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Sample records for oldest-old differentiates cognitively

  1. Gain in brain immunity in the oldest-old differentiates cognitively normal from demented individuals.

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    Pavel Katsel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent findings suggest that Alzheimer's disease (AD neuropathological features (neuritic plaques and NFTs are not strongly associated with dementia in extreme old (over 90 years of age and compel a search for neurobiological indices of dementia in this rapidly growing segment of the elderly population. We sought to characterize transcriptional and protein profiles of dementia in the oldest-old. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene and protein expression changes relative to non-demented age-matched controls were assessed by two microarray platforms, qPCR and Western blot in different regions of the brains of oldest-old and younger old persons who died at mild or severe stages of dementia. Our results indicate that: i consistent with recent neuropathological findings, gene expression changes associated with cognitive impairment in oldest-old persons are distinct from those in cognitively impaired youngest-old persons; ii transcripts affected in young-old subjects with dementia participate in biological pathways related to synaptic function and neurotransmission while transcripts affected in oldest-old subjects with dementia are associated with immune/inflammatory function; iii upregulation of immune response genes in cognitively intact oldest-old subjects and their subsequent downregulation in dementia suggests a potential protective role of the brain immune-associated system against dementia in the oldest-old; iv consistent with gene expression profiles, protein expression of several selected genes associated with the inflammatory/immune system in inferior temporal cortex is significantly increased in cognitively intact oldest-old persons relative to cognitively intact young-old persons, but impaired in cognitively compromised oldest-old persons relative to cognitively intact oldest-old controls. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that disruption of the robust immune homeostasis that is characteristic of oldest-old individuals who avoided

  2. Age Trajectory of High Cognitive Functioning Among the Oldest Old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thinggaard, Mikael; McGue, Matt; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    individual differences. This decline of cognitive functioning at an individual level may suggest that cognitive function at a population level decreases with age. However, in the Danish 1905 cohort, the age trajectory of both average and high cognitive functioning is constant at a population level from......The chance of reaching age 90 years has increased markedly over the last 50 years, and this chance will probably continue to increase with successive cohorts. There is a widespread concern that a large fraction of the future oldest old will be cognitively impaired. However, there is strong evidence...... that later born cohorts may have better late-life cognitive function than earlier born cohorts as studies have shown a decline both in the prevalence and in the incidence of dementia. Cognitive functioning generally declines after the age of 40 years at an individual level, but there are substantial...

  3. Multilingualism and cognitive state in the oldest old.

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    Kavé, Gitit; Eyal, Nitza; Shorek, Aviva; Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska

    2008-03-01

    In this study, the authors examined whether the number of languages a person speaks predicts performance on 2 cognitive-screening tests. Data were drawn from a representative sample of the oldest Israeli Jewish population (N = 814, M age = 83.0 years; SD = 5.4) that was interviewed first in 1989 and then twice more within the following 12 years. Cognitive state differed significantly among groups of self-reported bilingual, trilingual, and multilingual individuals at each of the 3 interview waves. Regression analyses showed that the number of languages spoken contributed to the prediction of cognitive test scores beyond the effect of other demographic variables, such as age, gender, place of birth, age at immigration, or education. Multilingualism was also found to be a significant predictor of cognitive state in a group of individuals who acquired no formal education at all. Those who reported being most fluent in a language other than their mother tongue scored higher on average than did those whose mother tongue was their best language, but the effect of number of languages on cognitive state was significant in both groups, with no significant interaction. Results are discussed in the context of theories of cognitive reserve.

  4. Functional Capacity, Muscle Fat Infiltration, Power Output, and Cognitive Impairment in Institutionalized Frail Oldest Old

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    Casas-Herrero, Alvaro; Eduardo L. Cadore; Zambom-Ferraresi, Fabricio; Idoate, Fernando; Millor, Nora; Martínez-Ramirez, Alicia; Gómez, Marisol; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Marcellán, Teresa; de Gordoa, Ana Ruiz; Mário C. Marques; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the neuromuscular and functional performance differences between frail oldest old with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In addition, the associations between functional capacities, muscle mass, strength, and power output of the leg muscles were also examined. Forty-three elderly men and women (91.9±4.1 years) were classified into three groups—the frail group, the frail with MCI group (frail+MCI), and the non-frail group. Strength tests were performed for upper ...

  5. Functional Capacity, Muscle Fat Infiltration, Power Output, and Cognitive Impairment in Institutionalized Frail Oldest Old

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    Casas-Herrero, Alvaro; Cadore, Eduardo L.; Zambom-Ferraresi, Fabricio; Idoate, Fernando; Millor, Nora; Martínez-Ramirez, Alicia; Gómez, Marisol; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Marcellán, Teresa; de Gordoa, Ana Ruiz; Marques, Mário C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study examined the neuromuscular and functional performance differences between frail oldest old with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In addition, the associations between functional capacities, muscle mass, strength, and power output of the leg muscles were also examined. Forty-three elderly men and women (91.9±4.1 years) were classified into three groups—the frail group, the frail with MCI group (frail+MCI), and the non-frail group. Strength tests were performed for upper and lower limbs. Functional tests included 5-meter habitual gait, timed up-and-go (TUG), dual task performance, balance, and rise from a chair ability. Incidence of falls was assessed using questionnaires. The thigh muscle mass and attenuation were assessed using computed tomography. There were no differences between the frail and frail+MCI groups for all the functional variables analyzed, except in the cognitive score of the TUG with verbal task, which frail showed greater performance than the frail+MCI group. Significant associations were observed between the functional performance, incidence of falls, muscle mass, strength, and power in the frail and frail+MCI groups (r=−0.73 to r=0.83, p<0.01 to p<0.05). These results suggest that the frail oldest old with and without MCI have similar functional and neuromuscular outcomes. Furthermore, the functional outcomes and incidences of falls are associated with muscle mass, strength, and power in the frail elderly population. PMID:23822577

  6. Survival, disabilities in activities of daily living, and physical and cognitive functioning among the oldest-old in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yi; Feng, Qiushi; Hesketh, Therese

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The oldest-old (those aged ≥80 years) are the most rapidly growing age group globally, and are most in need of health care and assistance. We aimed to assess changes in mortality, disability in activities of daily living, and physical and cognitive functioning among oldest-old individ......BACKGROUND: The oldest-old (those aged ≥80 years) are the most rapidly growing age group globally, and are most in need of health care and assistance. We aimed to assess changes in mortality, disability in activities of daily living, and physical and cognitive functioning among oldest......, and that disability according to activities of daily living had significantly reduced annually between 0·8% and 2·8%. However, cognitive impairment in the later cohorts increased annually between 0·7% and 2·2% and objective physical performance capacity (standing up from a chair, picking up a book from the floor......, and turning around 360°) decreased anually between 0·4% and 3·8%. We also noted that female mortality was substantially lower than male mortality among the oldest-old, but that women's functional capacities in activities of daily living, cognition, and physical performance were worse than their male...

