilisation (IVF) in women where the same ovarian stimulation led to the development of two or three mature follicles. A randomised controlled clinical trial compared the efficacy of IUI and IVF in a tertiary fertility centre (ISRCTN28780587). Primary outcome measures were fetal heart positive pregnancy rate and cost per live birth. The selection criteria were age: females 18-42 years and males 18-60 years, infertility for one year or more, no IVF or IUI for 12 months prior to the trial, and no coital, tubal or ovulatory disorders, oligospermia, untreated endometriosis or contraindication for multiple pregnancy. All women (n = 102) had the same dose FSH stimulation protocol. Those who developed two or three preovulatory follicles were randomised 3:1 to IUI (n = 33) or IVF (n = 10). IUI or IVF was performed 36 h after hCG administration with single or double embryo transfer on day two. Clinical pregnancy rates (40% vs 12%, P = 0.04) and live birth rate (40% vs 6%, P = 0.01) were higher for IVF than IUI. The cost per live birth was AU$8735 for IVF compared with $42,487 for IUI. This study provides evidence that IVF is more successful and cost-effective than IUI using the same doses of FSH. Further confirmatory studies are required. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  15. The efficacy of metformin and clomiphene citrate combination compared with clomiphene citrate alone for ovulation induction in infertile patients with PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papa Dasari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Low ovulatory and pregnancy rates with clomiphene citrate (CC in anovulatory polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. Aim: To find out the ovulatory and pregnancy rates in infertile PCOS subjects who receive CC alone and a combination of metformin and CC. Setting and Design: A prospective controlled clinical trial conducted in the outpatient department from August 2003 to August 2005. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four infertile PCOS women received CC alone at incremental doses of 50 mg up to 150 mg for three cycles and then at a dose of 150 mg for another three cycles (control group. The study group (16 PCOS received the same dose of CC along with 1500mg of metformin. Ovulation was monitored by transvaginal sonography up to six cycles or till pregnancy occurred. Statistical Analysis: This was carried out using software SSPS, version 10. Fisher′s exact test was used to calculate the ovulatory rates. Nine subjects of the control group who failed to conceive with CC had opted for CC and metformin and their ovulatory rate was calculated using statistical software, namely SPSS 15.0, Stata 8.0, MedCalc 9.0.1 and Systat 11.0 using Fischer′s exact test. Results: The metformin and clomiphene combination resulted in a significantly higher rate of ovulation ( P = 0.0016. The pregnancy rate was 8% with CC and 24% with metformin and CC. The CC failure group also ovulated at a similar rate as that of the study group. Conclusions: The ovulatory rate and the pregnancy rate with the metformin-CC combination was found to be higher when compared with CC alone. Metformin increased the ovulatory rate in CC failures, also implying increased sensitivity to CC.

  16. THE CHANGING FACE OF MEDICINE IN THE 21ST CENTURY – THE EXAMPLE OF INFERTILE CLOMID FAILED INSULIN RESISTANT POLYCYSTIC OVARIAN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE THERAPY (ART I N PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwat Jehan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of metformin administration in insulin resistant infertile polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS patients who had failed clomid. The research was conducted at the University Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART Institute in Pakistan – a developing country with a high prevalence of diabetes. 166 PCOS patients submitted to ART out of 277 referrals (59.9%. Of these 78 (47% achieved pregnancies with 75.6% take home babies and 24.4% reproductive failure prior to ART, Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI and In Vitro Fertilization (IVF. The total healthy take home baby rate was 47% of the 166 patients. These seventy eight (78 patients became pregnant prior to ART after starting metformin for insulin resistance. 88 required ART and 19 of these delivered a healthy baby. Metformin (500 to 2500 mg daily was started prior to pregnancy and continued throughout pregnancy. Metformin 1500 mg daily for 3 months resulted in 59 live and well neonates averaging 3.1kg. Metformin <1500 mg daily and / or administration for less than 3 months prior to Pregnancy resulted in 18 abortions and 1 intrauterine death at 30 weeks gestation with no live neonate. Almost 50% became pregnant without ART. When ART was needed 19 out of 88 patients delivered a live baby. Almost 50% of patients with failed ART elsewhere became pregnant on this regime with take home healthy babies and 6 did not require ART. Metformin 1500mg daily administrated for at least 3 months prior to pregnancy and continued throughout pregnancy had an uncomplicated neonatal outcome in 59 patients compared to lower doses or shorter duration of administration in 19 patients who had a uniformly poor pregnancy outcome. The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE and American Society for Reproductive Society (ASRM guidelines are biologically and statistically flawed. In South Asia infertile PCOS patients require a long term life cycle approach. Early insulin resistance should be

  17. Knowledge, perceptions and myths regarding infertility among selected adult population in Pakistan: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Syed F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reported prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is approximately 22% with 4% primary and 18% secondary infertility. Infertility is not only a medical but also a social problem in our society as cultural customs and perceived religious dictums may equate infertility with failure on a personal, interpersonal, or social level. It is imperative that people have adequate knowledge about infertility so couples can seek timely medical care and misconceptions can be rectified. We aim to assess the knowledge, perception and myths regarding infertility and suggest ways to improve it. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out by interviewing a sample of 447 adults who were accompanying the patients at two tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. They were interviewed one-on-one with the help of a pretested questionnaire drafted by the team after a thorough literature review and in consultation with infertility specialists. Results The correct knowledge of infertility was found to be limited amongst the participants. Only 25% correctly identified when infertility is pathological and only 46% knew about the fertile period in women's cycle. People are misinformed that use of IUCD (53% and OCPs (61% may cause infertility. Beliefs in evil forces and supernatural powers as a cause of infertility are still prevalent especially amongst people with lower level of education. Seeking alternative treatment for infertility remains a popular option for 28% of the participant as a primary preference and 75% as a secondary preference. IVF remains an unfamiliar (78% and an unacceptable option (55%. Conclusions Knowledge about infertility is limited in the population and a lot of misconceptions and myths are prevalent in the society. Alternative medicine is a popular option for seeking infertility treatment. The cultural and religious perspective about assisted reproductive technologies is unclear, which has resulted in its reduced

  18. Knowledge, perceptions and myths regarding infertility among selected adult population in Pakistan: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sumera; Sophie, Raafay; Imam, Ayesha M; Khan, Faisal I; Ali, Syed F; Shaikh, Annum; Farid-ul-Hasnain, Syed

    2011-10-04

    The reported prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is approximately 22% with 4% primary and 18% secondary infertility. Infertility is not only a medical but also a social problem in our society as cultural customs and perceived religious dictums may equate infertility with failure on a personal, interpersonal, or social level. It is imperative that people have adequate knowledge about infertility so couples can seek timely medical care and misconceptions can be rectified. We aim to assess the knowledge, perception and myths regarding infertility and suggest ways to improve it. A cross-sectional survey was carried out by interviewing a sample of 447 adults who were accompanying the patients at two tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. They were interviewed one-on-one with the help of a pretested questionnaire drafted by the team after a thorough literature review and in consultation with infertility specialists. The correct knowledge of infertility was found to be limited amongst the participants. Only 25% correctly identified when infertility is pathological and only 46% knew about the fertile period in women's cycle. People are misinformed that use of IUCD (53%) and OCPs (61%) may cause infertility. Beliefs in evil forces and supernatural powers as a cause of infertility are still prevalent especially amongst people with lower level of education. Seeking alternative treatment for infertility remains a popular option for 28% of the participant as a primary preference and 75% as a secondary preference. IVF remains an unfamiliar (78%) and an unacceptable option (55%). Knowledge about infertility is limited in the population and a lot of misconceptions and myths are prevalent in the society. Alternative medicine is a popular option for seeking infertility treatment. The cultural and religious perspective about assisted reproductive technologies is unclear, which has resulted in its reduced acceptability.

  19. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and Booklets Ten Things Physicians and Patients Should Question Choosing Wisely: When It's Hard To Get Pregnant RESOURCES Overview Infographic Gallery Educational ...

  20. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and Booklets Ten Things Physicians and Patients Should Question Choosing Wisely: When It's Hard To Get Pregnant RESOURCES Overview Infographic Gallery Educational ...

  1. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and Booklets Ten Things Physicians and Patients Should Question Choosing Wisely: When It's Hard To ...

  2. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and Booklets Ten Things Physicians and Patients Should Question Choosing Wisely: When It's Hard To ...

  3. The role of the female doctorally prepared nurse in caring for infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, L S

    1993-01-01

    Today, in medical and nursing literature, infertility is described as a couple problem, with interventions aimed at treating the couple. While not dismissing the fact that the conception does involve both genders, the reality of infertility treatment is that the woman, not the couple, undergoes the majority of infertility testing and treatment. The numerous physical demands made of women during infertility investigation and therapy are associated with significant emotional and informational needs. As such, all infertility practices should offer supportive counseling to their clients. Incorporation of such services into general infertility treatment will ensure that the greatest number of female infertility clients receive the information and emotional support they need. The health care professional best qualified to provide these services is the female doctorally prepared nurse. By virtue of both her gender and training, she is more likely to be capable of intervening therapeutically, woman to woman, in a sensitive and empathic manner. Furthermore, she can anticipate extending her role to include the following services: (a) provision of basic gynecological care, (b) follow-up of patients on hormone therapy, (c) coordination of patient care, (d) provision of supportive counseling, and (e) participation in research. To secure a position, the female doctorally prepared nurse needs to recognize the importance of promoting herself in the infertility marketplace. Ultimately, both the establishment and survival of her role will depend on her professional uniqueness.

  4. The Role Of Staphylococcus Haemolyticus In Men Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Ghizzawi, Ghaed’a. J.; Jomaa, Zahraa K.

    2018-05-01

    A total of 80 samples of seminal fluid from infertile men who were admitted to clinics and attended laboratories in Omara City during the period from 1 June 2016 to 1 December 2016, samples were subjected to semen analysis as recommended by WHO. The age of patients was from 20 – 59 year. Another 25 semen samples were collected from fertilized men considered as the control group. For this purpose seminal fluid were cultured on MacConkey agar, Blood agar, Chocolate agar. Within the 80 samples recorded S. haemolyticus appeared in 14 cases and the rate of infection was 18%, all strains was diagnosed by Vitek system 2 Double. The highest percent (64%) was recorded in the age group 30 – 39. Primary infertility recorded 94% while 6% was recorded for secondary infertility. Also, different species of bacterial isolates were identified in 32 cases by Vitek system 2 Double. The bacterial infection of the male genital system affected fertility.

  5. Identification of Reproductive Education Needs of Infertile Clients Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment Using Assessments of Their Knowledge and Attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezabadi Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background In order to empower infertile individuals and provide high quality patient-centered infertility care, it is necessary to recognize and meet infertile individuals’ educational needs. This study aims to examine infertility patients’ knowledge and subsequently their education needs given their attitudinal approach to infertility education in terms of patients who undergo assisted reproduction treatment. Materials and Methods This descriptive study enrolled 150 subjects by conveni- ence sampling of all patients who received their first assisted reproductive treatment between July and September 2015 at a referral fertility clinic, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. We used a questionnaire that measured fertility and infertility information (8 questions as well as attitude toward education on the causes and treatment of infertility (5 questions. Chi-square, independent sample t test, and one way ANOVA analyses were conducted to examine differences by sex. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Total mean knowledge was 3.08 ± 0.99. Clients’ responses indicated that the highest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of factors that affected pregnancy (3.97 ± 1.11 and infertility treatment (3.97 ± 1.16. The lowest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of the natural reproductive cycle (2.96 ± 1.12 and anatomy of the genital organs (2.94 ± 1.16. Most females (92.1% and males (83.3% were of the opinion that infertility education programs should include causes of infertility and types of treatment associated with diagnostic and laboratory procedures. No statistically significant difference existed between male and female participants (P=0.245. Conclusion Most participants in this study expressed awareness of factors that affect pregnancy and infertility treatment. It is imperative to educate and empower infertile individuals who seek reproduction treatment in terms of infertility causes and types of treatment, as

  6. Cultural Constructions of Infertility in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    The Work of a Woman is to give Birth to Children: Cultural ... sexuality, cosmology and religion can be examined. .... adult and are often seen to be of minimal ... marked variability of rates and meanings with the consequences of infertility being closely aligned to ...... and lifelong attachments is heavily weighed upon,.

  7. Seroevidence Of Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection In Infertile Male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Given the lack of information concerning the role of Chlamydia trachomatis in male infertility, it has become imperative to analyse the quality of semen of male with seroevidence of antibody to Chlamydia trachomatis infection. A total of 156 male patients attending the Human Reproduction Research Programme/Invitro ...

  8. Influence of Khat on seminal fluid among presumed infertile couples ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Abnormal values were obtained for relatively older patients who also showed a higher frequency of marriage, prolonged duration of infertility and greater number of children ever fathered (p<0.05). The normal and abnormal results for khat and other drug consumers accounted for 97 (53%) and 86 (47%) in contrast ...

  9. Scrotal abnormalities and infertility in west African men: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine and compare the spectrum of scrotal abnormalities in fertile and sub-fertile west African men using scrotal US. Subjects and methods: The study examined 249 subjects over a period of 13 months. The subjects comprised 149 patients with diagnosis of male infertility, as well as 100 healthy ...

  10. Unexplained infertility: association with inherited thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatini, Cinzia; Conti, Lucia; Turillazzi, Valentina; Sticchi, Elena; Romagnuolo, Ilaria; Milanini, Maria Novella; Cozzi, Cinzia; Abbate, Rosanna; Noci, Ivo

    2012-05-01

    Unexplained infertility represents one of the most common diagnoses in fertility care. Attention is being paid to the association between inherited thrombophilia and infertility causes. In this study we investigated the prevalence of inherited thrombophilia according to infertility causes. We studied Prothrombin gene G20210A mutation, Factor V Leiden, deficiencies in protein S and C and antithrombin in 930 Caucasian infertile women referred to Fertility Center of the Department of Sciences for Woman and Child's Health, University of Florence, of whom 230 with unexplained, 195 female and 283 male infertility, and in 240 women who have conceived naturally without hormonal stimulation therapy. A significant relationship between inherited thrombophilia [OR 95%CI 1.97 (1.05-3.68), p = 0.03] and unexplained infertility was observed, whereas no association between thrombophilia and female and male infertility was found. Significantly higher prevalence of prothrombin gene mutation in unexplained infertile women in comparison to that observed in fertile women was observed (5.7% vs 2.1% p = 0.04); the prevalence of the other thrombophilia determinants was higher, even if not significantly, in the unexplained infertile group. This study demonstrates the relationship between inherited thrombophilia and unexplained infertility, thus suggesting the contribution of genetic components in modulating unexplained infertility, behind anovulation, male and tubal factor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lower FOXO3 mRNA expression in granulosa cells is involved in unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hikaru; Yamashita, Yoshiki; Saito, Natsuho; Hayashi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Masami; Terai, Yoshito; Ohmichi, Masahide

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether FOXO1 and FOXO3 mRNA expression in granulosa cells is the cause of unexplained infertility. Thirty-one patients aged infertility and 18 with male partner infertility as a control group) whose serum anti-Müllerian hormone level was >0.5 ng/μL were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent oocyte retrieval under a short protocol from June 2012 to October 2013. Real-time PCR was carried out using mRNA extracted from granulosa cells retrieved from mature follicles. We compared FOXO1 and FOXO3 mRNA expression ratios in granulosa cells between the unexplained infertility group and the male infertility group. The relation between FOXO1 and FOXO3 mRNA expression ratios in granulosa cells and assisted reproduction technology clinical outcome was also examined. FOXO3 mRNA expression ratio was significantly lower in the unexplained infertility group than in the male infertility group. Moreover, FOXO3 mRNA expression ratio showed a positive correlation with both the number of retrieved oocytes and serum anti-Müllerian hormone level. A positive correlation was also identified between FOXO1 mRNA expression and total dose of hMG. As well, the number of retrieved oocytes in the unexplained infertility group was statistically lower than that in the male infertility group. A lower FOXO3 mRNA expression in granulosa cells leads to poor oocyte development in patients with unexplained infertility undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  12. Management of infertility in women over 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabry, Rosalie; Merviel, Philippe; Hazout, Andre; Belloc, Stephanie; Dalleac, Alain; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef

    2014-05-01

    Women's fertility potential is declining with age because of multiples intrinsic and extrinsic factors such as life style, oxidative stress and/or endocrine disruptors and is affecting the ability of these women to conceive naturally. This declining fertility potential and the late age of motherhood is increasing significantly the number of patients consulting infertility specialists. Different strategies of investigation and management are proposed to patients over 40 in order to overcome their infertility and improve the live birth rate in these patients. Intra Uterine Insemination (IUI) in women over 40 is associated with a low rate of ongoing pregnancy and IUI should not therefore be offered always as the first line of treatment. When the predictive factors are positive IVF/ICSI seem to be good alternatives until 43 years of age. Customized ovarian stimulation and flexible laboratory methods such as in vitro maturation (IVM), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), embryo vitrification and transfer after thawing in subsequent natural or artificial cycles can improve the success rate of ART in patients over 40. Meanwhile, oocyte and embryos donation remain good options for patient over 40 with a bad prognosis and can lead to successful ongoing pregnancies until 45 years of age. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation, oocyte vitrification at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage or metaphase II stage present a breakthrough for fertility preservation but the ideal age for starting fertility preservation is still debated as well as the minimum number of oocytes to be vitrified in order to optimize the chances of pregnancy when needed at an older age. This manuscript reports the results of our own experience from patients older than 40 in the light of the published data and discusses the different therapeutic alternatives which can be proposed to patients over 40 consulting ART centres. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Relationship between infertility-related stress and emotional distress and marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gana, Kamel; Jakubowska, Sylwia

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive effects of infertility-related stress on psychological distress and marital satisfaction. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate a nonrecursive model hypothesizing the impact of infertility-related stress on both emotional distress and marital dissatisfaction, which were supposed to have a reciprocal influence on each other. The model was estimated using data from a sample of 150 infertile patients (78 males and 72 females). Findings confirmed the predictive effects of infertility-related stress on both emotional and marital distress. However, infertility-related stress was found to have more impact on emotional distress than on marital satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. The Evaluation of the Relationship Between Obesity and Male Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Fikret Erdemir

    2013-01-01

      Infertility, defined as the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse, affects approximately 15% of couples. Male factor infertility is the sole cause of infertility in approximately 20% of infertile couples, with an additional 30% to 40% secondary to both male and female factors. Thus, male factor infertility is present in approximately half of all infertile couples. Known etiologies of male infertility include cryptorchidism, testicular torsion or trauma, varico...

  15. Is infertility a risk factor for female sexual dysfunction? A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millheiser, Leah S; Helmer, Amy E; Quintero, Rodolfo B; Westphal, Lynn M; Milki, Amin A; Lathi, Ruth B

    2010-11-01

    To determine the impact of infertility on female sexual function. A case-control study. Academic infertility and gynecology practices. One hundred nineteen women with infertility and 99 healthy female controls without infertility between the ages of 18 and 45 years were included in this study. Anonymous survey and Female Sexual Function Index. Female Sexual Function Index scores, frequency of sexual intercourse and masturbation, and sex-life satisfaction. Twenty-five percent of our control group had Female Sexual Function Index scores that put them at risk for sexual dysfunction (masturbation. The patients with infertility retrospectively reported a sex-life satisfaction score that was similar to that of the controls before their diagnosis, whereas their current sex-life satisfaction scores were significantly lower than those of the controls. Women with a diagnosis of infertility were found to be at higher risk for sexual dysfunction on the basis of their Female Sexual Function Index scores compared with women without infertility. The interaction of sexual function and infertility is complex and deserves further study. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Total antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation with and without in vitro zinc supplementation in infertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajina, T; Sallem, A; Haouas, Z; Mehdi, M

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and malondialdehyde (MDA) level in infertile men with asthenozoospermia and asthenoteratozoospermia compared to fertile donors, and to examine the effect of zinc on sperm lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in infertile and fertile men. Semen samples provided by infertile men (n = 38) and fertile donors (controls; n = 12) were exposed to 6 mmol/L of zinc for 2 hr at 37°C. After semen analysis, lipid peroxidation was detected by MDA assay and seminal TAC was assessed by colorimetric method using TAS (total antioxidant status) Kit. TAC was significantly lower in infertile group compared to controls (p = .037). However, lipid peroxidation did not alter in infertile patients compared to controls (p > .05). After in vitro incubation of samples with zinc, a significant increase in TAC level was found only in infertile men (p zinc had no effect on sperm lipid peroxidation in both fertile and infertile men (p > .05). Our data indicate that antioxidant treatment based on zinc in vitro supplementation may be helpful to enhance the rate of seminal antioxidant status in infertile men; however, it does not prevent sperm lipid peroxidation. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Nationwide survey of urological specialists regarding male infertility: results from a 2015 questionnaire in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumura, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Imamoto, Takashi; Umemoto, Yukihiro; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shiraishi, Koji; Shin, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Hisanori; Chiba, Koji; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Iwamoto, Teruaki

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the incidence, etiology, treatment indications, and outcomes regarding infertile male patients in Japan. Between April, 2014 and March, 2015, the authors contacted 47 clinical specialists in male infertility who had been certified by the Japan Society for Reproductive Medicine. The participating clinicians were sent a questionnaire regarding information on their infertile patients, according to etiology and the number and success rates of male infertility operations that had been performed in their practice. Thirty-nine specialists returned the questionnaire and provided information regarding 7268 patients. The etiology of infertility included testicular factors, sexual disorders, and seminal tract obstruction. During the study year, the clinicians performed varicocelectomies, testicular sperm extractions (TESEs), and re-anastomoses of the seminal tract. The rate of successful varicocelectomies was >70%. The sperm retrieval rates with conventional TESE and microdissection TESE were 98.3% and 34.0%, respectively, while the patency rates with vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy were 81.8% and 61.0%, respectively. Surgical outcomes for infertile male patients are favorable and can be of great clinical benefit for infertile couples. To achieve this, urologists should work in collaboration with gynecological specialists in order to optimize the treatment of both partners.

  18. A new strategy for professional medical support couples with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Zhukov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From our point of view, the problem of infertility in a pair of appropriately addressed jointly by the two related disciplines. This process has been actively helping set newsupplements Spematon and Pregnoton. The study included 50 couples planning to conceive: 25 couples with male factor infertility secretory type (group 1, 25 couples with infertility caused by varicocele in the postoperative period (group 2. The first group included patients with hyperprolactinemia relative to a second group – 25 somatically healthy patients. All groups patients takes Spematon and Pregnoton during 3 months. Terms of infertility in couples ranged from 1 to 4,5 years and an average reached 2,8 ± 1,6 years. According to the results of the comparative analysis the reproductive value of sperm had been enhanced, functional status of the female reproductive system had been improved, the menstrual cycle had been normalized and relatively elevated levels of prolactin had been decreased after co-application of these supplements. Five woman became pregnant.

  19. Laparoscopic examination of the reproductive organs in women treated for infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popiela, A.; Kasiak, J.; Heimrath, T.; Cislo, M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors discuss 84 cases of laparoscopic examination of women with primary or secondary infertility. The patients qualified for this examination had undergone at least 26 weeks of conventional treatment with no effect. In 7 cases the reproductive organ was found to be in order, with fallopian tubes fully patent. In 43 cases tubar inpatency was found (using hysterosalpingographic examination). The remaining patients suffered from other reproductive organ disorders. Therefore, the laparoscopic examination made detailed recognition of the causes of infertility possible and thus helped to establish the proper treatment. Additionally, in some cases it enabled the immediate removal of the source of infertility. (author)

  20. Intraoperative verification of hysterosalpingography and laparoscopy in cases of oviductal infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cislo, M.; Murawski, M.; Popiela, A.

    1993-01-01

    There has been made an analysis of 45 cases of women's oviductal infertility qualified to surgical treatment. In search of these reasons of infertility these patients underwent hysterosalpingographic examination and 24 of them additionally, diagnostic laparoscopy with chromoturbation. Positive intraoperative verification of HSG and laparoscopy, as a confirmation of tubal obstruction, they obtained at 40 women (88.9%) that made possible to carry out microsurgical operations in them. Such a big percentage of correct diagnoses make sure, that both HSG and laparoscopy are indispensable for proper qualification of a patient to microsurgical treatment of oviductal infertility. (author)

  1. Polycystic ovaries and infertility: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Rajashekar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is one of the most common (15-20% endocrine disorders in women of childbearing age. Although it is a major cause of infertility, its etiology remains unknown and its treatment difficult. Aim: To evaluate the incidence, treatment and outcome of patients with PCOS. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: PCOS patients (914 of the 1057 attending the outpatient department (OPD from June 2003 to February 2008 were evaluated for this study. Of the 914 patients investigated, 814 came for treatment and these patients were studied for hormonal disturbances and their response to various modalities of treatment. Results: Of the 2270 infertility patients, 46.50% (1057 had PCOS, out of these, 86.47% (914 were investigated and 77% (814 came for treatment. Our overall pregnancy rate was 48.40% (394/814. The pregnancy rate per cycle with timed intercourse (TI was 44.77% (47/105, 17.09% (286/1673 with intrauterine insemination (IUI, 29.82% (51/171 with in vitro fertilization (IVF and 22.22% (10/45 with frozen embryo transfer (FET. The maximum number of pregnancies (85.29%, 284/333 were achieved in the first three treatment cycles. The abortion rate was 19.01% (73/384 and the incidence of ectopic pregnancy was 5.47% (21/384. Complications seen were in the form of ovarian hyperstimulation (OHSS, retention cyst on day two and multiple pregnancies in 11.71% (228/1946 of the total treatment cycles. Conclusion: Most PCOS symptoms could be adequately controlled or eliminated with proper diagnosis and treatment. Thus, ovulation induction (OI protocols and treatment modalities must be balanced for optimal results.

  2. Pattern and outcome of infertility in Enugu: the need to improve diagnostic facilities and approaches to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwu, E O; Onwuka, C I; Okezie, O A

    2012-01-01

    In Nigeria, infertility is a social for the childless couple due to the high premium placed on propagating oneself. To determine the pattern of infertility among women attending the gynaecological clinic of university of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu and to examine the outcome of management. A descriptive retrospective design study based on findings from the folders of infertile couples presenting at the gynaecological clinic of University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital over a five year period (2004 - 2008). The data were collected from all documented and laboratory findings. The data extracted from the case records were the socio-demographic characteristics of the patients, the type of infertility whether primary or secondary, the causes, and the treatment in the years under review. The outcome of management was also evaluated. These were analyzed using SPSS 12.0.1 for window version. The mean age of the women was 34.1 +/- 4.9 range 21 - 46) years. The prevalence of infertility was 5.5% of all outpatient gynaecological consultations. The cause of infertility could not be determined in 39.4% of cases, female factors were identified as the sole causes in 28.7% of cases, male factors as sole causes in 11.5% of cases, and combined male/female factors in 20.4% of cases. Secondary infertility accounted for 76.8% of infertility and primary infertility 23.2%. The age of the women and the educational level did not significantly influence the type of infertility the women presented with (P > 0.05). Tubal factor was identified in majority of cases and pregnancy was recorded in only 17.0% of the women. Secondary infertility is more prevalent in Enugu with tubal factor accounting for majority of the cases with identifiable causes. The outcome of treatment of infertility is poor. There is need to improve infertility diagnostic and treatment facilities and approaches in Enugu, Nigeria.

