WorldWideScience

Sample records for oligodendrocytes increases sensitivity

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in oligodendrocytes increases sensitivity to excitotoxic death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas Monica A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously found that cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 was expressed in dying oligodendrocytes at the onset of demyelination in the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD model of multiple sclerosis (MS (Carlson et al. J.Neuroimmunology 2006, 149:40. This suggests that COX-2 may contribute to death of oligodendrocytes. Objective The goal of this study was to examine whether COX-2 contributes to excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes and potentially contributes to demyelination. Methods The potential link between COX-2 and oligodendrocyte death was approached using histopathology of MS lesions to examine whether COX-2 was expressed in dying oligodendrocytes. COX-2 inhibitors were examined for their ability to limit demyelination in the TMEV-IDD model of MS and to limit excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes in vitro. Genetic manipulation of COX-2 expression was used to determine whether COX-2 contributes to excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes. A transgenic mouse line was generated that overexpressed COX-2 in oligodendrocytes. Oligodendrocyte cultures derived from these transgenic mice were used to examine whether increased expression of COX-2 enhanced the vulnerability of oligodendrocytes to excitotoxic death. Oligodendrocytes derived from COX-2 knockout mice were evaluated to determine if decreased COX-2 expression promotes a greater resistance to excitotoxic death. Results COX-2 was expressed in dying oligodendrocytes in MS lesions. COX-2 inhibitors limited demyelination in the TMEV-IDD model of MS and protected oligodendrocytes against excitotoxic death in vitro. COX-2 expression was increased in wild-type oligodendrocytes following treatment with Kainic acid (KA. Overexpression of COX-2 in oligodendrocytes increased the sensitivity of oligodendrocytes to KA-induced excitotoxic death eight-fold compared to wild-type. Conversely, oligodendrocytes prepared from COX-2 knockout mice showed a

  2. Human Traumatic Brain Injury Results in Oligodendrocyte Death and Increases the Number of Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygt, Johanna; Gumucio, Astrid; Ingelsson, Martin; Skoglund, Karin; Holm, Jonatan; Alafuzoff, Irina; Marklund, Niklas

    2016-06-01

    Oligodendrocyte (OL) death may contribute to white matter pathology, a common cause of network dysfunction and persistent cognitive problems in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) persist throughout the adult CNS and may replace dead OLs. OL death and OPCs were analyzed by immunohistochemistry of human brain tissue samples, surgically removed due to life-threatening contusions and/or focal brain swelling at 60.6 ± 75 hours (range 4-192 hours) postinjury in 10 severe TBI patients (age 51.7 ± 18.5 years). Control brain tissue was obtained postmortem from 5 age-matched patients without CNS disorders. TUNEL and CC1 co-labeling was used to analyze apoptotic OLs, which were increased in injured brain tissue (p number of single-labeled Olig2, A2B5, NG2, and PDGFR-α-positive cells, numbers of Olig2 and A2B5 co-labeled cells were increased in TBI samples (p < 0.05); this was inversely correlated with time from injury to surgery (r = -0.8, p < 0.05). These results indicate that severe focal human TBI results in OL death and increases in OPCs postinjury, which may influence white matter function following TBI.

  3. Gas6 increases myelination by oligodendrocytes and its deficiency delays recovery following cuprizone-induced demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele D Binder

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a complex demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Current research has shown that at least in some cases, the primary insult in MS could be directed at the oligodendrocyte, and that the earliest immune responses are primarily via innate immune cells. We have identified a family of receptor protein tyrosine kinases, known as the TAM receptors (Tyro3, Axl and Mertk, as potentially important in regulating both the oligodendrocyte and immune responses. We have previously shown that Gas6, a ligand for the TAM receptors, can affect the severity of demyelination in mice, with a loss of signalling via Gas6 leading to decreased oligodendrocyte survival and increased microglial activation during cuprizone-induced demyelination. We hypothesised TAM receptor signalling would also influence the extent of recovery in mice following demyelination. A significant effect of the absence of Gas6 was detected upon remyelination, with a lower level of myelination after 4 weeks of recovery in comparison with wild-type mice. The delay in remyelination was accompanied by a reduction in oligodendrocyte numbers. To understand the molecular mechanisms that drive the observed effects, we also examined the effect of exogenous Gas6 in in vitro myelination assays. We found that Gas6 significantly increased myelination in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that TAM receptor signalling could be directly involved in myelination by oligodendrocytes. The reduced rate of remyelination in the absence of Gas6 could thus result from a lack of Gas6 at a critical time during myelin production after injury. These findings establish Gas6 as an important regulator of both CNS demyelination and remyelination.

  4. Erythropoietin (EPO) increases myelin gene expression in CG4 oligodendrocyte cells through the classical EPO receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervellini, Ilaria; Annenkov, Alexander; Brenton, Thomas; Chernajovsky, Yuti; Ghezzi, Pietro; Mengozzi, Manuela

    2013-08-28

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has protective effects in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases, including in animal models of multiple sclerosis, where EPO decreases disease severity. EPO also promotes neurogenesis and is protective in models of toxic demyelination. In this study, we asked whether EPO could promote neurorepair by also inducing remyelination. In addition, we investigated whether the effect of EPO could be mediated by the classical erythropoietic EPO receptor (EPOR), since it is still questioned if EPOR is functional in nonhematopoietic cells. Using CG4 cells, a line of rat oligodendrocyte precursor cells, we found that EPO increases the expression of myelin genes (myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein [MOG] and myelin basic protein [MBP]). EPO had no effect in wild-type CG4 cells, which do not express EPOR, whereas it increased MOG and MBP expression in cells engineered to overexpress EPOR (CG4-EPOR). This was reflected in a marked increase in MOG protein levels, as detected by Western blot. In these cells, EPO induced by 10-fold the early growth response gene 2 (Egr2), which is required for peripheral myelination. However, Egr2 silencing with a siRNA did not reverse the effect of EPO, indicating that EPO acts through other pathways. In conclusion, EPO induces the expression of myelin genes in oligodendrocytes and this effect requires the presence of EPOR. This study demonstrates that EPOR can mediate neuroreparative effects.

  5. Cyclosporin A increases recovery after spinal cord injury but does not improve myelination by oligodendrocyte progenitor cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Feng-Chao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs is an attractive therapy for demyelinating diseases. Cyclosporin A (CsA is one of the foremost immunosuppressive agents and has widespread use in tissue and cell transplantation. However, whether CsA affects survival and differentiation of engrafted OPCs in vivo is unknown. In this study, the effect of CsA on morphological, functional and immunological aspects, as well as survival and differentiation of engrafted OPCs in injured spinal cord was explored. Results We transplanted green fluorescent protein (GFP expressed OPCs (GFP-OPCs into injured spinal cords of rats treated with or without CsA (10 mg/kg. Two weeks after cell transplantation, more GFP-positive cells were found in CsA-treated rats than that in vehicle-treated ones. However, the engrafted cells mostly differentiated into astrocytes, but not oligodendrocytes in both groups. In the CsA-treated group, a significant decrease in spinal cord lesion volume along with increase in spared myelin and neurons were found compared to the control group. Such histological improvement correlated well with an increase in behavioral recovery. Further study suggested that CsA treatment could inhibit infiltration of T cells and activation of resident microglia and/or macrophages derived from infiltrating monocytes in injured spinal cords, which contributes to the survival of engrafted OPCs and repair of spinal cord injury (SCI. Conclusions These results collectively indicate that CsA can promote the survival of engrafted OPCs in injured spinal cords, but has no effect on their differentiation. The engrafted cells mostly differentiated into astrocytes, but not oligodendrocytes. The beneficial effect of CsA on SCI and the survival of engrafted cells may be attributed to its neuroprotective effect.

  6. Ba2+- and bupivacaine-sensitive background K+ conductances mediate rapid EPSP attenuation in oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chu-Fang; Kuo, Tzu-Wei; Weng, Ju-Yun; Lin, Yen-Chu; Chen, Ting-Yu; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Lien, Cheng-Chang

    2013-10-01

    Glutamatergic transmission onto oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) may regulate OPC proliferation, migration and differentiation. Dendritic integration of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) is critical for neuronal functions, and mechanisms regulating dendritic propagation and summation of EPSPs are well understood. However, little is known about EPSP attenuation and integration in OPCs. We developed realistic OPC models for synaptic integration, based on passive membrane responses of OPCs obtained by simultaneous dual whole-cell patch-pipette recordings. Compared with neurons, OPCs have a very low value of membrane resistivity, which is largely mediated by Ba(2+)- and bupivacaine-sensitive background K(+) conductances. The very low membrane resistivity not only leads to rapid EPSP attenuation along OPC processes but also sharpens EPSPs and narrows the temporal window for EPSP summation. Thus, background K(+) conductances regulate synaptic responses and integration in OPCs, thereby affecting activity-dependent neuronal control of OPC development and function.

  7. Moire interferometry with increased sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bongtae; Post, Daniel

    The basic sensitivity of moire interferometry was increased beyond the previously conceived theoretical limit. This was accomplished by creating the virtual reference grating inside a refractive medium instead of air, thus shortening the wavelength of light. A very compact four-beam moire interferometer in a refractive medium was developed for microscopic viewing, which produced a basic sensitivity of 208 nm per fringe order, corresponding to moire with 4800 lines per mm. Its configuration made it inherently stable and relatively insensitive to environmental disturbances. An optical microscope was employed as the image recording system to obtain high spatial resolution. The method was demonstrated for deformation of a thick graphite/epoxy composite at the 0/90 deg ply interface.

  8. Oligodendrocytes in a nutshell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John-Paul eMichalski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS. While the phrase is oft repeated and holds true, the last few years have borne witness to radical change in our understanding of this unique cell type. Once considered static glue, oligodendrocytes are now seen as plastic and adaptive, capable of reacting to a changing CNS. This review is intended as a primer and guide, exploring how the past five years have fundamentally altered our appreciation of oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination.

  9. Oligodendrocytes in a Nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, John-Paul; Kothary, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS). While the phrase is oft repeated and holds true, the last few years have borne witness to radical change in our understanding of this unique cell type. Once considered static glue, oligodendrocytes are now seen as plastic and adaptive, capable of reacting to a changing CNS. This review is intended as a primer and guide, exploring how the past 5 years have fundamentally altered our appreciation of oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination.

  10. Developmental stage of oligodendrocytes determines their response to activated microglia in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bresnahan Jacqueline C

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs and mature oligodendrocytes are both lost in central nervous system injury and disease. Activated microglia may play a role in OPC and oligodendrocyte loss or replacement, but it is not clear how the responses of OPCs and oligodendrocytes to activated microglia differ. Methods OPCs and microglia were isolated from rat cortex. OPCs were induced to differentiate into oligodendrocytes with thyroid hormone in defined medium. For selected experiments, microglia were added to OPC or oligodendrocyte cultures. Lipopolysaccharide was used to activate microglia and microglial activation was confirmed by TNFα ELISA. Cell survival was assessed with immunocytochemistry and cell counts. OPC proliferation and oligodendrocyte apoptosis were also assessed. Results OPCs and oligodendrocytes displayed phenotypes representative of immature and mature oligodendrocytes, respectively. Activated microglia reduced OPC survival, but increased survival and reduced apoptosis of mature oligodendrocytes. Activated microglia also underwent cell death themselves. Conclusion Activated microglia may have divergent effects on OPCs and mature oligodendrocytes, reducing OPC survival and increasing mature oligodendrocyte survival. This may be of importance because activated microglia are present in several disease states where both OPCs and mature oligodendrocytes are also reacting to injury. Activated microglia may simultaneously have deleterious and helpful effects on different cells after central nervous system injury.

  11. Neurofilament-tubulin binding site peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 increases the differentiation of oligodendrocytes in vitro and partially prevents them from lysophosphatidyl choline toxiciy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fressinaud, Catherine; Eyer, Joël

    2014-02-01

    During multiple sclerosis (MS), the main axon cystoskeleton proteins, neurofilaments (NF), are altered, and their release into the cerebrospinal fluid correlates with disease severity. The role of NF in the extraaxonal location is unknown. Therefore, we tested whether synthetic peptides corresponding to the tubulin-binding site (TBS) sequence identified on light NF chain (NFL-TBS.40-63) and keratin (KER-TBS.1-24), which could be released during MS, modulate remyelination in vitro. Biotinylated NFL-TBS.40-63, NFL-Scramble2, and KER-TBS.1-54 (1-100 μM, 24 hr) were added to rat oligodendrocyte (OL) and astrocyte (AS) cultures, grown in chemically defined medium. Proliferation and differentiation were characterized by using specific antibodies (A2B5, CNP, MBP, GFAP) and compared with untreated cultures. Lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC; 2 × 10(-5) M) was used to induce OL death and to test the effects of TBS peptides under these conditions. NFL-TBS.40-63 significantly increased OL differentiation and maturation, with more CNP(+) and MBP(+) cells characterized by numerous ramified processes, along with myelin balls. When OL were challenged with LPC, concomitant treatment with NFL-TBS.40-63 rescued more than 50% of OL compared with cultures treated with LPC only. Proliferation of OL progenitors was not affected, nor were AS proliferation and differentiation. NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide induces specific effects in vitro, increasing OL differentiation and maturation without altering AS fate. In addition, it partially protects OL from demyelinating injury. Thus release of NFL-TBS.40-63 caused by axonal damage in vivo could improve repair through increased OL differentiation, which is a prerequisite for remyelination. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. LINGO-1 negatively regulates myelination by oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Sha; Miller, Robert H; Lee, Xinhua; Scott, Martin L; Shulag-Morskaya, Svetlane; Shao, Zhaohui; Chang, Jufang; Thill, Greg; Levesque, Melissa; Zhang, Mingdi; Hession, Cathy; Sah, Dinah; Trapp, Bruce; He, Zhigang; Jung, Vincent; McCoy, John M; Pepinsky, R Blake

    2005-06-01

    The control of myelination by oligodendrocytes in the CNS is poorly understood. Here we show that LINGO-1 is an important negative regulator of this critical process. LINGO-1 is expressed in oligodendrocytes. Attenuation of its function by dominant-negative LINGO-1, LINGO-1 RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) or soluble human LINGO-1 (LINGO-1-Fc) leads to differentiation and increased myelination competence. Attenuation of LINGO-1 results in downregulation of RhoA activity, which has been implicated in oligodendrocyte differentiation. Conversely, overexpression of LINGO-1 leads to activation of RhoA and inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Treatment of oligodendrocyte and neuron cocultures with LINGO-1-Fc resulted in highly developed myelinated axons that have internodes and well-defined nodes of Ranvier. The contribution of LINGO-1 to myelination was verified in vivo through the analysis of LINGO-1 knockout mice. The ability to recapitulate CNS myelination in vitro using LINGO-1 antagonists and the in vivo effects seen in the LINGO-1 knockout indicate that LINGO-1 signaling may be critical for CNS myelination.

  13. Increased skeletal muscle capillarization enhances insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Laub, Lasse; Vedel, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Increased skeletal muscle capillarization is associated with improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. However, a possible causal relationship has not previously been identified. We therefore investigated whether increased skeletal muscle capillarization increases insulin sensitivity....... Skeletal muscle specific angiogenesis was induced by adding the α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist Prazosin to the drinking water of Sprague Dawley rats (n=33) while 34 rats served as controls. Insulin sensitivity was measured ≥40 h after termination of the 3-week Prazosin treatment, which ensured...... that Prazosin was cleared from the blood stream. Whole-body insulin sensitivity was measured in conscious, unrestrained rats by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Tissue specific insulin sensitivity was assessed by administration of 2-deoxy-[(3)H]-Glucose during the plateau phase of the clamp. Whole...

  14. Increase in the Array Television Camera Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhrukhanov, O. S.

    A simple adder circuit for successive television frames that enables to considerably increase the sensitivity of such radiation detectors is suggested by the example of array television camera QN902K.

  15. Epigenetic mechanisms facilitating oligodendrocyte development, maturation, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copray, Sjef; Huynh, Jimmy Long; Sher, Falak; Casaccia-Bonnefil, Patrizia; Boddeke, Erik

    2009-11-15

    The process of oligodendrocyte differentiation is regulated by a dynamic interaction between a genetic and an epigenetic program. Recent studies, addressing nucleosomal histone modifications have considerably increased our knowledge regarding epigenetic regulation of gene expression during oligodendrocyte development and aging. These results have generated new hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying the decreased efficiency of endogenous remyelination in response to demyelinating injuries with increasing age. In this review, we present an overview of the epigenetic mechanisms regulating gene expression at specific stages of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation as well as the changes that occur with aging.

  16. Epigenetic Mechanisms Facilitating Oligodendrocyte Development, Maturation, and Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, Sjef; Huynh, Jimmy Long; Sher, Falak; Casaccia-Bonnefil, Patrizia; Boddeke, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The process of oligodendrocyte differentiation is regulated by a dynamic interaction between a genetic and an epigenetic program. Recent studies, addressing nucleosomal histone modifications have considerably increased our knowledge regarding epigenetic regulation of gene expression during oligodend

  17. Interleukin-1 regulates proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, José M; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Arévalo-Martín, Angel; Almazán, Guillermina; Guaza, Carmen

    2002-07-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a pleiotropic cytokine expressed during normal CNS development and in inflammatory demyelinating diseases, but remarkably little is known about its effect on oligodendroglial cells. In this study we explored the role of IL-1beta in oligodendrocyte progenitors and differentiated oligodendrocytes. The effects of IL-1beta were compared to those of IL-1 receptor antagonist, the specific inhibitor of IL-1 activity, since progenitors and differentiated oligodendrocytes produce IL-1beta and express IL-1 receptors. Unlike other proinflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha and IFNgamma), IL-1beta was not toxic for oligodendrocyte lineage cells. However, this cytokine inhibited proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitors in the presence of growth factors (PDGF plus bFGF). This was evidenced by a significant decrease in both cells incorporating bromodeoxyuridine (45%) and total cell numbers (57%) after 6 days of treatment. Interestingly, IL-1beta blocked proliferation at the late progenitor/prooligodendrocyte (O4+) stage but did not affect proliferation of early progenitors (A2B5+). Inhibition of proliferation paralleled with promotion of differentiation, as revealed by the increased percentage of R-mab+ cells (6.7-fold). Moreover, when oligodendrocyte progenitors were allowed to differentiate in the absence of growth factors, treatment with IL-1beta promoted maturation to the MBP+ stage (4.2-fold) and survival of differentiating oligodendrocytes (2.1-fold). Regarding intracellular signaling, IL-1beta activated the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not the p42/p44 MAPK and, when combined with growth factors, intensified p38 activation but inhibited the growth-factor-induced p42/p44 activation. IL-1beta also induced a time-dependent inhibition of PFGF-Ralpha gene expression. These results support a role for IL-1beta in promoting mitotic arrest and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors as well as maturation and survival of differentiating

  18. Adrenomedullin promotes differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into myelin-basic-protein expressing oligodendrocytes under pathological conditions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Takakuni; Takahashi, Yoko; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Liang, Anna C; Ihara, Masafumi; Lo, Eng H; Arai, Ken

    2015-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes, which are the main cell type in cerebral white matter, are generated from their precursor cells (oligodendrocyte precursor cells: OPCs). However, the differentiation from OPCs to oligodendrocytes is disturbed under stressed conditions. Therefore, drugs that can improve oligodendrocyte regeneration may be effective for white matter-related diseases. Here we show that a vasoactive peptide adrenomedullin (AM) promotes the in vitro differentiation of OPCs under pathological conditions. Primary OPCs were prepared from neonatal rat brains, and differentiated into myelin-basic-protein expressing oligodendrocytes over time. This in vitro OPC differentiation was inhibited by prolonged chemical hypoxic stress induced by non-lethal CoCl(2) treatment. However, AM promoted the OPC differentiation under the hypoxic stress conditions, and the AM receptor antagonist AM(22-52) canceled the AM-induced OPC differentiation. In addition, AM treatment increased the phosphorylation level of Akt in OPC cultures, and correspondingly, the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 blocked the AM-induced OPC differentiation. Taken together, AM treatment rescued OPC maturation under pathological conditions via an AM-receptor-PI3K/Akt pathway. Oligodendrocytes play critical roles in white matter by forming myelin sheath. Therefore, AM signaling may be a promising therapeutic target to boost oligodendrocyte regeneration in CNS disorders.

  19. Interference comb-spectroscopy with increasing sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkin, Sergey; Borisov, Evgenii; Balabas, Michail; Uvarova, Svetlana; Shevtzov, Vladimir; Kalinichev, Alexei; Shoev, Vladislav; Venediktov, Dmitrii; Venediktov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    The paper considers the use of holographic interferometer for hologram recording of the wide spectrum from the comb - generator of the femtosecond laser was applied for illuminating of Michelson interferometer with atomic vapor. The behavior of spectral interference fringes on the exit slit of spectrograph reflects the behavior of nonlinear refractive index. The method of holographic interferometry with increasing sensitivity using phase modulator was applied for digital hologram processing.

  20. Oligodendrocyte-like cell transplantation for acute spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongtao Xu; Anmin Chen; Feng Li; Hougeng Lu

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we used insulin-like growth factor-1 to induce bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into oligodendrocyte-like cells. Cell surface marker identification showed that they expressed myelin basic protein and galactosylceramide, two specific markers of oligodendrocytes. These cells were transplanted into rats with acute spinal cord injury at T10. At 8 weeks post-implantation, oligodendrocyte-like cells were observed to have survived at the injury site. The critical angle of the inclined plane, and Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores were all increased. Furthermore, latencies of motion-evoked and somatosensory-evoked potentials were decreased. These results demonstrate that transplantation of oligodendrocytic-induced MSCs promote functional recovery of injured spinal cord.

  1. Human Oligodendrocytes in Remyelination Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czepiel, Marcin; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2015-01-01

    Studies on myelination and oligodendrocyte development are inevitably linked with demyelinating conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS), leukodystrophies or spinal cord injury (SCI). Chronic loss of myelin, subsequently leading to neurodegeneration, is the ultimate cause of severe and permanent d

  2. How to make an oligodendrocyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A.; Kuypers, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    and cerebral palsy, to multiple sclerosis and white matter stroke. Accordingly, replacing lost oligodendrocytes, whether by transplanting oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) or by mobilizing endogenous progenitors, holds great promise as a therapeutic strategy for the diseases of central white matter....... In this Primer, we describe the molecular events regulating oligodendrocyte development and how our understanding of this process has led to the establishment of methods for producing OPCs and oligodendrocytes from embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as directly from somatic cells....... In addition, we will discuss the safety of engrafted stem cell-derived OPCs, as well as approaches by which to modulate their differentiation and myelinogenesis in vivo following transplantation....

  3. Autophagy promotes oligodendrocyte survival and function following dysmyelination in a long-lived myelin mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chelsey M; Mayer, Joshua A; Duncan, Ian D

    2013-05-01

    The Long-Evans shaker (les) rat has a mutation in myelin basic protein that results in severe CNS dysmyelination and subsequent demyelination during development. During this time, les oligodendrocytes accumulate cytoplasmic vesicles, including lysosomes and membrane-bound organelles. However, the mechanism and functional relevance behind these oligodendrocyte abnormalities in les have not been investigated. Using high-magnification electron microscopy, we identified the accumulations in les oligodendrocytes as early and late autophagosomes. Additionally, immunohistochemistry and Western blots showed an increase in autophagy markers in les. However, autophagy did not precede the death of les oligodendrocytes. Instead, upregulating autophagy promoted membrane extensions in les oligodendrocytes in vitro. Furthermore, upregulating autophagy in les rats via intermittent fasting increased the proportion of myelinated axons as well as myelin sheath thickness in les and control rats. Overall, this study provides insight into the abnormalities described in les as well as identifying a novel mechanism that promotes the survival and function of oligodendrocytes.

  4. Hyperforin promotes mitochondrial function and development of oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlin; Zhang, Yanbo; He, Jue; Zhang, Handi; Xiao, Lan; Nazarali, Adil; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Dai; Tan, Qingrong; Kong, Jiming; Li, Xin-Min

    2011-11-01

    St. John's wort has been found to be an effective and safe herbal treatment for depression in several clinical trials. However, the underlying mechanism of its therapeutic effects is unclear. Recent studies show that the loss and malfunction of oligodendrocytes are closely related to the neuropathological changes in depression, which can be reversed by antidepressant treatment. In this study, we evaluated the effects of hyperforin, a major active component of St. John's wort, on the proliferation, development and mitochondrial function of oligodendrocytes. The study results revealed that hyperforin promotes maturation of oligodendrocytes and increases mitochondrial function without affecting proliferation of an oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line and neural stem/progenitor cells. Hyperforin also prevented mitochondrial toxin-induced cytotoxicity in an oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line. These findings suggest that hyperforin may stimulate the development and function of oligodendrocytes, which could be a mechanism of its effect in depression. Future in vitro and in vivo studies are required to further characterize the mechanisms of hyperforin.

  5. Golli myelin basic proteins stimulate oligodendrocyte progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in remyelinating adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Pablo M; Cheli, Veronica T; Ghiani, Cristina A; Spreuer, Vilma; Handley, Vance W; Campagnoni, Anthony T

    2012-07-01

    Golli myelin basic proteins are necessary for normal myelination, acting via voltage and store-dependent Ca(2+) entry at multiple steps during oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) development. To date nothing is known regarding the role of golli proteins in demyelination or remyelination events. Here the effects of golli ablation and overexpression in myelin loss and recovery were examined using the cuprizone (CPZ) model of demyelination/remyelination. We found severe demyelination in the corpus callosum (CC) of golli-overexpressing mice (JOE) during the CPZ treatment, which was accompanied by an increased number of reactive astrocytes and activation of microglia/macrophages. During demyelination of JOE brains, a significant increase in the number of proliferating OPCs was found in the CC as well as in the subventricular zone, and our data indicate that these progenitors matured and fully remyelinated the CC of JOE animals after CPZ withdrawal. In contrast, in the absence of golli (golli-KO mice) delayed myelin loss associated with a smaller immune response, and a lower number of OPCs was found in these mice during the CPZ treatment. Furthermore, incomplete remyelination was observed after CPZ removal in large areas of the CC of golli-KO mice, reflecting irregular recovery of the oligodendrocyte population and subsequent myelin sheath formation. Our findings demonstrate that golli proteins sensitize mature oligodendrocytes to CPZ-induced demyelination, while at the same time stimulate the proliferation/recruitment of OPCs during demyelination, resulting in accelerated remyelination.

  6. Lamb waves increase sensitivity in nondestructive testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Novi, R.

    1967-01-01

    Lamb waves improve sensitivity and resolution in the detection of small defects in thin plates and small diameter, thin-walled tubing. This improvement over shear waves applies to both longitudinal and transverse flaws in the specimens.

  7. Axon-to-Glia Interaction Regulates GABAA Receptor Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Rogelio O; Sánchez-Gómez, María Victoria; Alberdi, Elena; Canedo-Antelo, Manuel; Chara, Juan Carlos; Palomino, Aitor; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Myelination requires oligodendrocyte-neuron communication, and both neurotransmitters and contact interactions are essential for this process. Oligodendrocytes are endowed with neurotransmitter receptors whose expression levels and properties may change during myelination. However, only scant information is available about the extent and timing of these changes or how they are regulated by oligodendrocyte-neuron interactions. Here, we used electrophysiology to study the expression of ionotropic GABA, glutamate, and ATP receptors in oligodendrocytes derived from the optic nerve and forebrain cultured either alone or in the presence of dorsal root ganglion neurons. We observed that oligodendrocytes from both regions responded to these transmitters at 1 day in culture. After the first day in culture, however, GABA sensitivity diminished drastically to less than 10%, while that of glutamate and ATP remained constant. In contrast, the GABA response amplitude was sustained and remained stable in oligodendrocytes cocultured with dorsal root ganglion neurons. Immunochemistry and pharmacological properties of the responses indicated that they were mediated by distinctive GABAA receptors and that in coculture with neurons, the oligodendrocytes bearing the receptors were those in direct contact with axons. These results reveal that GABAA receptor regulation in oligodendrocytes is driven by axonal cues and that GABA signaling may play a role in myelination and/or during axon-glia recognition.

  8. DISC1 (disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 regulates differentiation of oligodendrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Hattori

    Full Text Available Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1 is a gene disrupted by a translocation, t(1;11 (q42.1;q14.3, that segregates with major psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, recurrent major depression and bipolar affective disorder, in a Scottish family. Here we report that mammalian DISC1 endogenously expressed in oligodendroglial lineage cells negatively regulates differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into oligodendrocytes. DISC1 expression was detected in oligodendrocytes of the mouse corpus callosum at P14 and P70. DISC1 mRNA was expressed in primary cultured rat cortical oligodendrocyte precursor cells and decreased when oligodendrocyte precursor cells were induced to differentiate by PDGF deprivation. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that overexpressed DISC1 was localized in the cell bodies and processes of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and oligodendrocytes. We show that expression of the myelin related markers, CNPase and MBP, as well as the number of cells with a matured oligodendrocyte morphology, were decreased following full length DISC1 overexpression. Conversely, both expression of CNPase and the number of oligodendrocytes with a mature morphology were increased following knockdown of endogenous DISC1 by RNA interference. Overexpression of a truncated form of DISC1 also resulted in an increase in expression of myelin related proteins and the number of mature oligodendrocytes, potentially acting via a dominant negative mechanism. We also identified involvement of Sox10 and Nkx2.2 in the DISC1 regulatory pathway of oligodendrocyte differentiation, both well-known transcription factors involved in the regulation of myelin genes.

  9. Auraptene induces oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in a cuprizone-induced animal model of demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Mitsunari; Shimizu, Risei; Furuta, Kohei; Sugino, Mami; Watanabe, Takashi; Aoki, Rui; Okuyama, Satoshi; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2016-05-15

    We investigated the effects of auraptene on mouse oligodendroglial cell lineage in an animal model of demyelination induced by cuprizone. Auraptene, a citrus coumarin, was intraperitoneally administered to mice fed the demyelinating agent cuprizone. Immunohistochemical analysis of the corpus callosum and/or Western blotting analysis of brain extracts revealed that cuprizone reduced immunoreactivity for myelin-basic protein, a marker of myelin, whereas it increased immunoreactivity to platelet derived-growth factor receptor-α, a marker of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Administration of auraptene enhanced the immunoreactivity to oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2, a marker of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells, but had no effect on immunoreactivity to myelin-basic protein or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α. These findings suggest that auraptene promotes the production of oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in an animal model of demyelination and may be useful for individuals with demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Protandim Protects Oligodendrocytes against an Oxidative Insult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L. Lim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte damage and loss are key features of multiple sclerosis (MS pathology. Oligodendrocytes appear to be particularly vulnerable to reactive oxygen species (ROS and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF, which induce cell death and prevent the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. Here, we investigated the efficacy of sulforaphane (SFN, monomethyl fumarate (MMF and Protandim to induce Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme expression, and protect oligodendrocytes against ROS-induced cell death and ROS-and TNF-mediated inhibition of OPC differentiation. OLN-93 cells and primary rat oligodendrocytes were treated with SFN, MMF or Protandim resulting in significant induction of Nrf2-driven (antioxidant proteins heme oygenase-1, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase-1 and p62/SQSTM1, as analysed by Western blotting. After incubation with the compounds, oligodendrocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Protandim most potently promoted oligodendrocyte cell survival as measured by live/death viability assay. Moreover, OPCs were treated with Protandim or vehicle control prior to exposing them to TNF or hydrogen peroxide for five days, which inhibited OPC differentiation. Protandim significantly promoted OPC differentiation under influence of ROS, but not TNF. Protandim, a combination of five herbal ingredients, potently induces antioxidants in oligodendrocytes and is able to protect oligodendrocytes against oxidative stress by preventing ROS-induced cell death and promoting OPC differentiation.

  11. FGF-2 signal promotes proliferation of cerebellar progenitor cells and their oligodendrocytic differentiation at early postnatal stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, Masae; Shibasaki, Koji; Ishizaki, Yasuki, E-mail: yasukiishizaki@gunma-u.ac.jp

    2015-08-07

    The origins and developmental regulation of cerebellar oligodendrocytes are largely unknown, although some hypotheses of embryonic origins have been suggested. Neural stem cells exist in the white matter of postnatal cerebellum, but it is unclear whether these neural stem cells generate oligodendrocytes at postnatal stages. We previously showed that cerebellar progenitor cells, including neural stem cells, widely express CD44 at around postnatal day 3. In the present study, we showed that CD44-positive cells prepared from the postnatal day 3 cerebellum gave rise to neurospheres, while CD44-negative cells prepared from the same cerebellum did not. These neurospheres differentiated mainly into oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, suggesting that CD44-positive neural stem/progenitor cells might generate oligodendrocytes in postnatal cerebellum. We cultured CD44-positive cells from the postnatal day 3 cerebellum in the presence of signaling molecules known as mitogens or inductive differentiation factors for oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Of these, only FGF-2 promoted survival and proliferation of CD44-positive cells, and these cells differentiated into O4+ oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, we examined the effect of FGF-2 on cerebellar oligodendrocyte development ex vivo. FGF-2 enhanced proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and increased the number of O4+ and CC1+ oligodendrocytes in slice cultures. These results suggest that CD44-positive cells might be a source of cerebellar oligodendrocytes and that FGF-2 plays important roles in their development at an early postnatal stage. - Highlights: • CD44 is expressed in cerebellar neural stem/progenitor cells at postnatal day 3 (P3). • FGF-2 promoted proliferation of CD44-positive progenitor cells from P3 cerebellum. • FGF-2 promoted oligodendrocytic differentiation of CD44-positive progenitor cells. • FGF-2 increased the number of oligodendrocytes in P3 cerebellar slice culture.

  12. Direct and indirect effects of immune and central nervous system-resident cells on human oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Craig S; Cui, Qiao-Ling; Warsi, Nebras M; Durafourt, Bryce A; Zorko, Nika; Owen, David R; Antel, Jack P; Bar-Or, Amit

    2015-01-15

    In multiple sclerosis, successful remyelination within the injured CNS is largely dependent on the survival and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. During inflammatory injury, oligodendrocytes and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells within lesion sites are exposed to secreted products derived from both infiltrating immune cell subsets and CNS-resident cells. Such products may be considered either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory and have the potential to contribute to both injury and repair processes. Within the CNS, astrocytes also contribute significantly to oligodendrocyte biology during development and following inflammatory injury. The overall objective of the current study was to determine how functionally distinct proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory human immune cell subsets, implicated in multiple sclerosis, can directly and/or indirectly (via astrocytes) impact human oligodendrocyte progenitor cell survival and differentiation. Proinflammatory T cell (Th1/Th17) and M1-polarized myeloid cell supernatants had a direct cytotoxic effect on human A2B5(+) neural progenitors, resulting in decreased O4(+) and GalC(+) oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Astrocyte-conditioned media collected from astrocytes pre-exposed to the same proinflammatory supernatants also resulted in decreased oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation without an apparent increase in cell death and was mediated through astrocyte-derived CXCL10, yet this decrease in differentiation was not observed in the more differentiated oligodendrocytes. Th2 and M2 macrophage or microglia supernatants had neither a direct nor an indirect impact on oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation. We conclude that proinflammatory immune cell responses can directly and indirectly (through astrocytes) impact the fate of immature oligodendrocyte-lineage cells, with oligodendrocyte progenitor cells more vulnerable to injury compared with mature oligodendrocytes.

  13. Protandim Protects Oligodendrocytes against an Oxidative Insult

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Jamie L; van der Pol, Susanne M A; Baron, Wia; McCord, Joe M; de Vries, Helga E; van Horssen, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte damage and loss are key features of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. Oligodendrocytes appear to be particularly vulnerable to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), which induce cell death and prevent the differentiation of

  14. Protandim Protects Oligodendrocytes against an Oxidative Insult

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Jamie L; van der Pol, Susanne M A; Baron, Wia; McCord, Joe M; de Vries, Helga E; van Horssen, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte damage and loss are key features of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. Oligodendrocytes appear to be particularly vulnerable to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), which induce cell death and prevent the differentiation of oligodendrocy

  15. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto; Pepke Pedersen, Jens Olaf

    2016-06-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warming world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) carbon release and global warming event 55.8 Ma ago, a possible future warming analogue. We obtain constrained estimates of CO2 and climate sensitivity before and during the PETM and of the PETM carbon input amount and nature. Sensitivity increased from 3.3-5.6 to 3.7-6.5 K (Kelvin) into the PETM. When taken together with Last Glacial Maximum and modern estimates, this result indicates climate sensitivity increase with global warming.

  16. Myocilin is involved in NgR1/Lingo-1-mediated oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination of the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Heung Sun; Nakaya, Naoki; Abu-Asab, Mones; Kim, Hong Sug; Tomarev, Stanislav I

    2014-04-16

    Myocilin is a secreted glycoprotein that belongs to a family of olfactomedin domain-containing proteins. Although myocilin is detected in several ocular and nonocular tissues, the only reported human pathology related to mutations in the MYOCILIN gene is primary open-angle glaucoma. Functions of myocilin are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that myocilin is a mediator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and is involved in the myelination of the optic nerve in mice. Myocilin is expressed and secreted by optic nerve astrocytes. Differentiation of optic nerve oligodendrocytes is delayed in Myocilin-null mice. Optic nerves of Myocilin-null mice contain reduced levels of several myelin-associated proteins including myelin basic protein, myelin proteolipid protein, and 2'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase compared with those of wild-type littermates. This leads to reduced myelin sheath thickness of optic nerve axons in Myocilin-null mice compared with wild-type littermates, and this difference is more pronounced at early postnatal stages compared with adult mice. Myocilin also affects differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursors in vitro. Its addition to primary cultures of differentiating oligodendrocyte precursors increases levels of tested markers of oligodendrocyte differentiation and stimulates elongation of oligodendrocyte processes. Myocilin stimulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation occurs through the NgR1/Lingo-1 receptor complex. Myocilin physically interacts with Lingo-1 and may be considered as a Lingo-1 ligand. Myocilin-induced elongation of oligodendrocyte processes may be mediated by activation of FYN and suppression of RhoA GTPase.

  17. Pericytes Stimulate Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Differentiation during CNS Remyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alerie Guzman De La Fuente

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the neurovascular niche in CNS myelin regeneration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that, upon demyelination, CNS-resident pericytes (PCs proliferate, and parenchymal non-vessel-associated PC-like cells (PLCs rapidly develop. During remyelination, mature oligodendrocytes were found in close proximity to PCs. In Pdgfbret/ret mice, which have reduced PC numbers, oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC differentiation was delayed, although remyelination proceeded to completion. PC-conditioned medium accelerated and enhanced OPC differentiation in vitro and increased the rate of remyelination in an ex vivo cerebellar slice model of demyelination. We identified Lama2 as a PC-derived factor that promotes OPC differentiation. Thus, the functional role of PCs is not restricted to vascular homeostasis but includes the modulation of adult CNS progenitor cells involved in regeneration.

  18. The NG2 Proteoglycan Protects Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells against Oxidative Stress via Interaction with OMI/HtrA2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Maus

    Full Text Available The NG2 proteoglycan is characteristically expressed by oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC and also by aggressive brain tumours highly resistant to chemo- and radiation therapy. Oligodendrocyte-lineage cells are particularly sensitive to stress resulting in cell death in white matter after hypoxic or ischemic insults of premature infants and destruction of OPC in some types of Multiple Sclerosis lesions. Here we show that the NG2 proteoglycan binds OMI/HtrA2, a mitochondrial serine protease which is released from damaged mitochondria into the cytosol in response to stress. In the cytosol, OMI/HtrA2 initiates apoptosis by proteolytic degradation of anti-apoptotic factors. OPC in which NG2 has been downregulated by siRNA, or OPC from the NG2-knockout mouse show an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress evidenced by increased cell death. The proapoptotic protease activity of OMI/HtrA2 in the cytosol can be reduced by the interaction with NG2. Human glioma expressing high levels of NG2 are less sensitive to oxidative stress than those with lower NG2 expression and reducing NG2 expression by siRNA increases cell death in response to oxidative stress. Binding of NG2 to OMI/HtrA2 may thus help protect cells against oxidative stress-induced cell death. This interaction is likely to contribute to the high chemo- and radioresistance of glioma.

  19. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warming...... world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) carbon release and global warming event 55.8Ma ago, a possible future...... indicates climate sensitivity increase with global warming....

  20. How to Determine the Increasing Returns Sensitivity of Your Industry?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Klein (Martin); E. den Hartigh; H.R. Commandeur (Harry); F. Langerak (Fred)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIncreasing returns means that self-reinforcing mechanisms are at work within firms and markets. These mechanisms come in four forms: scale effects, learning effects, network effects and social interaction effects. Some industries are more sensitive to increasing returns than others. It i

  1. Oligodendrocyte differentiation from adult multipotent stem cells is modulated by glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, F; Urra, O; Alberdi, E; Matute, C

    2012-02-02

    We used multipotent stem cells (MSCs) derived from the young rat subventricular zone (SVZ) to study the effects of glutamate in oligodendrocyte maturation. Glutamate stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation from SVZ-derived MSCs through the activation of specific N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits. The effect of glutamate and NMDA on oligodendrocyte differentiation was evident in both the number of newly generated oligodendrocytes and their morphology. In addition, the levels of NMDAR1 and NMDAR2A protein increased during differentiation, whereas NMDAR2B and NMDAR3 protein levels decreased, suggesting differential expression of NMDA receptor subunits during maturation. Microfluorimetry showed that the activation of NMDA receptors during oligodendrocyte differentiation elevated cytosolic calcium levels and promoted myelination in cocultures with neurons. Moreover, we observed that stimulation of MSCs by NMDA receptors induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which were negatively modulated by the NADPH inhibitor apocynin, and that the levels of ROS correlated with the degree of differentiation. Taken together, these findings suggest that ROS generated by NADPH oxidase by the activation of NMDA receptors promotes the maturation of oligodendrocytes and favors myelination.

  2. Low ethanol consumption increases insulin sensitivity in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Furuya

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Several human studies suggest that light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is associated with enhanced insulin sensitivity, but these studies are not free of conflicting results. To determine if ethanol-enhanced insulin sensitivity could be demonstrated in an animal model, male Wistar rats were fed a standard chow diet and received drinking water without (control or with different ethanol concentrations (0.5, 1.5, 3, 4.5 and 7%, v/v for 4 weeks ad libitum. Then, an intravenous insulin tolerance test (IVITT was performed to determine insulin sensitivity. Among the ethanol groups, only the 3% ethanol group showed an increase in insulin sensitivity based on the increase of the plasma glucose disappearance rate in the IVITT (30%, P<0.05. In addition, an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT was performed in control and 3% ethanol animals. Insulin sensitivity was confirmed in 3% ethanol rats based on the reduction of insulin secretion in the IVGTT (35%, P<0.05, despite the same glucose profile. Additionally, the 3% ethanol treatment did not impair body weight gain or plasma aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities. Thus, the present study established that 3% ethanol in the drinking water for 4 weeks in normal rats is a model of increased insulin sensitivity, which can be used for further investigations of the mechanisms involved.

  3. Orientation of llama antibodies strongly increases sensitivity of biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilling, Anke K; Hesselink, Thamara; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Cordewener, Jan H G; Jongsma, Maarten A; Schoffelen, Sanne; van Hest, Jan C M; Zuilhof, Han; Beekwilder, Jules

    2014-10-15

    Sensitivity of biosensors depends on the orientation of bio-receptors on the sensor surface. The objective of this study was to organize bio-receptors on surfaces in a way that their analyte binding site is exposed to the analyte solution. VHH proteins recognizing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were used for making biosensors, and azides were introduced in the VHH to function as bioorthogonal reactive groups. The importance of the orientation of bio-receptors was addressed by comparing sensors with randomly oriented VHH (with multiple exposed azide groups) to sensors with uniformly oriented VHH (with only a single azide group). A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chip exposing cyclooctyne was reacted to azide functionalized VHH domains, using click chemistry. Comparison between randomly and uniformly oriented bio-receptors showed up to 800-fold increase in biosensor sensitivity. This technique may increase the containment of infectious diseases such as FMDV as its strongly enhanced sensitivity may facilitate early diagnostics.

  4. Dual-specific Phosphatase-6 (Dusp6) and ERK Mediate AMPA Receptor-induced Oligodendrocyte Death*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domercq, Maria; Alberdi, Elena; Sánchez-Gómez, Maria Victoria; Ariz, Usue; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, are highly vulnerable to glutamate excitotoxicity, a mechanism involved in tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Thus, understanding oligodendrocyte death at the molecular level is important to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat the disease. Here, using microarray analysis and quantitative PCR, we observed that dual-specific phosphatase-6 (Dusp6), an extracellular regulated kinase-specific phosphatase, is up-regulated in oligodendrocyte cultures as well as in optic nerves after AMPA receptor activation. In turn, Dusp6 is overexpressed in optic nerves from multiple sclerosis patients before the appearance of evident damage in this structure. We further analyzed the role of Dusp6 and ERK signaling in excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and observed that AMPA receptor activation induces a rapid increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Blocking Dusp6 expression, which enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation, significantly diminished AMPA receptor-induced oligodendrocyte death. In contrast, MAPK/ERK pathway inhibition with UO126 significantly potentiates excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and increases cytochrome c release, mitochondrial depolarization, and mitochondrial calcium overload produced by AMPA receptor stimulation. Upstream analysis demonstrated that MAPK/ERK signaling alters AMPA receptor properties. Indeed, Dusp6 overexpression as well as incubation with UO126 produced an increase in AMPA receptor-induced inward currents and cytosolic calcium overload. Together, these data suggest that levels of phosphorylated ERK, controlled by Dusp6 phosphatase, regulate glutamate receptor permeability and oligodendroglial excitotoxicity. Therefore, targeting Dusp6 may be a useful strategy to prevent oligodendrocyte death in multiple sclerosis and other diseases involving CNS white matter. PMID:21300799

  5. Oligodendrocyte differentiation and implantation : new insights for remyelinating cell therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sher, Falak; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent research on oligodendrocyte development has yielded new insights on the involvement of morphogens and differentiation factors in oligodendrogenesis. This knowledge has improved strategies to control neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte differentiation and functional matu

  6. Synthesis of gangliosides by cultured oligodendrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, S.R.; Szuchet, S.; Dawson, G.

    1981-01-01

    Gangliosides are enriched in the nervous system compared to other tissues. The synthesis of gangliosides by monolayer cultures of isolated oligodendrocytes has not previously been investigated. Cells were labeled with (3H) galactose at preselected times and gangliosides isolated by phase partition, purified, and identified by chromatography. Cultured oligodendrocytes showed selectivity in their synthesis of gangliosides, which was expressed in the type of ganglioside synthesized as well as in the change of incorporation over time in culture. For the first ten days, there was very little incorporation of (3H) galactose in gangliosides, but this was followed by a stimulation of uptake for GM3, GM1/GD3, and GD1 gangliosides, reaching a maximum after approximately 25-30 days in vitro. There was little incorporation into GM2 or trisialogangliosides throughout the life of the cultures. Since oligodendrocytes synthesize extensive membranes during this period, one may speculate that the de novo-synthesized gangliosides are used for membranes.

  7. Mindfulness meditation and relaxation training increases time sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droit-Volet, S; Fanget, M; Dambrun, M

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments examined the effect of mindfulness meditation and relaxation on time perception using a temporal bisection task. In Experiment 1, the participants performed a temporal task before and after exercises of mindfulness meditation or relaxation. In Experiment 2, the procedure was similar than that used in Experiment 1, except that the participants were trained to mediate or relax every day over a period of several weeks. The results showed that mindfulness meditation exercises increased sensitivity to time and lengthened perceived time. However, this temporal improvement with meditation exercises was primarily observed in the experienced meditators. Our results also showed the experienced meditators were less anxious than the novice participants, and that the sensitivity to time increased when the level of anxiety decreased. Our results were explained by the practice of mindfulness technique that had developed individuals' abilities in devoting more attention resources to temporal information processing.

  8. SNX27, a protein involved in down syndrome, regulates GPR17 trafficking and oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraviglia, Veronica; Ulivi, Alessandro Francesco; Boccazzi, Marta; Valenza, Fabiola; Fratangeli, Alessandra; Passafaro, Maria; Lecca, Davide; Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Bartesaghi, Renata; Abbracchio, Maria P; Ceruti, Stefania; Rosa, Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor 17 (GPR17) plays crucial roles in myelination. It is highly expressed during transition of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to immature oligodendrocytes, but, after this stage, it must be down-regulated to allow generation of mature myelinating cells. After endocytosis, GPR17 is sorted into lysosomes for degradation or recycled to the plasma membrane. Balance between degradation and recycling is important for modulation of receptor levels at the cell surface and thus for the silencing/activation of GPR17-signaling pathways that, in turn, affect oligodendrocyte differentiation. The molecular mechanisms at the basis of these processes are still partially unknown and their characterization will allow a better understanding of myelination and provide cues to interpret the consequences of GPR17 dysfunction in diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the endocytic trafficking of GPR17 is mediated by the interaction of a type I PDZ-binding motif located at the C-terminus of the receptor and SNX27, a recently identified protein of the endosome-associated retromer complex and whose functions in oligodendrocytes have never been studied. SNX27 knock-down significantly reduces GPR17 plasma membrane recycling in differentiating oligodendrocytes while accelerating cells' terminal maturation. Interestingly, trisomy-linked down-regulation of SNX27 expression in the brain of Ts65Dn mice, a model of Down syndrome, correlates with a decrease in GPR17(+) cells and an increase in mature oligodendrocytes, which, however, fail in reaching full maturation, eventually leading to hypomyelination. Our data demonstrate that SNX27 modulates GPR17 plasma membrane recycling and stability, and that disruption of the SNX27/GPR17 interaction might contribute to pathological oligodendrocyte differentiation defects. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1437-1460.

  9. Cerebral cortex demyelination and oligodendrocyte precursor response to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolamo, Francesco; Ferrara, Giovanni; Strippoli, Maurizio; Rizzi, Marco; Errede, Mariella; Trojano, Maria; Perris, Roberto; Roncali, Luisa; Svelto, Maria; Mennini, Tiziana; Virgintino, Daniela

    2011-09-01

    Experimentally induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice provides an animal model that shares many features with human demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). To what extent the cerebral cortex is affected by the process of demyelination and how the corollary response of the oligodendrocyte lineage is explicated are still not completely known aspects of EAE. By performing a detailed in situ analysis of expression of myelin and oligodendrocyte markers we have identified areas of subpial demyelination in the cerebral cortex of animals with conventionally induced EAE conditions. On EAE-affected cerebral cortices, the distribution and relative abundance of cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage were assessed and compared with control mouse brains. The analysis demonstrated that A2B5(+) glial restricted progenitors (GRPs) and NG2(+)/PDGFR-α(+) oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) were increased in number during "early" disease, 20 days post MOG immunization, whereas in the "late" disease, 39 days post-immunization, they were strongly diminished, and there was an accompanying reduction in NG2(+)/O4(+) pre-oligodendrocytes and GST-π mature oligodendrocytes. These results, together with the observed steady-state amount of NG2(-)/O4(+) pre-myelinating oligodendrocytes, suggested that oligodendroglial precursors attempted to compensate for the progressive loss of myelin, although these cells appeared to fail to complete the last step of their differentiation program. Our findings confirm that this chronic model of EAE reproduces the features of neocortex pathology in progressive MS and suggest that, despite the proliferative response of the oligodendroglial precursors, the failure to accomplish final differentiation may be a key contributing factor to the impaired remyelination that characterizes these demyelinating conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dysfunctional parenting styles increase interpersonal sensitivity in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Koichi; Suzuki, Akihito; Shibuya, Naoshi; Matsumoto, Yoshihiko; Kamata, Mitsuhiro

    2009-12-01

    The effects of dysfunctional parenting styles on interpersonal sensitivity were studied in 640 Japanese volunteers. Interpersonal sensitivity was assessed by the Interpersonal Sensitivity Measure (IPSM), and perceived parental rearing was evaluated by the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), which is consisted of care and protection factors. Parental rearing was classified into 4 types, i.e., optimal parenting (high care/low protection), affectionate constraint (high care/high protection), neglectful parenting (low care/low protection), and affectionless control (low care/high protection). Males with paternal affectionless control showed higher total IPSM scores than those with paternal optimal parenting (p = 0.022). Females with maternal affectionate constraint (p = 0.001), neglectful parenting (p = 0.022), and affectionless control (p = 0.003) showed higher total IPSM scores than those with maternal optimal parenting. In males and females, dysfunctional parenting styles by the opposite-sex parents did not affected total IPSM scores. The present study suggests that in both males and females interpersonal sensitivity is increased by dysfunctional parenting styles by the same-sex parents.

  11. EPS8 inhibition increases cisplatin sensitivity in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija K Gorsic

    Full Text Available Cisplatin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic, is associated with ototoxicity, renal toxicity and neurotoxicity, thus identifying means to increase the therapeutic index of cisplatin may allow for improved outcomes. A SNP (rs4343077 within EPS8, discovered through a genome wide association study of cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, provided impetus to further study this gene. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the role of EPS8 in cellular susceptibility to cisplatin in cancerous and non-cancerous cells. We used EPS8 RNA interference to determine the effect of decreased EPS8 expression on LCL and A549 lung cancer cell sensitivity to cisplatin. EPS8 knockdown in LCLs resulted in a 7.9% increase in cisplatin-induced survival (P = 1.98 × 10(-7 and an 8.7% decrease in apoptosis (P = 0.004 compared to control. In contrast, reduced EPS8 expression in lung cancer cells resulted in a 20.6% decrease in cisplatin-induced survival (P = 5.08 × 10(-5. We then investigated an EPS8 inhibitor, mithramycin A, as a potential agent to increase the therapeutic index of cisplatin. Mithramycin A decreased EPS8 expression in LCLs resulting in decreased cellular sensitivity to cisplatin as evidenced by lower caspase 3/7 activation following cisplatin treatment (42.7% ± 6.8% relative to control P = 0.0002. In 5 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC cell lines, mithramycin A also resulted in decreased EPS8 expression. Adding mithramycin to 4 NSCLC cell lines and a bladder cancer cell line, resulted in increased sensitivity to cisplatin that was significantly more pronounced in tumor cell lines than in LCL lines (p<0.0001. An EGFR mutant NSCLC cell line (H1975 showed no significant change in sensitivity to cisplatin with the addition of mithramycin treatment. Therefore, an inhibitor of EPS8, such as mithramycin A, could improve cisplatin treatment by increasing sensitivity of tumor relative to normal cells.

  12. Current understanding of increased insulin sensitivity after exercise - emerging candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine Just; Sylow, Lykke; Richter, Erik

    2011-01-01

    insulin sensitivity. It is believed that increased sarcolemmal content of the glucose transporter GLUT4 can explain the phenomenon to some extent. Surprisingly no improvement in the proximal insulin signaling pathway is observed at the level of the insulin receptor, IRS1, PI3K or Akt. Recently more distal...... signaling component in the insulin signaling pathway such as aPKC, Rac1, TBC1D4 and TBC1D1 have been described. These are all affected by both insulin and exercise which means that they are likely converging points in promoting GLUT4 translocation and therefore possible candidates for regulating insulin...... in signaling to GLUT4 translocation, factors influencing the trans-sarcolemmal glucose concentration gradient might also be important. With regard to the interstitial glucose concentration microvascular perfusion is particular relevant as correlative evidence supports a connection between insulin sensitivity...

  13. Subclasses of oligodendrocytes populate the mouse hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinet, Jonathan; Lemieux, Philippe; Tamburri, Albert; Tiesinga, Paul; Scafidi, Joseph; Gallo, Vittorio; Sik, Attila

    2010-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system that facilitate transmission of axonal electrical impulses. Using transgenic mice expressing 2',3' cyclic nucleotide 3' phosphodiesterase (CNPase)-enhanced green fluorescent protein, a three-dimensional reconstruction tool a

  14. Metabolic aspects of Neuronal – Oligodendrocytic - Astrocytic (NOA interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I Amaral

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Whereas astrocytes have been in the limelight on the metabolic glucose interaction scene for a while, oligodendrocytes are still waiting for a place. We would like to call oligodendrocyte interaction with astrocytes and neurons: NOA (neuron – oligodendrocyte – astrocyte interactions. One of the reasons to find out more about oligodendrocyte interaction with neurons and astrocytes is to detect markers of healthy oligodendrocyte metabolism, to be used in diagnosis and treatment assessment in diseases such as Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and multiple sclerosis in which oligodendrocyte function is impaired, possibly due to glutamate toxicity. Glutamate receptors are expressed in oligodendrocytes and also vesicular glutamate release in the white matter has received considerable attention. It is also important to establish if the glial precursor cells recruited to damaged areas are developing oligodendrocyte characteristics or those of astrocytes. Thus, it is important to study astrocytes and oligodendrocytes separately to be able to differentiate between them. This is of particular importance in the white matter where the number of oligodendrocytes is considerable. The present review summarizes the not very extensive information published on glucose metabolism in oligodendrocytes in an attempt to stimulate research into this important field.

  15. Nogo-A and myelin-associated glycoprotein differently regulate oligodendrocyte maturation and myelin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Vincent; Joly, Sandrine; Christ, Franziska; Dimou, Leda; Schwab, Martin E

    2008-07-16

    Nogo-A is one of the most potent oligodendrocyte-derived inhibitors for axonal regrowth in the injured adult CNS. However, the physiological function of Nogo-A in development and in healthy oligodendrocytes is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the role of Nogo-A for myelin formation in the developing optic nerve. By quantitative real-time PCR, we found that the expression of Nogo-A increased faster in differentiating oligodendrocytes than that of the major myelin proteins MBP (myelin basic protein), PLP (proteolipid protein)/DM20, and CNP (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase). The analysis of optic nerves and cerebella of mice deficient for Nogo-A (Nogo-A(-/-)) revealed a marked delay of oligodendrocyte differentiation, myelin sheath formation, and axonal caliber growth within the first postnatal month. The combined deletion of Nogo-A and MAG caused a more severe transient hypomyelination. In contrast to MAG(-/-) mice, Nogo-A(-/-) mutants did not present abnormalities in the structure of myelin sheaths and Ranvier nodes. The common binding protein for Nogo-A and MAG, NgR1, was exclusively upregulated in MAG(-/-) animals, whereas the level of Lingo-1, a coreceptor, remained unchanged. Together, our results demonstrate that Nogo-A and MAG are differently involved in oligodendrocyte maturation in vivo, and suggest that Nogo-A may influence also remyelination in pathological conditions such as multiple sclerosis.

  16. In vitro transdifferentiation of human cultured CD34+ stem cells into oligodendrocyte precursors using thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Katari; Srikanth, Lokanathan; Vengamma, Bhuma; Chandrasekhar, Chodimella; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mouleshwara; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2015-02-19

    The extent of myelination on the axon promotes transmission of impulses in the neural network, any disturbances in this process results in the neurodegenerative condition. Transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursors that supports in the regeneration of axons through myelination is an important step in the restoration of damaged neurons. Therefore, in the present study, the differentiation of human CD34+ stem cells into oligodendrocytes was carried out. The pure human CD34+ culture developed from the stem cells obtained from a peripheral blood of a donor were subjected to oligodendrocyte differentiation medium (ODM). The ODM at a concentration of 40ng/ml thyroxine, 40ng/ml 3,3',5-tri-iodo-thyronine showed distinct morphological changes from day 6 to 9 with cells exhibiting conspicuous stellate morphology and extensive foot processes. The real-time PCR analysis showed prominent expression of Olig2, CNPase, PDGFRα and PLP1/DM20 in the differentiated cells confirming the formed cells are oligodendrocyte precursors. The expression of these genes increased from days 6 to 9 corresponding to the morphological changes observed with almost no expression of GFAP+ cells. The distinct CNPase activity was observed in these differentiated cells compared to normal CD34+ stem cells correlating with results of real-time PCR conclusively explains the development of oligodendrocytes from human CD34+ stem cells.

  17. Movement and structure of mitochondria in oligodendrocytes and their myelin sheaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinholm, Johanne E; Vervaeke, Koen; Tadross, Michael R; Tkachuk, Ariana N; Kopek, Benjamin G; Brown, Timothy A; Bergersen, Linda H; Clayton, David A

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria play several crucial roles in the life of oligodendrocytes. During development of the myelin sheath they are essential providers of carbon skeletons and energy for lipid synthesis. During normal brain function their consumption of pyruvate will be a key determinant of how much lactate is available for oligodendrocytes to export to power axonal function. Finally, during calcium-overload induced pathology, as occurs in ischemia, mitochondria may buffer calcium or induce apoptosis. Despite their important functions, very little is known of the properties of oligodendrocyte mitochondria, and mitochondria have never been observed in the myelin sheaths. We have now used targeted expression of fluorescent mitochondrial markers to characterize the location and movement of mitochondria within oligodendrocytes. We show for the first time that mitochondria are able to enter and move within the myelin sheath. Within the myelin sheath the highest number of mitochondria was in the cytoplasmic ridges along the sheath. Mitochondria moved more slowly than in neurons and, in contrast to their behavior in neurons and astrocytes, their movement was increased rather than inhibited by glutamate activating NMDA receptors. By electron microscopy we show that myelin sheath mitochondria have a low surface area of cristae, which suggests a low ATP production. These data specify fundamental properties of the oxidative phosphorylation system in oligodendrocytes, the glial cells that enhance cognition by speeding action potential propagation and provide metabolic support to axons. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Enhancement of oligodendrocyte differentiation from murine embryonic stem cells by an activator of gp130 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peilin; Chebath, Judith; Lonai, Peter; Revel, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst-stage embryos are a potential large scale source of oligodendrocytes and of their progenitors for transplantation into the central nervous system for the repair of demyelinating lesions. We found previously that interleukin-6 (IL-6) fused to its soluble receptor (IL-6R), a potent activator of the gp130 receptor, induces myelin gene expression in Schwann cells of embryonic dorsal root ganglia. Like leukemia inhibitory factor, IL-6R/IL-6 inhibits the differentiation of murine ES cells into embryoid bodies. In the present study, we show that this recombinant cytokine may be efficiently used to stimulate the differentiation of oligodendrocytes if added to ES cell-derived neural precursors. IL-6R/IL-6 leads to an increase in early chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan positive and late O4 positive progenitors and to a stimulation of maturation into O1 and myelin basic protein expressing oligodendrocytes. Expression of the genes for transcription factor genes Olig-1 and Sox10, which appear early in the oligodendrocyte lineage, was stimulated by IL-6R/IL-6 addition. We conclude that this cytokine can significantly enhance the derivation of oligodendrocytes from ES cells.

  19. Increased Mutagen Sensitivity and DNA Damage in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Chiara; Drake, Kylie M.; Rigelsky, Christina M.; McNelly, Lauren N.; Meade, Sirena L.; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious lung condition characterized by vascular remodeling in the precapillary pulmonary arterioles. We and others have demonstrated chromosomal abnormalities and increased DNA damage in PAH lung vascular cells, but their timing and role in disease pathogenesis is unknown. Objectives: We hypothesized that if DNA damage predates PAH, it might be an intrinsic cell property that is present outside the diseased lung. Methods: We measured DNA damage, mutagen sensitivity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in lung and blood cells from patients with Group 1 PAH, their relatives, and unrelated control subjects. Measurements and Main Results: Baseline DNA damage was significantly elevated in PAH, both in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (P < 0.05) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) (P < 0.001). Remarkably, PBMC from unaffected relatives showed similar increases, indicating this is not related to PAH treatments. ROS levels were also higher (P < 0.01). DNA damage correlated with ROS production and was suppressed by antioxidants (P < 0.001). PBMC from patients and relatives also showed markedly increased sensitivity to two chemotherapeutic drugs, bleomycin and etoposide (P < 0.001). Results were consistent across idiopathic, heritable, and associated PAH groups. Conclusions: Levels of baseline and mutagen-induced DNA damage are intrinsically higher in PAH cells. Similar results in PBMC from unaffected relatives suggest this may be a genetically determined trait that predates disease onset and may act as a risk factor contributing to lung vascular remodeling following endothelial cell injury. Further studies are required to fully characterize mutagen sensitivity, which could have important implications for clinical management. PMID:25918951

  20. PARK2 patient neuroprogenitors show increased mitochondrial sensitivity to copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Asad A; Tidball, Andrew M; Kumar, Kevin K; Neely, M Diana; Han, Bingying; Ess, Kevin C; Hong, Charles C; Erikson, Keith M; Hedera, Peter; Bowman, Aaron B

    2015-01-01

    Poorly-defined interactions between environmental and genetic risk factors underlie Parkinson's disease (PD) etiology. Here we tested the hypothesis that human stem cell derived forebrain neuroprogenitors from patients with known familial risk for early onset PD will exhibit enhanced sensitivity to PD environmental risk factors compared to healthy control subjects without a family history of PD. Two male siblings (SM and PM) with biallelic loss-of-function mutations in PARK2 were identified. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from SM, PM, and four control subjects with no known family histories of PD or related neurodegenerative diseases were utilized. We tested the hypothesis that hiPSC-derived neuroprogenitors from patients with PARK2 mutations would show heightened cell death, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reactive oxygen species generation compared to control cells as a result of exposure to heavy metals (PD environmental risk factors). We report that PARK2 mutant neuroprogenitors showed increased cytotoxicity with copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) exposure but not manganese (Mn) or methyl mercury (MeHg) relative to control neuroprogenitors. PARK2 mutant neuroprogenitors also showed a substantial increase in mitochondrial fragmentation, initial ROS generation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential following Cu exposure. Our data substantiate Cu exposure as an environmental risk factor for PD. Furthermore, we report a shift in the lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for greater sensitivity to Cu-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction in patients SM and PM relative to controls, correlating with their increased genetic risk for PD.

  1. Sensitivity Increases for the TITAN Decay Spectroscopy Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach K.G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The TITAN facility at TRIUMF has recently initiated a program of performing decay spectroscopy measurements in an electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT. The unique environment of the EBIT provides backingfree storage of the radioactive ions, while guiding charged decay particles from the trap centre via the strong magnetic field. This measurement technique is able to provide a significant increase in detection sensitivity for photons which result from radioactive decay. A brief overview of this device is presented, along with methods of improving the signal-to-background ratio for photon detection by reducing Compton scattered events, and eliminating vibrational noise.

  2. Sensitivity Increases for the TITAN Decay Spectroscopy Program

    CERN Document Server

    Leach, K G; Grossheim, A; Andreoiu, C; Dilling, J; Frekers, D; Good, M; Seeraji, S

    2014-01-01

    The TITAN facility at TRIUMF has recently initiated a program of performing decay spectroscopy measurements in an electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT). The unique environment of the EBIT provides backing-free storage of the radioactive ions, while guiding charged decay particles from the trap centre via the strong magnetic field. This measurement technique is able to provide a significant increase in detection sensitivity for photons which result from radioactive decay. A brief overview of this device is presented, along with methods of improving the signal-to-background ratio for photon detection by reducing Compton scattered events, and eliminating vibrational noise.

  3. Increase in the Sensitivity and Selectivity of Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muksunov, T. R.; Maksimova, N. K.; Sevast'yanov, E. Yu.; Shipilov, S. É.; Yakubov, V. P.

    2015-01-01

    Within the limits of a linear model based on processing of data of direct calibration measurements with semiconductor multisensors, a method of their calibration by standard levels of gas concentration is substantiated for its subsequent application for small concentration levels. On an example of data for nitrogen dioxide, the notion of the normalized surface density of the gas is introduced, and its relationship with the volume concentration is established. On this basis, the feasibility of increase in the sensitivity and selectivity of the multisensor system by several orders of magnitude compared with the existing instrumental methods is substantiated by imitational modeling using mathematical methods of modern algebra and regularization theory.