  7. Genetic variations in the CLU and PICALM genes are associated with cognitive function in the oldest old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Recently, two large, and independent genome wide association studies of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) established association with the same rs11136000 variation in the clusterin (CLU) gene. In addition, one variation, rs3851179, in the phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein...... (PICALM) gene and one variation, rs6656401, in the complement component (3b/4b) receptor 1 (CR) gene were associated with AD. Here, we replicate these associations with cognitive functioning in 1380 individuals from the Danish (1905) birth cohort study of the oldest old (92-93 years at intake) using...... measures of Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and a cognitive composite score. We found a significant association between the highly frequent CLU rs11136000 T allele (38%) and better performance on the cognitive composite score (p = 0.016) explaining 0.5% of the mean variation in cognitive composite...

  8. Genetic Variants in KLOTHO Associate With Cognitive Function in the Oldest Old Group

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    Mengel-From, Jonas; Sørensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    cognitive measures in two cohort strata. The haplotype effect was stronger than that of KL-VS. Two variants, rs2283368 and rs9526984, were the only variants significantly associated with cognitive decline over 7 years. We discuss an age-dependent effect of KL and the possibility that multiple gene variants...

  9. CLU Genetic Variants and Cognitive Decline among Elderly and Oldest Old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Thinggaard, Mikael; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    birth cohort (effect on intercept: 0.50 95% CI [0.12; 0.91]) and carriers of a rare TCC haplotype (1%) performed worse on the cognitive composite score (effect on intercept: -1.51 95% CI [-2.92; -0.06]). The association between the TTC haplotype and better cognitive composite score was higher among...

  10. The metabolic syndrome is associated with decelerated cognitive decline in the oldest old

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, E.; Biessels, G. J.; de Craen, A. J. M.; Gussekloo, J.; Westendorp, R. G. J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors including hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose metabolism, associated with cardiovascular disease. The metabolic syndrome also appears to predispose to cognitive dysfunction and dementia. In this study the

  11. The metabolic syndrome is associated with decelerated cognitive decline in the oldest old

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, E.; Biessels, G. J.; de Craen, A. J. M.; Gussekloo, J.; Westendorp, R. G. J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors including hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose metabolism, associated with cardiovascular disease. The metabolic syndrome also appears to predispose to cognitive dysfunction and dementia. In this study the associati

  12. CLU genetic variants and cognitive decline among elderly and oldest old.

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    Jonas Mengel-From

    Full Text Available The CLU gene is one of the prime genetic candidates associated with Alzheimers disease. In the present study CLU genotypes and haplotypes were associated with baseline cognition and the rate of cognitive decline in two cohorts, the Danish 1905 birth cohort (93 years of age in 1998 and the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish twins (LSADT (73-83 year old twins in 1997. Both Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE and a cognitive composite score was attained up to six times for up to 10 years and analysed using random effects models and vital status. The rs11136000 T allele was associated with better baseline cognitive performance both in the LSADT (effect on intercept: 0.41 95% CI [-0.04; 0.87] and the 1905 birth cohort (effect on intercept: 0.28 95% CI [0.01; 0.55], although it did not reach significance in the LSADT cohort. However, the rs11136000 T allele was significantly associated with a steeper decline (effect on slope: -0.06 95% CI [-0.11; -0.01] in the LSADT cohort, but not in the 1905 birth cohort. Haplotype analyses revealed that carriers of the common rs11136000, rs1532278 and rs9331888 TTC haplotype (36% in the CLU gene performed cognitively better than non-carriers in the 1905 birth cohort (effect on intercept: 0.50 95% CI [0.12; 0.91] and carriers of a rare TCC haplotype (1% performed worse on the cognitive composite score (effect on intercept: -1.51 95% CI [-2.92; -0.06]. The association between the TTC haplotype and better cognitive composite score was higher among those surviving past the age of 98 (p = 0.014, and among these the TTC haplotype was borderline associated with a steep decline (effect on slope: -0.13 95% CI [-0.27; 0.00]. In summery CLU genetic variants associate with cognition in two cohorts, but the genetic effect of CLU seems to regress toward the mean when aging.

  13. Effects of the APOE ε2 Allele on Mortality and Cognitive Function in the Oldest Old

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    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Tan, Qihua; Mengel-From, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    Some studies indicate that the APOE ε2 allele may have a protective effect on mortality and mental health among the elderly adults. We investigated the effect of the APOE ε2 allele on cognitive function and mortality in 1651 members of the virtually extinct Danish 1905 birth cohort. We found...

  14. High blood pressure and resilience to physical and cognitive decline in the oldest old: the Leiden 85-plus Study.

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    Sabayan, Behnam; Oleksik, Anna M; Maier, Andrea B; van Buchem, Mark A; Poortvliet, Rosalinde K E; de Ruijter, Wouter; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; de Craen, Anton J M; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the association between various blood pressure (BP) measures at age 85 and future decline in physical and cognitive function the oldest old. Longitudinal study. The population-based Leiden 85-plus Study. Five hundred seventy-two 85-year-old community-dwelling individuals. BP was measured at age 85 during home visits. Activities of daily living (ADLs) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were assessed at age 85 and annually thereafter up to age 90. On average, participants were followed for 3.2 years. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were performed using linear regression models using systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP) as the determinants. All analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic and cardiovascular factors. At age 85, higher SBP and PP were associated with lower ADL disability scores (both P = .01). Similarly, higher SBP, DBP, and MAP were associated with higher MMSE scores (all P physical and cognitive decline, especially in individuals with pre-existing physical disability. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Midlife Hypertension Risk and Cognition in the Non-Demented Oldest Old: Framingham Heart Study.

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    Nishtala, Arvind; Himali, Jayandra J; Beiser, Alexa; Murabito, Joanne M; Seshadri, Sudha; Wolf, Philip A; Au, Rhoda

    2015-01-01

    Midlife cardiovascular risk, hypertension (HTN) in particular, has been related cross-sectionally to poorer neuropsychological (NP) performance in middle age and older adults. This study investigated whether a similar relationship persists between midlife HTN or systolic blood pressure (SBP) and NP performance approximately 30 years later. 378 Framingham stroke and dementia-free Original cohort participants, with HTN and SBP ascertained between 50-60 years of age (mean age 55 ± 1, 65% women), were administered a NP assessment at age ≥80 years. Tests included Logical Memory, Visual Reproduction, Paired Associate, Hooper Visual Organization Test, Trail Making A & B, Digit Span Forward and Backward, Controlled Word Association Test (COWAT), and Similarities. Multivariable linear regression, adjusted for age, time interval between risk factor and NP testing, gender, and premorbid intelligence, assessed association between midlife HTN/SBP and NP outcomes. Midlife HTN was not significantly associated with NP outcome measures. Midlife SBP was associated with poorer Digit Span Forward and COWAT performance (p <  0.05). No significant interaction of age on HTN/SBP to NP associations was found. There was a significant interaction between ApoE4 status and SBP in their effects on COWAT (pinteraction = 0.074); SBP was negatively associated with COWAT only in those with the ApoE4 allele (p = 0.025). While midlife HTN is not associated with late life cognitive impairment, midlife SBP is related to late life attention and verbal fluency impairments, particularly among ApoE4+ individuals. These results offer insight into processes that are operative in the absence of overt cognitive impairment and dementia.