  3. A Survey on Infertility in Royan Institute

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    Mohammad Kamali

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is defined as failure in pregnancy after one year of unprotected intercourse.Several centers have reported different causes of infertility. The most common causes of infertility are:male factor such as sperm disturbance, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal factor,both male and female factor, and unexplained infertility .The aim of this study was to survey theepidemiology of infertility in Royan institute.Material and Methods: In this descriptive retrospective study, 2492 infertile couples were studied.These couples were selected by systematic sampling among couples referred to Royan institutebetween 1995 and 2001.All existing demographic data and diagnostic methods were recorded inquestionnaires .Results were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5.Results: In this study, the frequency of primary and secondary infertility was 90.1% and 9.9%,respectively. Among 2492 couples, 50.5% had male factor, 28.6% had female factor, 11.6% had bothmale and female factors and in 9.3% of couples, the cause of infertility was unknown .Results showedthat 32.3% of men had normal spermogram, 23.6% of couples had azoospermia, and 40.3% had spermdisturbance including oligospermia, asthenospermia, oligoasthenospermia and teratospermia .3.8%were not able to collect sample for semen analysis. Among women, different infertility factors included:ovarian factor (20.36%, tubal factor (12.64%, uterine factor (4.13%, endometriosis (1.28% andrecurrent abortion (0.68%. 50.48% of women were normal.Conclusion: Although male factor was the most common cause of infertility in Royan institute, we cannot conclude that this factor is the most common cause of infertility in Iran since this center isconsidered referral especially for male infertility. We suggest performance of similar researches inother centers to evaluate the most common causes of infertility in Iran.

  4. [Serum markers of oxidative stress in infertile women with endometriosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Aline Zyman de; Rodrigues, Jhenifer Kliemchen; Dib, Luciana Azôr; Romão, Gustavo Salata; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Jordão Junior, Alceu Afonso; Navarro, Paula Andrea de Albuquerque Salles

    2010-06-01

    to compare serum markers of oxidative stress between infertile patients with and without endometriosis and to assess the association of these markers with disease staging. this was a prospective study conducted on 112 consecutive infertile, non-obese patients younger than 39 years, divided into two groups: Endometriosis (n=48, 26 with minimal and mild endometriosis - Stage I/II, and 22 with moderate and severe endometriosis - Stage III/IV) and Control (n=64, with tubal and/or male factor infertility). Blood samples were collected during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle for the analysis of serum malondialdehyde, glutathione and total hydroxyperoxide levels by spectrophotometry and of vitamin E by high performance liquid chromatography. The results were compared between the endometriosis and control groups, stage I/II endometriosis and control, stage III/IV endometriosis and control, and between the two endometriosis subgroups. The level of significance was set at 5% (p Control Group (8.0 ± 2 µMol/g protein) and among patients with stage III/IV disease (9.7 ± 2.3 µMol/g protein) compared to patients with stage I/II disease (8.2 ± 1.0 µMol/g protein). No significant differences in serum malondialdehyde levels were observed between groups. we demonstrated a positive association between infertility related to endometriosis, advanced disease stage and increased serum hydroxyperoxide levels, suggesting an increased production of reactive species in women with endometriosis. These data, taken together with the reduction of serum vitamin E and glutathione levels, suggest the occurrence of systemic oxidative stress in women with infertility associated with endometriosis. The reproductive and metabolic implications of oxidative stress should be assessed in future studies.

  5. Identification of Reproductive Education Needs of Infertile Clients Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment Using Assessments of Their Knowledge and Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezabadi, Zahra; Mollaahmadi, Fahimeh; Mohammadi, Maryam; Omani Samani, Reza; Vesali, Samira

    2017-01-01

    Background In order to empower infertile individuals and provide high quality patient-centered infertility care, it is necessary to recognize and meet infertile individuals’ educational needs. This study aims to examine infertility patients’ knowledge and subsequently their education needs given their attitudinal approach to infertility education in terms of patients who undergo assisted reproduction treatment. Materials and Methods This descriptive study enrolled 150 subjects by conveni- ence sampling of all patients who received their first assisted reproductive treatment between July and September 2015 at a referral fertility clinic, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. We used a questionnaire that measured fertility and infertility information (8 questions) as well as attitude toward education on the causes and treatment of infertility (5 questions). Chi-square, independent sample t test, and one way ANOVA analyses were conducted to examine differences by sex. Pinfertility treatment (3.97 ± 1.16). The lowest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of the natural reproductive cycle (2.96 ± 1.12) and anatomy of the genital organs (2.94 ± 1.16). Most females (92.1%) and males (83.3%) were of the opinion that infertility education programs should include causes of infertility and types of treatment associated with diagnostic and laboratory procedures. No statistically significant difference existed between male and female participants (P=0.245). Conclusion Most participants in this study expressed awareness of factors that affect pregnancy and infertility treatment. It is imperative to educate and empower infertile individuals who seek reproduction treatment in terms of infertility causes and types of treatment, as well as diagnostic and laboratory procedures to enable them to make informed decisions about their assisted reproductive procedures. PMID:28367301

  6. Lifestyle causes of male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the potential effects of lifestyle factors on male reproductive health. Evidence of a global decline in human sperm quality over recent decades has been accumulating. Environmental, occupational, and modifiable lifestyle factors may contribute to this decline. This review focuses on key lifestyle factors that are associated with male infertility such as smoking cigarettes, alcohol intake, use of illicit drugs, obesity, psychological stress, advanced paternal age, dietary practices, and coffee consumption. Other factors such as testicular heat stress, intense cycling training, lack of sleep and exposure to electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone use are briefly discussed. Materials and method: A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify and synthesise all relevant information, mainly from within the last decade, on the major lifestyle factors associated with male infertility and semen quality. Database searches were limited to reports published in English only. A manual search of bibliographies of the reports retrieved was conducted to identify additional relevant articles. Results: In all, 1012 articles were identified from the database search and after reviewing the titles and abstract of the reports, 104 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 30 reports were excluded as the full-text could not be retrieved and the abstract did not have relevant data. The remaining 74 reports were reviewed for data on association between a particular lifestyle factor and male infertility and were included in the present review. Conclusion: The major lifestyle factors discussed in the present review are amongst the multiple potential risk factors that could impair male fertility. However, their negative impact may well be mostly overcome by behaviour modification and better lifestyle choices. Greater awareness and recognition of the possible impact of these lifestyle factors are important amongst couples seeking

  7. Hydrotubation in the management of female infertility: outcome in low resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesiyun, A G; Cole, B; Ogwuche, P

    2009-01-01

    To determine the outcome of therapeutic hydrotubation (tubal flushing) in patients with tubal infertility and unexplained infertility. Prospective non-randomised observational study. Alba hospital, a five bed multidisciplinary private hospital in Kaduna city, Nigeria. Infertile women with tubal and unexplained infertility. Two hundred and fifty seven patients that had therapeutic hydrotubation over 7.5 years were analysed. The age range was 21 to 44 years with mean of 34.5 years. Secondary infertility was found in 209 (81.3%) patients and primary infertility in 166 (64.6%) patients. Of the 257 patients, 134 (52.1%) had had induced abortion. Indications for hydrotubation were bilateral perifimbrial adhesion (incomplete tubal occlusion) 47.9%, bilateral fimbrial end occlusion 24.9%, bilateral cornual blockage 16% and unexplained infertility in 11.3% of cases. One hundred and nine conceptions were recorded in this study and the overall conception rate was 42.4%. Likewise, percentage ratio of conception in these 154 patients with evidence of post-hydrotubation tubal patency was 70.8%. Pregnancy outcome of the 109 conceptions are term pregnancy 84.4%, preterm pregnancy 9.2%, miscarriage 4.6% and ectopic pregnancy in 1.8% of the conceptions. Recorded complications were pelvic pain in 177 (68.9%) patients and vaginal bleeding in 63 (24.5%) patients. With good case selection, therapeutic hydrotubation may be beneficial in resource poor countries, especially in patients with incomplete tubal occlusion (bilateral perifimbrial adhesions) and as part of treatment for unexplained infertility.

  8. Value of hysteroscopy in management of unexplained infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha M. Elbareg

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: As a cause of unexplained infertility, subtle uterine abnormalities are diagnosed only during hysteroscopy and they are relatively common in infertility women. Although the presence of these abnormalities is not detected by the basic investigations for infertility, their correction seems to be necessary when infertility is desired and other infertility causes are excluded.

  9. Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Utilization of Prayer and Clergy Counseling by Infertile US Women Desiring Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Stephen C; Kim, Soorin; Chan, Esther

    2017-11-29

    Religion can have a significant influence on the experience of infertility. However, it is unclear how many US women turn to religion when facing infertility. Here, we examine the utilization of prayer and clergy counsel among a nationally representative sample of 1062 infertile US women. Prayer was used by 74.8% of the participants, and clergy counsel was the most common formal support system utilized. Both prayer and clergy counsel were significantly more common among black and Hispanic women. Healthcare providers should acknowledge the spiritual needs of their infertile patients and ally with clergy when possible to provide maximally effective care.

  10. Epidemiological Survey and Risk Factor Analysis of Recurrent Spontaneous Miscarriages in Infertile Women at Large Infertility Centers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yan Wang; Jie Qiao; Xiao-Xi Sun; Shu-yu Wang; Xiao-Yan Liang; Yun Sun; Feng-Hua Liu

    2017-01-01

    Background:A higher frequency of spontaneous miscarriage has been observed in infertile couples,and there is a higher prevalence of infertility among patients with a history of recurrent spontaneous miscarriages (RSMs;>2 miscarriages).This study aimed to determine the proportion of infertile patients with RSM and examine risk factors associated in patients with RSM being treated with assisted reproductive technologies.Methods:This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at six reproductive medicine centers in three cities of China.Data of 751 patients with at least one spontaneous miscarriage were analyzed.Demographic data and etiological factors associated with infertility were compiled and compared between patients with a single spontaneous miscarriage (SSM) and those with RSM.Results:Two hundred (26.6%,95% confidence interval [CI]:23.50-29.95%) patients experienced RSMs and 551 (73.4%) had a single miscarriage.The odds of RSM increased with increasing age (odds ratio [OR] =1.06),uterine disorders (OR =2.09),endocrine disorders (OR =2.48),and immune disorders (OR =2.98).Higher education level,masters or above,and a pelvic cavity disorder were associated with lower risk of RSM (OR =0.27 and 0.46,respectively).Late spontaneous miscarriages were more frequent in patients with RSM than in those with a SSM (31.5% vs.14.2%,respectively,P < 0.001) and were associated with a history of uterine cavity procedures (OR =2.095) and cervical factors related to infertility (OR =4.136,95% CI:1.012-16.90).Conclusions:Compared to patients with only a SSM,the conditions of patients with RSM are more complicated.To increase the success rate of assisted reproductive technology,factors including uterus cavity adhesion,cervical relaxation,endocrine disorders,and immune disorders should be treated before assisted reproduction is initiated.These data may provide treatment guidance for infertile patients with a history of RSM.

  11. Liquid crystal thermography of the testicles in the diagnosis of infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeblyoes, P.; Vydra, G.; Szabolcs, I.; Irsy, G.; Goth, M.; Szilagyi, G.

    1982-08-01

    The use of liquid thermography (LCT) of the testicles in diagnosis of infertility was investigated. Varicocele, the most common cause of male infertility, is easily detectable by LCT. The technique may be used as a control after surgical treatment. In the majority of patients with oligo-azoospermia, LCT corresponded to physical examination of the testicles. In patients with oligo-azoospermia and both testicles normal to palpation, LCT is useful method for determining the colder testicle for biopsy purposes.

  12. Super Infection of An Ovarian Dermoid Cyst with Actinomyces in An Infertile Woman

    OpenAIRE

    Salehpour, Saghar; Akbari Sene, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    We present super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst with actinomyces in an infertile patient. This is a case-report study for evaluation a couple with male factor infertility, who was a good candidate for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), while a 10 cm dermoid cyst was found in the woman’s right ovary. Patient complained of pelvic pain, intermittent fever, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia. The cyst was extracted using laparoscopy, whilst in histopathological examination, an actinomycosi...

  13. Conservative Nonhormonal Options for the Treatment of Male Infertility: Antibiotics, Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Calogero, Aldo E.; Condorelli, Rosita A.; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; La Vignera, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The nonhormonal medical treatment can be divided into empirical, when the cause has not been identified, and nonempirical, if the pathogenic mechanism causing male infertility can be solved or ameliorated. The empirical nonhormonal medical treatment has been proposed for patients with idiopathic or noncurable oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and for normozoospermic infertile patients. Anti-inflammatory, fibrinolytic, and antioxidant compounds, oligo elements, and vitamin supplementation may be pr...

  14. Liquid crystal thermography of the testicles in the diagnosis of infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeblyoes, P.; Vydra, G.; Szabolcs, I.; Irsy, G.; Goth, M.; Szilagyi, G.

    1982-01-01

    The use of liquid thermography (LCT) of the testicles in diagnosis of infertility was investigated. Varicocele, the most common cause of male infertility, is easily detectable by LCT. The technique may be used as a control after surgical treatment. In the majority of patients with oligo-azoospermia, LCT corresponded to physical examination of the testicles. In patients with oligo-azoospermia and both testicles normal to palpation, LCT is useful method for determining the colder testicle for biopsy purposes. (orig.)

  15. Alternative and antioxidant therapies used by a sample of infertile males in Jordan: a cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is frequently used in the Middle East, especially to treat chronic diseases such as infertility. We aimed to examine the prevalence, characteristics, and determinants of CAM use, particularly herbs and antioxidant therapies, among infertile males presenting for infertility evaluation in Jordan. Methods Demographic information, use of alternative and antioxidant therapies for infertility treatment, and patients’ belief in efficacy and safety of the therapies used were collected using a face-to-face questionnaire. Data were collected from 428 infertile male patients presenting at infertility clinics in Amman, the capital city of Jordan. The study was conducted between April 2013 and September 2013. Results Of the 428 men who completed the questionnaire, 184 (43%) used at least one of the alternative and antioxidant therapies specified in the questionnaire. Nutritional regime; vitamins, such as vitamins C and E; and medicinal herbs, such as ginger, saw palmetto, and ginseng were the most commonly used therapies reported. A correlation between the use of alternative and antioxidant therapies versus infertility duration was found. Additionally, the majority of males using CAM did not inform their health care providers about their usage. Conclusions The high prevalence of CAM use among infertile male patients underscores the urge to assimilate CAM into the education and training of health professionals, as well as to improve infertile patients’ knowledge of the safe use of CAM modalities. PMID:25026980

  16. Role of Ultrasound in Male Infertility

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    Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    US evaluation is the mainstay of diagnostic imaging of infertile men. In this editorial, we review the spectrum of diseases responsible for male infertility, discuss the way in which US imaging studies can be used for evaluation of male infertility, and illustrate characteristic US imaging features that allow for specific diagnosis. The discussion will be divided into three main categories: obstruction in sperm passage, impairment of sperm function, and defect in sperm genesis.

  17. Role of Ultrasound in Male Infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu

    2012-01-01

    US evaluation is the mainstay of diagnostic imaging of infertile men. In this editorial, we review the spectrum of diseases responsible for male infertility, discuss the way in which US imaging studies can be used for evaluation of male infertility, and illustrate characteristic US imaging features that allow for specific diagnosis. The discussion will be divided into three main categories: obstruction in sperm passage, impairment of sperm function, and defect in sperm genesis.

  18. Comprehensive 5-Year Study of Cytogenetic Aberrations in 668 Infertile Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsenko, Alexander N.; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Weedin, John W.; Lawrence, Amy E.; Patel, Ankita; Peacock, Sandra; Matzuk, Martin M.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The causes of male infertility are heterogeneous but more than 50% of cases have a genetic basis. Specific genetic defects have been identified in less than 20% of infertile males and, thus, most causes remain to be elucidated. The most common cytogenetic defects associated with nonobstructive azoospermia are numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities, including Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) and Y chromosome microdeletions. To refine the incidence and nature of chromosomal aberrations in males with infertility we reviewed cytogenetic results in 668 infertile men with oligozoospermia and azoospermia. Materials and Methods High resolution Giemsa banding chromosome analysis and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization were done in 668 infertile males referred for routine cytogenetic analysis between January 2004 and March 2009. Results The overall incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was about 8.2%. Of the 55 patients with abnormal cytogenetic findings sex chromosome aneuploidies were observed in 29 (53%), including Klinefelter syndrome in 27 (49%). Structural chromosome abnormalities involving autosomes (29%) and sex chromosomes (18%) were detected in 26 infertile men. Abnormal cytogenetic findings were observed in 35 of 264 patients (13.3%) with azoospermia and 19 of 365 (5.2%) with oligozoospermia. Conclusions Structural chromosomal defects and low level sex chromosome mosaicism are common in oligozoospermia cases. Extensive cytogenetic assessment and fluorescence in situ hybridization may improve the detection rate in males with oligozoospermia. These findings highlight the need for efficient genetic testing in infertile men so that couples may make informed decisions on assisted reproductive technologies to achieve parenthood. PMID:20172548

  19. Results of infertility investigations and follow-up among 312 infertile women and their partners in Kigali, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, Nathalie; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Busasa, Rosette; Gasarabwe, Ammiel; Temmerman, Marleen

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the outcome of infertility investigations and an 18-month follow-up of 312 infertile women and their partners in Rwanda. Between November 2007 and May 2009, an infertility research clinic was opened. Infertile couples received basic infertility

  20. Another face of violence against women: Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Rusen; Taner, Aylin; Guneri, Sezer Er; Yilmaz, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objective: Violence against women is a widespread problem and has serious implications on women’s health. Infertility, in many ways, is a very stressful condition that affect social and marital life of a couple; moreover, compared to fertile women, infertile women are twice as vulnerable against violence. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of violence and define the effect of infertility on violence on women receiving infertility treatment. Methods: Descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out 301 infertile women between November 2015 and August 2016 in a state hospital, Izmir. Data were collected as “Sociodemographic Characteristics Form” and “Infertile Women’s Exposure to Violence Determination Scale”. Results: The mean age of women was 31.77±5.46 years; the average duration of marriage was 6.93±4.53 years. About 32.5% of women stated that they have suffered from violence throughout their lives and 4.7% of women were still suffering from violence, while 5.0% of women were subjected to violence after infertility was diagnosed. Conclusion: It is an encouraging finding that infertile women have a low exposure to violence. However, despite a low violence rate, there is an increase in violence toward women who have been diagnosed with infertility. PMID:29067064

  1. Psychiatric disorders among infertile men and women attending three infertility clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alosaimi, Fahad Dakheel; Altuwirqi, Maram Hani; Bukhari, Mujahid; Abotalib, Zeinab; BinSaleh, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    No study has assessed psychiatric disorders among infertile men and women seeking fertility treatment in Saudi Arabia. Therefore, we sought to measure the rate of psychiatric disorders in this population. This was a cross-sectional observational study among patients attending infertility clinics at three referral hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between January 2013 and September 2014. 406 patients (206 women and 200 men) participated in the study. The approved Arabic version of the MINI tool was used to assess 18 common psychiatric illnesses. The response rate was 81%. Of the men surveyed, only 4.5% self-reported having a psychiatric disorder. Of the women surveyed, only 10.2% reported having a psychiatric disorder. However, using the MINI scale, psychiatric illness was documented in 30% of males and 36.9% of females. The most common diagnoses for both genders were depression (21.7%) and anxiety (21.2%). Significantly more females than males exhibited suicidality and depression. In contrast, significantly more males than females had bipolar disorders and substance-related disorders. A low monthly income among male and female participants and polygamy among female participants were significantly associated with psychiatric disorders. This study shows that a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and anxiety, among infertile men and women in Saudi Arabia is associated with lower income and polygamy. This study highlights the importance of integrated care for alleviating the psychological burden of this unfortunate population and improving outcomes and quality of life. This study also encourages follow-up studies that aim to further understand the complex relationship between fertility and psychological well-being.

  2. Mitochondrial Genetic Variation in Iranian Infertile Men with Varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Heidari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several recent studies have shown that mitochondrial DNA mutations lead to major disabilities and premature death in carriers. More than 150 mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genes have been associated with a wide spectrum of disorders. Varicocele, one of the causes of infertility in men wherein abnormal inflexion and distension of veins of the pampiniform plexus is observed within spermatic cord, can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS production in semen and cause oxidative stress and sperm dysfunction in patients. Given that mitochondria are the source of ROS production in cells, the aim of this study was to scan nine mitochondrial genes (MT-COX2, MT-tRNALys, MT-ATP8, MT-ATP6, MT-COX3, MT-tRNAGly, MT-ND3, MT-tRNAArg and MT-ND4L for mutations in infertile patients with varicocele. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing were used to detect and identify point mutations respectively in 9 mitochondrial genes in 72 infertile men with varicocele and 159 fertile men. In brief, the samples showing altered electrophoretic patterns of DNA in the SSCP gel were sent for DNA sequencing to identify the exact nucleotide variation. Results: Ten type nucleotide variants were detected exclusively in mitochondrial DNA of infertile men. These include six novel nucleotide changes and four variants previously reported for other disorders. Conclusion: Mutations in mitochondrial genes may affect respiratory complexes in combination with environmental risk factors. Therefore these nucleotide variants probably lead to impaired ATP synthesis and mitochondrial function ultimately interfering with sperm motility and infertility.

  3. Varicocele management for infertility and pain: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Lundy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite being first described two thousand years ago, the varicocele remains a controversial multifaceted disease process with numerous biological consequences including infertility, hypogonadism, and chronic orchidalgia. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood and likely include hypoxia, oxidative stress, hyperthermia, anatomical aberrations, and genetics as primary components. Despite a high prevalence amongst asymptomatic fertile men, varicoceles paradoxically also represent the most common correctable cause for male infertility. In this systematic review we discuss the rich historical aspects of the varicocele and the contemporary data regarding its clinical manifestations. We performed a systematic literature review with the goal of comparing outcomes and complication rates of each of the major surgical approaches as they relate to infertility and pain. We performed a Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA-compliant systematic literature review for manuscripts focused on varicocele and its biological consequences. We identified 112 studies suitable for qualitative analysis and included 56 of these for quantitative analysis, with an emphasis on infertility and chronic pain outcomes. Taken together, the clinical work to date suggests that the highest fertility rates and the lowest complication rates are associated with the microsurgical subinguinal surgical approach to varicocelectomy. In all, 26–40% of patients undergoing varicocelectomy will successfully achieve short-term spontaneous pregnancy, and up to 90% of all patients undergoing varicocelectomy for pain will have improvement and/or resolution of their symptoms. Taken together, the data support an ongoing role for varicocelectomy in both of these clinical arenas. Keywords: Varicocele, Infertility, Orchidalgia, Hypogonadism, Pampiniform plexus

  4. Hysterosalpingographic picture encountered during the investigation of female infertility clinic has Lemba of Saint Raphael

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitenge, N.; Nzeza, N.; Mbanzulu, P.; Ndaye, B.

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted at the St Raphael Lemba Clinic on a sample of 115 patients suspected of infertility during the period from june 1 1997 in 1 march 2003 (6 years). The technique of hysterosalpingography has allowed the identification of female infertility presents images that can diagnose one or more causes utero-tubal. Men also carry a significant responsibility in the genesis of the sterility of the couple: thus, they must also undergo exploration. Hormonal factors also have an important contribution in the investigation of infertility in women and must be taken in addition to hysterosalpingography

  5. How Common is Male Infertility, and What Are Its Causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print How common is male infertility, and what are its causes? Infertility is ... one-third of infertility cases are caused by male reproductive issues, one-third by female reproductive issues, ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related nonsyndromic male infertility CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description CATSPER1 -related nonsyndromic male infertility is a condition that affects the function of ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: sensorineural deafness and male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deafness and male infertility Sensorineural deafness and male infertility Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Sensorineural deafness and male infertility is a condition characterized by hearing loss and ...

  8. Detection of Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection in Female Partners of Infertile Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mehdi Kalantar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of infertility is about 10-15% among the couples overally. Several factors can affect fertility ability of men and women. Chlamydia is a non-motile gram negative obligatory interacellular pathogenic organism. It can cause infections in females as cervicitis, urethritis, endometritis, pelvic inflammatory disease also prostatitis and epidydidimitis in male as well. The aim of this survey is to mention the frequency of infection with Chlamydia in infertile female who were treated in Yazd Research & Clinical Center for Infertility.Materials and Methods: A questionnaire containing some demographic information and clinical features related to the infection was completed for each infertile woman. Specimen of vaginal discharge was collected by well trained nurses using sterile cotton swap from 91 women. Elisa test was done on blood serum. DNA extraction for Chlamydia was carried out using low salt method and PCR was done using MOMP and plasmid primers. DNA sequencing was performed on two PCR products using Chromas LITE ver.2.01 and analyzed by BLAST.Results: Of 91 blood samples collected in this survey, none of them was positive by ELISA. Also there was no positive PCR result. Four PCR products showed a questionable band which was not in the range of Chlamydia. The products underwent DNA sequencing and there were not any finding related to any other micro-organism.Conclusion: However, it is well known that Chlamydia as an infection plays a role in infertility. Nevertheless, there was not evidence of this organism in these infertile patients. It is necessary to design such a survey in larger populations of infertile patients especially on infertile women with tubal infertility and their husbands as well.

  9. Male Reproductive Cancers and Infertility: A Mutual Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Tvrda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive dysfunction and malignancies related to the male gender represent a serious health concern, whose incidence has significantly risen over the past years. Prior to treatment, testicular or prostate cancer patients often display poor semen characteristics similar to subfertile or infertile patients. This fact is underscored by cases where the malignancy is often diagnosed in males who undergo a general fertility screening. This review aims to examine the associations between male infertility and reproductive cancers focusing on common etiologies and biological mechanisms underlining these pathologies. Furthermore, we discuss compelling epidemiological data hypothesizing that male reproductive failure may act as a precursor of future andrological malignancies, including testicular or prostate cancer, thus providing a stimulus for a more specific research in male reproductive health and emphasizing the importance of this relation for physicians taking care of male patients with a reproductive disease.