  4. Increasing the sensitivity of a Shack-Hartmann sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Kasper, Markus; Hippler, Stefan; Davies, Ric; Glindemann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The Max-Planck institutes for astronomy (MPIA) and for extraterrestrial physics (MPE) run an adaptive optics (AO) system with a laser guide star at the 3.5 m telescope on Calar Alto, Spain. This system, called ALFA, produces now scientific results and works ex- cellent with natural guide stars (NGS) as faint as 13th magnitude in R-band. The ultimate goal however is to achieve similar performances with the laser guide star (LGS) which is faint and extended. We introduce the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor implemented in ALFA and present our efforts in increasing its sensitivity by using advanced centroiding and wavefront reconstruction algorithms.

  5. Sox10 directs neural stem cells toward the oligodendrocyte lineage by decreasing Suppressor of Fused expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Christine D.; Langseth, Abraham J.; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J. P.; Choe, Youngshik; Werb, Zena; Pleasure, Samuel J.

    2010-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are lineage-restricted progenitors generally limited in vivo to producing oligodendrocytes. Mechanisms controlling genesis of OPCs are of interest because of their importance in myelin development and their potential for regenerative therapies in multiple sclerosis and dysmyelinating syndromes. We show here that the SoxE transcription factors (comprising Sox8, 9, and 10) induce multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) from the early postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) to become OPCs in an autonomous manner. We performed a chromatin immunoprecipitation-based bioinformatic screen and identified Suppressor of Fused (Sufu) as a direct target of repression by Sox10. In vitro, overexpression of Sufu blocked OPC production, whereas RNAi-mediated inhibition augmented OPC production. Furthermore, mice heterozygous for Sufu have increased numbers of OPCs in the telencephalon during development. We conclude that Sox10 acts to restrict the potential of NPCs toward the oligodendrocyte lineage in part by regulating the expression of Sufu. PMID:21098272

  6. Efficient Generation of Myelinating Oligodendrocytes from Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Patients by Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Douvaras

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic demyelinating disease of unknown etiology that affects the CNS. While current therapies are primarily directed against the immune system, the new challenge is to address progressive MS with remyelinating and neuroprotective strategies. Here, we develop a highly reproducible protocol to efficiently derive oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs and mature oligodendrocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. Key elements of our protocol include adherent cultures, dual SMAD inhibition, and addition of retinoids from the beginning of differentiation, which lead to increased yields of OLIG2 progenitors and high numbers of OPCs within 75 days. Furthermore, we show the generation of viral and integration-free iPSCs from primary progressive MS (PPMS patients and their efficient differentiation to oligodendrocytes. PPMS OPCs are functional, as demonstrated by in vivo myelination in the shiverer mouse. These results provide encouraging advances toward the development of autologous cell therapies using iPSCs.

  7. Negative regulation of miRNA-9 on oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Yang; Hong Cui; Ting Cao

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 plays a key role in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and myelin repair. miRNA-9 is involved in the occurrence of many related neurological disorders. Bioin-formatics analysis demonstrated that miRNA-9 complementarily, but incompletely, bound oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1, but whether miRNA-9 regulates oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 remains poorly understood. Whole brain slices of 3-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured and divided into four groups:control group;oxygen-glucose deprivation group (treatment with 8% O2+ 92%N2 and sugar-free medium for 60 minutes);transfection control group (after oxygen and glucose deprivation for 60 minutes, transfected with control plasmid) and miRNA-9 transfection group (after oxygen and glucose deprivation for 60 minutes, transfected with miRNA-9 plasmid). From the third day of transfection, and with increasing culture days, oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 expression increased in each group, peaked at 14 days, and then decreased at 21 days. Real-time quantitative PCR results, however, demonstrated that oligoden-drocyte lineage gene 1 expression was lower in the miRNA-9 transfection group than that in the transfection control group at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after transfection. Results suggested that miRNA-9 possibly negatively regulated oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 in brain tissues during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  8. Increased sensitivity to kindling in mice lacking TSP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendus, D; Rankin-Gee, E K; Mustapha, M; Porter, B E

    2015-10-01

    The development of a hyperexcitable neuronal network is thought to be a critical event in epilepsy. Thrombospondins (TSPs) regulate synaptogenesis by binding the neuronal α2δ subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel. TSPs regulate synapse formation during development and in the mature brain following injury. It is unclear if TSPs are involved in hyperexcitability that contributes to the development of epilepsy. Here we explore the development of epilepsy using a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model in mice lacking TSP1 and TSP2. Unexpectedly, we found increased sensitivity to PTZ kindling in mice lacking TSP1, while mice lacking TSP2 kindled similar to wild-type. We found that the increased seizure susceptibility in the TSP1 knockout (KO) mice was not due to a compensatory increase in TSP2 mRNA as TSP1/2 KO mice were sensitive to PTZ, similar to the TSP1 KO mice. Furthermore, there were similar levels of TGF-B signal activation during kindling in the TSP1 KO mice compared to wild-type. We observed decreased expression of voltage-dependent calcium channel subunit CACNA2D1 mRNA in TSP1, TSP2, and TSP1/2 KO mice. Decreased CACNA2D2 mRNA was only detected in mice that lacked TSP1 and α2δ-1/2 protein levels in the cortex were lower in the TSP 1/2 KO mice. CACNA2D2 knockout mice have spontaneous seizures and increased PTZ seizure susceptibility. Here we report similar findings, TSP1, and TSP1/2 KO mice have low levels of CACNA2D2 mRNA expression and α2δ-1/2 receptor level in the cortex, and are more susceptible to seizures. CACNA2D2 mutations in mice and humans can cause epilepsy. Our data suggest TSP1 in particular may control CACNA2D2 levels and could be a modifier of seizure susceptibility.

  9. Targeting human oligodendrocyte progenitors for myelin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Karen C; Polanco, Jessie J; Pol, Suyog U; Sim, Fraser J

    2016-09-01

    Oligodendrocyte development has been studied for several decades, and has served as a model system for both neurodevelopmental and stem/progenitor cell biology. Until recently, the vast majority of studies have been conducted in lower species, especially those focused on rodent development and remyelination. In humans, the process of myelination requires the generation of vastly more myelinating glia, occurring over a period of years rather than weeks. Furthermore, as evidenced by the presence of chronic demyelination in a variety of human neurologic diseases, it appears likely that the mechanisms that regulate development and become dysfunctional in disease may be, in key ways, divergent across species. Improvements in isolation techniques, applied to primary human neural and oligodendrocyte progenitors from both fetal and adult brain, as well as advancements in the derivation of defined progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells, have begun to reveal the extent of both species-conserved signaling pathways and potential key differences at cellular and molecular levels. In this article, we will review the commonalities and differences in myelin development between rodents and man, describing the approaches used to study human oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, as well as heterogeneity within targetable progenitor pools, and discuss the advances made in determining which conserved pathways may be both modeled in rodents and translate into viable therapeutic strategies to promote myelin repair.

  10. Noscapine protects OLN-93 oligodendrocytes from ischemia-reperfusion damage: Calcium and nitric oxide involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadjafi, S; Ebrahimi, S-A; Rahbar-Roshandel, N

    2015-12-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of noscapine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid from opium poppy, on oligodendrocyte during ischemia/reperfusion-induced excitotoxic injury. Changes in intracellular calcium levels due to chemical ischemia and nitric oxide (NO) production during ischemia/reperfusion were evaluated as the hallmarks of ischemia-derived excitotoxic event. OLN-93 cell line (a permanent immature rat oligodendrocyte) was used as a model of oligodendrocyte. 30- or 60-minute-oxygen-glucose deprivation/24 hours reperfusion were used to induce excitotoxicity. MTT (3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay was used to evaluate cell viability. Ratiometric fluorescence microscopy using Ca(2+)-sensitive indicator Fura-2/AM was utilized to assess intracellular calcium levels. NO production was evaluated by Griess method. Noscapine (4 μM) significantly attenuated intracellular Ca(2+) elevation (P noscapine significantly decreased NO production during a 30-minute oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (P noscapine (4 μM) on intracellular Ca(2+) was greater than ionotropic glutamate receptors antagonists. Noscapine is protective against ischemia/reperfusion-induced excitotoxic injury in OLN-93 oligodendrocyte. This protective effect seems to be related to attenuation of intracellular Ca(2+) overload and NO production.

  11. Oligodendrocyte gap junction loss and disconnection from reactive astrocytes in multiple sclerosis gray matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoullis, Kyriaki; Sargiannidou, Irene; Schiza, Natasa; Roncaroli, Federico; Reynolds, Richard; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2014-09-01

    Gap junctions are essential for glial cell function and have been increasingly implicated in multiple sclerosis (MS). Because increasing cortical abnormalities correlate with disease progression and cognitive dysfunction, we examined the expression of oligodendrocytic connexin32 (Cx32) and Cx47 and their astrocytic partners Cx30 and Cx43 in cortical lesions and normal-appearing gray matter (NAGM) in MS patients. Postmortem brain tissue samples from 9 MS cases were compared with 10 controls using real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, and immunohistochemical analyses. Connexin32 and Cx47 gap junction formation in oligodendrocytes was reduced within lesions, whereas Cx32 loss also extended to NAGM. In contrast, astrocytic Cx30 expression was increased within cortical lesions, whereas Cx43 was elevated in both lesions and NAGM. Diffuse microglial activation and marked astrogliotic changes accompanied these connexin abnormalities. Increased expression of Cx43 correlated with inflammatory load (r = 0.828, p = 0.042), whereas Cx32 expression correlated with longer disease duration and, therefore, milder course (r = 0.825, p = 0.043). Thus, there is a loss of intramyelin and intercellular oligodendrocyte gap junctions in MS gray matter lesions and NAGM, whereas interastrocytic gap junctions are increased, reflecting astrogliosis. These changes correlate with inflammation and disease duration and suggest that disconnection of oligodendrocytes from reactive astrocytes may play a role in failed remyelination and disease progression.

  12. Doublecortin in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells in the Adult Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Jenna J.; Messier, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein.Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, but at a lower level of expression than in neuronal precursor.Doublecortin is not associated with a potential immature neuronal phenotype in Oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are glial cells that differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes during embryogenesis and early stages of post-natal life. OPCs continue to divide throughout adulthood and some eventually differentiate into oligodendrocytes in response to demyelinating lesions. There is growing evidence that OPCs are also involved in activity-driven de novo myelination of previously unmyelinated axons and myelin remodeling in adulthood. Considering these roles in the adult brain, OPCs are likely mobile cells that can migrate on some distances before they differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. A number of studies have noted that OPCs express doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in neural precursor cells and in migrating immature neurons. Here we describe the distribution of DCX in OPCs. We found that almost all OPCs express DCX, but the level of expression appears to be much lower than what is found in neural precursor. We found that DCX is downregulated when OPCs start expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and is absent in myelinating oligodendrocytes. DCX does not appear to signal an immature neuronal phenotype in OPCs in the adult mouse brain. Rather, it could be involved either in cell migration, or as a marker of an immature oligodendroglial cell phenotype.

  13. Exercise increases human skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity via coordinated increases in microvascular perfusion and molecular signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Frøsig, Christian; Kjøbsted, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major health risk and although exercise clearly improves skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, the mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that initiation of a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp four hours after single-legged exercise in humans increased microvascular perfusion...... and glycogen synthase in muscle. This secures improved glucose delivery on the one hand and increased ability to take up and dispose of the delivered glucose on the other hand.......Insulin resistance is a major health risk and although exercise clearly improves skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, the mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that initiation of a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp four hours after single-legged exercise in humans increased microvascular perfusion...... the insulin stimulated increase in microvascular perfusion in both legs and abrogated the greater glucose uptake in the exercised compared with the rested leg. Skeletal muscle phosphorylation of TBC1D4 Ser(318) and Ser(704) and glycogen synthase activity were greater in the exercised leg before insulin...

  14. Napping reverses increased pain sensitivity due to sleep restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice Faraut

    Full Text Available To investigate pain sensitivity after sleep restriction and the restorative effect of napping.A strictly controlled randomized crossover study with continuous polysomnography monitoring was performed.Laboratory-based study.11 healthy male volunteers.Volunteers attended two three-day sessions: "sleep restriction" alone and "sleep restriction and nap". Each session involved a baseline night of normal sleep, a night of sleep deprivation and a night of free recovery sleep. Participants were allowed to sleep only from 02:00 to 04:00 during the sleep deprivation night. During the "sleep restriction and nap" session, volunteers took two 30-minute naps, one in the morning and one in the afternoon.Quantitative sensory testing was performed with heat, cold and pressure, at 10:00 and 16:00, on three areas: the supraspinatus, lower back and thigh. After sleep restriction, quantitative sensory testing revealed differential changes in pain stimuli thresholds, but not in thermal threshold detection: lower back heat pain threshold decreased, pressure pain threshold increased in the supraspinatus area and no change was observed for the thigh. Napping restored responses to heat pain stimuli in the lower back and to pressure stimuli in the supraspinatus area.Sleep restriction induces different types of hypersensitivity to pain stimuli in different body areas, consistent with multilevel mechanisms, these changes being reversed by napping. The napping restorative effect on pain thresholds result principally from effects on pain mechanisms, since it was independent of vigilance status.

  15. Glucose-deprivation increases thyroid cancer cells sensitivity to metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikas, Athanasios; Jensen, Kirk; Patel, Aneeta; Costello, John; McDaniel, Dennis; Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Larin, Olexander; Hoperia, Victoria; Burman, Kenneth D; Boyle, Lisa; Wartofsky, Leonard; Vasko, Vasyl

    2015-12-01

    Metformin inhibits thyroid cancer cell growth. We sought to determine if variable glucose concentrations in medium alter the anti-cancer efficacy of metformin. Thyroid cancer cells (FTC133 and BCPAP) were cultured in high-glucose (20 mM) and low-glucose (5 mM) medium before treatment with metformin. Cell viability and apoptosis assays were performed. Expression of glycolytic genes was examined by real-time PCR, western blot, and immunostaining. Metformin inhibited cellular proliferation in high-glucose medium and induced cell death in low-glucose medium. In low-, but not in high-glucose medium, metformin induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy, and oncosis. At micromolar concentrations, metformin induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and blocked p-pS6 in low-glucose medium. Metformin increased the rate of glucose consumption from the medium and prompted medium acidification. Medium supplementation with glucose reversed metformin-inducible morphological changes. Treatment with an inhibitor of glycolysis (2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG)) increased thyroid cancer cell sensitivity to metformin. The combination of 2-DG with metformin led to cell death. Thyroid cancer cell lines were characterized by over-expression of glycolytic genes, and metformin decreased the protein level of pyruvate kinase muscle 2 (PKM2). PKM2 expression was detected in recurrent thyroid cancer tissue samples. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the glucose concentration in the cellular milieu is a factor modulating metformin's anti-cancer activity. These data suggest that the combination of metformin with inhibitors of glycolysis could represent a new strategy for the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  16. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto;

    2016-01-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warmin...

  17. Ion channel expression by white matter glia: I. Type 2 astrocytes and oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barres, B A; Chun, L L; Corey, D P

    1988-01-01

    White matter is a compact structure consisting primarily of neuronal axons and glial cells. As in other parts of the nervous system, the function of glial cells in white matter is poorly understood. We have explored the electrophysiological properties of two types of glial cells found predominantly in white matter: type 2 astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Whole-cells and single-channel patch-clamp techniques were used to study these cell types in postnatal rat optic nerve cultures prepared according to the procedures of Raff et al. (Nature, 303:390-396, 1983b). Type 2 astrocytes in culture exhibit a "neuronal" channel phenotype, expressing at least six distinct ion channel types. With whole-cell recording we observed three inward currents: a voltage-sensitive sodium current qualitatively similar to that found in neurons and both transient and sustained calcium currents. In addition, type 2 astrocytes had two components of outward current: a delayed potassium current which activated at 0 mV and an inactivating calcium-dependent potassium current which activated at -30 mV. Type 2 astrocytes in culture could be induced to fire single regenerative potentials in response to injections of depolarizing current. Single-channel recording demonstrated the presence of an outwardly rectifying chloride channel in both type 2 astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, but this channel could only be observed in excised patches. Oligodendrocytes expressed only one other current: an inwardly rectifying potassium current that is mediated by 30- and 120-pS channels. Because these channels preferentially conduct potassium from outside to inside the cell, and because they are open at the resting potential of the cell, they would be appropriate for removing potassium from the extracellular space; thus it is proposed that oligodendrocytes, besides myelinating axons, play an important role in potassium regulation in white matter. The conductances present in oligodendrocytes suggest a "modulated

  18. Increased risk of horse sensitization in southwestern Iranian horse riders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Farjadian, Shirin; Hosseini, Zeynab; Raayat, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to investigate the frequency of sensitization to horse allergens and clinical symptoms in horse riders. A total of 42 horse riders and 50 healthy individuals were examined by means of skin prick tests for a panel of horse and common animal allergens, and pulmonary function tests were done by spirometry. The rate of sensitization to horse allergens was 31% as proven by the skin prick test in horse riders whereas horse sensitization was not seen in the control group. Occupational allergy symptoms were reported by 19 horse riders. Two horse riders with no history of clinical symptoms showed positive skin reactions to horse allergens. To decrease the high risk of occupational sensitization among horse riders, workplace conditions should be improved to reduce the load of airborne horse allergens. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  19. Increased risk of horse sensitization in southwestern Iranian horse riders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Moghtaderi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study has been to investigate the frequency of sensitization to horse allergens and clinical symptoms in horse riders. Material and Methods: A total of 42 horse riders and 50 healthy individuals were examined by means of skin prick tests for a panel of horse and common animal allergens, and pulmonary function tests were done by spirometry. Results: The rate of sensitization to horse allergens was 31% as proven by the skin prick test in horse riders whereas horse sensitization was not seen in the control group. Occupational allergy symptoms were reported by 19 horse riders. Two horse riders with no history of clinical symptoms showed positive skin reactions to horse allergens. Conclusions: To decrease the high risk of occupational sensitization among horse riders, workplace conditions should be improved to reduce the load of airborne horse allergens.

  20. Increased sensitivity to climate change in disturbed ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroël-Dulay, György; Ransijn, Johannes; Schmidt, Inger Kappel;

    2015-01-01

    , with recently disturbed sites responding to treatments. Furthermore, most of these responses are not rapid (2-5 years) but emerge over a longer term (7-14 years). These results suggest that successional state influences the sensitivity of ecosystems to climate change, and that ecosystems recovering from...... disturbances may be sensitive to even modest climatic changes. A research bias towards undisturbed ecosystems might thus lead to an underestimation of the impacts of climate change....

  1. Natural dyes as sensitizers to increase the efficiency in sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, Bayron; Sivakumar, R.; Paulraj, M.

    2016-05-01

    A dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a sandwich type solar cell consisting of a photoelectrode, a counter electrode and a liquid electrolyte. The photo electrode comprises of a titanium dioxide semiconducting thin film grown over a glass substrate which in-turn has a transparent thin conducting layer of tin oxide film doped with fluorine (FTO) coated over it. The aim of this work is to develop photoelectrodes with different dyes to increase the efficiency of this type of solar cells. Dyes obtained from fresh sources of maqui, black myrtle, spinach and a dye mixture of spinach and spinach-maqui-myrtle were used. The technique used for the extraction of the dyes was maceration for one day, in methanol. Colourants and photoelectrodes were studied using, UV-vis spectrophotometer for their spectral properties. Their photovoltaic properties such as efficiency, fill factor, open circuit voltage and short circuit current were studied using a solar simulator and source meter unit.

  2. Increased risk of horse sensitization in southwestern Iranian horse riders

    OpenAIRE

    Mozhgan Moghtaderi; Shirin Farjadian; Zeynab Hosseini; Alireza Raayat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study has been to investigate the frequency of sensitization to horse allergens and clinical symptoms in horse riders. Material and Methods: A total of 42 horse riders and 50 healthy individuals were examined by means of skin prick tests for a panel of horse and common animal allergens, and pulmonary function tests were done by spirometry. Results: The rate of sensitization to horse allergens was 31% as proven by the skin prick test in horse riders whereas horse se...

  3. Increased risk of horse sensitization in southwestern Iranian horse riders

    OpenAIRE

    Mozhgan Moghtaderi; Shirin Farjadian; Zeynab Hosseini; Alireza Raayat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study has been to investigate the frequency of sensitization to horse allergens and clinical symptoms in horse riders. Material and Methods: A total of 42 horse riders and 50 healthy individuals were examined by means of skin prick tests for a panel of horse and common animal allergens, and pulmonary function tests were done by spirometry. Results: The rate of sensitization to horse allergens was 31% as proven by the skin prick test in horse riders whereas horse se...

  4. Oligodendrocyte dysfunction in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philips, T.; Bento-Abreu, A.; Nonneman, A.; Haeck, W.; Staats, K.; Geelen, V.; Hersmus, N.; Kusters, B.; Bosch, L. Van Den; Damme, P. van; Richardson, W.D.; Robberecht, W.

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are well known targets for immune-mediated and infectious diseases, and have been suggested to play a role in neurodegeneration. Here, we report the involvement of oligodendrocytes and their progenitor cells in the ventral grey matter of the spinal cord in amyotrophic lateral sclero

  5. Oligodendrocyte dysfunction in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philips, T.; Bento-Abreu, A.; Nonneman, A.; Haeck, W.; Staats, K.; Geelen, V.; Hersmus, N.; Kusters, B.; Bosch, L. Van Den; Damme, P. van; Richardson, W.D.; Robberecht, W.

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are well known targets for immune-mediated and infectious diseases, and have been suggested to play a role in neurodegeneration. Here, we report the involvement of oligodendrocytes and their progenitor cells in the ventral grey matter of the spinal cord in amyotrophic lateral sclero

  6. Exploration of protective strategies against oligodendrocyte cell death in Krabbe disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Arboleda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Krabbe disease (KD patients accumulate psychosine (galactosylsphingosine, a cytotoxic metabolite for oligodendrocytes, inducing early demyelination. Apoptosis has been suggested that plays an important role in psychosine-induced oligodendrocytes cell death in culture and in brains of Krabbe patients and an animal model of the disease (twitcher mouse. However, the molecular mechanism that triggers the activation of the apoptotic pathway, and hence the development/progression of the disease, still is not well understood. Here we report that silencing GALC gene expression induces cell death of the human derived oligodendrocyte cell line MO3.13. The induction of cell death is associated with the activation of caspase 3 and increase in Bax expression, suggesting that mitochondria is compromise, and decrease in cell survival signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK and AMPK, as observed by western blot analysis, 2 days after silencing. The data suggests an important psychosine-induced deregulation in apoptotic and anti-apoptotic cellular pathways. Moreover, pre-treatment with insuline-like growth factor (IGF-1 and PPARalfa agonist (WY 14643, significantly provides protection against the psychosine-induced changes described. Our data indicates that oligodendrocytes have a marked susceptibility to endogenous accumulation of psychosine and identified potential compounds that may offer protection against psychosine-induced apoptosis in vivo.

  7. Increased sensitivity to climate change in disturbed ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroël-Dulay, György; Ransijn, Johannes; Schmidt, Inger Kappel

    2015-01-01

    Human domination of the biosphere includes changes to disturbance regimes, which push many ecosystems towards early-successional states. Ecological theory predicts that early-successional ecosystems are more sensitive to perturbations than mature systems, but little evidence supports this relatio...

  8. Protracted abstinence from chronic ethanol exposure alters the structure of neurons and expression of oligodendrocytes and myelin in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, A I; Mandyam, C D

    2015-05-01

    In rodents, chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) produces alcohol dependence, alters the structure and activity of pyramidal neurons and decreases the number of oligodendroglial progenitors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In this study, adult Wistar rats were exposed to seven weeks of CIE and were withdrawn from CIE for 21 days (protracted abstinence; PA). Tissue enriched in the mPFC was processed for Western blot analysis and Golgi-Cox staining to investigate the long-lasting effects of CIE on the structure of mPFC neurons and the levels of myelin-associated proteins. PA increased dendritic arborization within apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. These changes occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor 2B (NR2B) at Tyr-1472. PA increased myelin basic protein (MBP) levels which occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the premyelinating oligodendrocyte bHLH transcription factor Olig2 in the mPFC. Given that PA is associated with increased sensitivity to stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, and stress alters oligodendrocyte expression as a function of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation, the levels of total GR and phosphorylated GR were also evaluated. PA produced hypophosphorylation of the GR at Ser-232 without affecting expression of total protein. These findings demonstrate persistent and compensatory effects of ethanol in the mPFC long after cessation of CIE, including enhanced myelin production and impaired GR function. Collectively, these results suggest a novel relationship between oligodendrocytes and GR in the mPFC, in which stress may alter frontal cortex function in alcohol dependent subjects by promoting hypermyelination, thereby altering the cellular composition and white matter structure in the mPFC.

  9. Zn2+ -induced ERK activation mediates PARP-1-dependent ischemic-reoxygenation damage to oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domercq, Maria; Mato, Susana; Soria, Federico N; Sánchez-gómez, M Victoria; Alberdi, Elena; Matute, Carlos

    2013-03-01

    Much of the cell death following episodes of anoxia and ischemia in the mammalian central nervous system has been attributed to extracellular accumulation of glutamate and ATP, which causes a rise in [Ca(2+)](i), loss of mitochondrial potential, and cell death. However, restoration of blood flow and reoxygenation are frequently associated with exacerbation of tissue injury (the oxygen paradox). Herein we describe a novel signaling pathway that is activated during ischemia-like conditions (oxygen and glucose deprivation; OGD) and contributes to ischemia-induced oligodendroglial cell death. OGD induced a retarded and sustained increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation after restoring glucose and O(2) (reperfusion-like conditions). Blocking the ERK1/2 pathway with the MEK inhibitor UO126 largely protected oligodendrocytes against ischemic insults. ERK1/2 activation was blocked by the high-affinity Zn(2+) chelator TPEN, but not by antagonists of AMPA/kainate or P2X7 receptors that were previously shown to be involved in ischemic oligodendroglial cell death. Using a high-affinity Zn(2+) probe, we showed that ischemia induced an intracellular Zn(2+) rise in oligodendrocytes, and that incubation with TPEN prevented mitochondrial depolarization and ROS generation after ischemia. Accordingly, exposure to TPEN and the antioxidant Trolox reduced ischemia-induced oligodendrocyte death. Moreover, UO126 blocked the ischemia-induced increase in poly-[ADP]-ribosylation of proteins, and the poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) inhibitor DPQ significantly inhibited ischemia-induced oligodendroglial cell death-demonstrating that PARP-1 was required downstream in the Zn(2+)-ERK oligodendrocyte cell death pathway. Chelation of cytosolic Zn(2+), blocking ERK signaling, and antioxidants may be beneficial for treating CNS white matter ischemia-reperfusion injury. Importantly, all the inhibitors of this pathway protected oligodendrocytes when applied

  10. Dynamic regulation of integrin activation by intracellular and extracellular signals controls oligodendrocyte morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Inger

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myelination requires precise control of oligodendrocyte morphology and myelin generation at each of the axons contacted by an individual cell. This control must involve the integration of extracellular cues, such as those on the axon surface, with intrinsic developmental programmes. We asked whether integrins represent one class of oligodendrocyte cell-surface receptors able to provide this integration. Results Integrins signal via a process of activation, a conformational change that can be induced either by "outside-in" signals comprising physiological extracellular matrix ligands (mimicked by the pharmacological use of the divalent cation manganese or "inside-out" signalling molecules such as R-Ras. Increasing levels of outside-in signalling via the laminin receptor α6β1 integrin were found to promote oligodendrocyte processing and myelin sheet formation in culture. Similar results were obtained when inside-out signalling was increased by the expression of a constitutively-active R-Ras. Inhibiting inside-out signalling by using dominant-negative R-Ras reduces processes and myelin sheets; importantly, this can be partially rescued by the co-stimulation of outside-in signalling using manganese. Conclusion The balance of the equilibrium between active and inactive integrins regulates oligodendrocyte morphology, which is itself regulated by extrinsic and intrinsic cues so providing a mechanism of signal integration. As laminins capable of providing outside-in signals are present on axons at the time of myelination, a mechanism exists by which morphology and myelin generation might be regulated independently in each oligodendrocyte process.

  11. An in vitro study on the involvement of LINGO-1 and Rho GTPases in Nogo-A regulated differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiang-Hui; Jin, Wei-Lin; Ju, Gong

    2007-10-01

    Nogo-A has been considered as one of the most important myelin-associated axonal regeneration inhibitors in the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated various additional physiological roles of Nogo family members. To understand the possible effect of Nogo-A on the differentiation of oligodendrocytes, antibodies against distinct extracellular domains of Nogo-A were applied in cell cultures. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells from P2 rat cortex were grown in the presence of monoclonal antibody against the N-terminal inhibitory domain of Nogo-A or the C-terminal 66 amino acid loop of Nogo-A for 3 days, and the antibody treatment resulted in stunted process extension and inhibited differentiation of oligodendrocytes. Concomitant with morphology changes, Rho GTPases activity was greatly increased upon the antibody treatment and the expression level of LINGO-1, which was recently shown to be a negative regulator for the oligodendrocyte maturation, was upregulated in the process of antibody treatment. These results indicate that endogenous Nogo-A expressed in oligodendrocyte may act though Rho GTPase and LINGO-1 to influence the morphological differentiation of oligodendrocytes and will help us to understand the physiology role of Nogo-A in oligodendrocyte biology.

  12. Napping Reverses Increased Pain Sensitivity Due to Sleep Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Brice Faraut; Damien Léger; Terkia Medkour; Alexandre Dubois; Virginie Bayon; Mounir Chennaoui; Serge Perrot

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective To investigate pain sensitivity after sleep restriction and the restorative effect of napping. Design A strictly controlled randomized crossover study with continuous polysomnography monitoring was performed. Setting Laboratory-based study. Participants 11 healthy male volunteers. Interventions Volunteers attended two three-day sessions: “sleep restriction” alone and “sleep restriction and nap”. Each session involved a baseline night of normal sleep, a night of sleep deprivati...

  13. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type z negatively regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Kuboyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fyn tyrosine kinase-mediated down-regulation of Rho activity through activation of p190RhoGAP is crucial for oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Therefore, the loss of function of its counterpart protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP may enhance myelination during development and remyelination in demyelinating diseases. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether Ptprz, a receptor-like PTP (RPTP expressed abuntantly in oligodendrocyte lineage cells, is involved in this process, because we recently revealed that p190RhoGAP is a physiological substrate for Ptprz. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found an early onset of the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP, a major protein of the myelin sheath, and early initiation of myelination in vivo during development of the Ptprz-deficient mouse, as compared with the wild-type. In addition, oligodendrocytes appeared earlier in primary cultures from Ptprz-deficient mice than wild-type mice. Furthermore, adult Ptprz-deficient mice were less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE induced by active immunization with myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide than were wild-type mice. After EAE was induced, the tyrosine phosphorylation of p190RhoGAP increased significantly, and the EAE-induced loss of MBP was markedly suppressed in the white matter of the spinal cord in Ptprz-deficient mice. Here, the number of T-cells and macrophages/microglia infiltrating into the spinal cord did not differ between the two genotypes after MOG immunization. All these findings strongly support the validity of our hypothesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ptprz plays a negative role in oligodendrocyte differentiation in early central nervous system (CNS development and remyelination in demyelinating CNS diseases, through the dephosphorylation of substrates such as p190RhoGAP.

  14. Alpha-synuclein mRNA expression in oligodendrocytes in MSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asi, Yasmine T; Simpson, Julie E; Heath, Paul R; Wharton, Stephen B; Lees, Andrew J; Revesz, Tamas; Houlden, Henry; Holton, Janice L

    2014-06-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease presenting clinically with parkinsonian, cerebellar, and autonomic features. α-Synuclein (αsyn), encoded by the gene SNCA, is the main constituent of glial cytoplasmic inclusion (GCI) found in oligodendrocytes in MSA, but the methods of its accumulation have not been established. The aim of this study is to investigate alterations in regional and cellular SNCA mRNA expression in MSA as a possible substrate for GCI formation. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed on postmortem brain samples from 15 MSA, 5 IPD, and 5 control cases to investigate regional expression in the frontal and occipital regions, dorsal putamen, pontine base, and cerebellum. For cellular expression analysis, neurons and oligodendrocytes were isolated by laser-capture microdissection from five MSA and five control cases. SNCA mRNA expression was not significantly different between the MSA, IPD and control cases in all regions (multilevel model, P = 0.14). After adjusting for group effect, the highest expression was found in the occipital cortex while the lowest was in the putamen (multilevel model, P MSA oligodendrocytes expressed more SNCA than control oligodendrocytes and expression in MSA neurons was slightly lower than that in controls, however, these results did not reach statistical significance. We have demonstrated regional variations in SNCA expression, which is higher in cortical than subcortical regions. This study is the first to demonstrate SNCA mRNA expression by oligodendrocytes in human postmortem tissue using qPCR and, although not statistically significant, could suggest that this may be increased in MSA compared to controls.

  15. Platelet-derived growth factor delays oligodendrocyte differentiation and axonal myelination in vivo in the anterior medullary velum of the developing rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, A M; Hornby, M F; Kirvell, S; Berry, M

    1997-06-15

    The AA dimeric form of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AA) is implicated in the differentiation of cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage, which express PDGF receptors of the alpha subunit type (PDGF-alphaR). In the present study, we show that a single injection of PDGF-AA into the cerebrospinal fluid of neonatal rats delays oligodendrocyte differentiation and interrupts the progress of myelination in the anterior medullary velum (AMV), a white matter tract roofing the IVth ventricle of the brain. PDGF-AA or saline was injected intrathecally in postnatal day (P) 7 rats, and the AMV was subsequently removed and immunolabelled with the oligodendrocyte-specific antibody Rip, at P9, P12, and P21, corresponding to postinjection days (PID) 2, 5, and 14. At P9 (PID2), myelination was retarded in PDGF-AA-treated rats as opposed to saline-treated controls but progressed rapidly after P12 (PID5). Quantification supported the qualitative observations that PDGF-AA mediated an acute decrease in the number of Rip+ oligodendrocytes at P9-12, which largely recovered by P21, suggesting that PDGF-AA may have delayed recruitment of myelinating oligodendrocytes. However, the definitive number of Rip+ oligodendrocytes in the AMV was not increased, suggesting that its action as a promoter of early oligodendrocyte survival may not ultimately affect the definitive number of myelinating oliogdendrocytes in vivo. We discuss the possibilities that excess PDGF-AA may have acted on early oligodendrocytes (precursors or preoligodendrocytes) to either (1) delay their differentiation by maintaining them in the cell cycle or (2) accelerate their differentiation, which may result in premature cell death in the absence of synchronised survival signals. This study supports a role for PDGF-AA in the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation in vivo, as has been shown in vitro.

  16. Neural and Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells: Transferrin Effects on Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Silvestroff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available NSC (neural stem cells/NPC (neural progenitor cells are multipotent and self-renew throughout adulthood in the SVZ (subventricular zone of the mammalian CNS (central nervous system. These cells are considered interesting targets for CNS neurodegenerative disorder cell therapies, and understanding their behaviour in vitro is crucial if they are to be cultured prior to transplantation. We cultured the SVZ tissue belonging to newborn rats under the form of NS (neurospheres to evaluate the effects of Tf (transferrin on cell proliferation. The NS were heterogeneous in terms of the NSC/NPC markers GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein, Nestin and Sox2 and the OL (oligodendrocyte progenitor markers NG2 (nerve/glia antigen 2 and PDGFRα (platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. The results of this study indicate that aTf (apoTransferrin is able to increase cell proliferation of SVZ-derived cells in vitro, and that these effects were mediated at least in part by the TfRc1 (Tf receptor 1. Since OPCs (oligodendrocyte progenitor cells represent a significant proportion of the proliferating cells in the SVZ-derived primary cultures, we used the immature OL cell line N20.1 to show that Tf was able to augment the proliferation rate of OPC, either by adding aTf to the culture medium or by overexpressing rat Tf in situ. The culture medium supplemented with ferric iron, together with aTf, increased the DNA content, while ferrous iron did not. The present work provides data that could have a potential application in human cell replacement therapies for neurodegenerative disease and/or CNS injury that require the use of in vitro amplified NPCs.

  17. Increasing the Sensitivity of the Michelson Interferometer through Multiple Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Woonghee

    Michelson interferometry has been one of the most famous and popular optical interference system for analyzing optical components and measuring optical metrology properties. Typical Michelson interferometer can measure object displacement with wavefront shapes to one half of the laser wavelength. As testing components and devices size reduce to micro and nano dimension, Michelson interferometer sensitivity is not suitable. The purpose of this study is to design and develop the Michelson interferometer using the concept of multiple reflections. This thesis proposes a new and novel design for a multiple reflection interferometer, where the number of reflections does not affect the quality of the interference. Theoretically we show that more than 1000 reflections can be achieved. Experimental results of greater than 100 reflections are presented in this thesis.

  18. Increasing the sensitivity of Kepler to Earth-like exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Hogg, David W.; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Wang, Dun

    2015-01-01

    Many transiting exoplanets have been discovered using photometry from the Kepler mission but the results are still very incomplete in some of the most interesting parts of parameter space: small planetary radius and long orbital period. We have developed a method for detecting transiting exoplanet signals in stellar light curves that is more sensitive to small planets on long orbits than previously published procedures. It is standard practice to start by "de-trending" the light curves—by filtering—to remove the instrumental systematics and stellar variability from the time series. Instead, we build an flexible model for these effects using a Gaussian Process. We use as inputs to the Gaussian Process not just time but also the light curves of dozens of other stars. This exploits the causal structure of the problem: permitting the noise model to capture spacecraft-induced covariability. Since we know a priori that the other stars are causally unrelated to the star of interest, any information that they share must be due to systematics. A key motivation for our work is that any filtering—no matter how robust—reduces the amplitude of the signals of interest. By marginalizing over the stellar and instrumental variability while simultaneously fitting for the transits, we maintain sensitivity to transit signals and reduce contamination. We apply our method to light curves from the Kepler mission. Using synthetic transits generated by realistic planetary systems injected into raw aperture photometry from the pipeline, we determine the detection efficiency of our method and train a supervised classification algorithm to weed out false signals. Our pipeline returns all of the ingredients needed for studies of exoplanet populations: a catalog of planet candidates, posterior samples for the physical parameters of these planets and their host stars, and an empirical measurement of the detection efficiency as a function of all of these parameters.

  19. Mutation of pescadillo disrupts oligodendrocyte formation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Simmons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vertebrates, the myelin sheath is essential for efficient propagation of action potentials along the axon shaft. Oligodendrocytes are the cells of the central nervous system that create myelin sheaths. During embryogenesis, ventral neural tube precursors give rise to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, which divide and migrate throughout the central nervous system. This study aimed to investigate mechanisms that regulate oligodendrocyte progenitor cell formation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By conducting a mutagenesis screen in transgenic zebrafish, we identified a mutation, designated vu166, by an apparent reduction in the number of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the dorsal spinal cord. We subsequently determined that vu166 is an allele of pescadillo, a gene known to play a role in ribosome biogenesis and cell proliferation. We found that pescadillo function is required for both the proper number of oligodendrocyte progenitors to form, by regulating cell cycle progression, and for normal levels of myelin gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide evidence that neural precursors require pes function to progress through the cell cycle and produce oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and for oligodendrocyte differentiation.

  20. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming:Climate Sensitivity Rise With Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2016-01-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warming world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleoce...

  1. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming:Climate Sensitivity Rise With Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2016-01-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warming world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleoce...

  2. Laminin regulates postnatal oligodendrocyte production by promoting oligodendrocyte progenitor survival in the subventricular zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relucio, Jenne; Menezes, Michael J; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Colognato, Holly

    2012-10-01

    The laminin family of extracellular matrix proteins are expressed broadly during embryonic brain development, but are enriched at ventricular and pial surfaces where laminins mediate radial glial attachment during corticogenesis. In the adult brain, however, laminin distribution is restricted, yet is found within the vascular basal lamina and associated fractones of the ventricular zone (VZ)-subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cell niche, where laminins regulate adult neural progenitor cell proliferation. It remains unknown, however, if laminins regulate the wave of oligodendrogenesis that occurs in the neonatal/early postnatal VZ-SVZ. Here we report that Lama2, the gene that encodes the laminin α2-subunit, regulates postnatal oligodendrogenesis. At birth, Lama2-/- mice had significantly higher levels of dying oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in the OPC germinal zone of the dorsal SVZ. This translated into fewer OPCs, both in the dorsal SVZ well as in an adjacent developing white matter tract, the corpus callosum. In addition, intermediate progenitor cells that give rise to OPCs in the Lama2-/- VZ-SVZ were mislocalized and proliferated nearer to the ventricle surface. Later, delays in oligodendrocyte maturation (with accompanying OPC accumulation), were observed in the Lama2-/- corpus callosum, leading to dysmyelination by postnatal day 21. Together these data suggest that prosurvival laminin interactions in the developing postnatal VZ-SVZ germinal zone regulate the ability, or timing, of oligodendrocyte production to occur appropriately.

  3. Large diurnal temperature range increases bird sensitivity to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Climate variability is changing on multiple temporal scales, and little is known of the consequences of increases in short-term variability, particularly in endotherms. Using mortality data with high temporal resolution of zebra finches living in large outdoor aviaries (5 years, 359.220 bird-days),

  4. Mice lacking neuropeptide Y show increased sensitivity to cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Woldbye, David Paul Drucker

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing data implicating neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the neurobiology of addiction. This study explored the possible role of NPY in cocaine-induced behavior using NPY knockout mice. The transgenic mice showed a hypersensitive response to cocaine in three animal models of cocaine addiction...

  5. Targeted Overexpression of a Golli-Myelin Basic Protein Isoform to Oligodendrocytes Results in Aberrant Oligodendrocyte Maturation and Myelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin C Jacobs

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several in vitro studies have shown that the golli-myelin basic proteins regulate Ca2+ homoeostasis in OPCs (oligodendrocyte precursor cells and immature OLs (oligodendrocytes, and that a number of the functions of these cells are affected by cellular levels of the golli proteins. To determine the influence of golli in vivo on OL development and myelination, a transgenic mouse was generated in which the golli isoform J37 was overexpressed specifically within OLs and OPCs. The mouse, called JOE (J37-overexpressing, is severely hypomyelinated between birth and postnatal day 50. During this time, it exhibits severe intention tremors that gradually abate at later ages. After postnatal day 50, ultrastructural studies and Northern and Western blot analyses indicate that myelin accumulates in the brain, but never reaches normal levels. Several factors appear to underlie the extensive hypomyelination. In vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that golli overexpression causes a significant delay in OL maturation, with accumulation of significantly greater numbers of pre-myelinating OLs that fail to myelinate axons during the normal myelinating period. Immunohistochemical studies with cell death and myelin markers indicate that JOE OLs undergo a heightened and extended period of cell death and are unable to effectively myelinate until 2 months after birth. The results indicate that increased levels of golli in OPC/OLs delays myelination, causing significant cell death of OLs particularly in white matter tracts. The results provide in vivo evidence for a significant role of the golli proteins in the regulation of maturation of OLs and normal myelination.

  6. Quantifying the increasing sensitivity of power systems to climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, H. C.; Brayshaw, D. J.; Shaffrey, L. C.; Coker, P. J.; Thornton, H. E.

    2016-12-01

    Large quantities of weather-dependent renewable energy generation are expected in power systems under climate change mitigation policies, yet little attention has been given to the impact of long term climate variability. By combining state-of-the-art multi-decadal meteorological records with a parsimonious representation of a power system, this study characterises the impact of year-to-year climate variability on multiple aspects of the power system of Great Britain (including coal, gas and nuclear generation), demonstrating why multi-decadal approaches are necessary. All aspects of the example system are impacted by inter-annual climate variability, with the impacts being most pronounced for baseload generation. The impacts of inter-annual climate variability increase in a 2025 wind-power scenario, with a 4-fold increase in the inter-annual range of operating hours for baseload such as nuclear. The impacts on peak load and peaking-plant are comparably small. Less than 10 years of power supply and demand data are shown to be insufficient for providing robust power system planning guidance. This suggests renewable integration studies—widely used in policy, investment and system design—should adopt a more robust approach to climate characterisation.

  7. Increased sensitivity to interferon-alpha in psoriatic T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten Wessel; Lovato, Paola; Skov, Lone

    2005-01-01

    disease characterized by CD8(+)-infiltrating T cells. In this study, we therefore investigate IFN-alpha signaling in T cells isolated from involved skin of psoriatic patients. We show that psoriatic T cells have increased and prolonged responses to IFN-alpha, on the level of signal transducers......Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by abnormal epidermal proliferation. Several studies have shown that skin-infiltrating activated T cells and cytokines play a pivotal role during the initiation and maintenance of the disease. Interferon (IFN)-alpha plays an important...... role in host defense against infections, but recent data have also implicated IFN-alpha in psoriasis. Thus, IFN-alpha induces or aggravates psoriasis in some patients, and mice lacking a transcriptional attenuator of IFN-alpha/beta signaling spontaneously develop a psoriasis-like inflammatory skin...

  8. Dimethyl fumarate modulates antioxidant and lipid metabolism in oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress contributes to pathology associated with inflammatory brain disorders and therapies that upregulate antioxidant pathways may be neuroprotective in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Dimethyl fumarate, a small molecule therapeutic for multiple sclerosis, activates cellular antioxidant signaling pathways and may promote myelin preservation. However, it is still unclear what mechanisms may underlie this neuroprotection and whether dimethyl fumarate affects oligodendrocyte responses to oxidative stress. Here, we examine metabolic alterations in oligodendrocytes treated with dimethyl fumarate by using a global metabolomic platform that employs both hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and shotgun lipidomics. Prolonged treatment of oligodendrocytes with dimethyl fumarate induces changes in citric acid cycle intermediates, glutathione, and lipids, indicating that this compound can directly impact oligodendrocyte metabolism. These metabolic alterations are also associated with protection from oxidant challenge. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which dimethyl fumarate could preserve myelin integrity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  9. Systematic review of the pharmacological properties of oligodendrocyte lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eMarinelli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OOligodendrogenesis and oligodendrocyte precursor maturation are essential processes during the course of central nervous system development, and lead to the myelination of axons. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage are generated in the germinal zone from migratory bipolar oligodendrocyte precursor cells, and acquire cell surface markers as they mature and respond specifically to factors which regulate proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival. Loss of myelin underlies a wide range of neurological disorders, some of an autoimmune nature – multiple sclerosis probably being the most prominent. Current therapies are based on the use of immunomodulatory agents which are likely to promote myelin repair (remyelination indirectly by subverting the inflammatory response, aspects of which impair the differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage express and are capable of responding to a diverse array of ligand-receptor pairs, including neurotransmitters and nuclear receptors such as gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, ATP, serotonin, acetylcholine, nitric oxide, opioids, prostaglandins, prolactin, cannabinoids and nuclear receptors. The intent of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of our present state of knowledge concerning the pharmacological properties of the oligodendrocyte lineage, with particular attention to these receptor-ligand (i.e., neurotransmitters and nuclear receptor interactions that can influence oligodendrocyte migration, proliferation, differentiation, and myelination, and an appraisal of their therapeutic potential. For example, many promising mediators work through Ca2+ signalling, and the balance between Ca2+ influx and efflux can determine the temporal and spatial properties of oligodendrocytes. Moreover, Ca2+ signalling in oligodendrocyte precursor cells can influence not only differentiation and myelination, but also process extension and migration, as

  10. Secretome analysis of human oligodendrocytes derived from neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Kyung Kim

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the secretome of human oligodendrocytes (F3.Olig2 cells generated from human neural stem cells by transduction with the gene encoding the Olig2 transcription factor. Using mRNA sequencing and protein cytokine arrays, we identified a number of biologically important secretory proteins whose expression has not been previously reported in oligodendrocytes. We found that F3.Olig2 cells secrete IL-6, PDGF-AA, GRO, GM-CSF, and M-CSF, and showed prominent expression of their corresponding receptors. Co-expression of ligands and receptors suggests that autocrine signaling loops may play important roles in both differentiation and maintenance of oligodendrocytes. We also found that F3.Olig2 cells secrete matrix metalloproteinases and matrix metalloproteinase-associated proteins associated with functional competence of oligodendrocytes. The results of our secretome analysis provide insights into the functional and molecular details of human oligodendrocytes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of the secretome of oligodendrocytes.

  11. Clozapine promotes glycolysis and myelin lipid synthesis in cultured oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann eSteiner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clozapine has stronger systemic metabolic side effects than haloperidol and it was hypothesized that therapeutic antipsychotic and adverse metabolic effects might be related. Considering that cerebral disconnectivity through oligodendrocyte dysfunction has been implicated in schizophrenia, it is important to determine the effect of these drugs on oligodendrocyte energy metabolism and myelin lipid production.Effects of clozapine and haloperidol on glucose and myelin lipid metabolism were evaluated and compared in cultured OLN-93 oligodendrocytes. First, glycolytic activity was assessed by measurement of extra- and intracellular glucose and lactate levels. Next, the expression of glucose (GLUT and monocarboxylate (MCT transporters was determined after 6h and 24h. And finally mitochondrial respiration, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, free fatty acids, and expression of the myelin lipid galactocerebroside were analyzed.Both drugs altered oligodendrocyte glucose metabolism, but in opposite directions. Clozapine improved the glucose uptake, production and release of lactate, without altering GLUT and MCT. In contrast, haloperidol led to higher extracellular levels of glucose and lower levels of lactate, suggesting reduced glycolysis. Antipsychotics did not alter significantly the number of functionally intact mitochondria, but clozapine enhanced the efficacy of oxidative phosphorylation and expression of galactocerebroside.Our findings support the superior impact of clozapine on white matter integrity in schizophrenia as previously observed, suggesting that this drug improves the energy supply and myelin lipid synthesis in oligodendrocytes. Characterizing the underlying signal transduction pathways may pave the way for novel oligodendrocyte-directed schizophrenia therapies.

  12. Glutamate receptor-mediated toxicity in optic nerve oligodendrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Carlos; Sánchez-Gómez, M. Victoria; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Miledi, Ricardo

    1997-01-01

    In cultured oligodendrocytes isolated from perinatal rat optic nerves, we have analyzed the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits as well as the effect of the activation of these receptors on oligodendrocyte viability. Reverse transcription–PCR, in combination with immunocytochemistry, demonstrated that most oligodendrocytes differentiated in vitro express the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluR3 and GluR4 and the kainate receptor subunits GluR6, GluR7, KA1 and KA2. Acute and chronic exposure to kainate caused extensive oligodendrocyte death in culture. This effect was partially prevented by the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 and was completely abolished by the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), suggesting that both AMPA and kainate receptors mediate the observed kainate toxicity. Furthermore, chronic application of kainate to optic nerves in vivo resulted in massive oligodendrocyte death which, as in vitro, could be prevented by coinfusion of the toxin with CNQX. These findings suggest that excessive activation of the ionotropic glutamate receptors expressed by oligodendrocytes may act as a negative regulator of the size of this cell population. PMID:9238063

  13. Effect of berberine on nitric oxide production during oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion in OLN-93 oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadjafi, Shabnam; Ebrahimi, Soltan-Ahmad; Rahbar-Roshandel, Nahid

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Coptidis rhizoma, on Nitric Oxide (NO) production, as a possible involved factor, during excitotoxic injury in oligodendroglial cells were evaluated. The overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors which is known as the excitotoxicity, is an important phenomenon because of the contribution in acute injury to the central nervous system, chronic neurodegenerative disorders, oligodendrocyte loss and demyelinating diseases as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Intracellular Ca2+ overload, have a key role during excitotoxic injury and such increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ triggers a series of events such as production of NO that end to cell death. Previous report showed the protective effects of berberine on ischemic-induced excitotoxic insult in oligodendrocytes. Hereby, we intended to know if the NO production could be associated with oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion-induced excitotoxic damage in oligodendrocyte; moreover, the alteration of NO production could be considered as an involved mechanism for protective effect of berberine in such condition. Therefore, the effect of berberine (2 μM) on NO production during oxygen-glucose deprivation/24 h reperfusion in oligodendrocytes were examined. The OLN-93 cell line (a permanent immature rat oligodendrocyte) was used as a model of oligodendrocyte. Thirty minutes-oxygen-glucose deprivation/24 h reperfusion was used to induce excitotoxicity. NO production was evaluated by Griess method. Our results demonstrated that berberine (2 μM) significantly decreased NO production during 30 min oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion. It seems that blockade of NO production by berberine may also participate in oligodendroglial cell protection against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion-induced insult.

  14. Endothelial cell–oligodendrocyte interactions in small vessel disease and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajani, Rikesh M.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a prevalent, neurological disease that significantly increases the risk of stroke and dementia. The main pathological changes are vascular, in the form of lipohyalinosis and arteriosclerosis, and in the white matter (WM), in the form of WM lesions. Despite this, it is unclear to what extent the key cell types involved–the endothelial cells (ECs) of the vasculature and the oligodendrocytes of the WM–interact. Here, we describe the work that has so far been carried out suggesting an interaction between ECs and oligodendrocytes in SVD. As these interactions have been studied in more detail in other disease states and in development, we explore these systems and discuss the role these mechanisms may play in SVD. PMID:28202749

  15. Bleaching induced tooth sensitivity: do the existing enamel craze lines increase sensitivity? A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Abdin, Sam; Sipahi, Cumhur

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate whether or not an association exists between the presence of enamel craze lines and the prevalence of tooth sensitivity (TS) after in-office bleaching. Subjects that met the inclusion criteria (N = 23) were screened to detect the existence of enamel craze lines. In total, 460 teeth were subjected to bleaching where 49% of them presented enamel craze lines. After bleaching (15% hydrogen peroxide), the subjects were asked to rate the level of TS by answering a self-administered questionnaire. The majority of subjects (91%) experienced TS at the first day of bleaching. The TS prevalence decreased gradually to 22% at second day, to 17% at third day, and to 9% at fourth day. After the fourth day, no subject reported TS. While 15% of teeth with craze lines presented TS, 11% of teeth with no craze lines also showed TS. A positive but weak correlation (r = 0.214) was found between the existence of enamel craze lines and TS. In this clinical study, higher incidence of TS was found with the use of 15% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent compared to the previous studies. Patients who would undergo in-office bleaching should be informed that tooth sensitivity is a very often side effect but it may disappear within 1 week.

  16. Oligodendrocyte lineage and subventricular zone response to traumatic axonal injury in the corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Genevieve M; Mierzwa, Amanda J; Kijpaisalratana, Naruchorn; Tang, Haiying; Wang, Yong; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Selwyn, Reed; Armstrong, Regina C

    2013-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury frequently causes traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in white matter tracts. Experimental TAI in the corpus callosum of adult mice was used to examine the effects on oligodendrocyte lineage cells and myelin in conjunction with neuroimaging. The injury targeted the corpus callosum over the subventricular zone, a source of neural stem/progenitor cells. Traumatic axonal injury was produced in the rostral body of the corpus callosum by impact onto the skull at the bregma. During the first week after injury, magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging showed that axial diffusivity decreased in the corpus callosum and that corresponding regions exhibited significant axon damage accompanied by hypertrophic microglia and reactive astrocytes. Oligodendrocyte progenitor proliferation increased in the subventricular zone and corpus callosum. Oligodendrocytes in the corpus callosum shifted toward upregulation of myelin gene transcription. Plp/CreER(T):R26IAP reporter mice showed normal reporter labeling of myelin sheaths 0 to 2 days after injury but labeling was increased between 2 and 7 days after injury. Electron microscopy revealed axon degeneration, demyelination, and redundant myelin figures. These findings expand the cell types and responses to white matter injuries that inform diffusion tensor imaging evaluation and identify pivotal white matter changes after TAI that may affect axon vulnerability vs. recovery after brain injury.

  17. Neuregulin and BDNF induce a switch to NMDA receptor-dependent myelination by oligodendrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iben Lundgaard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Myelination is essential for rapid impulse conduction in the CNS, but what determines whether an individual axon becomes myelinated remains unknown. Here we show, using a myelinating coculture system, that there are two distinct modes of myelination, one that is independent of neuronal activity and glutamate release and another that depends on neuronal action potentials releasing glutamate to activate NMDA receptors on oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Neuregulin switches oligodendrocytes from the activity-independent to the activity-dependent mode of myelination by increasing NMDA receptor currents in oligodendrocyte lineage cells 6-fold. With neuregulin present myelination is accelerated and increased, and NMDA receptor block reduces myelination to far below its level without neuregulin. Thus, a neuregulin-controlled switch enhances the myelination of active axons. In vivo, we demonstrate that remyelination after white matter damage is NMDA receptor-dependent. These data resolve controversies over the signalling regulating myelination and suggest novel roles for neuregulin in schizophrenia and in remyelination after white matter damage.

  18. Systematic Review of Pharmacological Properties of the Oligodendrocyte Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Carla; Bertalot, Thomas; Zusso, Morena; Skaper, Stephen D; Giusti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrogenesis and oligodendrocyte precursor maturation are essential processes during the course of central nervous system development, and lead to the myelination of axons. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage are generated in the germinal zone from migratory bipolar oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and acquire cell surface markers as they mature and respond specifically to factors which regulate proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival. Loss of myelin underlies a wide range of neurological disorders, some of an autoimmune nature-multiple sclerosis probably being the most prominent. Current therapies are based on the use of immunomodulatory agents which are likely to promote myelin repair (remyelination) indirectly by subverting the inflammatory response, aspects of which impair the differentiation of OPCs. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage express and are capable of responding to a diverse array of ligand-receptor pairs, including neurotransmitters and nuclear receptors such as γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, adenosine triphosphate, serotonin, acetylcholine, nitric oxide, opioids, prostaglandins, prolactin, and cannabinoids. The intent of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of our present state of knowledge concerning the pharmacological properties of the oligodendrocyte lineage, with particular attention to these receptor-ligand (i.e., neurotransmitters and nuclear receptor) interactions that can influence oligodendrocyte migration, proliferation, differentiation, and myelination, and an appraisal of their therapeutic potential. For example, many promising mediators work through Ca(2+) signaling, and the balance between Ca(2+) influx and efflux can determine the temporal and spatial properties of oligodendrocytes (OLs). Moreover, Ca(2+) signaling in OPCs can influence not only differentiation and myelination, but also process extension and migration, as well as cell death in mature mouse OLs. There is also evidence

  19. LINGO-1, a transmembrane signaling protein, inhibits oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination through intercellular self-interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Scott; Vought, Bryan; Gross, Christian H; Gan, Lu; Austen, Douglas; Frantz, J Daniel; Zwahlen, Jacque; Lowe, Derek; Markland, William; Krauss, Raul

    2012-06-22

    Overcoming remyelination failure is a major goal of new therapies for demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis. LINGO-1, a key negative regulator of myelination, is a transmembrane signaling protein expressed in both neurons and oligodendrocytes. In neurons, LINGO-1 is an integral component of the Nogo receptor complex, which inhibits axonal growth via RhoA. Because the only ligand-binding subunit of this complex, the Nogo receptor, is absent in oligodendrocytes, the extracellular signals that inhibit myelination through a LINGO-1-mediated mechanism are unknown. Here we show that LINGO-1 inhibits oligodendrocyte terminal differentiation through intercellular interactions and is capable of a self-association in trans. Consistent with previous reports, overexpression of full-length LINGO-1 inhibited differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Unexpectedly, treatment with a soluble recombinant LINGO-1 ectodomain also had an inhibitory effect on OPCs and decreased myelinated axonal segments in cocultures with neurons from dorsal root ganglia. We demonstrated LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of OPCs through intercellular signaling by using a surface-bound LINGO-1 construct expressed ectopically in astrocytes. Further investigation showed that the soluble LINGO-1 ectodomain can interact with itself in trans by binding to CHO cells expressing full-length LINGO-1. Finally, we observed that soluble LINGO-1 could activate RhoA in OPCs. We propose that LINGO-1 acts as both a ligand and a receptor and that the mechanism by which it negatively regulates OPC differentiation and myelination is mediated by a homophilic intercellular interaction. Disruption of this protein-protein interaction could lead to a decrease of LINGO-1 inhibition and an increase in myelination.

  20. A Minimally-invasive Blood-derived Biomarker of Oligodendrocyte Cell-loss in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, John A; Kenna, Lauren A; Tipon, Regine C; Spelios, Michael G; Stecker, Mark M; Akirav, Eitan M

    2016-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Minimally invasive biomarkers of MS are required for disease diagnosis and treatment. Differentially methylated circulating-free DNA (cfDNA) is a useful biomarker for disease diagnosis and prognosis, and may offer to be a viable approach for understanding MS. Here, methylation-specific primers and quantitative real-time PCR were used to study methylation patterns of the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) gene, which is expressed primarily in myelin-producing oligodendrocytes (ODCs). MOG-DNA was demethylated in O4(+) ODCs in mice and in DNA from human oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) when compared with other cell types. In the cuprizone-fed mouse model of demyelination, ODC derived demethylated MOG cfDNA was increased in serum and was associated with tissue-wide demyelination, demonstrating the utility of demethylated MOG cfDNA as a biomarker of ODC death. Collected sera from patients with active (symptomatic) relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) demonstrated a higher signature of demethylated MOG cfDNA when compared with patients with inactive disease and healthy controls. Taken together, these results offer a minimally invasive approach to measuring ODC death in the blood of MS patients that may be used to monitor disease progression.

  1. Slit2 regulates the dispersal of oligodendrocyte precursor cells via Fyn/RhoA signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiujie; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Jiazhen; Yuan, Yimin; Gao, Xiaofei; Su, Zhida; He, Cheng

    2012-05-18

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are a unique type of glia that are responsible for the myelination of the central nervous system. OPC migration is important for myelin formation during central nervous system development and repair. However, the precise extracellular and intracellular mechanisms that regulate OPC migration remain elusive. Slits were reported to regulate neurodevelopmental processes such as migration, adhesion, axon guidance, and elongation through binding to roundabout receptors (Robos). However, the potential roles of Slits/Robos in oligodendrocytes remain unknown. In this study, Slit2 was found to be involved in regulating the dispersal of OPCs through the association between Robo1 and Fyn. Initially, we examined the expression of Robos in OPCs both in vitro and in vivo. Subsequently, the Boyden chamber assay showed that Slit2 could inhibit OPC migration. RoboN, a specific inhibitor of Robos, could significantly attenuate this effect. The effects were confirmed through the explant migration assay. Furthermore, treating OPCs with Slit2 protein deactivated Fyn and increased the level of activated RhoA-GTP. Finally, Fyn was found to form complexes with Robo1, but this association was decreased after Slit2 stimulation. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that Slit2 regulates the dispersal of oligodendrocyte precursor cells through Fyn and RhoA signaling.

  2. NMDA modulates oligodendrocyte differentiation of subventricular zone cells through PKC activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eCavaliere

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent cells from the juvenile subventricular zone (SVZ possess the ability to differentiate into new neural cells. Depending on local signals, SVZ can generate new neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. We previously demonstrated that activation of NMDA receptors in SVZ progenitors increases the rate of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Here we investigated the mechanisms involved in NMDA receptor-dependent differentiation. Using functional studies performed with the reporter gene luciferase we found that activation of NMDA receptor stimulates PKC. In turn, stimulation of PKC precedes the activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX as demonstrated by translocation of the p67phox subunit to the cellular membrane. We propose that NOX2 is involved in the transduction of the signal from NMDA receptors through PKC activation as the inhibitor gp91 reduced their pro-differentiation effect. In addition, our data and that from other groups suggest that signaling through the NMDA receptor/PKC/NOX2 cascade generates ROS that activate the PI3/mTOR pathway and finally leads to the generation of new oligodendrocytes.

  3. A novel concept for increasing the peak sensitivity of LIGO by detuning the arm cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Hild, S

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a concept that uses detuned arm cavities to increase the shot noise limited sensitivity of LIGO without increasing the light power inside the arm cavities. Numerical simulations show an increased sensitivity between 125 and 400 Hz, with a maximal improvement of about 80% around 225 Hz, while the sensitivity above 400Hz is decreased. Furthermore our concept is found to give a sensitivity similar to that of a conventional RSE configuration with a Signal-Recycling mirror of moderate reflectivity. In the near future detuned arm cavities might be a beneficial alternative to RSE, due the potentially less hardware intensive implementation of the proposed concept.

  4. Genetic and physiological evidence that oligodendrocyte gap junctions contribute to spatial buffering of potassium released during neuronal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichella, Daniela M; Majdan, Marta; Awatramani, Rajeshwar; Goodenough, Daniel A; Sirkowski, Erich; Scherer, Steven S; Paul, David L

    2006-10-25

    Mice lacking the K+ channel Kir4.1 or both connexin32 (Cx32) and Cx47 exhibit myelin-associated vacuoles, raising the possibility that oligodendrocytes, and the connexins they express, contribute to recycling the K+ evolved during neuronal activity. To study this possibility, we first examined the effect of neuronal activity on the appearance of vacuoles in mice lacking both Cx32 and Cx47. The size and number of myelin vacuoles was dramatically increased when axonal activity was increased, by either a natural stimulus (eye opening) or pharmacological treatment. Conversely, myelin vacuoles were dramatically reduced when axonal activity was suppressed. Second, we used genetic complementation to test for a relationship between the function of Kir4.1 and oligodendrocyte connexins. In a Cx32-null background, haploinsufficiency of either Cx47 or Kir4.1 did not affect myelin, but double heterozygotes developed vacuoles, consistent with the idea that oligodendrocyte connexins and Kir4.1 function in a common pathway. Together, these results implicate oligodendrocytes and their connexins as having critical roles in the buffering of K+ released during neuronal activity.

  5. Adjunctive MSCs enhance myelin formation by xenogenic oligodendrocyte precursors transplanted in the retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aileen Arriola; Mary E Kie; Yufang Shi; Randall D McKinnon

    2010-01-01

    Dear Editor, We examined myelin formation by oligodendrocytes co-transplanted with immunosuppressive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) were grafted into the mouse retina, and graft survival and maturation was determined with or without adjunctive MSCs.

  6. Oligodendrocyte plasticity with an intact cell body in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Makinodan

    Full Text Available Demyelination is generally regarded as a consequence of oligodendrocytic cell death. Oligodendrocyte processes that form myelin sheaths may, however, degenerate and regenerate independently of the cell body, in which case cell death does not necessarily occur. We provide here the first evidence of retraction and regeneration of oligodendrocyte processes with no cell death in vitro, using time-lapse imaging. When processes were severed mechanically in vitro, the cells did not undergo cell death and the processes regenerated in 36 h. In a separate experiment, moderate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA stimuli caused process retraction without apparent cell death, and the processes regained their elaborate morphology after NMDA was removed from the culture medium. These results strongly suggest that demyelination and remyelination can take place without concomitant cell death, at least in vitro. Process regeneration may therefore become a target for future therapy of demyelinating disorders.

  7. Human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived oligodendrocyte precursor-like cells for axon and myelin sheath regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Chen; Yan Zhang; Zhijun Yang; Hongtian Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells from Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord were induced to differentiate into oligodendrocyte precursor-like cells in vitro. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells were transplanted into contused rat spinal cords. Immunofluorescence double staining indicated that transplanted cells survived in injured spinal cord, and differentiated into mature and immature oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Biotinylated dextran amine tracing results showed that cell transplantation promoted a higher density of the corticospinal tract in the central and caudal parts of the injured spinal cord. Luxol fast blue and toluidine blue staining showed that the volume of residual myelin was significantly increased at 1 and 2 mm rostral and caudal to the lesion epicenter after cell transplantation. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining verified that the newly regenerated myelin sheath was derived from the central nervous system. Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan testing showed an evident behavioral recovery. These results suggest that human umbilical mesenchymal stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte precursor cells promote the regeneration of spinal axons and myelin sheaths.

  8. Increased light harvesting in dye-sensitized solar cells with energy relay dyes

    KAUST Repository

    Hardin, Brian E.