  16. High blood pressure, physical and cognitive function, and risk of stroke in the oldest old: the Leiden 85-plus Study.

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    Sabayan, Behnam; van Vliet, Peter; de Ruijter, Wouter; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; de Craen, Anton J M; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown mixed findings on the association between hypertension and stroke in the oldest old. Heterogeneity of the populations under study may underlie variation in outcomes. We examined whether the level of physical and cognitive function moderates the association between blood pressure and stroke. We included 513 subjects aged 85 years old from the population-based Leiden 85-plus Study. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure were measured at baseline. Activities of daily living and Mini-Mental State Examination were assessed to estimate level of physical and cognitive function, respectively. Five-year risk of stroke was estimated with Cox regression analysis. In the entire cohort, there were no associations between various measures of blood pressure and risk of stroke except for the inverse relation between pulse pressure and stroke risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.80 [95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.98]). Among subjects with impaired physical functioning, higher systolic blood pressure (HR, 0.74 [95% CI, 0.59-0.92]), mean arterial pressure (HR: 0.68 [95% CI, 0.47-0.97]), and pulse pressure (HR, 0.71 [95% CI, 0.55-0.93]) were associated with reduced risk of stroke. Likewise, among subjects with impaired cognitive functioning, higher systolic blood pressure was associated with reduced risk of stroke (HR, 0.80 [95% CI, 0.65-0.98]). In subjects with unimpaired cognitive functioning, higher diastolic blood pressure (HR: 1.98 [95% CI, 1.21-3.22]) and mean arterial pressure (HR, 1.70 [95% CI, 1.08-2.68]) were associated with higher risk of stroke. Our findings suggest that impaired physical and cognitive function moderates the association between blood pressure and stroke.

  17. Associations between cognitive abilities and life satisfaction in the oldest-old. Results from the longitudinal population study Good Aging in Skåne

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    Enkvist Å

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Åsa Enkvist, Henrik Ekström, Sölve Elmståhl Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden Introduction: Studies on the associations between cognitive abilities and life satisfaction (LS in the oldest-old are few. The aim of this study was to explore whether abilities in six different cognitive domains could predict LS in the oldest-old 3 years later. Methods: The study population consisted of 681 individuals aged 78–98 years, drawn from the longitudinal population study “Good Aging in Skåne,” which is part of a national survey (The Swedish National Study on Aging and Care. Scores on 13 cognitive tests were related to scores on Neugartens’ LS index A (LSI-A 3 years later. The cognitive tests were added into six different cognitive domains. A multiple regression analysis was constructed for each cognitive domain separately, with scores on the LSI-A as the dependent variable. The model was adjusted stepwise for sex, age, education, functional capacity, and depressive mood. Results: Significant correlations were found between digit cancellation, word recall, verbal fluency (VF A, VF animals, VF occupations, and mental rotations at baseline, as well as LSI-A at follow-up. The domains of spatial abilities (B = 0.453, P = 0.014 and processing speed (B = 0.118, P = 0.020 remained significantly associated with LSI-A 3 years later after adjustment. Conclusion: The cognitive domains of spatial abilities and processing speed predicted LS 3 years later in the oldest-old. Clinical implications are discussed. Keywords: oldest-old, life satisfaction, longitudinal, crystallized and fluid intelligence, cognition

  18. Cognitive and Psychosocial Consequences of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita Among Middle-Aged, Older, and Oldest-Old Adults in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS).

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    Cherry, Katie E; Su, L Joseph; Welsh, David A; Galea, Sandro; Jazwinski, S Michal; Silva, Jennifer L; Erwin, Marla J

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on cognitive and psychosocial functioning among middle-aged (45-64 years), older (65-89 years) and oldest-old adults (90 years and over) in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS). Analyses of pre- and post-disaster cognitive data showed storm-related decrements in working memory for the middle-aged and older adults, but not for the oldest-old adults. Regression analyses confirmed that measures of social engagement and storm-related disruption significantly predicted pre- to post-disaster differences in short-term and working memory performance for the middle-aged and older adults only. These results are consistent with a burden perspective on post-disaster psychological reactions. Implications for current views of disaster reactions are discussed.

  19. Brain Aging in the Oldest-Old

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    A. von Gunten

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonagenarians and centenarians represent a quickly growing age group worldwide. In parallel, the prevalence of dementia increases substantially, but how to define dementia in this oldest-old age segment remains unclear. Although the idea that the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD decreases after age 90 has now been questioned, the oldest-old still represent a population relatively resistant to degenerative brain processes. Brain aging is characterised by the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs and senile plaques (SPs as well as neuronal and synaptic loss in both cognitively intact individuals and patients with AD. In nondemented cases NFTs are usually restricted to the hippocampal formation, whereas the progressive involvement of the association areas in the temporal neocortex parallels the development of overt clinical signs of dementia. In contrast, there is little correlation between the quantitative distribution of SP and AD severity. The pattern of lesion distribution and neuronal loss changes in extreme aging relative to the younger-old. In contrast to younger cases where dementia is mainly related to severe NFT formation within adjacent components of the medial and inferior aspects of the temporal cortex, oldest-old individuals display a preferential involvement of the anterior part of the CA1 field of the hippocampus whereas the inferior temporal and frontal association areas are relatively spared. This pattern suggests that both the extent of NFT development in the hippocampus as well as a displacement of subregional NFT distribution within the Cornu ammonis (CA fields may be key determinants of dementia in the very old. Cortical association areas are relatively preserved. The progression of NFT formation across increasing cognitive impairment was significantly slower in nonagenarians and centenarians compared to younger cases in the CA1 field and entorhinal cortex. The total amount of amyloid and the neuronal loss in these regions

  20. Genetic predisposition to higher production of interleukin-6 through -174 G > C polymorphism predicts global cognitive decline in oldest-old with cognitive impairment no dementia

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    Vanessa G. Fraga

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin 6 (IL-6 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine upregulated in neurodegenerative contexts. The polymorphism IL-6 -174 G > C influences release levels of this cytokine. We aimed to evaluate the influence of IL-6 -174 G > C on global cognitive score of a group with cognitive impairment no dementia in one year of follow-up.Methods The subjects were categorized in two groups: short-term decline in global cognitive score and those with short-term stability or improvement. IL-6 174 G > C information were compared among these groups.Results We observed that individuals with cognitive impairment no dementia with GGlowergenotype were more frequent among global cognitive score non-decliners while carriers of at least one Chigherallele were more frequent in the group with global cognitive score decliners (p = 0.012; RR = 3.095 IC95%= 1.087-8.812.Conclusion These results suggest that the higher expression of IL-6 gene may be an independent risk factor for cognitive decline among individuals with cognitive impairment no dementia.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and TrkB expression in the "oldest-old," the 90+ Study: correlation with cognitive status and levels of soluble amyloid-beta.