  10. Dropout is a problem in lifestyle intervention programs for overweight and obese infertile women: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaerts, M. A. Q.; Kuchenbecker, W. K. H.; Mol, B. W.; Land, J. A.; Hoek, A.

    2013-01-01

    What are the dropout rates in lifestyle intervention programs (LIPs) for overweight and obese infertile women and can intervention- or patient-related baseline factors associated with dropout be identified in these women? The median dropout rate was 24% in overweight and obese infertile women who

  11. Dropout is a problem in lifestyle intervention programs for overweight and obese infertile women : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaerts, M. A. Q.; Kuchenbecker, W. K. H.; Mol, B. W.; Land, J. A.; Hoek, A.

    What are the dropout rates in lifestyle intervention programs (LIPs) for overweight and obese infertile women and can intervention- or patient-related baseline factors associated with dropout be identified in these women? The median dropout rate was 24 in overweight and obese infertile women who

  12. Domestic violence in Iranian infertile women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhan, Zohre; Ozgoli, Giti; Azar, Mahyar; Alavimajd, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Millions of men and women suffer from infertility worldwide. In many cultures, infertile women are at risk of social and emotional problems. Infertility may affect the public health in many countries. Domestic violence is the intentional use of physical force, power or threat against oneself, another person or another group or community which leads to injury, death, mental harm, lack of development or deprivation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of domestic violence against infertile women who referred to the infertility centres of Tehran, Iran in 2011. Methods: This was cross- sectional descriptive study conducted on 400 infertile women who were selected through convenient sampling method. The questionnaire used in this study included two sections: a demographic section with questions about demographic characteristics of the infertile women and their husbands; and the domestic violence questionnaire with questions about physical, emotional and sexual violence. Data were analysed by SPSS16; descriptive statistics, Spearman’s test, t- test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression were used for data analysis. Results: Four hundred women with the average age of 30.50 ± 6.16 years participated in the study; of whom, 34.7% experienced domestic violence physical violence (5.3%), emotional violence (74.3%) and sexual violence (47.3%). Domestic violence was significantly associated with unwanted marriage, number of IVFs, drug abuse, emotional status of the women, smoking and addiction or drug abuse of the spouse, mental and physical diseases of the husband (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Many of the current problems in this society, particularly in families are due to the transition of the society from a traditional model to a modern one. The majority of the infertile women experience violence in Iran. Domestic violence against infertile women is a problem that should not be ignored. Clinicians should identify abused women. Providing

  13. Semen proteomics and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodar, Meritxell; Soler-Ventura, Ada; Oliva, Rafael

    2017-06-06

    Semen is a complex body fluid containing an admixture of spermatozoa suspended in secretions from the testes and epididymis which are mixed at the time of ejaculation with secretions from other accessory sex glands such as the prostate and seminal vesicles. High-throughput technologies have revealed that, contrary to the idea that sperm cells are simply a silent delivery vehicle of the male genome to the oocyte, the sperm cells in fact provide both a specific epigenetically marked DNA together with a complex population of proteins and RNAs crucial for embryogenesis. Similarly, -omic technologies have also enlightened that seminal fluid seems to play a much greater role than simply being a medium to carry the spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract. In the present review, we briefly overview the sperm cell biology, consider the key issues in sperm and seminal fluid sample preparation for high-throughput proteomic studies, describe the current state of the sperm and seminal fluid proteomes generated by high-throughput proteomic technologies and provide new insights into the potential communication between sperm and seminal fluid. In addition, comparative proteomic studies open a window to explore the potential pathogenic mechanisms of infertility and the discovery of potential biomarkers with clinical significance. The review updates the numerous proteomics studies performed on semen, including spermatozoa and seminal fluid. In addition, an integrative analysis of the testes, sperm and seminal fluid proteomes is also included providing insights into the molecular mechanisms that regulate the generation, maturation and transit of spermatozoa. Furthermore, the compilation of several differential proteomic studies focused on male infertility reveals potential pathways disturbed in specific subtypes of male infertility and points out towards future research directions in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lifestyle causes of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi

    2018-03-01

    To examine the potential effects of lifestyle factors on male reproductive health. Evidence of a global decline in human sperm quality over recent decades has been accumulating. Environmental, occupational, and modifiable lifestyle factors may contribute to this decline. This review focuses on key lifestyle factors that are associated with male infertility such as smoking cigarettes, alcohol intake, use of illicit drugs, obesity, psychological stress, advanced paternal age, dietary practices, and coffee consumption. Other factors such as testicular heat stress, intense cycling training, lack of sleep and exposure to electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone use are briefly discussed. A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify and synthesise all relevant information, mainly from within the last decade, on the major lifestyle factors associated with male infertility and semen quality. Database searches were limited to reports published in English only. A manual search of bibliographies of the reports retrieved was conducted to identify additional relevant articles. In all, 1012 articles were identified from the database search and after reviewing the titles and abstract of the reports, 104 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 30 reports were excluded as the full-text could not be retrieved and the abstract did not have relevant data. The remaining 74 reports were reviewed for data on association between a particular lifestyle factor and male infertility and were included in the present review. The major lifestyle factors discussed in the present review are amongst the multiple potential risk factors that could impair male fertility. However, their negative impact may well be mostly overcome by behaviour modification and better lifestyle choices. Greater awareness and recognition of the possible impact of these lifestyle factors are important amongst couples seeking conception.

  15. Prevalence of Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma in Infertile Men in Van Region and Effects to Semen Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Taken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU and Mycoplasma hominis (MH in semen cultures of cases with primary infertility in the Van Province, and also to determine the effect of therapy on sperm parameters. Material and Method: The study included 106 individuals divided into three groups: The infertile group (41 cases, the group with lower urinary tract symptoms (33 cases, and the control group (32 cases. The patients in the infertile group had no history of varicocele, testicular torsion, hydrocele, undescended testis, and hormonal disorders. The control group included cases without infertility and lower urinary tract symptoms. The parameters of culture-positive cases in the infertile group were determined before and after therapy. The identification of Mycoplasma species was made using the Biomerieux® Mycoplasma IST 2 (RCS Lyon-France kit. The sperm count was carried out with the Makler counting chamber (Self Medical Industries, Haifa, Israel. Results: In the infertile group, UU was isolated from 17 and MH was isolated from 3 cases. In the group with lower urinary tract symptoms, UU was isolated from 15 (45.5% and MH was isolated from 6 (18.8% cases. In the control group, UU was isolated from 6 (18.8% cases, but MH was isolated from none of the cases. In the infertile group, the sperm counts in 3 culture-positive cases (15% and in 10 culture-negative cases (50% were

  16. Pregravid preparation of fertile aged women with infertility

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    Podolskyi Vl.V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective — to develop and assess the effectiveness of the pregravid training methods for the fertile aged women with infertility. Patients and methods. The study involved 50 fertile aged women with infertility, who were divided into groups: Group I — with primary infertility and group II — with secondary infertility. Bacteriological studies were conducted with the aim of evaluation of the species and quantitative composition of the microflora of the women's vagina after the treatment course of autonomic disorders of the nervous system. According to the obtained results about a state of microbiocenosis urogenital organs at the first stage of treatment women with inflammation of genital organs had received basic treatment which was developed especially for women with such diseases and the effectiveness of which has been proven; the second stage of included application of Api-Norm preparation in the form of vaginal suppositories and for sexual partners of these women — Api-Norm in the form of rectal suppositories. Statistical analysis of the obtained results of research was carried out by the use of standard computer packages «Data Analysis» Microsoft Excel for Windows 2007. The values of the arithmetic mean are — the value (M, the average error of the mean value (m, the level of reliability of differences (p. Evaluation of the reliability of the obtained data is carried out by the conventional manner by means of t&test. Reliability was considered established if its reliability was equal to at least 95% (0.05. Results. The obtained data are pointed on the excess of diagnostic levels of conditionally pathogenic microflora in the vast majority of women. It is noted that qualitative and quantitative indicators of pathogenic microflora in women with secondary infertility are higher than diagnostic levels and more common than in women with primary infertility, which may certifies about the presence of chronic inflammatory diseases of the

  17. Clinical and Para Clinical Information Needs of Infertility Electronic Health Records in Iran: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzandipour, Mehrdad; Jeddi, Fateme Rangraz; Gilasi, Hamid Reza; Shirzadi, Diana

    2017-09-01

    infertility is referred to the person's inability to conceive pregnancy after one year of intercourse without using protection. This study paves the ground for creating a complete, united, and coherent source of patients' medical information. this is an applied research of descriptive-cross sectional type which has been carried out through qualitative - quantitative methods. The sample of the present study was 50 specialists in the field of infertility which has been chosen based on purposive sampling method. Designing the questionnaire was done based on library studies and Gathering experts' views was done based on Delphi technique. 261 items from clinical and Para clinical information of infertile patients' electronic health records were subjected to an opinion poll by experts. During this process 223 items were accepted and 38 items have been rejected after two sessions of surveys by infertility experts. Para clinical information section consisted of 57 items that all of them have been accepted by the experts. Also, clinical information section consisted of 242 items from which 204 items were accepted and 38 items were rejected by the experts. existence of a structured electronic record system of infertile patients' information leads to the integration of patients' information, improvement of health care services and a decrease in treatment costs: all working to increase information safety. Furthermore, only essential and relevant information would be provided for the specialists and it will facilitate and direct the future infertility related studies due to the coherence, unity and relevance of the information.

  18. The Effect of Provision of Information Regarding Infertility Treatment Strategies on Anxiety Level of Infertile Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Hamdieh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility may have many emotional and psychological implications on infertilecouples. So far, different methods for reducing anxiety in infertile couples have been evaluated. Thegoal of this study is to evaluate the effect of provision of information regarding infertility treatmentto infertile couples on their anxiety levels.Materials and Methods: This study was conducted as a before and after clinical trial. Forty-twoindividuals were considered as cases and 40 as controls. In order to evaluate anxiety and depressionin participants, the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS questionnaire was used. Theintervention group received information about infertility treatment through a two hour face-to-facemeeting and was provided with a brochure. Anxiety level was assessed at the time of admission,immediately after the session and two weeks later. Assessment was performed twice for the controlgroup; once at the time of admission and secondly, two weeks later.Results: Our results show that receiving information about infertility treatment significantlydecreases anxiety among infertile couples two weeks post-training. This decline does not have asignificant correlation with age, sex, education level of the couple, and neither with the durationnor the cause of infertility. Providing information does not have any significant effect on the rate ofdepression among couples.Conclusion: It is recommended that provision of information regarding infertility treatmentmethods should be considered as a means of decreasing anxiety among infertile couples who referto infertility treatment centers.

  19. Overcoming male factor infertility with intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Edson; Zanetti, Bianca Ferrarini; Braga, Daniela Paes de Almeida Ferreira; Setti, Amanda Souza; Figueira, Rita de Cássia Sávio; Nardi, Aguinaldo César; Iaconelli, Assumpto

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of male factor infertility on intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes compared with a control group presenting isolated tubal factor. This retrospective study included 743 couples undergoing ICSI as a result of isolated male factor and a control group consisting of 179 couples undergoing ICSI as a result of isolated tubal factor, performed in a private university- -affiliated in vitro fertilization center, between January/2010 and December/2016. Patients were divided into two groups according to maternal age: women ≤35 years old and >35 years old. The effects of infertility causes on laboratorial and clinical ICSI outcomes were evaluated using Student's t-test and (2 test. No differences in controlled ovarian stimulation outcomes were observed between male factor cycles and tubal factor cycles in the two age groups. Implantation (male factor 35.5% vs. tubal factor 32.0%, p=0.340), pregnancy (male factor 46.9% vs. tubal factor 40.9%, p=0.184) and miscarriage (male factor 10.3% vs. tubal factor 10.6%, p=0.572) rates were similar between the infertility groups, irrespective of female age. Considering maternal age, the cancelation rate was higher in older women (>35 years old) undergoing ICSI as a result of male factor infertility (17.4% vs. 8.9%, p=0.013). Our results showed that there is no difference in the outcomes of pregnancy between couples with male or tubal factor infertility, which indicates that ICSI surpasses the worse specific outcomes associated with male factor.

  20. Infertility among Yoruba Women: Perceptions on Causes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Yoruba of southwest Nigeria believe that infertility can be due to spittle problems, for which orthodox medical treatment is not appropriate. Therefore, women frequently seek prevention and treatment for infertility from local herbal and spiritual specialists, and from churches. This article presents preliminary findings from ...

  1. Is Infertility Associated with Childhood Autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether, Judith K.; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser…

  2. Infertility, psychological distress, and coping strategies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relatively little is known about infertility and its consequences in Mali, West Africa where the context and culture are different from those of previously studied settings. This study therefore aimed to specifically examine infertility induced psychological distress and coping strategies among women in Mali. A convergent ...

  3. The profile of infertility in a teaching Hospital in North West Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakar A Panti; Yusuf T Sununu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a global health problem and a socially destabilizing condition for couples carrying several stigmas and a cause of marital disharmony. We determined the prevalence, causes, and clinical pattern of infertility at Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital (UDUTH), Sokoto. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study conducted at the Gynecological Department of UDUTH Sokoto between 1 st January, 2011 and 31 st July, 2011. All the patients that presented with...

  4. Genetics of mitochondrial dysfunction and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demain, L A M; Conway, G S; Newman, W G

    2017-02-01

    Increasingly, mitochondria are being recognized as having an important role in fertility. Indeed in assisted reproductive technologies mitochondrial function is a key indicator of sperm and oocyte quality. Here, we review the literature regarding mitochondrial genetics and infertility. In many multisystem disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction death occurs prior to sexual maturity, or the clinical features are so severe that infertility may be underreported. Interestingly, many of the genes linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and infertility have roles in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA or in mitochondrial translation. Studies on populations with genetically uncharacterized infertility have highlighted an association with mitochondrial DNA deletions, whether this is causative or indicative of poor functioning mitochondria requires further examination. Studies on the impact of mitochondrial DNA variants present conflicting data but highlight POLG as a particularly interesting candidate gene for both male and female infertility. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Early Marriage: a Policy for Infertility Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Karimzadeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Female fertility begins to decline many years prior to the onset of menopause despite continued regular ovulatory cycles. Age related infertility is due to oocyte abnormalities and decreased ovarian reserve. Treatment of infertility when the cause is limited to decreased ovarian reserve is empirical at present except for oocyte donation. This mini review of the literature covers all available English biomedical journals that have been published from 1995 to 2008. The search based on combination of the words age, fertility, infertility, and oocyte abnormalities. The important findings from this search strategy are summarized and presented in the sub headings including female age and fertility, miscarriage and in vitro fertilization. Regarding infertility prevention, this mini review suggested that early marriage is a primordial, effective, inexpensive and easy way to prevent infertility.

  6. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... function of the ovaries, uterus and fallopian tubes. Primary ovarian insufficiency (early menopause), when the ovaries stop working and menstruation ends before age 40. Although the cause is often unknown, certain ...

  7. Social stigma and familial attitudes related to infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Rahime Nida; Polat, Aslıhan; Kars, Bülent; Öztekin, Deniz; Sofuoğlu, Kenan; Çalışkan, Eray

    2018-03-01

    To determine the perceived social stigma and familial attitides and perception of sexuality in infertile couples attending infertility clinics. Infertile couples attending infertility clinics between the years of 2014 and 2015 were requested to complete detailed evaluation forms including questions related to the social stigma on their infertility, their familial attitudes, and perception of sexuality. Any partner of the infertile couple accepting to enroll in the study was given the evaluation forms. Their scores related to answers and demographics, and parameters related to infertility were analyzed. A total 598 partners of infertile couples enrolled in the study, 58% represented 177 couples. Their infertility was primary in 98.3% and the duration of marriage and infertility was 9.81±5.58 and 9.76±5.53 years, respectively. The perception of social exclusion was present in 38% (psocial stigma on infertile couples.

  8. Understanding the perceptions of and emotional barriers to infertility treatment: a survey in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domar, Alice; Gordon, Keith; Garcia-Velasco, Juan; La Marca, Antonio; Barriere, Paul; Beligotti, Fabiola

    2012-04-01

    Infertility can significantly impact women's lives and personal relationships. Despite the negative impact of infertility, a significant number of women who are struggling to conceive do not consult a physician. This cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the emotional impact of infertility on women to identify which aspects of fertility treatment contribute to the psychological stress experienced by so many patients and to identify barriers to seeking treatment. Women (n = 445; 18-44 years) who had received fertility treatment within the past 2 years or were having trouble conceiving but had not received treatment, completed a 15-min survey online. Participants were from France (n = 108), Germany (n = 111), Italy (n = 112) and Spain (n = 114). Responses indicated that infertility causes a range of emotions and can strain relationships. Women who had received treatment were more likely to feel hopeful (26 versus 21%) and closer to their partner than women not in treatment (33 versus 19%, P barrier to treatment. This study has provided insight into the physical and psychological challenges of infertility treatments and permitted a better understanding of the factors that impact patient lives. A treatment protocol with minimal injections and provision of additional information may lessen the emotional impact and challenges of infertility and contribute to patient satisfaction with fertility treatment protocols.

  9. [48,XXYY men with azoospermia: how to manage infertility?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, C; Sonigo, C; Benmiloud-Tandjaoui, N; Boujenah, J; Benzacken, B; Poncelet, C; Hugues, J-N

    2014-01-01

    48,XXYY syndrome is a rare form of sex chromosomal aneuploidy. Usually considered as a variant of Klinefelter syndrome because of shared features (azoospermia, tall stature, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism), it is a separate entity because diagnostic is currently made in prepubertal boy with neuro-psychological disorders. We here report the case of a 48,XXYY patient consulting for adult infertility and the indication to perform testicular sperm extraction is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of Tribulus terrestris in Male Infertility: Is It Real or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    GamalEl Din, Sameh Fayek

    2017-12-20

    Tribulus terrestris is an annual herb of the Zygophyllaceae family and is commonly known as Gokshur, Gokharu, or puncturevine. Flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins, lignin, amides, and glycosides are the main active phytoconstituents of this plant. Infertility is defined by the failure to conceive a child after one year or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. Infertility affects society at large and has a negative impact on the social and emotional aspects of the patient. This in-depth review presents several studies that evaluate the role of Tribulus terrestris in a chronological order to help us better understand the exact mechanism by which this herbal medicine acts in male infertility. In conclusion, the exact role of Tribulus terrestris in male infertility is still controversial and needs future double-blind placebo-controlled studies that deploy larger cohorts.

  11. Laparoscopic findings of infertile women at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeela Ishrat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopy is an important component of infertility work up. It is the gold standard for evaluation of pelvic pathology and assessment of tubal patency. Objective: The objective of the study was to analyze the laparoscopic findings of infertile women presenting at Infertlity unit of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University. Method: We had a retrospective cross-sectional study on Japaroscopic findings of 110 women. Results: Out of all patients 22.7% women had endometriosis. Various degrees of adhesion of pouch of Douglus was present in 16.4 %. Regarding tubal pate:1cy , 26.4% had unilateral block and 28.2% had bilateral block. Conclusion: A significant number of infertile women at the Infertility unit of BSMMU has tuboperitoneal disease and bilateral tubal block and ultimately need in vitro fertilization.

  12. Hysterosalpingography and laparoscopy in infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarzewska, J.; Bianek-Bodzak, A.; Mielcarek, P.; Kobierski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite dynamic development of diagnostic imaging methods and endoscopic procedures, X-ray hysterosalpingography remains the basic diagnostic procedure when anatomical cause of infertility is suspected. The aim of the study was to assess the correlation between HSG results and laparoscopy findings, especially in infertile women with normal results of hysterosalpingography. Material/Methods: The results of HSG and laparoscopies performed between 2002 and 2005 years in 53 infertile women were analyzed retrospectively. The indication for HSG was primary infertility in 44 cases and secondary infertility in 9 cases.Results: The result of HSG was normal in 51%. Pathological findings were observed in 49% of HSG and in 93% of laparoscopies. The most common pathological findings observed during laparoscopy were tubal occlusion (26% cases) and endometriosis (25% cases). Polycystic ovaries and myomas were observed in 20% of the performed laparoscopies. HSG and laparoscopy yield consistent results in evaluation of tubal patency (p < 0.001). Conclusions: HSG remains the method of first choice in the diagnostics of uterine malformations and tubal diseases as causes of infertility. When mechanical factors of female infertility are suspected, HSG allows the optimal choice of more invasive procedure. (authors)

  13. Yoga Can Improve Assisted Reproduction Technology Outcomes in Couples With Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandi, Sara; Darbandi, Mahsa; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-11-07

    Context • Depending on the cause of the infertility, nonsurgical or surgical treatments may be used to treat men and women with infertility. Despite improved outcomes due to medical advances, assisted reproductive technology (ART) for couples with infertility is sometimes unsuccessful. Success may be affected by the patient's social, psychological, and physical status. Objective • The study examined the effects of yoga-including asanas (yoga poses), pranayama (proper breathing), shavasana, and meditation-on male and female fertility and ART outcomes. Design • The research team performed a literature review, electronically searching for articles published between January 1978 and January 2016 in the PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar databases. Setting • The study took place at the Reproductive Biotechnology Research Center at the Avicenna Research Institute at the Academic Center for Education, Culture, and Research (Tehran, Iran). Participants • Participants were couples with infertility taking part in 87 reviewed studies. Intervention • Yoga was the intervention. Outcome Measures • The outcome measures comprised fertility factors in males and females, fertility rate, and ART success rate. Results • The reviewed studies showed that yoga can provide stress management for patients with infertility, with beneficial effects on fertility, helping couples give birth. They found that yoga also could reduce pain; decrease depression, anxiety, and stress; reduce the rate of assisted vaginal delivery; and improve fetal outcomes. Conclusions • Yoga can help couples overcome infertility and increase the ART success rate by improving the physiological and psychological states of both men and women.

  14. The pattern of hysterosalpingographic findings in women being investigated for infertility in Nnewi, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, C O; Okafor, C I; Okpala, O C; Umeh, E

    2010-09-01

    Tubal occlusion is the commonest cause of female infertility in the developing societies. Hysterosalpingography remains a vital method of assessing tubal patency especially in resource limited settings such as ours. To review the pattern of hysterosalpingographic findings among women being investigated for infertility in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Nigeria over a period of five years (2001-2005). The data obtained from the request forms and radiologists' reports were analyzed using SPSS version 11. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Of the 320 studied, 230 were found suitable for analysis. Their ages ranged from 20 to 44 years (mean 32.8 +/- 5.8 years). The indications were primary infertility in 103 (44.8%), secondary infertility in 88(38.3%), while in 39 (16.9%) patients the type of infertility was not specified. The reports revealed that 67 (29.1%) had normal HSG Cervical abnormalities were found in 34 (14.8%), uterine cavity abnormalities in 108 (47.0%). Tubal pathologies were seen in 100 (43.5%) with bilateral tubal occlusion in 43 (18.7%) and bilateral hydrosalpinges in 6 (2.6%) patients. Tubal pathology remains a major contributor to female infertility in this part of the world.

  15. First Contact: the intersection of demographics, knowledge, and appraisal of treatment at the initial infertility visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHILDRESS, Krista J.; LAWSON, Angela K.; GHANT, Marissa S.; MENDOZA, Gricelda; CARDOZO, Eden R.; CONFINO, Edmond; MARSH, Erica E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of the initial infertility visit on treatment-related knowledge, patient anxiety, and appraisals of treatment. Study Design Prospective survey. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 234 English-speaking women, ages 18-50, attending their first infertility visit Intervention(s) Participants completed a survey assessing health literacy, knowledge, anxiety, and appraisals of the treatment process before and after their infertility visit. Main Outcome Measure(s) 1) Knowledge of infertility and treatment and, 2) Anxiety and appraisal scores. Results Most participants were white and earned >$100,000/year and had at least a college education. Baseline knowledge of reproductive anatomy, ART, and fertility factors was modest, but improved after the initial visit. Factors associated with higher knowledge included higher education and income, White or Asian ethnicity, and English as their primary language. Patient appraisals of treatment represented by the positive (Challenge) and negative (Threat and Loss) subscale scores on the Appraisal of Life Events (ALE) scale, changed from the pre-visit survey to the post-visit survey. Negative appraisals of treatment and anxiety scores decreased and positive appraisals of treatment increased after the initial visit. Lower knowledge was associated with higher positive appraisal scores lower health literacy was associated with higher anxiety and appraisal scores (positive and negative) post-visit. Black women had higher Challenge scores compared to White and Asian women. Hispanic women had higher anxiety scores than non-Hispanic women. Conclusions Infertility patients have modest baseline knowledge of fertility and infertility treatment. The initial infertility visit can improve this knowledge and decrease both negative appraisals of treatment and anxiety levels. Differences in knowledge and appraisal were seen across ethnic groups and other demographic variables. Physicians should individualize

  16. Estimating the prevalence of infertility in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnik, Tracey; Cook, Jocelynn L.; Yuzpe, A. Albert; Tough, Suzanne; Collins, John

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Over the past 10 years, there has been a significant increase in the use of assisted reproductive technologies in Canada, however, little is known about the overall prevalence of infertility in the population. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of current infertility in Canada according to three definitions of the risk of conception. METHODS Data from the infertility component of the 2009–2010 Canadian Community Health Survey were analyzed for married and common-law couples with a female partner aged 18–44. The three definitions of the risk of conception were derived sequentially starting with birth control use in the previous 12 months, adding reported sexual intercourse in the previous 12 months, then pregnancy intent. Prevalence and odds ratios of current infertility were estimated by selected characteristics. RESULTS Estimates of the prevalence of current infertility ranged from 11.5% (95% CI 10.2, 12.9) to 15.7% (95% CI 14.2, 17.4). Each estimate represented an increase in current infertility prevalence in Canada when compared with previous national estimates. Couples with lower parity (0 or 1 child) had significantly higher odds of experiencing current infertility when the female partner was aged 35–44 years versus 18–34 years. Lower odds of experiencing current infertility were observed for multiparous couples regardless of age group of the female partner, when compared with nulliparous couples. CONCLUSIONS The present study suggests that the prevalence of current infertility has increased since the last time it was measured in Canada, and is associated with the age of the female partner and parity. PMID:22258658

  17. Is male infertility a forerunner to cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney R. Burns

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The frequency of testicular cancer and male infertility has been increasing in the past several decades. This article examines the relationship between male infertility and testicular cancer, concentrating particularly on causal links. RESULTS: Both of these disorders are associated with testicular dysgenesis syndrome and have also been traced to mutations in genes involving DNA repair and tumor suppression, as well as environmental exposure. CONCLUSION: The identification and examination of these common points of origin supports the integration of testicular cancer screenings into the routine evaluation of infertile men.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF MALE INFERTILITY BY TESTICULAR BIOPSY IN SOUTHERN ODISHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Naik

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Infertility continues to be a significant problem since ages. Studies suggest that the problem affects 8-12% of couples across the globe, and among these affected couples, approximately 50% cases are contributed by the male partner. Semen analysis is the first investigation that indicates towards male factor in infertility. Finding the cause of infertility in cases of severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia by evaluating testicular biopsies has now become essential with the availability of Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART, which gives information about the level of spermatogenesis. The present study was undertaken to detect the histological findings in cases of male infertility in this geographic region. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective cross-sectional study was undertaken in which testicular biopsies received from 52 infertile male patients with seminogram impressions of very severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia constituted the study group. Detailed clinical data including the LH. FSH and testosterone hormone levels were recorded. Tissue samples were routinely processed and Haematoxylin and Eosin stained were made. Modified Johnsen scoring was used to categorise each case. RESULTS 86.5% cases in the study group were found to have azoospermia and rest 13.5% cases had severe oligozoospermia. All the cases were histologically classified into six categories- obstructive pathology 25 of 52 cases (48.1%, pure germ cell aplasia 14 of 52 cases (26.9%, maturation arrest 7 of 52 cases (13.5%, atrophic testis 4 of 52 cases (7.7%, hypospermatogenesis 1 of 52 cases (1.9% and inconclusive in 1 of 52 cases. Serum FSH and serum LH levels were found significantly raised in cases of pure germ cell aplasia and atrophic testis in contrast cases of obstructive aetiology had normal levels. Modified Johnsen scoring values were 9 in cases with obstructive pathology, 1/2 only in cases of pure germ cell aplasia and atrophic testes and 3 to 6 in cases

  19. Salpingitis isthmica nodosa in female infertility and tubal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, L; Sperling, Lene; Hansen, U

    1991-01-01

    -examination, it was found in 24 patients. Ten women with SIN were bilaterally salpingectomized. Only one woman had SIN in both tubes. Women with SIN gave birth to as many children as women without SIN. After SIN had been diagnosed, no children were born, but this was not statistically different from the frequency of births...... with infertility, pregnancies, outcome of pregnancies, births, pelvic inflammatory disease and salpingitis. Sections from the isthmus were present in the specimens from 223 tubes from 193 patients and were analysed by the same pathologist. Originally, SIN was found in 12 patients but on re...