    2009-06-21

    Conventional dye-sensitized solar cells have excellent charge collection efficiencies, high open-circuit voltages and good fill factors. However, dye-sensitized solar cells do not completely absorb all of the photons from the visible and near-infrared domain and consequently have lower short-circuit photocurrent densities than inorganic photovoltaic devices. Here, we present a new design where high-energy photons are absorbed by highly photoluminescent chromophores unattached to the titania and undergo Förster resonant energy transfer to the sensitizing dye. This novel architecture allows for broader spectral absorption, an increase in dye loading, and relaxes the design requirements for the sensitizing dye. We demonstrate a 26% increase in power conversion efficiency when using an energy relay dye (PTCDI) with an organic sensitizing dye (TT1). We estimate the average excitation transfer efficiency in this system to be at least 47%. This system offers a viable pathway to develop more efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

  9. P2X7 receptors mediate ischemic damage to oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domercq, Maria; Perez-Samartin, Alberto; Aparicio, David; Alberdi, Elena; Pampliega, Olatz; Matute, Carlos

    2010-04-15

    Brain ischemia leading to stroke is a major cause of disability in developed countries. Therapeutic strategies have most commonly focused on protecting neurons from ischemic damage. However, ischemic damage to white matter causes oligodendrocyte death, myelin disruption, and axon dysfunction, and it is partially mediated by glutamate excitotoxicity. We have previously demonstrated that oligodendrocytes express ionotropic purinergic receptors. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of purinergic signaling in white matter ischemia. We show that, in addition to glutamate, enhanced ATP signaling during ischemia is also deleterious to oligodendrocytes and myelin, and impairs white matter function. Thus, ischemic oligodendrocytes in culture display an inward current and cytosolic Ca(2+) overload, which is partially mediated by P2X7 receptors. Indeed, oligodendrocytes release ATP after oxygen and glucose deprivation through the opening of pannexin hemichannels. Consistently, ischemia-induced mitochondrial depolarization as well as oxidative stress culminating in cell death are partially reversed by P2X7 receptor antagonists, by the ATP degrading enzyme apyrase and by blockers of pannexin hemichannels. In turn, ischemic damage in isolated optic nerves, which share the properties of brain white matter, is greatly attenuated by all these drugs. Ultrastructural analysis and electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that P2X7 antagonists prevent ischemic damage to oligodendrocytes and myelin, and improved action potential recovery after ischemia. These data indicate that ATP released during ischemia and the subsequent activation of P2X7 receptor is critical to white matter demise during stroke and point to this receptor type as a therapeutic target to limit tissue damage in cerebrovascular diseases.

  10. Oligodendrocyte ablation as a tool to study demyelinating diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahdeah Pajoohesh-Ganji; Robert H. Miller

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune mediated neurodegenerative disease characterized by demyelin-ation and oligodendrocyte (OL) loss in the central nervous system and accompanied by local inlfammation and inifltration of peripheral immune cells. Although many risk factors and symptoms have been iden-tified in MS, the pathology is complicated and the cause remains unknown. It is also unclear whether OL apoptosis precedes the inlfammation or whether the local inlfammation is the cause of OL death and demyelination. This review brielfy discusses several models that have been developed to speciifcally ablate oligodendrocytes in an effort to separate the effects of demyelination from inlfammation.

  11. HDAC1 and HDAC2 regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation by disrupting the beta-catenin-TCF interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, F.; Chen, Y.; Hoang, T.; Montgomery, R.L.; Zhao, X.H.; Bu, H.; Hu, T.; Taketo, M.M.; van Es, J.H.; Clevers, H.; Hsieh, J.; Bassel-Duby, R.; Olson, E.N.; Lu, Q.R.

    2009-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte development is regulated by the interaction of repressors and activators in a complex transcriptional network. We found that two histone-modifying enzymes, HDAC1 and HDAC2, were required for oligodendrocyte formation. Genetic deletion of both Hdac1 and Hdac2 in oligodendrocyte lineag

  12. Children Increase Their Sensitivity to a Speaker's Nonlinguistic Cues Following a Communicative Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yow, W. Quin; Markman, Ellen M.

    2016-01-01

    Bilingual children regularly face communicative challenges when speakers switch languages. To cope with such challenges, children may attempt to discern a speaker's communicative intent, thereby heightening their sensitivity to nonverbal communicative cues. Two studies examined whether such communication breakdowns increase sensitivity to…

  13. Ethosome formulations of known contact allergens can increase their sensitizing capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jacob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Simonsson, Carl; Johansen, Jeanne D; Andersen, Klaus E

    2010-07-01

    Vesicular systems, such as liposomes and ethosomes, are used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products to encapsulate ingredients, to protect ingredients from degradation, to increase bioavailability, and to improve cosmetic performance. Some reports have suggested that formulation of cosmetic ingredients in vesicular carrier systems may increase their contact allergy elicitation potential in humans. However, no sensitization studies have been published. We formulated two model contact allergens (isoeugenol and dinitrochlorobenzene) in ethosomes and investigated the sensitization response using a modified local lymph node assay (LLNA). The results were compared with those for the same allergens in similar concentrations and vehicles without ethosomes. Both allergens encapsulated in 200-300 nm ethosomes showed increased sensitizing potency in the murine assay compared with the allergens in solution without ethosomes. Empty ethosomes were non-sensitizing according to LLNA. The clinical implications are so far uncertain, but increased allergenicity from ethosome-encapsulated topical product ingredients cannot be excluded.

  14. TDP6, a brain-derived neurotrophic factor-based trkB peptide mimetic, promotes oligodendrocyte myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Agnes W; Giuffrida, Lauren; Wood, Rhiannon; Peckham, Haley; Gonsalvez, David; Murray, Simon S; Hughes, Richard A; Xiao, Junhua

    2014-11-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays critical roles in the development and maintenance of the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). BDNF exerts its biological effects via tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). We have recently identified that BDNF promotes CNS myelination via oligodendroglial TrkB receptors. In order to selectively target TrkB to promote CNS myelination, we have used a putative TrkB agonist, a small multicyclic peptide (tricyclic dimeric peptide 6, TDP6) previously described by us that structurally mimics a region of BDNF that binds TrkB. We confirmed that TDP6 acts as a TrkB agonist as it provoked autophosphorylation of TrkB and its downstream signalling effector extracellular related-kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) in primary oligodendrocytes. Using an in vitro myelination assay, we show that TDP6 significantly promotes myelination by oligodendrocytes in vitro, as evidenced by enhanced myelin protein expression and an increased number of myelinated axonal segments. In contrast, a second, structurally distinct BDNF mimetic (cyclo-dPAKKR) that targets p75NTR had no effect upon oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro, despite the fact that cyclo-dPAKKR is a very effective promoter of peripheral (Schwann cell) myelination. The selectivity of TDP6 was further verified by using TrkB-deficient oligodendrocytes, in which TDP6 failed to promote myelination, indicating that the pro-myelinating effect of TDP6 is oligodendroglial TrkB-dependent. Together, our results demonstrate that TDP6 is a novel BDNF mimetic that promotes oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro via targeting TrkB.

  15. Passive gravitational sedimentation of peripheral blood increases the sensitivity of microscopic detection of malaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard Davis; Trenden Flanigan; Eric Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine if passive gravitational sedimentation of blood samples, followed by buffy coat thin smear preparation could increase the sensitivity of malaria diagnosis when compared to conventional thin smear preparation without the additional cost of centrifuges or molecular diagnostics. Methods: Blood samples were collected from 205 patients. Each patient sample was analyzed using all three methods of sample preparation. Results: Buffy coat analysis of centrifuged blood samples greatly increased the sensitivity of malaria diagnosis when compared to standard thin smear techniques. Sensitivity between mechanically centrifuged samples and gravitationally sedimented samples showed equal improvement in sensitivity when compared to standard thin smear preparation. Conclusions: Passive gravitational sedimentation of red blood cells followed by buffy coat analysis dramatically improves the sensitivity of malaria diagnosis without the additional costs associated with centrifugation.

  16. Prior AICAR stimulation increases insulin sensitivity in mouse skeletal muscle in an AMPK-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøbsted, Rasmus; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Fentz, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases glucose uptake in skeletal muscle by an insulin-independent mechanism. In the period after exercise insulin sensitivity to increase glucose uptake is enhanced. The molecular mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon are poorly understood, but appear to involve an increased ...

  17. Effects of pirfenidone on increased cough reflex sensitivity in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Akihito; Ohkura, Noriyuki; Fujimura, Masaki; Katayama, Nobuyuki; Kasahara, Kazuo

    2013-10-01

    Pirfenidone, an antifibrotic drug with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, delays fibrosis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Patients with IPF have a greater cough reflex sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin than healthy people, and cough is an independent predictor of IPF disease progression; however, the effects of pirfenidone on cough reflex sensitivity are unknown. After challenge with an aerosolized antigen in actively sensitized guinea pigs, pirfenidone was administered intraperitoneally, and the cough reflex sensitivity was measured at 48 h after the challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed, and the tracheal tissue was collected. Pirfenidone suppressed the capsaicin-induced increase in cough reflex sensitivity in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, increased levels of prostaglandin E2, substance P, and leukotriene B4, but not histamine, in the BAL fluid were dose dependently suppressed by pirfenidone. The decrease in neutral endopeptidase activity in the tracheal tissue was also alleviated by pirfenidone treatment. The total number of cells and components in the BAL fluid was not influenced. These results suggest that pirfenidone ameliorates isolated cough based on increased cough reflex sensitivity associated with allergic airway diseases, and potentially relieve chronic cough in IPF patients who often have increased cough reflex sensitivity. Prospective studies on cough-relieving effects of pirfenidone in patients with IPF are therefore warranted.

  18. Multiple Modes of Communication between Neurons and Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maldonado, Paloma P; Angulo, María Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The surprising discovery of bona fide synapses between neurons and oligodendrocytes precursor cells (OPCs) 15 years ago placed these progenitors as real partners of neurons in the CNS. The role of these synapses has not been established yet, but a main hypothesis is that neuron-OPC synaptic activity

  19. Cre-inducible site-specific recombination in zebrafish oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Olejua, Alejandro; Welte, Cornelia; Chekuru, Avinash; Bosak, Viktoria; Brand, Michael; Hans, Stefan; Stuermer, Claudia A O

    2017-01-01

    The conditional Cre/lox system has recently emerged as a valuable tool for studies on both embryonic and adult Zebrafish. Temporal control and site-specific recombination are achieved by using the ligand-inducible CreER(T2) and administration of the drug tamoxifen (TAM) or its active metabolite, 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT). Here we report the generation of a transgenic Zebrafish line, which expresses an mCherry-tagged variant of CreER(T2) under the control of the myelin basic protein a (mbpa) promoter. Our analysis shows that larval and adult expression of the transgene recapitulates the endogenous mbpa expression pattern in oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, combination with a Cre-dependent EGFP reporter results in EGFP-expressing oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord, brain, and optic nerve in TAM- or 4-OHT-treated larvae and 4-month-old fish, but not in untreated controls. The transgenic Zebrafish line Tg(mbpa:mCherry-T2A-CreER(T2) ) elicits CreER(T2) expression specifically in myelinating glia cells. Cre-inducible targeted recombination of genes in oligodendrocytes will be useful to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms of myelination in vivo during development (myelination) and regeneration (remyelination) after injury to the central nervous system (CNS). It will also allow targeted expression and overexpression of genes of interest (transgenes) in oligodendrocytes at defined developmental and adult stages. Developmental Dynamics 246:41-49, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Polarity development in oligodendrocytes : Sorting and trafficking of myelin components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, Olaf; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2008-01-01

    In vertebrates, myelination is required for the saltatory signal conductance along the axon. At the onset of myelination, the myelinating cells, i.e., oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, are heavily engaged in the biogenesis of membranes

  1. Increasing the sensitivity for tilt measurement using a cyclic interferometer with multiple reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretheesh Kumar, Valiyaparambil Chacko; Joenathan, Charles; Ganesan, Angarai; Somasundram, Umapathy

    2016-08-01

    Measurement of tilt plays an important role in metrological applications and consequently, several methods have been proposed in the recent past. Classical interferometric methods can measure angles with high accuracy but are easily susceptible to external turbulences. We propose to use a cyclic interferometer to measure tilt in which the sensitivity to tilt measurement is double when compared with that of the classical Michelson interferometer. Since the counter propagating beams travel identical paths, the interferometer is insensitive to external vibrations and turbulence and thus can be used under harsh environmental conditions. The novelty in the technique lies in creating multiple reflections in the tilt mirror to enhance the measurement accuracy by the way of increasing the sensitivity. This paper presents the basics of the interferometer and experimental results to quantify the increase in sensitivity. By increasing the number of reflections, it is shown that sensitivity can be further improved to measure tilt angles below 5 μrad.

  2. Systematic Review of Pharmacological Properties of the Oligodendrocyte Lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Carla; Bertalot, Thomas; Zusso, Morena; Skaper, Stephen D.; Giusti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrogenesis and oligodendrocyte precursor maturation are essential processes during the course of central nervous system development, and lead to the myelination of axons. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage are generated in the germinal zone from migratory bipolar oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and acquire cell surface markers as they mature and respond specifically to factors which regulate proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival. Loss of myelin underlies a wide range of neurological disorders, some of an autoimmune nature—multiple sclerosis probably being the most prominent. Current therapies are based on the use of immunomodulatory agents which are likely to promote myelin repair (remyelination) indirectly by subverting the inflammatory response, aspects of which impair the differentiation of OPCs. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage express and are capable of responding to a diverse array of ligand-receptor pairs, including neurotransmitters and nuclear receptors such as γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, adenosine triphosphate, serotonin, acetylcholine, nitric oxide, opioids, prostaglandins, prolactin, and cannabinoids. The intent of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of our present state of knowledge concerning the pharmacological properties of the oligodendrocyte lineage, with particular attention to these receptor-ligand (i.e., neurotransmitters and nuclear receptor) interactions that can influence oligodendrocyte migration, proliferation, differentiation, and myelination, and an appraisal of their therapeutic potential. For example, many promising mediators work through Ca2+ signaling, and the balance between Ca2+ influx and efflux can determine the temporal and spatial properties of oligodendrocytes (OLs). Moreover, Ca2+ signaling in OPCs can influence not only differentiation and myelination, but also process extension and migration, as well as cell death in mature mouse OLs. There is also evidence

  3. Oligodendrocyte and interneuron density in hippocampal subfields in schizophrenia and association of oligodendrocyte number with cognitive deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eFalkai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In schizophrenia, previous stereological post-mortem investigations of anterior, posterior, and total hippocampal subfields showed no alterations in total neuron number but did show decreased oligodendrocyte numbers in CA4, an area that corresponds to the polymorph layer of the dentate gyrus. However, these investigations identified oligodendrocytes only on the basis of morphological criteria in Nissl staining and did not assess alterations of interneurons with immunohistochemical markers. Moreover, the association of findings in the posterior hippocampus with cognitive deficits remains unknown.On the basis of the available clinical records, we compared patients with definite and possible cognitive dysfunction; nine patients had evidence in their records of either definite (n=4 or possible (n=5 cognitive dysfunction. Additionally, we assessed the density of two oligodendrocyte subpopulations immunostained by the oligodendrocyte transcription factors Olig1 and Olig2 and of interneurons immunolabeled by parvalbumin. We investigated posterior hippocampal subregions in the post-mortem brains of the same schizophrenia patients (n=10 and healthy controls (n=10 we examined in our previously published stereological studies. Our stereological studies found that patients with definite cognitive deficits had decreased total / Nissl-stained oligodendrocyte numbers in the left (p=0.014 and right (p=0.050 CA4, left CA2/3 (p=0.050, left CA1 (p=0.027, and left (p=0.050 and right (p=0.014 subiculum of the anterior part of the hippocampus compared to patients with possible cognitive deficits. In the present study, we found no significant influence of definite cognitive deficits in the posterior part of the hippocampus, whereas in the entire hippocampus schizophrenia patients with definite cognitive deficits showed decreased oligodendrocyte numbers in the left (p=0.050 and right (p=0.050 dentate gyrus and left CA2/3 (p=0.050. We did not find significant

  4. Contact sensitizers specifically increase MHC class II expression on murine immature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herouet, C; Cottin, M; LeClaire, J; Enk, A; Rousset, F

    2000-01-01

    Contact sensitivity is a T-cell-mediated immune disease that can occur when low-molecular-weight chemicals penetrate the skin. In vivo topical application of chemical sensitizers results in morphological modification of Langerhans cells (LC). Moreover, within 18 h, LC increase their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens expression and migrate to lymph nodes where they present the sensitizer to T lymphocytes. We wanted to determine if such an effect could also be observed in vitro. However, because of the high genetic diversity encountered in humans, assays were performed with dendritic cells (DC) obtained from a Balb/c mouse strain. The capacity of a strong sensitizer, DNBS (2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid), to modulate the phenotype of bone marrow-derived DC in vitro, was investigated. A specific and marked increase of MHC class II molecules expression was observed within 18 h. To eliminate the use of animals in sensitization studies, the XS52 DC line was tested at an immature stage. A 30-min contact with the strong sensitizers DNBS and oxazolone, or the moderate mercaptobenzothiazole, resulted in upregulation of MHC class II molecules expression, analyzed after 18-h incubation. This effect was not observed with irritants (dimethyl sulfoxide and sodium lauryl sulfate) nor with a neutral molecule (sodium chloride). These data suggested the possibility of developing an in vitro model for the identification of the sensitizing potential of chemicals, using a constant and non animal-consuming material.

  5. A role for hemopexin in oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Morello

    Full Text Available Myelin formation and maintenance are crucial for the proper function of the CNS and are orchestrated by a plethora of factors including growth factors, extracellular matrix components, metalloproteases and protease inhibitors. Hemopexin (Hx is a plasma protein with high heme binding affinity, which is also locally produced in the CNS by ependymal cells, neurons and glial cells. We have recently reported that oligodendrocytes (OLs are the type of cells in the brain that are most susceptible to lack of Hx, as the number of iron-overloaded OLs increases in Hx-null brain, leading to oxidative tissue damage. In the current study, we found that the expression of the Myelin Basic Protein along with the density of myelinated fibers in the basal ganglia and in the motor and somatosensory cortex of Hx-null mice were strongly reduced starting at 2 months and progressively decreased with age. Myelin abnormalities were confirmed by electron microscopy and, at the functional level, resulted in the inability of Hx-null mice to perform efficiently on the Rotarod. It is likely that the poor myelination in the brain of Hx-null mice was a consequence of defective maturation of OLs as we demonstrated that the number of mature OLs was significantly reduced in mutant mice whereas that of precursor cells was normal. Finally, in vitro experiments showed that Hx promotes OL differentiation. Thus, Hx may be considered a novel OL differentiation factor and the modulation of its expression in CNS may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: questions still to be answered despite increasing awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Volta, Umberto; Caio, Giacomo; Tovoli, Francesco; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the increasing number of patients worldwide who are sensitive to dietary gluten without evidence of celiac disease or wheat allergy has contributed to the identification of a new gluten-related syndrome defined as non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Our knowledge regarding this syndrome is still lacking, and many aspects of this syndrome remain unknown. Its pathogenesis is heterogeneous, with a recognized pivotal role for innate immunity; many other factors also contribute, including low...

  7. Niacin Skin Sensitivity Is Increased in Adolescents at Ultra-High Risk for Psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor E Berger

    Full Text Available Most studies provide evidence that the skin flush response to nicotinic acid (niacin stimulation is impaired in schizophrenia. However, only little is known about niacin sensitivity in the ultra-high risk (UHR phase of psychotic disorders.We compared visual ratings of niacin sensitivity between adolescents at UHR for psychosis according to the one year transition outcome (UHR-T n = 11; UHR-NT n = 55 with healthy controls (HC n = 25 and first episode schizophrenia patients (FEP n = 25 treated with atypical antipsychotics.Contrary to our hypothesis niacin sensitivity of the entire UHR group was not attenuated, but significantly increased compared to the HC group, whereas no difference could be found between the UHR-T and UHR-NT groups. As expected, niacin sensitivity of FEP was attenuated compared to HC group. In UHR individuals niacin sensitivity was inversely correlated with omega-6 and -9 fatty acids (FA, but positively correlated with phospholipase A2 (inPLA2 activity, a marker of membrane lipid repair/remodelling.Increased niacin sensitivity in UHR states likely indicates an impaired balance of eicosanoids and omega-6/-9 FA at a membrane level. Our findings suggest that the emergence of psychosis is associated with an increased mobilisation of eicosanoids prior to the transition to psychosis possibly reflecting a "pro-inflammatory state", whereas thereafter eicosanoid mobilisation seems to be attenuated. Potential treatment implications for the UHR state should be further investigated.

  8. Contraction-induced increase in muscle insulin sensitivity: requirement for a serum factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J; Gulve, E A; Holloszy, J O

    1994-02-01

    The insulin sensitivity of glucose transport is enhanced in skeletal muscle after a bout of exercise. In a previous study, stimulation of washed muscles to contract in vitro, in contrast to exercise, did not result in an increase in insulin sensitivity. The purpose of the present study was to explain this apparent discrepancy. We found that, although rat epitrochlearis muscles stimulated to contract in vitro after 15 min of incubation in Krebs-Henseleit buffer did not develop increased insulin sensitivity, muscles stimulated to contract immediately after being dissected showed a small but significant enhancement of the stimulation of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport by 30 microU/ml insulin. Furthermore, muscles stimulated to contract in situ and then allowed to recover in vitro showed as large an increase in insulin sensitivity as that which occurs after a bout of swimming. To follow up these findings suggesting involvement of a humoral factor, we incubated epitrochlearis muscles in serum before and during contractile activity in vitro. Epitrochlearis muscle insulin sensitivity was enhanced to as great an extent after in vitro contractile activity in serum as after swimming. Experiments involving charcoal treatment, ultrafiltration, or trypsin digestion provided evidence that the serum factor that interacts with contractions to enhance insulin sensitivity is a protein.

  9. Inhibition of Notch1 increases paclitaxel sensitivity to human breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Li; Ma Yongjie; Gu Feng; Fu Li

    2014-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel (PAC) is the first-line chemotherapy drug for most breast cancer patients,but clinical studies showed that some breast cancer patients were insensitive to PAC,which led to chemotherapy failure.It was reported that Notch1 signaling participated in drug resistance of breast cancer.Here,we show whether Notch1 expression is related to PAC sensitivity of breast cancer.Methods We employed Notch1 siRNA and Notch1 inhibitor,N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-1-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butylester (DAPT),to down regulate Notch1 expression in human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231,and detected the inhibition effect by Western blotting and reverse trans cription-polymerase chain reaction,respectively.After 24 hours exposure to different concentration of PAC (0,1,5,10,15,20,and 25 μg/ml),the viability of the control group and experimental group cells was tested by MTT.We also examined the expression of Notch1 in PAC sensitive and nonsensitive breast cancer patients,respectively by immunohistochemistry (IHC).The PAC sensitivity of breast cancer patients were identified by collagen gel droplet embedded culture-drug sensitivity test (CD-DST).Results Down regulation of Notch1 expression by Notch1siRNA interference or Notch1 inhibitor increased the PAC sensitivity in MDA-MB-231 cells (P <0.05).Also,the expression of Notch1 in PAC sensitive patients was much lower than that of PAC non-sensitive patients (P <0.01).Conclusion Notch1 expression has an effect on PAC sensitivity in breast cancer patients,and the inhibition of Notch1 increases paclitaxel sensitivity to human breast cancer.

  10. Continuous-flow ATP amplification system for increasing the sensitivity of quantitative bioluminescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tetsuya; Shinoda, Yasuharu; Alexandrov, Maxym; Kuroda, Akio; Murakami, Yuji

    2008-08-01

    We constructed a novel ATP amplification reactor using a continuous-flow system, and this allowed us to increase the sensitivity of a quantitative bioluminescence assay by controlling the number of ATP amplification cycles. We previously developed a bioluminescence assay coupled with ATP amplification using a batch system. However, it was difficult to control the number of amplification cycles. In this study, ATP amplification was performed using a continuous-flow system, and significant linear correlations between amplified luminescence and initial ATP concentration were observed. When performing four cycles of continuous-flow ATP amplification, the gradient of amplification was 1.87(N). Whereas the lower quantifiable level was 500 pM without amplification, values as low as 50 pM ATP could be measured after amplification. The sensitivity thus increased 10-fold, with further improvements expected with additional amplification cycles. The continuous-flow system thus effectively increased the sensitivity of the quantitative bioluminescence assay.

  11. Co-treatment of Salinomycin Sensitizes AZD5363-treated Cancer Cells Through Increased Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ae-Ran; Jung, Myung-Ji; Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoon, Sungpil

    2015-09-01

    AZD5363, an inhibitor of protein kinase B (AKT), is currently in clinical trials assessing the potential of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The purpose of the present study was to identify conditions that increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to AZD5363. Microscopic examination revealed that treatment of cancer cells with a low concentration of salinomycin reduced cellular growth of AZD5363-treated breast cancer cells. Furthermore, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, Hoechst staining, and annexin V staining revealed that co-treatment with salinomycin sensitizes AZD5363-treated cancer cells via increased apoptosis with S-phase arrest. These results suggest that salinomycin can be applied to increase treatment efficacy for AZD5363-treated cancer cells. Our findings may contribute to improving the efficacy of the development of AZD5363-based sensitization therapies for patients with cancer.

  12. Ethosome formulations of known contact allergens can increase their sensitizing capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Karlberg, Ann-Therese;

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular systems, such as liposomes and ethosomes, are used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products to encapsulate ingredients, to protect ingredients from degradation, to increase bioavailability, and to improve cosmetic performance. Some reports have suggested that formulation of cosmetic...... ingredients in vesicular carrier systems may increase their contact allergy elicitation potential in humans. However, no sensitization studies have been published. We formulated two model contact allergens (isoeugenol and dinitrochlorobenzene) in ethosomes and investigated the sensitization response using...... a modified local lymph node assay (LLNA). The results were compared with those for the same allergens in similar concentrations and vehicles without ethosomes. Both allergens encapsulated in 200-300 nm ethosomes showed increased sensitizing potency in the murine assay compared with the allergens in solution...

  13. Ultrastructural Alterations of Myelinated Fibers and Oligodendrocytes in the Prefrontal Cortex in Schizophrenia: A Postmortem Morphometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya A. Uranova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is believed to result from altered neuronal connectivity and impaired myelination. However, there are few direct evidence for myelin abnormalities in schizophrenia. We performed electron microscopic study of myelinated fibers and oligodendrocytes and morphometric study of myelinated fibers in the prefrontal cortex in gray and white matters in schizophrenia and normal controls. Six types of abnormal fibers and ultrastructural alterations of oligodendrocytes were found in schizophrenia. No significant group differences in area density of myelinated fibers were found. Frequency of pathological fibers was increased significantly in gray matter in young and elderly schizophrenia patients and in patients with predominantly positive symptoms. In contrast, in white matter, frequency of altered fibers was increased significantly in elderly patients, in patients with predominantly negative symptoms, and correlated with illness duration. Progressive alterations of myelinated fibers in white matter might be followed by alterations of myelinated fibers in gray matter in schizophrenia.

  14. Increased Angiotensin II Sensitivity Contributes to Microvascular Dysfunction in Women Who Have Had Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Jandu, Sandeep; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Alexander, Lacy M

    2017-08-01

    Women who have had preeclampsia have increased cardiovascular disease risk; however, the mechanism(s) responsible for this association remain unclear. Microvascular damage sustained during a preeclamptic pregnancy may persist postpartum. The putative mechanisms mediating this dysfunction include a reduction in NO-dependent dilation and an increased sensitivity to angiotensin II. In this study, we evaluated endothelium-dependent dilation, angiotensin II sensitivity, and the therapeutic effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade (losartan) on endothelium-dependent dilation in vivo in the microvasculature of women with a history of preeclampsia (n=12) and control women who had a healthy pregnancy (n=12). We hypothesized that preeclampsia would have (1) reduced endothelium-dependent dilation, (2) reduced NO-mediated dilation, and (3) increased sensitivity to angiotensin II. We further hypothesized that localized losartan would increase endothelium-dependent vasodilation in preeclampsia. We assessed microvascular endothelium-dependent vasodilator function by measurement of cutaneous vascular conductance responses to graded infusion of acetylcholine (acetylcholine; 10(-7)-102 mmol/L) and a standardized local heating protocol in control sites and sites treated with 15 mmol/L L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester; NO-synthase inhibitor) or 43 µmol/L losartan. Further, we assessed microvascular vasoconstrictor sensitivity to angiotensin II (10(-20)-10(-4) mol/L). Preeclampsia had significantly reduced endothelium-dependent dilation (-0.3±0.5 versus -1.0±0.4 logEC50; PPreeclampsia also had augmented vasoconstrictor sensitivity to angiotensin II (-10.2±1.3 versus -8.3±0.5; P=0.006). Angiotensin II type I receptor inhibition augmented endothelium-dependent vasodilation and NO-dependent dilation in preeclampsia but had no effect in healthy pregnancy. These data suggest that women who have had preeclampsia have persistent microvascular dysfunction postpartum, mediated

  15. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha F Kornfeld

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as

  16. Oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1 overexpression promotes oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 expression in the brains of neonatal rats exposed to hypoxia****☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Yang; Hong Cui; Aijun Yang; Wenxing Jiang

    2011-01-01

    To examine the expression profiles of oligodendrocyte transcription factors 1 and 2 (Olig1 and Olig2) and the interaction between these two proteins, Olig1 was transfected into the lateral ventricles of neonatal rats subjected to hypoxia. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that Olig2 was expressed throughout the nuclei in the brain, and expression increased at 3 days following hypoxia and was higher than levels at 7 days following Ad5-Olig1 transfection. Western blot revealed that Olig1 and Olig2 expression increased in Olig1-transfected brain cells 3 days after hypoxia, but Olig1 and Olig2 expression decreased at 7 days. These results indicate that Olig1 overexpression enhances Olig2 expression in brain tissues of hypoxia rats.

  17. Increased sensitivity to a nondepolarizing muscle relaxant in a patient with acquired neuromyotonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Greg; Forde, Ryan; Martyn, Jeevendra A J; Eikermann, Matthias

    2009-07-01

    Neuromyotonia is a disorder of hyperexcitability of the peripheral nerve. It has electromyographic features of spontaneous, continuous, irregularly occurring doublets, or multiplets of motor unit potential discharges. Neuromyotonia is characterized by both myokymic and neuromyotonic discharges. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature to assess the sensitivity of skeletal muscle to a nondepolarizing muscle relaxant drug, rocuronium, in a woman with acquired neuromyotonia. She had a past medical history notable for prolonged postoperative paralysis following anesthesia. The patient showed increased sensitivity to the neuromuscular effects of rocuronium. This increase in sensitivity may be explained by downregulation of acetylcholine receptors in response to chronic high agonist (acetylcholine) concentrations. If patients with neuromyotonia receive anesthesia, we recommend that smaller doses of a nondepolarizing muscle relaxant be administered, accompanied by monitoring of neuromuscular function, so as to provide optimal muscle relaxation while avoiding overdose and prolonged postoperative recovery.

  18. Video-feedback intervention increases sensitive parenting in ethnic minority mothers: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmur, Sengul; Mesman, Judi; Malda, Maike; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Ekmekci, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Using a randomized control trial design we tested the effectiveness of a culturally sensitive adaptation of the Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD) in a sample of 76 Turkish minority families in the Netherlands. The VIPP-SD was adapted based on a pilot with feedback of the target mothers, resulting in the VIPP-TM (VIPP-Turkish Minorities). The sample included families with 20-47-month-old children with high levels of externalizing problems. Maternal sensitivity, nonintrusiveness, and discipline strategies were observed during pretest and posttest home visits. The VIPP-TM was effective in increasing maternal sensitivity and nonintrusiveness, but not in enhancing discipline strategies. Applying newly learned sensitivity skills in discipline situations may take more time, especially in a cultural context that favors more authoritarian strategies. We conclude that the VIPP-SD program and its video-feedback approach can be successfully applied in immigrant families with a non-Western cultural background, with demonstrated effects on parenting sensitivity and nonintrusiveness.

  19. Ethosome formulations of known contact allergens can increase their sensitizing capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Karlberg, Ann-Therese;

    2010-01-01

    a modified local lymph node assay (LLNA). The results were compared with those for the same allergens in similar concentrations and vehicles without ethosomes. Both allergens encapsulated in 200-300 nm ethosomes showed increased sensitizing potency in the murine assay compared with the allergens in solution...

  20. Increased sensitivity in fiber-based spectroscopy using carbon-coated fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudirman, Aziza; Norin, Lars; Margulis, Walter

    2012-12-17

    Carbon-coated optical fibers are used here for reducing the luminescence background created by the primary-coating and thus increase the sensitivity of fiber-based spectroscopy systems. The 2-3 orders of magnitude signal-to-noise ratio improvement with standard telecom fibers is sufficient to allow for their use as Raman probes in the identification of organic solvents.

  1. Aerobic exercise increases peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity in sedentary adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing prevalence of obesity and its consequences is a serious public health concern. The present study was undertaken to determine whether a controlled aerobic exercise program (without weight loss) improves insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in sedentary adolescents. Twenty nine p...

  2. Moderate alcohol consumption increases insulin sensitivity and ADIPOQ expression in postmenopausal women: A randomised, crossover trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, M.M.; Beulens, J.W.J.; Kersten, S.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: To determine whether 6 weeks of daily, moderate alcohol consumption increases expression of the gene encoding adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and plasma levels of the protein, and improves insulin sensitivity in postmenopausal women. Methods: In a randomised, open-label, crossover trial conduc

  3. Ageing increases the sensitivity of neem (Azadirachta indica) seeds to imbibitional stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neya, O.; Golovina, E.A.; Nijsse, J.; Hoekstra, F.A.

    2004-01-01

    Imbibitional stress was imposed on neem (Azadirachta indica) seeds by letting them soak for 1 h in water at unfavourable, low temperatures before further incubation at 30degreesC. Sensitivity to low imbibition temperatures increased with a decrease in seed moisture content (MC). To investigate a pos

  4. Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein: Deciphering a Target in Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Peschl

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG, a member of the immunoglobulin (Ig superfamily, is a myelin protein solely expressed at the outermost surface of myelin sheaths and oligodendrocyte membranes. This makes MOG a potential target of cellular and humoral immune responses in inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Due to its late postnatal developmental expression, MOG is an important marker for oligodendrocyte maturation. Discovered about 30 years ago, it is one of the best-studied autoantigens for experimental autoimmune models for multiple sclerosis (MS. Human studies, however, have yielded controversial results on the role of MOG, especially MOG antibodies (Abs, as a biomarker in MS. But with improved detection methods using different expression systems to detect Abs in patients’ samples, this is meanwhile no longer the case. Using cell-based assays with recombinant full-length, conformationally intact MOG, several recent studies have revealed that MOG Abs can be found in a subset of predominantly pediatric patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM, aquaporin-4 (AQP4 seronegative neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD, monophasic or recurrent isolated optic neuritis (ON, or transverse myelitis, in atypical MS and in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-encephalitis with overlapping demyelinating syndromes. Whereas MOG Abs are only transiently observed in monophasic diseases such as ADEM and their decline is associated with a favorable outcome, they are persistent in multiphasic ADEM, NMOSD, recurrent ON, or myelitis. Due to distinct clinical features within these diseases it is controversially disputed to classify MOG Ab-positive cases as a new disease entity. Neuropathologically, the presence of MOG Abs is characterized by MS-typical demyelination and oligodendrocyte pathology associated with Abs and complement. However, it remains unclear whether MOG Abs are a mere inflammatory bystander effect or truly pathogenetic

  5. Hypoxia alters cell cycle regulatory protein expression and induces premature maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Shankar Akundi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periventricular white matter injury (PWMI is a common form of brain injury sustained by preterm infants. A major factor that predisposes to PWMI is hypoxia. Because oligodendrocytes (OLs are responsible for myelination of axons, abnormal OL development or function may affect brain myelination. At present our understanding of the influences of hypoxia on OL development is limited. To examine isolated effects of hypoxia on OLs, we examined the influences of hypoxia on OL development in vitro. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Cultures of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs were prepared from mixed glial cultures and were 99% pure. OPCs were maintained at 21% O(2 or hypoxia (1% or 4% O(2 for up to 7 days. We observed that 1% O(2 lead to an increase in the proportion of myelin basic protein (MBP-positive OLs after 1 week in culture, and a decrease in the proportion of platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha-positive cells suggesting premature OL maturation. Increased expression of the cell cycle regulatory proteins p27(Kip1 and phospho-cdc2, which play a role in OL differentiation, was seen as well. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that hypoxia interferes with the normal process of OL differentiation by inducing premature OPC maturation.

  6. Fine-tuning oligodendrocyte development by miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eLu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system is essential for normal neuronal functions. The failure of remyelination due to injury or pathological insults results in devastating demyelinating diseases. Oligodendrocytes originate in restricted regions of the embryonic ventral neural tube. After migration to populate all areas of the brain and spinal cord, they undergo a temporally well-defined series of molecular and structural changes, ultimately culminating in the cessation of proliferation, and the elaboration of a highly complex myelin sheath. The emergence of microRNAs as potent regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level has broad implications in all facets of biology. Recent studies have demonstrated a critical role of microRNAs in oligodendrocyte development, including cell proliferation, maturation, and myelin formation. In this review, we will highlight and discuss the recent understanding of functional links of miRNAs to regulatory networks for central myelination, as well as perspectives on the role of miRNAs in demyelinating diseases.

  7. Oligodendrocyte Injury and Pathogenesis of HIV-1-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes wrap neuronal axons to form myelin, an insulating sheath which is essential for nervous impulse conduction along axons. Axonal myelination is highly regulated by neuronal and astrocytic signals and the maintenance of myelin sheaths is a very complex process. Oligodendrocyte damage can cause axonal demyelination and neuronal injury, leading to neurological disorders. Demyelination in the cerebrum may produce cognitive impairment in a variety of neurological disorders, including human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. Although the combined antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of HIV-1-associated dementia, a severe form of HAND, milder forms of HAND remain prevalent even when the peripheral viral load is well controlled. HAND manifests as a subcortical dementia with damage in the brain white matter (e.g., corpus callosum, which consists of myelinated axonal fibers. How HIV-1 brain infection causes myelin injury and resultant white matter damage is an interesting area of current HIV research. In this review, we tentatively address recent progress on oligodendrocyte dysregulation and HAND pathogenesis.

  8. Diazoxide promotes oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation and myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Fogal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clinical conditions are associated with white matter injury, including periventricular white matter injury (PWMI, which is a form of brain injury sustained by preterm infants. It has been suggested that white matter injury in this condition is due to altered oligodendrocyte (OL development or death, resulting in OL loss and hypomyelination. At present drugs are not available that stimulate OL proliferation and promote myelination. Evidence suggests that depolarizing stimuli reduces OL proliferation and differentiation, whereas agents that hyperpolarize OLs stimulate OL proliferation and differentiation. Considering that the drug diazoxide activates K(ATP channels to hyperpolarize cells, we tested if this compound could influence OL proliferation and myelination. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Studies were performed using rat oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC cultures, cerebellar slice cultures, and an in vivo model of PWMI in which newborn mice were exposed to chronic sublethal hypoxia (10% O(2. We found that K(ATP channel components Kir 6.1 and 6.2 and SUR2 were expressed in oligodendrocytes. Additionally, diazoxide potently stimulated OPC proliferation, as did other K(ATP activators. Diazoxide also stimulated myelination in cerebellar slice cultures. We also found that diazoxide prevented hypomyelination and ventriculomegaly following chronic sublethal hypoxia. CONCLUSIONS: These results identify KATP channel components in OLs and show that diazoxide can stimulate OL proliferation in vitro. Importantly we find that diazoxide can promote myelination in vivo and prevent hypoxia-induced PWMI.

  9. Oligodendrocyte Injury and Pathogenesis of HIV-1-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Xu, Enquan; Liu, Jianuo; Xiong, Huangui

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes wrap neuronal axons to form myelin, an insulating sheath which is essential for nervous impulse conduction along axons. Axonal myelination is highly regulated by neuronal and astrocytic signals and the maintenance of myelin sheaths is a very complex process. Oligodendrocyte damage can cause axonal demyelination and neuronal injury, leading to neurological disorders. Demyelination in the cerebrum may produce cognitive impairment in a variety of neurological disorders, including human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1)-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Although the combined antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of HIV-1-associated dementia, a severe form of HAND, milder forms of HAND remain prevalent even when the peripheral viral load is well controlled. HAND manifests as a subcortical dementia with damage in the brain white matter (e.g., corpus callosum), which consists of myelinated axonal fibers. How HIV-1 brain infection causes myelin injury and resultant white matter damage is an interesting area of current HIV research. In this review, we tentatively address recent progress on oligodendrocyte dysregulation and HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27455335

  10. Increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by morphine-sensitization in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Mehdi; Farahmandfar, Maryam; Ranjbar, Faezeh Esmaeli; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-07-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse, such as morphine, elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect long-lasting changes in some of the important molecules involved in memory processing such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In the present study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression of α and β isoforms and activity of CaMKII in the hippocampus of male rats. Animals were treated for 3 days with saline or morphine (20mg/kg) and following a washout period of 5 days, a challenge dose of morphine (5mg/kg) were administered. The results indicate that morphine administration in pre-treated animals produces behavioral sensitization, as determined by significant increase in locomotion and oral stereotypy behavior. In addition, repeated morphine treatment increased mRNA expression of both α and β isoforms of CaMKII in the hippocampus. The present study also showed that induction of morphine sensitization significantly increased both Ca2+/calmodulin-independent and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent activities of CaMK II in the rat hippocampus. However, acute administration of morphine (5mg/kg) did not alter either α and β CaMKII mRNA expression or CaMKII activity in the hippocampus. The stimulation effects of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression and activity of CaMKII were completely abolished by administration of naloxone, 30min prior to s.c. injections of morphine (20mg/kg/day×3 days). Our data demonstrated that induction of morphine sensitization could effectively modulate the activity and the mRNA expression of CaMKII in the hippocampus and this effect of morphine was exerted by the activation of opioid receptors.

  11. Biochemical subtypes of oligodendrocyte in the anterior medullary velum of the rat as revealed by the monoclonal antibody Rip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, A M; Ibrahim, M; Ruge, F M; Berry, M

    1995-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes were studied in the anterior medullary velum (AMV) of the rat using the monoclonal antibody Rip, an oligodendrocyte marker of unknown function. Confocal microscopic imaging of double immunofluorescent labelling with antibodies to Rip and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) revealed two biochemically and morphologically distinct populations of oligodendrocyte which were either Rip+CAII+ or Rip+CAII-. Double immunofluorescent labelling with Rip and myelin basic protein (MBP) or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) provided direct evidence that Rip-labelled cells were phenotypically oligodendrocytes and confirmed that Rip did not recognise astrocytes. Oligodendrocytes which were Rip+CAII+ supported numerous myelin sheaths for small diameter axons, whilst Rip+CAII- oligodendrocytes supported fewer myelin sheaths for large diameter axons. Morphologically, Rip+CAII+ oligodendrocytes corresponded to types I or II of classical nomenclature, whilst Rip+CAII- oligodendrocytes corresponded to types III and IV. The results demonstrated a biochemical difference between oligodendrocytes which myelinated small and large diameter fibres.

  12. Increasing trend of sensitization to Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Maria Antonieta Rios; Rocha, Vanessa Barreto

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have shown increased sensitization to Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone. We report a retrospective study conducted at the Hospital das Clínicas - UFMG, based on the results of patch tests with the Brazilian standard series, performed on referred patients. The positive results in 359 patients from November 2009 to October 2012 were analyzed and compared with the previous data collected from March 2006 to October 2009 (447 patients). The data showed 11.14% sensitization to Methylchloroisothiazolinone/ methylisothiazolinone during 2009-2012, contrasting with the previous period (3.35%). A positive association was found between its positivity and the period of 2009-2012. PMID:24937839

  13. Increasing trend of sensitization to Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Maria Antonieta Rios; Rocha, Vanessa Barreto

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have shown increased sensitization to Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone. We report a retrospective study conducted at the Hospital das Clínicas--UFMG, based on the results of patch tests with the Brazilian standard series, performed on referred patients. The positive results in 359 patients from November 2009 to October 2012 were analyzed and compared with the previous data collected from March 2006 to October 2009 (447 patients). The data showed 11.14% sensitization to Methylchloroisothiazolinone/ methylisothiazolinone during 2009-2012, contrasting with the previous period (3.35%). A positive association was found between its positivity and the period of 2009-2012.

  14. mTOR: a link from the extracellular milieu to transcriptional regulation of oligodendrocyte development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L. Wood

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte development is controlled by numerous extracellular signals that regulate a series of transcription factors that promote the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to myelinating cells in the central nervous system. A major element of this regulatory system that has only recently been studied is the intracellular signalling from surface receptors to transcription factors to down-regulate inhibitors and up-regulate inducers of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. The current review focuses on one such pathway: the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, which integrates signals in many cell systems and induces cell responses including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. This review describes the known functions of mTOR as they relate to oligodendrocyte development, and its recently discovered impact on oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. A potential model for its role in oligodendrocyte development is proposed.

  15. mTOR: A Link from the Extracellular Milieu to Transcriptional Regulation of Oligodendrocyte Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L. Wood

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte development is controlled by numerous extracellular signals that regulate a series of transcription factors that promote the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to myelinating cells in the central nervous system. A major element of this regulatory system that has only recently been studied is the intracellular signalling from surface receptors to transcription factors to down-regulate inhibitors and up-regulate inducers of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. The current review focuses on one such pathway: the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, which integrates signals in many cell systems and induces cell responses including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. This review describes the known functions of mTOR as they relate to oligodendrocyte development, and its recently discovered impact on oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. A potential model for its role in oligodendrocyte development is proposed.

  16. Telomerase antagonist imetelstat increases radiation sensitivity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuping; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Sijun; Kuang, Zhihui; Tan, Guolei; Yang, Gang; Wei, Qichun; Guo, Zhigang

    2017-01-13

    The morbidity and mortality of esophageal cancer is one of the highest around the world and the principal therapeutic method is radiation. Thus, searching for sensitizers with lower toxicity and higher efficiency to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy is critical essential. Our research group has previously reported that imetelstat, the thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide inhibitor of telomerase, can decrease cell proliferation and colony formation ability as well as increase DNA breaks induced by radiation in esophageal cancer cells. Further study in this project showed that imetelstat significantly sensitized esophageal cancer cells to radiation in vitro. Later study showed that imetelstat leads to increased cell apoptosis. We also measured the expression level of several DNA repair and apoptosis signaling proteins. pS345 CHK1, γ-H2AX, p53 and caspase3 expression were up-regulated in imetelstat treated cells, identifying these factors as molecular markers. Mouse in vivo model using imetelstat at clinically achievable concentrations and fractionated irradiation scheme yielded results demonstrating radiosensitization effect. Finally, TUNEL assay, caspase 3 and Ki67 staining in tumor tissue proved that imetelstat sensitized esophageal cancer to radiation in vivo through promoting cell apoptosis and inhibiting cell proliferation. Our study supported imetelstat increase radiation sensitivity of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma through inducing cell apoptosis and the specific inhibitor of telomerase might serve as a potential novel therapeutic tool for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma therapy.

  17. Increasing measurement sensitivity for the electron's electric dipole moment using trapped molecular ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Gresh, Daniel; Cairncross, William; Grau, Matt; Ng, Kia Boon; Ni, Yiqi; Cornell, Eric; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Based on our latest measurements of the electron's electric dipole moment (eEDM) using trapped HfF+ ions, after 100 hours of data collection, the statistical error still dominates in our overall uncertainty budget. Overcoming the bottleneck of limited statistical sensitivity can increase the precision of the eEDM measurement directly. Here, we present the progress of three ongoing experiments: (1) applying STImulated Raman Adiabatic Passage (STIRAP) with rotating linear polarization for increased coherent population transfer from the ground X1Σ+ state to the eEDM-sensitive 3Δ1 state; (2) implementing a new ion-counting detector toward shot-noise limited sensitivity with significant suppression technical noise; (3) exploring the possibility of using the ground 3Δ1 state of ThF+ ions to realize a larger effective electric field and a longer coherence time. These experiments provide a route towards an order of magnitude increase in statistical sensitivity in the second generation of measurements.

  18. Stochasticity in Ca2+ increase in spines enables robust and sensitive information coding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Koumura

    Full Text Available A dendritic spine is a very small structure (∼0.1 µm3 of a neuron that processes input timing information. Why are spines so small? Here, we provide functional reasons; the size of spines is optimal for information coding. Spines code input timing information by the probability of Ca2+ increases, which makes robust and sensitive information coding possible. We created a stochastic simulation model of input timing-dependent Ca2+ increases in a cerebellar Purkinje cell's spine. Spines used probability coding of Ca2+ increases rather than amplitude coding for input timing detection via stochastic facilitation by utilizing the small number of molecules in a spine volume, where information per volume appeared optimal. Probability coding of Ca2+ increases in a spine volume was more robust against input fluctuation and more sensitive to input numbers than amplitude coding of Ca2+ increases in a cell volume. Thus, stochasticity is a strategy by which neurons robustly and sensitively code information.

  19. Effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes: evidence for increased muscle spindle sensitivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horslen, Brian C; Murnaghan, Chantelle D; Inglis, J Timothy; Chua, Romeo; Carpenter, Mark G

    2013-08-01

    Standing balance is often threatened in everyday life. These threats typically involve scenarios in which either the likelihood or the consequence of falling is higher than normal. When cats are placed in these scenarios they respond by increasing the sensitivity of muscle spindles imbedded in the leg muscles, presumably to increase balance-relevant afferent information available to the nervous system. At present, it is unknown whether humans also respond to such postural threats by altering muscle spindle sensitivity. Here we present two studies that probed the effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes. In study 1 we manipulated the threat associated with an increased consequence of a fall by having subjects stand at the edge of an elevated surface (3.2 m). In study 2 we manipulated the threat by increasing the likelihood of a fall by occasionally tilting the support surface on which subjects stood. In both scenarios we used Hoffmann (H) and tendon stretch (T) reflexes to probe the spinal stretch reflex circuit of the soleus muscle. We observed increased T-reflex amplitudes and unchanged H-reflex amplitudes in both threat scenarios. These results suggest that the synaptic state of the spinal stretch reflex is unaffected by postural threat and that therefore the muscle spindles activated in the T-reflexes must be more sensitive in the threatening conditions. We propose that this increase in sensitivity may function to satisfy the conflicting needs to restrict movement with threat, while maintaining a certain amount of sensory information related to postural control.

  20. Complex interactions between climate change and toxicants: evidence that temperature variability increases sensitivity to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberly, David A; Salice, Christopher J

    2014-07-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projects that global climate change will have significant impacts on environmental conditions including potential effects on sensitivity of organisms to environmental contaminants. The objective of this study was to test the climate-induced toxicant sensitivity (CITS) hypothesis in which acclimation to altered climate parameters increases toxicant sensitivity. Adult Physa pomilia snails were acclimated to a near optimal 22 °C or a high-normal 28 °C for 28 days. After 28 days, snails from each temperature group were challenged with either low (150 μg/L) or high (300 μg/L) cadmium at each temperature (28 or 22 °C). In contrast to the CITS hypothesis, we found that acclimation temperature did not have a strong influence on cadmium sensitivity except at the high cadmium test concentration where snails acclimated to 28 °C were more cadmium tolerant. However, snails that experienced a switch in temperature for the cadmium challenge, regardless of the switch direction, were the most sensitive to cadmium. Within the snails that were switched between temperatures, snails acclimated at 28 °C and then exposed to high cadmium at 22 °C exhibited significantly greater mortality than those snails acclimated to 22 °C and then exposed to cadmium at 28 °C. Our results point to the importance of temperature variability in increasing toxicant sensitivity but also suggest a potentially complex cost of temperature acclimation. Broadly, the type of temporal stressor exposures we simulated may reduce overall plasticity in responses to stress ultimately rendering populations more vulnerable to adverse effects.

  1. Inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor increases the sensitivity of thrombin generation assay to procoagulant microvesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheldof, Damien; Mullier, François; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Chatelain, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Patients with cancer have a seven-fold to 10-fold increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Circulating microvesicles could be a predictive biomarker for VTE in cancer. Thrombin generation assay (TGA) is a useful technique to detect procoagulant activity of microvesicles. However, TGA suffers from a lack of sensitivity due to the presence of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in plasma. The aim of the study was to improve the sensitivity of TGA to tissue factor by limiting the interference of TFPI. Serial dilutions of MDA-MB231 cells were incubated for 45 min at 37°C to generate microvesicles. Samples were then centrifuged and supernatants that contain microvesicles were used for TGA. Normal pooled plasma was incubated with inhibitor of TFPI or was diluted twice to decrease plasma level of TFPI. Lagtime was used as a surrogate marker of TGA to detect procoagulant activity of microvesicles. Inhibition of TFPI decreased twice the cell concentration needed for a significant reduction of lagtime and decreased 2.4-fold the intraassay variability. Plasma dilution had no impact on the TGA sensitivity when TGA was triggered by microvesicles derived from MDA-MB-231. Thrombin generation is a very sensitive method to study the procoagulant activity of tissue factor bearing microvesicles. The sensitivity can be increased by inhibition of TFPI with specific monoclonal antibody against its Kunitz domain I. A two times plasma dilution is an interesting cheaper alternative to study the procoagulant activity of microvesicles by TGA with a good sensitivity, especially when low plasma quantities are available.

  2. Increased photic sensitivity for phase resetting but not melatonin suppression in Siberian hamsters under short photoperiods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, G L; Harrison, E M; Elliott, J A; Gorman, M R

    2014-03-01

    Light regulates a variety of behavioral and physiological processes, including activity rhythms and hormone secretory patterns. Seasonal changes in the proportion of light in a day (photoperiod) further modulate those functions. Recently, short (SP) versus long days (LP) were found to markedly increase light sensitivity for phase shifting in Syrian hamsters. To our knowledge, photoperiod effects on light sensitivity have not been studied in other rodents, nor is it known if they generalize to other circadian responses. We tested whether photic phase shifting and melatonin suppression vary in Siberian hamsters maintained under LP or SP. Select irradiances of light were administered, and shifts in activity were determined. Photic sensitivity for melatonin suppression was examined in a separate group of animals via pulses of light across a 4 log-unit photon density range, with post-pulse plasma melatonin levels determined via RIA. Phase shifting and melatonin suppression were greater at higher irradiances for both LP and SP. The lower irradiance condition was below threshold for phase shifts in LP but not SP. Melatonin suppression did not vary by photoperiod, and the half saturation constant for fitted sigmoid curves was similar under LP and SP. Thus, the photoperiodic modulation of light sensitivity for phase shifting is conserved across two hamster genera. The dissociation of photoperiod effects on photic phase shifting and melatonin suppression suggests that the modulation of sensitivity occurs downstream of the common retinal input pathway. Understanding the mechanistic basis for this plasticity may yield therapeutic targets for optimizing light therapy practices.

  3. Transplanted microvascular endothelial cells promote oligodendrocyte precursor cell survival in ischemic demyelinating lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Keiya; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Puentes, Sandra; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2015-11-01

    We previously showed that transplantation of brain microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) greatly stimulated remyelination in the white matter infarct of the internal capsule (IC) induced by endothelin-1 injection and improved the behavioral outcome. In the present study, we examined the effect of MVEC transplantation on the infarct volume using intermittent magnetic resonance image and on the behavior of oligodendrocyte lineage cells histochemically. Our results in vivo show that MVEC transplantation reduced the infarct volume in IC and apoptotic death of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). These results indicate that MVECs have a survival effect on OPCs, and this effect might contribute to the recovery of the white matter infarct. The conditioned-medium from cultured MVECs reduced apoptosis of cultured OPCs, while the conditioned medium from cultured fibroblasts did not show such effect. These results suggest a possibility that transplanted MVECs increased the number of OPCs through the release of humoral factors that prevent their apoptotic death. Identification of such humoral factors may lead to the new therapeutic strategy against ischemic demyelinating diseases.

  4. Beta4 tubulin identifies a primitive cell source for oligodendrocytes in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuanshen; Chang, Ansi; Smith, Maria C; Won, Roy; Yin, Xinghua; Staugaitis, Susan M; Agamanolis, Dimitri; Kidd, Grahame J; Miller, Robert H; Trapp, Bruce D

    2009-06-17

    We have identified a novel population of cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the mammalian brain that expresses beta4 tubulin (betaT4) and has properties of primitive neuroectodermal cells. betaT4 cells are scattered throughout the SVZ of the lateral ventricles in adult human brain and are significantly increased in the SVZs bordering demyelinated white matter in multiple sclerosis brains. In human fetal brain, betaT4 cell densities peak during the latter stages of gliogenesis, which occurs in the SVZ of the lateral ventricles. betaT4 cells represent 95% of cells in neurospheres treated with the anti-mitotic agent Ara C. betaT4 cells produce oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes in vitro. We compared the myelinating potential of betaT4-positive cells with A2B5-positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cells after transplantation (25,000 cells) into postnatal day 3 (P3) myelin-deficient rat brains. At P20, the progeny of betaT4 cells myelinated up to 4 mm of the external capsule, which significantly exceeded that of transplanted A2B5-positive progenitor cells. Such extensive and rapid mature CNS cell generation by a relatively small number of transplanted cells provides in vivo support for the therapeutic potential of betaT4 cells. We propose that betaT4 cells are an endogenous cell source that can be recruited to promote neural repair in the adult telencephalon.

  5. Cannabidiol protects oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from inflammation-induced apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecha, M; Torrao, A S; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Mechoulam, R; Guaza, C

    2012-06-28

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is the most abundant cannabinoid in Cannabis sativa that has no psychoactive properties. CBD has been approved to treat inflammation, pain and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), of which demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss are hallmarks. Thus, we investigated the protective effects of CBD against the damage to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) mediated by the immune system. Doses of 1 μM CBD protect OPCs from oxidative stress by decreasing the production of reactive oxygen species. CBD also protects OPCs from apoptosis induced by LPS/IFNγ through the decrease of caspase 3 induction via mechanisms that do not involve CB1, CB2, TRPV1 or PPARγ receptors. Tunicamycin-induced OPC death was attenuated by CBD, suggesting a role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the mode of action of CBD. This protection against ER stress-induced apoptosis was associated with reduced phosphorylation of eiF2α, one of the initiators of the ER stress pathway. Indeed, CBD diminished the phosphorylation of PKR and eiF2α induced by LPS/IFNγ. The pro-survival effects of CBD in OPCs were accompanied by decreases in the expression of ER apoptotic effectors (CHOP, Bax and caspase 12), and increased expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. These findings suggest that attenuation of the ER stress pathway is involved in the 'oligoprotective' effects of CBD during inflammation.

  6. Differential proliferation rhythm of neural progenitor and oligodendrocyte precursor cells in the young adult hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs are a unique type of glial cells that function as oligodendrocyte progenitors while constantly proliferating in the normal condition from rodents to humans. However, the functional roles they play in the adult brain are largely unknown. In this study, we focus on the manner of OPC proliferation in the hippocampus of the young adult mice. Here we report that there are oscillatory dynamics in OPC proliferation that differ from neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ; the former showed S-phase and M-phase peaks in the resting and active periods, respectively, while the latter only exhibited M-phase peak in the active period. There is coincidence between different modes of proliferation and expression of cyclin proteins that are crucial for cell cycle; cyclin D1 is expressed in OPCs, while cyclin D2 is observed in neural stem cells. Similar to neurogenesis, the proliferation of hippocampal OPCs was enhanced by voluntary exercise that leads to an increase in neuronal activity in the hippocampus. These data suggest an intriguing control of OPC proliferation in the hippocampus.

  7. Increased sensitivity to Vinca alkaloids in cells overexpressing calmodulin by gene transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, M; Lagacé, L; Chafouleas, J G

    1990-10-15

    Mouse C127 cells, transfected with the chicken calmodulin (CaM) gene and overexpressing CaM protein, were used to evaluate the effect of elevated levels of CaM on the sensitivity of these cells to various anticancer drugs. Clones C2 and C3 overexpress CaM mRNA by 40- and 80-fold, respectively, and CaM protein 3- and 8-fold, respectively. These cell lines were tested for their sensitivity to vincristine, vinblastine, bleomycin, and Adriamycin by comparing the 50% inhibitory concentration in a 72-h growth inhibition assay. The 50% inhibitory concentration values for vincristine with C2 and C3 cells were 6.27 +/- 0.56 nM and 6.60 +/- 0.96 nM, respectively. These values were significantly lower than 13.9 +/- 0.79 nM for the parental C127 cells and 14.0 +/- 1.55 nM for clone 6.8 (the control cell line for transfection without the chicken CaM gene) at P less than or equal to 0.005. The proliferation of C2 and C3 cells was inhibited at lower concentrations of vinblastine as well. The 50% inhibitory concentration values for the C2 and C3 cell lines were approximately one-half those required for C127 or clone 6.8 cells. However, no significant difference in the sensitivity to the DNA-binding drugs, bleomycin and Adriamycin, was observed between the different cell lines. The uptake of [3H]vinblastine was evaluated and found to be increased 1.6- and 2.8-fold in C2 and C3 cells, respectively, as compared with that value obtained for C127 cells. Moreover, the efflux of [3H]vinblastine from vinblastine-loaded cells was also observed to be decreased in the C2 and C3 cell lines. These data suggest that the increase in CaM expression in the C2 and C3 cell lines might be related to the higher sensitivity of these cells to Vinca alkaloids. This increased sensitivity appears to be due to the increase in intracellular concentration of the Vinca alkaloids as a result of an increase in drug uptake and a decrease in efflux. Moreover, the increased sensitivity of clones C2 and C3 to Vinca

  8. Regulation of the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation:mechanisms and perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Huang; Xiao-Feng Zhao; Kang Zheng; Mengsheng Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Axonal myelination is an essential process for normal functioning of the vertebrate central nervous system.Proper formation of myelin sheaths around axons depends on the timely differentiation of oligodendrocytes.This differentiation occurs on a predictable schedule both in culture and during development.However,the timing mechanisms for oligodendrocyte differentiation during normal development have not been fully uncovered.Recent studies have identified a large number of regulatory factors,including cell-intrinsic factors and extracellular signals,that could control the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation.Here we provide a mechanistic and critical review of the timing control of oligodendrocyte differentiation.

  9. Fyn tyrosine kinase regulates oligodendroglial cell development but is not required for morphological differentiation of oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, B R; McMorris, F A

    2001-02-15

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase Fyn, which is a member of the Src family of kinases, has been shown to be essential for normal myelination and has been suggested to play a role in oligodendrocyte development. However, oligodendrocyte development has not been studied directly in cells lacking Fyn. Additionally, because Fyn is expressed in neurons as well as oligodendrocytes, it is possible that normal myelination requires Fyn expression in neurons but not in oligodendrocytes. To address these issues, we analyzed the development of oligodendrocytes in neuron-free glial cell cultures from fyn(-/-) mice that express no Fyn protein. We observed that oligodendrocytes develop to the stage where they elaborate an extensive network of membranous processes and express the antigenic components of mature oligodendrocytes in the complete absence of Fyn. However, as compared with fyn(+/+) controls, fewer oligodendroglia developed in fyn(-/-) cell cultures, and a smaller proportion of them matured to the stage characterized by a high degree of morphological complexity. In addition, we found that insulin-like growth factor-I, a potent stimulator of oligodendrocyte development, failed to stimulate morphological maturation of fyn(-/-) oligodendroglia. The pyrazolopyrimidine PP2, believed to be a selective inhibitor of Fyn, did not prevent the development of morphologically complex oligodendrocytes. Unexpectedly, however, it was toxic to both fyn(+/+) and fyn(-/-) glial cells, indicating that this class of inhibitors can have significant effects that are independent of Fyn.

  10. PCM1 Depletion Inhibits Glioblastoma Cell Ciliogenesis and Increases Cell Death and Sensitivity to Temozolomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan B. Hoang-Minh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the molecules implicated in the growth and survival of glioblastoma (GBM cells and their response to temozolomide (TMZ, the standard-of-care chemotherapeutic agent, is necessary for the development of new therapies that would improve the outcome of current GBM treatments. In this study, we characterize the role of pericentriolar material 1 (PCM1, a component of centriolar satellites surrounding centrosomes, in GBM cell proliferation and sensitivity to genotoxic agents such as TMZ. We show that PCM1 is expressed around centrioles and ciliary basal bodies in patient GBM biopsies and derived cell lines and that its localization is dynamic throughout the cell cycle. To test whether PCM1 mediates GBM cell proliferation and/or response to TMZ, we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to generate primary GBM cell lines depleted of PCM1. These PCM1-depleted cells displayed reduced AZI1 satellite protein localization and significantly decreased proliferation, which was attributable to increased apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, PCM1-depleted lines were more sensitive to TMZ toxicity than control lines. The increase in TMZ sensitivity may be partly due to the reduced ability of PCM1-depleted cells to form primary cilia, as depletion of KIF3A also ablated GBM cells' ciliogenesis and increased their sensitivity to TMZ while preserving PCM1 localization. In addition, the co-depletion of KIF3A and PCM1 did not have any additive effect on TMZ sensitivity. Together, our data suggest that PCM1 plays multiple roles in GBM pathogenesis and that associated pathways could be targeted to augment current or future anti-GBM therapies.

  11. Competition increases sensitivity of wheat (Triticum aestivum to biotic plant-soil feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W H Gera Hol

    Full Text Available Plant-soil feedback (PSF and plant competition play an important role in structuring vegetation composition, but their interaction remains unclear. Recent studies suggest that competing plants could dilute pathogenic effects, whereas the standing view is that competition may increase the sensitivity of the focal plant to PSF. In agro-ecosystems each of these two options would yield contrasting outcomes: reduced versus enhanced effects of weeds on crop biomass production. To test the effect of competition on sensitivity to PSF, we grew Triticum aestivum (Common wheat with and without competition from a weed community composed of Vicia villosa, Chenopodium album and Myosotis arvensis. Plants were grown in sterilized soil, with or without living field inoculum from 4 farms in the UK. In the conditioning phase, field inocula had both positive and negative effects on T. aestivum shoot biomass, depending on farm. In the feedback phase the differences between shoot biomass in T. aestivum monoculture on non-inoculated and inoculated soils had mostly disappeared. However, T. aestivum plants growing in mixtures in the feedback phase were larger on non-inoculated soil than on inoculated soil. Hence, T. aestivum was more sensitive to competition when the field soil biota was present. This was supported by the statistically significant negative correlation between shoot biomass of weeds and T. aestivum, which was absent on sterilized soil. In conclusion, competition in cereal crop-weed systems appears to increase cereal crop sensitivity to soil biota.

  12. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: questions still to be answered despite increasing awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Caio, Giacomo; Tovoli, Francesco; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2013-09-01

    Recently, the increasing number of patients worldwide who are sensitive to dietary gluten without evidence of celiac disease or wheat allergy has contributed to the identification of a new gluten-related syndrome defined as non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Our knowledge regarding this syndrome is still lacking, and many aspects of this syndrome remain unknown. Its pathogenesis is heterogeneous, with a recognized pivotal role for innate immunity; many other factors also contribute, including low-grade intestinal inflammation, increased intestinal barrier function and changes in the intestinal microbiota. Gluten and other wheat proteins, such as amylase trypsin inhibitors, are the primary triggers of this syndrome, but it has also been hypothesized that a diet rich in fermentable monosaccharides and polyols may elicit its functional gastrointestinal symptoms. The epidemiology of this condition is far from established; its prevalence in the general population is highly variable, ranging from 0.63% to 6%. From a clinical point of view, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is characterized by a wide array of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms that occur shortly after the ingestion of gluten and improve or disappear when gluten is withdrawn from the diet. These symptoms recur when gluten is reintroduced. Because diagnostic biomarkers have not yet been identified, a double-blind placebo-controlled gluten challenge is currently the diagnostic method with the highest accuracy. Future research is needed to generate more knowledge regarding non-celiac gluten sensitivity, a condition that has global acceptance but has only a few certainties and many unresolved issues.