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    Michalski, Bernadeta; Corrada, Maria M; Kawas, Claudia H; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    Factors associated with maintaining good cognition into old age are unclear. Decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) contributes to memory loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and soluble assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau contribute to neurodegeneration. However, it is unknown whether AD-type neuropathology, soluble Aβ and tau, or levels of BDNF and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) correlate with dementia in the oldest-old. We examined these targets in postmortem Brodmann's areas 7 and 9 (BA7 and BA9) in 4 groups of subjects >90 years old: (1) no dementia/no AD pathology, (2) no dementia/AD pathology, (3) dementia/no AD pathology, (4) dementia/AD pathology. In BA7, BDNF messenger RNA correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination scores and was decreased in demented versus nondemented subjects, regardless of pathology. Soluble Aβ42 was increased in both groups with AD pathology, demented or not, compared to no dementia/no AD pathology subjects. Groups did not differ in TrkB isoform levels or in levels of total soluble tau, individual tau isoforms, threonine-181 tau phosphorylation, or ratio of phosphorylated 3R-4R isoforms. In BA9, soluble Aβ42 correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination scores and with BDNF messenger RNA expression. Thus, soluble Aβ42 and BDNF, but not TrkB or soluble tau, correlate with dementia in the oldest-old.

  2. 军队高龄离退休干部轻度认知障碍的患病率调查%Study of the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment in oldest old male veterans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于宝成; 徐若华; 魏文志; 仲伟红; 何建政; 齐丽娟; 冯晓; 刘翠薇

    2012-01-01

    Objective Large scale study in mild cognitive impairement (MCI)in oldest-old people is scarce. In order to investigate Alzheimer's disease (AD), present study was design to explore the prevalence of MCI among oldest-old people in Shijiazhuang, China. Methods Chinese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment,Global Deterioration Scale,Activity of Daily Living,Hachinski Ischemic Scale and Hamilton Depression Scale were applied as screening tools. Prevalence of MCI among 1086 male veterans (aged 80 years old or older)from 28 military sanatorium in Shijiazhuang city were studied. Results The prevalence of MCI was 26.4% in oldest-old male veterans. With increase in educational background level, the prevalence of MCI was decreased (Y2=6.81,P=0.009). Conclusions The prevalence of MCI among oldest-old male veterans was increased significantly. Efforts should be put to monitor the MCI that developed in oldest-old people, whom are at high risk for AD. Also early intervention to treat MCI should be performed to slow down or stop progression of MCI into AD.%目的 目前国内对高龄轻度认知障碍(MCI)的大样本系统研究尚属少见.本研究系了解高龄MCI的流行现状,为进一步研究阿尔茨海默病(AD)提供依据.方法 于2010年8月对石家庄市28个部队干休所的1086例年龄≥82岁的男性高龄离退休干部进行MCI的患病率调查,采用中文版简易智能状态检查、蒙特利尔认知评估量表、总体衰退量表、日常生活能力量表(20项版本)及哈金斯基缺血指数量表、汉密尔抑郁量表为筛查工具.结果 高龄男性MCI的患病率为26.4%;随着受教育程度的提高,MCI患病率亦下降,差异有统计学意义(X2=6.81,P=0.009).结论 军队高龄离退休干部MCI患病率显著增高,应加强对军队高龄离退休干部MCI患者这一高危人群进行监测,早期进行干预治疗,从而延缓或阻止病情进展为AD.

  3. Association of cognitive function with superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde in the oldest old%高龄老人血浆超氧化物歧化酶和丙二醛与认知功能的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪文钊; 殷召雪

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the association of cognitive function with superoxide dismutase ( SOD ) and ma-londialdehyde (MDA) in the oldest - old aged 90 years and over. Methods: From 5 longevity areas, all centenari-ans were included, and the old aged 90 ~ 99 were matched and recruited. Information including basic information, smoking status, drinking status and leisure activities was collected by questionnaire; cognitive function was assessed by mini - mental state examination ( MMSE). 4 ml venous blood sample was collected to determine the level of tri-glycerides, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, SOD, MDA, uric acid, Cu and Zn. General lineal model was used to test the lineal trend of MMSE scores with the level of SOD and MDA. Logistic regression was used to analyze association of cognitive function with the level of SOD and MDA. Multivariate linear regression model was fit to study the association of MMSE scores with SOD and MDA. Results: t - test showed, comparing with cognitive normal group, SOD activity of cognitive impairment group (31. 85 ±5.31 U/ml) was higher significantly ( P 0. 05 ) , after the confounded factors were adjusted. Conclusion: SOD activity was inversely associated with cognitive function among the oldest - old, while MDA was not found to be associated with cognitive function.%目的:分析高龄老人血浆超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、丙二醛(MDA)与认知功能的关系.方法:通过问卷调查基本信息、生活方式及认知功能等,测定血浆相关生化指标及SOD和MDA水平.logistic回归分析和多元线性回归模型研究认知功能与SOD、MDA水平的关系.结果:与最低水平组比较,最高水平组SOD下认知受损发生的OR(95% CI)为3.96 (1.66-9.45).SOD水平与认知功能评分之间显著相关(P<0.05),MDA与认知功能评分之间无显著相关性(P>0.05).结论:高龄老人中血浆SOD活性与认知功能呈负向关系,未发现血浆MDA与认知功能有显著关系.

  4. Relationship between Serum and Brain Carotenoids, α-Tocopherol, and Retinol Concentrations and Cognitive Performance in the Oldest Old from the Georgia Centenarian Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J. Johnson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is involved in age-related cognitive decline. The dietary antioxidants, carotenoids, tocopherols, and vitamin A may play a role in the prevention or delay in cognitive decline. In this study, sera were obtained from 78 octogenarians and 220 centenarians from the Georgia Centenarian Study. Brain tissues were obtained from 47 centenarian decedents. Samples were analyzed for carotenoids, α-tocopherol, and retinol using HPLC. Analyte concentrations were compared with cognitive tests designed to evaluate global cognition, dementia, depression and cognitive domains (memory, processing speed, attention, and executive functioning. Serum lutein, zeaxanthin, and β-carotene concentrations were most consistently related to better cognition (P<0.05 in the whole population and in the centenarians. Only serum lutein was significantly related to better cognition in the octogenarians. In brain, lutein and β-carotene were related to cognition with lutein being consistently associated with a range of measures. There were fewer significant relationships for α-tocopherol and a negative relationship between brain retinol concentrations and delayed recognition. These findings suggest that the status of certain carotenoids in the old may reflect their cognitive function. The protective effect may not be related to an antioxidant effect given that α-tocopherol was less related to cognition than these carotenoids.