  20. Environment as a Risk Factor for Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Multigner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility affects 15% of couples in Western countries. Infertility is defined as the inability to conceive after 1 year of attempts without contraception, but it is not synonymous with sterility. Between 30 and 50% of infertile couples are infertile due to male reasons, mainly due to sperm production disorders. Although some risk factors, most of which are infectious, have been identified, there is still much uncertainty about the origins of male infertility.

  1. Hyperprolactinaemia in male infertility: Clinical case scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Dabbous

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the evaluation, treatment and impact of hyperprolactinaemia on male infertility and testicular function, as hyperprolactinaemia is commonly detected during the evaluation of infertile men. Methods: A literature search was performed using MEDLINE/PubMed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines to identify all studies exploring hyperprolactinaemia in male infertility. Results: Elevated levels of serum prolactin have a detrimental effect on male reproduction through inhibition of the pulsatile release of gonadotrophins from the anterior pituitary gland, and a direct effect on spermatogenesis. Treatment of confirmed hyperprolactinaemia with dopamine agonists leads to significant improvements in both semen parameters and hormone levels. Conclusion: Hyperprolactinaemia, both directly and indirectly, has a negative effect on sperm production, and its detection and management in men seeking fertility is mandatory. Keywords: Prolactin, Male infertility, Dopamine agonists, Testosterone, Pituitary adenoma

  2. Infertility, Psychological Distress, and Coping Strategies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Research for Health, Inc., Cuyahoga Falls, OH, USA1; School of Nursing & Health Sciences, Malone University,. Canton ... Health care professionals should provide holistic care for infertile women to meet their physical, spiritual, ..... find a cure.

  3. [The multiple interactions between infertility and sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimoun, S

    1993-03-01

    After investigating into literature and clinical experience, we shall line out in this study 4 types of interactions between sexuality and infertility: sexual causes to feminine (vaginism, with and without heavy dyspareunia) or masculine (impotency, ante-portas ejaculation, anejaculation, dysejaculation), infertility; influence of tests and of treatments for infertility on sexual life; influence of infertility on sexuality focusing on the various ambiguous feelings (of culpability, inferiority, aggressivity, passivity); and last, the psychological and sexual interactions with medical assisted procreation, reinforcing the sexual separation of man and woman if the body is considered a machine. Psychosomatic guidance of the couple during these steps (with reassurance as the being helped conception) will allow maintaining on removing sexual attraction.

  4. Possible fetal determinants of male infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Almstrup, Kristian; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2014-01-01

    with regard to testicular cancer, levels of testosterone and semen quality, but also from histopathological observations. Many infertile men have histological signs of testicular dysgenesis, including Sertoli-cell-only tubules, immature undifferentiated Sertoli cells, microliths and Leydig cell nodules...

  5. Secondary Infertility: Why Does It Happen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016. http://accessmedicine.com. Accessed Nov. 29, 2016. Hacker NF, et al. Infertility and assisted reproductive technologies. In: Hacker & Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 6th ed. ...

  6. Infertility trial outcomes: healthy moms and babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the primary outcome of infertility trials has been a positive pregnancy test or a clinically recognized pregnancy. However, parents desire a healthy baby that grows up to be a healthy adult, rather than a positive pregnancy test. Too often results of infertility trials are lacking in crucial obstetric details. This is problematic because treatments for infertility have the capacity to increase the risk for a variety of adverse obstetric outcomes. This review will outline important obstetric variables that should be included when reporting infertility research. The rationale for including these data, precise definitions of the variables, and cost-effective strategies for obtaining these obstetric details will be highlighted. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ovarian Surface Epithelium in Patients with Severe Ovarian Infertility: A Potential Source of Cells Expressing Markers of Pluripotent/Multipotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Virant-Klun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to confirm the presence of stem cells in the ovarian surface epithelium of patients with premature ovarian failure and no mature follicles and oocytes. In these patients, small round cells of unknown origin expressing SOX-2 marker of pluripotency were observed among the epithelial cells just after the ovarian surface epithelium scraping. These cells were an integral part of the ovarian surface epithelium. When the scraped cells were cultured in a medium with added follicular fluid to provide some ovarian niche, primitive oocyte-like cells and typical round-shaped cell clusters positively stained on alkaline phosphatase, and markers of pluripotency, such as SOX-2 and SSEA-4, were developed. These markers were expressed early and also later in the culture. Single oocyte-like cells expressed genes OCT4A, SOX-2, NANOG, NANOS, STELLA, CD9, LIN28, KLF4, GDF3, and MYC, characteristic for pluripotent stem cells. The results of this study confirmed the presence of putative stem cells in the ovarian surface epithelium of these patients and provided some basis to create a stem cell line in the future.

  8. Improving the Reporting of Clinical Trials of Infertility Treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which creates a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant after ≥20 weeks' gestation) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and couples

  9. Sexual behavior of infertile women: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokaie, Mahshid; Simbar, Masoumeh; Yassini Ardekani, Seyed Mojtaba

    2015-10-01

    Infertility makes an essential challenge to the sexual life of couples, especially infertile women. When pregnancy does not happen, infertile women think that sexual intercourse is not fruitful and sexual desire became reduce gradually. Infertile women progressively forget that their sexual relationship is also a response to their natural need. This qualitative study was conducted to explore the infertility consequences in the sexual behavior of infertile women. This was a qualitative content analysis study; and it was part of a widespread study, used a sequential mixed-method and conducted from August 2014 until February 2015. A purposeful sampling was used to recruit infertile women who had referred to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility. Data gathering techniques employed in this research included in-depth semi structured open face-to-face interviews and field notes. Credibility, transferability, confirm ability, and dependability were assessed for the rigor of the data collection. Totally, 15 infertile women and 8 key informants were interviewed. Data analysis showed four themes about impact of infertility on female sexual behavior: 1/ Impact of infertility drugs on couple sexual behavior, 2/ Impact of assisted reproductive technologies on female sexual behavior, 3/ Timed intercourse during infertility and 4/ The psychological impact of infertility on sexual behavior. Some of Iranian infertile women could cope with their problems, but some of them were very affected by infertility drugs and assisted reproductive technologies procedures. Psychosexual counseling before medical treatment could help them to have a better sexual life.

  10. Association Between Vitamin D Levels and Semen Parameters in Infertile Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Ozdemir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and laboratory characteristics of infertile males according to their postwash progressively motile sperm count and to evaluate whether there was a relationship between serum vitamin D (VD levels and semen parameters. Material and Method: A total of 198 infertile men were included in this cross-sectional study. Study population was mainly divided into two groups according to post wash total progressively motile sperm count (TPMSC as less than 5 million/ml (study group and equal or greater than 5 million/ml (control group. The main parameters recorded for each patient were; age, BMI (body mass index, infertility type, infertility duration, previous operation, history of disease, smoking, drug usage and serum levels of 25OHVD3, total calcium (Ca and testosterone (TT, gonadotropins, and semen parameters. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of age, BMI, infertility type, infertility duration, and previous operation, history of disease, smoking, drug usage, TT, and 25OHVD3 levels. Serum levels of gonadotropins were significantly lower in the study group (p

  11. Impaired Leydig cell function in infertile men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A-M; Jørgensen, N; Frydelund-Larsen, L

    2004-01-01

    , and calculated free T index (cFT) were compared between the two groups.A shift toward lower serum T levels, cFT, and T/LH ratio and higher serum LH, E(2), and E(2)/T levels was observed in the group of infertile men. On average, the infertile men had 18, 26, and 34% lower serum T, cFT, and T/LH levels...

  12. Psychological interactions with infertility among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikel, J; Gidron, Y; Sheiner, E

    2004-12-01

    Despite the fact that various studies have demonstrated the importance of the mind-body connection and fertility, the psychosocial aspects of infertility have not been adequately addressed. Fertility treatments, ranging from medical monitoring, to hormonal remedies and in vitro fertilization (IVF), are both a physical and emotional burden on women and their partners. Psychological factors such as depression, state-anxiety, and stress-induced changes in heart rate and cortisol are predictive of a decreased probability of achieving a viable pregnancy. A couple that is trying to conceive will undoubtedly experience feelings of frustration and disappointment if a pregnancy is not easily achieved. However, if the difficulties progress and the man and or woman are labelled as having fertility problems, then this may result in a severe insult to self-esteem, body image, and self-assessed masculinity or femininity. Three types of relationships have been hypothesized between psychological factors and infertility. These include: (1) psychological factors are risk factors of subsequent infertility; (2) the experience of the diagnosis and treatment of infertility causes subsequent psychological distress; (3) a reciprocal relationship exists between psychological factors and infertility. The evidence for these three relationships is reviewed and an alternative approach to the treatment of infertility including stress evaluation that precedes or is concurrent to fertility treatment is suggested.

  13. Gestational surrogacy: Viewpoint of Iranian infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Azad; Sattarzadeh, Nilofar; Gholizadeh, Leila; Sheikhalipour, Zahra; Allahbakhshian, Atefeh; Hassankhani, Hadi

    2011-09-01

    Surrogacy is a popular form of assisted reproductive technology of which only gestational form is approved by most of the religious scholars in Iran. Little evidence exists about the Iranian infertile women's viewpoint regarding gestational surrogacy. To assess the viewpoint of Iranian infertile women toward gestational surrogacy. This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The study sample consisted of 238 infertile women who were selected using the eligible sampling method. Data were collected by using a researcher developed questionnaire that included 25 items based on a five-point Likert scale. Data analysis was conducted by SPSS statistical software using descriptive statistics. Viewpoint of 214 women (89.9%) was positive. 36 (15.1%) women considered gestational surrogacy against their religious beliefs; 170 women (71.4%) did not assume the commissioning couple as owners of the baby; 160 women (67.2%) said that children who were born through surrogacy would better not know about it; and 174 women (73.1%) believed that children born through surrogacy will face mental problems. Iranian infertile women have positive viewpoint regarding the surrogacy. However, to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile women, further efforts are needed.

  14. Gestational surrogacy: Viewpoint of Iranian infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surrogacy is a popular form of assisted reproductive technology of which only gestational form is approved by most of the religious scholars in Iran. Little evidence exists about the Iranian infertile women′s viewpoint regarding gestational surrogacy. Aim: To assess the viewpoint of Iranian infertile women toward gestational surrogacy. Setting and Design: This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 238 infertile women who were selected using the eligible sampling method. Data were collected by using a researcher developed questionnaire that included 25 items based on a five-point Likert scale. 0 Statistical Analysis: Data analysis was conducted by SPSS statistical software using descriptive statistics. 0 Results: Viewpoint of 214 women (89.9% was positive. 36 (15.1% women considered gestational surrogacy against their religious beliefs; 170 women (71.4% did not assume the commissioning couple as owners of the baby; 160 women (67.2% said that children who were born through surrogacy would better not know about it; and 174 women (73.1% believed that children born through surrogacy will face mental problems. Conclusion: Iranian infertile women have positive viewpoint regarding the surrogacy. However, to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile women, further efforts are needed.

  15. Systematic review of hormone replacement therapy in the infertile man

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    Amr El Meliegy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To highlight alternative treatment options other than exogenous testosterone administration for hypogonadal men with concomitant infertility or who wish to preserve their fertility potential, as testosterone replacement therapy (TRT inhibits spermatogenesis, representing a problem for hypogonadal men of reproductive age. Materials and methods: We performed a comprehensive literature review for the years 1978–2017 via PubMed. Also abstracts from major urological/surgical conferences were reviewed. Review was consistent with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA criteria. We used Medical Subject Heading terms for the search including ‘testosterone replacement therapy’ or ‘TRT’ and ‘male infertility’. Results: In all, 91 manuscripts were screened and the final number used for the review was 56. All studies included were performed in adults, were written in English and had an abstract available. Conclusions: Exogenous testosterone inhibits spermatogenesis. Hypogonadal men wanting to preserve their fertility and at the same time benefiting from TRT effects can be prescribed selective oestrogen receptor modulators or testosterone plus low-dose human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG. Patients treated for infertility with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism can be prescribed hCG alone at first followed by or in combination from the start with follicle-stimulating hormone preparations. Keywords: Gonadotrophins, Hypogonadism, Infertility, Systematic review, Testosterone therapy

  16. Social stigma and familial attitudes related to infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahime Nida Ergin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the perceived social stigma and familial attitides and perception of sexuality in infertile couples attending infertility clinics. Materials and Methods: Infertile couples attending infertility clinics between the years of 2014 and 2015 were requested to complete detailed evaluation forms including questions related to the social stigma on their infertility, their familial attitudes, and perception of sexuality. Any partner of the infertile couple accepting to enroll in the study was given the evaluation forms. Their scores related to answers and demographics, and parameters related to infertility were analyzed. Results: A total 598 partners of infertile couples enrolled in the study, 58% represented 177 couples. Their infertility was primary in 98.3% and the duration of marriage and infertility was 9.81±5.58 and 9.76±5.53 years, respectively. The perception of social exclusion was present in 38% (p<0.001 of infertile couple, which was more significantly pronounced in female partners (p=0.013. Fifteen percent of the infertile couples thought themselves as isolated in public and losing value in public (p<0.001. However, sixty percent of infertile couples thought that they would achieve a notable place in community after having a baby (p<0.001. Infertility was accepted as a reason of divorce in only 13% of infertile couples (p<0.001. The majority of perticipnats, irrespective of sex, rejected that infertile women or men lost sexual appeal (86%; p<0.001. Conclusions: There is significant effect of infertility on familial attitudes and perception of sexuality of infertile couples. Unfortunately, there is significant negative social stigma on infertile couples.

  17. Adenomyosis uteri in infertile women: experience in a tropical community teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adesiyun, A.G.; Kolawole, A.; Samaila, M.O.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the demographic pattern and clinical presentation of 23 infertile women with intraoperative diagnosis of adenomyosis followed by histopathologic confirmation. A review of 23 consecutive infertile women that underwent surgery due to preoperative misdiagnosis for uterine fibroids over a period of 5 years. The patients mean age was 37.3 years with age range of 26 to 47 years. Only five patients (21.7%) had delivered before. Eighteen patients (78.3%) had had abortion(s) in the past. Secondary infertility accounted for 78.3% and 21.7% had primary infertility. Past gynaecological procedures included dilatation and curettage or manual vacuum aspiration in 17 (73.9%) patients, previous adhesiolysis for uterine synaechiae in 3 (13.1%) patients and past history of myomectomy in 5 (21.7%) patients. Preoperative hysterosalpingogram showed only 2 patients (8.7%) with bilateral tubal patency and 17 patients (73.9%) had bilateral tubal blockage. Unilateral patency of the fallopian tube was observed in 4 (17.4%) patients. Amongst patients with bilateral tubal blockage, cornual blockages were mostly encountered in 15 (88.2%) of the 17 patients. The modes of clinical presentation were abdominopelvic mass 100%, dymenorrhoea 82.6%, menorrhagia 60.9%, dyspareunia 47.8% and metrorrhagia in 34.8% of cases. Intraoperatively adenomyosis encountered were diffuse adenomyosis in 13 (56.5%) patients, multiple focal adenomyosis in 7 (30.4%) patients and unifocal adenomyosis in 3 (13.1%) patients. Co-existing uterine fibroid were found in 17 (73.9%) of the 23 patients. Two patients (8.7%) had coexisting endometriosis. At surgery, significant pelvic adhesion was encountered in 7 (30.4%) patients. In infertile women, adenomyosis is significantly associated with proximal tubal occlusion and tends to co-exist with insignificant uterine fibroids. (author)

  18. Infertility experience and health differentials - a population-based comparative study on infertile and non-infertile women (the HUNT Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostad, Berit; Schmidt, Lone; Sundby, Johanne

    2014-01-01

    between infertility and health and life satisfaction. DESIGN: Cross-sectional population-based health study, conducted between 2006 and 2008. SETTING: All women in a county in Norway were invited. The current material is restricted to women aged 20-49 years. POPULATION: A total of 9200 women participated......OBJECTIVE: Studies suggest that health complaints, distress and poor life satisfaction are associated with infertility experience. Research on health consequences of infertility experience in women has relied heavily on clinic-based samples. This population-based study investigates the association....... METHODS: Health measures were compared between women with infertility experience (infertile women) and women without infertility experience (non-infertile women). Disparities in health and life satisfaction among the infertile women were assessed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported health, functional...

  19. causes of infertility in females: evaluated by diagnonstic laparoscopy at a tertiary care centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siraj, A.; Naseer, S.; Khan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of various causes of infertility through diagnostic laparoscopy. Study Design: Cross sectional comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in gynaecology/obstetrics department unit I of Military Hospital Rawalpindi from May 2011 - May 2012. Patients and Methods: A total of 50 patients were recruited in the study through outpatient clinic, 32 out of 50 had primary infertility and 18 had secondary infertility. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed under general anesthesia and findings were recorded. Result: The mean age of patients was 26.4 years. Out of 50 patients 20 (40%) had polycystic ovaries, 15 (30%) had tubal blockage, 7 (14%) had endometriosis and 2 (4%) had fibroids while 6(12%) were found to have normal pelvis and no pathology was detected. Conclusion: polycystic ovaries was found major cause of infertility in this study group, followed by tubal factor infertility either secondary to pelvic inflammatory disease or otherwise, both these causes are treatable to variable extent and fertility can be resumed if managed properly. (author)

  20. Laparoscopic finding of female infertility-a study of 186 cases at a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasir, N.; Fatima, A.; Parveen, S.; Tariq, H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the various causes of female infertility, diagnosed at laparoscopy. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Military Hospital Rawalpindi, Pakistan from April 2008 to December 2010. Patients and Methods: A series of 186 patients, having either primary or secondary infertility admitted through gynae outpatient department undergoing diagnostic laparoscopy and meeting inclusion criteria were studied. The data was collected prospectively and analysed in the form of frequency and percentages by using SPSS version 10. Results: Amongst the cohort of 186 patients, 148 (79.6%) had primary and 38 (20.4%) had secondary infertility. Their ages ranged from 20 to 43 years. Mean age of study participants was 30.14 +- 4.04 years. Mean duration of infertility was 9.5 years. No laparoscopic abnormality was found in 51 (27.9%), while there were abnormal findings in 135 (72.6%) patients. Conclusion: Commonest etiological factor was tubal blockade in both types of infertility. Other factors were endometriosis, pelvic adhesions and fibroids. Laparoscopy is minimally invasive yet a reliable procedure for visualization of internal architecture of the female pelvis. (author)

  1. Male infertility in Kuwait: Etiologic and Therapeutic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadan, Laila R.; Ahmed, Adel A.; Kapila, Kusum A.; Hassan, Nahida A.; Kodaj, Jan A.; Pathan, Shahed K.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the pathological patterns associated with male infertility in Kuwait and to characterize treatment outcome after varicocele repair using percutaneous varicocele embolization. We carried out a prospective study of 64 infertile men in Kuwait between 2001 and 2005. All patients included had proven non-obstructive azoospermia or oligospermia (sperm count <20 million /ml). All patients underwent ultrasonographic evaluation of the scrotum. Fine needle aspiration of the testes was performed on all azoospermic patients. A total of 24(38%) patients were azoospermic and 40(62%) were oligospermic. Sertoli-cell-only pattern was the most common cytopathology associated with primary testicular failure. Among the oligospermic patients, 50% had small to moderate varicocele. Spermatic vein embolization resulted in a significant rise in the mean sperm count from 10.6+-3.8 million/ml to 30.2+-6.8 million/mn (p<0.05) in 5 treated oligospermic patients, followed by spontaneous pregnancy in 2 couples. No effect was seen azoospermic patients. From an etiological point of view, we believe that the high incidence of Sertoli cell-only-syndrome among nationals and residents of a country that underwent a major environmental insult strengths the chances of an environmental role in the development of this syndrome. From a management point of view, in cultures wherein vitro fertilization is either still not widely acceptable or is unaffordable, oligospermia with clinical or subclinical varicocele deserves a trial of low risk, outpatient procedure, spermatic, vein embolization that could improve fertility. (author)

  2. Review of the safety, efficacy, costs and patient acceptability of recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone for injection in assisting ovulation induction in infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen Nahuis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Marleen Nahuis1,2,3, Fulco van der Veen1, Jur Oosterhuis2, Ben Willem Mol1, Peter Hompes3, Madelon van Wely11Center for Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (H4-205, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Free Medical University, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsAbstract: Anovulation is a common cause of female subfertility. Treatment of anovulation is aimed at induction of ovulation. In women with clomiphene-citrate resistant WHO group II anovulation, one of the treatment options is ovulation induction with exogenous follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH or follitropin. FSH is derived from urine or is produced as recombinant FSH. Two forms of recombinant FSH are available – follitropin alpha and follitropin beta. To evaluate the efficacy, safety, costs and acceptability of recombinant FSH, we performed a review to compare recombinant FSH with urinary-derived FSH products. Follitropin alpha, beta and urinary FSH products appeared to be equally effective in terms of pregnancy rates. Patient safety was also found to be comparable, as the incidence of side effects including multiple pregnancies was similar for all FSH products. In practice follitropin alpha and beta may be more convenient to use due to the ease of self-administration, but they are also more expensive than the urinary products.Keywords: follitropin apha, follitropin beta, urinary gonadotropins, polycystic ovary syndrome

  3. Chromosomal and molecular abnormalities in a group of Brazilian infertile men with severe oligozoospermia or non-obstructive azoospermia attending an infertility service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A. Mafra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the frequency of genetic alterations in a population of Brazilian infertile men with severe oligozoospermia or non-obstructive azoospermia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective study of a group of 143 infertile men with severe oligozoospermia or non-obstructive azoospermia from the Andrology Outpatient Clinic of the Human Reproduction Service at the ABC School of Medicine. Of these patients, 100 had severe oligozoospermia, and 43 non-obstructive azoospermia. All patients underwent a genetic study which included karyotype analysis and Y-microdeletion investigation. RESULTS: Genetic abnormalities were found in 18.8% of the studied patients. Chromosomal abnormalities were found in 6.2% of the patients, being more prevalent in the azoospermia group (11.6% than in the oligozoospermia group (4%. Chromosomal variants were found in 8.3%, and Y-chromosome microdeletions in 4.2% of patients. CONCLUSION: The high frequency of genetic alterations (18.8% in our series justified performing a genetic investigation in a population with idiopathic infertility, as results may help determine the prognosis, as well as the choice of an assisted reproduction technique. Moreover, a genetic investigation could minimize the risk of transmitting genetic abnormalities to future generations such as genetic male infertility, mental retardation, genital ambiguity and/or birth defects.

  4. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws.

  5. The impact of infertility on sexuality: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Maycock3

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most studies address medical treatment of infertility and psychosocial outcomes caused by infertility-related stress, but few studies examine the infertility’s impact on sexuality.Aim: A literature review was conducted to answer the questions: 1 How is sexual self concept impacted in infertile individuals and their partners? 2 Does infertility have a negative impact on sexual relationships? 3 Is sexual function affected by infertility? In answering these questions, we may develop a better understanding of sexuality in the context of infertility, and thus better inform infertility management. Ultimately the aim is to improve the quality of life for infertile couples.Method: A literature search was conducted for publications from 1990 to 2011 via the electronic databases PubMed, PsycInfo and Scopus, which focused on sexuality in infertile subjects or couples.Results: In this review, all studies were descriptive quantitative studies which mapped the different aspects of sexuality in the context of infertility. The results suggested that infertility and its treatment approaches for fertilisationcould lead to changes in sexual self-esteem, sexual relationship and sexual function.Conclusion: The literature substantiated that many infertile subjects experienced trouble in various aspects of sexuality. However, further research should examine the reciprocal relations between sexual self concept, sexual relationship and sexual function in the context of infertility. How these changes affect the partners of infertile subjects should also be addressed.

  6. The Impact of Infertility on Infertile Men and Women in Ibadan, Oyo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    African Journal of Reproductive Health Vol 13 No 3 September 2009. 85. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE. The Impact of Infertility on ... reproductive health strategy does not seek to reduce the prevalence or impact of infertility but instead ..... will turn into a snake and go inside the cupboard and eat the soup, it nearly broke.