  13. Competition increases sensitivity of wheat (Triticum aestivum) to biotic plant-soil feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, W H Gera; de Boer, Wietse; ten Hooven, Freddy; van der Putten, Wim H

    2013-01-01

    Plant-soil feedback (PSF) and plant competition play an important role in structuring vegetation composition, but their interaction remains unclear. Recent studies suggest that competing plants could dilute pathogenic effects, whereas the standing view is that competition may increase the sensitivity of the focal plant to PSF. In agro-ecosystems each of these two options would yield contrasting outcomes: reduced versus enhanced effects of weeds on crop biomass production. To test the effect of competition on sensitivity to PSF, we grew Triticum aestivum (Common wheat) with and without competition from a weed community composed of Vicia villosa, Chenopodium album and Myosotis arvensis. Plants were grown in sterilized soil, with or without living field inoculum from 4 farms in the UK. In the conditioning phase, field inocula had both positive and negative effects on T. aestivum shoot biomass, depending on farm. In the feedback phase the differences between shoot biomass in T. aestivum monoculture on non-inoculated and inoculated soils had mostly disappeared. However, T. aestivum plants growing in mixtures in the feedback phase were larger on non-inoculated soil than on inoculated soil. Hence, T. aestivum was more sensitive to competition when the field soil biota was present. This was supported by the statistically significant negative correlation between shoot biomass of weeds and T. aestivum, which was absent on sterilized soil. In conclusion, competition in cereal crop-weed systems appears to increase cereal crop sensitivity to soil biota.

  14. ACTH-like peptides increase pain sensitivity and antagonize opiate analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heybach, J. P.; Vernikos, J.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the pituitary and of ACTH in pain sensitivity was investigated in the rat. Pain sensitivity was assessed by measuring paw-lick and jump latencies in response to being placed on a grid at 55 C. Hypophysectomy reduced pain sensitivity, and this effect was reversed by the intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of the opiate antagonist naloxone. Similarly, the analgesia produced by a dose of morphine was antagonized by the administration of ACTH or alpha-MSH. The peripheral injection of ACTH or alpha-MSH in normal rats did not increase pain sensitivity. However, ACTH administered ICV increased pain sensivity within 10 min. The results indicate that the pituitary is the source of an endogenous opiate antagonist and hyperalgesic factor and that this factor is ACTH or an ACTH-like peptide. This activity resides in the N-terminal portion of the ACTH molecule since ACTH sub 4-10 is not active in this respect, nor does this activity require a free N-terminal serine since alpha-MSH appears to be almost as potent as the ACTH sub 1-24 peptide. It is concluded that ACTH-like peptides of pituitary origin act as endogenous hyperalgesic and opiate antagonistic factors.

  15. Increased sensitivity to ET-1 in rat cerebral arteries following organ culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen-Schwartz, J; Edvinsson, L

    2000-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is recognized as being involved in the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular diseases. Using organ culture as a model for possible pathological changes we studied changes in ET(A) and ETB receptor function using a sensitive in vitro method. We observed an up-regulation of the ET......(B) receptor and an amazingly increased sensitivity to ET-1 by 3 log units in pEC50; pEC50(fresh) was 8.7 +/- 0.1, and pEC50(cultured) was 11.7 +/- 0.3. pA2 for FR139317 in the fresh vessel was 7.0 +/- 0.2 whereas it could not be obtained for the cultured vessel, indicating a possible cross-talk between the ET......(A) and ET(B) receptors. The increased sensitivity to ET-1 could also take place during cerebrovascular disease such as stroke or haemorrhage rendering the vessels considerably more sensitive to ET-1....

  16. Fibrinogen γ' increases the sensitivity to activated protein C in normal and factor V Leiden plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarova, Farida; Uitte de Willige, Shirley; Simioni, Paolo; Ariëns, Robert A S; Bertina, Rogier M; Rosing, Jan; Castoldi, Elisabetta

    2014-08-28

    Activated protein C (APC) resistance, often associated with the factor V (FV) Leiden mutation, is the most common risk factor for venous thrombosis. We observed increased APC resistance in carriers of fibrinogen γ gene (FGG) haplotype 2, which is associated with reduced levels of the alternatively spliced fibrinogen γ' chain. This finding prompted us to study the effects of fibrinogen and its γ' chain on APC resistance. Fibrinogen, and particularly the γA/γ' isoform, improved the response of plasma to added APC in the thrombin generation-based assay. Similarly, a synthetic peptide mimicking the C-terminus of the fibrinogen γ' chain, which binds thrombin and inhibits its activities, greatly increased the APC sensitivity of normal and FV Leiden plasma, likely due to its ability to inhibit thrombin-mediated activation of FV and FVIII. Although the fibrinogen γ' peptide also inhibited protein C activation by the thrombin/thrombomodulin complex, it still increased the sensitivity of plasma to endogenously formed APC when thrombin generation was measured in the presence of soluble thrombomodulin. We conclude that fibrinogen, and particularly fibrinogen γ', increases plasma APC sensitivity. The fibrinogen γ' peptide might form the basis for pharmacologic interventions to counteract APC resistance. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. d-LSD-induced c-Fos expression occurs in a population of oligodendrocytes in rat prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissig, Chad J; Rabin, Richard A; Winter, Jerrold C; Dlugos, Cynthia A

    2008-03-31

    Induction of mRNA or protein for immediate-early genes, such as c-fos, is used to identify brain areas, specific cell types, and neuronal circuits that become activated in response to various stimuli including psychoactive drugs. The objective of the present study was to identify the cell types in the prefrontal cortex in which lysergic acid diethylamide (d-LSD) induces c-Fos expression. Systemic administration of d-LSD resulted in a dose-dependent increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity. Although c-Fos-positive cells were found in all cortical layers, they were most numerous in layers III, IV, and V. d-LSD-induced c-Fos immunoreactivity was found in cells co-labeled with anti-neuron-specific enolase or anti-oligodendrocyte Oligo1. The Oligo1-labeled cells had small, round bodies and nuclear diameters characteristic of oligodendrocytes. Studies using confocal microscopy confirmed colocalization of c-Fos-labeled nuclei in NeuN-labeled neurons. Astrocytes and microglia labeled with glial fibrillary acidic protein antibody and OX-42 antibody, respectively, did not display LSD-induced c-Fos expression. Pyramidal neurons labeled with anti-neurofilament antibody also did not show induction of c-Fos immunoreactivity after systemic d-LSD administration. The present study demonstrates that d-LSD induced expression of c-Fos in the prefrontal cortex occurs in subpopulations of neurons and in oligodendrocytes, but not in pyramidal neurons, astrocytes, and microglia.

  18. Dual-arm multiple-reflection Michelson interferometer for large multiple reflections and increased sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joenathan, Charles; Bernal, Ashley; Woonghee, Youn; Bunch, Robert M.; Hakoda, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Michelson interferometer is one of the most popular optical interferometric systems used in optical metrology. Typically, Michelson interferometers are used to measure object displacement with wavefront shapes to one half of the laser wavelength. As testing components and device sizes reduce to micro and nano size, a sensitivity of half the wavelength of light cannot be used to measure several hundred picometer displacement. Multiple-reflection interferometers have been proposed and are used to increase the sensitivity in a Michelson interferometer; however, when altering the number of reflections, the system alignment becomes cumbersome. We describe some of the problems associated with the current multiple-reflection interferometer and introduce a setup for matching path lengths to increase the resolution and allow for the reduction of the stringent requirement on the coherence length of the lasers used. Theoretically, we show that more than 1000 reflections can be achieved. Experimental results of up to 100 reflections are presented in this paper.

  19. Voltage-Sensitive Load Controllers for Voltage Regulation and Increased Load Factor in Distribution Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglass, Philip James; Garcia-Valle, Rodrigo; Østergaard, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    consumption which can be mapped to temperature setpoint offsets of thermostat controlled loads. In networks where a lower voltage level corresponds to high system load (and vice versa), this controller acts to regulate voltage and increase the load factor. Simulations are conducted on low- and medium-voltage......This paper presents a novel controller design for controlling appliances based on local measurements of voltage. The controller finds the normalized voltage deviation accounting for the sensitivity of voltage measurements to appliance state. The controller produces a signal indicating desired power...... distribution systems with residential loads including voltage-sensitive water heaters. In low-voltage systems, the results of the simulations show the controller to be effective at reducing the extremes of voltage and increasing the load factor while respecting end-use temperature constraints. In medium-voltage...

  20. Increased activin bioavailability enhances hepatic insulin sensitivity while inducing hepatic steatosis in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerleider, Nathan A; Bonomi, Lara M; Brown, Melissa L; Schneyer, Alan L

    2013-06-01

    The development of insulin resistance is tightly linked to fatty liver disease and is considered a major health concern worldwide, although their mechanistic relationship remains controversial. Activin has emerging roles in nutrient homeostasis, but its metabolic effects on hepatocytes remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of increased endogenous activin bioactivity on hepatic nutrient homeostasis by creating mice with inactivating mutations that deplete the circulating activin antagonists follistatin-like-3 (FSTL3) or the follistatin 315 isoform (FST315; FST288-only mice). We investigated liver histology and lipid content, hepatic insulin sensitivity, and metabolic gene expression including the HepG2 cell and primary hepatocyte response to activin treatment. Both FSTL3-knockout and FST288-only mice had extensive hepatic steatosis and elevated hepatic triglyceride content. Unexpectedly, insulin signaling, as assessed by phospho-Akt (a.k.a. protein kinase B), was enhanced in both mouse models. Pretreatment of HepG2 cells with activin A increased their response to subsequent insulin challenge. Gene expression analysis suggests that increased lipid uptake, enhanced de novo lipid synthesis, decreased lipolysis, and/or enhanced glucose uptake contribute to increased hepatic triglyceride content in these models. However, activin treatment recapitulated only some of these gene changes, suggesting that increased activin bioactivity may be only partially responsible for this phenotype. Nevertheless, our results indicate that activin enhances hepatocyte insulin response, which ultimately leads to hepatic steatosis despite the increased insulin sensitivity. Thus, regulation of activin bioactivity is critical for maintaining normal liver lipid homeostasis and response to insulin, whereas activin agonists may be useful for increasing liver insulin sensitivity.

  1. A continuous-flow ATP amplification system for increasing the sensitivity of quantitative bioluminescence assay

    OpenAIRE

    Satoh, Tetsuya; Shinoda, Yasuharu; Alexandrov, Maxym; Kuroda, Akio; Murakami, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a novel ATP amplification reactor using a continuous-flow system, and this allowed us to increase the sensitivity of quantitative bioluminescence assay by controlling the number of ATP amplification cycles. We previously developed a bioluminescence assay coupled with ATP amplification using a batch system. However, it was difficult to control the number of amplification cycles. In this study, ATP amplification was performed using a continuous-flow system, and significant linear...

  2. Central melanocortin stimulation increases phosphorylated perilipin A and hormone-sensitive lipase in adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Y B; Vaughan, C H; Smith, B J; Song, C K; Baro, D J; Bartness, T J

    2010-07-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) released from the sympathetic nerves innervating white adipose tissue (WAT) is the principal initiator of lipolysis in mammals. Central WAT sympathetic outflow neurons express melanocortin 4-receptor (MC4-R) mRNA. Single central injection of melanotan II (MTII; MC3/4-R agonist) nonuniformly increases WAT NE turnover (NETO), increases interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) NETO, and increases the circulating lipolytic products glycerol and free fatty acid. The WAT pads that contributed to this lipolysis were inferred from the increases in NETO. Because phosphorylation of perilipin A (p-perilipin A) and hormone-sensitive lipase are necessary for NE-triggered lipolysis, we tested whether MTII would increase these intracellular markers of lipolysis. Male Siberian hamsters received a single 3rd ventricular injection of MTII or saline. Trunk blood was collected at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 h postinjection from excised inguinal, retroperitoneal, and epididymal WAT (IWAT, RWAT, and EWAT, respectively) and IBAT pads. MTII increased circulating glycerol concentrations at 0.5 and 1.0 h, whereas free fatty acid concentrations were increased at 1.0 and 2.0 h. Western blot analysis showed that MTII specifically increased p-perilipin A and hormone-sensitive lipase only in fat pads that previously had MTII-induced increases in NETO. Phosphorylation increased in IWAT at all time points and IBAT at 0.5 h, but not RWAT or EWAT at any time point. These results show for the first time in rodents that p-perilipin A can serve as an in vivo, fat pad-specific indictor of lipolysis and extend our previous findings showing that central melanocortin stimulation increases WAT lipolysis.

  3. The Proton-Activated Receptor GPR4 Modulates Glucose Homeostasis by Increasing Insulin Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Giudici

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The proton-activated G protein-coupled receptor GPR4 is expressed in many tissues including white adipose tissue. GPR4 is activated by extracellular protons in the physiological pH range (i.e. pH 7.7 - 6.8 and is coupled to the production of cAMP. Methods: We examined mice lacking GPR4 and examined glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in young and aged mice as well as in mice fed with a high fat diet. Expression profiles of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in white adipose tissue, liver and skeletal muscle was assessed. Results: Here we show that mice lacking GPR4 have an improved intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and increased insulin sensitivity. Insulin levels were comparable but leptin levels were increased in GPR4 KO mice. Gpr4-/- showed altered expression of PPARα, IL-6, IL-10, TNFα, and TGF-1β in skeletal muscle, white adipose tissue, and liver. High fat diet abolished the differences in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity between Gpr4+/+ and Gpr4-/- mice. In contrast, in aged mice (12 months old, the positive effect of GPR4 deficiency on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity was maintained. Liver and adipose tissue showed no major differences in the mRNA expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory factors between aged mice of both genotypes. Conclusion: Thus, GPR4 deficiency improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. The effect may involve an altered balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors in insulin target tissues.

  4. Low-dose Simvastatin Increases Skeletal Muscle Sensitivity to Caffeine and Halothane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-lei Cui; Ying-lin Wang; Gang Tan; Ai-lun Luo; Xiang-yang Guo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the myotoxic side effects of statin simvastatin affect skeletal muscle’s sensitivity to caffeine and halothane. Methods Primary cultured neonate rat skeletal myotubes were treated with 0.01-5.0μmol/L simvastatin for 48 hours. MTT was used to evaluate cellular viability. The gross morphology and microstructure of the myotubes were observed with a light and electron microscope, respectively. The intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) at rest and in response to caffeine and halothane were investigated by fluorescence calcium imaging. Data were analyzed byanalysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Results Simvastatin (0.01-5.0μmol/L) decreased myotube viability, changed their morphological features and microstructure, and increased the resting [Ca2+]i in a dose-dependent manner. Simvastatin did not change myotube’s sensitivity to low doses of caffeine (0.625-2.5 mmol/L) or halothane (1.0-5.0 mmol/L). In response to high-dose caffeine (10.0 mmol/L, 20.0 mmol/L) and halothane (20.0 mmol/L, 40.0 mmol/L), myotubes treated with 0.01μmol/L simvastatin showed a significant increase in sensitivity, but those treated with 1.0μmol/L and 5.0μmol/L simvastatin showed a significant decrease. The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ storage peaked in the myotubes treated with 0.01μmol/L simvastatin, but it decreased when cells were treated with higher doses of simvastatin (0.1-5.0μmol/L). Conclusions The myotoxic side effect of simvastatin was found to change the sensitivity of myotubes in response to high-dose caffeine and halothane. When dose was low, sensitivity increased mainly because of increased Ca2+ content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which might explain why some individuals with statin-induced myotoxic symptoms may show positivecaffeine-halothane contracture test results. However, when the dose was high and the damage to the myotubes was severer, sensitivity was lower. It is here supposed that the damage itself might put individuals with

  5. Increase of ozone concentrations, its temperature sensitivity and the precursor factor in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised about the possible connections between the local and regional photochemical problem and global warming. The current study assesses the trend of ozone in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta (PRD in South China and investigates the interannual changes of sensitivity of ozone to air temperature, as well as the trends in regional precursors. Results reveal, at the three monitoring sites from the mid-1990s to 2010, an increase in the mean ozone concentrations from 1.0 to 1.6 µg m−3 per year. The increase occurred in all seasons, with the highest rate in autumn. This is consistent with trends and temperature anomalies in the region. The increase in the sensitivity of ozone to temperature is clearly evident from the correlation between ozone (OMI [Ozone Monitoring Instrument] column amount and surface air temperature (from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder displayed in the correlation maps for the PRD during the prominently high ozone period of July–September. It is observed to have increased from 2005 to 2010, the latter being the hottest year on record globally. To verify this temporal change in sensitivity, the ground-level trends of correlation coefficients/regression slopes are analysed. As expected, results reveal a statistically significant upward trend over a 14-year period (1997–2010. While the correlation revealed in the correlation maps is in agreement with the corresponding OMI ozone maps when juxtaposed, temperature sensitivity of surface ozone also shows an association with ozone concentration, with R=0.5. These characteristics of ozone sensitivity are believed to have adverse implications for the region. As shown by ground measurements and/or satellite analyses, the decrease in nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx in Hong Kong is not statistically significant while NO2 of the PRD has only very slightly changed. However, carbon dioxide has remarkably declined in the whole region. While these observations concerning

  6. Soil warming increases metabolic quotients of soil microorganisms without changes in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón-Jiménez, Sara; Soong, Jenniffer L.; Leblans, Niki I. W.; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Dauwe, Steven; Fransen, Erik; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2017-04-01

    Increasing temperatures can accelerate soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and release large amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, potentially inducing climate change feedbacks. Alterations to the temperature sensitivity and metabolic pathways of soil microorganisms in response to soil warming can play a key role in these soil carbon (C) losses. Here, we present results of an incubation experiment using soils from a geothermal gradient in Iceland that have been subjected to different intensities of soil warming (+0, +1, +3, +5, +10 and +20 °C above ambient) over seven years. We hypothesized that 7 years of soil warming would led to a depletion of labile organic substrates, with a subsequent decrease of the "apparent" temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. Associated to this C limitation and more sub-optimal conditions for microbial growth, we also hypothesized increased microbial metabolic quotients (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass), which is associated with increases in the relative amount of C invested into catabolic pathways along the warming gradient. Soil respiration and basal respiration rates decreased with soil warming intensity, in parallel with a decline in soil C availability. Contrasting to our first hypothesis, we did not detect changes in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration with soil warming or on the availability of nutrients and of labile C substrates at the time of incubation. However, in agreement to our second hypothesis, microbial metabolic quotients (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass) increased at warmer temperatures, while the C retained in biomass decreased as substrate became limiting. Long-term (7 years) temperature increases thus triggered a change in the metabolic functioning of the soil microbial communities towards increasing energy costs for maintenance or resource acquisition, thereby lowering the capacity of C retention and stabilization of warmed soils. These results highlight the need

  7. Envelope enhancement increases cortical sensitivity to interaural envelope delays with acoustic and electric hearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas E H Hartley

    Full Text Available Evidence from human psychophysical and animal electrophysiological studies suggests that sensitivity to interaural time delay (ITD in the modulating envelope of a high-frequency carrier can be enhanced using half-wave rectified stimuli. Recent evidence has shown potential benefits of equivalent electrical stimuli to deaf individuals with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs. In the current study we assessed the effects of envelope shape on ITD sensitivity in the primary auditory cortex of normal-hearing ferrets, and profoundly-deaf animals with bilateral CIs. In normal-hearing animals, cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±1 ms in 0.1-ms steps was assessed in response to dichotically-presented i sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM and ii half-wave rectified (HWR tones (100-ms duration; 70 dB SPL presented at the best-frequency of the unit over a range of modulation frequencies. In separate experiments, adult ferrets were deafened with neomycin administration and bilaterally-implanted with intra-cochlear electrode arrays. Electrically-evoked auditory brainstem responses (EABRs were recorded in response to bipolar electrical stimulation of the apical pair of electrodes with singe biphasic current pulses (40 µs per phase over a range of current levels to measure hearing thresholds. Subsequently, we recorded cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±800 µs in 80-µs steps within the envelope of SAM and HWR biphasic-pulse trains (40 µs per phase; 6000 pulses per second, 100-ms duration over a range of modulation frequencies. In normal-hearing animals, nearly a third of cortical neurons were sensitive to envelope-ITDs in response to SAM tones. In deaf animals with bilateral CI, the proportion of ITD-sensitive cortical neurons was approximately a fifth in response to SAM pulse trains. In normal-hearing and deaf animals with bilateral CI the proportion of ITD sensitive units and neural sensitivity to ITDs increased in response to HWR, compared with SAM stimuli

  8. Obesity Increases Sensitivity to Endotoxin Liver Injury: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Steatohepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shi Qi; Zhi Lin, Hui; Lane, M. Daniel; Clemens, Mark; Diehl, Anna Mae

    1997-03-01

    Genetically obese fatty/fatty rats and obese/obese mice exhibit increased sensitivity to endotoxin hepatotoxicity, quickly developing steatohepatitis after exposure to low doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Among obese animals, females are more sensitive to endotoxin liver injury than males. LPS induction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα ), the proven affecter of endotoxin liver injury, is no greater in the livers, white adipose tissues, or sera of obese animals than in those of lean controls. Indeed, the lowest serum concentrations of TNF occur in female obese rodents, which exhibit the most endotoxin-induced liver injury. Several cytokines that modulate the biological activity of TNF are regulated abnormally in the livers of obese animals. After exposure to LPS, mRNA of interferon γ , which sensitizes hepatocytes to TNF toxicity, is overexpressed, and mRNA levels of interleukin 10, a TNF inhibitor, are decreased. The phagocytic activity of liver macrophages and the hepatic expression of a gene encoding a macrophage-specific receptor are also decreased in obesity. This new animal model of obesity-associated liver disease demonstrates that hepatic macrophage dysfunction occurs in obesity and suggests that this might promote steatohepatitis by sensitizing hepatocytes to endotoxin.

  9. Acute ozone exposure increases plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha in ozone-sensitive human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelegle, E.S.; Adams, W.C.; Giri, S.N.; Siefkin, A.D.

    1989-07-01

    Twenty O/sub 3/-sensitive and /sup 2/O O/sub 3/-nonsensitive subjects participated in a study to investigate the effects of disparate O/sub 3/ sensitivity on plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha responses consequent to exposure to ambient O3 concentrations. Subjects were selected from a pool of 75 normal healthy college-aged males who had been previously exposed to 0.35 ppm O3 for 1 h at an exercising VE of 60 L/min. The selection criterion used was the observed decrement in FEV1 after the O/sub 3/ exposure: O/sub 3/-sensitive, FEV1 decrement greater than 24%; O/sub 3/-nonsensitive, FEV1 decrement less than 11%. Each subject was exposed to filtered air and to 0.20 and 0.35 ppm O/sub 3/ for 80 min while exercising at a VE of 50 L/min. These experimental protocols were divided into two 40-min sessions separated by a period of 4 to 10 min. PGF2 alpha, FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75 were evaluated before, during, and after each protocol. SGaw and Vtg were measured before and after each protocol. Plasma PGF2 alpha was significantly increased in the O/sub 3/-sensitive group during and after the 0.35-ppm O/sub 3/ exposure.

  10. Heat Shock Protein translocation induced by membrane fluidization increases tumor-cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Nina C; Ireland, H Elyse; Smith, Carly M; Hoyle, Christine F; Williams, John H H

    2010-10-28

    Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains a challenge due to the frequency of drug resistance amongst patients. Improving the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents while reducing the expression of anti-apoptotic Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) within the cancer cells may facilitate in overcoming this drug resistance. We demonstrate for the first time that sub-lethal doses of chemotherapeutic agents can be combined with membrane fluidizing treatments to produce a significant increase in drug efficacy and apoptosis in vitro. We show that fluidizers result in a transient decrease in intracellular HSPs, resulting in increased tumor-cell sensitivity and a membrane-associated induction of HSP gene expression.

  11. Alcohol acutely increases vascular reactivity together with insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, G; Kretschmer, S; Gouya, G; Haider, D G; Mittermayer, F; Riedl, M; Wagner, O; Pacini, G; Wolzt, M; Ludvik, B

    2010-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with increased insulin sensitivity and reduced cardiovascular risk. We hypothesized that this relates to a direct effect of alcohol and therefore investigated whether acute alcohol intake altered insulin sensitivity or endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. In an open-label two period design, the effect of a single oral dose of 40 g of alcohol (168 ml 40% vodka) on an insulin-modified frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT) and on endothelium-dependent (flow mediated, FMD) or endothelium-independent (glyceroltrinitrate (GTN)-induced) vasodilation of the brachial artery measured by ultrasound was studied. Experiments were carried out in twelve male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (64+/-6 years, body mass index 28.4+/-5.7 kg/m (2)). Baseline insulin sensitivity index (S (I)) was 1.10+/-0.34 min (-1).microU (-1).ml, baseline FMD was +4.1+/-3.0%, and GTN-induced vasodilation +7.4+/-2.3% from resting brachial artery diameter. Acute alcohol intake increased alcohol plasma levels to 0.33+/-0.04 per thousand, S (I) to 1.86+/-0.45 min (-1).microU (-1).ml (p<0.05), and FMD to +8.2+/-2.8% (p<0.05), while GTN-induced dilation remained unchanged. No relationship was detectable between the observed changes. We conclude that alcohol intake acutely increases endothelium-dependent brachial artery vasodilation in patients with type 2 diabetes together with insulin sensitivity. This acute effect might explain some beneficial effects of low alcohol consumption in epidemiological observations.

  12. Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient Arabidopsis mutants growing in a hydroponic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellouzi, Hasna; Hamed, Karim Ben; Cela, Jana; Müller, Maren; Abdelly, Chedly; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that tocopherols could play physiological roles in salt tolerance but the mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed changes in growth, mineral and oxidative status in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants exposed to salt stress. vte1 and vte4 mutants lack α-tocopherol, but only the vte1 mutant is additionally deficient in γ-tocopherol. Results showed that a deficiency in vitamin E leads to reduced growth and increased oxidative stress in hydroponically-grown plants. This effect was observed at early stages, not only in rosettes but also in roots. The vte1 mutant was more sensitive to salt-induced oxidative stress than the wild type and the vte4 mutant. Salt sensitivity was associated with (i) high contents of Na+, (ii) reduced efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm ratio) and (iii) more pronounced oxidative stress as indicated by increased hydrogen peroxide and malondialdeyde levels. The vte 4 mutant, which accumulates γ- instead of α-tocopherol showed an intermediate sensitivity to salt stress between the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Contents of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were higher in the vte1 mutant than the vte4 mutant and wild type. It is concluded that vitamin E-deficient plants show an increased sensitivity to salt stress both in rosettes and roots, therefore indicating the positive role of tocopherols in stress tolerance, not only by minimizing oxidative stress, but also controlling Na+/K+ homeostasis and hormonal balance. PMID:23299430

  13. Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient Arabidopsis mutants growing in a hydroponic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellouzi, Hasna; Hamed, Karim Ben; Cela, Jana; Müller, Maren; Abdelly, Chedly; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that tocopherols could play physiological roles in salt tolerance but the mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed changes in growth, mineral and oxidative status in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants exposed to salt stress. vte1 and vte4 mutants lack α-tocopherol, but only the vte1 mutant is additionally deficient in γ-tocopherol. Results showed that a deficiency in vitamin E leads to reduced growth and increased oxidative stress in hydroponically-grown plants. This effect was observed at early stages, not only in rosettes but also in roots. The vte1 mutant was more sensitive to salt-induced oxidative stress than the wild type and the vte4 mutant. Salt sensitivity was associated with (i) high contents of Na(+), (ii) reduced efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm ratio) and (iii) more pronounced oxidative stress as indicated by increased hydrogen peroxide and malondialdeyde levels. The vte 4 mutant, which accumulates γ- instead of α-tocopherol showed an intermediate sensitivity to salt stress between the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Contents of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were higher in the vte1 mutant than the vte4 mutant and wild type. It is concluded that vitamin E-deficient plants show an increased sensitivity to salt stress both in rosettes and roots, therefore indicating the positive role of tocopherols in stress tolerance, not only by minimizing oxidative stress, but also controlling Na(+)/K(+) homeostasis and hormonal balance.

  14. Involvement of ER Stress in Dysmyelination of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease with PLP1 Missense Mutations Shown by iPSC-Derived Oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Numasawa-Kuroiwa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD is a form of X-linked leukodystrophy caused by mutations in the proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1 gene. Although PLP1 proteins with missense mutations have been shown to accumulate in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER in disease model animals and cell lines transfected with mutant PLP1 genes, the exact pathogenetic mechanism of PMD has not previously been clarified. In this study, we established induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from two PMD patients carrying missense mutation and differentiated them into oligodendrocytes in vitro. In the PMD iPSC-derived oligodendrocytes, mislocalization of mutant PLP1 proteins to the ER and an association between increased susceptibility to ER stress and increased numbers of apoptotic oligodendrocytes were observed. Moreover, electron microscopic analysis demonstrated drastically reduced myelin formation accompanied by abnormal ER morphology. Thus, this study demonstrates the involvement of ER stress in pathogenic dysmyelination in the oligodendrocytes of PMD patients with the PLP1 missense mutation.

  15. Oligodendrocytes and the control of myelination in vivo: new insights from the rat anterior medullary velum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, A M; Berry, M

    2000-02-15

    The rat anterior medullary velum (AMV) is representative of the brain and spinal cord, overall, and provides an almost two-dimensional preparation for investigating axon-glial interactions in vivo. Here, we review some of our findings on axon-oligodendrocyte unit relations in our adult, development, and injury paradigms: (1) adult oligodendrocytes are phenotypically heterogeneous, conforming to Del Rio Hortega's types I-IV, whereby differences in oligodendrocyte morphology, metabolism, myelin sheath radial and longitudinal dimensions, and biochemistry correlate with the diameters of axons in the unit; (2) oligodendrocytes derive from a common premyelinating oligodendrocyte phenotype, and divergence of types I-IV is related to the age they emerge and the presumptive diameter of axons in the unit; (3) during myelination, axon-oligodendrocyte units progress through a sequence of maturation phases, related to axon contact, ensheathment, establishment of internodal myelin sheaths, and finally the radial growth and compaction of the myelin sheath; (4) we provide direct in vivo evidence that platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA), fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) differentially regulate these events, by injecting the growth factors into the cerebrospinal fluid of neonatal rat pups; (5) in lesioned adult AMV, transected central nervous system (CNS) axons regenerate through the putatively inhibitory environment of the glial scar, but remyelination by oligodendrocytes is incomplete, indicating that axon-oligodendrocyte interactions are defective; and (6) in the adult AMV, cells expressing the NG2 chondroitin sulphate have a presumptive adult oligodendrocyte progenitor antigenic phenotype, but are highly complex cells and send processes to contact axolemma at nodes of Ranvier, suggesting they subserve a specific perinodal function. Thus, axons and oligodendrocyte lineage cells form interdependent functional units, but

  16. Increasing amperometric biosensor sensitivity by length fractionated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Federico; Gorton, Lo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    In this work the sensitivity-increasing effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in amperometric biosensors, depending on their average length distribution, was studied. For this purpose the SWCNTs were oxidatively shortened and subsequently length separated by size exclusion chromatogra......In this work the sensitivity-increasing effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in amperometric biosensors, depending on their average length distribution, was studied. For this purpose the SWCNTs were oxidatively shortened and subsequently length separated by size exclusion...... chromatography. Transmission electron micrographs of different fractions of SWCNTs were collected. Diaphorase ``wired'' to an osmium redox polymer was blended with the shortened SWCNTs of different lengths. Depending on the average length of the SWCNTs the sensitivity of the amperometric biosensor model system...... limit was 1 mu M. The biosensor exhibited excellent electrocatalytic properties. Even at relatively high NADH concentrations the oxidative current was limited by the diffusion rate of NADH. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Spatial covert attention increases contrast sensitivity across the CSF: support for signal enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, M.; Penpeci-Talgar, C.; Eckstein, M.

    2000-01-01

    This study is the first to report the benefits of spatial covert attention on contrast sensitivity in a wide range of spatial frequencies when a target alone was presented in the absence of a local post-mask. We used a peripheral precue (a small circle indicating the target location) to explore the effects of covert spatial attention on contrast sensitivity as assessed by orientation discrimination (Experiments 1-4), detection (Experiments 2 and 3) and localization (Experiment 3) tasks. In all four experiments the target (a Gabor patch ranging in spatial frequency from 0.5 to 10 cpd) was presented alone in one of eight possible locations equidistant from fixation. Contrast sensitivity was consistently higher for peripherally- than for neutrally-cued trials, even though we eliminated variables (distracters, global masks, local masks, and location uncertainty) that are known to contribute to an external noise reduction explanation of attention. When observers were presented with vertical and horizontal Gabor patches an external noise reduction signal detection model accounted for the cueing benefit in a discrimination task (Experiment 1). However, such a model could not account for this benefit when location uncertainty was reduced, either by: (a) Increasing overall performance level (Experiment 2); (b) increasing stimulus contrast to enable fine discriminations of slightly tilted suprathreshold stimuli (Experiment 3); and (c) presenting a local post-mask (Experiment 4). Given that attentional benefits occurred under conditions that exclude all variables predicted by the external noise reduction model, these results support the signal enhancement model of attention.

  18. Reduced mtDNA copy number increases the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, H; Sun, S; Bai, Y; Chen, Y; Chai, R; Li, H

    2015-04-02

    Many cancer drugs are toxic to cells by activating apoptotic pathways. Previous studies have shown that mitochondria have key roles in apoptosis in mammalian cells, but the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number variation in the pathogenesis of tumor cell apoptosis remains largely unknown. We used the HEp-2, HNE2, and A549 tumor cell lines to explore the relationship between mtDNA copy number variation and cell apoptosis. We first induced apoptosis in three tumor cell lines and one normal adult human skin fibroblast cell line (HSF) with cisplatin (DDP) or doxorubicin (DOX) treatment and found that the mtDNA copy number significantly increased in apoptotic tumor cells, but not in HSF cells. We then downregulated the mtDNA copy number by transfection with shRNA-TFAM plasmids or treatment with ethidium bromide and found that the sensitivity of tumor cells to DDP or DOX was significantly increased. Furthermore, we observed that levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased significantly in tumor cells with lower mtDNA copy numbers, and this might be related to a low level of antioxidant gene expression. Finally, we rescued the increase of ROS in tumor cells with lipoic acid or N-acetyl-L-cysteine and found that the apoptosis rate decreased. Our studies suggest that the increase of mtDNA copy number is a self-protective mechanism of tumor cells to prevent apoptosis and that reduced mtDNA copy number increases ROS levels in tumor cells, increases the tumor cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, and increases the rate of apoptosis. This research provides evidence that mtDNA copy number variation might be a promising new therapeutic target for the clinical treatment of tumors.

  19. Reduced mtDNA copy number increases the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, H; Sun, S; Bai, Y; Chen, Y; Chai, R; Li, H

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer drugs are toxic to cells by activating apoptotic pathways. Previous studies have shown that mitochondria have key roles in apoptosis in mammalian cells, but the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number variation in the pathogenesis of tumor cell apoptosis remains largely unknown. We used the HEp-2, HNE2, and A549 tumor cell lines to explore the relationship between mtDNA copy number variation and cell apoptosis. We first induced apoptosis in three tumor cell lines and one normal adult human skin fibroblast cell line (HSF) with cisplatin (DDP) or doxorubicin (DOX) treatment and found that the mtDNA copy number significantly increased in apoptotic tumor cells, but not in HSF cells. We then downregulated the mtDNA copy number by transfection with shRNA-TFAM plasmids or treatment with ethidium bromide and found that the sensitivity of tumor cells to DDP or DOX was significantly increased. Furthermore, we observed that levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased significantly in tumor cells with lower mtDNA copy numbers, and this might be related to a low level of antioxidant gene expression. Finally, we rescued the increase of ROS in tumor cells with lipoic acid or N-acetyl-L-cysteine and found that the apoptosis rate decreased. Our studies suggest that the increase of mtDNA copy number is a self-protective mechanism of tumor cells to prevent apoptosis and that reduced mtDNA copy number increases ROS levels in tumor cells, increases the tumor cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, and increases the rate of apoptosis. This research provides evidence that mtDNA copy number variation might be a promising new therapeutic target for the clinical treatment of tumors. PMID:25837486

  20. Astrocytes in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Development and White Matter Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiasi; Zhang, Lei; Chu, Yongxin; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Benqiang; Kong, Jiming; Bi, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system (CNS) which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in gray matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica (NMO). In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  1. Astrocytes in oligodendrocyte lineage development and white matter pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiasi eLi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in grey matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica. In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  2. Stevioside from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Increases Insulin Sensitivity in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabilatul Hani Mohd-Radzman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevioside from Stevia rebaudiana has been reported to exert antihyperglycemic effects in both rat and human subjects. There have been few studies on these effects in vitro. In this paper, radioactive glucose uptake assay was implemented in order to assess improvements in insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 cells by elevation of glucose uptake following treatment with stevioside. Oil Red-O staining and MTT assay were utilized to confirm adipocyte differentiation and cell viability, respectively. Findings from this research showed a significant increase in absorbance values in mature adipocytes following Oil Red-O staining, confirming the differentiation process. Stevioside was noncytotoxic to 3T3-L1 cells as cell viability was reduced by a maximum of 17%, making it impossible to determine its IC50. Stevioside increased glucose uptake activities by 2.1 times (p<0.001 in normal conditions and up to 4.4 times (p<0.001 in insulin-resistant states. At times, this increase was higher than that seen in positive control group treated with rosiglitazone maleate, an antidiabetic agent. Expressions of pY20 and p-IRS1 which were measured via Western blot were improved by stevioside treatment. In conclusion, stevioside has direct effects on 3T3-L1 insulin sensitivity via increase in glucose uptake and enhanced expression of proteins involved in insulin-signalling pathway.

  3. Increased Sensitivity of Magnetoelectric Sensors at Low Frequencies Using Magnetic Field Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Jonathan; Viehland, Dwight; Gray, David; Mandal, Sanjay; Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi; Srinivasan, Gopalan; Edelstein, Alan

    2012-02-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) laminate sensors are vector magnetometers that can detect pT magnetic fields at 1 kHz, although sensitivity may be reduced at lower frequencies. These passive sensors consist of alternating layers of magnetostrictive and piezoelectric materials. A magnetic field causes the magnetostrictive layer to strain the piezoelectric material and create measurable charge. We have shownootnotetextTo be published in Journal of Applied Physics. that since the strain response is a nonlinear function of the bias field, sweeping the magnetic bias on the magnetostrictive layer can modulate the ME response and increase the operating frequency of the sensor. This upward shift lowers the 1/f noise and increases the signal amplitude if the new operating frequency is near a mechanical resonance mode of the sensor. Using this modulation technique, the low frequency sensitivity has been improved by more than an order of magnitude and we have achieved a detectivity of 7 pT/Hz at1 Hz. In addition to increasing the magnetic signal frequency, we can use magnetic modulation to increase the operating frequency of acoustic signals detected by these sensors. This occurs because the ME sensors are nonlinear devices. In these cases using magnetic field modulation, the signal appears as sidebands around the modulation frequency.

  4. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: questions still to be answered despite increasing awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Caio, Giacomo; Tovoli, Francesco; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the increasing number of patients worldwide who are sensitive to dietary gluten without evidence of celiac disease or wheat allergy has contributed to the identification of a new gluten-related syndrome defined as non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Our knowledge regarding this syndrome is still lacking, and many aspects of this syndrome remain unknown. Its pathogenesis is heterogeneous, with a recognized pivotal role for innate immunity; many other factors also contribute, including low-grade intestinal inflammation, increased intestinal barrier function and changes in the intestinal microbiota. Gluten and other wheat proteins, such as amylase trypsin inhibitors, are the primary triggers of this syndrome, but it has also been hypothesized that a diet rich in fermentable monosaccharides and polyols may elicit its functional gastrointestinal symptoms. The epidemiology of this condition is far from established; its prevalence in the general population is highly variable, ranging from 0.63% to 6%. From a clinical point of view, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is characterized by a wide array of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms that occur shortly after the ingestion of gluten and improve or disappear when gluten is withdrawn from the diet. These symptoms recur when gluten is reintroduced. Because diagnostic biomarkers have not yet been identified, a double-blind placebo-controlled gluten challenge is currently the diagnostic method with the highest accuracy. Future research is needed to generate more knowledge regarding non-celiac gluten sensitivity, a condition that has global acceptance but has only a few certainties and many unresolved issues. PMID:23934026

  5. On the biogenesis of the myelin sheath : Cognate polarized trafficking pathways in oligodendrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H; Hoekstra, D

    2000-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, are capable of transporting vast quantities of proteins and of lipids, In particular galactosphingolipids, to the myelin sheath. The sheath is continuous with the plasma membrane of the oligodendrocyte, but the composition of bot

  6. The relationship between cocaine-induced increases in NAC1 and behavioral sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P J; Stromberg, Michael; Replenski, Stephen; Snyder-Mackler, Alexander; Mackler, Scott A

    2003-04-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine can cause long-term behavioral changes in mammals, including an augmented locomotor response known as behavioral sensitization. A major goal of research is the identification of molecules associated with these behaviors. NAC1, a member of the POZ/BTB transcription factor family, exhibited increased mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens of the rat weeks after cocaine use. NAC1 exists as two isoforms, each demonstrating the ability to inhibit transcription, but to different extents. The present experiments examined the time course for both NAC1 isoforms after five consecutive days of systemic cocaine administration in male rats. Tissues were collected from several central nervous system regions and underwent Western blot analysis. There was significantly greater expression of the long isoform, lNAC1 (cocaine 1.341+/-0.641; saline 1+/-0.321; P=.044), and the short isoform, sNAC1 (cocaine 3.038+/-2.816; saline 1+/-0.720; P=.001), in the nucleus accumbens of cocaine-treated rats. The olfactory tubercle also showed a significant increase, but only in sNAC1 expression and at only one time period. No other significant differences were observed for either isoform of NAC1 in any other brain region. The expression of lNAC1 exhibited an inverse relationship with behavioral sensitization in rats 1-3 months following repeated cocaine injections predicting approximately 40% of the variance in the behavior variables (R(2)=.387; and P=.031 for distance and P=.025 for ambulatory count). These results indicate that NAC1 expression is increased for a period of several months after chronic cocaine exposure. Furthermore, these data suggest that NAC1 may function as an endogenous inhibitor of behavioral sensitization. NAC1 represents a target for future studies examining cocaine-induced behavioral changes.

  7. Repetitive hyperbaric oxygen treatment increases insulin sensitivity in diabetes patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Wei, Yi-ting; Fan, Shuang-bo; Wang, Liang; Zhou, Xiao-ping

    2017-01-01

    Aim The role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke is controversial. This study aims to investigate whether the peripheral insulin sensitivity of type 2 diabetes patients suffering from intracerebral hemorrhage can be increased after HBOT. Methods Fifty-two type 2 diabetes participants were recruited after being diagnosed with intracerebral hemorrhage in our hospital. Insulin sensitivity was measured by the glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (80 mU m−2 min−1) at baseline and 10 and 30 days after HBOT sessions. Serum insulin, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1C were measured in fasting serum at baseline and after HBOT sessions. In addition, early (∼10 days after onset) and late (1 month after onset) outcomes (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, NIHSS scores) and efficacy (changes of NIHSS scores) of HBOT were evaluated. Results In response to HBOT, the glucose infusion rate was increased by 37.8%±5.76% at 1 month after onset compared with baseline. Reduced serum insulin, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1C were observed after HBOT. Both early and late outcomes of the HBOT group were improved compared with baseline (P<0.001). In the control group, there was significant difference only in the late outcome (P<0.05). In the assessment of efficacy, there were statistically significant differences between the groups when comparing changes in NIHSS scores at 10 days and 1 month after onset (P<0.05). Conclusion Peripheral insulin sensitivity was increased following HBOT in type 2 diabetes patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. The HBOT used in this study may be effective for diabetes patients with acute stroke and is a safe and harmless adjunctive treatment. PMID:28228657

  8. Endogenous visuospatial attention increases visual awareness independent of visual discrimination sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernet, Marine; Japee, Shruti; Lokey, Savannah; Ahmed, Sara; Zachariou, Valentinos; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2017-08-12

    Visuospatial attention often improves task performance by increasing signal gain at attended locations and decreasing noise at unattended locations. Attention is also believed to be the mechanism that allows information to enter awareness. In this experiment, we assessed whether orienting endogenous visuospatial attention with cues differentially affects visual discrimination sensitivity (an objective task performance) and visual awareness (the subjective feeling of perceiving) during the same discrimination task. Gabor patch targets were presented laterally, either at low contrast (contrast stimuli) or at high contrast embedded in noise (noise stimuli). Participants reported their orientation either in a 3-alternative choice task (clockwise, counterclockwise, unknown) that allowed for both objective and subjective reports, or in a 2-alternative choice task (clockwise, counterclockwise) that provided a control for objective reports. Signal detection theory models were fit to the experimental data: estimated perceptual sensitivity reflected objective performance; decision criteria, or subjective biases, were a proxy for visual awareness. Attention increased sensitivity (i.e., improved objective performance) for the contrast, but not for the noise stimuli. Indeed, with the latter, attention did not further enhance the already high target signal or reduce the already low uncertainty on its position. Interestingly, for both contrast and noise stimuli, attention resulted in more liberal criteria, i.e., awareness increased. The noise condition is thus an experimental configuration where people think they see the targets they attend to better, even if they do not. This could be explained by an internal representation of their attentional state, which influences awareness independent of objective visual signals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Reduced thermal sensitivity and increased opioidergic tone in the TASTPM mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Yahyah; Pitcher, Thomas; Simeoli, Raffaele; Ballard, Clive; Malcangio, Marzia

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are in susceptible patient groups in which pain is an important clinical issue that is often underdiagnosed. However, it is unclear whether decreased pain complaints in patients with AD result from elevated pain tolerance or an impaired ability to communicate sensations. Here, we explored if AD-related pathology is present in key regions of the pain pathway and assessed whether nociceptive thresholds to acute noxious stimulation are altered in the double-mutant APPswe × PS1.M146V (TASTPM) transgenic mouse model of AD. TASTPM mice exhibited an age-dependant cognitive deficit at the age of 6 months, but not at 4 months, a deficit that was accompanied by amyloid plaques in the cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. In the spinal cord, β-amyloid (APP/Aβ) immunoreactivity was observed in dorsal and ventral horn neurons, and the expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) was significantly reduced, while the expression of the inhibitory peptides enkephalins was increased in TASTPM dorsal horn, consistent with an increased inhibitory tone. TASTPM mice displayed reduced sensitivity to acute noxious heat, which was reversed by naloxone, an opioid antagonist. This study suggests that increased inhibition and decreased excitation in the spinal cord may be responsible for the reduced thermal sensitivity associated with AD-related pathology.

  10. Altered ATP-sensitive potassium channels may underscore obesity-triggered increase in blood pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hong FAN; Hong-yan TIAN; Ai-qun MA; Zhi HU; Jian-hua HUO; Yong-xiao CAO

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To determine whether ATP-sensitive potassium channels are altered in VSMC from arotas and mesenteric arteries of obese rat,and their association with obesity-triggered increase in blood pressure.Methods:Obesity was induced by 24 weeks of high-fat diet feeding in male Sprague-Dawley rats.Control rats were fed with standard laboratory rat chow.Blood pressure and body weight of these rats were measured every 4 weeks.At the end of 24 weeks,KATP channel-mediated relaxation responses in the aortas and mesenteric arteries,KATP channel current,and gene expression were examined,respectively.Results:Blood pres-sure and body weight were increased in rats fed with high-fat diet.KATP channel-mediated relaxation responses,currents,and KATP expression in VSMC of both aortas and mesenteric arteries were inhibited in these rats.Conclusion:Altered ATP-sensitive potassium channels in obese rats may underscore obesity-triggered increase in blood pressure.

  11. Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity by Regulating Cholesterol Metabolism, Adipokines and PPARγ Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Dong, Huansheng; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Mingjun; Song, Lili; Pan, Qingjie; Bulmer, Andrew; Adams, David B; Dong, Xiao; Wang, Hongjun

    2015-05-28

    Obesity can cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Moderate elevations in bilirubin levels have anti-diabetic effects. This study is aimed at determining the mechanisms by which bilirubin treatment reduces obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. DIO mice were treated with bilirubin or vehicle for 14 days. Body weights, plasma glucose, and insulin tolerance tests were performed prior to, immediately, and 7 weeks post-treatment. Serum lipid, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, total and direct bilirubin levels were measured. Expression of factors involved in adipose metabolism including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-1), insulin receptor (IR), and PPARγ in liver were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Compared to controls, bilirubin-treated mice exhibited reductions in body weight, blood glucose levels, total cholesterol (TC), leptin, total and direct bilirubin, and increases in adiponectin and expression of SREBP-1, IR, and PPARγ mRNA. The improved metabolic control achieved by bilirubin-treated mice was persistent: at two months after treatment termination, bilirubin-treated DIO mice remained insulin sensitive with lower leptin and higher adiponectin levels, together with increased PPARγ expression. These results indicate that bilirubin regulates cholesterol metabolism, adipokines and PPARγ levels, which likely contribute to increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in DIO mice.

  12. Omecamtiv Mecarbil Abolishes Length-Mediated Increase in Guinea Pig Cardiac Myofiber Ca(2+) Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollapudi, Sampath K; Reda, Sherif M; Chandra, Murali

    2017-08-22

    Omecamtiv mecarbil (OM) is a pharmacological agent that augments cardiac contractile function by enhancing myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. Given that interventions that increase myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity have the potential to alter length-dependent activation (LDA) of cardiac myofilaments, we tested the influence of OM on this fundamental property of the heart. This is significant not only because LDA is prominent in cardiac muscle but also because it contributes to the Frank-Starling law, a mechanism by which the heart increases stroke volume in response to an increase in venous return. We measured steady-state and dynamic contractile indices in detergent-skinned guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) cardiac muscle fibers in the absence and presence of 0.3 and 3.0 μM OM at two different sarcomere lengths (SLs), short SL (1.9 μm) and long SL (2.3 μm). Myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity, as measured by pCa50 (-log of [Ca(2+)]free concentration required for half-maximal activation), increased significantly at both short and long SLs in OM-treated fibers when compared to untreated fibers; however, the magnitude of increase in pCa50 was twofold greater at short SL than at long SL. A consequence of this greater increase in pCa50 at short SL was that pCa50 did not increase any further at long SL, suggesting that OM abolished the SL dependency of pCa50. Furthermore, the SL dependency of rate constants of cross-bridge distortion dynamics (c) and force redevelopment (ktr) was abolished in 0.3-μM-OM-treated fibers. The negative impact of OM on the SL dependency of pCa50, c, and ktr was also observed in 3.0-μM-OM-treated fibers, indicating that cooperative mechanisms linked to LDA were altered by the OM-mediated effects on cardiac myofilaments. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improved Sensing Pulses for Increased Human Head Depth Measurement Sensitivity With Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes an improved electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) stimulus paradigm, based on dual-energy pulses using the stochastic Gabor function (SGF) that may more sensitively assess deep brain tissue impedance than current single-pulse paradigms. The SGF is a uniformly distributed noise, modulated by a Gaussian envelope, with a wide-frequency spectrum representation regardless of the stimuli energy, and is least compact in the sample frequency phase plane. Numerical results obtained using a realistic human head model confirm that two sequential SGF pulses at different energies can improve EIS depth sensitivity when used in a dual-energy subtraction scheme. Specifically, although the two SGF pulses exhibit different tissue current distributions, they maintain the broadband sensing pulse characteristics needed to generate all the frequencies of interest. Moreover, finite-difference time domain simulations show that this dual-energy excitation scheme is capable of reducing the amplitude of weighted current densities surface directly underneath the electrodes by approximately 3 million times versus single stimulation pulses, while maintaining an acceptable tissue conductivity distribution at depth. This increased sensitivity for the detection of small, deep impedance changes might be of value in potential future EIS applications, such as the portable, point-of-care detection of deep brain hemorrhage or infarction. PMID:24043365

  14. Targeting CDKs with Roscovitine Increases Sensitivity to DNA Damaging Drugs of Human Osteosarcoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Serena; Tavanti, Elisa; Hattinger, Claudia Maria; Fanelli, Marilù; Versteeg, Rogier; Koster, Jan; Picci, Piero; Serra, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) has been reported to be essential for cell proliferation in several human tumours and it has been suggested as an appropriate target to be considered in order to enhance the efficacy of treatment regimens based on the use of DNA damaging drugs. We evaluated the clinical impact of CDK2 overexpression on a series of 21 high-grade osteosarcoma (OS) samples profiled by using cDNA microarrays. We also assessed the in vitro efficacy of the CDKs inhibitor roscovitine in a panel of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant human OS cell lines. OS tumour samples showed an inherent overexpression of CDK2, and high expression levels at diagnosis of this kinase appeared to negatively impact on clinical outcome. CDK2 expression also proved to be relevant for in vitro OS cells growth. These findings indicated CDK2 as a promising candidate therapeutic marker for OS and therefore we assessed the efficacy of the CDKs-inhibitor roscovitine in both drug-sensitive and -resistant OS cell lines. All cell lines resulted to be responsive to roscovitine, which was also able to increase the activity of cisplatin and doxorubicin, the two most active DNA damaging drugs used in OS chemotherapy. Our results indicated that combined treatment with conventional OS chemotherapeutic drugs and roscovitine may represent a new candidate intervention approach, which may be considered to enhance tumour cell sensitivity to DNA damaging drugs.

  15. Increased sensitivity of NS1 ELISA by heat dissociation in acute dengue 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonora, Sibelle Nogueira; Dos Santos, Flavia Barreto; Daumas, Regina Paiva; Passos, Sonia Regina Lambert; da Silva, Manoela Heringer; de Lima, Monique Rocha; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro

    2017-03-11

    Dengue is an acute febrile illness considered the major arboviral disease in terms of morbidity, mortality, economic impact and dissemination worldwide. Brazil accounts for the highest notification rate, with circulation of all four dengue serotypes. The NS1 antigen is a dengue highly conserved specific soluble glycoprotein essential for viral replication and viability that can be detected 0 to 18 days from the onset of fever (peak first 3 days). It induces a strong humoral response and is known as a complement-fixing antigen. Lower NS1 test sensitivity occurs in secondary dengue infections probably due to immune complex formation impairing antigen detection by ELISA. We compared the sensitivity of NS1 ELISA in heat dissociated and non-dissociated samples from 156 RT-PCR confirmed acute dengue-4 cases from 362 prospectively enrolled patients. Secondary infections accounted for 83.3% of cases. NS1 ELISA was positive in 42.5% and indeterminate in 10.2% of dengue-4 cases. After heat dissociation, 7 negative and 16 indeterminate samples turned positive, increasing the overall test sensitivity to 57.7%. Although it is time consuming and requires the use of specific laboratory equipment, NS1 ELISA combined with heat dissociation could be a slightly better alternative for triage in suspected dengue cases.

  16. Phagosomal degradation increases TLR access to bacterial ligands and enhances macrophage sensitivity to bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andrea J.; Arruda, Andrea; Reyes, Christopher N.; Kaplan, Amber T.; Shimada, Takahiro; Shimada, Kenichi; Arditi, Moshe; Liu, George; Underhill, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Signaling by innate immune receptors initiates and orchestrates the overall immune responses to infection. Macrophage receptors recognizing pathogens can be broadly grouped into surface receptors and receptors restricted to intracellular compartments, such as phagosomes and the cytoplasm. There is an expectation that ingestion and degradation of microorganisms by phagocytes contributes to activation of intracellular innate receptors, although direct demonstrations of this are rare and many model ligands are studied in soluble form, outside of their microbial context. By comparing a wild-type strain of Staphylococcus aureus and a lysozyme-sensitive mutant, we have been able to directly address the role of degradation of live bacteria by mouse macrophages in determining the overall innate cellular inflammatory response. Our investigations revealed a biphasic response to S. aureus that consisted of an initial signal resulting from the engagement of surface TLR2, followed by a later, second wave on inflammatory gene induction. This second wave of inflammatory signaling was dependent on and correlated with the timing of bacterial degradation in phagosomes. We found that TLR2 signaling followed by TLR2/TLR9 signaling enhanced sensitivity to small numbers of bacteria. We further found that treating wild-type bacteria with the peptidoglycan synthesis-inhibiting antibiotic vancomycin made S. aureus more susceptible to degradation and resulted in increased inflammatory responses, similar to those observed for mutant degradation-sensitive bacteria. PMID:22031762

  17. Increased intracellular free calcium and sensitivity to angiotensin II in platelets of preeclamptic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, H; Oeney, T; Hauck, U; Distler, A; Philipp, T

    1989-04-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by a generalized vasoconstriction and increased vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II. Intracellular free calcium, implicated in vascular smooth muscle contraction, has been found to be elevated in platelets of other hypertensive disorders. We therefore measured intracellular free calcium concentrations by using the fluorescent probe quin-2 in platelets of six patients with preeclampsia and compared them to measurements in ten normotensive pregnant women and ten age-matched nonpregnant women. Intracellular free calcium was also determined in the preeclamptic women after delivery. We found that intracellular free calcium was slightly elevated in normal pregnancy (102 +/- 13 nmol/L v 87 +/- 17 nmol/L) but was markedly increased in preeclampsia (138 +/- 13 nmol/L, P less than .05). This increase disappeared six weeks after delivery (84 + 10 nmol/L, P less than .01). To investigate whether the increased intracellular free calcium was related to angiotensin II, the platelets were exposed to thrombin and angiotensin II in vitro. Exposure to thrombin and angiotensin II caused a dose-dependent increase in intracellular free calcium. The intracellular response to thrombin was not significantly different in the three groups. However, stimulation with angiotensin II revealed an increased response in intracellular free calcium in preeclampsia (P less than .05) that disappeared after delivery. Our findings show a sustained increase in platelet intracellular free calcium in preeclampsia and suggest a functional alteration of the angiotensin II receptor in this disease.

  18. MicroRNA-218 Increases the Sensitivity of Bladder Cancer to Cisplatin by Targeting Glut1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: MicroRNA-218 (miR-218 is down-regulated in many malignancies that have been implicated in the regulation of diverse processes in cancer cells. However, the involvement of miR-218 in chemo-sensitivity to cisplatin and the precise mechanism of this action remained unknown in bladder cancer. Methods: qRT-PCR was used to detect miR-218 and its target Glut1 expression in bladder cancer cell lines T24 and EJ. CCK-8 method was utilized to measure the cell viability. IC 50 was calculated via a probit regression model. Glut1 was detected by western blotting for analysis of potential mechanism. Luciferase reporter assay was utilized to validate Glut1 as a direct target gene of miR-218. The intracellular level of GSH and ROS were determined using a commercial colorimetric assay kit and 2’, 7’-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein diacetate, respectively. Results: Over-expression of miR-218 significantly reduced the rate of glucose uptake and total level of GSH and enhanced the chemo-sensitivity of bladder cancer to cisplatin. Mechanistically, Glut1 was found to be a direct and functional target of miR-218. Up-regulation of Glut1 could restore chemo-resistance in T24 and EJ cells. On the contrary, knockdown of Glut1 could generate a similar effect as up-regulating the expression of miR-218. Conclusions: MiR-218 increases the sensitivity of bladder cancer to cisplatin by targeting Glut1. Restoration of miR-218 and repression of glut1 may provide a potential strategy to restore chemo-sensitivity in bladder cancer.

  19. MicroRNA-218 Increases the Sensitivity of Bladder Cancer to Cisplatin by Targeting Glut1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Yang, Xiao; Cheng, Yidong; Zhang, Xiaolei; Yang, Chengdi; Deng, Xiaheng; Li, Pengchao; Tao, Jun; Yang, Haiwei; Wei, Jifu; Tang, Jingyuan; Yuan, Wenbo; Lu, Qiang; Xu, Xiaoting; Gu, Min

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNA-218 (miR-218) is down-regulated in many malignancies that have been implicated in the regulation of diverse processes in cancer cells. However, the involvement of miR-218 in chemo-sensitivity to cisplatin and the precise mechanism of this action remained unknown in bladder cancer. qRT-PCR was used to detect miR-218 and its target Glut1 expression in bladder cancer cell lines T24 and EJ. CCK-8 method was utilized to measure the cell viability. IC 50 was calculated via a probit regression model. Glut1 was detected by western blotting for analysis of potential mechanism. Luciferase reporter assay was utilized to validate Glut1 as a direct target gene of miR-218. The intracellular level of GSH and ROS were determined using a commercial colorimetric assay kit and 2', 7'-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein diacetate, respectively. Over-expression of miR-218 significantly reduced the rate of glucose uptake and total level of GSH and enhanced the chemo-sensitivity of bladder cancer to cisplatin. Mechanistically, Glut1 was found to be a direct and functional target of miR-218. Up-regulation of Glut1 could restore chemo-resistance in T24 and EJ cells. On the contrary, knockdown of Glut1 could generate a similar effect as up-regulating the expression of miR-218. MiR-218 increases the sensitivity of bladder cancer to cisplatin by targeting Glut1. Restoration of miR-218 and repression of glut1 may provide a potential strategy to restore chemo-sensitivity in bladder cancer. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Shh Signaling through the Primary Cilium Modulates Rat Oligodendrocyte Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcón-Urrutia, Paulina; Carrasco, Carlos M; Lois, Pablo; Palma, Veronica; Roth, Alejandro D

    2015-01-01

    Primary Cilia (PC) are a very likely place for signal integration where multiple signaling pathways converge. Two major signaling pathways clearly shown to signal through the PC, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and PDGF-Rα, are particularly important for the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocytes, suggesting that their interaction occurs in or around this organelle. We identified PC in rat oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) and found that, while easily detectable in early OPCs, PC are lost as these cells progress to terminal differentiation. We confirmed the interaction between these pathways, as cyclopamine inhibition of Hedgehog function impairs both PDGF-mediated OPC proliferation and Shh-dependent cell branching. However, we failed to detect PDGF-Rα localization into the PC. Remarkably, ciliobrevin-mediated disruption of PC and reduction of OPC process extension was counteracted by recombinant Shh treatment, while PDGF had no effect. Therefore, while PDGF-Rα-dependent OPC proliferation and survival most probably does not initiate at the PC, still the integrity of this organelle and cilium-centered pathway is necessary for OPC survival and differentiation.

  1. Role of Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Oligodendrocyte Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-12-01

    During development, the secreted molecule Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is required for lineage specification and proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs), which are the glia cells responsible for the myelination of axons in the central nervous system (CNS). Shh signaling has been implicated in controlling both the generation of oligodendrocytes (OLGs) during embryonic development and their production in adulthood. Although, some evidence points to a role of Shh signaling in OLG development, its involvement in OLG differentiation remains to be fully determined. The objective of this study was to assess whether Shh signaling is involved in OLG differentiation after neural stem cell commitment to the OLG lineage. To address these questions, we manipulated Shh signaling using cyclopamine, a potent inhibitor of Shh signaling activator Smoothened (Smo), alone or combined with the agonist SAG in OLG primary cultures and assessed expression of myelin-specific markers. We found that inactivation of Shh signaling caused a dose-dependent decrease in myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in differentiating OLGs. Co-treatment of the cells with SAG reversed the inhibitory effect of cyclopamine on both myelin-specific protein levels and morphological changes associated with it. Further experiments are required to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which Shh signaling regulates OLG differentiation.

  2. Involvement of astrocyte and oligodendrocyte gene sets in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eising, Else; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Min, Josine L; Anttila, Verneri; Verheijen, Mark Hg; Terwindt, Gisela M; Dichgans, Martin; Freilinger, Tobias; Kubisch, Christian; Ferrari, Michel D; Smit, August B; de Vries, Boukje; Palotie, Aarno; van den Maagdenberg, Arn Mjm; Posthuma, Danielle

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a common episodic brain disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of severe unilateral headache and additional neurological symptoms. Two main migraine types can be distinguished based on the presence of aura symptoms that can accompany the headache: migraine with aura and migraine without aura. Multiple genetic and environmental factors confer disease susceptibility. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that migraine susceptibility genes are involved in various pathways, including neurotransmission, which have already been implicated in genetic studies of monogenic familial hemiplegic migraine, a subtype of migraine with aura. To further explore the genetic background of migraine, we performed a gene set analysis of migraine GWAS data of 4954 clinic-based patients with migraine, as well as 13,390 controls. Curated sets of synaptic genes and sets of genes predominantly expressed in three glial cell types (astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes) were investigated. Our results show that gene sets containing astrocyte- and oligodendrocyte-related genes are associated with migraine, which is especially true for gene sets involved in protein modification and signal transduction. Observed differences between migraine with aura and migraine without aura indicate that both migraine types, at least in part, seem to have a different genetic background. © International Headache Society 2015.

  3. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase sensitivity in the next generation of the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Bundschuh

    Full Text Available The nanoparticle industry is expected to become a trillion dollar business in the near future. Therefore, the unintentional introduction of nanoparticles into the environment is increasingly likely. However, currently applied risk-assessment practices require further adaptation to accommodate the intrinsic nature of engineered nanoparticles. Combining a chronic flow-through exposure system with subsequent acute toxicity tests for the standard test organism Daphnia magna, we found that juvenile offspring of adults that were previously exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit a significantly increased sensitivity to titanium dioxide nanoparticles compared with the offspring of unexposed adults, as displayed by lower 96 h-EC(50 values. This observation is particularly remarkable because adults exhibited no differences among treatments in terms of typically assessed endpoints, such as sensitivity, number of offspring, or energy reserves. Hence, the present study suggests that ecotoxicological research requires further development to include the assessment of the environmental risks of nanoparticles for the next and hence not directly exposed generation, which is currently not included in standard test protocols.

  4. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase sensitivity in the next generation of the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Seitz, Frank; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R; Schulz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The nanoparticle industry is expected to become a trillion dollar business in the near future. Therefore, the unintentional introduction of nanoparticles into the environment is increasingly likely. However, currently applied risk-assessment practices require further adaptation to accommodate the intrinsic nature of engineered nanoparticles. Combining a chronic flow-through exposure system with subsequent acute toxicity tests for the standard test organism Daphnia magna, we found that juvenile offspring of adults that were previously exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit a significantly increased sensitivity to titanium dioxide nanoparticles compared with the offspring of unexposed adults, as displayed by lower 96 h-EC(50) values. This observation is particularly remarkable because adults exhibited no differences among treatments in terms of typically assessed endpoints, such as sensitivity, number of offspring, or energy reserves. Hence, the present study suggests that ecotoxicological research requires further development to include the assessment of the environmental risks of nanoparticles for the next and hence not directly exposed generation, which is currently not included in standard test protocols.

  5. Increasing Drought Sensitivity and Decline of Atlas Cedar (Cedrus atlantica in the Moroccan Middle Atlas Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Julio Camarero

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the interactions between climate change and forest structure on tree growth are needed for decision making in forest conservation and management. In this paper, we investigated the relative contribution of tree features and stand structure on Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica radial growth in forests that have experienced heavy grazing and logging in the past. Dendrochronological methods were applied to quantify patterns in basal-area increment and drought sensitivity of Atlas cedar in the Middle Atlas, northern Morocco. We estimated the tree-to-tree competition intensity and quantified the structure in Atlas cedar stands with contrasting tree density, age, and decline symptoms. The relative contribution of tree age and size and stand structure to Atlas cedar growth decline was estimated by variance partitioning using partial-redundancy analyses. Recurrent drought events and temperature increases have been identified from local climate records since the 1970s. We detected consistent growth declines and increased drought sensitivity in Atlas cedar across all sites since the early 1980s. Specifically, we determined that previous growth rates and tree age were the strongest tree features, while Quercus rotundifolia basal area was the strongest stand structure measure related to Atlas cedar decline. As a result, we suggest that Atlas cedar forests that have experienced severe drought in combination with grazing and logging may be in the process of shifting dominance toward more drought-tolerant species such as Q. rotundifolia.