  5. Hierarchical Linear Model Approach to the Determinants of Activities of Daily Living of Chinese Oldest Old at Both Individual and Regional levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Deting; Lu Jiehua

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Chinese longitudinal healthy longevity survey conducted in 2002,this paper uses hierarchical linear model(HLM)to make an approach to the possible determinants of activities of daily living(ADL)of Chinese oldest old(aged 80 and above)by combining both individual and provincial level factors.The descriptive analysis shows that there is a great differential in ADL by province among Chinese oldest old.The findings turn out that there does exist a significant differential in ADL between oldest old and young old,and that there is also a great differential in ADL by province among Chinese oldest old.The HLM demonstrates that comorbidity,age,cognitive impairment,visual impairment,and emotion could be the most important individual factors while natural environment,medical facilities,type of staple food and poverty rate in urban areas are the most significantly regional determinants of ADL of oldest old.The findings imply that future actions should not only be taken at individual level,but also at regional level in order to achieve the goal of a healthy aging society in China.

  6. G-395A polymorphism in the promoter region of the KLOTHO gene associates with reduced cognitive impairment among the oldest old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiukui; Ding, Xiang; Gao, Langli; Yang, Ming; Dong, Birong

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to examine the possible association between G-395A polymorphism in the promoter region of the KLOTHO gene and cognitive impairment among Chinese nonagenarians and centenarians. This study is a secondary analysis of the Project of Longevity and Aging in Dujiangyan (PLAD) study. Community-dwelling Chinese people aged 90 years or older were included. G-395A (rs1207568) genotyping in the promoter region of the KLOTHO gene was performed using the TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Cognitive function was assessed with the mini-mental status examination (MMSE). A total of 706 participants (68.0 % female; mean age 93.5 ± 3.6 years) were included. The KLOTHO G-395A polymorphism genotype frequencies for the whole sample were 2.0 % AA, 30.3 % GA, and 67.7 % GG. The GG genotype frequencies for the cognitive impairment and control groups were 70.2 and 62.7 %, respectively. Cognitive impairment prevalence was significantly lower in the GA+AA group than in the GG genotype group (61.4 vs. 69.0 %, p = 0.044). GA+AA genotype subjects had a significantly lower risk of cognitive impairment (odds ratio 0.66; 95 % confidence interval 0.44 to 0.98) than GG genotype individuals after adjusting for age, gender, and other relevant risk factors. KLOTHO G-395A polymorphism associates with reduced cognitive impairment in a sample of Chinese nonagenarians and centenarians.

  7. Predicting perceived health in Angolan elderly: the moderator effect of being oldest old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, José Manuel; Gutiérrez, Melchor; Sancho, Patricia; Galiana, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the predicting effects of variables measuring social support, dependence/active perceptions, and generativity, on this facet of well-being when controlled for socio-demographic variables (age, gender, marital status, and institutionalization). The research tries to extend previous literature by assessing them in a multivariate context, studying differential effects of these variables in young old and oldest old, and offering evidence of the scarcely studied population of Angola. The sample was formed by 737 young old and 266 oldest old. It was built a hierarchical regression, in which, among the different predictors, interactions effects between age and the psychosocial factors were included. Results provide evidence of the qualitative different perceived health and well-being of the young old and oldest old. When predicting perceived health of the Angolan oldest old, psychosocial factors lose much of its importance, and age itself and the limitations that accompanied it seem to be the key point.

  8. Genetic variation in healthy oldest-old.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Halaschek-Wiener

    Full Text Available Individuals who live to 85 and beyond without developing major age-related diseases may achieve this, in part, by lacking disease susceptibility factors, or by possessing resistance factors that enhance their ability to avoid disease and prolong lifespan. Healthy aging is a complex phenotype likely to be affected by both genetic and environmental factors. We sequenced 24 candidate healthy aging genes in DNA samples from 47 healthy individuals aged eighty-five years or older (the 'oldest-old', to characterize genetic variation that is present in this exceptional group. These healthy seniors were never diagnosed with cancer, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, diabetes, or Alzheimer disease. We re-sequenced all exons, intron-exon boundaries and selected conserved non-coding sequences of candidate genes involved in aging-related processes, including dietary restriction (PPARG, PPARGC1A, SIRT1, SIRT3, UCP2, UCP3, metabolism (IGF1R, APOB, SCD, autophagy (BECN1, FRAP1, stem cell activation (NOTCH1, DLL1, tumor suppression (TP53, CDKN2A, ING1, DNA methylation (TRDMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B Progeria syndromes (LMNA, ZMPSTE24, KL and stress response (CRYAB, HSPB2. We detected 935 variants, including 848 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 87 insertion or deletions; 41% (385 were not recorded in dbSNP. This study is the first to present a comprehensive analysis of genetic variation in aging-related candidate genes in healthy oldest-old. These variants and especially our novel polymorphisms are valuable resources to test for genetic association in models of disease susceptibility or resistance. In addition, we propose an innovative tagSNP selection strategy that combines variants identified through gene re-sequencing- and HapMap-derived SNPs.

  9. Genetic variation in healthy oldest-old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaschek-Wiener, Julius; Amirabbasi-Beik, Mahsa; Monfared, Nasim; Pieczyk, Markus; Sailer, Christian; Kollar, Anita; Thomas, Ruth; Agalaridis, Georgios; Yamada, So; Oliveira, Lisa; Collins, Jennifer A; Meneilly, Graydon; Marra, Marco A; Madden, Kenneth M; Le, Nhu D; Connors, Joseph M; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R

    2009-08-14

    Individuals who live to 85 and beyond without developing major age-related diseases may achieve this, in part, by lacking disease susceptibility factors, or by possessing resistance factors that enhance their ability to avoid disease and prolong lifespan. Healthy aging is a complex phenotype likely to be affected by both genetic and environmental factors. We sequenced 24 candidate healthy aging genes in DNA samples from 47 healthy individuals aged eighty-five years or older (the 'oldest-old'), to characterize genetic variation that is present in this exceptional group. These healthy seniors were never diagnosed with cancer, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, diabetes, or Alzheimer disease. We re-sequenced all exons, intron-exon boundaries and selected conserved non-coding sequences of candidate genes involved in aging-related processes, including dietary restriction (PPARG, PPARGC1A, SIRT1, SIRT3, UCP2, UCP3), metabolism (IGF1R, APOB, SCD), autophagy (BECN1, FRAP1), stem cell activation (NOTCH1, DLL1), tumor suppression (TP53, CDKN2A, ING1), DNA methylation (TRDMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B) Progeria syndromes (LMNA, ZMPSTE24, KL) and stress response (CRYAB, HSPB2). We detected 935 variants, including 848 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 87 insertion or deletions; 41% (385) were not recorded in dbSNP. This study is the first to present a comprehensive analysis of genetic variation in aging-related candidate genes in healthy oldest-old. These variants and especially our novel polymorphisms are valuable resources to test for genetic association in models of disease susceptibility or resistance. In addition, we propose an innovative tagSNP selection strategy that combines variants identified through gene re-sequencing- and HapMap-derived SNPs.