  7. Sexual function in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Michael P; Legro, Richard S; Coutifaris, Christos; Alvero, Ruben; Robinson, Randal D; Casson, Peter A; Christman, Gregory M; Huang, Hao; Hansen, Karl R; Baker, Valerie; Usadi, Rebecca; Seungdamrong, Aimee; Bates, G Wright; Rosen, R Mitchell; Schlaff, William; Haisenleder, Daniel; Krawetz, Stephen A; Barnhart, Kurt; Trussell, J C; Santoro, Nanette; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping

    2017-08-01

    While female sexual dysfunction is a frequent occurrence, characteristics in infertile women are not well delineated. Furthermore, the impact of infertility etiology on the characteristics in women with differing androgen levels observed in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility has not been assessed. The objective of the study was to determine the characteristics of sexual dysfunction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility. A secondary data analysis was performed on 2 of Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Cooperative Reproductive Medicine Networks clinical trials: Pregnancy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Study II and Assessment of Multiple Intrauterine Gestations From Ovarian Stimulation. Both protocols assessed female sexual function using the Female Sexual Function Inventory and the Female Sexual Distress Scale. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome had higher weight and body mass index than women with unexplained infertility (each P polycystic ovary syndrome. The mean Female Sexual Function Inventory total score increased slightly as the free androgen index increased, mainly as a result of the desire subscore. This association was more pronounced in the women with unexplained infertility. Reproductive-age women with infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility, despite phenotypic and biochemical differences in androgenic manifestations, do not manifest clinically significant differences in sexual function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A proton NMR study of the effect of Mucuna pruriens on seminal plasma metabolites of infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashish; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Ahmad, Mohammad Kaleem; Shukla, Kamla Kant; Bansal, Navneeta; Jaiswer, Shyam Pyari; Shankhwar, Satya Narain

    2011-07-15

    The objective of this study was to employ proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy to evaluate the impact of Mucuna pruriens seeds on the metabolic profile of seminal plasma of infertile patients. A total of 180 infertile patients were administered M. pruriens seed powder for a period of three months. Age-matched healthy men comprised the control (n=50) group in the study. Lactate, alanine, choline, citrate, glycerophosphocholine (GPC), glutamine, tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, and uridine were measured in seminal plasma by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. To evaluate the degree of infertility and extent of hormonal imbalance induced by this milieu, separate sperm concentration, motility, lipid peroxide in seminal plasma and LH, FSH, T, and PRL hormone concentration in serum were measured using standard laboratory methods and RIA, respectively, in the same subjects. M. pruriens therapy rectifies the perturbed alanine, citrate, GPC, histidine and phenylalanine content in seminal plasma and improves the semen quality of post-treated infertile men with compared to pre-treated. Concomitantly, clinical variables in seminal plasma and blood serum were also improved over post therapy in infertile men. On the basis of these observations, it may be proposed that M. pruriens seed powder not only reactivates the enzymatic activity of metabolic pathways and energy metabolism but also rejuvenates the harmonic balance of male reproductive hormones in infertile men. These findings open more opportunities for infertility treatment and management by improving semen quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale in Iranian infertile people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroufizadeh, Saman; Omani Samani, Reza; Amini, Payam; Navid, Behnaz

    2016-09-01

    This study examined psychometric properties of the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale among Iranian infertile patients. In all, 312 infertile patients completed the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the original three-factor model of Levenson's Locus of Control Scale was adequate ( χ 2 / df = 2.139; goodness-of-fit index = 0.88; root mean square error of approximation = 0.061; and standardized root mean square residual = 0.076). The Cronbach's alpha of the subscales ranged from 0.56 to 0.67. The Levenson's Locus of Control Scale subscales significantly correlated with anxiety and depression, showing an acceptable convergent validity. In conclusion, the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale has adequate reliability and validity and can be used to measure locus of control orientation in Iranian infertile patients.

  10. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome microdelations as potential causes of male infertility in Serbian patients, as well as to test the hypothesis that CFTR mutations in infertile men are predominantly located in the several last exons of the gene. Methods. This study has encompassed 33 men with oligo- or azoospermia. The screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region was performed by multiplex PCR analysis. The screening of the CFTR gene was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method. Results. Deletions on Y chromosome were detected in four patients, predominantly in AZFc region (four of total six deletions. Mutations in the CFTR gene were detected on eight out of 66 analyzed chromosomes of infertile men. The most common mutation was F508del (six of total eight mutations. Conclusion. This study confirmed that both Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations played important role in etiology of male infertility in Serbian infertile men. Genetic testing for Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations has been introduced in routine diagnostics and offered to couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques. Considering that both the type of Y chromosome microdeletion and the type of CFTR mutation have a prognostic value, it is recommended that AZF and CFTR genotyping should not only be performed in patients with reduced sperm quality before undergoing assisted reproduction, but also for the purpose of preimplantation and

  11. Study of Y Chromosome Microdeletion in AZF Region in Infertile Males of Isfahan Population

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    M Motovali-Bashi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: One of the main genetic factors of infertility is the deletions in the chromosome Y. Accordingly this study was conducted to determine the frequency of microdeletion of AZF region in infertile men of Isfahan, Iran. Methods: In this case-control study, 100 infertile men referred to the Infertility Center of Isfahan and 100 fertile men as controls were randomly selected. Genomic DNA was extracted from their blood and amplified by sequence tagged sites-polymerase chain reaction (STS-PCR method. The presence of microdeletion in AZF locus was diagnosed. Results: No AZFa, AZFb or AZFc deletions were found in the control group. Microdeletions were observed in one patient in AZFb region, eight patients in AZFc region and two patients in AZFa region. Conclusion: The incidence of Yq microdeletions in Iranian population is similar to the international frequency. Our data agree with other studies regarding microdeletions of AZFc, but for microdeletions of AZFa (2% our results show smaller frequency and differ significantly with many studies. Key words: Infertility, Y chromosome, Microdeletion

  12. Infertility, infertility treatment and twinning: the Danish National BirthCohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have previously observed that an increasing time to pregnancy (TTP) is associated with a reduced frequency of twin deliveries in couples not receiving infertility treatment. By using updated information, we assessed the frequencies of dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin...... deliveries as a function of infertility (TTP>12 months), as well as infertility treatment. METHODS From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51 730 fertile couples with TTPwith TTP>12 months and 5163 infertile couples who conceived after treatment. Information on zygosity, available...... for part of the cohort (1997-2000), was based on standardized questions on the similarities between the twins at the age of 3-5 years. RESULTS Compared with fertile couples, the frequency of DZ twin deliveries was lower for infertile couples conceiving naturally (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0...

  13. Screening for mutations in the androgen receptor gene (AR) causing infertility in Syrian men using real-time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madania, A.; Ghouri, I.; Abou-Alshamat, Gh.; Issa, M.; Al-Halabi, M.

    2012-01-01

    14 known point mutations in the androgen receptor gene (AR) causing male infertility were screened by real time PCR and by DNA sequencing, in order to identify point mutations in the AR gene causing infertility in azoospermic men. We screened 110 Syrian patients suffering from non-obstructive azoospermia with no chromosomal aberrations or AZF micro deletions. We discovered a new AR mutation, del 57Leu, described for the first time as a possible cause of male infertility. Furthermore, we found two patients with the Ala474Val mutation and one patient bearing the Pro390Ser mutation. Our results indicate that these mutations are significant markers for idiopathic male infertility in the Syrian society and in Mediterranean populations in general. (author)

  14. Family-Related Opinions and Stressful Situations Associated with Psychological Distress in Women Undergoing Infertility Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiro Takaki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate how family-related opinions and stressful situations are related to psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment. The subjects in this cross-sectional study were recruited from female patients undergoing infertility treatment (n = 2540 at 70 infertility treatment institutions in Japan. Because of non-participation or missing data, the number of subjects included in the analysis was 635 (response rate, 25.0%. The family-related opinions and stressful situations were evaluated using the original questions. Psychological distress was assessed using a self-report measure, the Kessler Six-question Psychological Distress Scale (K6. The K6 scores of the following participants were significantly (p < 0.05 and independently high: those with more frequent miscarriage/stillbirth/abortions, those with repeated miscarriages as the cause of infertility, those with infertility of unknown causes, those living with no child, those having a low joint income with their partner, those with the opinion that “women should devote themselves to their household duties” those who had considered stopping treatment, those without the opinion that “married life without children is favorable” and those who had experienced stressful situations such as inadequate explanation by doctors, frustration of multiple failed attempts, differences of opinion with the partner, and lack of knowledge regarding when to stop treatment. Family-related opinions and stressful situations associated with psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment are outlined. The results of this study may contribute to the prevention of and care for psychological distress in female patients undergoing infertility treatment.

  15. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism in infertile women with and without endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Filho, Rubens P; Brandes, Ariel; Christofolini, Denise M; Lerner, Tatiana G; Bianco, Bianca; Barbosa, Caio P

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate PAI-1 genotypes in a group of infertile women with or without endometriosis and control subjects. Case-control study. Human Reproduction Center of Medicina do ABC Faculty. One hundred and forty infertile women with endometriosis, 64 women with idiopathic infertility and 148 fertile women as control subjects. The PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction. Genotype distribution and allele frequency of the 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 gene. The frequencies of genotypes 4G/4G, 4G/5G and 5G/5G of the PAI-1 gene in the infertile women with endometriosis were 38.6, 37.1 and 24.3%, respectively, and in the control group 24.3, 33.8 and 41.9%, respectively (p=0.003). When the infertile women with endometriosis were divided according to their endometriosis stage, genotypes 4G/4G, 4G/5G and 5G/5G were identified, respectively, in 36.7, 32.9 and 30.4% of the patients with minimal/mild endometriosis (p=0.102) and in 41.0, 42.6 and 16.4% of the patients with moderate/severe endometriosis (p=0.001); in the women with idiopathic infertility, these genotypes were found at a frequency of 29.7, 34.3 and 36%, respectively (p=0.637). The data suggest that, in Brazilian women, the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism may be associated with a risk of endometriosis-associated infertility. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  16. Lessons from elective in vitro fertilization (IVF in, principally, non-infertile women

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    Gleicher Norbert

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We here report the first investigation of exclusively elective in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles in women with no apparent history of infertility. Since IVF outcome in women with infertility are always influenced by underlying causes of infertility, a study on non-infertile women may offer new insights. Methods We investigated 88 females without history of infertility in 109 consecutive elective IVF cycles, almost exclusively performed for purposes of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS; i.e., elective gender selection. The following questions were addressed: (i impact of PGS on IVF pregnancy chances; (ii impact of transfer of 1 vs. ≥2 embryos on IVF pregnancy chances; (iii correlation of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH levels to embryo ploidy (iv effect of gonadotropin dosage used in stimulation on available embryos for transfer; and (v in form of a 1:1 case control study, compared 33 elective PGS cycles with matched control cycles without PGS, performed in couples with either prior tubal ligations and/or severe male factor infertility as indication of IVF. Results The overall clinical pregnancy rate for the group was 36.7%; pregnancy was associated with number of euploid (P = 0.009 and number of embryos transferred (P = 0.001. Odds of pregnancy were 3.4-times higher if ≥4 euploid embryos were produced in comparison to Conclusions This study suggests that outcomes of elective IVF cycles may significantly deviate from infertility-associated cycles. Affirming proof of concept for PGS, utilizing day-3 embryo biopsy and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH, both widely held responsible for earlier failures to establish such proof, suggests that the principal cause of prior failures were likely not insufficient laboratory techniques but poor patient selection for PGS. Such a conclusion questions the current reintroduction of PGS with improved techniques and technologies in absence of prior determination of suited

  17. Polymorphism rs3088232 in the BRDT gene is associated with idiopathic male infertility in the West Siberian Region of Russia

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    A. S. Wainer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Allelic variants of genes involved in spermatogenesis can contribute to the genetic predisposition to idiopathic male infertility. In the present study we investigated the association of polymorphism rs3088232 in the BRDT gene with the risk of this pathology on the sample of 105 infertile patients and 230 healthy controls. We revealed the association of allele G (OR = 1.80; CI 1.16—2.80; p = 0.008 and genotype GG (OR = 6.47; CI 1.23—34.15; p = 0.01 with idiopathic male infertility.

  18. The Value of Testicular Biopsy in Male Infertility: Experience with 63 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The subject of male infertility is large and complex. While testicular biopsy has been condemned in the diagnosis of patients with testicular tumors, it has a well established place in the investigation of the sub-fertile male. This study was conducted to examine the role of testicular biopsy in patients with male ...

  19. "Wash leather scrotum" (scrotal dermatitis): a treatable cause of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, W F; Munro, D D

    1990-02-01

    A group of 16 male patients with infertility had dermatitis of the scrotum and groins giving lichenified oedematous skin; the resulting thickening and loss of rugosity produced a characteristic appearance that we have termed wash leather scrotum. Treatment of the dermatosis resulted in an improvement in sperm count and motility in most patients, and 5 couples produced one or more pregnancies.

  20. The International Glossary on Infertility and Fertility Care, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Adamson, G David; Dyer, Silke; Racowsky, Catherine; de Mouzon, Jacques; Sokol, Rebecca; Rienzi, Laura; Sunde, Arne; Schmidt, Lone; Cooke, Ian D; Simpson, Joe Leigh; van der Poel, Sheryl

    2017-09-01

    representatives of international/regional scientific and patient organizations. A consensus-based and evidence-driven set of 283 terminologies used in infertility and fertility care was generated to harmonize communication among health professionals and scientists as well as the lay public, patients and policy makers. Definitions such as 'fertility care' and 'fertility awareness' together with terminologies used in embryology and andrology have been introduced in the glossary for the first time. Furthermore, the definition of 'infertility' has been expanded in order to cover a wider spectrum of conditions affecting the capacity of individuals and couples to reproduce. The definition of infertility remains as a disease characterized by the failure to establish a clinical pregnancy; however, it also acknowledges that the failure to become pregnant does not always result from a disease, and therefore introduces the concept of an impairment of function which can lead to a disability. Additionally, subfertility is now redundant, being replaced by the term infertility so as to standardize the definition and avoid confusion. All stakeholders agreed to the vast majority of terminologies included in this glossary. In cases where disagreements were not resolved, the final decision was reached after a vote, defined before the meeting as consensus if passed with 75%. Over the following months, an external expert group, which included representatives from non-governmental organizations, reviewed and provided final feedback on the glossary. Some terminologies have different definitions, depending on the area of medicine, for example demographic or clinical as well as geographic differences. These differences were taken into account and this glossary represents a multinational effort to harmonize terminologies that should be used worldwide. None. N/A. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights

  1. The International Glossary on Infertility and Fertility Care, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Adamson, G David; Dyer, Silke; Racowsky, Catherine; de Mouzon, Jacques; Sokol, Rebecca; Rienzi, Laura; Sunde, Arne; Schmidt, Lone; Cooke, Ian D; Simpson, Joe Leigh; van der Poel, Sheryl

    2017-09-01

    representatives of international/regional scientific and patient organizations. A consensus-based and evidence-driven set of 283 terminologies used in infertility and fertility care was generated to harmonize communication among health professionals and scientists as well as the lay public, patients and policy makers. Definitions such as 'fertility care' and 'fertility awareness' together with terminologies used in embryology and andrology have been introduced in the glossary for the first time. Furthermore, the definition of 'infertility' has been expanded in order to cover a wider spectrum of conditions affecting the capacity of individuals and couples to reproduce. The definition of infertility remains as a disease characterized by the failure to establish a clinical pregnancy; however, it also acknowledges that the failure to become pregnant does not always result from a disease, and therefore introduces the concept of an impairment of function which can lead to a disability. Additionally, subfertility is now redundant, being replaced by the term infertility so as to standardize the definition and avoid confusion. All stakeholders agreed to the vast majority of terminologies included in this glossary. In cases where disagreements were not resolved, the final decision was reached after a vote, defined before the meeting as consensus if passed with 75%. Over the following months, an external expert group, which included representatives from non-governmental organizations, reviewed and provided final feedback on the glossary. Some terminologies have different definitions, depending on the area of medicine, for example demographic or clinical as well as geographic differences. These differences were taken into account and this glossary represents a multinational effort to harmonize terminologies that should be used worldwide. None. N/A. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Infertility diagnosis has a significant impact on the transcriptome of developing blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallie, Blair R; Parks, Jason C; Griffin, Darren K; Schoolcraft, William B; Katz-Jaffe, Mandy G

    2017-08-01

    Is the human blastocyst transcriptome associated with infertility diagnosis, specifically: polycystic ovaries (PCO), male factor (MF) and unexplained (UE)? The global blastocyst transcriptome was significantly altered in association with a PCO, MF and UE infertility diagnosis. Infertility diagnosis has an impact on the probability for a successful outcome following an IVF cycle. Limited information is known regarding the relationship between a specific infertility diagnosis and blastocyst transcription during preimplantation development. Blastocysts created during infertility treatment from patients with specific infertility diagnoses (PCO, MF and UE) were analyzed for global transcriptome compared to fertile donor oocyte blastocysts (control). Surplus cryopreserved blastocysts were donated with patient consent and institutional review board approval. Female patients were infertility diagnosis: PCO (n = 50), MF (n = 50), UE (n = 50) and fertile donor oocyte controls (n = 50). Pooled blastocysts were lysed for RNA isolation followed by microarray analysis using the SurePrint G3 Human Gene Expression Microarray. Validation was performed on significant genes of interest using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Transcription alterations were observed for all infertility etiologies compared to controls, resulting in differentially expressed genes: PCO = 869, MF = 348 and UE = 473 (P 2-fold). Functional annotation of biological and molecular processes revealed both similarities, as well as differences, across the infertility groups. All infertility etiologies displayed transcriptome alterations in signal transducer activity, receptor binding, reproduction, cell adhesion and response to stimulus. Blastocysts from PCO patients were also enriched for apoptotic genes while MF blastocysts displayed enrichment for genes involved in cancer processes. Blastocysts from couples with unexplained infertility displayed transcription alterations related to various disease states

  3. Attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kian, Ensiyeh Mohebbi; Riazi, Hedieh; Bashirian, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surrogacy arrangements are multifaceted in nature, involving multiple controversial aspects and engaging ethical, moral, psychological and social issues. Successful treatment in reproductive medicine is strongly based on the mutual agreement of both partners, especially in Iran where men often make the final decision for health-related problems of this nature. AIM: The aim of the following study is to assess the attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy. SETTING AND DESIGN: This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Hamadan university of medical sciences, Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study sample consisted of 150 infertile couples selected using a systematic randomized method. Data collection was based on responses to a questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: P surrogacy, the overall attitudes toward surrogacy were positive (53.3% of women and 54.6% of men surveyed). CONCLUSION: Although, there was not a significant difference between the overall positive attitudes of infertile women and men toward surrogacy, the general attitude toward using this method is not strongly positive. Therefore, further efforts are required to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile couples. PMID:24829531

  4. Attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensiyeh Mohebbi Kian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surrogacy arrangements are multifaceted in nature, involving multiple controversial aspects and engaging ethical, moral, psychological and social issues. Successful treatment in reproductive medicine is strongly based on the mutual agreement of both partners, especially in Iran where men often make the final decision for health-related problems of this nature. AIM: The aim of the following study is to assess the attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy. Setting and Design: This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Hamadan university of medical sciences, Iran. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 150 infertile couples selected using a systematic randomized method. Data collection was based on responses to a questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. Statistical Analysis: P <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Results: While 33.3% of men and 43.3% of women surveyed insisted on not using surrogacy, the overall attitudes toward surrogacy were positive (53.3% of women and 54.6% of men surveyed. Conclusion: Although, there was not a significant difference between the overall positive attitudes of infertile women and men toward surrogacy, the general attitude toward using this method is not strongly positive. Therefore, further efforts are required to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile couples.

  5. Attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kian, Ensiyeh Mohebbi; Riazi, Hedieh; Bashirian, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Surrogacy arrangements are multifaceted in nature, involving multiple controversial aspects and engaging ethical, moral, psychological and social issues. Successful treatment in reproductive medicine is strongly based on the mutual agreement of both partners, especially in Iran where men often make the final decision for health-related problems of this nature. The aim of the following study is to assess the attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy. This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Hamadan university of medical sciences, Iran. The study sample consisted of 150 infertile couples selected using a systematic randomized method. Data collection was based on responses to a questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. P surrogacy, the overall attitudes toward surrogacy were positive (53.3% of women and 54.6% of men surveyed). Although, there was not a significant difference between the overall positive attitudes of infertile women and men toward surrogacy, the general attitude toward using this method is not strongly positive. Therefore, further efforts are required to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile couples.

  6. Large Vesicula Seminalis Cyst: A Very Rare Cause of Constipation and Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuksel Ates

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a 35-year-old male patient with chronic constipation and infertility for 4 years. Spermiogram revealed severe oligospermia. An external mass compressing the rectum was found during rectal examination and flexible rectosigmoidoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography showed a presacral cystic mass which displaced the bladder anteriorly. The cyst was completely removed with open surgery. Histopathologic analysis revealed a cystic lesion covered with squamous epithelium including polymorphonuclear leukocytes, macrophages and sperm cells. After the operation, the patient's symptoms were relieved. We considered that the constipation was caused by external compression by the vesicula seminalis cyst. In cases of constipation with infertility, vesicula seminalis cyst should be kept in mind.

  7. Conservative Nonhormonal Options for the Treatment of Male Infertility: Antibiotics, Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogero, Aldo E; Condorelli, Rosita A; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; La Vignera, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The nonhormonal medical treatment can be divided into empirical, when the cause has not been identified, and nonempirical, if the pathogenic mechanism causing male infertility can be solved or ameliorated. The empirical nonhormonal medical treatment has been proposed for patients with idiopathic or noncurable oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and for normozoospermic infertile patients. Anti-inflammatory, fibrinolytic, and antioxidant compounds, oligo elements, and vitamin supplementation may be prescribed. Infection, inflammation, and/or increased oxidative stress often require a specific treatment with antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and/or antioxidants. Combined therapies can contribute to improve sperm quality.

  8. Disability, psychiatric symptoms, and quality of life in infertile women: a cross-sectional study in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Hacer; Hocaoglu, Cicek; Guvendag-Guven, Emine Seda

    2016-04-25

    symptoms than fertile married controls, but they do report greater physical and psychological disability and a poorer quality of life. The negative effects of infertility were more severe in infertile women who were employed than in those who were not employed. Larger follow-up studies are needed to assess the reasons for the differences between these results and those reported in western countries which usually report a higher prevalence of depression and anxiety in infertile patients.

  9. Family-related opinions and stressful situations associated with psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Jiro; Hibino, Yuri

    2014-09-02

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how family-related opinions and stressful situations are related to psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment. The subjects in this cross-sectional study were recruited from female patients undergoing infertility treatment (n = 2540) at 70 infertility treatment institutions in Japan. Because of non-participation or missing data, the number of subjects included in the analysis was 635 (response rate, 25.0%). The family-related opinions and stressful situations were evaluated using the original questions. Psychological distress was assessed using a self-report measure, the Kessler Six-question Psychological Distress Scale (K6). The K6 scores of the following participants were significantly (p women should devote themselves to their household duties" those who had considered stopping treatment, those without the opinion that "married life without children is favorable" and those who had experienced stressful situations such as inadequate explanation by doctors, frustration of multiple failed attempts, differences of opinion with the partner, and lack of knowledge regarding when to stop treatment. Family-related opinions and stressful situations associated with psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment are outlined. The results of this study may contribute to the prevention of and care for psychological distress in female patients undergoing infertility treatment.

  10. Epidemiology of infertility and polycystic ovarian disease: endocrinological and demographic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, M G

    1987-09-01

    The frequency of polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) as a cause of oligo-amenorrhea and infertility was determined, first by characterizing clinically occult PCOD using endocrinological methods, and secondly by estimating the frequency of overt and occult PCOD amongst infertile women residing in a particular area. Four groups of infertile women with oligo-amenorrhea due to 'functional' disorder were compared. The results show that by contrast with the groups having hyperprolactinemia or hypothalamic disorder the group with hirsutism (and therefore presumed PCOD) was closely resembled by a non-hirsute group in terms of estrogenization, LH level, LH/FSH ratio, prolactin level, body mass and responsiveness to clomiphene. The last group was therefore concluded to have a mild occult form of PCOD. The population studies revealed, first, that overt and occult PCOD accounted for 90% of patients with oligomenorrhea and 37% with amenorrhea, or 73% with oligo- or amenorrhea. Oligo- or amenorrhea accounted for 21% of couples with infertility and the annual incidence was 247 patients per million of the general population. The annual incidence of infertility due to PCOD per million was 41 with overt PCOD and 139 with occult PCOD (total 180). Of those, 140 appeared to respond well to clomiphene (78%) but 40 (22%) failed, requiring alternative therapy.

  11. The diagnostic value of radionuclide hysterosalphingography on oviduct function in infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhixiang; Li Guangyu; Li Zhigang; Dong Jian; Ren Chun'e; Li Yanmin; Jiang Aifang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the criteria of normal and abnormal oviduct function and the difference of oviduct function between the primary and secondary infertile patients. Methods: Twenty-nine cases of normal controls and 126 infertile women were imaged by improved radionuclide hysterosalpingography (RNHS). Results: In the normal control group with small dose fractional injection of 99 Tc m -macroaggregated albumin (MAA) into cervical canal, the appearance time of radioactivity in ovarian tube by dynamic imaging was (4.0±2.7) s. When there was much more liquid retained in uterus, the ovarian appearance time delayed to (18.0±1.2) s. Combined the injection under pressure and second dynamic imaging in all 252 ovarian tubes of 126 cases, the damaged fallopian tubes could be divided into six patterns. Among all of the infertile women whose fallopian tubes showed mechanical patency by the X-ray hysterosalpingography (HSG), their positivity of damaged fallopian tube fuction reached 70.5% by RNHS. Besides, the mild and severe functional abnormality of fallopian tube in patients of primary and secondary infertility were 20.3% and 11.9% versus 14.9% and 17.9% respectively. Conclusion: Modified RNHS has important diagnostic value for judgment of the damage magnitude and patency of fallopian tube in infertile women. (authors)

  12. The Serologic Screening for Celiac Disease in the General Population (Blood Donors) and in Some High-Risk Groups of Adults (Patients with AutoimmuneDiseases, Osteoporosis and Infertility) in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vančíková, Z.; Chlumecký, Vít; Sokol, Dan; Horáková, Dana; Hamšíková, E.; Fučíková, T.; Janatková, T.; Ulčová-Gallová, Z.; Štěpán, J.; Límanová, Z.; Dvořák, M.; Kocna, P.; Sánchez, Daniel; Tučková, Ludmila; Tlaskalová, Helena

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 6 (2002), s. 753-758 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/01/0933; GA ČR GA303/01/1380; GA AV ČR IBS5020203; GA MZe QD1023 Keywords : blood donors * osteoporosis * infertility Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.979, year: 2002

  13. Frequency of anti-Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies in infertile women referred to Tabriz Al-Zahra hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Sattari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is one of the major issues in society and its incidence is estimated to be almost 10-15%. Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis is an important cause of sexually transmitted diseases leading to infertility. Objective: This study was designed to determine the frequency of anti-C. trachomatis antibodies in infertile women at Al-zahra hospital, Tabriz, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the blood samples were collected randomly from 184 infertile women (case group and 100 pregnant women (control group. The frequency of specific IgG and IgM anti-C. trachomatis antibodies were evaluated using ELISA method. Results: The frequency of IgG anti-C. trachomatis antibody in the control and case groups was 18% and 35.88%, respectively. IgM anti-C. trachomatis antibody was found in 2% of controls and 5.44% of infertile women. Our results showed the significant differences between the case and control groups in anti-C. trachomatis antibodies (IgG, p=0.035 and IgM, p=0.004. Also, no significant relation was seen between the frequency of anti-C. trachomatis antibodies and age, location, and tubal factor infertility in our two study groups. Conclusion: According to high frequency of antibody anti-C. trachomatis among infertile women in competition to the control group, evaluation and treatment of Chlamydia infections is necessary in these patients

  14. Infertility, infertility treatment and psychomotor development: the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Olsen, Jørn

    2009-03-01

    Babies born of infertile couples, regardless of treatment, have a higher risk of preterm birth and low birthweight, conditions associated with delayed development. We examined developmental milestones in singletons as a function of parental infertility [time to pregnancy (TTP) > 12 months] and infertility treatment. From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 37 897 singletons born of fertile couples (TTP 12 months), and 3309 born after infertility treatment. When the children were about 18 months old, mothers reported 12 developmental milestones by responding to structured questions. We defined a failure to achieve the assessed milestone or the minimal numbers of milestones in a summary (motor, or cognitive/language skills) as delay. Naturally conceived children born of infertile couples had a pattern of psychomotor development similar to that of children born of fertile couples, but increasing TTP correlated with a modest delay. When the analysis was restricted to infertile couples (treated and untreated), children born after treatment showed a slight delay in cognitive/language development (odds ratio 1.24, [95% confidence interval 1.01, 1.53]) for not meeting at least three out of six cognitive/language milestones); children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) had the highest estimated relative risk of delay for most milestones, especially motor milestones. These results suggest that a long TTP may be associated with a modest developmental delay. Infertility treatment, especially ICSI, may be associated with a slight delay for some of these early milestones.