  6. Anosmin-1 over-expression regulates oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation, migration and myelin sheath thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Martínez-Hernández, José; Gruart, Agnès; Luján, Rafael; Delgado-García, José María; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    During development of the central nervous system, anosmin-1 (A1) works as a chemotropic cue contributing to axonal outgrowth and collateralization, as well as modulating the migration of different cell types, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) being the main receptor involved in all these events. To further understand the role of A1 during development, we have analysed the over-expression of human A1 in a transgenic mouse line. Compared with control mice during development and in early adulthood, A1 over-expressing transgenic mice showed an enhanced oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) proliferation and a higher number of OPCs in the subventricular zone and in the corpus callosum (CC). The migratory capacity of OPCs from the transgenic mice is increased in vitro due to a higher basal activation of ERK1/2 mediated through FGFR1 and they also produced more myelin basic protein (MBP). In vivo, the over-expression of A1 resulted in an elevated number of mature oligodendrocytes with higher levels of MBP mRNA and protein, as well as increased levels of activation of the ERK1/2 proteins, while electron microscopy revealed thicker myelin sheaths around the axons of the CC in adulthood. Also in the mature CC, the nodes of Ranvier were significantly longer and the conduction velocity of the nerve impulse in vivo was significantly increased in the CC of A1 over-expressing transgenic mice. Altogether, these data confirmed the involvement of A1 in oligodendrogliogenesis and its relevance for myelination.

  7. Increased sensitivity to light-induced damage in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D Alan; Fritz, Jason J; Hauswirth, William W; Kaushal, Shalesh; Lewin, Alfred S

    2007-05-01

    rhodopsin transgene. The results suggest that elimination of the glycosylation site at N15 is associated with increased sensitivity to light-induced damage.

  8. Topiramate treatment is neuroprotective and reduces oligodendrocyte loss after cervical spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Gensel

    Full Text Available Excess glutamate release and associated neurotoxicity contributes to cell death after spinal cord injury (SCI. Indeed, delayed administration of glutamate receptor antagonists after SCI in rodents improves tissue sparing and functional recovery. Despite their therapeutic potential, most glutamate receptor antagonists have detrimental side effects and have largely failed clinical trials. Topiramate is an AMPA-specific, glutamate receptor antagonists that is FDA-approved to treat CNS disorders. In the current study we tested whether topiramate treatment is neuroprotective after cervical contusion injury in rats. We report that topiramate, delivered 15-minutes after SCI, increases tissue sparing and preserves oligodendrocytes and neurons when compared to vehicle treatment. In addition, topiramate is more effective than the AMPA-receptor antagonist, NBQX. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report documenting a neuroprotective effect of topiramate treatment after spinal cord injury.

  9. Sensitivity of mice to lipopolysaccharide is increased by a high saturated fat and cholesterol diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens Rachel L

    2007-11-01

    HCD increased the sensitivity of mice to LPS without affecting its plasma level. Although increased serum amyloid A and CD14 in the circulation may inhibit LPS actions, their overexpression, along with hepatic toll-like receptor-4 or other factors, may contribute to the heightened sensitivity to LPS.

  10. Dynamics of oligodendrocyte responses to anterograde axonal (Wallerian) and terminal degeneration in normal and TNF-transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drøjdahl, Nina; Fenger, Christina; Nielsen, Helle H

    2004-01-01

    degeneration and lesion-induced axonal sprouting in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in TNF-transgenic mice with the response in genetically normal mice. Transectioning of the entorhino-dentate perforant path axonal projection increased hippocampal TNF mRNA expression in both types of mice, but to significantly...... larger levels in the TNF-transgenics. At 5 days after axonal transection, numbers of oligodendrocytes and myelin basic protein (MBP) mRNA expression in the denervated dentate gyrus in TNF-transgenic mice had increased to the same extent as in nontransgenic littermates. At this time, transgenics showed...

  11. Hypoxia increases pulmonary arterial thromboxane receptor internalization independent of receptor sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fediuk, J; Sikarwar, A S; Lizotte, P P; Hinton, M; Nolette, N; Dakshinamurti, S

    2015-02-01

    Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn (PPHN) is characterized by sustained vasospasm and an increased thromboxane:prostacyclin ratio. Thromboxane (TP) receptors signal via Gαq to mobilize IP3 and Ca(2+), causing pulmonary arterial constriction. We have previously reported increased TP internalization in hypoxic pulmonary arterial (PA) myocytes. Serum-deprived PA myocytes were grown in normoxia (NM) or hypoxia (HM) for 72 h. TP localization was visualized in agonist-naïve and -challenged NM and HM by immunocytochemistry. Pathways for agonist-induced TP receptor internalization were determined by inhibiting caveolin- or clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and caveolar fractionation. Roles of actin and tubulin in TP receptor internalization were assessed using inhibitors of tubulin, actin-stabilizing or -destabilizing agents. PKA, PKC or GRK activation and inhibition were used to determine the kinase responsible for post-agonist receptor internalization. Agonist-naïve HM had decreased cell surface TP, and greater TP internalization after agonist challenge. TP protein did not sort with caveolin-rich fractions. Inhibition of clathrin prevented TP internalization. Both actin-stabilizing and -destabilizing agents prevented TP endocytosis in NM, while normalizing TP internalization in HM. Velocity of TP internalization was unaffected by PKA activity, but PKC activation normalized TP receptor internalization in HM. GRK inhibition had no effect. We conclude that in hypoxic myocytes, TP is internalized faster and to a greater extent than in normoxic controls. Internalization of the agonist-challenged TP requires clathrin, dynamic actin and is sensitive to PKC activity. TP receptor trafficking and signaling in hypoxia are pivotal to understanding increased vasoconstrictor sensitivity.

  12. BRCA1 deficiency increases the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to auranofin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oommen, Deepu [School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Yiannakis, Dennis [Plymouth Oncology Centre, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N., E-mail: a.jha@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • BRCA1 deficient cancer cells exhibit increased DNA damage upon auranofin treatment. • Auranofin induces apoptosis in BRCA1 deficient cancer cells despite the activation of Nrf2. • Antioxidant protects BRCA1 deficient cancer cells from auranofin. - Abstract: Auranofin, a thioredoxin reductase inhibitor and an anti-rheumatic drug is currently undergoing phase 2 clinical studies for repurposing to treat recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Previous studies have established that auranofin exerts its cytotoxic activity by increasing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) is a DNA repair protein whose functional status is critical in the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Apart from its key role in DNA repair, BRCA1 is also known to modulate cellular redox homeostasis by regulating the stability of anti-oxidant transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2—related factor 2 (Nrf2) via direct protein–protein interaction. However, it is currently unknown whether BRCA1 modulates the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to auranofin. Here we report that BRCA1-depleted cells exhibited increased DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and decreased clonogenic cell survival upon auranofin treatment. Interestingly, auranofin induced the expression of Nrf2 in BRCA1-depleted cells suggesting its regulation independent of BRCA1. Furthermore, anti-oxidant agent, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) protected BRCA1-depleted cells from DNA damage and apoptosis induced by auranofin. Our study suggests that accumulated lethal DSBs resulting from the oxidative damage render BRCA1 deficient cells more sensitive to auranofin despite the activation of Nrf2.

  13. Soybean fermentation with Bacillus licheniformis increases insulin sensitizing and insulinotropic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Dae Young; Moon, Na Rang; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Hee Joo; Jung, Do Yeon; Park, Sunmin

    2013-11-01

    Traditionally fermented soybeans (chungkookjang; TFC) may have potent anti-diabetic activity, depending on the ambient microorganisms and conditions. We hypothesized that one of the major Bacillus species in TFC contributes to the anti-diabetic activity and could be used to standardize a highly functional TFC. We tested the hypothesis by using cell-based studies to evaluate insulin sensitizing and insulinotropic action of chungkookjangs fermented with various Bacillus spp. and fermentation periods. The 70% methanol and water extracts of chungkookjang fermented with Bacillus licheniformis (BL) for 48 h contained similar profiles of isoflavonoids and peptides to methanol and water extracts of TFC with potent anti-diabetic activity. Water extracts (mainly containing peptides) of TFC and BL fermented for 48 h and 72 h had a better insulin sensitizing action via activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and increased the expression of PPAR-γ in 3T3-L1 adipocytes better than unfermented cooked soybeans (CSB). The 70% methanol extracts (predominantly isoflavone aglycones) of BL fermented for 48 h and 72 h improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and protected β-cell viability better than CSB in insulinoma cells, and the improvement by BL was similar to TFC. In conclusion, the BL water extract fermented for 48 h exhibited equal insulin sensitization as TFC and BL methanol extract exerted similar insulinotropic actions to those of TFC. B. licheniformis may be one of the major microorganisms responsible for anti-diabetic actions of chungkookjang. It is important to make chungkookjang that retains the anti-diabetic properties of the most efficacious traditional chungkookjang using a standardized method.

  14. How big is the myelinating orchestra? Cellular diversity within the oligodendrocyte lineage: facts and hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Fossati, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Since monumental studies from scientists like His, Ramón y Cajal, Lorente de Nó and many others have put down roots for modern neuroscience, the scientific community has spent a considerable amount of time, and money, investigating any possible aspect of the evolution, development and function of neurons. Today, the complexity and diversity of myriads of neuronal populations, and their progenitors, is still focus of extensive studies in hundreds of laboratories around the world. However, our prevalent neuron-centric perspective has dampened the efforts in understanding glial cells, even though their active participation in the brain physiology and pathophysiology has been increasingly recognized over the years. Among all glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocytes (OLs) are a particularly specialized type of cells that provide fundamental support to neuronal activity by producing the myelin sheath. Despite their functional relevance, the developmental mechanisms regulating the generation of OLs are still poorly understood. In particular, it is still not known whether these cells share the same degree of heterogeneity of their neuronal companions and whether multiple subtypes exist within the lineage. Here, we will review and discuss current knowledge about OL development and function in the brain and spinal cord. We will try to address some specific questions: do multiple OL subtypes exist in the CNS? What is the evidence for their existence and those against them? What are the functional features that define an oligodendrocyte? We will end our journey by reviewing recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell differentiation towards OLs. This exciting field is still at its earliest days, but it is quickly evolving with improved protocols to generate functional OLs from different spatial origins. As stem cells constitute now an unprecedented source of human OLs, we believe that they will become an increasingly valuable tool for deciphering

  15. Suramin induces and enhances apoptosis in a model of hyperoxia-induced oligodendrocyte injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Simone; Schuller, Alexandra; Sifringer, Marco; Gerstner, Bettina; Brehmer, Felix; Weber, Sven; Altmann, Rodica; Obladen, Michael; Buhrer, Christoph; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests oxygen as a powerful trigger for cell death in the immature white matter, leading to periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) as a cause of adverse neurological outcome in survivors of preterm birth. This oligodendrocyte (OL) death is associated with oxidative stress, upregulation of apoptotic signaling factors (i.e., Fas, caspase-3) and decreased amounts of neurotrophins. In search of neuroprotective strategies we investigated whether the polysulfonated urea derivative suramin, recently identified as a potent inhibitor of Fas signaling, affords neuroprotection in an in vitro model of hyperoxia-induced injury to immature oligodendrocytes. Immature OLs (OLN-93) were subjected to 80% hyperoxia (48 h) in the presence or absence of suramin (0, 30, 60, 120 microM). Cell death was assessed by flow cytometry (Annexin V, caspase-3 activity assay) and immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3. Immunoblotting for the death receptor Fas, cleaved caspase-8 and the phosphorylated isoform of the serine-threonin kinase Akt (pAkt) was performed. Suramin lead to OL apoptosis and potentiated hyperoxia-induced injury in a dose-dependent manner. Immunoblotting revealed increased Fas and caspase-8 expression by suramin treatment. This effect was significantly enhanced when suramin was combined with hyperoxia. Furthermore, pAkt levels decreased following suramin exposure, indicating interference with neurotrophin-dependent growth factor signaling. These data indicate that suramin causes apoptotic cell death and aggravates hyperoxia-induced cell death in immature OLs. Its mechanism of action includes an increase of previously described hyperoxia-induced expression of pro-apoptotic factors and deprivation of growth factor dependent signaling components.

  16. How big is the myelinating orchestra? Cellular diversity within the oligodendrocyte lineage: facts and hypotheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio eSrubek Tomassy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since monumental studies from scientists like His, Ramón y Cajal, Lorente de Nó and many others have put down roots for modern neuroscience, the scientific community has spent a considerable amount of time, and money, investigating any aspect of the evolution, development and function of neurons. Today, the complexity and diversity of myriads of neuronal populations is still focus of extensive studies in hundreds of laboratories around the world. However, our prevalent neuron-centric perspective has dampened the efforts in understanding glial cells, even though their active participation in the brain physiology and pathophysiology has been increasingly recognized over the years. Among all glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS, oligodendrocytes (OLs are a particularly specialized type of cells that provide fundamental support to neuronal activity by producing the myelin sheath. Despite their functional relevance, the developmental mechanisms regulating the generation of OLs are still poorly understood. In particular, it is still not known whether these cells share the same degree of heterogeneity of their neuronal companions and whether multiple subtypes exist within the lineage. Here, we will review and discuss current knowledge about OL development and function in the brain and spinal cord. We will try to address some specific questions: do multiple OL subtypes exist in the CNS? What is the evidence for their existence and those against them? What are the functional features that define an oligodendrocyte? We will end our journey by reviewing recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell differentiation towards OLs. This exciting field is still at its earliest days, but it is quickly evolving with improved protocols to generate functional OLs from different spatial origins. As stem cells constitute now an unprecedented source of human OLs, we believe that they will become an increasingly valuable tool for deciphering the complexity

  17. Increased sensitivity to cocaine-induced analgesia in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Fabrício A; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2007-02-13

    This study examined the analgesic effect of cocaine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR), which are considered a suitable model for the study of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and in Wistar (WIS) rats of both sexes using the hot-plate test. In addition, we tested whether habituation to the unheated hot-plate apparatus, that "normalizes" the basal hypoalgesic phenotype of SHR, alters the subsequent cocaine-induced analgesia (CIA) in this strain. SHR of both sexes were hypoalgesic compared to WIS rats in the hot-plate test and showed higher sensitivity to CIA. Habituation to the unheated hot-plate reduced the basal nociceptive latency of SHR, suggesting cognitive/emotional modulation of pain in this strain, but did not alter the magnitude of CIA. The present study shows increased sensitivity to CIA in SHR, which may be related to abnormalities in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system. Further studies using SHR strain may reveal new information on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying ADHD and its co-morbidity with drug addiction.

  18. Faster quantitative real-time PCR protocols may lose sensitivity and show increased variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilscher, Chelsey; Vahrson, Wolfgang; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2005-11-27

    Quantitative real-time PCR has become the method of choice for measuring mRNA transcription. Recently, fast PCR protocols have been developed as a means to increase assay throughput. Yet it is unclear whether more rapid cycling conditions preserve the original assay performance characteristics. We compared 16 primer sets directed against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) mRNAs using universal and fast PCR cycling conditions. These primers are of clinical relevance, since they can be used to monitor viral oncogene and drug-resistance gene expression in transplant patients and EBV-associated cancers. While none of the primers failed under fast PCR conditions, the fast PCR protocols performed worse than universal cycling conditions. Fast PCR was associated with a loss of sensitivity as well as higher variability, but not with a loss of specificity or with a higher false positive rate.

  19. TIMP-1 gene deficiency increases tumour cell sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Marie Louise; Würts, S.Ø.; Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed;

    2006-01-01

    in cancer. In this regard, several studies have demonstrated an antiapoptotic effect of TIMP-1 in a number of different cell types. Since chemotherapy works by inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, we raised the hypothesis that TIMP-1 promotes resistance against chemotherapeutic drugs. In order to investigate...... this hypothesis, we have established TIMP-1 gene-deficient and TIMP-1 wild-type fibrosarcoma cells from mouse lung tissue. We have characterised these cells with regard to TIMP-1 genotype, TIMP-1 expression, malignant transformation and sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. We show that TIMP-1 gene...... deficiency increases the response to chemotherapy considerably, confirming that TIMP-1 protects the cells from apoptosis. This is to our knowledge the first study investigating TIMP-1 and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis employing a powerful model system comprising TIMP-1 gene-deficient cells...

  20. Osteoblasts detect pericellular calcium concentration increase via neomycin-sensitive voltage gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuanhao; Kishore, Vipuil; Fites, Kateri; Akkus, Ozan

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the detection of critically loaded or micro-damaged regions of bone by bone cells are still a matter of debate. Our previous studies showed that calcium efflux originates from pre-failure regions of bone matrix and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts respond to such efflux by an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration. The mechanisms by which the intracellular calcium concentration increases in response to an increase in the pericellular calcium concentration are unknown. Elevation of the intracellular calcium may occur via release from the internal calcium stores of the cell and/or via the membrane bound channels. The current study applied a wide range of pharmaceutical inhibitors to identify the calcium entry pathways involved in the process: internal calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER, inhibited by thapsigargin and TMB-8), calcium receptor (CaSR, inhibited by calhex), stretch-activated calcium channel (SACC, inhibited by gadolinium), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC, inhibited by nifedipine, verapamil, neomycin, and ω-conotoxin), and calcium-induced-calcium-release channel (CICRC, inhibited by ryanodine and dantrolene). These inhibitors were screened for their effectiveness to block intracellular calcium increase by using a concentration gradient induced calcium efflux model which mimics calcium diffusion from the basal aspect of cells. The inhibitor(s) which reduced the intracellular calcium response was further tested on osteoblasts seeded on mechanically loaded notched cortical bone wafers undergoing damage. The results showed that only neomycin reduced the intracellular calcium response in osteoblasts, by 27%, upon extracellular calcium stimulus induced by concentration gradient. The inhibitory effect of neomycin was more pronounced (75% reduction in maximum fluorescence) for osteoblasts seeded on notched cortical bone wafers loaded mechanically to damaging load levels. These results imply that the increase in

  1. Increased BOLD sensitivity in the orbitofrontal cortex using slice-dependent echo times at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domsch, Sebastian; Linke, Julia; Heiler, Patrick M; Kroll, Alexander; Flor, Herta; Wessa, Michèle; Schad, Lothar R

    2013-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) exploits the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect to detect neuronal activation related to various experimental paradigms. Some of these, such as reversal learning, involve the orbitofrontal cortex and its interaction with other brain regions like the amygdala, striatum or dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These paradigms are commonly investigated with event-related methods and gradient echo-planar imaging (EPI) with short echo time of 27 ms. However, susceptibility-induced signal losses and image distortions in the orbitofrontal cortex are still a problem for this optimized sequence as this brain region consists of several slices with different optimal echo times. An EPI sequence with slice-dependent echo times is suitable to maximize BOLD sensitivity in all slices and might thus improve signal detection in the orbitofrontal cortex. To test this hypothesis, we first optimized echo times via BOLD sensitivity simulation. Second, we measured 12 healthy volunteers using a standard EPI sequence with an echo time of 27 ms and a modified EPI sequence with echo times ranging from 22 ms to 47 ms. In the orbitofrontal cortex, the number of activated voxels increased from 87 ± 44 to 549 ± 83 and the maximal t-value increased from 4.4 ± 0.3 to 5.4 ± 0.3 when the modified EPI was used. We conclude that an EPI with slice-dependent echo times may be a valuable tool to mitigate susceptibility artifacts in event-related whole-brain fMRI studies with a focus on the orbitofrontal cortex.

  2. Addiction: Decreased reward sensitivity and increased expectation sensitivity conspire to overwhelm the brain’s control circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.; Baler, R.

    2010-07-01

    Based on brain imaging findings, we present a model according to which addiction emerges as an imbalance in the information processing and integration among various brain circuits and functions. The dysfunctions reflect (a) decreased sensitivity of reward circuits, (b) enhanced sensitivity of memory circuits to conditioned expectations to drugs and drug cues, stress reactivity, and (c) negative mood, and a weakened control circuit. Although initial experimentation with a drug of abuse is largely a voluntary behavior, continued drug use can eventually impair neuronal circuits in the brain that are involved in free will, turning drug use into an automatic compulsive behavior. The ability of addictive drugs to co-opt neurotransmitter signals between neurons (including dopamine, glutamate, and GABA) modifies the function of different neuronal circuits, which begin to falter at different stages of an addiction trajectory. Upon exposure to the drug, drug cues or stress this results in unrestrained hyperactivation of the motivation/drive circuit that results in the compulsive drug intake that characterizes addiction.

  3. MiR-224 expression increases radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upraity, Shailendra; Kazi, Sadaf; Padul, Vijay; Shirsat, Neelam Vishwanath, E-mail: nshirsat@actrec.gov.in

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • MiR-224 expression in established glioblastoma cell lines and sporadic tumor tissues is low. • Exogenous miR-224 expression was found to increase radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells. • MiR-224 expression brought about 55–60% reduction in API5 expression levels. • Transfection with API5 siRNA increased radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells. • Low miR-224 and high API5 expression correlated with worse survival of GBM patients. - Abstract: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly aggressive primary malignant brain tumor. The intrinsic resistance of this brain tumor limits the efficacy of administered treatment like radiation therapy. In the present study, effect of miR-224 expression on growth characteristics of established GBM cell lines was analyzed. MiR-224 expression in the cell lines as well as in primary GBM tumor tissues was found to be low. Exogenous transient expression of miR-224 using either synthetic mimics or stable inducible expression using doxycycline inducible lentiviral vector carrying miR-224 gene, was found to bring about 30–55% reduction in clonogenic potential of U87 MG cells. MiR-224 expression reduced clonogenic potential of U87 MG cells by 85–90% on irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy, a dose that brought about 50% reduction in clonogenic potential in the absence of miR-224 expression. MiR-224 expression in glioblastoma cells resulted in 55–65% reduction in the expression levels of API5 gene, a known target of miR-224. Further, siRNA mediated down-regulation of API5 was also found to have radiation sensitizing effect on glioblastoma cell lines. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas data showed lower miR-224 expression levels in male GBM patients to correlate with poorer survival. Higher expression levels of miR-224 target API5 also showed significant correlation with poorer survival of GBM patients. Up-regulation of miR-224 or down-regulation of its target API5 in combination with radiation therapy

  4. Increased Replicative Fitness Can Lead to Decreased Drug Sensitivity of Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Julie; Beach, Nathan M.; Moreno, Elena; Gallego, Isabel; Piñeiro, David; Martínez-Salas, Encarnación; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rice, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Passage of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human hepatoma cells resulted in populations that displayed partial resistance to alpha interferon (IFN-α), telaprevir, daclatasvir, cyclosporine, and ribavirin, despite no prior exposure to these drugs. Mutant spectrum analyses and kinetics of virus production in the absence and presence of drugs indicate that resistance is not due to the presence of drug resistance mutations in the mutant spectrum of the initial or passaged populations but to increased replicative fitness acquired during passage. Fitness increases did not alter host factors that lead to shutoff of general host cell protein synthesis and preferential translation of HCV RNA. The results imply that viral replicative fitness is a mechanism of multidrug resistance in HCV. IMPORTANCE Viral drug resistance is usually attributed to the presence of amino acid substitutions in the protein targeted by the drug. In the present study with HCV, we show that high viral replicative fitness can confer a general drug resistance phenotype to the virus. The results exclude the possibility that genomes with drug resistance mutations are responsible for the observed phenotype. The fact that replicative fitness can be a determinant of multidrug resistance may explain why the virus is less sensitive to drug treatments in prolonged chronic HCV infections that favor increases in replicative fitness. PMID:25122776

  5. Early loss of oligodendrocytes in human and experimental neuromyelitis optica lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzos, Claudia; Winkler, Anne; Metz, Imke; Kayser, Dieter M; Thal, Dietmar R; Wegner, Christiane; Brück, Wolfgang; Nessler, Stefan; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Stadelmann, Christine

    2014-04-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a chronic, mostly relapsing inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS characterized by serum anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4) antibodies in the majority of patients. Anti-AQP4 antibodies derived from NMO patients target and deplete astrocytes in experimental models when co-injected with complement. However, the time course and mechanisms of oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination and the fate of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) have not been examined in detail. Also, no studies regarding astrocyte repopulation of experimental NMO lesions have been reported. We utilized two rat models using either systemic transfer or focal intracerebral injection of recombinant human anti-AQP4 antibodies to generate NMO-like lesions. Time-course experiments were performed to examine oligodendroglial and astroglial damage and repair. In addition, oligodendrocyte pathology was studied in early human NMO lesions. Apart from early complement-mediated astrocyte destruction, we observed a prominent, very early loss of oligodendrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) as well as a delayed loss of myelin. Astrocyte repopulation of focal NMO lesions was already substantial after 1 week. Olig2-positive OPCs reappeared before NogoA-positive, mature oligodendrocytes. Thus, using two experimental models that closely mimic the human disease, our study demonstrates that oligodendrocyte and OPC loss is an extremely early feature in the formation of human and experimental NMO lesions and leads to subsequent, delayed demyelination, highlighting an important difference in the pathogenesis of MS and NMO.

  6. Differentiation of rat oligodendrocyte precursor cells in chemical conditional medium in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate in vitro differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) into mature oligodendrocytes in chemical conditional medium. Methods: The mixed glial cells from cerebral cortices of 48-hour-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were cultured in vitro. The OPCs were separated by shaking procedure around 9-10 d in the primary culture. Then the isolated OPCs were further transferred into the chemical conditional medium for cell differentiation. The pattern of OPCs maturation in vitro was continuously observed with contrast phase microscopy and mature oligodendrocytes were further identified by immunocytochemical assays. Results: OPCs grew well when co-cultured with glial cells and distinct cellular stratification formed about 9-10 d in the primary culture, which indicated the appropriate opportunity for the separation of OPCs. Following cultured in the chemical conditional medium, the OPCs progressively differentiated into the mature oligodendrocytes. These mature oligodendrocytes were also immunostained with the oligodendrocyte lineage-specific antibody, Oligo2. Conclusion: The OPCs isolated from the cerebral cortices of neonatal SD rats can progressively differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes in the chemical conditional medium in vitro.

  7. Peripheral Sensitization Increases Opioid Receptor Expression and Activation by Crotalphine in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Vanessa Olzon; Fernandes, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Gutierrez, Vanessa Pacciari; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Cury, Yara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation enhances the peripheral analgesic efficacy of opioid drugs, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. Crotalphine (CRP), a peptide that was first isolated from South American rattlesnake C.d. terrificus venom, induces a potent and long-lasting anti-nociceptive effect that is mediated by the activation of peripheral opioid receptors. Because the high efficacy of CRP is only observed in the presence of inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the CRP anti-nociceptive effect induced by inflammation. Using real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA assays, we demonstrate that the intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases the mRNA and protein levels of the µ- and κ-opioid receptors in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and paw tissue of rats within 3 h of the injection. Using conformation state-sensitive antibodies that recognize activated opioid receptors, we show that PGE2, alone does not increase the activation of these opioid receptors but that in the presence of PGE2, the activation of specific opioid receptors by CRP and selective µ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists (positive controls) increases. Furthermore, PGE2 down-regulated the expression and activation of the δ-opioid receptor. CRP increased the level of activated mitogen-activated protein kinases in cultured DRG neurons, and this increase was dependent on the activation of protein kinase Cζ. This CRP effect was much more prominent when the cells were pretreated with PGE2. These results indicate that the expression and activation of peripheral opioid receptors by opioid-like drugs can be up- or down-regulated in the presence of an acute injury and that acute tissue injury enhances the efficacy of peripheral opioids. PMID:24594607

  8. Effects of ocean acidification increase embryonic sensitivity to thermal extremes in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Flemming T; Leo, Elettra; Mark, Felix C; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Bickmeyer, Ulf; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Storch, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Thermal tolerance windows serve as a powerful tool for estimating the vulnerability of marine species and their life stages to increasing temperature means and extremes. However, it remains uncertain to which extent additional drivers, such as ocean acidification, modify organismal responses to temperature. This study investigated the effects of CO2 -driven ocean acidification on embryonic thermal sensitivity and performance in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, from the Kattegat. Fertilized eggs were exposed to factorial combinations of two PCO2 conditions (400 μatm vs. 1100 μatm) and five temperature treatments (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 °C), which allow identifying both lower and upper thermal tolerance thresholds. We quantified hatching success, oxygen consumption (MO2 ) and mitochondrial functioning of embryos as well as larval morphometrics at hatch and the abundance of acid-base-relevant ionocytes on the yolk sac epithelium of newly hatched larvae. Hatching success was high under ambient spawning conditions (3-6 °C), but decreased towards both cold and warm temperature extremes. Elevated PCO2 caused a significant decrease in hatching success, particularly at cold (3 and 0 °C) and warm (12 °C) temperatures. Warming imposed limitations to MO2 and mitochondrial capacities. Elevated PCO2 stimulated MO2 at cold and intermediate temperatures, but exacerbated warming-induced constraints on MO2 , indicating a synergistic interaction with temperature. Mitochondrial functioning was not affected by PCO2 . Increased MO2 in response to elevated PCO2 was paralleled by reduced larval size at hatch. Finally, ionocyte abundance decreased with increasing temperature, but did not differ between PCO2 treatments. Our results demonstrate increased thermal sensitivity of cod embryos under future PCO2 conditions and suggest that acclimation to elevated PCO2 requires reallocation of limited resources at the expense of embryonic growth. We conclude that ocean acidification constrains

  9. Severe Convulsions and Dysmyelination in Both Jimpy and Cx32/47 (-/-) Mice may Associate Astrocytic L-Channel Function with Myelination and Oligodendrocytic Connexins with Internodal Kv Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Y H Gerald; Chen, Ye; Hertz, Elna; Hertz, Leif

    2017-02-18

    The Jimpy mouse illustrates the importance of interactions between astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. It has a mutation in Plp coding for proteolipid protein and DM20. Its behavior is normal at birth but from the age of ~2 weeks it shows severe convulsions associated with oligodendrocyte/myelination deficits and early death. A normally occurring increase in oxygen consumption by highly elevated K(+) concentrations is absent in Jimpy brain slices and cultured astrocytes, reflecting that Plp at early embryonic stages affects common precursors as also shown by the ability of conditioned medium from normal astrocytes to counteract histological abnormalities. This metabolic response is now known to reflect opening of L-channels for Ca(2+). The resulting deficiency in Ca(2+) entry has many consequences, including lack of K(+)-stimulated glycogenolysis and release of gliotransmitter ATP. Lack of purinergic stimulation compromises oligodendrocyte survival and myelination and affects connexins and K(+) channels. Mice lacking the oligodendrocytic connexins Cx32 and 47 show similar neurological dysfunction as Jimpy. This possibly reflects that K(+) released by intermodal axonal Kv channels is transported underneath a loosened myelin sheath instead of reaching the extracellular space via connexin-mediated transport to oligodendrocytes, followed by release and astrocytic Na(+),K(+)-ATPase-driven uptake with subsequent Kir4.1-facilitated release and neuronal uptake.

  10. Salinomycin sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells by increasing apoptosis via the prevention of G2 arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoo, Hye-In; Kang, Han Sung; Ro, Jungsil [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sungpil, E-mail: yoons@ncc.re.kr [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes them by prevention of G2 arrest and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal also sensitizes them by increasing DNA damage and reducing p21 level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low concentration of Sal effectively sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether Sal could sensitize cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. We demonstrated that Sal sensitized paclitaxcel (PAC)-, docetaxcel (DOC)-, vinblastin (VIN)-, or colchicine (COL)-treated cancer cell lines, suggesting that Sal has the ability to sensitize the cells to any form of microtubule-targeting drugs. Sensitization to the antimitotic drugs could be achieved with very low concentrations of Sal, suggesting that there is a possibility to minimize Sal toxicity associated with human cancer patient treatments. Sensitization by Sal increased apoptosis, which was observed by C-PARP production. Sal sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by preventing G2 arrest, suggesting that Sal contributes to the induction of mitotic catastrophe. Sal generally reduced cyclin D1 levels in PAC-, DOC-, and VIN-treated cells. In addition, Sal treatment increased pH2AX levels and reduced p21 levels in antimitotic drugs-treated cells. These observations suggest that the mechanisms underlying Sal sensitization to DNA-damaging compounds, radiation, and microtubule-targeting drugs are similar. Our data demonstrated that Sal sensitizes cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by increasing apoptosis through the prevention of G2 arrest via conserved Sal-sensitization mechanisms. These results may contribute to the development of Sal-based chemotherapy for cancer patients treated with antimitotic drugs.

  11. Pathogenesis of myelin/oligodendrocyte damage in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhib-Jalbut, Suhayl

    2007-05-29

    Substantial evidence supports autoimmune activity as the etiologic mechanism underlying multiple sclerosis (MS). Both the innate and the adaptive arms of the immune system are involved in the aberrant response to several antigens associated with the myelin sheath and oligodendrocytes (OGCs) after the activation of immune cells by self- or cross-reactive microbial pathogens. The CD4(+) Th1 cell, in particular, has been implicated, but it is abetted by a variety of other cell types (CD8(+) cells, B cells, macrophages, and microglia) and soluble products (proteases, cytokines, and nitric oxide [NO]) that act both outside of and within the CNS. This review describes recent and salient findings from animal models and human clinical studies that have established our current understanding of the distinct steps in the development of immune autoreactivity that culminates in the CNS lesions associated with MS.

  12. The relationship between developing oligodendrocyte units and maturing axons during myelinogenesis in the anterior medullary velum of neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, A M; Ibrahim, M; Berry, M

    1997-05-01

    Myelinogenesis was investigated in whole-mounted anterior medullary vela from rats aged postnatal day (P) 10-12, using double immunofluorescence labelling with Rip and anti-neurofilament 200 (NF200) antibodies, to identify oligodendrocytes and axons, respectively. A number of discrete phases of maturation of oligodendrocyte units were recognised. (1) Promyelinating oligodendrocytes co-expressed Rip and Myelin basic Protein and formed axonal associations, prior to ensheathment. (2) Transitional oligodendrocytes contained both ensheathing and non-ensheating processes. (3) Myelinating oligodendrocytes were established after a period of remodelling (in which non-ensheathing processes were lost), appearing as oligodendrocyte unit morphological phenotypes with a definitive number of incipient myelin sheaths. (4) Maturation of myelinating oligodendrocytes was defined as the establishment of internodal sheath lengths and the redistrubution of myelin basic protein from the cell somata and radial processes into the myelin sheaths only. Myelination was probably related to the maturational state of the axons, since it was initiated when the latter had attained a critical diameter of between approximately 0.2 and 0.4 micron, coincident with the expression of NF200. Oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination of the AMV were asynchronous and multifocal, and at P10: (1) axons which were destined to be of the largest calibre in the adult AMV were already myelinated by early developing oligodendrocytes, whilst those which were destined to be the smallest calibre in the adult were unmyelinated, but ultimately became ensheathed by late developing oligoendrocytes; (2) axons were sequentially ensheathed by early developing myelinating oligodendrocytes and late developing promyelinating oligodendrocytes; (3) all axons were small calibre; (4) oligodendrocyte units exhibited polymorphism. Thus, the development of oligodendrocyte morphological phenotypes was not related solely to

  13. Electroacupuncture promotes the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and oligodendrocytes in the injured spinal cord of adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiying Wu; Min Hu; Dekai Yuan; Yunhui Wang; Jing Wang; Tao Li; Chuanyun Qian

    2012-01-01

    A contusive model of spinal cord injury at spinal segment T8-9 was established in rats. Huantiao (GB30) and Huatuojiaji (Ex-B05) were punctured with needles, and endogenous neural stem cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and NG2. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that electroacupuncture markedly increased the numbers of BrdU+/NG2+ cells at spinal cord tissue 15 mm away from the injury center in the rostral and caudal directions. The results suggest that electroacupuncture promotes the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and oligodendrocytes in rats with spinal cord injury.

  14. Increased salt sensitivity induced by sensory denervation:role of superoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-zhong SONG; Alex F CHEN; Donna H WANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To test the hypothesis that production of superoxide in mesenteric resistance arteries is increased and contributes to the development of hypertension induced by sensory denervation plus high salt intake. METHODS:Newborn Wistar rats were given capsaicin 50mg/kg sc on the 1st and 2nd d of life. After weaning, male rats were grouped as follows and treated for 3 weeks with: capsaicin pretreatment plus normal sodium diet (0.5%, CAP-NS),CAP plus high sodium diet (4%, CAP-HS), control plus NS (CON-NS), or CON-HS. Both tail-cuff systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured in each of the groups. Western blot analysis was used for measurement of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the mesenteric resistance arteries. Lucigenin chemiluminescence assay was used for superoxide production in the mesenteric resistance arteries. The Griess method was used for measurement of nitrite/nitrate levels in plasma.RESULTS: Both tail-cuff pressure and MAP were higher in CAP-HS compared with CAP-NS, CON-HS, and CONNS rats (P<0.05). Both MnSOD and eNOS in the mesenteric resistance arteries were increased in CAP-HS compared with CAP-NS, CON-HS, and CON-NS (P<0.05). However, nitrite/nitrate levels in plasma were not different among 4 groups. Acute iv administration of tempol, a membrane-permeable superoxide scavenger, decreased MAP in both CAP-HS and CON-HS when compared with their respective controls. However, the decreases of MAP between these two groups were not different. Chronic treatment with tempol failed to prevent the development of hypertension in CAP-HS rats. Superoxide production in the mesenteric resistance arteries was increased in CAP-HS compared with CAP-NS, CON-HS, and CON-NS (P<0.05). However, chronic treatment with tempol did not prevent the increase of mesenteric superoxide production in CAP-HS rats. CONCLUSIONS:Regardless of increased vascular MnSOD levels, salt sensitive hypertension

  15. IL-35 over-expression increases apoptosis sensitivity and suppresses cell growth in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jun; Zhang, Xulong; Wen, Mingjie; Kong, Qingli; Lv, Zhe; An, Yunqing; Wei, Xiao-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is a novel heterodimeric cytokine in the IL-12 family and is composed of two subunits: Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) and IL-12p35. IL-35 is expressed in T regulatory (Treg) cells and contributes to the immune suppression function of these cells. In contrast, we found that both IL-35 subunits were expressed concurrently in most human cancer cell lines compared to normal cell lines. In addition, we found that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulation led to increased IL-35 expression in human cancer cells. Furthermore, over-expression of IL-35 in human cancer cells suppressed cell growth in vitro, induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and mediated robust apoptosis induced by serum starvation, TNF-α, and IFN-γ stimulation through the up-regulation of Fas and concurrent down-regulation of cyclinD1, survivin, and Bcl-2 expression. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel functional role for IL-35 in suppressing cancer activity, inhibiting cancer cell growth, and increasing the apoptosis sensitivity of human cancer cells through the regulation of genes related to the cell cycle and apoptosis. Thus, this research provides new insights into IL-35 function and presents a possible target for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  16. The new horizon in 2D electrophoresis: new technology to increase resolution and sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Martin; Albrecht, Dirk; Maaß, Sandra; Hecker, Michael; Westermeier, Reiner; Büttner, Knut

    2013-06-01

    A principally new type of an electrophoresis setup for the second dimension of 2DE named HPE (high performance electrophoresis) has recently become available that provides excellent reproducibility much superior to traditional 2DE. It takes up ideas from early beginnings of 2DE which could not be satisfactory realized at that time. The new HPE system is in contrast to all other established systems a horizontal electrophoresis that employs a new type of precast polyacrylamide gels on film-backing and runs on a multilevel flatbed electrophoresis apparatus. In a systematic approach we compared its features to traditional 2DE for the cytosolic proteome of Bacillus subtilis. Not only the reproducibility is enhanced, but also nearly all qualitative parameters as resolution, sensitivity, the number of protein spots (25% more), and the number of different proteins (also additional 25%) are markedly increased. More than 200 proteins were exclusively found in HPE. This new electrophoresis system does not use buffer tanks. No glass plates are needed. Therefore handling of gels is greatly facilitated and very simple to use even for personnel with low technical skills. The new HPE system is technically at the beginnings and further development with increased performance can be expected.

  17. Offspring of prenatal IV nicotine exposure exhibit increased sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of methamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Brown Harrod

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with increased substance abuse in offspring. Preclinical research shows that in utero exposure to nicotine, the primary psychoactive compound in tobacco smoke, influences the neurodevelopment of reward systems and alters motivated behavior in offspring. The present study determined if prenatal nicotine (PN exposure altered the sensitivity to the reinforcing and aversive effects of methamphetamine (METH in offspring using a low dose, intravenous (IV exposure method. Pregnant dams were administered nicotine (0.05 mg/kg/injection or prenatal saline (PS 3×/day on gestational days 8-21, and adult offspring were tested using METH self-administration (experiment 1 or METH-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA; experiment 2 procedures. For METH self-administration, animals were trained to respond for IV METH (0.05 mg/kg/injection; fixed-ratio 3 and they were tested on varying doses the reinforcer (0.0005-1.0 mg/kg/injection. For METH CTA, rats received three saccharin and METH pairings (0, 0.3, or 0.5 mg/kg, sc followed by fourteen daily extinction trials. Experiment 1: PN and PS animals exhibited inverted U-shaped dose-response curves; however, the PN animal’s curve was shifted to the left, suggesting PN animals were more sensitive to the reinforcing effects of METH. Experiment 2: METH CTA was acquired in a dose-dependent manner and the factor of PN exposure was not related to the acquisition or extinction of METH-induced CTA. There were no sex differences in either experiment. These results indicate that adult offspring of IV PN exposure exhibited altered motivation for the reinforcing effects of METH. This suggests that PN exposure, via maternal smoking, will alter the reinforcing effects of METH during later stages of development, and furthermore, will influence substance use vulnerability in adult human offspring.

  18. Gestational hypothyroidism increases the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in adult offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, Eduardo A; Carreño, Leandro J; Cortes, Claudia M; Gonzalez, Pablo A; Cisternas, Pablo A; Cautivo, Kelly M; Catalán, Tamara P; Opazo, M Cecilia; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Berman, Joan W; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M; Riedel, Claudia A

    2013-12-01

    Maternal thyroid hormones play a fundamental role in appropriate fetal development during gestation. Offspring that have been gestated under maternal hypothyroidism suffer cognitive impairment. Thyroid hormone deficiency during gestation can significantly impact the central nervous system by altering the migration, differentiation, and function of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. Given that gestational hypothyroidism alters the immune cell ratio in offspring, it is possible that this condition could result in higher sensitivity for the development of autoimmune diseases. Adult mice gestated under hypothyroidism were induced with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Twenty-one days after EAE induction, the disease score, myelin content, immune cell infiltration, and oligodendrocyte death were evaluated. We observed that mice gestated under hypothyroidism showed higher EAE scores after disease induction during adulthood compared to mice gestated in euthyroidism. In addition, spinal cord sections of mice gestated under hypothyroidism that suffered EAE in adulthood showed higher demyelination, CD4(+) and CD8(+) infiltration, and increased oligodendrocyte death. These results show for the first time that a deficiency in maternal thyroid hormones during gestation can influence the outcome of a central nervous system inflammatory disease, such as EAE, in their offspring. These data strongly support evaluating thyroid hormones in pregnant women and treating hypothyroidism during pregnancy to prevent increased susceptibility to inflammatory diseases in the central nervous system of offspring.

  19. Protective Effect of Electroacupuncture on Neural Myelin Sheaths is Mediated via Promotion of Oligodendrocyte Proliferation and Inhibition of Oligodendrocyte Death After Compressed Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Siqin; Tang, Chenglin; Sun, Shanquan; Cao, Wenfu; Qi, Wei; Xu, Jin; Huang, Juan; Lu, Weitian; Liu, Qian; Gong, Biao; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been used worldwide to treat demyelinating diseases, but its therapeutic mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, a custom-designed model of compressed spinal cord injury (CSCI) was used to induce demyelination. Zusanli (ST36) and Taixi (KI3) acupoints of adult rats were stimulated by EA to demonstrate its protective effect. At 14 days after EA, both locomotor skills and ultrastructural features of myelin sheath were significantly improved. Phenotypes of proliferating cells were identified by double immunolabeling of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine with antibodies to cell markers: NG2 [oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) marker], 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) (oligodendrocyte marker), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (astrocyte marker). EA enhanced the proliferation of OPCs and CNPase, as well as the differentiation of OPCs by promoting Olig2 (the basic helix-loop-helix protein) and attenuating Id2 (the inhibitor of DNA binding 2). EA could also improve myelin basic protein (MBP) and protect existing oligodendrocytes from apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-12 (a representative of endoplasmic reticulum stress) and cytochrome c (an apoptotic factor and hallmark of mitochondria). Therefore, our results indicate that the protective effect of EA on neural myelin sheaths is mediated via promotion of oligodendrocyte proliferation and inhibition of oligodendrocyte death after CSCI.

  20. Temperature modulates coccolithophorid sensitivity of growth, photosynthesis and calcification to increasing seawater pCO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sett, Scarlett; Bach, Lennart T; Schulz, Kai G; Koch-Klavsen, Signe; Lebrato, Mario; Riebesell, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO₂ concentrations are expected to impact pelagic ecosystem functioning in the near future by driving ocean warming and acidification. While numerous studies have investigated impacts of rising temperature and seawater acidification on planktonic organisms separately, little is presently known on their combined effects. To test for possible synergistic effects we exposed two coccolithophore species, Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica, to a CO₂ gradient ranging from ∼0.5-250 µmol kg⁻¹ (i.e. ∼20-6000 µatm pCO₂) at three different temperatures (i.e. 10, 15, 20°C for E. huxleyi and 15, 20, 25°C for G. oceanica). Both species showed CO₂-dependent optimum-curve responses for growth, photosynthesis and calcification rates at all temperatures. Increased temperature generally enhanced growth and production rates and modified sensitivities of metabolic processes to increasing CO₂. CO₂ optimum concentrations for growth, calcification, and organic carbon fixation rates were only marginally influenced from low to intermediate temperatures. However, there was a clear optimum shift towards higher CO₂ concentrations from intermediate to high temperatures in both species. Our results demonstrate that the CO₂ concentration where optimum growth, calcification and carbon fixation rates occur is modulated by temperature. Thus, the response of a coccolithophore strain to ocean acidification at a given temperature can be negative, neutral or positive depending on that strain's temperature optimum. This emphasizes that the cellular responses of coccolithophores to ocean acidification can only be judged accurately when interpreted in the proper eco-physiological context of a given strain or species. Addressing the synergistic effects of changing carbonate chemistry and temperature is an essential step when assessing the success of coccolithophores in the future ocean.

  1. Simulating increased Lamb wave detection sensitivity of surface bonded fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, J.; Hackney, D. A.; Bradford, P. D.; Peters, K. J.

    2017-04-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are excellent transducers for collecting ultrasonic wave signals for structural health monitoring (SHM). Typically, FBG sensors are directly bonded to the surface of a structure to detect signals. Unfortunately, demodulating relevant information from the collected signal demands a high signal-to-noise ratio because the structural ultrasonic waves have low amplitudes. Our previous experimental work demonstrated that the optical fiber could be bonded at a distance away from the FBG location, referred to here as remote bonding. This remote bonding technique increased the output signal amplitude compared to the direct bonding case, however the mechanism causing the increase was not explored. In this work, we simulate the previous experimental work through transient analysis based on the finite element method, and the output FBG response is calculated through the transfer matrix method. The model is first constructed without an adhesive to assume an ideal bonding condition, investigating the difference in excitation signal coherence along the FBG length between the two bonding configurations. A second model is constructed with an adhesive to investigate the effect of the presence of the adhesive around the FBG. The results demonstrate that the amplitude increase is originated not from the excitation signal coherence, but from the shear lag effect which causes immature signal amplitude development in the direct bonding case compared to the remote bonding case. The results also indicate that depending on the adhesive properties the surface-bonded optical fiber manifests varying resonant frequency, therefore resulting in a peak amplitude response when the input excitation frequency is matched. This work provides beneficial reference for selecting adhesive and calibrating sensing system for maximum ultrasonic detection sensitivity using the FBG sensor.

  2. Temperature modulates coccolithophorid sensitivity of growth, photosynthesis and calcification to increasing seawater pCO₂.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarlett Sett

    Full Text Available Increasing atmospheric CO₂ concentrations are expected to impact pelagic ecosystem functioning in the near future by driving ocean warming and acidification. While numerous studies have investigated impacts of rising temperature and seawater acidification on planktonic organisms separately, little is presently known on their combined effects. To test for possible synergistic effects we exposed two coccolithophore species, Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica, to a CO₂ gradient ranging from ∼0.5-250 µmol kg⁻¹ (i.e. ∼20-6000 µatm pCO₂ at three different temperatures (i.e. 10, 15, 20°C for E. huxleyi and 15, 20, 25°C for G. oceanica. Both species showed CO₂-dependent optimum-curve responses for growth, photosynthesis and calcification rates at all temperatures. Increased temperature generally enhanced growth and production rates and modified sensitivities of metabolic processes to increasing CO₂. CO₂ optimum concentrations for growth, calcification, and organic carbon fixation rates were only marginally influenced from low to intermediate temperatures. However, there was a clear optimum shift towards higher CO₂ concentrations from intermediate to high temperatures in both species. Our results demonstrate that the CO₂ concentration where optimum growth, calcification and carbon fixation rates occur is modulated by temperature. Thus, the response of a coccolithophore strain to ocean acidification at a given temperature can be negative, neutral or positive depending on that strain's temperature optimum. This emphasizes that the cellular responses of coccolithophores to ocean acidification can only be judged accurately when interpreted in the proper eco-physiological context of a given strain or species. Addressing the synergistic effects of changing carbonate chemistry and temperature is an essential step when assessing the success of coccolithophores in the future ocean.

  3. Increased postexercise insulin sensitivity is accompanied by increased AS160 phosphorylation in slow-twitch soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabe, Maiko; Kawamoto, Emi; Koshinaka, Keiichi; Kawanaka, Kentaro

    2014-12-01

    A single bout of exercise can enhance insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in both fast-twitch (type II) and slow-twitch (type I) skeletal muscle for several hours postexercise. Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) is most distal insulin signaling proteins that have been proposed to contribute to the postexercise enhancement of insulin action in fast-twitch muscle. In this study, we examined whether the postexercise increase in insulin action of glucose uptake in slow-twitch muscle is accompanied by increased phosphorylation of AS160 and its paralog TBC1D1. Male Wistar rats (~1-month-old) were exercised on a treadmill for 180 min (9 m/min). Insulin (50 μU/mL)-stimulated glucose uptake was increased at 2 h after cessation of exercise in soleus muscle composed of predominantly slow-twitch fibers. This postexercise increase in insulin action of glucose uptake was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of AS160 (detected by phospho-Thr642 and phospho-Ser588 antibody). On the other hand, prior exercise did not increase phosphorylation of TBC1D1 (detected by phospho-Thr590) at 2 h postexercise. These results suggest the possibility that an enhancement in AS160 phosphorylation but not TBC1D1 phosphorylation is involved with increased postexercise insulin action of glucose uptake in slow-twitch muscle.

  4. Increased capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia in patients with multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mosbech, Holger

    2011-01-01

    in experimental pain models to provoke peripheral and central sensitization. In patients with symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia and temporal summation were assessed as markers for abnormal central nociceptive processing together with neurogenic inflammation (flare).......the underlying cause of pathophysiological mechanisms triggering multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) remains disputed.Recently, alterations in the central nervous system, for example,central sensitization, similar to various chronic pain disorders, have been suggested. Capsaicin is used...

  5. Increased capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia in patients with multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mosbech, Holger;

    2011-01-01

    in experimental pain models to provoke peripheral and central sensitization. In patients with symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia and temporal summation were assessed as markers for abnormal central nociceptive processing together with neurogenic inflammation (flare).......the underlying cause of pathophysiological mechanisms triggering multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) remains disputed.Recently, alterations in the central nervous system, for example,central sensitization, similar to various chronic pain disorders, have been suggested. Capsaicin is used...

  6. Parkinson's disease: low-dose haloperidol increases dopamine receptor sensitivity and clinical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Craig J; Seeman, Philip; Seeman, Mary V

    2014-01-01

    Background. It is known that ultra-low doses of haloperidol can cause dopamine supersensitivity of dopamine D2 receptors and related behaviour in animals. Objective. The objective was to determine whether a daily ultra-low dose of 40 micrograms of haloperidol could enhance the clinical action of levodopa in Parkinson's disease patients. Method. While continuing their daily treatment with levodopa, 16 patients with Parkinson's disease were followed weekly for six weeks. They received an add-on daily dose of 40 micrograms of haloperidol for the first two weeks only. The SPES/SCOPA scale (short scale for assessment of motor impairments and disabilities in Parkinson's disease) was administered before treatment and weekly throughout the trial. Results. The results showed a mean decrease in SPES/SCOPA scores after one week of the add-on treatment. Conclusion. SCOPA scores decreased after the addition of low-dose haloperidol to the standard daily levodopa dose. This finding is consistent with an increase in sensitivity of dopamine D2 receptors induced by haloperidol. Such treatment for Parkinson's disease may possibly permit the levodopa dose to be reduced and, thus, delay the onset of levodopa side effects.

  7. Selective ALDH3A1 inhibition by benzimidazole analogues increase mafosfamide sensitivity in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Bibek; Fishel, Melissa L; Hurley, Thomas D

    2014-01-23

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes irreversibly oxidize aldehydes generated from metabolism of amino acids, fatty acids, food, smoke, additives, and xenobiotic drugs. Cyclophosphamide is one such xenobiotic used in cancer therapies. Upon activation, cyclophosphamide forms an intermediate, aldophosphamide, which can be detoxified to carboxyphosphamide by aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH), especially ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1. Consequently, selective inhibition of ALDH3A1 could increase chemosensitivity toward cyclophosphamide in ALDH3A1 expressing tumors. Here, we report detailed kinetics and structural characterization of a highly selective submicromolar inhibitor of ALDH3A1, 1-[(4-fluorophenyl)sulfonyl]-2-methyl-1H-benzimidazole (CB7, IC50 of 0.2 μM). CB7 does not inhibit ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, ALDH1A3, ALDH1B1, or ALDH2 activity. Structural, kinetics, and mutagenesis studies show that CB7 binds to the aldehyde binding pocket of ALDH3A1. ALDH3A1-expressing lung adenocarcinoma and glioblastoma cell lines are sensitized toward mafosfamide (MF) treatment in the presence analogues of CB7, whereas primary lung fibroblasts lacking ALDH3A1 expression, are not.

  8. Susceptibility to traumatic stress sensitizes the dopaminergic response to cocaine and increases motivation for cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodnik, Zachary D; Black, Emily M; Clark, Meagan J; Kornsey, Kristen N; Snyder, Nathaniel W; España, Rodrigo A

    2017-10-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder have a heightened vulnerability to developing substance use disorders; however, the biological underpinnings of this vulnerability remain unresolved. We used the predator odor stress model of post-traumatic stress disorder with segregation of subjects as susceptible or resilient based on elevated plus maze behavior and context avoidance. We then determined behavioral and neurochemical differences across susceptible, resilient, and control populations using a panel of behavioral and neurochemical assays. Susceptible subjects showed a significant increase in the motoric and dopaminergic effects of cocaine, and this corresponded with heightened motivation to self-administer cocaine. Resilient subjects did not show differences in the motoric effects of cocaine, in dopamine signaling in vivo, or in any measure of cocaine self-administration. Nonetheless, we found that these animals displayed elevations in both the dopamine release-promoting effects of cocaine and dopamine autoreceptor sensitivity ex vivo. Our results suggest that the experience of traumatic stress may produce alterations in dopamine systems that drive elevations in cocaine self-administration behavior in susceptible subjects, but may also produce both active and passive forms of resilience that function to prevent gross changes in cocaine's reinforcing efficacy in resilient subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing the sensitivity of human skin hyperspectral responses to increasing anemia severity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranoski, Gladimir V. G.; Dey, Ankita; Chen, Tenn F.

    2015-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent medical condition that seriously affects millions of people all over the world. In many regions, not only its initial detection but also its monitoring are hindered by limited access to laboratory facilities. This situation has motivated the development of a wide range of optical devices and procedures to assist physicians in these tasks. Although noticeable progress has been achieved in this area, the search for reliable, low-cost, and risk-free solutions still continues, and the strengthening of the knowledge base about this disorder and its effects is essential for the success of these initiatives. We contribute to these efforts by closely examining the sensitivity of human skin hyperspectral responses (within and outside the visible region of the light spectrum) to reduced hemoglobin concentrations associated with increasing anemia severity levels. This investigation, which involves skin specimens with distinct biophysical and morphological characteristics, is supported by controlled in silico experiments performed using a predictive light transport model and measured data reported in the biomedical literature. We also propose a noninvasive procedure to be employed in the monitoring of this condition at the point-of-care.

  10. Increased bioassay sensitivity of bioactive molecule discovery using metal-enhanced bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Karina; Elbaz, Amit; McNeil, Ronald; Kushmaro, Ariel; Geddes, Chris D.; Marks, Robert S.

    2014-12-01

    We report the use of bioluminescence signal enhancement via proximity to deposited silver nanoparticles for bioactive compound discovery. This approach employs a whole-cell bioreporter harboring a plasmid-borne fusion of a specific promoter incorporated with a bioluminescence reporter gene. The silver deposition process was first optimized to provide optimal nanoparticle size in the reaction time dependence with fluorescein. The use of silver deposition of 350 nm particles enabled the doubling of the bioluminescent signal amplitude by the bacterial bioreporter when compared to an untouched non-silver-deposited microtiter plate surface. This recording is carried out in the less optimal but necessary far-field distance. SEM micrographs provided a visualization of the proximity of the bioreporter to the silver nanoparticles. The electromagnetic field distributions around the nanoparticles were simulated using Finite Difference Time Domain, further suggesting a re-excitation of non-chemically excited bioluminescence in addition to metal-enhanced bioluminescence. The possibility of an antiseptic silver effect caused by such a close proximity was eliminated disregarded by the dynamic growth curves of the bioreporter strains as seen using viability staining. As a highly attractive biotechnology tool, this silver deposition technique, coupled with whole-cell sensing, enables increased bioluminescence sensitivity, making it especially useful for cases in which reporter luminescence signals are very weak.

  11. Increased pain sensitivity is not associated with electrodiagnostic findings in women with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Laguarta-Val, Sofia; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-01-01

    To determine the differences in widespread pressure pain and thermal hypersensitivity in women with minimal, moderate, and severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and healthy controls. A total of 72 women with CTS (19 with minimal, 18 with moderate, and 35 with severe) and 19 healthy age-matched women participated. Pressure pain thresholds were bilaterally assessed over the median, ulnar, and radial nerves, the C5 to C6 zygapophyseal joint, the carpal tunnel, and the tibialis anterior muscle. In addition, warm and cold detection thresholds and heat and cold pain thresholds were bilaterally assessed over the carpal tunnel and the thenar eminence. All outcome parameters were assessed by an assessor blinded to the participant's condition. No significant differences in pain parameters among patients with minimal, moderate, and severe CTS were found. The results showed that PPT were significantly decreased bilaterally over the median, ulnar, and radial nerve trunks, the carpal tunnel, C5 to C6 zygapophyseal joint, and the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS as compared with healthy controls (all, P<0.001). In addition, patients with CTS also showed lower heat pain threshold and reduced cold pain threshold compared with controls (P<0.001). No significant sensory differences between minimal, moderate, or severe CTS were found. The similar widespread pressure and thermal hypersensitivity in patients with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS and pain intensity suggests that increased pain sensitivity is not related to electrodiagnostic findings.

  12. Dysregulated autophagy increased melanocyte sensitivity to H2O2-induced oxidative stress in vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanmin; Li, Shuli; Zhang, Weigang; Dai, Wei; Cui, Tingting; Wang, Gang; Gao, Tianwen; Li, Chunying

    2017-01-01

    In vitiligo, melanocytes are particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress owing to the pro-oxidant state generated during melanin synthesis and to the genetic antioxidant defects. Autophagy is a controlled self-digestion process which can protect cells against oxidative damage. However, the exact role of autophagy in vitiligo melanocytes in response to oxidative stress and the mechanism involved are still not clear. To determine the implications of autophagy for melanocyte survival in response to oxidative stress, we first detected the autophagic flux in normal melanocytes exposure to H2O2, and found that autophagy was significantly enhanced in normal melanocytes, for protecting cells against H2O2-induced oxidative damage. Nevertheless, vitiligo melanocytes exhibited dysregulated autophagy and hypersensitivity to H2O2-induced oxidative injury. In addition, we confirmed that the impairment of Nrf2-p62 pathway is responsible for the defects of autophagy in vitiligo melanocytes. Noteworthily, upregulation of the Nrf2-p62 pathway or p62 reduced H2O2-induced oxidative damage of vitiligo melanocytes. Therefore, our data demonstrated that dysregulated autophagy owing to the impairment of Nrf2-p62 pathway increase the sensitivity of vitiligo melanocytes to oxidative stress, thus promote the development of vitiligo. Upregulation of p62-dependent autophagy may be applied to vitiligo treatment in the future. PMID:28186139

  13. 2-bromoethylamine, a suicide inhibitor of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase, increases hydralazine hypotension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, Horacio; Medina, Martha

    2005-09-01

    Previous work has shown that inhibitors of the predominantly vascular enzyme semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) potentiate the hypotensive response to hydralazine, itself a SSAO inhibitor, in anesthetized rats. The present study was carried out to determine whether the recently described suicide SSAO inhibitor 2-bromoethylamine shares this effect. Hypotensive responses to hydralazine, 0.1 mg/kg IV, were obtained in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized rats, either unpretreated or receiving bromoethylamine at different doses and pretreatment intervals. Parallel experiments were run with semicarbazide, the prototypical hydrazine SSAO inhibitor. Both inhibitors potentiated hydralazine hypotension, bromoethylamine having a longer latency and a shorter duration of action than semicarbazide. High doses of bromoethylamine did not produce potentiation, a phenomenon attributed to SSAO inactivation by excess substrate and decreased formation by the enzyme of the inhibitor product. Experiments with combined administration of both inhibitors were also carried out. When semicarbazide was administered before bromoethylamine, potentiaton was prevented, apparently by a mechanism similar to the above; when it was given after the amine, potentiation was increased. This was attributed to enzyme inhibition by interaction with 2 different active sites. The charactertistics of hydralazine potentiation by bromoethylamine were considered compatible with the mechanism of SSAO inhibition by the amine.

  14. Increasing sensitivity of pulse EPR experiments using echo train detection schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentink-Vigier, F.; Collauto, A.; Feintuch, A.; Kaminker, I.; Tarle, V.; Goldfarb, D.

    2013-11-01

    Modern pulse EPR experiments are routinely used to study the structural features of paramagnetic centers. They are usually performed at low temperatures, where relaxation times are long and polarization is high, to achieve a sufficient Signal/Noise Ratio (SNR). However, when working with samples whose amount and/or concentration are limited, sensitivity becomes an issue and therefore measurements may require a significant accumulation time, up to 12 h or more. As the detection scheme of practically all pulse EPR sequences is based on the integration of a spin echo - either primary, stimulated or refocused - a considerable increase in SNR can be obtained by replacing the single echo detection scheme by a train of echoes. All these echoes, generated by Carr-Purcell type sequences, are integrated and summed together to improve the SNR. This scheme is commonly used in NMR and here we demonstrate its applicability to a number of frequently used pulse EPR experiments: Echo-Detected EPR, Davies and Mims ENDOR (Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance), DEER (Electron-Electron Double Resonance|) and EDNMR (Electron-Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR)-Detected NMR), which were combined with a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) type detection scheme at W-band. By collecting the transient signal and integrating a number of refocused echoes, this detection scheme yielded a 1.6-5 folds SNR improvement, depending on the paramagnetic center and the pulse sequence applied. This improvement is achieved while keeping the experimental time constant and it does not introduce signal distortion.

  15. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by Rosa damascena associated with an increased sensitivity to heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriner, Samuel E; Katoozi, Niki S; Pham, Kevin Q; Gazarian, Maral; Zarban, Asghar; Jafari, Mahtab

    2012-04-01

    Rosa damascena, or Damask rose, is a rose hybrid commonly harvested for rose oil used in perfumery and for rose water used to flavor food. The petal extract of R. damascena was recently found to decrease Drosophila melanogaster mortality without impairing reproductive fitness or metabolic rate. Here, we report that R. damascena extended both mean and maximum lifespan of the fly. The extract also protected against oxidative stress in flies, predominantly in females. However, it did not alter mitochondrial respiration or content, superoxide production, or the major antioxidant defenses, superoxide dismutase and catalase. The extract increased survival in both sexes when exposed to reduced iron, though surprisingly, it sensitized both sexes to heat stress (survival at 37°C), and appeared to down-regulate the major heat shock protein HSP70 and the small mitochondrial heat shock protein HSP22, at 25°C and after heat shock (4 h at 37°C). We hypothesize that R. damascena extends lifespan by protecting against iron, which concomitantly leads to decreased HSP expression and compromising heat tolerance.

  16. Transformation of adrenal medullary chromaffin cells increases asthmatic susceptibility in pups from allergen-sensitized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jun-Tao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that epinephrine release is impaired in patients with asthma. The pregnancy of female rats (dams with asthma promotes in their pups the differentiation of adrenal medulla chromaffin cells (AMCCs into sympathetic neurons, mediated by nerve growth factor, which leads to a reduction in epinephrine secretion. However, the relatedness between the alteration of AMCCs and increased asthma susceptibility in such offspring has not been established. Methods In this study, we observed the effects of allergization via ovalbumin on rat pups born of asthmatic dams. Results Compared to the offspring of untreated controls, bronchial hyperreactivity and airway inflammation were more severe in the pups from sensitized (asthmatic dams. In pups exposed to nerve growth factor (NGF in utero these effects were aggravated further, but the effects were blocked in pups whose dams had been treated with anti-NGF. Furthermore, alterations in AMCC phenotype corresponded to the degree of bronchial hyperreactivity and lung lesions of the different treatment groups. Such AMCC alterations included degranulation of chromaffin granules, reduction of epinephrine and phenylethanolamine-n-methyl transferase, and elevation of NGF and peripherin levels. Conclusions Our results present evidence that asthma during the pregnancy of rat dams promotes asthma susceptibility in their offspring, and that the transformation of AMCCs to neurons induced by NGF plays an important role in this process.

  17. Increased bioassay sensitivity of bioactive molecule discovery using metal-enhanced bioluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golberg, Karina, E-mail: karingo@bgu.ac.il; Elbaz, Amit [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering (Israel); McNeil, Ronald [The Institute of Fluorescence, University of Maryland Baltimore County (United States); Kushmaro, Ariel [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering (Israel); Geddes, Chris D. [The Institute of Fluorescence, University of Maryland Baltimore County (United States); Marks, Robert S., E-mail: rsmarks@bgu.ac.il [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering (Israel)

    2014-12-15

    We report the use of bioluminescence signal enhancement via proximity to deposited silver nanoparticles for bioactive compound discovery. This approach employs a whole-cell bioreporter harboring a plasmid-borne fusion of a specific promoter incorporated with a bioluminescence reporter gene. The silver deposition process was first optimized to provide optimal nanoparticle size in the reaction time dependence with fluorescein. The use of silver deposition of 350 nm particles enabled the doubling of the bioluminescent signal amplitude by the bacterial bioreporter when compared to an untouched non-silver-deposited microtiter plate surface. This recording is carried out in the less optimal but necessary far-field distance. SEM micrographs provided a visualization of the proximity of the bioreporter to the silver nanoparticles. The electromagnetic field distributions around the nanoparticles were simulated using Finite Difference Time Domain, further suggesting a re-excitation of non-chemically excited bioluminescence in addition to metal-enhanced bioluminescence. The possibility of an antiseptic silver effect caused by such a close proximity was eliminated disregarded by the dynamic growth curves of the bioreporter strains as seen using viability staining. As a highly attractive biotechnology tool, this silver deposition technique, coupled with whole-cell sensing, enables increased bioluminescence sensitivity, making it especially useful for cases in which reporter luminescence signals are very weak.