  10. Differences in suicide between the old and the oldest old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Bille-Brahe, Unni; Jeune, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of our study is to examine suicide trends among the old (65-79 years) and oldest old (80+ years). METHODS: All persons aged 50 or older who committed suicide in Denmark during 1972-1998 are included in the analysis. Suicide trends are analyzed by sex, age, civil status......, and methods. Age, period, and cohort effects are examined graphically. RESULTS: In all, 17,729 persons (10,479 men and 7,250 women) committed suicide. During the study period, the suicide trends among the middle-aged and the old adults decreased. The trend among the oldest old, by contrast, remained stable....... Marriage ceases to have a preventive effect among the oldest old. The oldest old tend to use more determined suicide methods. DISCUSSION: Distinct differences in suicide mortality between the old and the oldest old were found. The suicide trend of the oldest old does not reflect the recent improvements...

  11. Concept of successful ageing among the community-dwelling oldest old in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Komata, Michiko; Hoshino, Akiko; Usui, Kanae; Katsura, Toshiki

    2015-12-01

    In Japan, increasing human longevity has forced society to rethink the notion of what constitutes 'successful ageing'. This study attempts to advocate a new concept of successful ageing that involves complete acceptance of the ageing process. Research was based on semi-structured interviews with 15 community dwelling oldest-old (aged 85 years and above) participants. The analysis was completed using a grounded theory approach. Successful ageing for the oldest old was grouped into six categories. Within these categories, we discovered the structure of successful ageing, which synthesises ideas from the adaptation process with those of physical and cognitive decreased function as well as spirituality. The oldest old in Japan work to arrive at a conclusion with their lives, all the while coping with the drawbacks of ageing, such as declining physical and cognitive functions. This resilient and flexible way of life makes their form of ageing an equally 'successful' one.

  12. Muscle strength in the oldest old and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Ferreira Cardoso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional household-based study was to investigate the factors associated with muscle strength in the oldest old (≥ 80 years living in a rural area, of southern Brazil. We interviewed a total of 56 men (85.0 ± 4.4 y and 78 women (84.5 ± 4.8 y. Prevalence of poor performance in the handgrip test (isometric strength was 39.2% and was associated with illiteracy, underweight, and cognitive deficit. Poor performance in the "chair stand" test (lower body strength/physical function was observed in 48.5% of the elderly and was more prevalent in men and among those who consumed more alcoholic drink/week. The results may be useful as indicators to public health surveillance, and to the development of prevention and intervention actions.

  13. Technology use by rural and urban oldest old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, James F.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Leahy, Marjorie; Hexem, Kari; Carlson, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Technologies designed to optimally maintain older people as they age in their desired places of residence are proliferating. An important step in designing and deploying such technologies is to determine the current use and familiarity with technology in general among older people. The goal of this study was to determine the extent that community-dwelling elderly at highest risk of losing independence, the oldest old, use common electronic devices found in residential urban or rural settings. Methods We surveyed 306 nondemented elderly age 85 or over; 144 were part of a rural aging study, the Klamath Exceptional Aging Project, and 181 were from an urban aging cohort in Portland. Results The most frequently used devices were televisions, microwave ovens, and answering machines. Persons with mild cognitive impairment were less likely to use all devices than those with no impairment. Higher socioeconomic status and education were associated with use of more complicated devices. Urban respondents were more likely than rural ones to use most devices. Conclusion Technology use by very old community-dwelling elderly is common. There are significant differences in use between rural and urban elderly. PMID:19478400

  14. Dementia in the oldest old: a multi-factorial and growing public health issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Raquel C; Valcour, Victor; Yaffe, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    The population of oldest old, or people aged 85 and older, is growing rapidly. A better understanding of dementia in this population is thus of increasing national and global importance. In this review, we describe the major epidemiological studies, prevalence, clinical presentation, neuropathological and imaging features, risk factors, and treatment of dementia in the oldest old. Prevalence estimates for dementia among those aged 85+ ranges from 18 to 38%. The most common clinical syndromes are Alzheimer's dementia, vascular dementia, and mixed dementia from multiple etiologies. The rate of progression appears to be slower than in the younger old. Single neuropathological entities such as Alzheimer's dementia and Lewy body pathology appear to have declining relevance to cognitive decline, while mixed pathology with Alzheimer's disease, vascular disease (especially cortical microinfarcts), and hippocampal sclerosis appear to have increasing relevance. Neuroimaging data are sparse. Risk factors for dementia in the oldest old include a low level of education, poor mid-life general health, low level of physical activity, depression, and delirium, whereas apolipoprotein E genotype, late-life hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and elevated peripheral inflammatory markers appear to have less relevance. Treatment approaches require further study, but the oldest old may be more prone to negative side effects compared with younger patients and targeted therapies may be less efficacious since single pathologies are less frequent. We also highlight the limitations and challenges of research in this area, including the difficulty of defining functional decline, a necessary component for a dementia diagnosis, the lack of normative neuropsychological data, and other shortcomings inherent in existing diagnostic criteria. In summary, our understanding of dementia in the oldest old has advanced dramatically in recent years, but more research is needed, particularly among varied racial

  15. A Population-based study of dementia in the oldest old: the Monzino 80-plus Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasina Luca

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite being the fastest growing and the most cognitively impaired age group, the oldest olds are under-represented in clinical research. The purpose of this study was to describe the design, methods, and baseline characteristics of the survey population and investigate possible differences in demographic, cognitive, functional, and behavioral characteristics between oldest old with and without any performance on cognitive tests and between oldest old alive and those deceased prior to the interview. Methods The Monzino 80-plus Study is a prospective door-to-door population-based survey among 80 years or older residents in the municipalities in the province of Varese, Italy. Dementia cases were identified with a one-phase design. Trained psychologists interviewed both the subject and a proxy informant. The interview included a comprehensive standardized questionnaire together with an array of rating scales and a multidomain cognitive battery to assess cognitive and functional ability, behavioral disturbances and mood. Results Information was available for 2,139 of the 2,428 registered individuals aged 80 years or older. Main baseline characteristics of the population are reported and discussed. In comparison with those living, elderly persons who had died before the first visit were older, had twice the rate of institutionalization, poorer cognitive performance and competence, and significantly greater instrumental and basic functional disability. The percentage of elderly persons, alive at baseline, without Mini-Mental State Examination rose rather evenly with age. Moreover, they had significantly worse cognitive competence and functional ability, and reported higher prevalences of depressive symptoms and problem behaviors than those with Mini-Mental State Examination. Conclusions Prospective investigation of a large population of oldest old can contribute significantly to understanding the relations between age, cognitive

  16. Loss of partner and suicide risks among oldest old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Jeune, Bernard; Bille-Brahe, Unni

    2004-01-01

    the impact that loss of a partner has on the suicide risks of the oldest old (80+) compared to younger age groups. SUBJECTS: the entire Danish population aged 50 during 1994-1998 (n = 1,978,527). METHODS: we applied survival analysis to calculate the changes in relative risk of suicide after a loss by using...