  15. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura O; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Kesmodel, Ulrik S

    2016-01-01

    . RESULTS: A total of 60 440 pregnancies were included, and 0.8% of the children developed epilepsy.The primary analyses showed no association between parental infertility or fertility treatment, and the overall risk of childhood epilepsy (hazard rate ratios (HRs); 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.08 (0......BACKGROUND: A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment......, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. METHODS: This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility treatment...

  16. Legal aspects of auxillary reproductive technologies in infertility treatment

    OpenAIRE

    V.Yu. Albitskiy; N.D. Odinayeva; V.O. Mansimova

    2011-01-01

    The article presents several aspects of legal regulation of auxillary reproductive technologies in treatment of infertility in Russia and other countries.Key words: auxillary reproductive technologies, method of extracorporeal fertilization, newborn, premature newborn, multiple pregnancy, embryo, infertility, law.

  17. Gender Issues in the Management of Infertility in Developing Countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender Issues in the Management of Infertility in Developing Countries. Editorial. Infertility ... heritage has become morbidly adherent in the mind of even the highly ... the respondents preferred male to female children, and this was attributed to ...

  18. What Treatment Options Are Available for Male Infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Klinefelter Syndrome (KS) Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a ... infertility? Related A-Z Topics Infertility and Fertility Klinefelter Syndrome (KS) Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) NICHD News Spotlights ...

  19. Cyclical Changes in Prolactin Levels among Infertile Women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    investigation of infertility while the elevation of prolactin in the 3 study groups might be responsible for the infertility observed. ... dopamine and enhanced by some other hormones. In ... also appears to have a role in the immune response,.

  20. Individualised gonadotrophin ovulation induction in women with normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Mette Petri; Loft, Anne; Pinborg, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate an individualised gonadotrophin starting dose regimen for women with anovulatory infertility. Study design We included 71 normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertile women in a prospective, observational study. All underwent one ovulation induction cycle...

  1. Hysterosalpingographic abnormalities in women with infertility in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Structural tubal abnormalities are responsible for infertility in significant proportion of infertile couples. Hysterosalpingography (HSG) being a simple, less invasive, relatively inexpensive, and reproducible rapid diagnostic test provides valuable information about the uterine cavity and tubal architecture.

  2. Use of complementary and alternative medicines by a sample of Turkish women for infertility enhancement: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolusari Ali

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility patients are a vulnerable group that often seeks a non-medical solution for their failure to conceive. World-wide, women use CAM for productive health, but only a limited number of studies report on CAM use to enhance fertility. Little is known about traditional and religious forms of therapies that are used in relation to conventional medicine in Turkey. We investigated the prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM used by infertile Turkish women for fertility enhancement. Methods A face-to-face questionnaire inquiring demographic information and types of CAM used for fertility enhancement were completed by hundred infertility patients admitted to a primary care family planning centre in Van, Turkey between January and July 2009. Results The vast majority of infertile women had used CAM at least once for infertility. CAM use included religious interventions, herbal products and recommendations of traditional "hodja's" (faith healers. Of these women, 87.8% were abused in the last 12 months, 36.6% felt not being supported by her partner and 80.5% had never spoken with a physician about CAM. Conclusions Infertile Turkish women use complementary medicine frequently for fertility enhancement and are in need of information about CAM. Religious and traditional therapies are used as an adjunct to, rather than a substitute for, conventional medical therapy. Physicians need to approach fertility patients with sensitivity and should be able to council their patients about CAM accordingly.

  3. Infertility and the provision of infertility medical services in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombelet, Willem; Cooke, Ian; Dyer, Silke; Serour, Gamal; Devroey, Paul

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Worldwide more than 70 million couples suffer from infertility, the majority being residents of developing countries. Negative consequences of childlessness are experienced to a greater degree in developing countries when compared with Western societies. Bilateral tubal occlusion due to sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy-related infections is the most common cause of infertility in developing countries, a condition that is potentially treatable with assisted reproductive technologies (ART). New reproductive technologies are either unavailable or very costly in developing countries. This review provides a comprehensive survey of all important papers on the issue of infertility in developing countries. METHODS Medline, PubMed, Excerpta Medica and EMBASE searches identified relevant papers published between 1978 and 2007 and the keywords used were the combinations of ‘affordable, assisted reproduction, ART, developing countries, health services, infertility, IVF, simplified methods, traditional health care'. RESULTS The exact prevalence of infertility in developing countries is unknown due to a lack of registration and well-performed studies. On the other hand, the implementation of appropriate infertility treatment is currently not a main goal for most international non-profit organizations. Keystones in the successful implementation of infertility care in low-resource settings include simplification of diagnostic and ART procedures, minimizing the complication rate of interventions, providing training-courses for health-care workers and incorporating infertility treatment into sexual and reproductive health-care programmes. CONCLUSIONS Although recognizing the importance of education and prevention, we believe that for the reasons of social justice, infertility treatment in developing countries requires greater attention at National and International levels. PMID:18820005

  4. Prediction of Infertility Treatment Outcomes Using Classification Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milewska Anna Justyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is currently a common problem with causes that are often unexplained, which complicates treatment. In many cases, the use of ART methods provides the only possibility of getting pregnant. Analysis of this type of data is very complex. More and more often, data mining methods or artificial intelligence techniques are appropriate for solving such problems. In this study, classification trees were used for analysis. This resulted in obtaining a group of patients characterized most likely to get pregnant while using in vitro fertilization.

  5. The International Glossary on Infertility and Fertility Care, 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Adamson, G. David; Dyer, Silke

    2017-01-01

    : Twenty-five professionals, from all parts of the world and representing their expertise in a variety of sub-specialties, were organized into five working groups: clinical definitions; outcome measurements; embryology laboratory; clinical and laboratory andrology; and epidemiology and public health...... and representatives of international/regional scientific and patient organizations. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: A consensus-based and evidence-driven set of 283 terminologies used in infertility and fertility care was generated to harmonize communication among health professionals and scientists as well...

  6. Role of laparoscopic surgery in treatment of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Šijanović

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of laparoscopy in assisted reproduction is disputed by many. A rising problem of infertility is battled by an increasingnumber of centres for reproductive medicine in the region. Nevertheless,there is a large number of indications and conditionswhere laparoscopic surgery should not be avoided as a therapeuticchoice or an aid in assisted reproductive techniques (ART.The number of centres where laparoscopic surgery is performed is significantly higher than the number of reproductive centres; anumber of gynaecologists educated in laparoscopic gynaecologyis growing, making it more available for patients.

  7. Effectiveness of psychiatric and counseling interventions On fertility rate in infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramezanzadeh F.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the psycho-social model of diseases, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychiatric intervention on the pregnancy rate of infertile couples.Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 638 infertile patients referred to a university infertility clinic were evaluated. Among them, 140 couples with different levels of depression in at least one of the spouses were included in this substudy. These couples were divided randomly into two groups. The patients in the case group received 6-8 sessions of psychotherapy before starting infertility treatment and were given fluoxetine 20-60 mg per day during the same period. The control group did not receive any intervention. Three questionnaires including the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Holmes-Rahe stress scale and a socio-demographic questionnaire were applied for all patients. The clinical pregnancy rates of the two groups, based on sonographic detection of the gestational sac six weeks after LMP, were compared. The data were analyzed by paired-T test, T-test, χ2 and the logistic regression method. Results: The pregnancy rate was 47.1% in the case group and 7.1% in the control group. The pregnancy rate was significantly related to the duration and cause of infertility and the level of stress in both groups (p< 0.001. The pregnancy rate was shown to be higher in couples in which the male has a secondary level of education (p< 0.001.Conclusions: Psychiatric interventions greatly improve pregnancy rates, and it is therefore crucial to mandate psychiatric counseling in all fertility centers in order to diagnose and treat infertile patients with psychiatric disorders and help couples deal with stress.

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of lifestyle intervention in obese infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oers, A M; Mutsaerts, M A Q; Burggraaff, J M; Kuchenbecker, W K H; Perquin, D A M; Koks, C A M; van Golde, R; Kaaijk, E M; Schierbeek, J M; Klijn, N F; van Kasteren, Y M; Land, J A; Mol, B W J; Hoek, A; Groen, H

    2017-07-01

    control group. Exploratory scenario analyses showed that after changing the effectiveness outcome to all live births conceived within 24 months, irrespective of delivery within or after 24 months, cost-effectiveness of the lifestyle intervention improved. Using this effectiveness outcome, the probability that lifestyle intervention preceding infertility treatment was cost-effective in anovulatory women was 40%, in completers of the lifestyle intervention 39%, and in women ≥36 years 29%. In contrast to the study protocol, we were not able to perform the analysis from a societal perspective. Besides the primary outcome of the LIFEstyle study, we performed exploratory analyses using outcomes observed at longer follow-up times and we evaluated subgroups of women; the trial was not powered on these additional outcomes or subgroup analyses. Cost-effectiveness of a lifestyle intervention is more likely for longer follow-up times, and with live births conceived within 24 months as the effectiveness outcome. This effect was most profound in anovulatory women, in completers of the lifestyle intervention and in women ≥36 years old. This result indicates that the follow-up period of lifestyle interventions in obese infertile women is important. The scenario analyses performed in this study suggest that offering and reimbursing lifestyle intervention programmes in certain patient categories may be cost-effective and it provides directions for future research in this field. The study was supported by a grant from ZonMw, the Dutch Organization for Health Research and Development (50-50110-96-518). The department of obstetrics and gynaecology of the UMCG received an unrestricted educational grant from Ferring pharmaceuticals BV, The Netherlands. B.W.J.M. is a consultant for ObsEva, Geneva. The LIFEstyle RCT was registered at the Dutch trial registry (NTR 1530). http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC = 1530. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press

  9. Sexually Transmitted Disease and Male Infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Fusco, Ferdinando; Lipshultz, Larry

    2016-01-01

    ACQUISITION: We performed a systematic literature review in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for articles published before January 1, 2016, using the MeSH terms for a variety of STDs and infertility. The search was restricted to human studies...... performed in men and published in English. Studies were included if they contained original data on a possible association or a cause-and-effect relationship between STD and male infertility. Studies were considered only if they included an appropriate control group and/or comprehensive laboratory data. Due...

  10. Physical and psychological violence against infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Moghadam

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the prevalence of physical and psychological violence against women with female factor infertility.Materials and methods: A total of 400 women with primary infertility attending the Vali-e-asr Reproductive Health Research Center in Tehran, Iran, were interviewed using the conflict tactics Scales (CTS2 questionnaire to investigate their experiences of physical and psychological violence.Results: The prevalence of psychological violence was 135 (33.8%, followed by physical 56 (14%. All women reported their husbands to be the perpetrators.Conclusion: Clinicians should identify the abused women and provide them with medical care and supportive counseling.

  11. Diagnostic methods of tubal factor in infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzon, T.; Mielnik, J.; Gosciniak, W.

    1993-01-01

    The diagnostic methods of tubal factor in infertility have been presented. In details have been discussed PJ, PK HSG and pelviscopy. These examinations themselves constitute the basic ones in infertility. We turned our attention into technical details and possible mistakes which may occur at the time of performing them, these misinterpretations may lead to absolutely wrong conclusion and diagnosis. Authors have wide experience in performing the discussed examinations and this allows them to share their opinion. Over the years several thousand of PK and HSG examinations have been carried out and also 1000 laparoscopies. (author)

  12. Infertility, impotence, and emasculation - psychosocial contexts for abandoning reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Wibowo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From a Darwinian perspective we live to reproduce, but in various situations genetic males elect not to reproduce by choosing medical treatments leading to infertility, impotence, and, in the extreme, emasculation. For many men, infertility can be psychologically distressing. However, for certain genetic males, being infertile may improve their quality of life. Examples include (1 men who seek vasectomy, (2 individuals with Gender Dysphoria (e.g., transwomen, and modern day voluntary eunuchs, (3 most gay men, and (4 men treated for testicular and prostate cancer. Men who desire vasectomy typically have a Darwinian fitness W >1 at the time of their vasectomies; i.e., after they have their desired number of offspring or consider themselves past an age for parenting newborns. In contrast, prostate and testicular cancer patients, along with individuals with extreme Gender Dysphoria, do not necessarily seek to be sterile, but accept it as an unavoidable consequence of the treatment for their condition undertaken for survival (in case of cancer patients or to achieve a better quality of life (for those with Gender Dysphoria. Most gay men do not father children, but they may play an avuncular role, providing for their siblings′ offspring′s welfare, thus improving their inclusive fitness through kin selection. In a strictly Darwinian model, the primary motivation for all individuals is to reproduce, but there are many situations for men to remove themselves from the breeding populations because they have achieved a fitness W ≥1, or have stronger medical or psychological needs that preclude remaining fertile.

  13. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Treat Infertility Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Eifert, Georg H.

    2011-01-01

    Women and men diagnosed with infertility experience a variety of infertility-related stressors, including changes to their family and social networks, strain on their sexual relationship, and difficulties and unexpected challenges in their relationship. Infertility stress is linked with depression and psychological distress, and can lead to…

  14. A Comparative study of Depression among fertile and infertile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    levels of both fertile and infertile group. The prevalence of depression in infertile women ranges. 19 from 8% to 54%. Depression is thought to be a major public health problem associated with infertility, particularly in developing countries,. Nigeria inclusive, where having a child is very important for sociocultural, economic, ...

  15. Pattern of mental illness among women attending an infertility clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Female infertility is highly co-morbid with mental illness. In Nigeria, very few studies have been conducted to determine the pattern of mental illness among women with infertility. We aimed to determine the pattern of mental illness in a sample of women with female infertility as well as its associated correlates.

  16. Prevalence of Infertility in Women in a Southwestern Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence and common causes of infertility in women aged between 15 and 55 years was assessed in four hospital centers in Osun State, located in the SouthWestern part of Nigeria. A survey of a consecutive sample of 200 cases of infertility were carried out in four hospital centers with a total of 50 cases of infertility ...

  17. The prevalence and clinical pattern of infertility in Bauchi, northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Infertility is a common condition and is now viewed as a global reproductive health issue. The causes of infertility vary widely, both among and within countries. Objectives: To describe the magnitude, pattern, aetiology, outcome of infertility and its associated factors in Bauchi, northern Nigeria. Methods: This was a ...

  18. Infertility | Jose-Miller | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infertility is defined as failure to achieve pregnancy during one year of frequent, unprotected intercourse. Evaluation generally begins after 12 months, but it can be initiated earlier if infertility is suspected based on history or if the female partner is older than 35 years. Major causes of infertility include male factors, ovarian ...

  19. Male infertility in Nigeria: A neglected reproductive health issue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even though infertility is not lethal, it has been described as a radical life changing problem that carries with it significant psychological trauma. Male factor infertility is responsible for about 40–50% of all infertility cases. Despite its high prevalence in Nigeria, not much effort has been made at tackling the problem. The impact ...

  20. The pattern and challenges of infertility management in Lagos, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Infertility remains a threat to successful reproduction by couples desirous of pregnancy. Objective: To determine the pattern of infertility cases amongst infertile couples seeking care in Lagos University Teaching Hospital as well as challenges in their management. Methods: A review of the management of ...

  1. Clinical Correlates of Unexplained Infertility in Southeastern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: In the absence of any obvious aetiological factor, a couple is said to have unexplained infertility. It is desirable to identify factors associated with unexplained infertility in this environment and to ascertain if there is a causal relationship between infertility and uterine leiomyomata. Objective: The study is aimed at ...

  2. The pattern and challenges of infertility management in Lagos, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Abstract. Background: Infertility remains a threat to successful reproduction by couples desirous of pregnancy. Objective: To determine the pattern of infertility cases amongst infertile couples seeking care in Lagos University Teaching. Hospital as well as challenges in their management. Methods: A review of the ...

  3. Desire for a child and eating disorders in women seeking infertility treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Bruneau

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of EDs in women seeking treatment for infertility, and to better characterize their clinical profile.Sixty participants completed self-report measures that assessed EDs, desire for a child, body preoccupations, quality of life, anxiety and depression.Ten patients (17% met criteria for a past or current ED. We showed a significant association between greater body dissatisfaction and a more ambivalent desire for a child. Furthermore, an ED was associated with (i a lower quality of life, and (ii more anxiety disorders.Screening for a history of ED in infertile women is recommended to plan for adapted care regarding infertility but also regarding ED and psychiatric comorbidities. Therefore, the assessment has to take into account the desire for a child and the body satisfaction, that are essential parts of the ED process on the one hand and infertility process on the other. This could help with the infertility treatment and the prevention of negative maternal and fetal outcomes.

  4. Do the causes of infertility play a direct role in the aetiology of preterm birth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerlian, Carmen; Platt, Robert W; Ata, Baris; Tan, Seang-Lin; Basso, Olga

    2015-03-01

    It is well established that singletons born of assisted reproductive technology are at higher risk of preterm birth and other adverse outcomes. What remains unclear is whether the increased risk is attributable to the effects of the treatment alone or whether the underlying causes of infertility also play a role. The aim of this study was to examine whether any of the six categories of causes of infertility were associated with a direct effect on preterm birth using causal mediation analysis. We assembled a hospital-based cohort of births delivered at a large tertiary care hospital in Montreal, Canada between 2001 and 2007. Causes of infertility were ascertained through a clinical database and medical chart abstraction. We employed marginal structural models (MSM) to estimate the controlled direct effect of each cause of infertility on preterm birth compared with couples without the cause under examination. The final study cohort comprised 18,598 singleton and twin pregnancies, including 1689 in couples with ascertained infertility. MSM results suggested no significant direct effect for any of the six categories of causes. However, power was limited in smaller subgroup analyses, and a possible direct effect for uterine abnormalities (e.g. fibroids and malformations) could not be ruled out. In this cohort, most of the increased risk of preterm birth appeared to be explained by maternal characteristics (such as age, body mass index, and education) and by assisted reproduction. If these findings are corroborated, physicians should consider these risks when counselling patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The effect of recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone on semen parameters after varicocelectomy in infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atoosa Bagheri Behzad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is defined as failure to achieve pregnancy after one year of unprotected sexual intercourse. Infertility can be related to male or female factors. Varicocele is the most common cause of infertility in men that is correctable with surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH on semen parameters in infertile men. Methods: This randomized clinical trial was done on 96 infertile men admitted to the Women's General Hospital Mohebe-Yas from September 2014 to September 2015. Inclusion criteria were to include varicocelectomy for unilateral idiopathic varicoceles and consent to participate in the study. Allergy to the drug combination and patient dissatisfaction were exclusion criteria. Patients participating in the study were divided into two groups randomly, one group received recombinant FSH three times a week and the other group received a placebo (normal saline in the same way. After three months, the improvement of semen parameters, including motility, morphology and sperm count as well as the complications were determined in both groups. The data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS version 13 (Chicago, IL, USA. Results: A total of 96 patients were enrolled in two groups of 48 men and women; both groups were matched in terms of underlying factors. The rate of improvement in the morphology and motility of sperm in the treated group was significantly more than the placebo group (P= 0.0001; but the changes in sperm count were not significantly different between the groups (P= 0.495. Conclusion: In summary, based on the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that recombinant FSH is effective on improving semen parameters in infertile men after varicocelectomy compared with a placebo group and its major impact is on the morphology and motility of sperm.

  6. The pattern of abnormalities on sperm analysis: A study of 1186 infertile male in Yasmin IVF clinic Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulia, S. N.; Lestari, S. W.; Pratama, G.; Harzief, A. K.; Sumapraja, K.; Hestiantoro, A.; Wiweko, B.

    2017-08-01

    A declined in semen quality resulted an increase of male infertility has been reported. The pattern of abnormalities differs from one country to another. Conflicting results from different studies may be influenced by many factor. The aims are to evaluate the pattern of semen analysis of male partners of infertile couples and identify the current status of the contribution of male factor towards the infertility in our environment. The study is a descriptive analysis of the semen analysis of male partners in infertile couples, who were present at Yasmin IVF Clinic, infertility clinic of a Tertiary Care University Teaching Hospital between 1st January 2012 and 31st December 2015. A total of 1186 consenting male partners of infertile couple were recruited into the study. According to 2010 WHO normal reference values for semen parameters, 795 (67%) of patients were normozoospermia which had normal semen parameters and 391 (33%) patients had abnormal semen parameters. Oligozospermia was evident in 155 (39.5%) patients, being the most common disorder observed. It is followed by azoospermia (24.4%), oligoasthenozospermia (17.8%), asthenozospermia (5.9%), oligoasthenotera-tozospermia (5,7%), teratozospermia (2.6%), asthenoteratozospermia (2.8%), cryptozoospermia (0.8%), necrozospermia (0.3%), and oligoteratozospermia (0.3%). Abnormal semen quality remains a significant contribution to the overall infertility with oligozospermia being the most common semen quality abnormality. This condition is an indication for the need to focus on the prevention and management of male infertility. In addition, further studies are needed to address possible etiologies and treatment in order to improve fertility rates.

  7. Correlation of H. pylori infection and infertility; a survey in Yazd infertility clinic

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    Khalili M B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a worldwide problem. Many different factors may cause infertility. Among them, bacterial infection of the reproductive system is one of the main factors. Recently, some limited investigation has revealed that H. pylori is capable of causing genital inflammation that may lead to infertility. Although known to be a causative agent of gastritis and duodenal ulcers, this species may be transferred orally to the vagina and asymptomatic infection leads to inflammation of the system and finally manifestation of infertility. In addition, infertility may be due to antibodies synthesized against H. pylori cross-reacting with the genital tissue. Methods: In the present study, 180 women consisting of 90 cases referred to IVF center of Yazd and 90 matched controls were enrolled. Serum was taken from all women for detection of IgG and IgM using the ELISA technique. Results: A total of 117 (65% serum samples were positive for Helicobacter, of which 63.3% were from fertile and 66.7% from infertile women. The serum positive population was found to be predominantly in the age range of 25-35, although some 35-42 year olds were also serum positive. When the prevalence of Helicobacter infection status was compared with marriage duration in both groups, it was found that antibody titer in subjects from marriages with durations of greater than five years was significantly higher than those of five-year marriages. In addition, higher antibody titers were found in infertile women with fallopian tube (FT factor and lower titers in those with polycystic factors. Conclusion: Although the results were not significant, they nevertheless indicate that the Helicobacter antibody titers in infertile women were higher than those of fertile women (P =0.6. Therefore, further studies are necessary to determine the role that Helicobacter infection plays with regard to infertility among women. Since the antibody titer in infertile cases with FT factor was

  8. Is Any Press Good Press? The Impact of Media Portrayals of Infertility on Young Adults' Perceptions of Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, Sarah L; Lawson, Karen L

    2015-12-01

    Infertility is an issue of current concern across North America. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada advocates for public education regarding infertility issues. Public education is supposed to be a fundamental objective of news media. However, it is uncertain whether the media are acting as good partners to the medical profession in this objective of educating the public, and young women in particular. Recent findings suggest that print news tends to present infertility using high-alarm framing strategies; however, the impact of this framing on news consumers is unknown. The purpose of this study was to understand the effects of high- versus low-alarm frames on consumers of infertility-related news. In this experiment, 131 undergraduate students were randomly assigned to read infertility-focused news articles judged to employ either high- or low-alarm framing strategies in presenting infertility. Participants subsequently completed various psychological, emotional, and knowledge measures to gauge the impact of the news exposure. The participants exposed to the high-alarm framing showed higher levels of perceived personal susceptibility to infertility, marginally higher levels of worry about infertility, and significantly lower levels of infertility-related knowledge than those exposed to the low-alarm framing. The manner in which the news media report on infertility has repercussions on how individuals think and feel about infertility. The findings of this study can inform health care providers about how the media are shaping perceptions of infertility, and can assist professional bodies interested in undertaking public education initiatives.