  18. Multi-probe relaxation dispersion measurements increase sensitivity to protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, R Bryn; Oyen, David; Wright, Peter E

    2016-02-17

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion measurements are a valuable tool for the characterization of structural transitions on the micro-millisecond timescale. While the measurement of (15)N relaxation dispersion is now routine, the measurements with alternative nuclei remain limited. Here we report (15)N as well as (1)H R2 relaxation dispersion measurements of the N23PP/S148A "dynamic knockout" mutant of dihydrofolate reductase. The (1)H dispersion measurements are complementary to (15)N data as many additional residues are observed to have dispersive behavior for the (1)H nucleus. Simultaneous fitting of the dispersion profiles for the two nuclei increases the accuracy of exchange parameters determined for individual residues and clustered groups of residues. The different sensitivity of the two nuclei to changes in backbone torsional angles, ring currents, and hydrogen bonding effects provides important insights into the nature of the structural changes that take place during the exchange process. We observe clear evidence of direct and indirect hydrogen bond effects for the (15)N and (1)H chemical shift changes in the active-site, modulation of ring current shielding in the CD-loop and backbone torsional changes in a cluster of residues associated with the C-terminus. This work demonstrates the power of combined (1)H and (15)N probes for the study of backbone dynamics on the micro-millisecond timescale though the analysis of chemical shift changes.

  19. Adipogenesis-related increase of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and monoamine oxidase in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Sandy; Daviaud, Danièle; Gres, Sandra; Lefort, Corinne; Prévot, Danielle; Zorzano, Antonio; Wabitsch, Martin; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Valet, Philippe; Carpéné, Christian

    2007-08-01

    A strong induction of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) has previously been reported during murine preadipocyte lineage differentiation but it remains unknown whether this emergence also occurs during adipogenesis in man. Our aim was to compare SSAO and monoamine oxidase (MAO) expression during in vitro differentiation of human preadipocytes and in adipose and stroma-vascular fractions of human fat depots. A human preadipocyte cell strain from a patient with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome was first used to follow amine oxidase expression during in vitro differentiation. Then, human preadipocytes isolated from subcutaneous adipose tissues were cultured under conditions promoting ex vivo adipose differentiation and tested for MAO and SSAO expression. Lastly, human adipose tissue was separated into mature adipocyte and stroma-vascular fractions for analyses of MAO and SSAO at mRNA, protein and activity levels. Both SSAO and MAO were increased from undifferentiated preadipocytes to lipid-laden cells in all the models: 3T3-F442A and 3T3-L1 murine lineages, human SGBS cell strain or human preadipocytes in primary culture. In human subcutaneous adipose tissue, the adipocyte-enriched fraction exhibited seven-fold higher amine oxidase activity and contained three- to seven-fold higher levels of mRNAs encoded by MAO-A, MAO-B, AOC3 and AOC2 genes than the stroma-vascular fraction. MAO-A and AOC3 genes accounted for the majority of their respective MAO and SSAO activities in human adipose tissue. Most of the SSAO and MAO found in adipose tissue originated from mature adipocytes. Although the mechanism and role of adipogenesis-related increase in amine oxidase expression remain to be established, the resulting elevated levels of amine oxidase activities found in human adipocytes may be of potential interest for therapeutic intervention in obesity.

  20. Inhibition of PI3K increases oxaliplatin sensitivity in cholangiocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udomchaiprasertkul Wandee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistance of cholangiocarcinoma to chemotherapy is a major problem in cancer treatment. The mechanism of resistance is believed to involve phosphoinositide-3- kinase (PI3K/Akt activation. Although the platinum-containing compound oxaliplatin has been extensively used in the treatment of several solid tumors, recent data regarding its use to treat cholangiocarcinoma are ambiguous. Oxaliplatin resistance in this disease could potentially involve PI3K pathways. We, therefore, examined the effects of PI3K pathways in cholangiocarcinoma cells in modulating oxaliplatin resistance. Results After exposing the cholangiocarcinoma cell lines RMCCA1 and KKU100 to oxaliplatin, the levels of Akt and mTOR phosphorylation increased, as shown by western blot analysis. The WST-1 cell proliferation assay showed increased inhibition of cell growth under high concentrations of oxaliplatin. The combination of oxaliplatin with LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K, resulted in a remarkable arrest of cell proliferation. Deactivation of mTOR by RAD001 was also synergistic with oxaliplatin, although to a lesser extent. The combination of oxaliplatin and a PI3K inhibitor also resulted in a significant induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by the TUNEL assay. Conclusion Activation of PI3K might protect cholangiocarcinoma cells from oxaliplatininduced cytotoxicity. Although the inhibition of PI3K and the inhibition of mTOR both enhance oxaliplatin-induced cytotoxicity, PI3K inhibition has a greater effect. Targeting the PI3K pathway may be a useful approach to improve the chemotherapeutic sensitivity of cholangiocarcinoma.

  1. Rehabilitation: Periodic somatosensory stimulation increases arterial baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gademan, Maaike G J; Sun, Yiping; Han, Liming; Valk, Vanessa J; Schalij, Martin J; van Exel, Henk J; Lucas, Carolien M H B; Maan, Arie C; Verwey, Harriette F; van de Vooren, Hedde; Pinna, Gian D; Maestri, Roberto; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; van der Wall, Ernst E; Swenne, Cees A

    2011-10-20

    One of the beneficial effects of exercise training in chronic heart failure (CHF) is an improvement in baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), a prognostic index in CHF. In our hypothesis-generating study we propose that at least part of this effect is mediated by neural afferent information, and more specifically, by exercise-induced somatosensory nerve traffic. To compare the effects of periodic electrical somatosensory stimulation on BRS in patients with CHF with the effects of exercise training and with usual care. We compared in stable CHF patients the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, N = 23, LVEF 30 ± 9%) with the effects of bicycle exercise training (EXTR, N = 20, LVEF 32 ± 7%). To mimic exercise-associated somatosensory ergoreceptor stimulation, we applied periodic (2/s, marching pace) burst TENS to both feet. TENS and EXTR sessions were held during two successive days. BRS, measured prior to the first intervention session and one day after the second intervention session, increased by 28% from 3.07 ± 2.06 to 4.24 ± 2.61 ms/mmHg in the TENS group, but did not change in the EXTR group (baseline: 3.37 ± 2.53 ms/mmHg; effect: 3.26 ± 2.54 ms/mmHg) (P(TENS vs EXTR) = 0.02). Heart rate and systolic blood pressure did not change in either group. We demonstrated that periodic somatosensory input alone is sufficient and efficient in increasing BRS in CHF patients. This concept constitutes a basis for studies towards more effective exercise training regimens in the diseased/impaired, in whom training aimed at BRS improvement should possibly focus more on the somatosensory aspect. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A genetic variant near the PMAIP1/Noxa gene is associated with increased bleomycin sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, J.; Ye, Y.; Spitz, M.R.; Lin, J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Xing, J.; Hildebrandt, M.A.T.; Ki Hong, W.; Amos, C.I.; Wu, X.

    2011-01-01

    Mutagen sensitivity, a measurement of chromatid breaks induced by various mutagens in short-term cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes, is an established risk factor for a number of cancers and is highly heritable. The purpose of this study is to identify genetic predictors of mutagen sensitivity

  3. Developing teacher sensitivity to individual learning differences (ILDs) : Studies on increasing teacher effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenfeld, M.N.

    2008-01-01

    Effective teachers are sensitive to individual learning differences (ILDs). This dissertation investigates teacher changes as a result of eight long-term professional development (PD) courses (56-hours and 28-hours) designed to help them become more sensitive to ILDs. In these courses, the teache

  4. Mechanisms regulating the development of oligodendrocytes and central nervous system myelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitew, S; Hay, C M; Peckham, H; Xiao, J; Koenning, M; Emery, B

    2014-09-12

    Oligodendrocytes and the myelin they produce are a remarkable vertebrate specialization that enables rapid and efficient nerve conduction within the central nervous system. The generation of myelin during development involves a finely-tuned pathway of oligodendrocyte precursor specification, proliferation and migration followed by differentiation and the subsequent myelination of appropriate axons. In this review we summarize the molecular mechanisms known to regulate each of these processes, including the extracellular ligands that promote or inhibit development of the oligodendrocyte lineage, the intracellular pathways they signal through and the key transcription factors that mediate their effects. Many of these regulatory mechanisms have recurring roles in regulating several transitions during oligodendrocyte development, highlighting their importance. It is also highly likely that many of these developmental mechanisms will also be involved in myelin repair in human neurological disease.

  5. Rock-dwelling lizards exhibit less sensitivity of sprint speed to increases in substrate rugosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Clint E; Self, Jessica D; Anderson, Roger A; McBrayer, Lance D

    2013-06-01

    Effectively moving across variable substrates is important to all terrestrial animals. The effects of substrates on lizard performance have ecological ramifications including the partitioning of habitat according to sprinting ability on different surfaces. This phenomenon is known as sprint sensitivity, or the decrease in sprint speed due to change in substrate. However, sprint sensitivity has been characterized only in arboreal Anolis lizards. Our study measured sensitivity to substrate rugosity among six lizard species that occupy rocky, sandy, and/or arboreal habitats. Lizards that use rocky habitats are less sensitive to changes in substrate rugosity, followed by arboreal lizards, and then by lizards that use sandy habitats. We infer from comparative phylogenetic analysis that forelimb, chest, and tail dimensions are important external morphological features related to sensitivity to changes in substrate rugosity.

  6. Increasing the selectivity and sensitivity of gas sensors for the detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Daniel

    Over the past decade, the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) has increased, domestically and internationally, highlighting a growing need for a method to quickly and reliably detect explosive devices in both military and civilian environments before the explosive can cause damage. Conventional techniques have been successful in explosive detection, however they typically suffer from enormous costs in capital equipment and maintenance, costs in energy consumption, sampling, operational related expenses, and lack of continuous and real-time monitoring. The goal was thus to produce an inexpensive, portable sensor that continuously monitors the environment, quickly detects the presence of explosive compounds and alerts the user. In 2012, here at URI, a sensor design was proposed for the detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP). The design entailed a thermodynamic gas sensor that measures the heat of decomposition between trace TATP vapor and a metal oxide catalyst film. The sensor was able to detect TATP vapor at the part per million level (ppm) and showed great promise for eventual commercial use, however, the sensor lacked selectivity. Thus, the specific objective of this work was to take the original sensor design proposed in 2012 and to make several key improvements to advance the sensor towards commercialization. It was demonstrated that a sensor can be engineered to detect TATP and ignore the effects of interferent H2O2 molecules by doping SnO2 films with varying amounts of Pd. Compared with a pure SnO2 catalyst, a SnO2, film doped with 8 wt. % Pd had the highest selectivity between TATP and H2O2. Also, at 12 wt. % Pd, the response to TATP and H2O2 was enhanced, indicating that sensitivity, not only selectivity, can be increased by modifying the composition of the catalyst. An orthogonal detection system was demonstrated. The platform consists of two independent sensing mechanisms, one thermodynamic and one conductometric, which take measurements from

  7. Convergent functional genomics of oligodendrocyte differentiation identifies multiple autoinhibitory signaling circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Rosanna Pescini; Joubert, Lara; Curchod, Marie-Laure; Salvat, Catherine; Foucault, Isabelle; Jorand-Lebrun, Catherine; Lamarine, Marc; Peixoto, Hélène; Vignaud, Chloé; Frémaux, Christèle; Jomotte, Thérèse; Françon, Bernard; Alliod, Chantal; Bernasconi, Lilia; Abderrahim, Hadi; Perrin, Dominique; Bombrun, Agnes; Zanoguera, Francisca; Rommel, Christian; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob

    2009-03-01

    Inadequate remyelination of brain white matter lesions has been associated with a failure of oligodendrocyte precursors to differentiate into mature, myelin-producing cells. In order to better understand which genes play a critical role in oligodendrocyte differentiation, we performed time-dependent, genome-wide gene expression studies of mouse Oli-neu cells as they differentiate into process-forming and myelin basic protein-producing cells, following treatment with three different agents. Our data indicate that different inducers activate distinct pathways that ultimately converge into the completely differentiated state, where regulated gene sets overlap maximally. In order to also gain insight into the functional role of genes that are regulated in this process, we silenced 88 of these genes using small interfering RNA and identified multiple repressors of spontaneous differentiation of Oli-neu, most of which were confirmed in rat primary oligodendrocyte precursors cells. Among these repressors were CNP, a well-known myelin constituent, and three phosphatases, each known to negatively control mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. We show that a novel inhibitor for one of the identified genes, dual-specificity phosphatase DUSP10/MKP5, was also capable of inducing oligodendrocyte differentiation in primary oligodendrocyte precursors. Oligodendrocytic differentiation feedback loops may therefore yield pharmacological targets to treat disease related to dysfunctional myelin deposition.

  8. On the biogenesis of the myelin sheath: cognate polarized trafficking pathways in oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, H; Hoekstra, D

    2000-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, are capable of transporting vast quantities of proteins and of lipids, in particular galactosphingolipids, to the myelin sheath. The sheath is continuous with the plasma membrane of the oligodendrocyte, but the composition of both membrane domains differs substantially. Given its high glycosphingolipid and cholesterol content the myelin sheath bears similarity to the lipid composition of the apical domain of a polarized cell. The question thus arises whether myelin components, like typical apical membrane proteins are transported by an apical-like trafficking mechanism to the sheath, involving a 'raft'-mediated mechanism. Indeed, the evidence indicates the presence of cognate apical and basolateral pathways in oligodendrocytes. However, all major myelin proteins do not participate in this pathway, and remarkably apical-like trafficking seems to be restricted to the oligodendrocyte cell body. In this review, we summarize the evidence on the existence of different trafficking pathways in the oligodendrocyte, and discuss possible mechanisms separating the oligodendrocyte's membrane domains.

  9. Axon-myelin sheath relations of oligodendrocyte unit phenotypes in the adult rat anterior medullary velum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, A M; Ibrahim, M; Berry, M

    1998-04-01

    Axon-oligodendrocyte relations of Rip-immunolabelled and dye-injected oligodendrocyte units are characterised in the adult rat anterior medullary velum (AMV). Each oligodendrocyte unit comprised the oligodendrocyte cell body, processes and the internodal myelin segments they support. Oligodendrocyte units corresponded to classically described type I/II or type III/IV unit phenotypes which respectively myelinated discrete populations of small and large diameter axons, delineated by a myelinated fire diameter of 2-4 microns (diameter of the axon plus its myelin sheath). Within units, mean fibre diameter was directly related to mean internodal length and inversely related to the number of myelin sheaths in the unit. The relationship between fibre diameter and internodal length was retained in units which myelinated axons of different diameters, indicating that axon diameter was an important determinant of the longitudinal dimensions of myelin sheaths. We also show that type III/IV units maintained a far greater volume of myelin than type I/II units. It was concluded that type I/II and III/IV oligodendrocytes represent two functionally and morphologically distinct phenotypes whose distribution densities were determined by the diameter and spatial dispersion of axons.

  10. Epigenetic Modulation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation to Oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Douvaras

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells provide an invaluable tool for generating human, disease-relevant cells. Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, characterized by myelin damage. Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS; they differentiate from progenitor cells, and their membranes ensheath axons, providing trophic support and allowing fast conduction velocity. The current understanding of oligodendrocyte biology was founded by rodent studies, where the establishment of repressive epigenetic marks on histone proteins, followed by activation of myelin genes, leads to lineage progression. To assess whether this epigenetic regulation is conserved across species, we differentiated human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to oligodendrocytes and asked whether similar histone marks and relative enzymatic activities could be detected. The transcriptional levels of enzymes responsible for methylation and acetylation of histone marks were analyzed during oligodendrocyte differentiation, and the post-translational modifications on histones were detected using immunofluorescence. These studies showed that also in human cells, differentiation along the oligodendrocyte lineage is characterized by the acquisition of multiple repressive histone marks, including deacetylation of lysine residues on histone H3 and trimethylation of residues K9 and K27. These data suggest that the epigenetic modulation of oligodendrocyte identity is highly conserved across species.

  11. Increased postexercise insulin sensitivity is accompanied by increased AS160 phosphorylation in slow‐twitch soleus muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Iwabe, Maiko; Kawamoto, Emi; Koshinaka, Keiichi; Kawanaka, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A single bout of exercise can enhance insulin‐stimulated glucose uptake in both fast‐twitch (type II) and slow‐twitch (type I) skeletal muscle for several hours postexercise. Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) is most distal insulin signaling proteins that have been proposed to contribute to the postexercise enhancement of insulin action in fast‐twitch muscle. In this study, we examined whether the postexercise increase in insulin action of glucose uptake in slow‐twitch muscle is accom...

  12. High Dose Astaxanthin Lowers Blood Pressure and Increases Insulin Sensitivity in Rats: Are These Effects Interdependent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry G. Preuss, Bobby Echard, Eiji Yamashita, Nicholas V. Perricone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation in Sprague-Dawley rats (SD was designed to examine effects of astaxanthin (Asta at different doses on elevated blood pressure (BP and glucose-insulin perturbations produced by heavy sucrose ingestion. We also examined effects of Asta on BP during restraint stress. SD were divided into six groups each containing eight rats. All SD ate a basic diet of ground regular rat chow with sucrose added at 30% w/w. The Control group received only the basic diet containing added sucrose, while the other five groups each received the same diet with added test material: captopril, (30 mg/Kg, pioglitazone (15.0 mg/Kg, low Asta (25 mg/Kg, medium Asta (50 mg/kg or high Asta (100 mg/Kg. Many tests were carried out to examine the mechanisms behind the effects of Asta on BP (serum ACE activity, losartan challenge, and LNAME challenge and the glucose-insulin system (glucose tolerance, HOMA measurement, and insulin challenge. In SD, a relatively low dose of Asta decreased SBP, but produced no major changes in the glucose-insulin system simulating results from a previous study using Zucker Fatty Rats. Increasing the dose of Asta resulted in both a lowering of elevated systolic BP and enhanced insulin sensitivity determined by many different estimations. BP lowering was consistent with changes in the renin-angiotensin (RAS and nitric oxide (NO systems. At the examined doses of each, captopril lowered BP in SD without influencing glucose-insulin metabolism, whereas pioglitazone favorably affected glucose-insulin metabolism while showing essentially no effects on BP. Accordingly, Asta beneficially affects both sucrose-induced elevations of BP and insulin resistance at relatively high doses in SD. Also, Asta at higher doses lessens restraint stress, whereas, captopril and pioglitazone did not at the doses examined, even though they influenced the BP and glucose-insulin systems respectively.

  13. Increased sensitivity of estrogen receptor alpha overexpressing antral follicles to methoxychlor and its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulose, Tessie; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S; Peretz, Jackye; Flaws, Jodi A

    2011-04-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC), an organochlorine pesticide, and its metabolites, mono-hydroxy MXC (MOH) and bis-hydroxy MXC (HPTE) are known ovarian toxicants and can cause inhibition of antral follicle growth. Since these chemicals bind to estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1), we hypothesized that ovaries overexpressing ESR1 (ESR1 OE) would be more susceptible to toxicity induced by MXC and its metabolites because the chemicals can bind to more ESR1 in the antral follicles. We cultured antral follicles from controls and ESR1 OE mouse ovaries with either the vehicle dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), MXC, MOH, or HPTE. The data show that at 96 h, the cultured antral follicles from ESR1 OE antral follicles are more susceptible to toxicity induced by MXC, MOH, and HPTE because low doses of these chemicals cause follicle growth inhibition in ESR1 OE mice but not in control mice. On comparing gene expression levels of nuclear receptors in the cultured antral follicles of ESR1 OE and control follicles, we found differential messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of Esr1, estrogen receptor beta (Esr2), androgen receptor (Ar), progesterone receptor (Pr), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) between the genotypes. We also analyzed mRNA levels of Cyp3a41a, the enzyme metabolizing MOH and HPTE, in the cultured follicles and found that Cyp3a41a was significantly lower in DMSO-treated ESR1 OE follicles compared with controls. In ESR1 OE livers, we found that Cyp3a41a levels were significantly lower compared with control livers. Collectively, these data suggest that MXC and its metabolites cause differential gene expression in ESR1 OE mice compared with controls. The results also suggest that the increased sensitivity of ESR1 OE mouse ovaries to toxicity induced by MXC and its metabolites is due to low clearance of the metabolites by the liver and ovary.

  14. Aerobic Exercise Increases Peripheral and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity in Sedentary Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Gert-Jan; Toffolo, Gianna; Manesso, Erica; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Sunehag, Agneta L.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Data are limited on the effects of controlled aerobic exercise programs (without weight loss) on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in children and adolescents. Objective: To determine whether a controlled aerobic exercise program (without weight loss) improves peripheral and

  15. Comparison of increased venous contrast in ischemic stroke using phase-sensitive MR imaging with perfusion changes on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Eijiro; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide (Div. of Radiology, Dept. of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori Univ. Hospital, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)), email: eyamashi-ttr@umin.ac.jp; Tanaka, Takuro; Hirata, Yoshiharu (Div. of Clinical Radiology, Tottori Univ. Hospital, Yonago, Tottori (Japan))

    2011-10-15

    Background Increased venous contrast in ischemic stroke using susceptibility-weighted imaging has been widely reported, although few reports have compared increased venous contrast areas with perfusion change areas. Purpose To compare venous contrast on phase-sensitive MR images (PSI) with perfusion change on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) images, and to discuss the clinical use of PSI in ischemic stroke. Material and Methods Thirty patients with clinically suspected acute infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory within 7 days of onset were evaluated. Phase-sensitive imaging (PSI), flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were obtained using 3 Tesla scanner. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed the MR images, as well as the PSI, DWI, and FAIR images. They were blinded to the clinical data and to each other's findings. The abnormal area of each image was ultimately identified after both neuroradiologists reached consensus. We analyzed areas of increased venous contrast on PSI, perfusion changes on FAIR images and signal changes on DWI for each case. Results Venous contrast increased on PSI and hypoperfusion was evident on FAIR images from 22 of the 30 patients (73%). The distribution of the increased venous contrast was the same as that of the hypoperfused areas on FAIR images in 16 of these 22. The extent of these lesions was larger than that of lesions visualized by on DWI in 18 of the 22 patients. Hypointense signals reflecting hemorrhage and no increased venous contrast on PSI and hyperperfusion on FAIR images were found in six of the remaining eight patients (20%). Findings on PSI were normal and hypoperfusion areas were absent on FAIR images of two patients (7%). Conclusion Increased venous contrast on PSI might serve as an index of misery perfusion and provide useful information

  16. Regulation of Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Maturation by PPARδ: Effects on Bone Morphogenetic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vittoria Simonini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In EAE (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, agonists of PPARs (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors provide clinical benefit and reduce damage. In contrast with PPARγ, agonists of PPARδ are more effective when given at later stages of EAE and increase myelin gene expression, suggesting effects on OL (oligodendrocyte maturation. In the present study we examined effects of the PPARδ agonist GW0742 on OPCs (OL progenitor cells, and tested whether the effects involve modulation of BMPs (bone morphogenetic proteins. We show that effects of GW0742 are mediated through PPARδ since no amelioration of EAE clinical scores was observed in PPARδ-null mice. In OPCs derived from E13 mice (where E is embryonic day, GW0742, but not the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone, increased the number of myelin-producing OLs. This was due to activation of PPARδ since process formation was reduced in PPARδ-null compared with wild-type OPCs. In both OPCs and enriched astrocyte cultures, GW0742 increased noggin protein expression; however, noggin mRNA was only increased in astrocytes. In contrast, GW0742 reduced BMP2 and BMP4 mRNA levels in OPCs, with lesser effects in astrocytes. These findings demonstrate that PPARδ plays a role in OPC maturation, mediated, in part, by regulation of BMP and BMP antagonists.

  17. Increased brain dopamine D4-like binding after chronic ethanol is not associated with behavioral sensitization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, Isabel Marian Hartmann; Nobrega, Jose Nascimento; Hipolide, Debora Cristina; Souza-Formigoni, Maria Lucia Oliveira

    2005-10-01

    Dopaminergic D4 receptors have been hypothesized to be involved in neuropsychiatric disorders and substance abuse. In mice, repeated ethanol administration may induce behavioral sensitization, a phenomenon of increased sensitivity to the drug's stimulant properties. This study aimed to analyze brain D4 receptors binding in mice with different levels of behavioral sensitization to ethanol. Male Swiss mice received 2.2 g/kg ethanol (n = 64) or saline (n = 16) intraperitoneally daily for 21 days and were weekly tested for locomotor activity and for blood ethanol levels. According to the locomotor scores presented across test days, ethanol-treated mice were classified as "sensitized" or "nonsensitized." Twenty-four hours after the last administration, mice were sacrificed and brains were processed for autoradiography. Brain D4 binding was assessed by quantitative autoradiography using [3H]nemonapride + raclopride in three groups: saline-treated controls (n = 10), ethanol-sensitized (n = 11), and ethanol-nonsensitized (n = 9) mice. Both sensitized and nonsensitized mice showed higher D4 binding densities than saline-treated controls in the posterior caudate-putamen and the olfactory tubercle (p < .02), but only sensitized mice presented higher D4 binding than controls at the lateral septal nucleus (p < .02). However, there were no differences between sensitized and nonsensitized mice in any of the brain regions analyzed. Furthermore, sensitized and nonsensitized mice presented similar blood ethanol levels during the treatment. The higher D4 binding levels observed in both ethanol-treated subgroups (sensitized and nonsensitized) suggest that chronic ethanol treatment may induce upregulation of D4 receptors in specific brain regions. However, this mechanism does not seem to be associated with the differential ability to develop behavioral sensitization to ethanol in mice.

  18. Doping of a dielectric layer as a new alternative for increasing sensitivity of the contactless conductivity detection in microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Renato Sousa; Segato, Thiago Pinotti; Gobbi, Angelo Luiz; Coltro, Wendell Karlos Tomazelli; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2011-12-21

    This communication describes a new procedure to increase the sensitivity of C(4)D in PDMS/glass microchips. The method consists in doping the insulating layer (PDMS) over the electrodes with nanoparticles of TiO(2), increasing thus its dielectric constant. The experimental protocol is simple, inexpensive, and fast.

  19. Transplantation of PDGF-AA-Overexpressing Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Promotes Recovery in Rat Following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zong-Feng; Wang, Ying; Lin, Yu-Hong; Wu, Yan; Zhu, An-You; Wang, Rui; Shen, Lin; Xi, Jin; Qi, Qi; Jiang, Zhi-Quan; Lü, He-Zuo; Hu, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Our previous study showed that Schwann cells (SCs) promote survival, proliferation and migration of co-transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and neurological recovery in rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). A subsequent in vitro study confirmed that SCs modulated OPC proliferation and migration by secreting platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF)-2. We also found that PDGF-AA stimulated OPC proliferation and their differentiation into oligodendrocytes (OLs) at later stages. We therefore speculated that PDGF-AA administration can exert the same effect as SC co-transplantation in SCI repair. To test this hypothesis, in this study we investigated the effect of transplanting PDGF-AA-overexpressing OPCs in a rat model of SCI. We found that PDGF-AA overexpression in OPCs promoted their survival, proliferation, and migration and differentiation into OLs in vivo. OPCs overexpressing PDGF-AA were also associated with increased myelination and tissue repair after SCI, leading to the recovery of neurological function. These results indicate that PDGF-AA-overexpressing OPCs may be an effective treatment for SCI.

  20. University Practice as a Key Factor in Increasing the Sensitivity to Educational Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luna Velasco, Laura E.; Hernández Fernández, Antonio; Ferrándiz Vindel, Isabel María

    2012-01-01

    The present article is based on research carried out in three universities, the University Center South (Cusur, Mexico), Jaen and Cuenca (Spain) on the influence of university practice in the development of sensitivity towards inclusive education in our students the first years of the Diploma in Education, using the subject "pedagogical basis…

  1. Increasing the Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Chemical Sensors and other Chemical Sensing Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    that composes the wire. Nanowires sensitive to methanol and ethanol are composed of Polypyrrole (PPy) and Polyaniline ( PANI ). Palladium (Pd) nanowires...nanowires involves measuring the v resistance of palladium, polypyrrole and polyaniline nanowires. The nanowires need to be measured with currents of

  2. Combination of Dragon Fruit, Hibiscus and Bitterleaf as Dye Sensitizer to Increase Efficiency of DSSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asful Hariyadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC from natural products was being prominently developed in recent years. The main advantage of DSSC was its fabrication which did not require high process technology, so the production cost was lower than solar cells from crystalline materials. There were important materials in Dye-sensitized Solar Cell technology, such as: Zinc Oxide as an electrode, electrolyte solution and plant pigments as dye sensitizer to absorb light energy and convert it into a source of electrical energy. In this study, the combination of multiple dye mixture had been investigated to achieve high external quantum efficiency as sensitizers. Furthermore, each sample would be tested to determine the characteristics of natural dye and to calculate the power flow and efficiency of the electricity generated by each variable of dye solution. There would be four variables in this study, which was the composition (% v/v of the three main sources of natural dyes; hibiscus, bitter leaf and dragon fruit, respectively first (50% : 25% :25%, second (25% : 50% : 25%, third (25% : 25% : 50% and fourth (33,33% : 33,33% : 33,33%. The result of the study showed that efficiency of variable 1 to 4 was 1.9076%, 2.8739%, 0.8566% and 0.8344%, respectively

  3. Anxiety sensitivity uniquely predicts exercise behaviors in young adults seeking to increase physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moshier, S.J.; Szuhany, K.L.; Hearon, B.A.; Smits, J.A.J.; Otto, M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with elevated levels of anxiety sensitivity (AS) may be motivated to avoid aversive emotional or physical states, and therefore may have greater difficulty achieving healthy behavioral change. This may be particularly true for exercise, which produces many of the somatic sensations withi

  4. Infection with Soil-Transmitted Helminths Is Associated with Increased Insulin Sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiria, A.E.; Hamid, F.; Wammes, L.J.; Prasetyani, M.A.; Dekkers, O.M.; May, L.; Kaisar, M.M.; Verweij, J.J.; Guigas, B.; Partono, F.; Sartono, E.; Supali, T.; Yazdanbakhsh, M.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Given that helminth infections have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in animal studies, which may be explained by beneficial effects on energy balance or by a shift in the immune system to an anti-inflammatory profile, we investigated whether soil-transmitted helminth (STH)-infec

  5. Aerobic Exercise Increases Peripheral and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity in Sedentary Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Gert-Jan; Toffolo, Gianna; Manesso, Erica; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Sunehag, Agneta L.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Data are limited on the effects of controlled aerobic exercise programs (without weight loss) on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in children and adolescents. Objective: To determine whether a controlled aerobic exercise program (without weight loss) improves peripheral and hepati

  6. PUFAs acutely affect triacylglycerol-derived skeletal muscle fatty acid uptake and increase postprandial insulin sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jans, A.; Konings, E.; Goossens, G.H.; Bouwman, F.G.; Moors, C.C.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Afman, L.A.; Muller, M.R.; Mariman, E.C.; Blaak, E.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dietary fat quality may influence skeletal muscle lipid processing and fat accumulation, thereby modulating insulin sensitivity. Objective: The objective was to examine the acute effects of meals with various fatty acid (FA) compositions on skeletal muscle FA processing and postprandial

  7. Mutations in troponin T associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy increase Ca(2+)-sensitivity and suppress the modulation of Ca(2+)-sensitivity by troponin I phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Andrew E; Bayliss, Christopher R; El-Mezgueldi, Mohammed; Redwood, Charles S; Ward, Douglas G; Leung, Man-Ching; Papadaki, Maria; Dos Remedios, Cristobal; Marston, Steven B

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effect of 7 Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)-causing mutations in troponin T (TnT) on troponin function in thin filaments reconstituted with actin and human cardiac tropomyosin. We used the quantitative in vitro motility assay to study Ca(2+)-regulation of unloaded movement and its modulation by troponin I phosphorylation. Troponin from a patient with the K280N TnT mutation showed no difference in Ca(2+)-sensitivity when compared with donor heart troponin and the Ca(2+)-sensitivity was also independent of the troponin I phosphorylation level (uncoupled). The recombinant K280N TnT mutation increased Ca(2+)-sensitivity 1.7-fold and was also uncoupled. The R92Q TnT mutation in troponin from transgenic mouse increased Ca(2+)-sensitivity and was also completely uncoupled. Five TnT mutations (Δ14, Δ28 + 7, ΔE160, S179F and K273E) studied in recombinant troponin increased Ca(2+)-sensitivity and were all fully uncoupled. Thus, for HCM-causing mutations in TnT, Ca(2+)-sensitisation together with uncoupling in vitro is the usual response and both factors may contribute to the HCM phenotype. We also found that Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can restore coupling to all uncoupled HCM-causing TnT mutations. In fact the combination of Ca(2+)-desensitisation and re-coupling due to EGCG completely reverses both the abnormalities found in troponin with a TnT HCM mutation suggesting it may have therapeutic potential.

  8. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibits antigen-stimulated increases in vasoconstriction and glycogenolysis in perfused livers derived from sensitized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hines, K.L.; Bates, J.N.; Fisher, R.A. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Recent studies in the authors laboratory demonstrated that infusion of antigen into perfused livers from sensitized rats produces increases in hepatic portal pressure, increases in hepatic glucose output and decreases in hepatic oxygen consumption. In the present study, effects of NO on these hepatic responses to antigen challenge were investigated. Infusion of NO into perfused livers from sensitized rats attenuated ovalbumin induced increases in hepatic portal pressure and glucose output approximately 85% and 90%, respectively, and abolished ovalbumin-induced decreases in hepatic oxygen consumption. The duration of ovalbumin-stimulated increases in hepatic portal pressure was reduced nearly 90% by NO. Similarly, infusion of NO into perfused livers from sensitized rats inhibited increases in hepatic portal pressure and glucose output in response to platelet-activating factor (PAF) nearly 80 and 90%, respectively. In contrast, NO inhibited completely hepatic vasoconstriction in response to phenylephrine without altering glycogenolytic responses to this {alpha}-adrenergic agonist. These results provide evidence for regulatory effects of NO on hemodynamic and glycogenolytic responses to antigen in perfused livers from sensitized rats. These observations support previous findings which suggest that hepatic responses to sensitizing antigen may be mediated by PAF or other autacoid mediators which stimulate glycogenolysis in liver by indirect mechanisms involving hepatic vasoconstriction.

  9. Long-term fertilization of a boreal Norway spruce forest increases the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coucheney, Elsa; Strömgren, Monika; Lerch, Thomas Z; Herrmann, Anke M

    2013-12-01

    Boreal ecosystems store one-third of global soil organic carbon (SOC) and are particularly sensitive to climate warming and higher nutrient inputs. Thus, a better description of how forest managements such as nutrient fertilization impact soil carbon (C) and its temperature sensitivity is needed to better predict feedbacks between C cycling and climate. The temperature sensitivity of in situ soil C respiration was investigated in a boreal forest, which has received long-term nutrient fertilization (22 years), and compared with the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization measured in the laboratory. We found that the fertilization treatment increased both the response of soil in situ CO2 effluxes to a warming treatment and the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization measured in the laboratory (Q10). These results suggested that soil C may be more sensitive to an increase in temperature in long-term fertilized in comparison with nutrient poor boreal ecosystems. Furthermore, the fertilization treatment modified the SOC content and the microbial community composition, but we found no direct relationship between either SOC or microbial changes and the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization. However, the relation between the soil C:N ratio and the fungal/bacterial ratio was changed in the combined warmed and fertilized treatment compared with the other treatments, which suggest that strong interaction mechanisms may occur between nutrient input and warming in boreal soils. Further research is needed to unravel into more details in how far soil organic matter and microbial community composition changes are responsible for the change in the temperature sensitivity of soil C under increasing mineral N inputs. Such research would help to take into account the effect of fertilization managements on soil C storage in C cycling numerical models.

  10. Simplifying the construction of dye-sensitized solar cells to increase their accessibility for community education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleyard, Steve [Department of Environment and Conservation, PO Box K822, Perth, WA 6842 (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    Simple dye-sensitized solar cells were developed using blackboard chalk as a substrate for mixed ZnO and SnO{sub 2} films that were sensitized with Mercurochrome (Merbromine) dye. Graphite pencil 'leads' were used as counter electrodes for the cells and the electrolyte consisted of an aqueous solution of iodine and potassium iodide that was gelled with a disinfectant containing quaternary ammonium compounds and cyanoacrylate adhesive (Superglue {sup registered}). The open circuit potential of constructed cells was typically 0.50-0.64 V and the short circuit current varied between 0.5 and 2.0 mA cm{sup -2}. The cells were developed as an educational resource that could be simply and safely constructed in a home or school environment with readily accessible materials. (author)

  11. Increasing LIGO sensitivity by feedforward subtraction of auxiliary length control noise

    CERN Document Server

    Meadors, Grant David; Riles, Keith

    2013-01-01

    LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, has been designed and constructed to measure gravitational wave strain via differential arm length. The LIGO 4-km Michelson arms with Fabry-Perot cavities have auxiliary length control servos for suppressing Michelson motion of the beam-splitter and arm cavity input mirrors, which degrades interferometer sensitivity. We demonstrate how a post-facto pipeline called AMPS improves a data sample from LIGO Science Run~6 with feedforward subtraction. Dividing data into 1024-second windows, AMPS numerically fits filter functions representing the frequency-domain transfer functions from Michelson length channels into the gravitational-wave strain data channel for each window, then subtracts the filtered Michelson channel noise (witness) from the strain channel (target). In this paper we describe the algorithm, assess achievable improvements in sensitivity to astrophysical sources, and consider relevance to future interferometry.

  12. Increase in sensitivity of sensor units of environment refraction index change based on superficial plasmon resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushenin Yu. V.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Results of computer modeling of an angular spectrum superficial plasmon resonance in metal films measurements with device PLAZMON-5 with infra-red radiator are analysed. It is shown that use of an infra-red source of radiation allows to improve sensitivity of sensor device in comparison with source of visible light. On an example of dielectric refraction indexes measurement with PLAZMON-5 device experimental check of theoretical calculations has been carried out.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutants of Salmonella enterica Have Increased Sensitivity to Catechins

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Miho; OKAMOTO, Akira; Ota, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity is one of the well-known biological characteristics of catechins, the main extract of green tea leaves. It is thought that catechins intercalate into the bacterial cell membrane and damage the lipid bilayer. However, the association between catechins and lipopolysaccharides, which consist of an O side chain, core oligosaccharide, and lipid A, has not been previously investigated. In this study, we evaluated the catechin sensitivity of Salmonella enterica mutants that la...

  14. Reduced access to insulin-sensitive tissues in dogs with obesity secondary to increased fat intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellmerer, Martin; Hamilton-Wessler, Marianthe; Kim, Stella P; Huecking, Katrin; Kirkman, Erlinda; Chiu, Jenny; Richey, Joyce; Bergman, Richard N

    2006-06-01

    Physiological hyperinsulinemia provokes hemodynamic actions and augments access of macromolecules to insulin-sensitive tissues. We investigated whether induction of insulin resistance by a hypercaloric high-fat diet has an effect on the extracellular distribution of macromolecules to insulin-sensitive tissues. Male mongrel dogs were randomly selected into two groups: seven dogs were fed an isocaloric control diet ( approximately 3,900 kcal, 35% from fat), and six dogs were fed a hypercaloric high-fat diet ( approximately 5,300 kcal, 54% from fat) for a period of 12 weeks. During hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, we determined transport parameters and distribution volumes of [(14)C]inulin by applying a three-compartment model to the plasma clearance data of intravenously injected [(14)C]inulin (0.8 microCi/kg). In another study with direct cannulation of the hindlimb skeletal muscle lymphatics, we investigated the effect of physiological hyperinsulinemia on the appearance of intravenously injected [(14)C]inulin in skeletal muscle interstitial fluid and compared the effect of insulin between control and high-fat diet groups. The hypercaloric high-fat diet resulted in significant weight gain (18%; Pfat depots, as well as peripheral insulin resistance, measured as a significant reduction of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake during clamps (-35%; Pinsulin action to stimulate access of macromolecules to insulin-sensitive tissues (control diet 32%, Pfat diet 18%, NS). The present results indicate that access of macromolecules to insulin-sensitive tissues is impaired during diet-induced insulin resistance and suggest that the ability of insulin itself to stimulate tissue access is diminished. We speculate that the observed diet-induced defects in stimulation of tissue perfusion contribute to the development of peripheral insulin resistance.

  15. Detection of shigella in lettuce by the use of a rapid molecular assay with increased sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenia Barrantes Jiménez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR assay to be used as an alternative to the conventional culture method in detecting Shigella and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC virulence genes ipaH and ial in lettuce was developed. Efficacy and rapidity of the molecular method were determined as compared to the conventional culture. Lettuce samples were inoculated with different Shigella flexneri concentrations (from 10 CFU/ml to 10(7 CFU/ml. DNA was extracted directly from lettuce after inoculation (direct-PCR and after an enrichment step (enrichment PCR. Multiplex PCR detection limit was 10(4 CFU/ml, diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 100% accurate. An internal amplification control (IAC of 100 bp was used in order to avoid false negative results. This method produced results in 1 to 2 days while the conventional culture method required 5 to 6 days. Also, the culture method detection limit was 10(6 CFU/ml, diagnostic sensitivity was 53% and diagnostic specificity was 100%. In this study a Multiplex PCR method for detection of virulence genes in Shigella and EIEC was shown to be effective in terms of diagnostic sensitivity, detection limit and amount of time as compared to Shigella conventional culture.

  16. Detection of shigella in lettuce by the use of a rapid molecular assay with increased sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Kenia Barrantes; McCoy², Clyde B.; Achí, Rosario

    2010-01-01

    A Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assay to be used as an alternative to the conventional culture method in detecting Shigella and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) virulence genes ipaH and ial in lettuce was developed. Efficacy and rapidity of the molecular method were determined as compared to the conventional culture. Lettuce samples were inoculated with different Shigella flexneri concentrations (from 10 CFU/ml to 107 CFU/ml). DNA was extracted directly from lettuce after inoculation (direct-PCR) and after an enrichment step (enrichment PCR). Multiplex PCR detection limit was 104CFU/ml, diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 100% accurate. An internal amplification control (IAC) of 100 bp was used in order to avoid false negative results. This method produced results in 1 to 2 days while the conventional culture method required 5 to 6 days. Also, the culture method detection limit was 106 CFU/ml, diagnostic sensitivity was 53% and diagnostic specificity was 100%. In this study a Multiplex PCR method for detection of virulence genes in Shigella and EIEC was shown to be effective in terms of diagnostic sensitivity, detection limit and amount of time as compared to Shigella conventional culture. PMID:24031579

  17. Very mild Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by increased sensitivity to mnemonic interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Jim M.; Balota, David A.; Warren, David E.; Cohen, Neal J.

    2014-01-01

    Early pathology and tissue loss in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) occurs in the hippocampus, a brain region that has recently been implicated in relational processing irrespective of delay. Thus, tasks that involve relational processing will especially tax the hippocampal memory system, and should be sensitive to even mild dysfunction typical of early AD. Here we used a short-lag, short-delay memory task previously shown to be sensitive to hippocampal integrity in an effort to discriminate cognitive changes due to healthy aging from those associated with very mild AD. Young adults, healthy older adults, and individuals with very mild AD (N = 30 for each group) participated in our investigation, which entailed attempting to find an exact match to a previously presented target among a series of stimuli that varied in perceptual similarity to the target stimulus. Older adults with very mild AD were less accurate than healthy older adults, who, in turn, were impaired relative to young adults. Older adults with very mild AD were also particularly susceptible to interference from intervening lure stimuli. A measure based on this finding was able to explain additional variance in differentiating those in the very mild stage of AD from healthy older adults after accounting for episodic memory and global cognition composite scores in logistic regression models. Our findings suggest that cognitive changes in early stage AD reflect aging along with an additional factor potentially centered on sensitivity to interference, thereby supporting multifactorial models of aging. PMID:24747209

  18. Very mild Alzheimer׳s disease is characterized by increased sensitivity to mnemonic interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Jim M; Balota, David A; Warren, David E; Cohen, Neal J

    2014-07-01

    Early pathology and tissue loss in Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) occurs in the hippocampus, a brain region that has recently been implicated in relational processing irrespective of delay. Thus, tasks that involve relational processing will especially tax the hippocampal memory system, and should be sensitive to even mild dysfunction typical of early AD. Here we used a short-lag, short-delay memory task previously shown to be sensitive to hippocampal integrity in an effort to discriminate cognitive changes due to healthy aging from those associated with very mild AD. Young adults, healthy older adults, and individuals with very mild AD (N=30 for each group) participated in our investigation, which entailed attempting to find an exact match to a previously presented target among a series of stimuli that varied in perceptual similarity to the target stimulus. Older adults with very mild AD were less accurate than healthy older adults, who, in turn, were impaired relative to young adults. Older adults with very mild AD were also particularly susceptible to interference from intervening lure stimuli. A measure based on this finding was able to explain additional variance in differentiating those in the very mild stage of AD from healthy older adults after accounting for episodic memory and global cognition composite scores in logistic regression models. Our findings suggest that cognitive changes in early stage AD reflect aging along with an additional factor potentially centered on sensitivity to interference, thereby supporting multifactorial models of aging.

  19. Morphine sensitization increases the extracellular level of glutamate in CA1 of rat hippocampus via μ-opioid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Kadivar, Mehdi; Afrouzi, Hossein; Naghdi, Nasser

    2011-04-25

    Repeated administration of abuse drugs such as morphine elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect plastic changes requiring regulation of glutamatergic system in the brain. In this study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on extracellular glutamate concentration in the hippocampus, a brain region rich in glutamatergic neurons. Sensitization was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of morphine, once daily for 3 days followed by 5 days free of the opioid treatment. The results showed that extracellular glutamate concentration in the CA1 was decreased following administration of morphine in non-sensitized rats. However, morphine-induced behavioral sensitization significantly increased the extracellular glutamate concentration in this area. The enhancement of glutamate in morphine sensitized rats was prevented by administration of naloxone 30 min before each of three daily doses of morphine. These results suggest an adaptation of the glutamatergic neuronal transmission in the hippocampus after morphine sensitization and it is postulated that opioid receptors may play an important role in this effect.

  20. bFGF Protects Pre-oligodendrocytes from Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation Injury to Ameliorate Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xuebin; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Ma, Li; Wu, Xiuxiang; Luo, Mengjiao; Dong, Fuxing; Yao, Ruiqin

    2015-10-01

    One of the pathological hallmarks of periventricular white matter injury is the vulnerability of pre-oligodendrocytes (preOLs) to hypoxia-ischemia (HI). There is increasing evidence that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is an important signaling molecule for neurogenesis and neuroprotection in the central nervous system. However, it is unknown whether bFGF protects preOLs from oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) damage in vitro and promotes remyelination in HI-induced rats. In this present study, bFGF exerted a protective effect on myelin by increasing the myelin thickness, the number of myelinated axons, and myelin basic protein expression in the HI-induced demyelinated neonatal rat corpus callosum. In vitro, bFGF ameliorated the impaired mitochondria and cell processes induced by OGD to promote the survival of isolated O4-positive preOLs. Additionally, the expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) was dramatically up-regulated in the preOLs after bFGF administration in vivo and in vitro. Thus, bFGF-stimulated remyelination in HI-induced rats by protecting the preOLs from hypoxic injury, and the mechanism involved may be mediated by FGFR3.

  1. Corticosteroids reverse cytokine-induced block of survival and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Romy

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL is a frequent complication of preterm delivery. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α released from astrocytes and microglia activated by infection or ischemia have previously been shown to impair survival and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitors and could thus be considered as potential factors contributing to the generation of this disease. The first goal of the present study was to investigate whether exposure of oligodendrocyte precursors to these cytokines arrests the maturation of ion currents in parallel to its effects on myelin proteins and morphological maturation. Secondly, in the search for agents, that can protect differentiating oligodendrocyte precursor cells from cytokine-induced damage we investigated effects of coapplications of corticosteroids with proinflammatory cytokines on the subsequent survival and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Methods To exclude influences from factors released from other cell types purified cultures of oligodendrocyte precursors were exposed to cytokines and/or steroids and allowed to differentiate for further 6 days in culture. Changes in membrane surface were investigated with capacitance recordings and Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy. Na+- and K+- currents were investigated using whole cell patch clamp recordings. The expression of myelin specific proteins was investigated using western blots and the precursor cells were identified using immunostaining with A2B5 antibodies. Results Surviving IFN-γ and TNF-α treated cells continued to maintain voltage-activated Na+- and K+ currents characteristic for the immature cells after 6 days in differentiation medium. Corticosterone, dihydrocorticosterone and, most prominently dexamethasone, counteracted the deleterious effects of IFN-γ and TNF-α on cell survival, A2B5-immunostaining and expression of myelin basic

  2. Mothers' depressive symptoms predict both increased and reduced negative reactivity: aversion sensitivity and the regulation of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Theodore; Moed, Anat; Anderson, Edward R

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether, as mothers' depressive symptoms increase, their expressions of negative emotion to children increasingly reflect aversion sensitivity and motivation to minimize ongoing stress or discomfort. In multiple interactions over 2 years, negative affect expressed by 319 mothers and their children was observed across variations in mothers' depressive symptoms, the aversiveness of children's immediate behavior, and observed differences in children's general negative reactivity. As expected, depressive symptoms predicted reduced maternal negative reactivity when child behavior was low in aversiveness, particularly with children who were high in negative reactivity. Depressive symptoms predicted high negative reactivity and steep increases in negative reactivity as the aversiveness of child behavior increased, particularly when high and continued aversiveness from the child was expected (i.e., children were high in negative reactivity). The findings are consistent with the proposal that deficits in parenting competence as depressive symptoms increase reflect aversion sensitivity and motivation to avoid conflict and suppress children's aversive behavior.

  3. Coordinated control of oligodendrocyte development by extrinsic and intrinsic signaling cues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li He; Q.Richard Lu

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes,the myelin-forming cells for axon ensheathment in the central nervous system,are critical for maximizing and maintaining the conduction velocity of nerve impulses and proper brain function.Demyelination caused by injury or disease together with failure of myelin regeneration disrupts the rapid propagation of action potentials along nerve fibers,and is associated with acquired and inherited disorders,including devastating multiple sclerosis and leukodystrophies.The molecular mechanisms of oligodendrocyte myelination and remyelination remain poorly understood.Recently,a series of signaling pathways including Shh,Notch,BMP and Wnt signaling and their intracellular effectors such as Olig1/2,Hes1/5,Smads and TCFs,have been shown to play important roles in regulating oligodendrocyte development and myelination.In this review,we summarize our recent understanding of how these signaling pathways modulate the progression of oligodendrocyte specification and differentiation in a spatiotemporally-specific manner.A better understanding of the complex but coordinated function of extracellular signals and intracellular determinants during oligodendrocyte development will help to devise effective strategies to promote myelin repair for patients with demyelinating diseases.

  4. Linking white and grey matter in schizophrenia: oligodendrocyte and neuron pathology in the prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Hoistad

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal circuitry relies to a large extent on the presence of functional myelin produced in the brain by oligodendrocytes. Schizophrenia has been proposed to arise partly from altered brain connectivity. Brain imaging and neuropathologic studies have revealed changes in white matter and reduction in myelin content in patients with schizophrenia. In particular, alterations in the directionality and alignment of axons have been documented in schizophrenia. Moreover, the expression levels of several myelin-related genes are decreased in postmortem brains obtained from patients with schizophrenia. These findings have led to the formulation of the oligodendrocyte/myelin dysfunction hypothesis of schizophrenia. In this review, we present a brief overview of the neuropathologic findings obtained on white matter and oligodendrocyte status observed in schizophrenia patients, and relate these changes to the processes of brain maturation and myelination. We also review recent data on oligodendrocyte/myelin genes, and present some recent mouse models of myelin deficiencies. The use of transgenic and mutant animal models offers a unique opportunity to analyze oligodendrocyte and neuronal changes that may have a clinical impact. Lastly, we present some recent morphological findings supporting possible causal involvement of white and grey matter abnormalities, in the aim of determining the morphologic characteristics of the circuits whose alteration leads to the cortical dysfunction that possibly underlies the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  5. Knockdown of Lingo1b protein promotes myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wu; Hu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Demyelinating diseases include multiple sclerosis, which is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by immune attacks on the central nervous system (CNS), resulting in myelin sheath damage and axonal loss. Leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin domain-containing neurite outgrowth inhibitory protein (Nogo) receptor-interacting protein-1 (LINGO-1) have been identified as a negative regulator of oligodendrocytes differentiation. Targeted LINGO-1 inhibition promotes neuron survival, axon regeneration, oligodendrocyte differentiation, and remyelination in diverse animal models. Although studies in rodent models have extended our understanding of LINGO-1, its roles in neural development and myelination in zebrafish (Danio rerio) are not yet clear. In this study, we cloned the zebrafish homolog of the human LINGO-1 and found that lingo1b regulated myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation. The expression of lingo1b started 1 (mRNA) and 2 (protein) days post-fertilization (dpf) in the CNS. Morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of lingo1b resulted in developmental abnormalities, including less dark pigment, small eyes, and a curly spinal cord. The lack of lingo1b enhanced myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation during embryogenesis. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry and movement analysis showed that lingo1b was involved in the axon development of primary motor neurons. These results suggested that Lingo1b protein functions as a negative regulator of myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation during zebrafish development.

  6. Motor neurons and oligodendrocytes arise from distinct cell lineages by progenitor recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanelli, Andrew M; Appel, Bruce

    2015-12-01

    During spinal cord development, ventral neural progenitor cells that express the transcription factors Olig1 and Olig2, called pMN progenitors, produce motor neurons and then oligodendrocytes. Whether motor neurons and oligodendrocytes arise from common or distinct progenitors in vivo is not known. Using zebrafish, we found that motor neurons and oligodendrocytes are produced sequentially by distinct progenitors that have distinct origins. When olig2(+) cells were tracked during the peak period of motor neuron formation, most differentiated as motor neurons without further cell division. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that, as motor neurons differentiated, more dorsally positioned neuroepithelial progenitors descended to the pMN domain and initiated olig2 expression. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling during motor neuron differentiation blocked the ventral movement of progenitors, the progressive initiation of olig2 expression, and oligodendrocyte formation. We therefore propose that the motor neuron-to-oligodendrocyte switch results from Hedgehog-mediated recruitment of glial-fated progenitors to the pMN domain subsequent to neurogenesis.

  7. A3 Adenosine receptors mediate oligodendrocyte death and ischemic damage to optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Estíbaliz; Sánchez-Gómez, María Victoria; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Arellano, Rogelio O; Matute, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Adenosine receptor activation is involved in myelination and in apoptotic pathways linked to neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of adenosine receptor activation in the viability of oligodendrocytes of the rat optic nerve. Selective activation of A3 receptors in pure cultures of oligodendrocytes caused concentration-dependent apoptotic and necrotic death which was preceded by oxidative stress and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Oligodendrocyte apoptosis induced by A3 receptor activation was caspase-dependent and caspase-independent. In addition to dissociated cultures, incubation of optic nerves ex vivo with adenosine and the A3 receptor agonist 2-CI-IB-MECA(1-[2-Chloro-6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-b-D-ribofuranuronamide)-induced caspase-3 activation, oligodendrocyte damage, and myelin loss, effects which were prevented by the presence of caffeine and the A3 receptor antagonist MRS 1220 (N-[9-Chloro-2-(2-furanyl)[1,2,4]-triazolo [1,5-c]quinazolin-5-yl]benzene acetamide). Finally, ischemia-induced injury and functional loss to the optic nerve was attenuated by blocking A3 receptors. Together, these results indicate that adenosine may trigger oligodendrocyte death via activation of A3 receptors and suggest that this mechanism contributes to optic nerve and white matter ischemic damage.

  8. Induction of oligodendrocyte differentiation from adult human fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shin-ichiro; Tokumoto, Yasuhito; Miyake, Jun; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2011-08-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) prepared from somatic cells might become a novel therapeutic tool in regenerative medicine, especially for the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we attempted to induce O4-positive (O4(+)) oligodendrocytes from adult human fibroblast-derived iPSCs in vitro. We used two adult human iPSC cell lines, 201B7 and 253G1. 201B7 was induced by four-gene transduction (oct4, sox2, klf4, c-myc), and 253G1 was induced by three-gene transduction (oct4, sox2, klf4). We treated these cells with two in vitro oligodendrocyte-directed differentiation protocols that were optimized for human embryonic stem cells. One protocol used platelet-derived growth factor as the major mitogen for oligodendrocyte lineage cells, and the other protocol used epidermal growth factor (EGF) as the mitogen. Although the differentiation efficiency was low (less than 0.01%), we could induce O4(+) oligodendrocytes from 253G1 cells using the EGF-dependent differentiation protocol. This is the first report of the in vitro induction of oligodendrocytes differentiation from human iPSCs.

  9. Coplanar Electrode Layout Optimized for Increased Sensitivity for Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Skands, Gustav Erik; Bertelsen, Christian Vinther;

    2015-01-01

    This work describes an improvement in the layout of coplanar electrodes for electrical impedance spectroscopy. We have developed, fabricated, and tested an improved electrode layout, which improves the sensitivity of an impedance flow cytometry chip. The improved chip was experimentally tested...... and compared to a chip with a conventional electrode layout. The improved chip was able to discriminate 0.5 mu m beads from 1 mu m as opposed to the conventional chip. Furthermore, finite element modeling was used to simulate the improvements in electrical field density and uniformity between the electrodes...... of the new electrode layout. Good agreement was observed between the model and the obtained experimental results....

  10. Dietary fat restriction increases fat taste sensitivity in people with obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Lisa P.; Bolhuis, Dieuwerke P.; Susan J. Torres; Keast, Russell S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Individuals with obesity may be less sensitive to the taste of fat, and it is hypothesized that this is due to excess dietary fat intake. This study assessed the effect of a 6‐week low‐fat (LF) or portion control (PC) diet matched for weight loss on fat taste thresholds, fat perception, and preference in people with overweight/obesity. Methods Participants (n = 53) completed a randomized dietary intervention and consumed either a LF diet (25% fat) or PC diet (33% fat) for 6 weeks. F...

  11. Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) increases glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity in muscle cells via multipathway mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Changkeun; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Jung, Eun-Sun; Seyedian, Ramin; Jo, MiNa; Kim, Jehein; Kim, Jong-Shu; Kim, Euikyung

    2012-12-15

    Saffron (Crocus sativus Linn.) has been an important subject of research in the past two decades because of its various biological properties, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-atherosclerotic activities. On the other hand, the molecular bases of its actions have been scarcely understood. Here, we elucidated the mechanism of the hypoglycemic actions of saffron through investigating its signaling pathways associated with glucose metabolism in C(2)C(12) skeletal muscle cells. Saffron strongly enhanced glucose uptake and the phosphorylation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase)/ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases), but not PI 3-kinase (Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/Akt. Interestingly, the co-treatment of saffron and insulin further improved the insulin sensitivity via both insulin-independent (AMPK/ACC and MAPKs) and insulin-dependent (PI 3-kinase/Akt and mTOR) pathways. It also suggested that there is a crosstalk between the two signaling pathways of glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle cells. These results could be confirmed from the findings of GLUT4 translocation. Taken together, AMPK plays a major role in the effects of saffron on glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle cells. Our study provides important insights for the possible mechanism of action of saffron and its potential as a therapeutic agent in diabetic patients.

  12. Increasing LIGO sensitivity by feedforward subtraction of auxiliary length control noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadors, Grant; Kawabe, Keita; Riles, Keith

    2013-04-01

    LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory [Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana] measures the differential length of 4-km Michelson arms with Fabry-Perot cavities. Length changes could indicate strain caused by astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. Fundamentally limited by seismic noise, thermal suspension noise, and laser shot noise in different frequency bands, a LIGO interferometer's sensitivity can also be degraded by additional relative motion of the inner arm cavity mirrors due to imperfectly-servoed Michelson motion. In this project we seek to subtract the effects of this residual motion by feedforward correction of the gravitational-wave data channel. We divide data from LIGO's sixth science run into 1024-second time windows and numerically fit a filter representing the frequency-domain transfer function from Michelson servo noise to gravitational wave channel for each window. Finally, the Michelson servo channel is processed through the filter and is subtracted from the gravitational-wave signal channel. The algorithm used in this procedure will be described with a preliminary assessment of the achievable sensitivity improvement.

  13. Renaturation of blotted allergens increases the sensitivity of specific IgE detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, M D; Fernández, C; Moneo, I

    1996-01-01

    Several authors have demonstrated that renaturation is an essential step for the appropriate recognition of blotted proteins. The use of nonionic detergents has been described as a useful alternative to enhance the antigenicity in immunoblotting, although elution from proteins by detergents has been observed. To measure the influence of different factors on the sensitivity of specific IgE by immunoblotting, we used twenty human sera from atopic patients who were allergic or nonallergic to a common, reliable allergen (grass pollen mixture). The use of Nonidet-P40 was found to be a useful alternative for the renaturation of the allergens. No elution from the membrane was found when employing this detergent, even at high concentrations (3%), and its use gave better sensitivity than methanol. On the other hand, we detected that methanol possessed renaturing properties. A transfer method using diffusion instead of electric transfer gave the best results and two membranes could be obtained from each gel. Using this method, we found that after NP-40 incubation of the membrane, the use of bovine albumin could be omitted as blocking agent and that its use had even deleterious effects.

  14. Increased effort requirements and risk sensitivity: a comparison of delay and magnitude manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshenbaum, Ari P.; Szalda-Petree, Allen D.; Haddad, Nabil F.

    2003-03-31

    Reward magnitude and delay to reward were independently manipulated in two separate experiments examining risk-sensitive choice in rats. A dual-running wheel apparatus was used and the tangential force resistance required to displace both wheels was low (50g) for half of the subjects, and high (120g) for the remaining subjects. Concurrent FI30-s and FI60-s schedules delivered equivalent amounts of food reward per unit time (i.e. 5 and 10 pellets of food, respectively), and these conditions served as the baseline treatment for all subjects. Variability, either in reward magnitude or delay, was introduced on the long-delay (60s) schedule during the second phase. All subjects were returned to the baseline condition in the third phase, and variability was introduced on the short-delay (30s) interval schedule during phase four. The subjects were again returned to the baseline condition in the fifth and final phase, ultimately yielding a five-phase ABACA design. Original baseline performance was characterized by a slight short-delay interval preference, and this pattern of performance was recovered with each subsequent presentation of the baseline condition. Overall, the data obtained from the reward magnitude and delay-to-reward manipulations were indistinguishable; subjects experiencing low-response effort requirement behaved in a risk-indifferent manner and subjects experiencing high-response effort requirement preferred the variable schedule. Implications for the daily energy budget rule on risk-sensitive foraging are discussed in light of these findings.

  15. Polymorphism in NEDD4L is associated with increased salt sensitivity, reduced levels of P-renin and increased levels of Nt-proANP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Dahlberg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Neuronal precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated 4-like (NEDD4L is a regulator of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, thus a candidate gene for salt sensitivity. Carriers of an intact NEDD4L C2-domain, encoded by the NEDD4L rs4149601 (G/A GG genotype, together with the C-allele of the NEDD4L rs2288774 (C/T polymorphism have previously been shown to have increased blood pressure. Our aim was to test if genetic variation in NEDD4L is associated with increased salt sensitivity. METHODS: 39 normotensive subjects were studied. The difference in 24-hour systolic blood pressure after four weeks on 150 mmol/day NaCl intake and four weeks on 50 mmol/day NaCl was defined as salt sensitivity. The rs4149601 and rs2288774 polymorphisms were genotyped using PCR-based techniques. RESULTS: Carriers of the rs4149601 GG-genotype together with the rs2288774 CC-genotype had significantly higher salt sensitivity (median, IQR (18.0, 7.5-20.0 mmHg vs 6.0, 0.0-10.0 mmHg, P = 0.007 and lower plasma renin concentration (P-renin (6.0, 2.0-9.5 mU/L vs 15.0, 9.0-24.0 mU/L, P = 0.005 as compared to non-carriers of these genotypes. In carriers of the rs4149601 GG-genotype together with the rs2288774 CC- or CT-genotype, as compared to non-carriers, salt sensitivity was (8.0, 6.0-18.0 mmHg vs 5.0, 0.0-10.0 mmHg, P = 0.07 and P-renin (9.0, 6.0-16.0 mU/L vs 15.0, 9.0-28.0 mU/L, P = 0.03. CONCLUSION: Genetic NEDD4L variation seems to affect salt sensitivity and P-renin in normotensive subjects, suggesting that genotyping of NEDD4L may be clinically useful in order to identify subjects who benefit from dietary salt restriction in the prevention of hypertension.

  16. Increased visceral sensitivity to capsaicin after DSS-induced colitis in mice : spinal cord c-Fos expression and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelkamp, Niels; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Schedlowski, Manfred; Holtmann, Gerald; Heijnen, Cobi J.

    2007-01-01

    Increased visceral sensitivity to capsaicin after DSS-induced colitis in mice: spinal cord c-Fos expression and behavior. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 293: G749-G757, 2007. First published July 26, 2007; doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00114.2007.During acute and chronic inflammation visceral pain perc

  17. Increased sensitivity of an adriamycin-resistant human small cell lung carcinoma cell line to mitochondrial inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; Holtrop, M; de Vries, H; de Vries, Liesbeth; Mulder, N H

    1992-01-01

    The energy metabolism of an atypical multidrug resistant human small cell lung carcinoma cell line (GLC4/ADR) was studied. The glycolytic rate was 30% reduced and the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity 2-fold increased in GLC4/ADR compared to the parental sensitive line (GLC4). Although mito

  18. Has the sensitivity of soybean cultivars to ozone pollution increased with time? An analysis of published dose-response data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rising trend in concentrations of ground-level ozone (O3) – a common air pollutant and phytotoxin – currently being experienced in some world regions represents a threat to agricultural yield. Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is an O3-sensitive crop species, and is experiencing increasing globa...

  19. Increased visceral sensitivity to capsaicin after DSS-induced colitis in mice : spinal cord c-Fos expression and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelkamp, Niels; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Schedlowski, Manfred; Holtmann, Gerald; Heijnen, Cobi J.

    2007-01-01

    Increased visceral sensitivity to capsaicin after DSS-induced colitis in mice: spinal cord c-Fos expression and behavior. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 293: G749-G757, 2007. First published July 26, 2007; doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00114.2007.During acute and chronic inflammation visceral pain

  20. Lead Poisoning Disturbs Oligodendrocytes Differentiation Involved in Decreased Expression of NCX3 Inducing Intracellular Calcium Overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb poisoning has always been a serious health concern, as it permanently damages the central nervous system. Chronic Pb accumulation in the human body disturbs oligodendrocytes (OLs differentiation, resulting in dysmyelination, but the molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this study, Pb at 1 μM inhibits OLs precursor cells (OPCs differentiation via decreasing the expression of Olig 2, CNPase proteins in vitro. Moreover, Pb treatment inhibits the sodium/calcium exchanger 3 (NCX3 mRNA expression, one of the major means of calcium (Ca2+ extrusion at the plasma membrane during OPCs differentiation. Also addition of KB-R7943, NCX3 inhibitor, to simulate Pb toxicity, resulted in decreased myelin basic protein (MBP expression and cell branching. Ca2+ response trace with Pb and KB-R7943 treatment did not drop down in the same recovery time as the control, which elevated intracellular Ca2+ concentration reducing MBP expression. In contrast, over-expression of NCX3 in Pb exposed OPCs displayed significant increase MBP fluorescence signal in positive regions and CNPase expression, which recovered OPCs differentiation to counterbalance Pb toxicity. In conclusion, Pb exposure disturbs OLs differentiation via affecting the function of NCX3 by inducing intracellular calcium overload.