  17. What matters for life satisfaction among the oldest-old? Evidence from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Nai Peng; Asadullah, M. Niaz

    2017-01-01

    Objective The world population is aging rapidly and the well-being of older people is of great interest. Therefore, this study investigates the determinants of life satisfaction among the oldest-old (i.e. individuals aged 80 or over) in China. Materials and methods We use the 2011/2012 Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey data (n = 6530) for this paper. Logistic regression is used to analyse the effects of socio-demographic, economic, health, instrumental activities of daily living, family and community factors on life satisfaction and depression among the oldest-old in China. Results Our analysis confirms the significance of many factors affecting life satisfaction among the oldest-old in China. Factors that are correlated with life satisfaction include respondent’s sex, education, place of residence, self-rated health status, cognitive ability (using mini mental state examination), regular physical examination, perceived relative economic status, access to social security provisions, commercialized insurances, living arrangements, and number of social services available in the community (p<0.05 for all these variables). Although life satisfaction is negatively associated with instrumental activities of daily living (β = -0.068, 95%CI = -.093—.043), and depression (β = -0.463, 95%CI = -.644—.282), the overall effect of self-rated health status is positive (p<0.001). This confirms the primacy of health as the determinant of well-being among the oldest-old. Conclusions Majority of the oldest-old in China rated their life satisfaction as good or very good. Our findings show that health and economic status are by far the most significant predictors of life satisfaction. Our finding on the primacy of health and relative income as determinants of well-being among the oldest-old, and the greater influence of self-rated health status over objective health measures is consistent with the findings of many past studies. Our results suggest that efforts

  18. Engaging the oldest old in research: lessons from the Newcastle 85+ study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Those aged 85 and over, the oldest old, are now the fastest growing sector of the population. Information on their health is essential to inform future planning; however, there is a paucity of up-to-date information on the oldest old, who are often excluded from research. The aim of the Newcastle 85+ Study is to investigate the health of a cohort of 85-year-olds from a biological, medical and psychosocial perspective. This paper describes the methods employed for the successful recruitment, retention and evaluation of this cohort. Methods Participants were all individuals born in 1921 and registered with a participating general practice in Newcastle and North Tyneside, UK. Involvement comprised detailed health assessments, by a nurse, in their usual place of residence and/or review of their general practice medical records. Results Of the 1453 individuals eligible to participate, 72% (n = 1042) were recruited; 59% (n = 851) consented to both health assessment and review of general practice records. Key factors for successful involvement included protected time to engage with family and other key gatekeepers, minimising participant burden, through for example home based assessment, and flexibility of approach. Cognitive impairment is a significant issue; due consideration should be given to the ethical and legal issues of capacity and consent. Interim withdrawal rates at phase 2 (18 month post baseline), show 88 out of 854 participants (10%) had withdrawn with approval for continued use of data and materials and a further 2 participants (0.2%) had withdrawn and requested that all data be destroyed. Attrition due to death of participants within this same time frame was 135 (16%). Conclusion Our recruitment rates were good and compared favourably with other similar UK and international longitudinal studies of the oldest old. The challenges of and successful strategies for involving, recruiting and retaining the oldest old in research, including those in

  19. What matters for life satisfaction among the oldest-old? Evidence from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sor Tho; Tey, Nai Peng; Asadullah, M Niaz

    2017-01-01

    The world population is aging rapidly and the well-being of older people is of great interest. Therefore, this study investigates the determinants of life satisfaction among the oldest-old (i.e. individuals aged 80 or over) in China. We use the 2011/2012 Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey data (n = 6530) for this paper. Logistic regression is used to analyse the effects of socio-demographic, economic, health, instrumental activities of daily living, family and community factors on life satisfaction and depression among the oldest-old in China. Our analysis confirms the significance of many factors affecting life satisfaction among the oldest-old in China. Factors that are correlated with life satisfaction include respondent's sex, education, place of residence, self-rated health status, cognitive ability (using mini mental state examination), regular physical examination, perceived relative economic status, access to social security provisions, commercialized insurances, living arrangements, and number of social services available in the community (plife satisfaction is negatively associated with instrumental activities of daily living (β = -0.068, 95%CI = -.093-.043), and depression (β = -0.463, 95%CI = -.644-.282), the overall effect of self-rated health status is positive (plife satisfaction as good or very good. Our findings show that health and economic status are by far the most significant predictors of life satisfaction. Our finding on the primacy of health and relative income as determinants of well-being among the oldest-old, and the greater influence of self-rated health status over objective health measures is consistent with the findings of many past studies. Our results suggest that efforts should be directed at enhancing family support as well as health and social service provisions in the community to improve life satisfaction of older people.

  20. Engaging the oldest old in research: lessons from the Newcastle 85+ study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Karen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Those aged 85 and over, the oldest old, are now the fastest growing sector of the population. Information on their health is essential to inform future planning; however, there is a paucity of up-to-date information on the oldest old, who are often excluded from research. The aim of the Newcastle 85+ Study is to investigate the health of a cohort of 85-year-olds from a biological, medical and psychosocial perspective. This paper describes the methods employed for the successful recruitment, retention and evaluation of this cohort. Methods Participants were all individuals born in 1921 and registered with a participating general practice in Newcastle and North Tyneside, UK. Involvement comprised detailed health assessments, by a nurse, in their usual place of residence and/or review of their general practice medical records. Results Of the 1453 individuals eligible to participate, 72% (n = 1042 were recruited; 59% (n = 851 consented to both health assessment and review of general practice records. Key factors for successful involvement included protected time to engage with family and other key gatekeepers, minimising participant burden, through for example home based assessment, and flexibility of approach. Cognitive impairment is a significant issue; due consideration should be given to the ethical and legal issues of capacity and consent. Interim withdrawal rates at phase 2 (18 month post baseline, show 88 out of 854 participants (10% had withdrawn with approval for continued use of data and materials and a further 2 participants (0.2% had withdrawn and requested that all data be destroyed. Attrition due to death of participants within this same time frame was 135 (16%. Conclusion Our recruitment rates were good and compared favourably with other similar UK and international longitudinal studies of the oldest old. The challenges of and successful strategies for involving, recruiting and retaining the oldest old in research

  1. Characteristics of the institutionalized and community-residing oldest-old in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Danan; Dupre, Matthew E; Liu, Guangya