  9. Herlyn–Werner–Wunderlich syndrome presenting with infertility: Role of MRI in diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Zohra; Goyal, Ankur; Das, Chandan J; Deka, Dipika; Sharma, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome (HWWS), characterized by uterus didelphys, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis, is an uncommon combined Mullerian and mesonephric duct anomaly, and its presentation in adulthood is even rarer. We report here a 22-year-old female presenting with primary infertility where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested the diagnosis of HWWS with endometriosis. In a patient of infertility with endometriosis and unilateral renal agenesis, diagnosis of HWWS should be suspected and MRI is the investigation of choice for such anomalies

  10. Specific antibodies to porcine zona pellucida detected by quantitative radioimmunoassay in both fertile and infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurachi, H.; Wakimoto, H.; Sakumoto, T.; Aono, T.; Kurachi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The specific radioimmunoassay system was developed for the titration of the antibodies to porcine zona pellucida (ZP) in human sera by using 125 I-labeled purified porcine ZP as antigen, which is known to have cross-reactivity with human ZP. The antibodies in human sera were detected in 3 of 11 (27%) women with unexplained infertility, in 16 of 48 (33%) amenorrheic patients, in 4 of 12 (33%) fertile women, and in 3 of 10 (30%) men. Moreover, antibody titers in infertile women were no higher than those in fertile women and in men. These results seem to suggest that the antibodies in human sera that cross-react with porcine ZP may not be an important factor in causing infertility in women

  11. A new rapid and effective method for treatment of unexplained infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edelstam, G.; Sjosten, A.; Bjuresten, K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Artificial insemination (intrauterine insemination by husband or artificial insemination by husband) is often tried as first treatment for couples with unexplained infertility. Perturbation has previously proved to increase the chance of achieving pregnancy for these couples. The effect...... and insemination cycles for couples with unexplained infertility. METHODS: In a prospective, open study, the patients were randomized, the day before ovulation, during a clomiphene citrate stimulated cycle to either perturbation with low-dose local anaesthetic or no perturbation before insemination. RESULTS......: The perturbation treatment significantly enhanced the clinical pregnancy rate and was well tolerated. No complications were noted. The combined treatment of clomiphene citrate, perturbation and insemination can be used as a cost-effective, first-line treatment for couples with unexplained infertility...

  12. Simultaneous Serous Cyst Adenoma and Ovarian Pregnancy in An Infertile Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbod Ebrahimi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian pregnancy is a rare form of extra uterine pregnancy. Serous cyst adenoma is a benign variant of epithelial cell tumors of ovary. The coexistence of a cyst adenoma with an ovarian pregnancy in the same ovary is extremely rare. Some studies suggested that infertility or ovulation-inducing drugs can be involved in increased risk of ovarian tumors and ovarian pregnancies. A 28-year-old infertile woman presented with a ruptured ovarian pregnancy following ovulation induction with metformin. She had a concurrent benign serous cyst adenoma in the same ovary. Resection of both ovarian pregnancy and tumoral mass were performed. The ovary was preserved. Removal of gestational tissue and preservation of the involved ovary are the best options for management of ovarian pregnancy in young patient. Although there is an association between infertility/ovulation inducting medications and ovarian gestation, their connections with serous cyst adenoma are undetermined.

  13. A unique view on male infertility around the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Mulgund, Aditi; Hamada, Alaa; Chyatte, Michelle Renee

    2015-04-26

    Infertility affects an estimated 15% of couples globally, amounting to 48.5 million couples. Males are found to be solely responsible for 20-30% of infertility cases and contribute to 50% of cases overall. However, this number does not accurately represent all regions of the world. Indeed, on a global level, there is a lack of accurate statistics on rates of male infertility. Our report examines major regions of the world and reports rates of male infertility based on data on female infertility. Our search consisted of systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and population-based studies by searching the terms "epidemiology, male infertility, and prevalence." We identified 16 articles for detailed study. We typically used the assumption that 50% of all cases of infertility are due to female factors alone, 20-30% are due to male factors alone, and the remaining 20-30% are due to a combination of male and female factors. Therefore, in regions of the world where male factor or rates of male infertility were not reported, we used this assumption to calculate general rates of male factor infertility. Our calculated data showed that the distribution of infertility due to male factor ranged from 20% to 70% and that the percentage of infertile men ranged from 2·5% to 12%. Infertility rates were highest in Africa and Central/Eastern Europe. Additionally, according to a variety of sources, rates of male infertility in North America, Australia, and Central and Eastern Europe varied from 4 5-6%, 9%, and 8-12%, respectively. This study demonstrates a novel and unique way to calculate the distribution of male infertility around the world. According to our results, at least 30 million men worldwide are infertile with the highest rates in Africa and Eastern Europe. Results indicate further research is needed regarding etiology and treatment, reduce stigma & cultural barriers, and establish a more precise calculation.

  14. Comparison of Sexual Problems in Fertile and Infertile Couples

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    Zahra Zare

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infertility is known to have a negative effect on couple's life and in most cases it has a profound impact on sexual relations. Sexual problems may be the cause of infertility or may arise as a result of infertility. The aim of this study was to compare the sexual problems in fertile and infertile couples. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 110 infertile and 110 fertile couples referring to Montaserieh infertility center and five health centers in Mashhad which were selected as class clustering method and easy method. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaires and Golombok-Rust Inventory. The collected information was analyzed by SPSS software and descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: No significant difference was found between fertile 26 (17, 37 and infertile 26(18, 37 women in terms of total score of sexual problems and other aspects of sexual problems (except infrequency. The women in the fertile group had higher infrequency than infertile women. Total score of sexual problems in fertile men was 18.5 (13, 27 and in infertile men 25 (19, 31 and the difference was statistically significant. Infertile men reported more problems in no relation, impotency and premature ejaculation compared to fertile men. Men in both fertile and infertile group reported more sexual problems than women. Conclusion: In view of the more frequent sexual problems in infertile men than infertile women, it seems that it is necessary to pay more attention to sexual aspects of infertility in men and design the training programs for sexual and marital skills in infertility centers.

  15. Sexual behavior of infertile women: a qualitative study

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    Mahshid Bokaie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility makes an essential challenge to the sexual life of couples, especially infertile women. When pregnancy does not happen, infertile women think that sexual intercourse is not fruitful and sexual desire became reduce gradually. Infertile women progressively forget that their sexual relationship is also a response to their natural need. Objective: This qualitative study was conducted to explore the infertility consequences in the sexual behavior of infertile women. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative content analysis study; and it was part of a widespread study, used a sequential mixed-method and conducted from August 2014 until February 2015. A purposeful sampling was used to recruit infertile women who had referred to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility. Data gathering techniques employed in this research included in-depth semi structured open face-to-face interviews and field notes. Credibility, transferability, confirm ability, and dependability were assessed for the rigor of the data collection. Results: Totally, 15 infertile women and 8 key informants were interviewed. Data analysis showed four themes about impact of infertility on female sexual behavior: 1/ Impact of infertility drugs on couple sexual behavior, 2/ Impact of assisted reproductive technologies on female sexual behavior, 3/ Timed intercourse during infertility and 4/ The psychological impact of infertility on sexual behavior. Conclusion: Some of Iranian infertile women could cope with their problems, but some of them were very affected by infertility drugs and assisted reproductive technologies procedures. Psychosexual counseling before medical treatment could help them to have a better sexual life.

  16. Male infertility: actual questions of physiology, pathogenesis and diagnosis of disorders of the reproductive system in male

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    O. A. Nikiforov

    2014-08-01

    , reproducing like stem cells, or gives rise to daughter cells, further differentiate into the spermatocyte. A further division of spermatocyte gives rise to cell lines eventually differentiates into Spermatid and later in the sperm. Diagnosis of male infertility can be suspected in the case of absence of the child's conception in the pair during 12 months of regular sexual life without use of all types of contraception. Clinical examination of patients includes: history, physical examination, ejaculate study, determination of the level of hormones in blood serum, ultrasound of the scrotum, prostate gland, seminal vesicles.

  17. Masculinity, infertility, stigma and media reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Kenneth; Glover, Lesley; Abel, Paul

    2004-09-01

    There is growing concern about the health of men in the developed West. Compared with women they have higher rates of morbidity and mortality and are less likely to seek out and employ medical services. Several authors have drawn on social constructionist models, such as the concept of hegemonic masculinity, to account for these gender differences in risk and behaviour. One might anticipate that certain conditions, such as male infertility, would be perceived as posing a particular threat to conventional views of masculinity. There is some support for this, although there is little research into the social construction of male infertility. In this study Discourse Analysis was employed to analyse newspaper accounts of a reported decline in sperm counts in order to study the way in which infertility and masculinity were represented and constructed in the media. The results indicate a construction of fertility as being in crisis and of male infertility as conflated with impotence. Men were positioned as vulnerable and threatened by forces outside their control. The accounts drew on a range of stereotypically masculine reference points, such as warfare and mechanical analogies. These results are consistent with concepts of hegemonic masculinity and suggest that men are offered a highly restricted set of options in terms of perceiving and representing their bodies and their health. Copyright 2004 Elseiver Ltd.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NBK1339/ Citation on PubMed Tyler-Smith C. An evolutionary perspective on Y-chromosomal variation and male infertility. ... genome editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Alopecia areata ...

  19. Bariatric Surgery, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, and Infertility

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    James Butterworth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the commonest cause of female infertility. Visceral obesity and insulin resistance are key pathophysiological mechanisms behind PCOS. Women suffering from this syndrome and infertility often seek bariatric surgery hoping that they would be able to conceive postoperatively. Objective. At present, there is no consensus on the role of bariatric surgery in the management of PCOS-associated infertility within the medical community, making it difficult to give specific advice to these women, so a review of the literature was necessary. Results. A detailed review of the literature was performed. Only 6 manuscripts were relevant and contained quantitative data. They demonstrated that bariatric surgery results in postoperative conception rates varying from 33% to 100%. Surgery is also associated with amelioration of menstrual irregularities, hormonal abnormalities, and hirsutism that are associated with PCOS. These studies were retrospective and only had a small number of participants with infertility. Conclusions. Bariatric surgery has been shown to conclusively improve life expectancy, quality of life, and comorbidities like type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea. However, further research is required to identify whether weight loss surgery results in significant improvement in fertility of women with PCOS and to investigate which operation has the best results.

  20. Selenium: its potential role in male infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguntibeju, O.O.; Esterhuyse, J.S.; Truter, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, biomedical research is showing interest in the anti-oxidant activity of selenium. This could be due to compelling evidence that reported that oxidative damage to cells and cell membranes is one of the causative agents in the pathogenesis of many disease states including male infertility. Selenium is a trace element which may be found in soil, water and some foods and is considered to be an essential element which plays an active role in several metabolic pathways and is believed to perform several important roles in the human body. These roles include anti-oxidative activities at cellular level and participating in different enzyme systems. Selenium also serves as a vital component in the maintenance of muscle cell and red blood cell integrity, playing a role in the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA). It has also been reported that selenium is essential in the detoxification of toxic metals in the human system, foetal respiration and energy transfer reactions as well as in the production of sperm cells. It is thought that male infertility can be the result of a selenium deficiency as the absence of selenium in the testicular tissues induces degeneration which results in the active impairment of sperm motility as the first indication of impending infertility. This review paper investigates the role of selenium in male infertility. (author)

  1. Infertility as a transformational process: a framework for psychotherapeutic support of infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L O

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to investigate the phenomenon of infertility as experienced by infertile women. A purposive sample of 25 infertile women participated in the study. Data were extracted from taped interviews and the researcher's observational field notes. Data analysis was conducted according to the techniques described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Participant responses to interviews were categorized by examining the interview transcripts and identifying significant statements and meanings. Themes which emerged from the statements were then ascertained and cross-case comparisons were made in order to confirm or to reconsider these themes. Five key themes emerged from the data: failure to fulfill a prescribed societal norm, assault on personal identity, mourning, transformation, and restitution. The women experienced infertility as a transformational process in which they mourned their loss of reproductive function and parenting roles and struggled to make restitution for the perceived stigma and powerlessness associated with nonfulfillment of a prescribed societal norm, the exclusion from cherished societal rituals, and the deprivation of ties of descent. Findings from this study have provided a framework for increased awareness of the phenomenon of infertility and for the essential components of supportive counseling or psychotherapy, regardless of the outcome of the infertility experience.

  2. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Aberrations of the X chromosome as cause of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röpke, Albrecht; Tüttelmann, Frank

    2017-11-01

    Male infertility is most commonly caused by spermatogenetic failure, clinically noted as oligo- or a-zoospermia. Today, in approximately 20% of azoospermic patients, a causal genetic defect can be identified. The most frequent genetic causes of azoospermia (or severe oligozoospermia) are Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY), structural chromosomal abnormalities and Y-chromosomal microdeletions. Consistent with Ohno's law, the human X chromosome is the most stable of all the chromosomes, but contrary to Ohno's law, the X chromosome is loaded with regions of acquired, rapidly evolving genes, which are of special interest because they are predominantly expressed in the testis. Therefore, it is not surprising that the X chromosome, considered as the female counterpart of the male-associated Y chromosome, may actually play an essential role in male infertility and sperm production. This is supported by the recent description of a significantly increased copy number variation (CNV) burden on both sex chromosomes in infertile men and point mutations in X-chromosomal genes responsible for male infertility. Thus, the X chromosome seems to be frequently affected in infertile male patients. Four principal X-chromosomal aberrations have been identified so far: (1) aneuploidy of the X chromosome as found in Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY or mosaicism for additional X chromosomes). (2) Translocations involving the X chromosome, e.g. nonsyndromic 46,XX testicular disorders of sex development (XX-male syndrome) or X-autosome translocations. (3) CNVs affecting the X chromosome. (4) Point mutations disrupting X-chromosomal genes. All these are reviewed herein and assessed concerning their importance for the clinical routine diagnostic workup of the infertile male as well as their potential to shape research on spermatogenic failure in the next years. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  3. Klinefelter syndrome and its association with male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Ramakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter's syndrome is the most common genetic disorder in which there is at least one extra X chromosome. Males normally have an X chromosome and a Y chromosome (XY. But males who have Klinefelter syndrome have an extra X chromosome (XXY, giving them a total of 47 instead of the normal 46 chromosomes. Sex chromosome abnormalities are more frequently associated with male infertility. The prevalence of XXYs has risen from 1.09 to 1.72 per 1 000 male births. A patient attended to fertility and genetic clinic, during the clinical diagnosis we found the following complaints of loss of secondary sexual characteristics and infertility. Physical examination revealed breast development, thin built, small size testes, and absence of beard and pubic hairs. Karyotype and biochemical analysis were performed to detect chromosomal abnormality as well as hormonal level to confirm the diagnosis of Klinefelter's syndrome. Chromosomal analysis of the peripheral blood lymphocytes demonstrated the constitutional karyotype of 47, XXY. Using karyotype the presence of extra X chromosome was confirmed, supporting the cytogenetic finding. The 47, XXY syndrome is relatively uncommon and can be missed clinically because of its variable clinical presentations. Accurate diagnosis of this constitutional karyotype provides a valuable aid in the counselling and early management of the patients who undertake fertility evaluation.

  4. Stem cell therapeutic possibilities: future therapeutic options for male-factor and female-factor infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Charles A; Simerly, Calvin R; Schatten, Gerald

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in assisted reproduction treatment have enabled some couples with severe infertility issues to conceive, but the methods are not successful in all cases. Notwithstanding the significant financial burden of assisted reproduction treatment, the emotional scars from an inability to conceive a child enacts a greater toll on affected couples. While methods have circumvented some root causes for male and female infertility, often the underlying causes cannot be treated, thus true cures for restoring a patient's fertility are limited. Furthermore, the procedures are only available if the affected patients are able to produce gametes. Patients rendered sterile by medical interventions, exposure to toxicants or genetic causes are unable to utilize assisted reproduction to conceive a child - and often resort to donors, where permitted. Stem cells represent a future potential avenue for allowing these sterile patients to produce offspring. Advances in stem cell biology indicate that stem cell replacement therapies or in-vitro differentiation may be on the horizon to treat and could cure male and female infertility, although significant challenges need to be met before this technology can reach clinical practice. This article discusses these advances and describes the impact that these advances may have on treating infertility. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Costs of infertility treatment: Results from an 18-month prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Patricia; Showstack, Jonathan; Smith, James F.; Nachtigall, Robert D.; Millstein, Susan G.; Wing, Holly; Eisenberg, Michael L.; Pasch, Lauri A.; Croughan, Mary S.; Adler, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To examine resource use (costs) by women presenting for infertility evaluation and treatment over 18 months, regardless of treatment pursued. Design Prospective cohort study in which women were followed for 18 months. Setting Eight infertility practices. Patients 398 women recruited from infertility practices. Data collection Women completed interviews and questionnaires at baseline, and after 4, 10, and 18 months of follow-up. Medical records were abstracted after 18 months to obtain details of services used. Main outcome measures Per-person and per-successful-outcome costs Results Treatment groups were defined as highest intensity treatment use. 20% of women did not pursue cycle-based treatment; about half pursued in-vitro fertilization (IVF). Median per-person costs ranged from $1,182 for medications only, to $24,373 and $38,015 for IVF and IVF-donor egg groups, respectively. Estimates of costs of successful outcomes (delivery or ongoing pregnancy by 18 months) were higher – $61,377 for IVF, for example – reflecting treatment success rates. Within the timeframe of the study, costs were not significantly different for women who were successful and women who were not. Conclusions While individual patient costs vary, these cost estimates developed from actual patient treatment experiences may provide patients with realistic estimates to consider when initiating infertility treatment. PMID:21130988

  6. Infertility in Mazandaran province - north of Iran: an etiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadali Musanejad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence and etiology of infertility are not similar in different parts of the world. There are only few reports of this topic in Iran.Objective: This study was conducted to determine the clinical patterns and major causes of infertility in Mazandaran province in north of Iran.Materials and Methods: The medical records of 3734 consecutive couples attending two infertility clinics in Mazandaran province, from 2003 to 2008, were reviewed. The couples had not had a viable birth after at least 1 year of unprotected intercourse and were fully investigated.Results: Of the entire samples, 78.7% had primary infertility and 21.3% had secondary infertility. The mean duration of infertility in couples was 5.7±4 years. The etiology of infertility in couples revealed; male factor in 38.9%, female factor in 34.7%, combined factors in 14.6% and undetermined cause in 11.8%.Conclusion: In this study, delayed attendance of infertile couples to the infertility clinic was found. Therefore, there is a need to revise public health program on infertility to focus on the education and prevention of infertility and its risk factors.

  7. Association of Positive History of Pulmonary Tuberculosis with Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Eshrati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of infertility has direct influence on the plan and outcome of its management.In this paper we showed the effect of history of tuberculosis (TB on female infertility among infertilecouples admitted to Royan infertility management center.Material and Methods: This case control study was performed on cases that were diagnosed withfemale infertility (308 women. Controls were women whose husbands were infertile due to some malefactor (314 women. Those who had both female and male infertility were excluded from the study. Theobserved variables were BMI>25 kg/m2, positive history of smoking, tuberculosis, sexually transmitteddisease and pelvic inflammatory diseases.Results: The age adjusted odds ratio of history of tuberculosis for female infertility was 6.21(95 CI:1.31-29.56.The attributable risk in exposed group was about 1%.Conclusion: According to our study, positive history of tuberculosis may be responsible for femaleinfertility.

  8. Genetic screening for infertility: When should it be done?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elda Kara

    2010-07-01

    Primary amenorrhea should be investigated by karyotype analysis and selected mutation screening according to the patient's clinical features. Karyotype analyses and FMR1 gene screening is recommended in cases of POF. At present the infertility of patients with POF cannot be restored if the diagnosis is made after complete follicular depletion, but in some cases, early diagnosis by genetic investigation may instead lead to the advice of early conception or oocyte harvesting and preservation. In addition, the accumulation and annotation of array comparative genomic hybridization data might, in the near future, lead to the identification of pathogenetic copy number variations and genes involved in POF. Karyotype analysis of both partners is recommended in all couples with recurrent pregnancy loss. No routine genetic test can be recommended so far in patients with PCOS.

  9. Clinical significance of measurement of serum TNF-α, T, FSH and PRL levels in male infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianquan; Zhou Minglian; He Haoming

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the significance of changes of serum TNF-α, T, FSH and PRL levels in male patients with infertility. Methods: Serum TNF-α, T, FSH and PRL (with RIA) were measured in 36 male patients with infertility and 35 male controls. Results: Serum T level was significantly lower in the patients than those in controls (P<0.01), while the serum TNF-α, FSH and PRL levels were significantly higher in the patients (P<0.01). Serum TNF-α level was negatively correlated with T level in the patients (r=-0.5184, P<0.01) and positively correlated with FSH, PRL levels (r=0.6184, 0.5925, P<0.01). Conclusion: Serum TNF-α, T, FSH and PRL levels were significantly changed in male with infertility and determination of which might useful for prognosis and treatment clinically. (authors)

  10. Effects of Nursing Care Based on Watson's Theory of Human Caring on Anxiety, Distress, And Coping, When Infertility Treatment Fails: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgun Ozan, Yeter; Okumuş, Hülya

    2017-06-01

    Introduction: The failure of infertility treatment leads to individual, familial, and social problems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the nursing care program based on Watson's "Theory of Human Caring" on anxiety and distress caused by coping when the treatment fails. Methods: This study randomized controlled trial study was conducted from April to November 2012, with 86 Turkish women with infertility (intervention group: 45, control group: 41). Follow-up of 32 infertile women, who failed infertility treatment from intervention group, and 35 infertile women, who failed infertility treatment from control group, continued for another four weeks. Data were collected through Spiel Berger's State/Trait Anxiety Inventory, Distress Scale, and Ways of Coping Questionnaire. The analyses of data were conducted using SPSS ver 13. Results: The intervention and control groups significantly differed in terms of anxiety, distress, and coping levels. The intervention group's mean anxiety score decreased by thirteen points and distress by fourteen points (in a positive direction). The intervention group's mean positive coping style score increased. Whereas a negative increase was observed in the control group's values depending on the failure of the treatment. Conclusion: Watson's theory of human caring is recommended as a guide to nursing patients with infertility treatment to decrease levels of anxiety and distress, and to increase the positive coping style among infertile women.

  11. Gonadotropins in Infertile Men with Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

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    Homayoun Abbasi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stimulatory therapy with gonadotrpins is an effective treatment to inducespermatogenesis in men with idiopathic hypogonadotroptic hypogonadism (IHH. The aim ofthis study was to assess the effectiveness of human chorionic gonadotropin / human menopausalgonadotropin on hypogonadotropic infertile men.Materials and Methods: This study included fifty-six azoospermic infertile men with IHH treatedwith hCG / hMG. All patients received hCG (5000 IU, IM3 times /week for three months. Afterthat, treatment was continued combined with hMG (75 IU, IM 3 times/week. Semen analysis wasperformed every 3 months. After 15 months, fine needle aspiration was performed if the patientswere azoospermic. Treatment continued if mature spermatozoa were present in FNA, otherwisetreatment was discontinued. In the former cases, semen analysis was requested 24months afterthebeginning of treatment.Results: In this study, spermatozoa were present in the ejaculate in 50 out of 56 patients (89.2%after combined treatment. Average time of sperm appearance was 9.2 months. Mean spermconcentration was 9.12 x 106/ml. FNA carried out after 15 months of treatment in 23(41% ofpatients with persistent azoospermia, 91.3% of these latter patients had mature spermatozoa on fineneedle aspiration. Pregnancy occurred in 23 (41% cases.The mean sperm concentration in patients whose spouses became pregnant was 15.56x 10.6Conclusion: hCG/ hMG combination therapy is effective treatment for fertility in patients withIHH. FNA can be used as a safe and suitable tool to evaluate patients that remains azoospermicafter 15 month of treatment.

  12. Antral follicle count in normal (fertility-proven) and infertile Indian women.

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    Agarwal, Arjit; Verma, Ashish; Agarwal, Shubhra; Shukla, Ram Chandra; Jain, Madhu; Srivastava, Arvind

    2014-07-01

    Antral follicle count (AFC) has been labeled as the most accurate biomarker to assess female fecundity. Unfortunately, no baseline Indian data exists, and we continue using surrogate values from the Western literature (inferred from studies on women, grossly different than Indian women in morphology and genetic makeup). (1) To establish the role of AFC as a function of ovarian reserve in fertility-proven and in subfertile Indian women. (2) To establish baseline cut-off AFC values for Indian women. Prospective observational case-control study. Thirty patients undergoing workup for infertility were included and compared to equal number of controls (women with proven fertility). The basal ovarian volume and AFC were measured by endovaginal. USG the relevant clinical data and hormonal assays were charted for every patient. SPSS platform was used to perform the Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test for intergroup comparisons. Correlations were determined by Pearson's ranked correlation coefficient. Regression analysis revealed the highest correlation of AFC and age in fertile and infertile patients with difference in mean AFC of both the groups. Comparison of the data recorded for cases and controls showed no significant difference in the mean ovarian volume. AFC has the closest association with chronological age in normal and infertile Indian women. The same is lower in infertile women than in matched controls. Baseline and cut-off values in Indian women are lower than that mentioned in the Western literature.

  13. The Frequency of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Endocervix of Infertile Women in Northwest Iran

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    Akhi Mohammad Taghi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Infertility is one of the major social issues. Due to the asymptomatic cervical infection associated with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, the majority of patients remain undiagnosed. The present study intended to assess the frequency of S. aureus isolated from infertile women’s endocervix in northwest Iran. Materials and Methods In a descriptive cross sectional study, specimens were randomly collected during vagina examination using a sterile speculum and swabbing. After performance of antibiotic susceptibility testing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to identify methicillin-resistance S. aureus (MRSA and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1. Results About 26 (26% and 9 (9% women’s urogenital tracts were colonized by S. aureus and Candida spp., respectively, of which three (11.5% patients were infected with fungi and S. aureus, simultaneously. Antibiotic susceptibility results showed high activity of vancomycin and co-trimoxazole on isolates. Regarding PCR results, mecA sequences were detected in 7 (26.9% strains, whilst the tst gene encoding TSST-1 was not detected in any of clinical strains. Conclusion The prevalence of S. aureus was very high in infertile women. Therefore, it demands all patients undergoing infertility treatment to be investigated thoroughly for this type of infection.