  1. Oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1 mRNA and protein expression in organotypic rat brain slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Cui; Lijun Yang; Dezhuang Huang; Wandong Zhang; Weijuan Han; Yanqing Yao; Wenxing Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have confirmed that oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1 (Olig-1) is vital for myelin repair. However, the effects of hypoxia and ischemia on Olig-1 expression remain unknown.In this study, Olig-1 mRNA and protein expressions were analyzed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, to determine the expression profile of Olig-1 in rat brain slices exposed to hypoxia and ischemia. Brains were obtained from 2-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats, and sections were randomly assigned to control and hypoxia/ischemia groups. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed karyorrhexis and karyopyknosis in cells from the hypoxia/ischemia group. Under electron microscopy, mitochondria swelling and neuropil edema were observed in the hypoxia/ischemia group. Olig-1 mRNA and protein expressions were increased at 1 day after hypoxia and ischemia treatment. These results suggest that in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry could be used simultaneously to detect mRNA and protein expression in brain slices.

  2. P2X7 receptors and Fyn kinase mediate ATP-induced oligodendrocyte progenitor cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ji-Feng; Gao, Xiao-Fei; Pu, Ying-Yan; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Xiang, Zhenghua; He, Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Recruitment of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) to the lesions is the most important event for remyelination after central nervous system (CNS) injury or in demyelinating diseases. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, we found high concentrations of ATP could increase the number of migrating OPCs in vitro, while after pretreatment with oxidized ATP (a P2X7 receptor antagonist), the promotive effect was attenuated. The promotive effect of 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP) (a P2X7 receptor agonist) was more potent than ATP. After incubation with BzATP, the activity of Fyn, one member of the Src family of kinases, was enhanced. Moreover, the interaction between P2X7 and Fyn was identified by co-immunoprecipitation. After blocking the activity of Fyn or down-regulating the expression of Fyn, the migration of OPCs induced by BzATP was inhibited. These data indicate that P2X7 receptors/Fyn may mediate ATP-induced OPC migration under pathological conditions.

  3. 3D numerical simulation of a lab-on-a-chip--increasing measurement sensitivity of interdigitated capacitors by passivation optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Birnbaumer, Gerald M; Zanghellini, Juergen; Ertl, Peter

    2011-04-07

    Interdigital electrode structures (IDES) play a major role in many technical and analytical applications. In particular, they are a key technology in modern lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. As high sensitivity is a key component of any (bio)analytical method, the presented work is aimed at designing a novel dielectric sensing system, which exhibits maximum sensor sensitivity using passivated dielectric microsensors. Although the implementation of high-ε(r) dielectric passivation materials such as tantalum oxide or titanium oxide showed increased sensor sensitivity by a factor of 5, simulations revealed that sensor sensitivity is ultimately determined by the dielectric properties of the analyte. Ideally, dielectric properties of the passivation material need to be adjusted to the dielectric properties of the material under investigation and any deviations (e.g. higher or lower dielectric constants) will result in significant loss of sensitivity. To address these shortcomings we have developed a novel dielectric sensing concept based on a dual-material passivation geometry. The novel design consists of electric flux barriers that are layered between the finger electrodes, as well as electric flux guides which are located above the electrode structures that direct the entire generated electric flux to the object under investigation. Our 3D numerical results clearly show that the novel design offers two main advantages: firstly, the measurement sensitivity is further increased by more than a factor of two in comparison to a homogeneous passivation material sensing strategy. Secondly, maximum sensitivity for a given set of finger geometries can be achieved using a single sensor design regardless of the frequency-dependent dielectric properties of the measured objects. Hence, the novel approach is capable of reducing design and manufacturing costs of lab-on-a-chip devices.

  4. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol activates [Ca2+], increases partly sensitive to capacitative store refilling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; deZeeuw, D; Nelemans, SA

    1997-01-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol induces [Ca2+](i) increases in DDT1MF-2 smooth muscle cells. Both Ca2+ entry and release from intracellular Ca2+ stores were concentration dependently activated. The Ca2+ entry component contributed most to the increases in [Ca2+](i). Stimulation with Delta(9)-tetrahydr

  5. Increasing the sensitivity for stem cell monitoring in system-function based magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Them, Kolja; Salamon, J.; Szwargulski, P.; Sequeira, S.; Kaul, M. G.; Lange, C.; Ittrich, H.; Knopp, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    The use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) has provided new possibilities in biophysics and biomedical imaging technologies. The magnetization dynamics of SPIONs, which can be influenced by the environment, are of central interest. In this work, different biological SPION environments are used to investigate three different calibration methods for stem cell monitoring in magnetic particle imaging. It is shown that calibrating using SPIONs immobilized via agarose gel or intracellular uptake results in superior stem cell image quality compared to mobile SPIONs in saline. This superior image quality enables more sensitive localization and identification of a significantly smaller number of magnetically labeled stem cells. The results are important for cell tracking and monitoring of future SPION based therapies such as hyperthermia based cancer therapies, targeted drug delivery, or tissue regeneration approaches where it is crucial to image a sufficiently small number of SPIONs interacting with biological matter.

  6. Increased Prepulse Inhibition and Sensitization of the Startle Reflex in Autistic Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Gitte Falcher; Bilenberg, Niels; Cantio, Cathriona;

    2014-01-01

    The relation between autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia is a subject of intense debate and research due to evidence of common neurobiological pathways in the two disorders. The objective of this study was to explore whether deficits in prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex...... and 40 matched NTD controls were tested in a psychophysiological test battery. The PPI of the acoustic startle reflex was analyzed in 18 ASD subjects and 34 NTD controls. Habituation and sensitization were analyzed in 23 ASD subjects and 39 NTD controls. In trials with less intense prestimuli (76 d....... The relation to PPI deficits observed in schizophrenia is not apparent. Future research should study the developmental course of PPI deficits in ASD patients in a longitudinal design. Autism Res 2013, ●●: ●●-●●. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  7. Coplanar Electrode Layout Optimized for Increased Sensitivity for Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper Hyttel Clausen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work describes an improvement in the layout of coplanar electrodes for electrical impedance spectroscopy. We have developed, fabricated, and tested an improved electrode layout, which improves the sensitivity of an impedance flow cytometry chip. The improved chip was experimentally tested and compared to a chip with a conventional electrode layout. The improved chip was able to discriminate 0.5 μm beads from 1 μm as opposed to the conventional chip. Furthermore, finite element modeling was used to simulate the improvements in electrical field density and uniformity between the electrodes of the new electrode layout. Good agreement was observed between the model and the obtained experimental results.

  8. Increasing the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors with double squeezed-input

    CERN Document Server

    Khalili, Farid Ya; Chen, Yanbei

    2009-01-01

    We consider improving the sensitivity of future interferometric gravitational-wave detectors by simultaneously injecting two squeezed vacuums (light), filtered through a resonant Fabry-Perot cavity, into the dark port of the interferometer.The same scheme with single squeezed vacuum was first proposed and analyzed by Corbitt et al. Here we show that the extra squeezed vacuum, together with an additional homodyne detection suggested previously by one of the authors, allows reduction of quantum noise over the entire detection band. To motivate future implementations, we take into account a realistic technical noise budget for Advanced LIGO (AdvLIGO) and numerically optimize the parameters of both the filter and the interferometer for detecting gravitational-wave signals from two important astrophysics sources, namely Neutron-Star--Neutron-Star (NSNS) binaries and Bursts. Assuming the optical loss of the 30m filter cavity to be 10ppm per bounce and 10dB squeezing injection, the corresponding quantum noise with o...

  9. Updating Mars-GRAM to Increase the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, Hiliary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). During the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process, it was discovered that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear set to 0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. As a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented from work being done to derive better multipliers by including variation with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data. The addition of these more precise density factors to Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  10. Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Precision of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with TES observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. The addition of these density factors to Mars-GRAM will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  11. Axonal degeneration stimulates the formation of NG2+ cells and oligodendrocytes in the mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Ladeby, Rune; Drøjdahl, Nina;

    2006-01-01

    Proliferation of the adult NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells has traditionally been viewed as a remyelination response ensuing from destruction of myelin and oligodendrocytes, and not to the axonal pathology that is also a characteristic of demyelinating disease. To better understand...... the response of the NG2+ cells to the different components of demyelinating pathology, we investigated the response of adult NG2+ cells to axonal degeneration in the absence of primary myelin or oligodendrocyte pathology. Axonal degeneration was induced in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult mice...... by transection of the entorhino-dentate perforant path projection. The acutely induced degeneration of axons and terminals resulted in a prompt response of NG2+ cells, consisting of morphological transformation, cellular proliferation, and upregulation of NG2 expression days 2-3 after surgery. This was followed...

  12. Oligodendrocyte, Astrocyte, and Microglia Crosstalk in Myelin Development, Damage, and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Helena S.; Portugal, Camila C.; Socodato, Renato; Relvas, João B.

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating glia of the central nervous system. Myelination of axons allows rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses and contributes to axonal integrity. Devastating neurological deficits caused by demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, illustrate well the importance of the process. In this review, we focus on the positive and negative interactions between oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia during developmental myelination and remyelination. Even though many lines of evidence support a crucial role for glia crosstalk during these processes, the nature of such interactions is often neglected when designing therapeutics for repair of demyelinated lesions. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying glial cell communication and how they influence oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination is fundamental to uncover novel therapeutic strategies for myelin repair. PMID:27551677

  13. Exercise-induced increase in IL-6 level enhances GLUT4 expression and insulin sensitivity in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Tamura, Yoshifumi; Kakehi, Saori; Sanada, Hiromi; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Watada, Hirotaka

    2016-05-13

    A single bout of exercise is known to increase the insulin sensitivity of skeletal muscle; however, the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood. Because a single bout of exercise induces a transient increase in blood interleukin-6 (IL-6) level, we hypothesized that the enhancement of insulin sensitivity after a single bout of exercise in skeletal muscle is mediated at least in part through IL-6-dependent mechanisms. To test this hypothesis, C57BL6J mice were intravenously injected with normal IgG or an IL-6 neutralizing antibody before exercise. Twenty-four hours after a single bout of exercise, the plantaris muscle was harvested to measure insulin sensitivity and glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 expression levels by ex-vivo insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake and Western blotting, respectively. Compared with sedentary mice, mice that performed exercise showed enhanced IL-6 concentration, insulin-stimulated 2-DG uptake, and GLUT-4 expression in the plantaris muscle. The enhanced insulin sensitivity and GLUT4 expression were canceled by injection of the IL-6 neutralizing antibody before exercise. In addition, IL-6 injection increased GLUT4 expression, both in the plantaris muscle and the soleus muscle in C57BL6J mice. Furthermore, a short period of incubation with IL-6 increased GLUT4 expression in differentiated C2C12 myotubes. In summary, these results suggested that IL-6 increased GLUT4 expression in muscle and that this phenomenon may play a role in the post-exercise enhancement of insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle.

  14. Increased pain sensitivity in accident-related chronic pain patients with comorbid posttraumatic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Harvold, Mathea

    2017-01-01

    of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to ten repeated stimulations), and conditioning pain modulation (CPM: increase in cPPT during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Warmth detection threshold (WDT) and heat pain threshold (HPT) at the hand were also assessed. Clinical pain intensity...... demonstrated increased pain intensity, and psychological distress as well as reduced WDT and cPTT compared with patients without PTSD (PCPM were found. The association between PTSD and pain intensity was mediated by pain catastrophizing, and fear...

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 activates integrin-mediated intracellular signaling and migration in oligodendrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chesik, Daniel; De Keyser, Jacques; Bron, Reinier; Fuhler, Gwenny M.

    2010-01-01

    P>In multiple sclerosis (MS), oligodendrocytes in lesions are lost, leaving damaged tissue virtually devoid of these myelin-producing cells. Our group has recently demonstrated enhanced expression of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) in oligodendrocytes (CNPase+) localized

  16. The oligodendrocyte-specific G protein-coupled receptor GPR17 is a cell-intrinsic timer of myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Wu, Heng; Wang, Shuzong; Koito, Hisami; Li, Jianrong; Ye, Feng; Hoang, Jenny; Escobar, Sabine S; Gow, Alexander; Arnett, Heather A; Trapp, Bruce D; Karandikar, Nitin J; Hsieh, Jenny; Lu, Q Richard

    2009-11-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Olig1 promotes oligodendrocyte maturation and is required for myelin repair. We characterized an Olig1-regulated G protein-coupled receptor, GPR17, whose function is to oppose the action of Olig1. Gpr17 was restricted to oligodendrocyte lineage cells, but was downregulated during the peak period of myelination and in adulthood. Transgenic mice with sustained Gpr17 expression in oligodendrocytes exhibited stereotypic features of myelinating disorders in the CNS. Gpr17 overexpression inhibited oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation both in vivo and in vitro. Conversely, Gpr17 knockout mice showed early onset of oligodendrocyte myelination. The opposing action of Gpr17 on oligodendrocyte maturation reflects, at least partially, upregulation and nuclear translocation of the potent oligodendrocyte differentiation inhibitors ID2/4. Collectively, these findings suggest that GPR17 orchestrates the transition between immature and myelinating oligodendrocytes via an ID protein-mediated negative regulation and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for CNS myelin repair.

  17. Transcriptional Expression of Myelin Basic Protein in Oligodendrocytes Depends on Functional Syntaxin 4 : a Potential Correlation with Autocrine Signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlard, Marjolein; Klunder, Lammert; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Nomden, Anita; Tyagi, Sanjay; de Vries, Hans; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2015-01-01

    Myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes is essential for saltatory nerve conduction. To form myelin membranes, a coordinated synthesis and subsequent polarized transport of myelin components are necessary. Here, we show that as part of the mechanism to establish membrane polarity, oligodendrocytes

  18. Is glycyrrhizin sensitivity increased in anorexia nervosa and should licorice be avoided? Case report and review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, René K; Lingqvist, Linnéa E; Bonde, Rasmus K

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hypokalemia is a potentially life-threatening electrolyte disturbance in anorexia nervosa and is most frequently caused by purging behavior. We report a case of severe hypokalemia in anorexia nervosa induced by daily ingestion of approximately 20 g of licorice. METHODS: To confirm...... low daily dose of licorice suggests high glycyrrhizin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Patients with anorexia nervosa not only have decreased food intake but also selective and sometimes bizarre eating habits that, in association with increased sensitivity to glycyrrhizin, may cause severe hypokalemia....

  19. Increased glucocorticoid sensitivity in pancreatic beta-cells : Effects on glucose metabolism and insulin release

    OpenAIRE

    Davani, Behrous

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by three pathological alterations: (1) insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, (2) increased hepatic glucose production and (3) impaired insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta-cells. Glucocorticoids (GCs) exert profound effects on glucose homeostasis. They decrease glucose uptake and increase hepatic glucose production. In addition, they may directly inhibit insulin release. The main aim of this thesis was to investigate...

  20. Sensitivity of a prairie wetland to increased temperature and seasonal precipitation changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poiani, K.A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Johnson, W.C. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States); Kittel, T.G.F. [Univ. Corp. for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)]|[Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We assessed the potential effects of increased temperature and changes in amount and seasonal timing of precipitation on the hydrology and vegetation of a semi-permanent prairie wetland in North Dakota using a spatially-defined, rule-based simulation model. Simulations were run with increased temperatures of 2{degree}C combined with a 10 percent increase or decrease in total growing season precipitation. Changes in precipitation were applied either evenly across all months or to individual seasons (spring, summer, or fall). The response of semi-permanent wetland P1 was relatively similar under most of the seasonal scenarios. A 10 percent increase in total growing season precipitation applied to summer months only, to fall months only, and over all months produced lower water levels compared to those resulting from the current climate due to increased evapotranspiration. Wetland hydrology was most affected by changes in spring precipitation and runoff. Vegetation response was relatively consistent across scenarios. Seven of the eight seasonal scenarios produced drier conditions with no open water and greater vegetation cover compared to those resulting from the current climate. Only when spring precipitation increased did the wetland maintain an extensive open water area (49 percent). 36 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Immunocytochemical study with an anti-transferrin binding protein serum: a marker for avian oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S S; Lucas, J J

    1995-03-13

    We have investigated immunocytochemically the localization of a transferrin binding protein (TfBP) in adult CNS of avian and mammalian species using a polyclonal antibody raised against the protein purified from hen oviduct membranes (alpha OV-TfBP). TfBP has recently been shown to be HSP108. An overall strong immunoreactivity was revealed in most parts of the avian brains, especially in the white matter. The main immunoreactivity originated in small, intensely reacting cells interpreted as oligodendrocytes. The density of TfBP-labeled oligodendrocytes of the avian brains was generally proportional to the degree of myelination. There were no marked differences in TfBP-immunostaining pattern between avian species (chick, pigeon and lovebird). On the other hand, in rat, rabbit and cat brains we could not find any TfBP-immunoreactivity. Immunoelectron microscopy has further revealed that TfBP is present in the light and medium types of oligodendrocytes which are known to have high metabolic activities. TfBP reaction product was homogeneously dispersed throughout the perinuclear cytoplasm and fine processes of oligodendrocytes. The intracytoplasmic organelles such as mitochondria and Golgi apparatus were devoid of reaction product. The presence of TfBP in oligodendrocytes implies that this protein may play an important role in transferrin-mediated iron metabolism in the CNS. The complete lack of cross-reactivity between alpha OV-TfBP and mammalian tissues suggests that there is species variability in TfBP structure. We conclude that this chick TfBP antiserum will prove useful in studies of oligodendrocytes and myelination in the avian CNS.

  2. Fluoxetine prevents oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Y; Kang, So R; Yune, Tae Y

    2015-05-01

    Oligodendrocyte cell death and axon demyelination after spinal cord injury (SCI) are known to be important secondary injuries contributing to permanent neurological disability. Thus, blocking oligodendrocyte cell death should be considered for therapeutic intervention after SCI. Here, we demonstrated that fluoxetine, an antidepressant drug, alleviates oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation after SCI. After injury at the T9 level with a Precision Systems and Instrumentation (Lexington, KY) device, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) was administered once a day for the indicated time points. Immunostaining with CD11b (OX-42) antibody and quantification analysis showed that microglia activation was significantly inhibited by fluoxetine at 5 days after injury. Fluoxetine also significantly inhibited activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) and expression of pro-nerve growth factor (pro-NGF), which is known to mediate oligodendrocyte cell death through the p75 neurotrophin receptor after SCI. In addition, fluoxetine attenuated activation of Ras homolog gene family member A and decreased the level of phosphorylated c-Jun and, ultimately, alleviated caspase-3 activation and significantly reduced cell death of oligodendrocytes at 5 days after SCI. Further, the decrease of myelin basic protein, myelin loss, and axon loss in white matter was also significantly blocked by fluoxetine, as compared to vehicle control. These results suggest that fluoxetine inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation and p38-MAPK activation, followed by pro-NGF production after SCI, and provide a potential usage of fluoxetine for a therapeutic agent after acute SCI in humans.

  3. Engineering an Anti-Transferrin Receptor ScFv for pH-Sensitive Binding Leads to Increased Intracellular Accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Tillotson

    Full Text Available The equilibrium binding affinity of receptor-ligand or antibody-antigen pairs may be modulated by protonation of histidine side-chains, and such pH-dependent mechanisms play important roles in biological systems, affecting molecular uptake and trafficking. Here, we aimed to manipulate cellular transport of single-chain antibodies (scFvs against the transferrin receptor (TfR by engineering pH-dependent antigen binding. An anti-TfR scFv was subjected to histidine saturation mutagenesis of a single CDR. By employing yeast surface display with a pH-dependent screening pressure, scFvs having markedly increased dissociation from TfR at pH 5.5 were identified. The pH-sensitivity generally resulted from a central cluster of histidine residues in CDRH1. When soluble, pH-sensitive, scFv clone M16 was dosed onto live cells, the internalized fraction was 2.6-fold greater than scFvs that lacked pH-sensitive binding and the increase was dependent on endosomal acidification. Differences in the intracellular distribution of M16 were also observed consistent with an intracellular decoupling of the scFv M16-TfR complex. Engineered pH-sensitive TfR binding could prove important for increasing the effectiveness of TfR-targeted antibodies seeking to exploit endocytosis or transcytosis for drug delivery purposes.

  4. Improving Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Extensively utilized for numerous mission applications, the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model. In a Monte-Carlo mode, Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is used to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Mars-GRAM has been found to be inexact when used during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3. Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) from the surface to 80 km altitude. Mars-GRAM with the MapYear parameter set to 0 utilizes results from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 at all locations for the entire year. Imprecise atmospheric density and pressure at all altitudes is a consequence of this use of MGCM with tau=3. Density factor values have been determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 as a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem. These factors adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. These density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls and are included in Mars-GRAM Release 1.3. Work currently being done, to derive better multipliers by including variations with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data, will be highlighted in the presentation. The TES limb data utilized in this process has been validated by a comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). This comparison study was undertaken for locations on Mars of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST. The more precise density factors will be included in Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 and thus improve the results of future sensitivity studies done for large

  5. Coral population trajectories, increased disturbance and management intervention: A sensitivity analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Riegl, Bernhard

    2013-03-07

    Coral reefs distant from human population were sampled in the Red Sea and one-third showed degradation by predator outbreaks (crown-of-thorns-starfish=COTS observed in all regions in all years) or bleaching (1998, 2010). Models were built to assess future trajectories. They assumed variable coral types (slow/fast growing), disturbance frequencies (5,10,20years), mortality (equal or not), and connectivity (un/connected to un/disturbed community). Known disturbances were used to parameterize models. Present and future disturbances were estimated from remote-sensing chlorophyll and temperature data. Simulations and sensitivity analysis suggest community resilience at >20-year disturbance frequency, but degradation at higher frequency. Trajectories move from fast-grower to slow-grower dominance at intermediate disturbance frequency, then again to fast-grower dominance. A similar succession was observed in the field: Acropora to Porites to Stylophora/Pocillopora dominance on shallow reefs, and a transition from large poritids to small faviids on deep reefs. Synthesis and application: Even distant reefs are impacted by global changes. COTS impacts and bleaching were key driver of coral degradation, coral population decline could be reduced if these outbreaks and bleaching susceptibility were managed by maintaining water quality and by other interventions. Just leaving reefs alone, seems no longer a satisfactory option. 2013 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution.

  6. Coral population trajectories, increased disturbance and management intervention: a sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegl, Bernhard; Berumen, Michael; Bruckner, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Coral reefs distant from human population were sampled in the Red Sea and one-third showed degradation by predator outbreaks (crown-of-thorns-starfish = COTS observed in all regions in all years) or bleaching (1998, 2010). Models were built to assess future trajectories. They assumed variable coral types (slow/fast growing), disturbance frequencies (5,10,20 years), mortality (equal or not), and connectivity (un/connected to un/disturbed community). Known disturbances were used to parameterize models. Present and future disturbances were estimated from remote-sensing chlorophyll and temperature data. Simulations and sensitivity analysis suggest community resilience at >20-year disturbance frequency, but degradation at higher frequency. Trajectories move from fast-grower to slow-grower dominance at intermediate disturbance frequency, then again to fast-grower dominance. A similar succession was observed in the field: Acropora to Porites to Stylophora/Pocillopora dominance on shallow reefs, and a transition from large poritids to small faviids on deep reefs. Synthesis and application: Even distant reefs are impacted by global changes. COTS impacts and bleaching were key driver of coral degradation, coral population decline could be reduced if these outbreaks and bleaching susceptibility were managed by maintaining water quality and by other interventions. Just leaving reefs alone, seems no longer a satisfactory option.

  7. Incubating rainbow trout in soft water increased their later sensitivity to cadmium and zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebane, Christopher A.; Hennessy, Daniel P.; Dillon, Frank S.

    2010-01-01

    Water hardness is well known to affect the toxicity of some metals; however, reports on the influence of hardness during incubation or acclimation on later toxicity to metals have been conflicting. We incubated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) near the confluence of two streams, one with soft water and one with very-soft water (average incubation hardnesses of about 21 and 11 mg/L as CaCO3, respectively). After developing to the swim-up stage, the fish were exposed for 96-h to a mixture of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) in water with a hardness of 27 mg/L as CaCO3. The fish incubated in the higher hardness water were about two times more resistant than the fish incubated in the extremely soft water. This difference was similar or greater than the difference that would have been predicted by criteria hardness equations had the fish been tested in the different acclimation waters. We think it is plausible that the energy demands for fish to maintain homeostasis in the lower hardness water make the fish more sensitive to metals that inhibit ionoregulation such as Cd and Zn. We suggest that if important decisions were to be based upon test results, assumptions of adequate hardness acclimation should be carefully considered and short acclimation periods avoided. If practical, incubating rainbow trout in the control waters to be tested may reduce uncertainties in the possible influences of differing rearing water hardness on the test results.

  8. Increased sensitivity to perceptual interference in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Alexander A; Maron, Leeza; Nigg, Joel T; Cheung, Desmond; Ester, Edward F; Awh, Edward

    2012-05-01

    Difficulty with selective attention is a frequent complaint of adult patients with ADHD, but selective attention tasks have not provided robust evidence of attentional dysfunction in this group. Two experiments examine this puzzle by distinguishing between failures of spatial selection and problems due to sensitivity to perceptual interference. In Experiment 1, we measured the level of perceptual interference generated by targets in crowded displays with nearby distractors by comparing luminance thresholds in both distractor-present (noise) and distractor-absent (clean) displays. ADHD and control participants had comparable thresholds for clean displays, but ADHD individuals had elevated thresholds to crowded displays. These effects could be explained in two distinct ways. Deficits may have arisen from amplified visual interference in the noise condition, or from abnormalities in top-down attentional processes that reduce visual interference. Experiment 2 adjusted for individual perceptual differences with clean and noise displays, before measuring visual interference resolution at attended versus unattended locations. ADHD and control groups had comparable interference resolution at attended locations. These results suggest that perceptual interference rather than spatial attention deficits may account for some deficits in ADHD. This putative deficit in sensory function highlights a potential early-stage perceptual processing deficit in ADHD distinct from selective attention.

  9. MEK5/ERK5 signaling inhibition increases colon cancer cell sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil through a p53-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Diane M.; Simões, André E. S.; Gomes, Sofia E.; Castro, Rui E.; Carvalho, Tânia; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.; Borralho, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    The MEK5/ERK5 signaling pathway is emerging as an important contributor to colon cancer onset, progression and metastasis; however, its relevance to chemotherapy resistance remains unknown. Here, we evaluated the impact of the MEK5/ERK5 cascade in colon cancer cell sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Increased ERK5 expression was correlated with poor overall survival in colon cancer patients. In colon cancer cells, 5-FU exposure impaired endogenous KRAS/MEK5/ERK5 expression and/or activation. In turn, MEK5 constitutive activation reduced 5-FU-induced cytotoxicity. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that ERK5 inhibition increased caspase-3/7 activity and apoptosis following 5-FU exposure. Mechanistically, this was further associated with increased p53 transcriptional activation of p21 and PUMA. In addition, ERK5 inhibition increased the response of HCT116 p53+/+ cells to 5-FU, but failed to sensitize HCT116 p53−/− cells to the cytotoxic effects of this chemotherapeutic agent, suggesting a p53-dependent axis mediating 5-FU sensitization. Finally, ERK5 inhibition using XMD8-92 was shown to increase the antitumor effects of 5-FU in a murine subcutaneous xenograft model, enhancing apoptosis while markedly reducing tumor growth. Collectively, our results suggest that ERK5-targeted in hibition provides a promising therapeutic approach to overcome resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy and improve colon cancer treatment. PMID:27144434

  10. LINGO-1 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation by inhibiting ErbB2 translocation and activation in lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Xinhua; Shao, Zhaohui; Sheng, Guoqing; Pepinsky, Blake; Mi, Sha

    2014-05-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation is negatively regulated by LINGO-1 and positively regulated by the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase. In wild-type oligodendrocytes, inhibition of ErbB2 blocks differentiation, whereas activation of ErbB2 promotes differentiation. In LINGO-1(-/-) oligodendrocytes, inhibition of ErbB2 blocks oligodendrocyte differentiation; whereas activation of ErbB2 does not enhance differentiation. Biological and biochemical evidence showing that LINGO-1 can directly bind to ErbB2, block ErbB2 translocation into lipid rafts, and inhibit its phosphorylation for activation. The study demonstrates a novel regulatory mechanism of ErbB2 function whereby LINGO-1 suppresses oligodendrocyte differentiation by inhibiting ErbB2 translocation and activation in lipid rafts.

  11. Increased sensitivity of anodic stripping voltammetry at the hanging mercury drop electrode by ultracathodic deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, José A; Rodrigues, Carlos M; Almeida, Paulo J; Valente, Inês M; Gonçalves, Luís M; Compton, Richard G; Barros, Aquiles A

    2011-09-09

    An improved approach to the anodic stripping voltammetric (ASV) determination of heavy metals, using the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE), is reported. It was discovered that using very cathodic accumulation potentials, at which the solvent reduction occurs (overpotential deposition), the voltammetric signals of zinc(II), cadmium(II), lead(II) and copper(II) increase. When compared with the classical methodology a 5 to 10-fold signal increase is obtained. This effect is likely due to both mercury drop oscillation at such cathodic potentials and added local convection at the mercury drop surface caused by the evolution of hydrogen bubbles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Image stacking approach to increase sensitivity of fluorescence detection using a low cost complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) webcam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Kostov, Yordan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    Optical technologies are important for biological analysis. Current biomedical optical analyses rely on high-cost, high-sensitivity optical detectors such as photomultipliers, avalanched photodiodes or cooled CCD cameras. In contrast, Webcams, mobile phones and other popular consumer electronics use lower-sensitivity, lower-cost optical components such as photodiodes or CMOS sensors. In order for consumer electronics devices, such as webcams, to be useful for biomedical analysis, they must have increased sensitivity. We combined two strategies to increase the sensitivity of CMOS-based fluorescence detector. We captured hundreds of low sensitivity images using a Webcam in video mode, instead of a single image typically used in cooled CCD devices.We then used a computational approach consisting of an image stacking algorithm to remove the noise by combining all of the images into a single image. While video mode is widely used for dynamic scene imaging (e.g. movies or time-lapse photography), it is not used to capture a single static image, which removes noise and increases sensitivity by more than thirty fold. The portable, battery-operated Webcam-based fluorometer system developed here consists of five modules: (1) a low cost CMOS Webcam to monitor light emission, (2) a plate to perform assays, (3) filters and multi-wavelength LED illuminator for fluorophore excitation, (4) a portable computer to acquire and analyze images, and (5) image stacking software for image enhancement. The samples consisted of various concentrations of fluorescein, ranging from 30 μM to 1000 μM, in a 36-well miniature plate. In the single frame mode, the fluorometer's limit-of-detection (LOD) for fluorescein is ∼1000 μM, which is relatively insensitive. However, when used in video mode combined with image stacking enhancement, the LOD is dramatically reduced to 30 μM, sensitivity which is similar to that of state-of-the-art ELISA plate photomultiplier-based readers. Numerous medical

  13. Targeted disruption of the CREB coactivator Crtc2 increases insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yiguo; Inoue, Hiroshi; Ravnskjær, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Under fasting conditions, increases in circulating concentrations of pancreatic glucagon maintain glucose homeostasis through induction of gluconeogenic genes by the CREB coactivator CRTC2. Hepatic CRTC2 activity is elevated in obesity, although the extent to which this cofactor contributes to at...

  14. Increased sensitivity of anodic stripping voltammetry at the hanging mercury drop electrode by ultracathodic deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Jose A.; Rodrigues, Carlos M.; Almeida, Paulo J.; Valente, Ines M.; Goncalves, Luis M. [Requimte - Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, no. 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Compton, Richard G. [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Barros, Aquiles A., E-mail: ajbarros@fc.up.pt [Requimte - Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, no. 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} At very cathodic accumulation potentials (overpotential deposition) the voltammetric signals of Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} increase. {yields} 5 to 10-fold signal increase is obtained. {yields} This effect is likely due to mercury drop oscillation at such cathodic potentials. {yields} This effect is also likely due to added local convection at the mercury drop surface caused by the evolution of hydrogen bubbles. - Abstract: An improved approach to the anodic stripping voltammetric (ASV) determination of heavy metals, using the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE), is reported. It was discovered that using very cathodic accumulation potentials, at which the solvent reduction occurs (overpotential deposition), the voltammetric signals of zinc(II), cadmium(II), lead(II) and copper(II) increase. When compared with the classical methodology a 5 to 10-fold signal increase is obtained. This effect is likely due to both mercury drop oscillation at such cathodic potentials and added local convection at the mercury drop surface caused by the evolution of hydrogen bubbles.

  15. Competition increases sensitivity of wheat (Triticum aestivum) to biotic plant-soil feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, W.H.G.; Boer, de W.; Hooven, ten F.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2013-01-01

    Plant-soil feedback (PSF) and plant competition play an important role in structuring vegetation composition, but their interaction remains unclear. Recent studies suggest that competing plants could dilute pathogenic effects, whereas the standing view is that competition may increase the sensitivit

  16. Increase of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channels in the heart of type-1 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhih-Cherng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An impairment of cardiovascular function in streptozotocin (STZ-diabetic rats has been mentioned within 5 days-to-3 months of induction. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channels are expressed on cardiac sarcolemmal membranes. It is highly responsive to metabolic fluctuations and can have effects on cardiac contractility. The present study attempted to clarify the changes of cardiac KATP channels in diabetic disorders. Methods Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes treated with a high concentration of glucose (a D-glucose concentration of 30 mM was used and cells were cultured for 24 hr were used to examine the effect of hyperglycemia on cardiac function and the expression of KATP channels. KATP channels expression was found to be linked to cardiac tonic dysfunction, and we evaluated the expression levels of KATP channels by Western blot and Northern blot analysis. Results The result shows diazoxide produced a marked reduction of heart rate in control group. Furthermore, the methods of Northern blotting and Western blotting were employed to identify the gene expression of KATP channel. Two subunits of cardiac KATP channel (SUR2A and kir 6.2 were purchased as indicators and showed significantly decreased in both diabetic rats and high glucose treated rat cardiac myocytes. Correction of hyperglycemia by insulin or phlorizin restored the gene expression of cardiac KATP in these diabetic rats. Conclusions Both mRNA and protein expression of cardiac KATP channels are decreased in diabetic rats induced by STZ for 8 weeks. This phenomenon leads to result in desensitization of some KATP channel drugs.

  17. Mental stress-induced increase in blood pressure is not related to baroreflex sensitivity in middle-aged healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvel, J P; Cerutti, C; Quelin, P; Laville, M; Gustin, M P; Paultre, C Z; Ducher, M

    2000-04-01

    The baroreflex that acts to blunt blood pressure (BP) variations through opposite variations in heart rate should limit the BP increase produced by an emotional challenge. However, relations between baroreflex sensitivity and BP reactivity induced by a psychological stress in a large group of adults have never been firmly established. In 280 healthy men, rest (10 minutes) and stress (5 minutes) BP and heart rate were recorded beat to beat by a blood pressure monitor. The mental stress was elicited by a well-standardized computerized version of a word color conflict stress test (Stroop Color Test). Rest and stress baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by the cross-spectral analysis of BP and heart rate and by the sequence method. The stress-induced increase in systolic BP (22.4+/-0.1 mm Hg) was not correlated with resting baroreflex sensitivity but was slightly correlated (r=0.2, P<0.001) with BP variability assessed either by standard deviation or by mid-frequency band spectral power. Our results suggested that a centrally mediated sympathetic stimulation overcame cardiac autonomic regulation and emphasized the role of the sympathetic vasoconstriction in the pressure response at the onset of the stressing stimulation. During the sustained sympathoexcitatory phase, the cardiac baroreflex blunts BP variations but at a lower sensitivity.

  18. Sensitivity of the recent increase in Antarctic sea ice in ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellsson, Joakim; Holland, Paul; Marshall, Gareth; Coward, Andrew; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Bacon, Sheldon; Megann, Alexis; Ridley, Jeff

    2015-04-01

    We study the recent increase in Antarctic sea ice using a coupled ocean--sea ice model forced by atmospheric reanalysis. We investigate the impact on sea ice from both model parameters (e.g. vertical mixing and eddy parameterisation) as well as external forcing (e.g. precipitation and melt water from the Antarctic continent). We use the NEMO ocean model coupled to the CICE sea-ice model at 1 degree horizontal resolution forced with ERA-Interim reanalysis. The results will have impacts for our understanding of the Southern Ocean, its sea ice and their representation in future coupled climate-model studies, e.g. CMIP6. Since the dawn of the satellite era there has been a slow increase in Antarctic sea ice with pronounced spatial structure. The reason for this increase is not yet fully understood and very few climate-model simulations reproduce the observed mean state and/or increase. By varying model parameters and external forcing, we determine that obtaining a realistic sea ice cover requires a complex balance of horizontal and vertical mixing as well as fresh water input. The surface fresh water balance impacts the vertical salinity gradient and thus vertical fluxes of heat and salt. Underestimation of precipitation or melt water results in deep convection in the open ocean and the opening of large polynyas in the Weddell and Ross sea. The presence of polynyas reduces the sea ice extent. The depth of the mixed layer has a large impact on the sea ice seasonal cycle. The summer mixed layer must be sufficiently deep to prevent SST from becoming too high but not so deep as to mix up heat and salt from below. In winter, a deep mixed layer lets brine rejected from sea ice mix down to depths below that of the summer mixed layer thus maintaining a necessary stratification.

  19. Overexpression of SOS (Salt Overly Sensitive)Genes Increases Salt Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Yang; Zhi-Zhong Chen; Xiao-Feng Zhoua; Hai-Bo Yin; Xia Li; Xiu-Fang Xin; Xu-Hui Hong; Jian-Kang Zhu; Zhizhong Gong

    2009-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major abiotic stress that decreases plant growth and productivity. Recently, it was reported that plants overexpressing AtNHX1 or SOS1 have significantly increased salt tolerance. To test whether overexpression of multiple genes can improve plant salt tolerance even more, we produced six different transgenic Arabidopsis plants that overexpress AtNHX1, SOS3, AtNHXl + SOS3, SOS1, SOS2 + SOS3, or SOS1 + SOS2 + SOS3. Northern blot analyses confirmed the presence of high levels of the relevant gene transcripts in transgenic plants. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtNHX1 alone did not present any significant increase in salt tolerance, contrary to earlier reports. We found that transgenic plants overexpressing SOS3 exhibit increased salt tolerance similar to plants overexpressing SOS1. Moreover, salt tolerance of transgenic plants overexpressing AtNHXl + SOS3, 50S2 + SOS3, or SOS1 + SOS2 +SOS3, respectively, appeared similar to the tolerance of transgenic plants overexpressing either SOS1 or SOS3 alone.

  20. Cadmium Increases the Sensitivity of Adolescent Female Mice to Nicotine-Related Behavioral Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Adeyemi Adeniyi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates spatial and nonspatial working memory, anxiety related behavior, and motor activities in cadmium and/or nicotine exposed female adolescent mice. P28 female adolescent mice (albino strain were divided into four groups of five (n=5 mice each. A set of mice (Nic received subcutaneous nicotine (2.0 mg/kg while a separate set (Cd was treated with 2.0 mg/kg cadmium (subcutaneous. For the combined treatments of cadmium and nicotine, we administered 2.0 mg/kg Nicotine and 2.0 mg/kg of Cd. Subsequently, a separate group of animals (n=5; control received normal saline. The total duration of treatment for all groups was 28 days (P28–P56. At P56, the treatment was discontinued, after which the animals were examined in behavioural tests. Nicotine and cadmium increased the metabolism and food intake in the female adolescent mice. This also corresponded to an increase in weight when compared with the control. However, a combined nicotine-cadmium treatment induced a decline in weight of the animals versus the control. Also, nicotine administration increased the motor function, while cadmium and nicotine-cadmium treatment caused a decline in motor activity. Both nicotine and cadmium induced a reduction in memory index; however, nicotine-cadmium treatment induced the most significant decrease in nonspatial working memory.

  1. Cell cycle-arrested tumor cells exhibit increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, H; Wachter, F; Grunert, M; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Resting tumor cells represent a huge challenge during anticancer therapy due to their increased treatment resistance. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a putative future anticancer drug, currently in phases I and II clinical studies. We recently showed that TRAIL is able to target leukemia stem cell surrogates. Here, we tested the ability of TRAIL to target cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Cell cycle arrest was induced in tumor cell lines and xenografted tumor cells in G0, G1 or G2 using cytotoxic drugs, phase-specific inhibitors or RNA interference against cyclinB and E. Biochemical or molecular arrest at any point of the cell cycle increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, when cell cycle arrest was disabled by addition of caffeine, the antitumor activity of TRAIL was reduced. Most important for clinical translation, tumor cells from three children with B precursor or T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia showed increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis upon knockdown of either cyclinB or cyclinE, arresting the cell cycle in G2 or G1, respectively. Taken together and in contrast to most conventional cytotoxic drugs, TRAIL exerts enhanced antitumor activity against cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Therefore, TRAIL might represent an interesting drug to treat static-tumor disease, for example, during minimal residual disease. PMID:23744361

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways contribute to hypercontractility and increased Ca2+ sensitization in murine experimental colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Eikichi; Beck, Paul L; Chappellaz, Mona; Wong, Josee; Medlicott, Shaun A; MacDonald, Justin A

    2009-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with intestinal smooth muscle dysfunction. Many smooth muscle contractile events are associated with alterations in Ca(2+)-sensitizing pathways. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of colitis on Ca(2+) sensitization and the signaling pathways responsible for contractile dysfunction in murine experimental colitis. Colitis was induced in BALB/c mice by providing 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days. Contractile responses of colonic circular smooth muscle strips to 118 mM K(+) and carbachol (CCh) were assessed. DSS induced a T(H)2 colitis [increased interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-6] with no changes in T(H)1 cytokines. Animals exposed to DSS had increased CCh-induced contraction (3.5-fold) and CCh-induced Ca(2+)-sensitization (2.2-fold) responses in intact and alpha-toxin permeabilized colonic smooth muscle, respectively. The contributions of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) to CCh-induced contractions were significantly increased during colitis. Ca(2+)-independent contraction induced by microcystin was potentiated (1.5-fold) in mice with colitis. ERK and p38MAPK (but not Rho-associated kinase) contributed to this potentiation. ERK1/2 and p38MAPK expression were increased in the muscularis propria of colonic tissue from both DSS-treated mice and patients with IBD (ulcerative colitis > Crohn's disease). Murine T(H)2 colitis resulted in colonic smooth muscle hypercontractility with increased Ca(2+) sensitization. Both ERK and p38MAPK pathways contributed to this contractile dysfunction, and expression of these molecules was altered in patients with IBD.

  3. The Gas-Filled-Magnet at PRIME Lab: Increased Sensitivity of Cosmogenic Nuclide Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffee, M. W.; Granger, D. E.; Woodruff, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), radionuclides produced either by cosmic-ray interactions or by nucleogenic means can be measured. Typical isotopic abundance ratios range from 1 x 10-10 to 1 x 10-15. The routinely measured radionuclides are 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, and 129I. Be-10, 26Al, and 36Cl have isobaric interferences that cannot be eliminated mass through mass analysis, but dE/dx techniques suppresses these isobars enough to allow successful measurements. There are compromises, the isobar for 26Al, 26Mg, precludes successful measurement of 26Al if AlO- is injected into the accelerator. Mg- doesn't form a stable negative ion so a 26Al measurement requires injection of 26Al-. But the Al- ion is formed inefficiently; secondary ion currents using Al- are ~ 10 times less than an AlO- secondary ion beam. Precision scales with count rate so precise measurement of the 26Al/Al for all but higher ratio samples is difficult. It has long been recognized that a gas-filled-magnet (GFM) could potentially improve the measurement of those radionuclides with intractable isobar interferences. A GFM works on the principle that each element of an isobar pair, e.g. 26Mg and 26Al, has a different average charge state as it traverses a gas (3-4 Torr of N2) contained within the vacuum jacket of a magnet. The magnet steers each species with its own momentum-to-charge ratio on its own distinct radius of curvature. The magnet can be tuned to allow the isotope of interest into a dE/dx detector; most of the isobar doesn't make it into the detector. Using the PRIME Lab GFM we are now able to routinely run 26Al with a precision that is comparable to that obtained with 10Be. We are also using the GFM for routine measurements of 10Be and 36Cl. Although the improvement for these nuclides is not as pronounced as it is for 26Al, the GFM has improved the detection sensitivity for both. Our 10Be background is now ~ 5 x 10-16 and for 36Cl we can now run the source more

  4. Prox1 Inhibits Proliferation and Is Required for Differentiation of the Oligodendrocyte Cell Lineage in the Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Kato

    Full Text Available Central nervous system injury induces a regenerative response in ensheathing glial cells comprising cell proliferation, spontaneous axonal remyelination, and limited functional recovery, but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In Drosophila, this involves the genes prospero and Notch controlling the balance between glial proliferation and differentiation, and manipulating their levels in glia can switch the response to injury from prevention to promotion of repair. In the mouse, Notch1 maintains NG2 oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs in a progenitor state, but what factor may enable oligodendrocyte (OL differentiation and functional remyelination is not understood. Here, we asked whether the mammalian homologue of prospero, Prox1, is involved. Our data show that Prox1 is distributed in NG2+ OPCs and in OLs in primary cultured cells, and in the mouse spinal cord in vivo. siRNA prox1 knockdown in primary OPCs increased cell proliferation, increased NG2+ OPC cell number and decreased CC1+ OL number. Prox1 conditional knockout in the OL cell lineage in mice increased NG2+ OPC cell number, and decreased CC1+ OL number. Lysolecithin-induced demyelination injury caused a reduction in CC1+ OLs in homozygous Prox1-/- conditional knockout mice compared to controls. Remarkably, Prox1-/- conditional knockout mice had smaller lesions than controls. Altogether, these data show that Prox1 is required to inhibit OPC proliferation and for OL differentiation, and could be a relevant component of the regenerative glial response. Therapeutic uses of glia and stem cells to promote regeneration and repair after central nervous system injury would benefit from manipulating Prox1.

  5. Human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors aid in functional recovery of sensory pathways following contusive spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo H All

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transplantations of human stem cell derivatives have been widely investigated in rodent models for the potential restoration of function of neural pathways after spinal cord injury (SCI. Studies have already demonstrated cells survival following transplantation in SCI. We sought to evaluate survival and potential therapeutic effects of transplanted human embryonic stem (hES cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs in a contusive injury in rats. Bioluminescence imaging was utilized to verify survivability of cells up to 4 weeks, and somatosensory evoked potential (SSEPs were recorded at the cortex to monitor function of sensory pathways throughout the 6-week recovery period. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: hES cells were transduced with the firefly luciferase gene and differentiated into OPCs. OPCs were transplanted into the lesion epicenter of rat spinal cords 2 hours after inducing a moderate contusive SCI. The hES-treatment group showed improved SSEPs, including increased amplitude and decreased latencies, compared to the control group. The bioluminescence of transplanted OPCs decreased by 97% in the injured spinal cord compared to only 80% when injected into an uninjured spinal cord. Bioluminescence increased in both experimental groups such that by week 3, no statistical difference was detected, signifying that the cells survived and proliferated independent of injury. Post-mortem histology of the spinal cords showed integration of human cells expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and myelin basic protein without the expression of markers for astrocytes (GFAP or pluripotent cells (OCT4. CONCLUSIONS: hES-derived OPCs transplanted 2 hours after contusive SCI survive and differentiate into OLs that produce MBP. Treated rats demonstrated functional improvements in SSEP amplitudes and latencies compared to controls as early as 1 week post-injury. Finally, the hostile injury microenvironment at 2 hours post-injury initially caused

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor deficiency restricts proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitors following cuprizone-induced demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiperson, Vladislav; Huang, Yangyang; Bagayogo, Issa; Song, Yeri; VonDran, Melissa W; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel; Dreyfus, Cheryl F

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors that through its neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 (TrkB) receptor, increases 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in culture. Roles in vivo are less well understood; however, increases in numbers of OPCs are restricted in BDNF+/- mice following cuprizone-elicited demyelination. Here, we investigate whether these blunted increases in OPCs are associated with changes in proliferation. BDNF+/+ and BDNF+/- mice were fed cuprizone-containing or control feed. To assess effects on OPC numbers, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα)+ or NG2+ cells were counted. To monitor DNA synthesis, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) was injected intraperitoneally and colocalized with PDGFRα+ cells. Alternatively, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was colocalized with PDGFRα or NG2. Labeling indices were determined in the BDNF+/+ and BDNF+/- animals. After 4 or 5 weeks of control feed, BDNF+/- mice exhibit similar numbers of OPCs compared with BDNF+/+ animals. The labeling indices for EdU and PCNA also were not significantly different, suggesting that neither the DNA synthesis phase (S phase) nor the proliferative pool size was different between genotypes. In contrast, when mice were challenged by cuprizone for 4 or 5 weeks, increases in OPCs observed in BDNF+/+ mice were reduced in the BDNF+/- mice. This difference in elevations in cell number was accompanied by decreases in EdU labeling and PCNA labeling without changes in cell death, indicating a reduction in the DNA synthesis and the proliferative pool. Therefore, levels of BDNF influence the proliferation of OPCs resulting from a demyelinating lesion.

  7. Reducing time and increasing sensitivity in sample preparation for adherent mammalian cell metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Matthew A; Burant, Charles F; Kennedy, Robert T

    2011-05-01

    A simple, fast, and reproducible sample preparation procedure was developed for relative quantification of metabolites in adherent mammalian cells using the clonal β-cell line INS-1 as a model sample. The method was developed by evaluating the effect of different sample preparation procedures on high performance liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry quantification of 27 metabolites involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle on a directed basis as well as for all detectable chromatographic features on an undirected basis. We demonstrate that a rapid water rinse step prior to quenching of metabolism reduces components that suppress electrospray ionization thereby increasing signal for 26 of 27 targeted metabolites and increasing total number of detected features from 237 to 452 with no detectable change of metabolite content. A novel quenching technique is employed which involves addition of liquid nitrogen directly to the culture dish and allows for samples to be stored at -80 °C for at least 7 d before extraction. Separation of quenching and extraction steps provides the benefit of increased experimental convenience and sample stability while maintaining metabolite content similar to techniques that employ simultaneous quenching and extraction with cold organic solvent. The extraction solvent 9:1 methanol: chloroform was found to provide superior performance over acetonitrile, ethanol, and methanol with respect to metabolite recovery and extract stability. Maximal recovery was achieved using a single rapid (∼1 min) extraction step. The utility of this rapid preparation method (∼5 min) was demonstrated through precise metabolite measurements (11% average relative standard deviation without internal standards) associated with step changes in glucose concentration that evoke insulin secretion in the clonal β-cell line INS-1.

  8. Cell cycle-arrested tumor cells exhibit increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrhardt, H.; Wachter, F; Grunert, M.; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Resting tumor cells represent a huge challenge during anticancer therapy due to their increased treatment resistance. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a putative future anticancer drug, currently in phases I and II clinical studies. We recently showed that TRAIL is able to target leukemia stem cell surrogates. Here, we tested the ability of TRAIL to target cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Cell cycle arrest was induced in tumor cell lines and xenografted tumor cells in G0, G1 o...

  9. The R527H mutation in LMNA gene causes an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Masi, Alessandra; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Ricordy, Ruggero; Tanzarella, Caterina; Novelli, Giuseppe

    2008-07-01

    Mandibuloacral dysplasia type A (MADA; OMIM # 248370) is a premature ageing disease caused by the homozygous R527H mutation in the LMNA gene. At the cellular level, MADA is characterized by unprocessed prelamin A accumulation, nuclear architecture alterations, chromatin defects and increased incidence of apoptosis. In some progeroid laminopathies (e.g., HGPS) it has been demonstrated that such biochemical and morphological alterations are strongly linked with genomic instability. To test this also in MADA fibroblasts, their response to the ionising radiation-induced damage was analysed. We observed that their ability to repair the damage was significantly impaired, as demonstrated by the increased chromosome damage and the higher percentage of residual gamma-H2AX foci, corresponding to unrepaired DNA-damage sites. Moreover, MADA fibroblasts showed a markedly reduced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15(S15) and a lower induction of p53 and CDKN1A proteins after irradiation, compared to the control cell line. Upon irradiation, we also detected differences in the expression of some p53 downstream target genes. In addition, MADA cells showed partial defects in the checkpoint response, particularly in G(1)/S transition. Our results indicate that accumulation of the lamin A precursor protein determines a defect in DNA damage response after X-ray exposure, supporting a crucial role of lamin A in regulating DNA repair process and cell cycle control.

  10. Increase of insulin sensitivity in diabetic rats received Die-Huang-Wan, a herbal mixture used in Chinese traditional medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yang-Chang; HSU Jen-Hao; LIU I-Min; LIOU Shorong-Shii; SU Hui-Chen; CHENG Juei-Tang

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Effects on insulin sensitivity of Die-Huang-Wan, the herbal mixture widely used to treat diabetic disorder in Chinese traditional medicine, were investigated in vivo. METHODS: The obese Zucker rats were employed as insulin-resistant animal model. Also, insulin-resistance was induced by the repeated intraperitoneal injections of long-acting human insulin at 0.5 U/kg three times daily into adult male Wistar rats. Insulin resistance was identified using the loss of tolbutamide (10 mg/kg) or electroacupuncture (EA)-induced plasma glucose lowering action. The plasma glucose concentration was examined by glucose oxidase assay. RESULTS: The plasma glucose-lowering action induced by tolbutamide was significantly enhanced in obese Zucker rats receiving the repeated administration of Die-Huang-Wan at dosage of 26 mg/kg for 3 d. Furthermore, administration of Die-Huang-Wan delayed the formation of insulin resistance in rats that were induced by the daily repeated injection of human long-acting insulin at 0.5 U/kg three times daily and identified by the loss of tolbutamide- or EA-induced hypoglycemia. In streptozotocininduced diabetic rats, oral administration of metformin at 320 mg/kg once daily made an increase of the response to exogenous short-acting human insulin 15 d later. This is consistent with the view that metformin can increase insulin sensitivity. Similar treatment with Die-Huang-Wan at an effective dose (26.0 mg/kg) also increased the plasma glucose lowering action of exogenous insulin at 10 d later. The effect of Die-Huang-Wan on insulin sensitivity seems to produce more rapidly than that of metformin. CONCLUSION: The present study found that oral administration of Die-Huang-Wan increased insulin sensitivity and delayed the development of insulin resistance in rats.

  11. Vitamin B6 deficient plants display increased sensitivity to high light and photo-oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumeau Dominique

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin B6 is a collective term for a group of six interconvertible compounds: pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine and their phosphorylated derivatives. Vitamin B6 plays essential roles as a cofactor in a range of biochemical reactions. In addition, vitamin B6 is able to quench reactive oxygen species in vitro, and exogenously applied vitamin B6 protects plant cells against cell death induced by singlet oxygen (1O2. These results raise the important question as to whether plants employ vitamin B6 as an antioxidant to protect themselves against reactive oxygen species. Results The pdx1.3 mutation affects the vitamin B6 biosynthesis enzyme, pyridoxal synthase (PDX1, and leads to a reduction of the vitamin B6 concentration in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. Although leaves of the pdx1.3 Arabidopsis mutant contained less chlorophyll than wild-type leaves, we found that vitamin B6 deficiency did not significantly impact photosynthetic performance or shoot and root growth. Chlorophyll loss was associated with an increase in the chlorophyll a/b ratio and a selective decrease in the abundance of several PSII antenna proteins (Lhcb1/2, Lhcb6. These changes were strongly dependent on light intensity, with high light amplifying the difference between pdx1.3 and the wild type. When leaf discs were exposed to exogenous 1O2, lipid peroxidation in pdx1.3 was increased relative to the wild type; this effect was not observed with superoxide or hydrogen peroxide. When leaf discs or whole plants were exposed to excess light energy, 1O2-mediated lipid peroxidation was enhanced in leaves of the pdx1.3 mutant relative to the wild type. High light also caused an increased level of 1O2 in vitamin B6-deficient leaves. Combining the pdx1.3 mutation with mutations affecting the level of 'classical' quenchers of 1O2 (zeaxanthin, tocopherols resulted in a highly photosensitive phenotype. Conclusion This study demonstrates that vitamin B6 has a function in

  12. Pandanus amaryllifolius leaf extract increases insulin sensitivity in high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suphaket Saenthaweesuk; Jarinyaporn Naowaboot; Nuntiya Somparn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of Pandanus amaryllifolius (P. amaryllifolius) leaf extract on the insulin resistance state in obese ICR mice. Methods: Obesity was induced in mice fed with high-fat diet (45%fat) for 12 weeks. After the first six weeks on the diet, the obese mice were administered with the water extract of P. amaryllifolius leaf at 125 and 250 mg/kg/day, respectively for another six weeks. At the 5th week of treatment, oral glucose tolerance test was conducted. After six weeks of treat-ment, the levels of blood glucose, serum insulin, leptin, adiponectin, and lipid profiles were determined. The liver, muscle and epididymal fat tissues were removed for measuring the biochemical parameters and protein expression, as well as histological examination. Results: Six weeks of treatment with P. amaryllifolius led to a significant reduction in the blood glucose level as well as improvement in the insulin resistance. P. amaryllifolius also increased the liver glycogen storage and serum adiponectin and decreased the serum leptin levels. A reduction in the serum and hepatic triglyceride, and non-esterified fatty acid levels was also observed. The histological examination showed that the obese mice treated with P. amaryllifolius reduced the lipid droplet in liver tissue and adipocyte size in epididymal fat tissue. The treatment also increased the protein expression of glucose transporter 4 in the muscle and fat tissues. Conclusions: The treatment with P. amaryllifolius could decrease several parameters of impaired glucose and lipid metabolism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of P. amaryllifolius leaf extract in alleviating the insulin dysfunction in obesity state.

  13. Food intake and energy expenditure are increased in high-fat-sensitive but not in high-carbohydrate-sensitive obesity-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Chaumontet, Catherine; Nadkarni, Nachiket A; Piedcoq, Julien; Fromentin, Gilles; Tomé, Daniel; Even, Patrick C

    2014-08-01

    Obesity-prone (OP) rodents are used as models of human obesity predisposition. The goal of the present study was to identify preexisting defects in energy expenditure components in OP rats. Two studies were performed. In the first one, male Wistar rats (n = 48) were fed a high-carbohydrate diet (HCD) for 3 wk and then a high-fat diet (HFD) for the next 3 wk. This study showed that adiposity gain under HCD was 2.9-fold larger in carbohydrate-sensitive (CS) than in carbohydrate-resistant (CR) rats, confirming the concept of "carbohydrate-sensitive" rats. Energy expenditure (EE), respiratory quotient (RQ), caloric intake (CI), and locomotor activity measured during HFD identified no differences in EE and RQ between fat-resistant (FR) and fat-sensitive (FS) rats, and indicated that obesity developed in FS rats only as the result of a larger CI not fully compensated by a parallel increase in EE. A specific pattern of spontaneous activity, characterized by reduced activity burst intensity, was identified in FS rats but not in CS ones. This mirrors a previous observation that under HCD, CS but not FS rats, exhibited bursts of activity of reduced intensity. In a second study, rats were fed a HFD for 3 wk, and the components of energy expenditure were examined by indirect calorimetry in 10 FR and 10 FS rats. This study confirmed that a low basal EE, reduced thermic effect of feeding, defective postprandial energy partitioning, or a defective substrate utilization by the working muscle are not involved in the FS phenotype. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  14. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchi, Naomi W; Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya.

  15. Infectious Mononucleosis Triggers Generation of IgG Auto-Antibodies against Native Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Kakalacheva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A history of infectious mononucleosis (IM, symptomatic primary infection with the Epstein Barr virus, is associated with the development of autoimmune diseases and increases the risk to develop multiple sclerosis. Here, we hypothesized that immune activation during IM triggers autoreactive immune responses. Antibody responses towards cellular antigens using a HEp-2 based indirect immunofluorescence assay and native myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG using a flow cytometry-based assay were determined in 35 patients with IM and in 23 control subjects. We detected frequent immunoglobulin M (IgM reactivity to vimentin, a major constituent of the intermediate filament family of proteins, in IM patients (27/35; 77% but rarely in control subjects (2/23; 9%. IgG autoantibodies binding to HEp-2 cells were absent in both groups. In contrast, IgG responses to native MOG, present in up to 40% of children with inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system (CNS, were detectable in 7/35 (20% patients with IM but not in control subjects. Normalization of anti-vimentin IgM levels to increased total IgM concentrations during IM resulted in loss of significant differences for anti-vimentin IgM titers. Anti-MOG specific IgG responses were still detectable in a subset of three out of 35 patients with IM (9%, even after normalization to increased total IgG levels. Vimentin-specific IgM and MOG-specific IgG responses decreased following clinical resolution of acute IM symptoms. We conclude from our data that MOG-specific memory B cells are activated in subset of patients with IM.

  16. Increased sensitivity of apolipoprotein E knockout mice to copper-induced oxidative injury to the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Li, Bin; Zhao, Ran-ran; Zhang, Hui-feng; Zhen, Chao; Guo, Li

    2015-04-10

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotypes are related to clinical presentations in patients with Wilson's disease, indicating that ApoE may play an important role in the disease. However, our understanding of the role of ApoE in Wilson's disease is limited. High copper concentration in Wilson's disease induces excessive generation of free oxygen radicals. Meanwhile, ApoE proteins possess antioxidant effects. We therefore determined whether copper-induced oxidative damage differ in the liver of wild-type and ApoE knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Both wild-type and ApoE(-/-) mice were intragastrically administered with 0.2 mL of copper sulfate pentahydrate (200 mg/kg; a total dose of 4 mg/d) or the same volume of saline daily for 12 weeks, respectively. Copper and oxidative stress markers in the liver tissue and in the serum were assessed. Our results showed that, compared with the wild-type mice administered with copper, TBARS as a marker of lipid peroxidation, the expression of oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, and quinone 1 (NQO1) significantly increased in the ApoE(-/-) mice administered with copper, meanwhile superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity significantly decreased. Thus, it is concluded that ApoE may protect the liver from copper-induced oxidative damage in Wilson's disease.

  17. Human cytomegalovirus increases HUVEC sensitivity to thrombin and modulates expression of thrombin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Milan; Paskas, Svetlana; Zivković, Maja; Burysek, Ladislav; Laumonnier, Yves

    2010-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes a life-long persistent infection. HCMV infection could be associated with chronic inflammatory diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. Here we observed that in HCMV (AD-169) pre-exposed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), thrombin-induced expression of IL-1alpha and M-CSF is markedly enhanced compared to the un-exposed cells. Study of the expression of thrombin receptor genes in HUVEC showed that HCMV triggered a time- and concentration-dependent expression of the thrombin receptors PAR1, PAR3 and PAR4 at the mRNA level. Induction of PAR1 and PAR3 mRNA expression is due to transcriptional activation of their promoters as shown by gene reporter assay. Furthermore, the virus induced expression of PAR1 and PAR3 but not PAR4 proteins, as analyzed by Western immunoblotting. However, flow cytometric analysis revealed that only PAR3, expressed at very low level in control HUVEC, is induced at the surface during the exposure to the virus. Our data suggest that although exposure to HCMV induces a minor increase of cell-surface receptors expression, it does make endothelial cells more responsive to additional thrombin stimulation.

  18. Inferior frontal sensitivity to common speech sounds is amplified by increasing word intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaden, Kenneth I; Kuchinsky, Stefanie E; Keren, Noam I; Harris, Kelly C; Ahlstrom, Jayne B; Dubno, Judy R; Eckert, Mark A

    2011-11-01

    The left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) exhibits increased responsiveness when people listen to words composed of speech sounds that frequently co-occur in the English language (Vaden, Piquado, & Hickok, 2011), termed high phonotactic frequency (Vitevitch & Luce, 1998). The current experiment aimed to further characterize the relation of phonotactic frequency to LIFG activity by manipulating word intelligibility in participants of varying age. Thirty six native English speakers, 19-79 years old (mean=50.5, sd=21.0) indicated with a button press whether they recognized 120 binaurally presented consonant-vowel-consonant words during a sparse sampling fMRI experiment (TR=8 s). Word intelligibility was manipulated by low-pass filtering (cutoff frequencies of 400 Hz, 1000 Hz, 1600 Hz, and 3150 Hz). Group analyses revealed a significant positive correlation between phonotactic frequency and LIFG activity, which was unaffected by age and hearing thresholds. A region of interest analysis revealed that the relation between phonotactic frequency and LIFG activity was significantly strengthened for the most intelligible words (low-pass cutoff at 3150 Hz). These results suggest that the responsiveness of the left inferior frontal cortex to phonotactic frequency reflects the downstream impact of word recognition rather than support of word recognition, at least when there are no speech production demands. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators increase sensitivity to cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Traci R; Takiar, Vinita; Kumar, Bhavna; Kumar, Pawan; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2017-03-28

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive and often fatal disease. Cisplatin is the most common chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of HNSCC, but intrinsic and acquired resistance are frequent, and severe side effects occur at high doses. The second messenger cyclic GMP (cGMP) is produced by soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). We previously reported that activation of the cGMP signaling cascade caused apoptosis in HNSCC cells, while others found that this pathway enhances cisplatin efficacy in some cell types. Here we found that sGC stimulators reduced HNSCC cell viability synergistically with cisplatin, and enhanced apoptosis by cisplatin. Moreover, the sGC stimulators effectively reduced viability in cells with acquired cisplatin resistance, and were synergistic with cisplatin. The sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 reduced expression of the survival proteins EGFR and β-catenin, and increased pro-apoptotic Bax, suggesting a potential mechanism for the anti-tumorigenic effects of these drugs. The sGC stimulator Riociguat is FDA-approved to treat pulmonary hypertension, and others are being studied for therapeutic use in several diseases. These drugs could provide valuable addition or alternative to cisplatin in the treatment of HNSCC.

  20. Increased muscular and cutaneous pain sensitivity in cephalic region in patients with chronic tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashina, S; Babenko, L; Jensen, R; Ashina, M; Magerl, W; Bendtsen, L

    2005-07-01

    Increased excitability of the central nervous system generated by repetitive and sustained pericranial myofascial nociception may be responsible for transformation of episodic tension-type headache into chronic form. We aimed to compare mechanical and electrical (intramuscular and cutaneous) pain thresholds in trapezius and anterior tibial regions between 20 patients with chronic tension type headache and 20 healthy controls. Pain thresholds to three types of electrical stimulation (single pulse, 2 and 100 Hz) were significantly lower in patients than in controls in trapezius muscle (P tension-type headache than in healthy controls. Increased sensitivity in nociceptive pathways from cephalic region may be of importance in the pathophysiology of chronic tension type headache.

  1. Evidence for increased renal tubule and parathyroid gland sensitivity to serum calcium in human idiopathic hypercalciuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, Elaine M; Bergsland, Kristin J; Gillen, Daniel L; Coe, Fredric L

    2013-09-15

    Patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH) have decreased renal calcium reabsorption, most marked in the postprandial state, but the mechanisms are unknown. We compared 29 subjects with IH and 17 normal subjects (N) each fed meals providing identical amounts of calcium. Urine and blood samples were collected fasting and after meals. Levels of three candidate signalers, serum calcium (SCa), insulin (I), and plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH), did not differ between IH and N either fasting or fed, but all changed with feeding, and the change in SCa was greater in IH than in N. Regression analysis of fractional excretion of calcium (FECa) was significant for PTH and SCa in IH but not N. With the use of multivariable analysis, Sca entered the model while PTH and I did not. To avoid internal correlation we decomposed FECa into its independent terms: adjusted urine calcium (UCa) and UFCa molarity. Analyses using adjusted Uca and unadjusted Uca parallel those using FECa, showing a dominant effect of SCa with no effect of PTH or I. The effect of SCa may be mediated via vitamin D receptor-stimulated increased abundance of basolateral Ca receptor, which is supported by the fact PTH levels also seem more responsive to serum Ca in IH than in N. Although our data support an effect of SCa on FECa and UCa, which is more marked in IH than in N, it can account for only a modest fraction of the meal effect, perhaps 10-20%, suggesting additional mediators are also responsible for the exaggerated postprandial hypercalciuria seen in IH.