  14. Phthalate metabolites related to infertile biomarkers and infertility in Chinese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liangpo; Wang, Heng; Tian, Meiping; Zhang, Jie; Panuwet, Parinya; D'Souza, Priya Esilda; Barr, Dana Boyd; Huang, Qingyu; Xia, Yankai; Shen, Heqing

    2017-12-01

    Although in vitro and in vivo laboratory studies have demonstrated androgen and anti-androgen effects on male reproduction from phthalate exposures, human studies still remain inconsistent. Therefore, a case-control study (n = 289) was conducted to evaluate the associations between phthalate exposures, male infertility risks, and changes in metabolomic biomarkers. Regional participants consisted of fertile (n = 150) and infertile (n = 139) males were recruited from Nanjing Medical University' affiliated hospitals. Seven urinary phthalate metabolites were measured using HPLC-MS/MS. Associations between levels of phthalate metabolites, infertility risks, and infertility-related biomarkers were statistically evaluated. MEHHP, one of the most abundant DEHP oxidative metabolites was significantly lower in cases than in controls (p = 0.039). When using the 1st quartile range as a reference, although statistically insignificant for odds ratios (ORs) of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartiles (OR (95% CI) = 1.50 (0.34-6.48), 0.70 (0.14-3.52) and 0.42 (0.09-2.00), respectively), the MEHHP dose-dependent trend of infertility risk expressed as OR decreased significantly (p = 0.034). More interestingly, most of the phthalate metabolites, including MEHHP, were either positively associated with fertile prevention metabolic biomarkers or negatively associated with fertile hazard ones. Phthalate metabolism, along with their activated infertility-related biomarkers, may contribute to a decreased risk of male infertility at the subjects' ongoing exposure levels. Our results may be illustrated by the low-dose related androgen effect of phthalates and can improve our understanding of the controversial epidemiological results on this issue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of the Uterine Causes of Female Infertility by Ultrasound: A Literature Review

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    Shohreh Irani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Various uterine disorders lead to infertility in women of reproductive ages. This study was performed to describe the common uterine causes of infertility and sonographic evaluation of these causes for midwives. Methods: This literature review was conducted on the manuscripts published at such databases as Elsevier, PubMed, Google Scholar, and SID as well as the original text books between 1985 and 2015. The search was performed using the following keywords: infertility, uterus, ultrasound scan, transvaginal sonography, endometrial polyp, fibroma, leiomyoma, endometrial hyperplasia, intrauterine adhesion, Asherman’s syndrome, uterine synechiae, adenomyosis, congenital uterine anomalies, and congenital uterine malformations. Results: Atotal of approximately 180 publications were retrieved from the respective databases out of which 44 articles were more related to our topic and studied as suitable references. In addition, 11 published books on ultrasonography and infertility were evaluated to provide more precise knowledge on the mentioned areas. According to the literature, ultrasonography has a crucial role in the investigation and differentiation of uterine disorders in females with infertility. However, the diagnosis depends on the day of menstruation, clinical prese-ntations, and the suspected uterine disorder. In this review, we provided the key notes about proper timing of the ultrasound examination. Conclusion: Ultrasonography is the first step imaging tool in the investigation of female infertility, which provides information for the diagnosis of uterine disorders. However, the accurate diagnosis depends on the “time of evaluation”. Therefore, every midwife needs to learn about the “optimum timing” for ultrasound evaluation based on each patient.

  16. Knowledge, attitude and practice towards child adoption amongst women attending infertility clinics in Lagos State, Nigeria

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    Adenike O. Omosun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Child adoption is a recommended alternative form of infertility management. Infertility is of public health importance in Nigeria and many other developing nations. This is a result of its high prevalence and especially because of its serious social implications as the African society places a passionate premium on procreation in any family setting. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of child adoption amongst women attending infertility clinics in teaching hospitals in Lagos State and to determine the factors that influence their attitude and practice towards it. Method: A cross-sectional descriptive design was used. Data were collected by using a structured questionnaire which was interviewer-administered. The study was conducted in the two teaching hospitals in Lagos State (LUTH [Lagos University Teaching Hospital] and LASUTH [Lagos State University Teaching Hospital] from amongst 350 women attending the gynaecological clinics. All the patients under management for infertility at the gynaecology clinics during the period of the study were interviewed. Results: Many respondents (85.7% had heard of child adoption and 59.3% of them knew the correct meaning of the term. More than half of the respondents (68.3% said that they could love an adopted child but less than half of them (33.7% were willing to consider adoption. Only 13.9% has ever adopted a child. The major reason given for their unwillingness to adopt was their desire to have their own biological child. Factors that were favourable towards child adoption were Igbo tribe identity, an age above 40 years, duration of infertility above 15 years, and knowing the correct meaning of child adoption. Conclusion: There is a poor attitude to adoption even amongst infertile couples. Interventions need to be implemented to educate the public on child adoption, to improve their attitude towards adoption and to make it more acceptable.

  17. Correlation of Seminal Plasma Total Antioxidant Capacity and Malondialdehyde Levels With Sperm Parameters in Men With Idiopathic Infertility

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    Fazeli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Oxidative stress is the result of an imbalance between the production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Recently, oxidative stress has been introduced as a major cause of male infertility. Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the correlation between total antioxidant capacity (TAC and malondialdehyde (MDA as markers of oxidative stress in relation to idiopathic male infertility and sperm parameters. Patients and Methods This case control study was conducted using 35 men with idiopathic infertility and 34 men with proven fertility. Seminal plasma TAC and MDA were measured by ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP and thiobarbituric acid (TBA reaction methods, respectively. Results Seminal TAC levels were significantly lower and seminal MDA levels were significantly higher in men with idiopathic infertility than in fertile men (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.004, respectively. A positive correlation was shown between sperm motility, sperm morphology, and TAC levels in men with idiopathic infertility (P = 0.002 and P = 0.002, respectively. In addition, there was a correlation between sperm motility and TAC levels in fertile men (P = 0.005. There was no correlation between sperm count and TAC levels in either men with idiopathic infertility or in fertile men. Negative correlations were observed between MDA levels and sperm motility, morphology, and sperm count only in men with idiopathic infertility (P = 0.003, P = 0.001, and P = 0.006, respectively. Conclusions Our results show that oxidative stress could play an important role in male infertility as well as in sperm motility and sperm morphology.

  18. Human Papillomavirus Infection, Infertility, and Assisted Reproductive Outcomes

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    Nigel Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV is a sexually transmitted infection common among men and women across all geographic and socioeconomic subgroups worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that HPV infection may affect fertility and alter the efficacy of assisted reproductive technologies. In men, HPV infection can affect sperm parameters, specifically motility. HPV-infected sperm can transmit viral DNA to oocytes, which may be expressed in the developing blastocyst. HPV can increase trophoblastic apoptosis and reduce the endometrial implantation of trophoblastic cells, thus increasing the theoretical risk of miscarriage. Vertical transmission of HPV during pregnancy may be involved in the pathophysiology of preterm rupture of membranes and spontaneous preterm birth. In patients undergoing intrauterine insemination for idiopathic infertility, HPV infection confers a lower pregnancy rate. In contrast, the evidence regarding any detrimental impact of HPV infection on IVF outcomes is inconclusive. It has been suggested that vaccination could potentially counter HPV-related sperm impairment, trophoblastic apoptosis, and spontaneous miscarriages; however, these conclusions are based on in vitro studies rather than large-scale epidemiological studies. Improvement in the understanding of HPV sperm infection mechanisms and HPV transmission into the oocyte and developing blastocyst may help explain idiopathic causes of infertility and miscarriage.

  19. The management of infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome

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    Homburg Roy

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polycystic ovary syndrome [PCOS] is the commonest cause of anovulatory infertility. Treatment modes available are numerous mainly relying on ovarian stimulation with FSH, a reduction in insulin concentrations and a decrease in LH levels as the basis of the therapeutic principles. Clomiphene citrate is still the first line treatment and if unsuccessful is usually followed by direct FSH stimulation. This should be given in a low dose protocol, essential to avoid the otherwise prevalent complications of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and multiple pregnancies. The addition of a GnRH agonists, while very useful during IVF/ET, adds little to ovulation induction success whereas the position of GnRH antagonists is not yet clear. Hyperinsulinemia is the commonest contributor to the state of anovulation and its reduction, by weight loss or insulin sensitizing agents such as metformin, will alone often restore ovulation or will improve results when used in combination with other agents. Laparoscopic ovarian drilling is proving equally as successful as FSH for the induction of ovulation, particularly in thin patients with high LH concentrations. Aromatase inhibitors are presently being examined and may replace clomiphene in the future. When all else has failed, IVF/ET produces excellent results. In conclusion, there are very few women suffering from anovulatory infertility associated with PCOS who cannot be successfully treated today.

  20. Zoroastrians Support Oocyte and Embryo Donation Program for Infertile Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvaei, Iman; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi-Esmailabad, Saeed; Nabi, Ali; Shamsi, Farimah

    2014-01-01

    Background The main goal was to evaluate the attitudes and knowledge of Zoroastrians living in Iran towards oocyte donation (OD) and embryo donation (ED) program. Methods This cross sectional study consisted of 318 Zoroastrians (n=175 for OD and n=143 for ED) of both sexes. The questionnaire form comprised two parts of general demographic characteristics of the participants and twenty multiple-choice questions about attitude and knowledge of participants towards OD and ED. For statistical analysis, the chi-square test was applied for comparison of data generated from ED and OD groups. Results Majority of the participants supported OD (69.7%) and ED (71.3%) for infertile patients. In addition, 40% and 42% preferred donation program (OD and ED, respectively), compared to adoption. About 60% of the respondents believed that the donors have no right to find the child and claim it as their own. In addition, more than half of the respondents thought that the recipients of oocyte/embryo should never know the name and address of the donors. More than half of the participants did not know whether their religion accepts donation program or not. Approximately, 80% of respondents supported psychological counseling for both donors and recipients. Moreover, about 56% of the participants necessitated the advertisement on OD/ED program in the mass media. Conclusion Our preliminary data showed that Zoroastrians supported both OD and ED program equally for infertile couples. PMID:25473631

  1. Validation of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine guidelines/recommendations in white European men presenting for couple's infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, Eugenio; Capogrosso, Paolo; Boeri, Luca; Ippolito, Silvia; Scano, Roberta; Moschini, Marco; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Papaleo, Enrico; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    To retrospectively validate the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) guidelines/recommendations concerning endocrine evaluation in a cohort of white European men presenting for couple's infertility. Retrospective study. Academic reproductive medicine outpatient clinic. Cohort of 1,056 consecutive infertile men (noninterracial infertile couples). Testicular volume was assessed with a Prader orchidometer. Serum hormones were measured (8-10 a.m.) in all cases. Hypogonadism was defined as total T Society definition. Semen analysis values were assessed based on the 2010 World Health Organisation reference criteria. ASRM indications for endocrine assessment in infertile men (sperm concentration Society classification criteria. Conversely, 37 (23.7%) out of 156 patients with biochemical hypogonadism would have been overlooked. The overall predictive accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the ASRM guidelines was 58%, 76%, and 39%, respectively. Our nomogram was not reliable enough to predict hypogonadism, despite demonstrating a significantly higher predictive accuracy (68%) than the ASRM guidelines. The current findings show that the ASRM guidelines/recommendations for male infertility workup may not be suitable for application in white European infertile men. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Psychological profile of women with infertility: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Shuvabrata; Sanyal, Nilanjana; Mukherjee, Urbi

    2014-01-01

    An endeavour to probe into the psychological profile of infertile women in a comparative stance with the fertile women is not very common. This study is an attempt to explore the possible non-apparent personality factors which contribute to the unexplained pain of infertility. The main objectives of the present study were (a) to examine whether infertile women are different from fertile women in terms of selected psychological variables- narcissistic components, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defensive manoeuvres; and (b) whether the primary infertile women (n=18) are different from the secondary infertile women (n=12) with respect to those variables. A total of 60 individuals (30 infertile women and 30 matched fertile women) were assessed through Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ), Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) and Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40). General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) was administered on to the fertile women to rule out the psychiatric morbidity. Findings revealed that infertile women group differed from fertile women group with respect to narcissism, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defense mechanism. The primary infertile group also showed marked difference from the secondary infertile group with respect to those variables. This study endeavours to enrich the knowledge regarding the personality dynamics of infertile women to design psychotherapeutic programme to aid their well-being, help them to cherish the flavour of parenthood and improve their quality of life.

  3. Psychological profile of women with infertility: A comparative study

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    Shuvabrata Poddar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An endeavour to probe into the psychological profile of infertile women in a comparative stance with the fertile women is not very common. This study is an attempt to explore the possible non-apparent personality factors which contribute to the unexplained pain of infertility. Methods: The main objectives of the present study were (a to examine whether infertile women are different from fertile women in terms of selected psychological variables- narcissistic components, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defensive manoeuvres; and (b whether the primary infertile women (n=18 are different from the secondary infertile women (n=12 with respect to those variables. A total of 60 individuals (30 infertile women and 30 matched fertile women were assessed through Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ, Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI and Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40. General Health Questionnaire (GHQ was administered on to the fertile women to rule out the psychiatric morbidity. Results: Findings revealed that infertile women group differed from fertile women group with respect to narcissism, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defense mechanism. The primary infertile group also showed marked difference from the secondary infertile group with respect to those variables. Conclusions: This study endeavours to enrich the knowledge regarding the personality dynamics of infertile women to design psychotherapeutic programme to aid their well-being, help them to cherish the flavour of parenthood and improve their quality of life.

  4. Aspects of psychosocial development in infertile versus fertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Binaafar, Sima; Ardakani, Zohreh Behjati; Kamali, Kourosh; Kosari, Haleh; Ghorbani, Behzad

    2013-04-01

    Infertility is one of the most difficult life experiences that a couple might encounter. Infertility as a bio-psycho-social phenomenon, could influence all aspects of life. While paying special attention to the psychological aspects of infertility in couples; many studies have investigated the non-clinical aspects of infertility, however, they rarely have evaluated the psychosocial development of infertile versus fertile men. We aimed to study the effects of infertility on psychosocial development in men. In fact, we designed the study based on "Erikson's theory of psychosocial development". We focused on the relationship between psychosocial development and some self-conceived indices. For this purpose, we divided the participants volunteers into two groups of cases (80 infertile men) and controls (40 fertile men) and asked them to complete a 112 (questions questionnaire based on "self description"). The statistical analysis was performed by SPSS (version 13) using independent t-test, Pearson correlation coefficient and analysis of covariance. A p-value stages (p stages. Infertility as a phenomenon had its own effects on the psychosocial development of infertile men. However, good coping skills are powerful tools to manage these myriad of feelings surrounding infertile men.

  5. Evaluation of superoxide dismutase activity and its impact on semen quality parameters of infertile men.

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    Jolanta Saczko

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, as one of the most important antioxidative defence enzymes, in seminal plasma of patients consulting for male infertility was presented in the article. The study included also the determination of its influence on selected human semen quality parameters. The material represents semen samples obtained from 15 men, which were divided into two groups: Group I (n=10 including patients consulting for infertility and Group II (n=5 containing healthy sperm donors as a control. All of the semen samples were cryopreserved and stored in liquid nitrogen. The frozen samples were thawed at the same time and then SOD activity was determined spectrophotometrically. The analysis of the investigations results indicates a significantly lower semen SOD activity detected in oligoasthenozoospermic patients, comparing to the activity found in normospermic men. The study showed a positive correlation between SOD activity in seminal plasma and semen quality parameters--sperm concentration and overall motility, which are regarded as the most important for normal fertilizing ability of the spermatozoa. Significantly lower SOD activity in seminal plasma of infertile patients, comparing to healthy sperm donors, as well as positive correlation and beneficial impact of SOD activity on human semen quality parameters seem to confirm the observations, that decreased seminal plasma scavenger antioxidant capacity, particularly in form of low SOD activity, can be responsible for male infertility. This trial shows that SOD activity survey in seminal plasma could be a useful tool for determining sperm fertilization potential and could improve the diagnosis of male infertility.

  6. The social epidemiology of coping with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Christensen, Ulla; Holstein, B E

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To analyse the cross-sectional association between coping responses with infertility and occupational social class. Infertility is evenly distributed across social classes in Denmark, and there is free access to high-quality assisted reproduction technology. METHODS: Data were based...... was developed in four categories: active-avoidance coping; active-confronting coping; passive-avoidance coping; meaning-based coping. These subscales were later confirmed by factor analysis. Occupational social class was measured in a standardized way. RESULTS: Contrary to expectations, the logistic regression...... analyses showed that women from lower social classes V + VI and men from social classes III + IV used significantly more active-confronting coping. Women from lower social classes V + VI used significantly more meaning-based coping. Both men and women from social classes III - VI used significantly more...

  7. Bioengineering Strategies to Treat Female Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Che-Ying; Baker, Hannah; Fries, Melissa H; Yoo, James J; Kim, Peter C W; Fisher, John P

    2017-06-01

    Bioengineering strategies have demonstrated enormous potential to treat female infertility as a result of chemotherapy, uterine injuries, fallopian tube occlusion, massive intrauterine adhesions, congenital uterine malformations, and hysterectomy. These strategies can be classified into two broad categories as follows: (i) Transplantation of fresh or cryopreserved organs into the host and (ii) tissue engineering approaches that utilize a combination of cells, growth factors, and biomaterials that leverages the body's inherent ability to regenerate/repair reproductive organs. While whole organ transplant has demonstrated success, the source of the organ and the immunogenic effects of allografts remain challenging. Even though tissue engineering strategies can avoid these issues, their feasibilities of creating whole organ constructs are yet to be demonstrated. In this article we summarize the recent advancements in the applications of bioengineering to treat female infertility.

  8. Improving the reporting of clinical trials of infertility treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement†‡.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legro, Richard S; Wu, Xiaoke; Barnhart, Kurt T; Farquhar, Cynthia; Fauser, Bart C J M; Mol, Ben

    2014-10-10

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and result in a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which create a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant ≥20 weeks gestations) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and during the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and

  9. Clinical, biochemical and ultrasonographic features of infertile women with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, F.; Rizvi, J.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the clinical, biochemical and ultrasonic features of infertile women with PCOS from the two infertility centers of Karachi, The Aga Khan University Hospital and Concept Fertility Centre. Patients attending the Infertility Clinics of Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi and Concept Fertility Centre, Karachi, were evaluated for their clinical features. Complete biochemical evaluation was performed by day 2 FSH, LH, serum prolactin, serum testosterone and fasting serum insulin determination. These results were recorded on the data collection form. Ultrasonic evaluation was performed with transvaginal ultrasound to check the morphological appearance of ovaries. A total of 508 patients were evaluated for epidemiological features of PCOS. Frequency of PCOS in the infertility clinic was 17.6% with high rate of obesity (68.5%) and hyperinsulinemia (59%). The highest rate of abnormal clinical, biochemical features were seen above BMI of 30. High rates of obesity, hyperinsulinemia and impaired glycemic control were seen in this series. It was demonstrated that high BMI had an association and correlation with abnormal clinical and biochemical features. Obese women with PCOS need more attention for their appropriate management. (author)

  10. Where are all the men? The marginalization of men in social scientific research on infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Lorraine; Hudson, Nicky; Lohan, Maria

    2013-09-01

    There is a wealth of research exploring the psychological consequences of infertility and assisted reproduction technology, a substantial body of sociological and anthropological work on 'reproductive disruptions' of many kinds and a small but growing literature on patient perspectives of the quality of care in assisted reproduction. In all these fields, research studies are far more likely to be focused on the understandings and experiences of women than those of men. This paper discusses reasons for the relative exclusion of men in what has been called the 'psycho-social' literature on infertility, comments on research on men from psychological and social perspectives and recent work on the quality of patient care, and makes suggestions for a reframing of the research agenda on men and assisted reproduction. Further research is needed in all areas, including: perceptions of infertility and infertility treatment seeking; experiences of treatment; information and support needs; decisions to end treatment; fatherhood post assisted conception; and the motivation and experiences of sperm donors and men who seek fatherhood through surrogacy or co-parenting. This paper argues for multimethod, interdisciplinary research that includes broader populations of men which can contribute to improved clinical practice and support for users of assisted reproduction treatment. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Variation in distress among women with infertility: evidence from a population-based sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greil, Arthur L; Shreffler, Karina M; Schmidt, Lone

    2011-01-01

    with infertility with no prior pregnancies (primary infertility, n = 399). We further distinguish between women with infertility who were actually 'trying' to become pregnant (the infertile with intent) with those who met the medical definition of infertile but did not describe themselves as trying to become...... with primary infertility who were explicitly trying to become pregnant at the time of the infertility episode stand out as a particularly distressed group. Caregivers should be aware that the emotional needs of women with primary infertility may differ from those with secondary infertility....

  12. Infertility and Weight Reduction: Influence and Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, M. N.; Baloch, S.; Baloch, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of weight reduction in obese infertile women on conception rate spontaneously as well as with ovulation induction and pregnancy outcome. Study Design: Observational experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Different private clinics at Mirpurkhas, Thana Bola Khan and Hyderabad, Sindh, Pakistan, from March 2008 to February 2011. Methodology: Infertile women who were obese with the body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/ m2 and failed to conceive within 2-5 years after taking treatment of infertility for many cycles were inducted. These women underwent life style change program related to exercise and diet for 6 months and in the next 6 months they were observed for spontaneous conception. Those women who failed to conceive were prescribed ovulation induction (clomifene citrate) for the next 6 months and were observed for conception. After conception, they visited regularly during antenatal period till delivery. The data was collected and analyzed on SPSS version 17. Results: The mean decrease in the body index observed was 9.6 +- 1.23 kg/m2, spontaneous conception rate was (n = 35, 41.17%) and miscarriage rate was (n = 9, 16.66%). Conclusion: Weight reduction leads to high spontaneous conception rate as well as with ovulation induction therapy and improves the pregnancy outcome. (author)

  13. Resolved Parental Infertility and Children's Educational Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branigan, Amelia R; Helgertz, Jonas

    2017-06-01

    Although difficulty conceiving a child has long been a major medical and social preoccupation, it has not been considered as a predictor of long-term outcomes in children ultimately conceived. This is consistent with a broader gap in knowledge regarding the consequences of parental health for educational performance in offspring. Here we address that omission, asking how resolved parental infertility relates to children's academic achievement. In a sample of all Swedish births between 1988 and 1995, we find that involuntary childlessness prior to either a first or a second birth is associated with lower academic achievement (both test scores and GPA) in children at age 16, even if the period of infertility was prior to a sibling's birth rather than the child's own. Our results support a conceptualization of infertility as a cumulative physical and social experience with effects extending well beyond the point at which a child is born, and emphasize the need to better understand how specific parental health conditions constrain children's educational outcomes.

  14. Role of ultrasonography in infertility management : ovulation monitoring and assisted conception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, I.U.; Manzur, S.; Rehman, A.U.; Farooq, A.

    2010-01-01

    Infertility causes great stress to many couples. Most of those presenting with childlessness have reduced fertility, rather than absolute sterility, and many are likely to conceive spontaneously. In this 'ultrasonographic monitoring of growing follicles, in ovaries to determine the day of ovulation and its coordination with time of intercourse' has a well established role in the management of 'unexplained infertility'. This study was conducted to find out its efficacy in our setup. 86 female.s patients of unexplained infertility, with different post-marital time period, underwent ultrasonographic ovulation monitoring each with follow up for minimum of four menstrual cycles. Average follicular growth rate was 2 mm a day, which increased to 3 mm a day, two days prior to ovulation. Follicular diameter at the time of ovulation ranged from 22 mm to 27 mm with a mean of 24 mm. We observed ovulation in 79.2% of our patients. In 8.1% patient.s dominant follicle ceased to grow beyond 18 mm size and gradually become atretic. Leutinized un ruptured follicle was documented in 12.7% of our patients in whom follicular size reached to periovulatory range but did not rupture. Uterine endometrial thickness at the time of ovulation varied from 7 mm to 13 mm and multilayered appearance (triple line sign) was observed in 57.3% of patients. Overall conception rate was 16.3% whereas it was much more encouraging to see in 23.5% of patients who were in less than 5 years of their marriage. Keeping in view of easy to workup as out patient basis in large numbers of patient, less time consuming, promising results, cost effectiveness and non invasive nature of technique; ultrasonographic monitoring of ovulation is recommended as a part of management in all patients of unexplained infertility. (author)

  15. Psychological and emotional concomitants of infertility diagnosis in women with diminished ovarian reserve or anatomical cause of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoloro-SantaBarbara, Jennifer M; Lobel, Marci; Bocca, Silvina; Stelling, James R; Pastore, Lisa M

    2017-07-01

    To examine the magnitude and predictors of emotional reactions to an infertility diagnosis in two groups of women: those with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR), and those clinically diagnosed with an anatomical cause of infertility (ACI). Cross-sectional study. Academic and private fertility clinics. Women diagnosed with DOR (n = 51) and women diagnosed with ACI (n = 51). Not applicable. Fertility Problem Inventory (infertility distress), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Health Orientation Scale (emotional reactions to receiving a diagnosis). Women with DOR had statistically significantly higher infertility distress scores than women with ACI and higher scores on subscales assessing distress from social concerns, sexual concerns, and a need for parenthood. In both groups, higher self-esteem was associated with lower infertility distress. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that for women with DOR and those with ACI lower infertility distress but not self-esteem predicted a more positive emotional reaction toward receiving a fertility diagnosis. Women diagnosed with DOR have greater infertility distress but similar self-esteem and emotional reactions to their diagnosis compared with women who have an anatomical cause of infertility. These results suggest that for both groups distress surrounding infertility itself may influence the way women respond to learning the cause of their infertility. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sero-Prevalence of anti-sperm anti-bodies in infertile males in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Infertility is a serious health challenge which causes distress to the couples especially; in Africa. The cause of infertility is multifactorial. Immunological infertility is said to be one of the major causes of unexplained infertility in men. Anti-sperm anti-bodies can be used as an immunological marker of infertility.

  17. Experiencing male infertility: A review of the qualitative research literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, E; Gough, B

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the qualitative research literature that exists in relation to men’s experiences of male infertility. Since men have often been marginalized in the realm of reproduction, including academic research on infertility, it is important to focus on any qualitative research that gives voices to male perspectives and concerns. Given the distress documented by studies of infertile women, we focus in partic...

  18. Inequity between male and female coverage in state infertility laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, James M; Dickey, Ryan M; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-06-01

    To analyze state insurance laws mandating coverage for male factor infertility and identify possible inequities between male and female coverage in state insurance laws. We identified states with laws or codes related to infertility insurance coverage using the National Conference of States Legislatures' and the National Infertility Association's websites. We performed a primary, systematic analysis of the laws or codes to specifically identify coverage for male factor infertility services. Not applicable. Not applicable. Not applicable. The presence or absence of language in state insurance laws mandating coverage for male factor infertility care. There are 15 states with laws mandating insurance coverage for female factor infertility. Only eight of those states (California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and West Virginia) have mandates for male factor infertility evaluation or treatment. Insurance coverage for male factor infertility is most specific in Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York, yet significant differences exist in the male factor policies in all eight states. Three states (Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York) exempt coverage for vasectomy reversal. Despite national recommendations that male and female partners begin infertility evaluations together, only 8 of 15 states with laws mandating infertility coverage include coverage for the male partner. Excluding men from infertility coverage places an undue burden on female partners and risks missing opportunities to diagnose serious male health conditions, correct reversible causes of infertility, and provide cost-effective treatments that can downgrade the intensity of intervention required to achieve a pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    James M Dupree

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of h...

  20. Male factor in infertility: study from a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Kalavathi D. Biradar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a condition with important psychological, economic, demographic and medical implications. Male infertility refers to a male's inability to result pregnancy in a fertile female. Methods: The present hospital based study was conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, East Point Hospital, Bangalore. Duration of the study was for 6 months from October 2015 to March 2016. A total of 250 infertile couples couple coming for evaluation to the outpatient d...