  2. Low-Level Fluoride Exposure Increases Insulin Sensitivity in Experimental Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, J G V M; Leite, A L; Pereira, H A B S; Fernandes, M S; Peres-Buzalaf, C; Sumida, D H; Rigalli, A; Buzalaf, M A R

    2015-07-01

    The effect of chronic fluoride (F) exposure from the drinking water on parameters related to glucose homeostasis was investigated. Wistar rats were randomly distributed into 2 groups (diabetic [D] and nondiabetic [ND]; n = 54 each). In D, diabetes was induced with streptozotocin. Each group was further divided into 3 subgroups (0, 10, or 50 mgF/L in drinking water). After 22 days of treatment, plasma and liver samples were collected. No alterations in glycemia, insulinemia, K(ITT), and HOMA2-IR (homeostasis model assessment 2 of insulin resistance) were seen for ND. F-exposure of D rats led to significantly lower insulinemia, without alterations in glycemia (increased %S). Proteomic analysis detected 19, 39, and 16 proteins differentially expressed for the comparisons D0 vs. D10, D0 vs. D50, and D10 vs. D50, respectively. Gene Ontology with the most significant terms in the comparisons D0 vs. D10, D0 vs. D50, and D50 vs. D10 were organic acid metabolic process and carboxylic acid metabolic process, organic acid metabolic process, and cellular ketone metabolic process. Analysis of subnetworks revealed that proteins with fold changes interacted with GLUT4 in comparison D0 vs. D10. Among these proteins, ERj3p was present in D10. Upregulation of this protein in the presence of F might help to explain the higher %S found in these animals. These data suggest that fluoride might enhance glucose homeostasis in diabetes and identify specific biological mechanisms that merit future studies.

  3. Interneurons and oligodendrocyte progenitors form a structured synaptic network in the developing neocortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orduz, David; Maldonado, Paloma P; Balia, Maddalena; Vélez-Fort, Mateo; de Sars, Vincent; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Emiliani, Valentina; Angulo, Maria Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    NG2 cells, oligodendrocyte progenitors, receive a major synaptic input from interneurons in the developing neocortex. It is presumed that these precursors integrate cortical networks where they act as sensors of neuronal activity. We show that NG2 cells of the developing somatosensory cortex form a

  4. Transient expression of Olig1 initiates the differentiation of neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balasubramaniyan, [No Value; Timmer, N; Kust, B; Boddeke, E; Copray, S

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop an efficient strategy to induce the in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), NSCs were isolated from E14 mice and grown in medium containing epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor (FGF). Besides supplementing

  5. Endogenous GABA controls oligodendrocyte lineage cell number, myelination, and CNS internode length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, Nicola B; Clarke, Laura E; Arancibia-Carcamo, I Lorena;

    2016-01-01

    Adjusting the thickness and internodal length of the myelin sheath is a mechanism for tuning the conduction velocity of axons to match computational needs. Interactions between oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) and developing axons regulate the formation of myelin around axons. We now show, ...

  6. Effect of MK-801 and clozapine on the proteome of cultured human oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Silva Cassoli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Separate lines of evidence have demonstrated the involvement of NMDA receptor and oligodendrocyte dysfunctions in schizophrenia. Here we have carried out shotgun mass spectrometry proteome analysis of oligodendrocytes treated with the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 to gain potential insights into these effects at the molecular level. The MK-801 treatment led to alterations in the levels of 68 proteins, which are associated with seven distinct biological processes. Most of these proteins are involved in energy metabolism and many have been found to be dysregulated in previous proteomic studies of post-mortem brain tissues from schizophrenia patients. Finally, addition of the antipsychotic clozapine to MK-801-treated oligodendrocyte cultures resulted in changes in the levels of 45 proteins and treatment with clozapine alone altered 122 proteins and many of these showed opposite changes to the MK-801effects. Therefore, these proteins and the associated energy metabolism pathways should be explored as potential biomarkers of antipsychotic efficacy. In conclusion, MK-801 treatment of oligodendrocytes may provide a useful model for testing the efficacy of novel treatment approaches.

  7. Altered Oligodendrocyte Maturation and Myelin Maintenance: The Role of Antiretrovirals in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Brigid K; Monnerie, Hubert; Mannell, Maggie V; Gannon, Patrick J; Espinoza, Cagla Akay; Erickson, Michelle A; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Gelman, Benjamin B; Briand, Lisa A; Pierce, R Christopher; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L; Grinspan, Judith B

    2015-11-01

    Despite effective viral suppression through combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), approximately half of HIV-positive individuals have HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Studies of antiretroviral-treated patients have revealed persistent white matter abnormalities including diffuse myelin pallor, diminished white matter tracts, and decreased myelin protein mRNAs. Loss of myelin can contribute to neurocognitive dysfunction because the myelin membrane generated by oligodendrocytes is essential for rapid signal transduction and axonal maintenance. We hypothesized that myelin changes in HAND are partly due to effects of antiretroviral drugs on oligodendrocyte survival and/or maturation. We showed that primary mouse oligodendrocyte precursor cell cultures treated with therapeutic concentrations of HIV protease inhibitors ritonavir or lopinavir displayed dose-dependent decreases in oligodendrocyte maturation; however, this effect was rapidly reversed after drug removal. Conversely, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine had no effect. Furthermore, in vivo ritonavir administration to adult mice reduced frontal cortex myelin protein levels. Finally, prefrontal cortex tissue from HIV-positive individuals with HAND on cART showed a significant decrease in myelin basic protein compared with untreated HIV-positive individuals with HAND or HIV-negative controls. These findings demonstrate that antiretrovirals can impact myelin integrity and have implications for myelination in juvenile HIV patients and myelin maintenance in adults on lifelong therapy.

  8. Differential and cell development-dependent localization of myelin mRNAs in oligodendrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deVries, H; deJonge, JC; Schrage, C; vanderHaar, ME; Hoekstra, D

    1997-01-01

    In oligodendrocytes (OLG), the mRNAs for the various myelin proteins localize to different intracellular sites, Whereas the confinement of myelin basic protein (MBP) mRNA to the processes of the cell has been well established, we demonstrate that most other myelin mRNA species are mainly present in

  9. Culture of rat cerebral oligodendrocytes in a serum-free, chemically defined medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, J.W.; Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Romijn, H.J.; Golde, L.M.G. van

    1984-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes were isolated from the cerebra of young rats (5-10 days old) by trypsinization of the tissue followed by cell separation on Percoll gradients. The isolation was carried out in physiological, isotonic media. The cell yield was 2-4 × 10⁶ cells per brain; the plating efficiency was ≥70

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes central nervous system myelination via a direct effect upon oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junhua; Wong, Agnes W; Willingham, Melanie M; van den Buuse, Maarten; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Murray, Simon S

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular factors that are responsible for inducing myelination in the central nervous system (CNS) remain elusive. We investigated whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated, by first confirming that BDNF heterozygous mice exhibit delayed CNS myelination during early postnatal development. We next established that the influence of BDNF upon myelination was direct, by acting on oligodendrocytes, using co-cultures of dorsal root ganglia neurons and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Importantly, we found that BDNF retains its capacity to enhance myelination of neurons or by oligodendrocytes derived from p75NTR knockout mice, indicating the expression of p75NTR is not necessary for BDNF-induced myelination. Conversely, we observed that phosphorylation of TrkB correlated with myelination, and that inhibiting TrkB signalling also inhibited the promyelinating effect of BDNF, suggesting that BDNF enhances CNS myelination via activating oligodendroglial TrkB-FL receptors. Together, our data reveal a previously unknown role for BDNF in potentiating the normal development of CNS myelination, via signalling within oligodendrocytes.

  11. Reduced fasting-induced activation of hypothalamic arcuate neurons is associated with hyperleptinemia and increased leptin sensitivity in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Fasting increases c-Fos expression in neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) in lean, but not in hyperleptinemic mice with late-onset obesity (LOO). Although obesity is associated with leptin resistance, we hypothesized that under fasting conditions, leptin sensitivity might be restored and that hyperleptinemia may counteract the neuronal response to fasting. We investigated whether the reduced fasting response of ARC neurons in LOO is paralleled by an increase in leptin sensitivity, as measured by leptin-induced STAT-3 phosphorylation. To assess leptin's role in the modulation of the fasting-induced ARC activation, we investigated c-Fos responses and hormone and metabolite levels in hyperleptinemic diet-induced obese (DIO) and in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Leptin induced a stronger STAT-3 phosphorylation in fasted LOO and lean mice than in ad libitum-fed animals. Similar to LOO, hyperleptinemic DIO mice showed no c-Fos response after fasting, while ob/ob mice showed a stronger response than lean control mice. Mimicking hyperleptinemia by repeated leptin injections in lean mice during fasting attenuated the fasting-induced c-Fos expression. Our findings indicate that high leptin levels prevent the fasting-induced activation of ARC neurons in mice. Moreover, leptin sensitivity is dynamic in obese subjects and depends on the feeding status. During short-term increases in leptin sensitivity, e.g., during fasting, leptin signaling appears to be effective, even in hyperleptinemic obesity. As reflected by the blockade of the fasting-induced ARC activation, fasting seems to interfere with the responsiveness of the ARC to signals related to the status of energy intake.

  12. PTHrP Overexpression Increases Sensitivity of Breast Cancer Cells to Apo2L/TRAIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cheung

    Full Text Available Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP is a key component in breast development and breast tumour biology. PTHrP has been discovered as a causative agent of hypercalcaemia of malignancy and is also one of the main factors implicated in breast cancer mediated osteolysis. Clinical studies have determined that PTHrP expression by primary breast cancers was an independent predictor of improved prognosis. Furthermore, PTHrP has been demonstrated to cause tumour cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Apo2L/TRAIL is a promising new anti-cancer agent, due to its ability to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells whilst sparing most normal cells. However, some cancer cells are resistant to Apo2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis thus limiting its therapeutic efficacy. The effects of PTHrP on cell death signalling pathways initiated by Apo2L/TRAIL were investigated in breast cancer cells. Expression of PTHrP in Apo2L/TRAIL resistant cell line MCF-7 sensitised these cells to Apo2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The actions of PTHrP resulted from intracellular effects, since exogenous treatment of PTHrP had no effect on Apo2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Apo2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis in PTHrP expressing cells occurred through the activation of caspase-10 resulting in caspase-9 activation and induction of apoptosis through the effector caspases, caspase-6 and -7. PTHrP increased cell surface expression of Apo2L/TRAIL death receptors, TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2. Antagonistic antibodies against the death receptors demonstrated that Apo2L/TRAIL mediated its apoptotic signals through activation of the TRAIL-R2 in PTHrP expressing breast cancer cells. These studies reveal a novel role for PTHrP with Apo2L/TRAIL that maybe important for future diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.

  13. PPARγ agonists promote oligodendrocyte differentiation of neural stem cells by modulating stemness and differentiation genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Kanakasabai

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs are a small population of resident cells that can grow, migrate and differentiate into neuro-glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a nuclear receptor transcription factor that regulates cell growth and differentiation. In this study we analyzed the influence of PPARγ agonists on neural stem cell growth and differentiation in culture. We found that in vitro culture of mouse NSCs in neurobasal medium with B27 in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF induced their growth and expansion as neurospheres. Addition of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and PPARγ agonist ciglitazone or 15-Deoxy-Δ(12,14-Prostaglandin J(2 (15d-PGJ2 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability and proliferation of NSCs in culture. Interestingly, NSCs cultured with PPARγ agonists, but not ATRA, showed significant increase in oligodendrocyte precursor-specific O4 and NG2 reactivity with a reduction in NSC marker nestin, in 3-7 days. In vitro treatment with PPARγ agonists and ATRA also induced modest increase in the expression of neuronal β-III tubulin and astrocyte-specific GFAP in NSCs in 3-7 days. Further analyses showed that PPARγ agonists and ATRA induced significant alterations in the expression of many stemness and differentiation genes associated with neuro-glial differentiation in NSCs. These findings highlight the influence of PPARγ agonists in promoting neuro-glial differentiation of NSCs and its significance in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Jicama (Pachyrhizus erosus) extract increases insulin sensitivity and regulates hepatic glucose in C57BL/Ksj-db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Joo; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Han, Ji-Sook

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of jicama extract on hyperglycemia and insulin sensitivity in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. Male C57BL/Ksj-db/db mice were divided into groups subsequently fed a regular diet (controls), or diet supplemented with jicama extract, and rosiglitazone. After 6 weeks, blood levels of glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were significantly lower in animals administered the jicama extract than the control group. Additionally, glucose and insulin tolerance tests showed that jicama extract increased insulin sensitivity. The homeostatic index of insulin resistance was lower in the jicama extract-treated group than in the diabetic control group. Administration of jicama extract significantly enhanced the expressions of the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase and Akt substrate of 160 kDa, and plasma membrane glucose transporter type 4 in skeletal muscle. Jicama extract administration also decreased the expressions of glucose 6-phosphatase and phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase in the liver. Jicama extract may increases insulin sensitivity and inhibites the gluconeogenesis in the liver.

  15. Loss-of-function myostatin mutation increases insulin sensitivity and browning of white fat in Meishan pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chunbo; Qian, Lili; Jiang, Shengwang; Sun, Youde; Wang, Qingqing; Ma, Dezun; Xiao, Gaojun; Li, Biao; Xie, Shanshan; Gao, Ting; Chen, Yaoxing; Liu, Jie; An, Xiaorong; Cui, Wentao; Li, Kui

    2017-05-23

    Myostatin-deficient mice showed a remarkable hypertrophy of skeletal muscle, with a decreased fat mass and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Currently, it is unclear if the inhibition of myostatin could be used as an approach to treat human obesity and insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated if the inhibition of porcine myostatin has any effect on fat deposition and insulin sensitivity using genetically engineered Meishan pigs containing a myostatin loss-of-function mutation (Mstn -/- ). Our results indicated that, when compared with wild-type pigs, the amount of subcutaneous fat and leaf fat of Mstn -/- pigs were significantly decreased mainly due to the browning of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Additionally, the serum insulin level decreased and the insulin sensitivity increased significantly in Mstn -/- pigs. Moreover, we found a significant increase in levels of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate proteins in skeletal muscle of Mstn -/- pigs, which then activating the insulin signaling pathway. Irisin-mediated regulation is not the only pathway for the activation of insulin signal in Mstn -/- skeletal muscle. This study provides valuable insight for the treatment of human obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  16. Deletion of Jun proteins in adult oligodendrocytes does not perturb cell survival, or myelin maintenance in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Schreiner

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS, are fundamental players in rapid impulse conduction and normal axonal functions. JunB and c-Jun are DNA-binding components of the AP-1 transcription factor, which is known to regulate different processes such as proliferation, differentiation, stress responses and death in several cell types, including cultured oligodendrocyte/lineage cells. By selectively inactivating Jun B and c-Jun in myelinating oligodendrocytes in vivo, we generated mutant mice that developed normally, and within more than 12 months showed normal ageing and survival rates. In the adult CNS, absence of JunB and c-Jun from mature oligodendrocytes caused low-grade glial activation without overt signs of demyelination or secondary leukocyte infiltration into the brain. Even after exposure to toxic or autoimmune oligodendrocyte insults, signs of altered oligodendrocyte viability were mild and detectable only upon cuprizone treatment. We conclude that JunB and c-Jun expression in post-mitotic oligodendrocytes is mostly dispensable for the maintainance of white matter tracts throughout adult life, even under demyelinating conditions.

  17. Human induced pluripotent stem cells differentiation into oligodendrocyte progenitors and transplantation in a rat model of optic chiasm demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Pouya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aims to differentiate human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs into oligodendrocyte precursors and assess their recovery potential in a demyelinated optic chiasm model in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated a cell population of oligodendrocyte progenitors from hiPSCs by using embryoid body formation in a defined medium supplemented with a combination of factors, positive selection and mechanical enrichment. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence analyses showed that stage-specific markers, Olig2, Sox10, NG2, PDGFRα, O4, A2B5, GalC, and MBP were expressed following the differentiation procedure, and enrichment of the oligodendrocyte lineage. These results are comparable with the expression of stage-specific markers in human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Transplantation of hiPSC-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors into the lysolecithin-induced demyelinated optic chiasm of the rat model resulted in recovery from symptoms, and integration and differentiation into oligodendrocytes were detected by immunohistofluorescence staining against PLP and MBP, and measurements of the visual evoked potentials. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results showed that oligodendrocyte progenitors generated efficiently from hiPSCs can be used in future biomedical studies once safety issues have been overcome.

  18. Loss of lingual sensitivity and slightly increased size signaling schwannoma in a patient with mixed conjunctive tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, D C; Nogueira, G; Cancio, V A; Cavalcante, F S; Godefroy, P; Sousa, D S C; Hespanhol, W; dos Santos, K R N; Cavalcante, M A B

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe an unusual case of a lingual schwannoma associated with a mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). A case report. A lingual schwannoma with loss of lingual sensitivity and slightly increased size in an 18-year-old patient with MCTD was correctly diagnosed through a biopsy and no reoccurrence was observed one year after the surgical removal of the tumor and sensitivity returned 3 months after surgery. This case was considered uncommon, making the clinical diagnosis challenging in view of the diversity of possibilities for its differential diagnosis, thus showing the importance of a biopsy to confirm the diagnosis and long term follow up in such cases.

  19. LINGO-1 Regulates Oligodendrocyte Differentiation through the Cytoplasmic Gelsolin Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhaohui; Lee, Xinhua; Huang, Guanrong; Sheng, Guoqing; Henderson, Christopher E; Louvard, Daniel; Sohn, Jiho; Pepinsky, Blake; Mi, Sha

    2017-03-22

    Differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) involve the assembly and disassembly of actin microfilaments. However, how actin dynamics are regulated during this process remains poorly understood. Leucine-rich repeat and Ig-like domain-containing Nogo receptor interacting protein 1 (LINGO-1) is a negative regulator of OPC differentiation. We discovered that anti-LINGO-1 antibody-promoted OPC differentiation was accompanied by upregulation of cytoplasmic gelsolin (cGSN), an abundant actin-severing protein involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments. Treating rat OPCs with cGSN siRNA reduced OPC differentiation, whereas overexpression of cGSN promoted OPC differentiation in vitro and remyelination in vivo Furthermore, coexpression of cGSN and LINGO-1 blocked the inhibitory effect of LINGO-1. Our study demonstrates that cGSN works downstream of LINGO-1 signaling pathway, which enhances actin dynamics and is essential for OPC morphogenesis and differentiation. This finding may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS).SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelin loss and subsequent axon degeneration contributes to a variety of neurological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Understanding the regulation of myelination by oligodendrocytes is therefore critical for developing therapies for the treatment of MS. We previously demonstrated that leucine-rich repeat and Ig-like domain-containing Nogo receptor interacting protein 1 (LINGO-1) is a negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and that anti-LINGO-1 promotes remyelination in preclinical animal models for MS and in a phase II acute optic neuritis clinical trial (RENEW). The mechanism by which LINGO-1 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that LINGO-1 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation through the cytoplasmic gelsolin signaling pathway, providing new

  20. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells are mediated by astrocytes and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Y; Cai, Z; Rhodes, P G

    2000-11-15

    Oligodendrocytes are the primary cells injured in periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), a predominant form of brain white matter lesion in preterm infants. To explore the possible linkage between white matter injury and maternal infection, purified rat O-2A progenitor (Oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte progenitor) cell cultures were used as a model in studying the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin, on survival and differentiation of oligodendrocytes and the involvement of other glial cells in the effects of LPS. O-2A progenitor cells were cultured from optic nerves of 7-day-old rat pups in a chemically defined medium (CDM). Astrocyte and microglia cell cultures were prepared from the cortex of 1-day-old rat brains in the CDM. Direct treatment of LPS (1 microg/ml) to O-2A cells had no effect on viability or differentiation of these cells. When O-2A progenitor cells were cultured in the conditioned medium obtained from either astrocyte or microglial cell cultures for 48 hr, survival rate and differentiation of O-2A cells into mature oligodendrocytes were greatly enhanced as measured by the MTT assay and immunocytochemistry. The conditioned medium obtained from astrocytes or microglia treated with LPS for 48 hr, however, failed to show such a promotional effect on viability and differentiation of O-2A cells. When 5 microg/ml LPS was used to stimulate astrocytes or microglia, the conditioned medium from these glial cell cultures caused O-2A cell injury. The overall results indicate that astrocytes and microglia may promote viability and differentiation of O-2A progenitor cells under physiological conditions, but they may also mediate cytotoxic effects of LPS on oligodendrocytes under an infectious disease biochemical environment.

  1. Pío del Río Hortega and the discovery of the oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando ePérez-Cerdá

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pío del Río Hortega (1882-1945 discovered microglia and oligodendrocytes and was after Ramón y Cajal, the most prominent figure of the Spanish school of neurology. He began his scientific career with Nicolás Achúcarro with whom he learned the use of metallic impregnation techniques suitable to study non neuronal cells. Later on, he joined Cajal´s laboratory, and afterwards he created his own group where he continued developing other innovative modifications of the silver staining methods that revolutionised the study of glial cells a century ago. He was at that time also interested in neuropathology and became a leading authority in Central Nervous System (CNS tumours. In parallel to this clinical activity, del Río Hortega rendered the first systematic description of the great polymorphism present in a subtype of macroglial cells that he named himself as oligodendroglia and later oligodendrocytes. He established their ectodermic origin and suggested that they build the myelin sheath of CNS axons, just as Schwann cells do in the periphery. Notably, he also suggested the trophic role of oligodendrocytes for neuronal functionality, an idea that it has been substantiated in the last few years. Del Río Hortega became internationally recognized and established an important neurohistological school with outstanding pupils from Spain and abroad, which nearly disappeared after his exile due to the Spanish civil war. Yet, the difficulty of metal impregnation methods and their variability in results, delayed for some decades the confirmation of his great insights into oligodendrocyte biology until the development of electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. This review aims at summarizing the pioneer and essential contributions of del Río Hortega to the current knowledge of oligodendrocyte structure and function, and to provide a hint of the scientific personality of this extraordinary and insufficiently recognized man.

  2. Pretreatment with mixed-function oxidase inducers increases the sensitivity of the hepatocyte/DNA repair assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaddock, J.G.; Heflich, R.H.; McMillan, D.C.; Hinson, J.A.; Casciano, D.A. (National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AK (USA) Univ. of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock (USA))

    1989-01-01

    A recent National Toxicology Program evaluation indicates that the rat hepatocyte/DNA repair assay has a high false-negative rate and that it is insensitive to some genotoxic hepatocarcinogens as well as other species and organ-specific carcinogens. In this study, the authors examined whether the sensitivity of the hepatocyte/DNA repair assay might be increased through animal pretreatment with various hepatic mixed-function oxidase inducers, i.e., Aroclor 1254, phenobarbital, and 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-tetrachloroazobenzene (TCAB). The effects on unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS), a measured of DNA damage and repair, were studied in cultures exposed to known and/or potential carcinogens that had been evaluated as negative or questionable or that produced conflicting results with hepatocytes isolated from uninduced animals. 4,4{prime}-Oxydianiline, 1-nitropy-rene, and TCAB produced concentration-dependent increases in UDS in hepatocytes from rats pretreated with Aroclor 1254. 4,4{prime}-Oxydianiline and TCAB also induced a dose-dependent increase in DNA repair in hepatocytes from rats pretreated with phenobarbital, whereas 1-nitropyrene was negative. These data indicate that the limited sensitivity to chemical carcinogens displayed by the hepatocyte/DNA repair assay may be increased by using hepatocytes isolated from animals exposed to hepatic mixed-function oxidase inducers.

  3. Increasing the Depth of Current Understanding: Sensitivity Testing of Deep-Sea Larval Dispersal Models for Ecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Rebecca E; Nimmo-Smith, W Alex M; Howell, Kerry L

    2016-01-01

    Larval dispersal is an important ecological process of great interest to conservation and the establishment of marine protected areas. Increasing numbers of studies are turning to biophysical models to simulate dispersal patterns, including in the deep-sea, but for many ecologists unassisted by a physical oceanographer, a model can present as a black box. Sensitivity testing offers a means to test the models' abilities and limitations and is a starting point for all modelling efforts. The aim of this study is to illustrate a sensitivity testing process for the unassisted ecologist, through a deep-sea case study example, and demonstrate how sensitivity testing can be used to determine optimal model settings, assess model adequacy, and inform ecological interpretation of model outputs. Five input parameters are tested (timestep of particle simulator (TS), horizontal (HS) and vertical separation (VS) of release points, release frequency (RF), and temporal range (TR) of simulations) using a commonly employed pairing of models. The procedures used are relevant to all marine larval dispersal models. It is shown how the results of these tests can inform the future set up and interpretation of ecological studies in this area. For example, an optimal arrangement of release locations spanning a release area could be deduced; the increased depth range spanned in deep-sea studies may necessitate the stratification of dispersal simulations with different numbers of release locations at different depths; no fewer than 52 releases per year should be used unless biologically informed; three years of simulations chosen based on climatic extremes may provide results with 90% similarity to five years of simulation; and this model setup is not appropriate for simulating rare dispersal events. A step-by-step process, summarising advice on the sensitivity testing procedure, is provided to inform all future unassisted ecologists looking to run a larval dispersal simulation.

  4. Increasing the Depth of Current Understanding: Sensitivity Testing of Deep-Sea Larval Dispersal Models for Ecologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.; Howell, Kerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Larval dispersal is an important ecological process of great interest to conservation and the establishment of marine protected areas. Increasing numbers of studies are turning to biophysical models to simulate dispersal patterns, including in the deep-sea, but for many ecologists unassisted by a physical oceanographer, a model can present as a black box. Sensitivity testing offers a means to test the models’ abilities and limitations and is a starting point for all modelling efforts. The aim of this study is to illustrate a sensitivity testing process for the unassisted ecologist, through a deep-sea case study example, and demonstrate how sensitivity testing can be used to determine optimal model settings, assess model adequacy, and inform ecological interpretation of model outputs. Five input parameters are tested (timestep of particle simulator (TS), horizontal (HS) and vertical separation (VS) of release points, release frequency (RF), and temporal range (TR) of simulations) using a commonly employed pairing of models. The procedures used are relevant to all marine larval dispersal models. It is shown how the results of these tests can inform the future set up and interpretation of ecological studies in this area. For example, an optimal arrangement of release locations spanning a release area could be deduced; the increased depth range spanned in deep-sea studies may necessitate the stratification of dispersal simulations with different numbers of release locations at different depths; no fewer than 52 releases per year should be used unless biologically informed; three years of simulations chosen based on climatic extremes may provide results with 90% similarity to five years of simulation; and this model setup is not appropriate for simulating rare dispersal events. A step-by-step process, summarising advice on the sensitivity testing procedure, is provided to inform all future unassisted ecologists looking to run a larval dispersal simulation. PMID

  5. Increasing Superoxide Production and the Labile Iron Pool in Tumor Cells May Sensitize Them to Extracellular Ascorbate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Frederick Mccarty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Low millimolar concencentrations of ascorbate are capable of inflicting lethal damage on a high proportion of cancer cells lines, yet leave non-transformed cell lines unscathed; extracellular generation of hydrogen peroxide, reflecting reduction of molecular oxygen by ascorbate, has been shown to mediate this effect. Although some cancer cell lines express low catalase activity, this cannot fully explain the selective sensitivity of cancer cells to hydrogen peroxide. Ranzato and colleagues have presented evidence for a plausible new explanation of this sensitivity - a high proportion of cancers, via NADPH oxidase complexes or dysfunctional mitochondria, produce elevated amounts of superoxide. This superoxide, via a transition metal-catalyzed transfer of an electron to the hydrogen peroxide produced by ascorbate, can generate deadly hydroxyl radical (Haber-Weiss reaction. It thus can be predicted that concurrent measures which somewhat selectively boost superoxide production in cancers will enhance their sensitivity to i.v. ascorbate therapy. One way to achieve this is to increase the provision of substrate to cancer mitochondria. Measures which inhibit the constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 activity in cancers (such as salsalate and mTORC1 inhibitors, or an improvement of tumor oxygenation, or that inhibit the HIF-1-inducible pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (such as dichloroacetate, can be expected to increase pyruvate oxidation. A ketogenic diet should provide more lipid substrate for tumor mitochondria. The cancer-killing activity of 42°C hyperthermia is to some degree contingent on an increase in oxidative stress, likely of mitochondrial origin; reports that hydrogen peroxide synergizes with hyperthermia in killing cancer cells suggest that hyperthermia and i.v. ascorbate could potentiate each other’s efficacy. A concurrent enhancement of tumor oxygenation might improve results by decreasing HIF-1 activity while increasing the

  6. Replacing Alpha-Fetoprotein With Alpha-Fetoprotein-L3 Increases the Sensitivity of Prenatal Screening for Trisomy 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huai, Lei; Leng, Jianhang; Ma, Shenglin; Huang, Fang; Shen, Junya; Ding, Yu

    This study aimed to investigate the serum concentration of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-L3 in midterm pregnancies and its potential application in prenatal trisomy screening. The serum samples from 27 women with trisomy 21 fetuses and 800 women with normal fetuses were examined to measure the concentrations of AFP, AFP-L3, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), unconjugated estriol (uE3), and inhibin-A. The screening results of various tests consisting of these markers were analyzed. In normal pregnancies within 15-20 weeks of gestation, the medians of serum AFP-L3 were 4.63, 5.70, 5.78, 6.58, 7.03, and 7.25 pg/mL. The median of AFP-L3 MoM in the trisomy 21 group was 0.46, which was significantly lower than the value of 1 in the normal group (P < 0.05). When using a cutoff value of 1/270, the sensitivity of the triple marker test (AFP, hCG, uE3) was improved from 74% to 81% by replacing AFP with AFP-L3, with the false-positive rate slightly increased from 5.4% to 6.8%. Similarly, the sensitivity of the quad marker test (AFP, hCG, uE3, inhibin-A) was improved from 81% to 89% by replacing AFP with AFP-L3, with the false-positive rate slightly increased from 4.6% to 5.6%. Serum AFP-L3 concentration increases along with more weeks of gestation in the midterm pregnancies. Trisomy 21 screening tests with AFP replaced by AFP-L3 have higher sensitivities at the expense of slightly increased false-positive rates. This improvement in screening may help to better prepare the parents and caregivers for the special needs of newborns with trisomy 21.

  7. Transplantation of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in an animal model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury: survival and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leyan; Ryu, Jiwon; Hiel, Hakim; Menon, Adarsh; Aggarwal, Ayushi; Rha, Elizabeth; Mahairaki, Vasiliki; Cummings, Brian J; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2015-05-14

    Diffuse axonal injury is an extremely common type of traumatic brain injury encountered in motor vehicle crashes, sports injuries, and in combat. Although many cases of diffuse axonal injury result in chronic disability, there are no current treatments for this condition. Its basic lesion, traumatic axonal injury, has been aggressively modeled in primate and rodent animal models. The inexorable axonal and perikaryal degeneration and dysmyelination often encountered in traumatic axonal injury calls for regenerative therapies, including therapies based on stem cells and precursors. Here we explore the proof of concept that treatments based on transplants of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells can replace or remodel myelin and, eventually, contribute to axonal regeneration in traumatic axonal injury. We derived human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from the human embryonic stem cell line H9, purified and characterized them. We then transplanted these human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells into the deep sensorimotor cortex next to the corpus callosum of nude rats subjected to traumatic axonal injury based on the impact acceleration model of Marmarou. We explored the time course and spatial distribution of differentiation and structural integration of these cells in rat forebrain. At the time of transplantation, over 90 % of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells expressed A2B5, PDGFR, NG2, O4, Olig2 and Sox10, a profile consistent with their progenitor or early oligodendrocyte status. After transplantation, these cells survived well and migrated massively via the corpus callosum in both injured and uninjured brains. Human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells displayed a striking preference for white matter tracts and were contained almost exclusively in the corpus callosum and external capsule, the striatopallidal striae, and cortical layer 6. Over 3 months, human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells progressively matured into myelin basic protein(+) and adenomatous

  8. Passive sensitization increases histamine-stimulated calcium signaling and NF-кB transcription activity in bronchial epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si JIN; Dan TIAN; Jian-guo CHEN; Li-ping ZHU; Sheng-yuan LIU; Di-xun WANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To find out if the two aspects of asthma (chronic airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness) are related to hypersensitivity of calcium signaling in bronchial epithelial cells. Methods: Porcine bronchial epithelial cells (PBEC) were divided into sensitized (S) and nonsesitized (N) groups. In group S, the cells were preincubated with serum from ovalbumin sensitized guinea pigs. In group N, the cells were preincubated with serum from nonsensitized guinea pigs. Single cell calcium imaging and ELISA-based NF-κB activity were used to evaluate the histamine-stimulated intracellular free calcium level and NF-κB activity, respectively. Results: First, 0.1 umol/L histamine could induce [Ca2+]i oscillations in PBEC of group S, but not in group N. Second, 1 umol/L histamine could induce [Ca2+]i oscillations of PBEC in both group S and group N. The [Ca2+]i oscillation frequency of PBEC was significantly higher in group S than in group N, though the [Ca2+]i oscillation amplitude showed no difference between the two groups. Finally, when 10 umol/L histamine was used to stimulate PBEC, a transient initial increase followed by a sustained elevation (FSE) of [Ca2+]i was observed in PBEC in both groups. The amplitude of the FSE of [Ca2+]i in PBEC was significantly higher in group S than in group N. The subsequent NF-KB activity was in accordance to the calcium oscillation frequency evoked by histamine, but not to the amplitude. Conclusion: It was suggested that the increased sensitivity of calcium signaling in bronchial epithelial cells might contribute to the exorbitant inflammation or increased susceptibility in asthmatic airway epithelial cells.

  9. Increasing the analytical sensitivity by oligonucleotides modified with para- and ortho-twisted intercalating nucleic acids--TINA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uffe V Schneider

    Full Text Available The sensitivity and specificity of clinical diagnostic assays using DNA hybridization techniques are limited by the dissociation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA antiparallel duplex helices. This situation can be improved by addition of DNA stabilizing molecules such as nucleic acid intercalators. Here, we report the synthesis of a novel ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA amidite utilizing the phosphoramidite approach, and examine the stabilizing effect of ortho- and para-TINA molecules in antiparallel DNA duplex formation. In a thermal stability assay, ortho- and para-TINA molecules increased the melting point (Tm of Watson-Crick based antiparallel DNA duplexes. The increase in Tm was greatest when the intercalators were placed at the 5' and 3' termini (preferable or, if placed internally, for each half or whole helix turn. Terminally positioned TINA molecules improved analytical sensitivity in a DNA hybridization capture assay targeting the Escherichia coli rrs gene. The corresponding sequence from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa rrs gene was used as cross-reactivity control. At 150 mM ionic strength, analytical sensitivity was improved 27-fold by addition of ortho-TINA molecules and 7-fold by addition of para-TINA molecules (versus the unmodified DNA oligonucleotide, with a 4-fold increase retained at 1 M ionic strength. Both intercalators sustained the discrimination of mismatches in the dsDNA (indicated by ΔTm, unless placed directly adjacent to the mismatch--in which case they partly concealed ΔTm (most pronounced for para-TINA molecules. We anticipate that the presented rules for placement of TINA molecules will be broadly applicable in hybridization capture assays and target amplification systems.

  10. Increasing the Analytical Sensitivity by Oligonucleotides Modified with Para- and Ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acids – TINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uffe V.; Géci, Imrich; Jøhnk, Nina; Mikkelsen, Nikolaj D.; Pedersen, Erik B.; Lisby, Gorm

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of clinical diagnostic assays using DNA hybridization techniques are limited by the dissociation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antiparallel duplex helices. This situation can be improved by addition of DNA stabilizing molecules such as nucleic acid intercalators. Here, we report the synthesis of a novel ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA) amidite utilizing the phosphoramidite approach, and examine the stabilizing effect of ortho- and para-TINA molecules in antiparallel DNA duplex formation. In a thermal stability assay, ortho- and para-TINA molecules increased the melting point (Tm) of Watson-Crick based antiparallel DNA duplexes. The increase in Tm was greatest when the intercalators were placed at the 5′ and 3′ termini (preferable) or, if placed internally, for each half or whole helix turn. Terminally positioned TINA molecules improved analytical sensitivity in a DNA hybridization capture assay targeting the Escherichia coli rrs gene. The corresponding sequence from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa rrs gene was used as cross-reactivity control. At 150 mM ionic strength, analytical sensitivity was improved 27-fold by addition of ortho-TINA molecules and 7-fold by addition of para-TINA molecules (versus the unmodified DNA oligonucleotide), with a 4-fold increase retained at 1 M ionic strength. Both intercalators sustained the discrimination of mismatches in the dsDNA (indicated by ΔTm), unless placed directly adjacent to the mismatch – in which case they partly concealed ΔTm (most pronounced for para-TINA molecules). We anticipate that the presented rules for placement of TINA molecules will be broadly applicable in hybridization capture assays and target amplification systems. PMID:21673988

  11. Usage of Leptospira spp. local strains as antigens increases the sensitivity of the serodiagnosis of bovine leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Priscila S; Loureiro, Ana P; Penna, Bruno; Lilenbaum, Walter

    2015-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease that occurs worldwide, particularly in tropical countries. In livestock the agent is responsible for reproductive problems such as infertility and abortion. Serogroup Sejroe, particularly serovar Hardjo, prevails in cattle in several regions. The microscopic agglutination test (MAT) is the current method for diagnosing leptospirosis. It has been proposed that the inclusion of local strains could detect a larger set of seroreactive animals. In that context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate if the usage of local strains as antigens increases the sensitivity of the serodiagnosis of bovine leptospirosis. Blood and urine samples were collected from 314 bovines from several herds randomly selected in a slaughterhouse in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Serological diagnosis was made with MAT using a 21 reference-strains panel (MAT21). Additionally, 12 local strains (MAT33) were included as antigens. PCR was performed with the urine samples and it was positive on 71 out of 222 samples (31.9%). MAT21 identified as seroreactive 173 (55.1%) out of the 314 animals studied, with Sejroe the most common (38.1%). In MAT33, 204 (65.0%) animals were seroreactive with a significant increase on seroreactivity (9.9%). In conclusion, MAT presented with a significant increase of sensitivity when local strains were used as antigens. Among the local strains, 2013_U152 (KP263062) (serogroup Shermani) and 2013_U280 (KP263069) (serogroup Grippotyphosa) showed to be more antigenic.

  12. Loss of the N-terminal methyltransferase NRMT1 increases sensitivity to DNA damage and promotes mammary oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Klinge, Carolyn M.; Tooley, Christine E. Schaner

    2015-01-01

    Though discovered over four decades ago, the function of N-terminal methylation has mostly remained a mystery. Our discovery of the first mammalian N-terminal methyltransferase, NRMT1, has led to the discovery of many new functions for N-terminal methylation, including regulation of DNA/protein interactions, accurate mitotic division, and nucleotide excision repair (NER). Here we test whether NRMT1 is also important for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and given its previously known roles in cell cycle regulation and the DNA damage response, assay if NRMT1 is acting as a tumor suppressor. We find that NRMT1 knockdown significantly enhances the sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to both etoposide treatment and γ-irradiation, as well as, increases proliferation rate, invasive potential, anchorage-independent growth, xenograft tumor size, and tamoxifen sensitivity. Interestingly, this positions NRMT1 as a tumor suppressor protein involved in multiple DNA repair pathways, and indicates, similar to BRCA1 and BRCA2, its loss may result in tumors with enhanced sensitivity to diverse DNA damaging chemotherapeutics. PMID:25909287

  13. Patients with chronic tension-type headache demonstrate increased mechano-sensitivity of the supra-orbital nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Coppieters, Michel W; Cuadrado, María Luz; Pareja, Juan A

    2008-04-01

    This study aimed to establish whether increased sensitivity to mechanical stimuli is present in neural tissues in chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). Muscle hyperalgesia is a common finding in CTTH. No previous studies have investigated the sensitivity of peripheral nerves in patients with CTTH. A blinded controlled study. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and pain intensity following palpation of the supra-orbital nerve (V1) were compared between 20 patients with CTTH and 20 healthy matched subjects. A pressure algometer and numerical pain rate scale were used to quantify PPT and pain to palpation. A headache diary was kept for 4 weeks to substantiate the diagnosis and record the pain history. The analysis of variance demonstrated significantly lower PPT for patients (0.86+/-0.13 kg/cm2) than controls (1.50+/-0.19 kg/cm2) (Por=0.72; P<.001). These findings reveal that mechanical hypersensitivity is not limited to muscles but also occurs in cranial nerves, and that the level of sensitization, either due to peripheral or central processes, is related to the severity of the primary headache.

  14. Long-term behavioral sensitization to apomorphine is independent of conditioning and increases conditioned pecking, but not preference, in pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselme, Patrick; Edeş, Neslihan; Tabrik, Sepideh; Güntürkün, Onur

    2017-08-30

    When rodents are given a free choice between a variable option and a constant option, they may prefer variability. This preference is even sometimes increased following repeated administration of a dopamine agonist. The present study was the first to examine preference for variability under the systemic administration of a dopamine agonist, apomorphine (Apo), in birds. Experiment 1 tested the drug-free preference and the propensity to choose of pigeons for a constant over a variable delay. It appeared that they preferred and decided more quickly to peck at the optimal delay option. Experiment 2 assessed the effects of a repeated injection of Apo on delay preference, in comparison with previous control tests within the same individuals. Apo treatment might have decreased the number of pecks at the constant option across the different experimental phases, but failed to induce a preference for the variable option. In Experiment 3, two groups of pigeons (Apo-sensitized and saline) were used in order to avoid inhomogeneity in treatments. They had to choose between a 50% probability option and a 5-s delay option. Conditioned pecking and the propensity to choose were higher in the Apo-sensitized pigeons, but, in each group, the pigeons showed indifference between the two options. This experiment also showed that long-term behavioral sensitization to Apo can occur independently of a conditioning process. These results suggest that Apo sensitization can enhance the attractiveness of conditioned cues, while having no effect on the development of a preference for variable-delay and probabilistic schedules of reinforcement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pholcodine stimulates a dramatic increase of IgE in IgE-sensitized individuals. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florvaag, E; Johansson, S G O; Oman, H; Harboe, T; Nopp, A

    2006-01-01

    A previous study showed a relation between pholcodine (PHO) consumption, prevalence of IgE-sensitization to PHO, morphine (MOR) and suxamethonium (SUX) and anaphylaxis to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the effect on IgE production, in IgE-sensitized and nonsensitized individuals, of exposure to cough syrup and environmental chemicals containing PHO, MOR and SUX related allergenic structures. Serum concentrations of IgE and IgE antibodies to PHO, MOR and SUX allergens measured by ImmunoCAP (Pharmacia Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden) were followed after intake of cough syrup, or exposure to confectionary and other household chemicals containing various amounts of substances cross-reacting with PHO, MOR and SUX. Cough syrup containing PHO gave, in sensitized individuals, within 1-2 weeks, an increase of IgE of 60-105 times and of IgE antibodies to PHO, MOR and SUX in the order of 30-80 times. The tested confectionary did not have any similar stimulating effect but seemed to counteract the expected decrease of IgE. No effect was seen in nonsensitized individuals. The PHO stimulated IgE showed a nonspecific binding to ImmunoCAP with common allergens and glycine background ImmunoCAP that was up to 10-fold higher than that of monomeric myeloma-IgE at twice the concentration. It seems as cough syrups containing PHO have a most remarkable IgE boostering effect in persons IgE-sensitized to PHO, MOR and SUX related allergens. Household chemicals containing such allergenic epitopes seem capable of some, minor, stimulation.

  16. Increasing Superoxide Production and the Labile Iron Pool in Tumor Cells may Sensitize Them to Extracellular Ascorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark Frederick; Contreras, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Low millimolar concentrations of ascorbate are capable of inflicting lethal damage on a high proportion of cancer cells lines, yet leave non-transformed cell lines unscathed. Extracellular generation of hydrogen peroxide, reflecting reduction of molecular oxygen by ascorbate, has been shown to mediate this effect. Although some cancer cell lines express low catalase activity, this cannot fully explain the selective sensitivity of cancer cells to hydrogen peroxide. Ranzato and colleagues have presented evidence for a plausible new explanation of this sensitivity - a high proportion of cancers, via NADPH oxidase complexes or dysfunctional mitochondria, produce elevated amounts of superoxide. This superoxide, via a transition metal-catalyzed transfer of an electron to the hydrogen peroxide produced by ascorbate, can generate deadly hydroxyl radical (Haber-Weiss reaction). It thus can be predicted that concurrent measures which somewhat selectively boost superoxide production in cancers will enhance their sensitivity to i.v. ascorbate therapy. One way to achieve this is to increase the provision of substrate to cancer mitochondria. Measures which inhibit the constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activity in cancers (such as salsalate and mTORC1 inhibitors, or an improvement of tumor oxygenation), or that inhibit the HIF-1-inducible pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (such as dichloroacetate), can be expected to increase pyruvate oxidation. A ketogenic diet should provide more lipid substrate for tumor mitochondria. The cancer-killing activity of 42°C hyperthermia is to some degree contingent on an increase in oxidative stress, likely of mitochondrial origin; reports that hydrogen peroxide synergizes with hyperthermia in killing cancer cells suggest that hyperthermia and i.v. ascorbate could potentiate each other's efficacy. A concurrent enhancement of tumor oxygenation might improve results by decreasing HIF-1 activity while increasing the interaction of ascorbic

  17. Increased expression of the dsRNA-activated protein kinase PKR in breast cancer promotes sensitivity to doxorubicin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Bennett

    Full Text Available It has been reported that the expression and activity of the interferon-inducible, dsRNA-dependent protein kinase, PKR, is increased in mammary carcinoma cell lines and primary tumor samples. To extend these findings and determine how PKR signaling may affect breast cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapy, we measured PKR expression by immunohistochemical staining of 538 cases of primary breast cancer and normal tissues. Significantly, PKR expression was elevated in ductal, lobular and squamous cell carcinomas or lymph node metastases but not in either benign tumor specimens or cases of inflammation compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, PKR expression was increased in precancerous stages of mammary cell hyperplasia and dysplasia compared to normal tissues, indicating that PKR expression may be upregulated by the process of tumorigenesis. To test the function of PKR in breast cancer, we generated MCF7, T-47D and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines with significantly reduced PKR expression by siRNA knockdown. Importantly, while knockdown of PKR expression had no effect on cell proliferation under normal growth conditions, MCF7, T-47D or MDA-MB-231 cells with reduced PKR expression or treated with a small molecule PKR inhibitor were significantly less sensitive to doxorubicin or H(2O(2-induced toxicity compared to control cells. In addition, the rate of eIF2α phosphorylation following treatment with doxorubicin was delayed in breast cancer cell lines with decreased PKR expression. Significantly, treatment of breast cancer lines with reduced PKR expression with either interferon-α, which increases PKR expression, or salubrinal, which increases eIF2α phosphorylation, restored doxorubicin sensitivity to normal levels. Taken together these results indicate that increased PKR expression in primary breast cancer tissues may serve as a biomarker for response to doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy and that future therapeutic approaches to promote PKR

  18. International kidney paired donation transplantations to increase kidney transplant of O group and highly sensitized patient: First report from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kute, Vivek B; Patel, Himanshu V; Shah, Pankaj R; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Rizvi, Sayyed J; Pal, Bipin C; Shah, Priya S; Wakhare, Pavan S; Shinde, Saiprasad G; Ghodela, Vijay A; Varyani, Umesh T; Patel, Minaxi H; Trivedi, Varsha B; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2017-01-01

    AIM To report the first international living related two way kidney paired donation (KPD) transplantation from India which occurred on 17th February 2015 after legal permission from authorization committee. METHODS Donor recipient pairs were from Portugal and India who were highly sensitized and ABO incompatible with their spouse respectively. The two donor recipient pairs had negative lymphocyte cross-matching, flow cross-match and donor specific antibody in two way kidney exchange with the intended KPD donor. Local KPD options were fully explored for Indian patient prior to embarking on international KPD. RESULTS Both pairs underwent simultaneous uneventful kidney transplant surgeries and creatinine was 1 mg/dL on tacrolimus based immunosuppression at 11 mo follow up. The uniqueness of these transplantations was that they are first international KPD transplantations in our center. CONCLUSION International KPD will increases quality and quantity of living donor kidney transplantation. This could be an important step to solving the kidney shortage with additional benefit of reduced costs, improved quality and increased access for difficult to match incompatible pairs like O blood group patient with non-O donor and sensitized patient. To the best of our knowledge this is first international KPD transplantation from India. PMID:28280697

  19. Zerumbone inhibits growth of hormone refractory prostate cancer cells by inhibiting JAK2/STAT3 pathway and increases paclitaxel sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorvig, Jessica E; Chakraborty, Arup

    2015-02-01

    Zerumbone, a phytochemical isolated from Zingiber zerumbet has been shown previously to exhibit antineoplastic activity. But, the effect of zerumbone in prostate cancer has not been evaluated. Prostate cancer is frequently associated with elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), which exerts its oncogenic effects through activation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) followed by activation of the transcription factor STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). Here, we investigated whether the anticancer effects of zerumbone are mediated through inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway and whether zerumbone can increase the paclitaxel (PTX) sensitivity of prostate cancer cells. Zerumbone exerted significant cytotoxicity of DU145 versus PC3 prostate cancer cells through cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase followed by apoptosis. Zerumbone selectively inhibited JAK2 in both DU145 and PC3 cells. However, the biological axis of IL-6/JAK2/STAT3 was inhibited only in DU145 cells as no STAT3 phosphorylation was detected in PC3 cells even after IL-6 stimulation. Other signaling pathways in DU145 cells remained unaffected. The expression of prostate cancer-associated genes, including cyclin D1, IL-6, COX2, and ETV1, was blocked. Zerumbone also synergistically increased the sensitivity to PTX. Further preclinical study might reveal the potential use of zerumbone as a chemotherapeutic agent for hormone refractory prostate cancer where IL-6/JAK2/STAT3 signaling is aberrantly active and may be combined with PTX.

  20. Exposure to Fasciola hepatica miracidia increases the sensitivity of Lymnaea (Fossaria) humilis to high and low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Mendoza, I; Naranjo-García, E; Quintero-Martínez, M T; Ibarra-Velarde, F; Correa, D

    2006-06-01

    Humidity and temperature have been considered important factors affecting the infectivity of Fasciola hepatica to its molluscan host. One hundred and thirty laboratory-reared Lymnaea humilis were exposed for 4 hr to the miracidia of F. hepatica over a pH range from 4.0 to 10.0, and their rates of survival were compared with 130 similarly treated but unexposed control snails. All control snails died within 24 hr at pH 4.0, but they showed better survival at pH 5.0-10.0. Their sensitivity to solutions with high and low pH, however, was increased if kept in the presence of F. hepatica miracidia. Snails exposed at pH 5.0 died within 24 hr, whereas most other pHs also affected survival such that by day 18 only those snails exposed at pH 7.2 remained alive. The increased sensitivity of the snails to pH could be explained by a damage-mediated release of parasite enzymes, because infectivity was highest at pHs associated with the lowest host mortality.

  1. Transforming growth factor beta receptor 1 is increased following abstinence from cocaine self-administration, but not cocaine sensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Gancarz-Kausch

    Full Text Available The addicted phenotype is characterized as a long-lasting, chronically relapsing disorder that persists following long periods of abstinence, suggesting that the underlying molecular changes are stable and endure for long periods even in the absence of drug. Here, we investigated Transforming Growth Factor-Beta Type I receptor (TGF-β R1 expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc following periods of withdrawal from cocaine self-administration (SA and a sensitizing regimen of non-contingent cocaine. Rats were exposed to either (i repeated systemic injections (cocaine or saline, or (ii self-administration (cocaine or saline and underwent a period of forced abstinence (either 1 or 7 days of drug cessation. Withdrawal from cocaine self-administration resulted in an increase in TGF-β R1 protein expression in the NAc compared to saline controls. This increase was specific for volitional cocaine intake as no change in expression was observed following a sensitizing regimen of experimenter-administered cocaine. These findings implicate TGF-β signaling as a novel potential therapeutic target for treating drug addiction.

  2. Antisense bcl-2 retrovirus vector increases the sensitivity of a human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W G; Ma, L P; Wang, S W; Zhang, Z Y; Cao, G D

    1999-05-01

    The bcl-2 oncoprotein directly prolongs cellular survival by blocking apoptosis and its overexpression is associated with cellular resistance to killing by chemotherapeutic drugs and gamma-irradiation. Meanwhile, it has been shown that bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide can induce apoptosis or increase toxicity of the treatment in tumors in vivo and in vitro. However, it is difficult to obtain stable transfection by this approach and there are no reports about the effect of an antisense bcl-2 on the sensitivity to oxidative stress induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Here we investigated the effect of an antisense bcl-2 RNA retrovirus vector transfer on the sensitivity of 2-butylamino-2-demethoxy-hypocrellin A (2-BA-2-DMHA) photosensitization in a human gastric adenocarcinoma MGC803 cell line. The results indicate that antisense bcl-2-infected MGC803 cells expressed exogenous antisense bcl-2 mRNA measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and significantly reduced bcl-2 protein determined by western blotting analysis. The decreased expression of bcl-2 protein was accompanied by increased phototoxicity and susceptibility to apoptosis induced by 2-BA-2-DMHA PDT. Our finding suggests that reduction of bcl-2 protein in gastric cancers, and possibly also in a variety of other tumors, may be a novel and rational approach to improve photosensitivity and the treatment outcome.

  3. Increasing the Analytical Sensitivity by Oligonucleotides Modified with Para- and Ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acids - TINA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Uffe V; Géci, Imrich; Jøhnk, Nina

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of clinical diagnostic assays using DNA hybridization techniques are limited by the dissociation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antiparallel duplex helices. This situation can be improved by addition of DNA stabilizing molecules such as nucleic acid intercalators....... Here, we report the synthesis of a novel ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA) amidite utilizing the phosphoramidite approach, and examine the stabilizing effect of ortho- and para-TINA molecules in antiparallel DNA duplex formation. In a thermal stability assay, ortho- and para......-TINA molecules increased the melting point (Tm) of Watson-Crick based antiparallel DNA duplexes. The increase in Tm was greatest when the intercalators were placed at the 5' and 3' termini (preferable) or, if placed internally, for each half or whole helix turn. Terminally positioned TINA molecules improved...

  4. Erk1/2 but not PI3K pathway is required for neurotrophin 3-induced oligodendrocyte differentiation of post-natal neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XinhuaHu; LuJin; LinyinFeng

    2005-01-01

    Neurotrophin 3 (NT3) induces mouse cortical stem cells to an asymmetric division from a symmetric division, suggesting that NT3 may work as an early differentiative signal for neural stem cells (NSCs). Here, using cultured post-natal hippocampal stem cells as a model, we demonstrated that NT3-stimulation causes NSCs to differentiate into oligodendrocyte precursors (OLPs) through an extracellular signal-related kinasel/2 (Erkl/2)-dependent pathway. Following the treatment of NT3 for 24h, NSCs differentiated into more OLPs and fewer neurons, whereas the proliferation and survival of OLPs were not affected. NT3 induced a series of intracellular responses including enhancement of phosphorylation of Erk 1/2 or Akt and increase of expression of oligodendrocyte lineage gene (Olig)-1, a transcriptional factor known to participate in oligodendrocyte development. Application of U0126, a specific inhibitor of MEK1/2 which are upstream to Erk1/2, blocked the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, suppressed the expression of Olig-1 and prevented NSC differentiation into OLPs in response to NT3 stimulation. Blockade of TrkC also inhibited the differentiation of NSCs to OLPs induced by NT3. However,administration of LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), blocked the phosphorylation of Akt but did not affect the effect of NT3 on the expression of Olig-1 and on NSC differentiation into OLPs. Taken together, these results suggest that NT3 induce NSCs to differentiate into OLPs by enhancing the expression of Olig-1 through an Erk1/2-dependent pathway.

  5. Attenuation of 7-ketocholesterol-induced overproduction of reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and autophagy by dimethyl fumarate on 158N murine oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouk, Amira; Nury, Thomas; Karym, El-Mostafa; Vejux, Anne; Sghaier, Randa; Gondcaille, Catherine; Andreoletti, Pierre; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Debbabi, Meryam; Fromont, Agnès; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Moreau, Thibault; Lizard, Gérard

    2016-02-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress are involved in several non demyelinating or demyelinating neurodegenerative diseases. Some of them, including multiple sclerosis (MS), are associated with lipid peroxidation processes leading to increased levels of 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). So, the eventual protective effect of dimethylfumarate (DMF), which is used for the treatment of MS, was evaluated on 7KC-treated oligodendrocytes, which are myelin synthesizing cells. To this end, murine oligodendrocytes 158N were exposed to 7KC (25, 50μM) for 24h without or with DMF (1, 25, 50μM). The biological activities of DMF associated or not with 7KC were evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, crystal violet and MTT tests. The impact on transmembrane mitochondrial potential (ΔYm), O2(-) and H2O2 production, apoptosis and autophagy was measured by microscopical and flow cytometric methods by staining with DiOC6(3), dihydroethidine and dihydrorhodamine 123, Hoechst 33342, and by Western blotting with the use of specific antibodies raised against uncleaved and cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and LC3-I/II. DMF attenuates the different effects of 7KC, namely: cell growth inhibition and/or loss of cell adhesion, decrease of ΔΨm, O2(-) and H2O2 overproduction, PARP and caspase-3 cleavage, nuclear condensation and fragmentation, and activation of LC3-I into LC3-II. The ability of DMF to attenuate 7KC-induced reactive oxygen species overproduction, apoptosis, and autophagy on oligodendrocytes reinforces the interest for this molecule for the treatment of MS or other demyelinating diseases.

  6. Cardiac troponin I concentration is commonly increased in nondialysis patients with CKD: experience with a sensitive assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Edmund J; Kenny, Claire; Abbas, Nasir A; John, R Ian; Webb, Michelle C; Price, Christopher P; Vickery, Susan

    2007-04-01

    Cardiac troponin (cTn) concentrations commonly are increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the absence of an acute coronary syndrome. cTn T (cTnT) concentration reportedly is increased more commonly than cTn I (cTnI). Using a sensitive cTnI assay, we studied cTnI concentrations in predialysis patients with CKD who did not have an acute coronary event. Observational cohort study. Nondialysis patients with CKD attending an outpatient clinic. Plasma cTnI was measured using the cTnI-Ultra assay (Bayer HealthCare LLC, Diagnostics Division, Tarrytown, NY), the same manufacturer's standard cTnI assay, and a cTnT assay (Roche Diagnostics PLC, East Sussex, UK). Prevalence of increased cTn concentration, effect of clinical variables on cTnI-Ultra concentration, and independent associations between cTn assays and all-cause mortality by using multiple regression modeling. Plasma cTnI-Ultra concentration exceeded the upper limit of normal in 33% of patients compared with 18% with the cTnI-standard assay and 43% with the cTnT assay. Age, vascular disease, parathyroid hormone concentration, and left ventricular mass, but not kidney function, had independent effects on plasma cTnI-Ultra concentrations. There were 39 deaths during follow-up. Survival was decreased in patients with baseline cTnI-Ultra concentrations of 0.040 ng/mL or greater (54% versus 83%; P sensitive assay, we found that the prevalence of increased cTnI concentrations in patients with CKD is similar to that observed for cTnT. cTnT concentration, but not cTnI, was independently associated with death.

  7. Protective Effects of Berberine on Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion on Oligodendrocyte Cell Line (OLN-93

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Nadjafi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: We concluded that berberine protected OLN-93 oligodendrocyte against ischemic induced excitotoxic injury. Attenuation of intracellular Ca 2+ overload by berberine may be the key mechanism that saved OLN-93 from excitotoxicity damage.

  8. Survival and Functionality of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendrocytes in a Nonhuman Primate Model for Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiruvalluvan, Arun; Czepiel, Marcin; Kap, Yolanda A; Mantingh-Otter, Ietje; Vainchtein, Ilia; Kuipers, Jeroen; Bijlard, Marjolein; Baron, Wia; Giepmans, Ben; Brück, Wolfgang; 't Hart, Bert A; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-01-01

    : Fast remyelination by endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) is essential to prevent axonal and subsequent retrograde neuronal degeneration in demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). In chronic lesions, however, the remyelination capacity of OPCs becomes insufficient. Cell the

  9. Cutting edge: Multiple sclerosis-like lesions induced by effector CD8 T cells recognizing a sequestered antigen on oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amit; Bauer, Jan; Scheikl, Tanja; Zappulla, Jacques; Audebert, Marc; Desbois, Sabine; Waisman, Ari; Lassmann, Hans; Liblau, Roland S; Mars, Lennart T

    2008-08-01

    CD8 T cells are emerging as important players in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis, although their direct contribution to tissue damage is still debated. To assess whether autoreactive CD8 T cells can contribute to the pronounced loss of oligodendrocytes observed in MS plaques, we generated mice in which the model Ag influenza hemagglutinin is selectively expressed in oligodendrocytes. Transfer of preactivated hemagglutinin-specific CD8 T cells led to inflammatory lesions in the optic nerve, spinal cord, and brain. These lesions, associating CD8 T cell infiltration with focal loss of oligodendrocytes, demyelination, and microglia activation, were very reminiscent of active MS lesions. Thus, our study demonstrates the potential of CD8 T cells to induce oligodendrocyte lysis in vivo as a likely consequence of direct Ag-recognition. These results provide new insights with regard to CNS tissue damage mediated by CD8 T cells and for understanding the role of CD8 T cells in MS.

  10. Increased sensitivity to thermal pain following a single opiate dose is influenced by the COMT val(158met polymorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin B Jensen

    Full Text Available Increased pain sensitivity after opioid administration (opioid-induced hyperalgesia and/or repeated painful stimuli is an individually varying and clinically important phenomenon. The functional polymorphism (val(158met of the Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene regulates the metabolism of dopamine/noradrenaline. Individuals homozygous for the met(158 allele have been reported to have increased pain sensitivity and there are findings of lower micro-opioid system activation during sustained pain. We hypothesized that met/met individuals would exhibit higher pain sensitization and opioid-induced hyperalgesia in response to repeated pain stimuli and an intravenous injection of an opioid drug. Participants were 43 healthy subjects who went through an experiment where five blocks of pain were induced to the hand using a heat probe. After each stimulus subjects rated the pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS from 0 mm (no pain to 100 mm (worst possible pain. Before the second stimulus there was an intravenous injection of a rapid and potent opioid drug. At baseline there was no difference in pain ratings between the COMTval(158met genotypes, F(2, 39<1. However, a repeated measures ANOVA for all five stimuli revealed a main effect for COMTval(158met genotype, F(2, 36 = 4.17, p = 0.024. Met/met individuals reported significantly more pain compared to val/val, p = 0.010. A pairwise comparison of baseline and the opioid intervention demonstrated that analgesia was induced in all groups (p = 0.042 without a separating effect for genotype (n.s. We suggest that the initial response of the descending pain system is not influenced by the COMTval(158met polymorphism but when the system is challenged the difference is revealed. An important clinical implication of this may be that the COMTval(158met related differences may be more expressed in individuals where the inhibitory system is already challenged and sensitive, e.g. chronic pain patients. This has to

  11. Antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in bilateral and recurrent optic neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Reddel, Stephen W.; Henderson, Andrew; Parratt, John D.E.; Barnett, Michael; Gatt, Prudence N.; Merheb, Vera; Kumaran, Raani-Yogeeta Anusuiya; Pathmanandavel, Karrnan; Sinmaz, Nese; Ghadiri, Mahtab; Yiannikas, Con; Vucic, Steve; Stewart, Graeme; Bleasel, Andrew F.; Booth, David; Fung, Victor S.C.; Dale, Russell C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We examined a cohort of adults with aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody–negative neuromyelitis optica/neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMO/NMOSD) for antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Methods: We performed a flow cytometry cell-based assay using live human lentivirus–transduced cells expressing full-length surface MOG. Serum was tested in 23 AQP4 antibody–negative NMO/NMOSD patients with bilateral and/or recurrent optic neuritis (BON, n = 11), longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM, n = 10), and sequential BON and LETM (n = 2), as well as in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, n = 76) and controls (n = 52). Results: MOG antibodies were detected in 9/23 AQP4 antibody–negative patients with NMO/NMOSD, compared to 1/76 patients with MS and 0/52 controls (p < 0.001). MOG antibodies were detected in 8/11 patients with BON, 0/10 patients with LETM, and 1/2 patients with sequential BON and LETM. Six of 9 MOG antibody–positive patients had a relapsing course. MOG antibody–positive patients had prominent optic disc swelling and were more likely to have a rapid response to steroid therapy and relapse on steroid cessation than MOG antibody–negative patients (p = 0.034 and p = 0.029, respectively). While 8/9 MOG antibody–positive patients had good follow-up visual acuity, one experienced sustained visual impairment, 3 had retinal nerve fiber layer thinning, and one had residual spinal disability. Conclusions: MOG antibodies have a strong association with BON and may be a useful clinical biomarker. MOG antibody–associated BON is a relapsing disorder that is frequently steroid responsive and often steroid dependent. Failure to recognize the disorder early and institute immunotherapy promptly may be associated with sustained impairment. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that MOG antibodies are associated with AQP4 antibody–negative BON (sensitivity 69%, 95% confidence interval [CI

  12. Increased androgenic sensitivity in the hind limb muscular system marks the evolution of a derived gestural display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiamele, Lisa A.; Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Schuppe, Eric R.; Taylor, Rebecca S.; Hödl, Walter; Preininger, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Physical gestures are prominent features of many species’ multimodal displays, yet how evolution incorporates body and leg movements into animal signaling repertoires is unclear. Androgenic hormones modulate the production of reproductive signals and sexual motor skills in many vertebrates; therefore, one possibility is that selection for physical signals drives the evolution of androgenic sensitivity in select neuromotor pathways. We examined this issue in the Bornean rock frog (Staurois parvus, family: Ranidae). Males court females and compete with rivals by performing both vocalizations and hind limb gestural signals, called “foot flags.” Foot flagging is a derived display that emerged in the ranids after vocal signaling. Here, we show that administration of testosterone (T) increases foot flagging behavior under seminatural conditions. Moreover, using quantitative PCR, we also find that adult male S. parvus maintain a unique androgenic phenotype, in which androgen receptor (AR) in the hind limb musculature is expressed at levels ∼10× greater than in two other anuran species, which do not produce foot flags (Rana pipiens and Xenopus laevis). Finally, because males of all three of these species solicit mates with calls, we accordingly detect no differences in AR expression in the vocal apparatus (larynx) among taxa. The results show that foot flagging is an androgen-dependent gestural signal, and its emergence is associated with increased androgenic sensitivity within the hind limb musculature. Selection for this novel gestural signal may therefore drive the evolution of increased AR expression in key muscles that control signal production to support adaptive motor performance. PMID:27143723

  13. Increased pressure-induced tone in rat parenchymal arterioles vs. middle cerebral arteries: role of ion channels and calcium sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Marilyn J; Sweet, Julie; Chan, Siu-Lung; Tavares, Matthew J; Gokina, Natalia; Brayden, Joseph E

    2014-07-01

    Brain parenchymal arterioles (PAs) are high-resistance vessels that branch off pial arteries and perfuse the brain parenchyma. PAs are the target of cerebral small vessel disease and have been shown to have greater pressure-induced tone at lower pre