    2007-02-01

    Existing research on the institutionalized population of older adults is primarily limited to Western countries. This study is the first to use nationally representative data to examine differences in the institutionalized and community-residing population of the oldest-old (ages 80+) in China. Using three waves of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) (1998, 2000, and 2002), we examine differences in sociodemographic characteristics, family caregiving resources, health practices, religious activity, chronic conditions, and mortality risk. The results indicate that the institutionalized oldest-old are younger, male, reside in urban areas, have lower family-care resources, and exhibit poorer health compared to those living in the community. We also find that the 2-year mortality risk for institutionalized elders is 1.35 times greater than for those residing in the community. However, the mortality differential is eliminated once the sociodemographic, family caregiving, and health characteristics of the oldest-old are taken into account. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Motivators and barriers for physical activity in the oldest old: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Veerle; Gorus, Ellen; Mets, Tony; Geerts, Christel; Bautmans, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    Worldwide, people engage insufficiently in physical activity, particularly subjects aged 80 years and over. For optimal life-style campaigns, knowledge of motivators and barriers for physical activity is mandatory. Given their specific needs, it is conceivable that these would be different for the oldest old compared to younger subjects. Pubmed, Web of Science and Psychinfo were systematically screened for articles reporting motivators and barriers for physical activity. Papers were excluded if data regarding elderly aged >79 years were absent. Forty-four relevant articles were included, involving a total of 28,583 subjects. Sixty one motivators and 59 barriers for physical activity in the elderly were identified, including those who are relevant for persons aged 80 years and over. Based on the results of our literature review, we recommend that when promoting physical activity in the oldest old, special attention is paid to the health benefits of physical activity, to the subject's fears, individual preferences and social support, and to constraints related to the physical environment. However, no studies were found exclusively describing people aged 80 years and over, and future research is necessary to differentiate the barriers or motivators that are specific for the oldest old from those of younger elderly.

  3. Economic Stress, Quality of Life, and Mortality for the Oldest-Old in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, W. Jean; Xu, Zhenhua

    2012-01-01

    China's oldest old population is estimated to quadruple by 2050. Yet, poverty rate for the oldest old has been the highest among all age groups in China. This paper investigates the relationship between economic stress, quality of life, and mortality among the oldest-old in China. Both objective economic hardships and perceived economic strain are…

  4. Changes in loneliness among oldest-old Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Jane Kimm Lii; Tey, Nai Peng

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the changes in loneliness assessments among the oldest-old in China from 2008 to 2011, and its association with health and social support factors. Data came from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS), from two waves in 2008 and 2011. Descriptive statistics and multinomial logistic regression methods were used in the analyses. Percentage of respondents who needed institutional care and assistance in basic activities of daily living (BADLs) increased over the 3-year period. Over this period, self-reported health assessments reflected apparent waning health among the respondents, but there were no distinctive patterns in loneliness assessments. A slight majority reported worsened assessments in loneliness and self-reported health. Multinomial logistic regression results revealed that changes in physical limitations (resulting in the need for assistance) and health were highly associated and in tandem with the changes in loneliness. Living alone contributed to worsened levels of loneliness but living with household members did not improve the assessment of loneliness among the oldest-old. Those not married (majority widowed) were more likely to report improved assessments of loneliness, as compared to those who were currently married and living with their spouse.

  5. Polypharmacy in a Belgian cohort of community-dwelling oldest old (80+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Maarten; Elseviers, Monique; Vaes, Bert; Degryse, Jan; Dalleur, Olivia; Vander Stichele, Robert; Van Bortel, Luc; Azermai, Majda

    2016-06-01

    Polypharmacy is highly prevalent among older people (65+), but little is known on the medication use of the oldest old (80+). This study explores the medication use of the Belgian community-dwelling oldest old in relation to their demographic, clinical and functional characteristics. Baseline data was used from the BELFRAIL study; a prospective, observational population-based cohort of Belgian community-dwelling patients (80+). General practitioners recorded clinical problems and medications. Medications were coded by the Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical classification. Participants' (n = 503) mean age was 84.4 years (range 80-102) and 61.2% was female. Median chronic medication use was 5 (range 0-16). Polypharmacy (≥5 medications) was high (57.7%), with excessive polypharmacy (≥10 medications) in 9.1%. Most commonly used medication group were antithrombotics, but also benzodiazepines and antidepressants were frequently consumed. Demographics related to polypharmacy (univariate analysis) were female gender, low education and moderate alcohol use. Age, care dependency and cognitive impairment showed no association with polypharmacy. In multivariate analysis, the predominant association with polypharmacy was found for multimorbidity (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.5-2.1), followed by depression (OR 3.7, 95% CI 4.4-9.7) and physical activity (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.7-0.9). Polypharmacy was high among Belgian community-dwelling oldest old (80+). Determinants of polypharmacy were interrelated, but dominated by multimorbidity. On top of the burden of multimorbidity, polypharmacy was independently associated with less physical activity, and with depressive symptoms.

  6. Small vascular and Alzheimer disease-related pathologic determinants of dementia in the oldest-old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinka, Lidia; Kövari, Enikö; Gold, Gabriel; Hof, Patrick R; Herrmann, François R; Bouras, Constantin; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2010-12-01

    The relative contributions of Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular lesion burden to the occurrence of cognitive decline are more difficult to define in the oldest-old than they are in younger cohorts. To address this issue, we examined 93 prospectively documented autopsy cases from 90 to 103 years with various degrees of AD lesions, lacunes, and microvascular pathology. Cognitive assessment was performed prospectively using the Clinical Dementia Rating scale. Neuropathologic evaluation included the Braak neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) and β-amyloid (Aβ) protein deposition staging and bilateral semiquantitative assessment of vascular lesions. Statistics included regression models and receiver operating characteristic analyses. Braak NFTs, Aβ deposition, and cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) predicted 30% of Clinical Dementia Rating variability and 49% of the presence of dementia. Braak NFT and CMI thresholds yielded 0.82 sensitivity, 0.91 specificity, and 0.84 correct classification rates for dementia. Using these threshold values, we could distinguish 3 groups of demented cases and propose criteria for neuropathologic definition of mixed dementia, pure vascular dementia, and AD in very old age. Braak NFT staging and severity of CMI allow for defining most of demented cases in the oldest-old. Most importantly, single cutoff scores for these variables that could be used in the future to formulate neuropathologic criteria for mixed dementia in this age group were identified.

  7. Contributory factors for the functional independence of oldest old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dâmarys Kohlbeck de Melo Neu Ribeiro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To investigate the socioeconomic and clinical factors that contribute to the functional independence of the oldest old of a community. METHOD Cross-sectional quantitative study whose sample consisted of 214 elderly people registered in Basic Health Units. Data were collected through structured interviews and application of the Functional Independence Measure. We used descriptive statistics, and for association of the variables we used the Student t-test, ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons. RESULTS The significant variables that contributed to the functional independence were remaining economically active, practicing physical and leisure activities, having a social life, eating fruits, vegetables and meat. The orientation to conduct these practices reduces the demand for care and help needed in everyday activities. CONCLUSION Maintaining independence is primordial to delay disability and presents itself as an excellent field of work for nursing.

  8. Personality Change in the Oldest-Old: Is It a Matter of Compromised Health and Functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Anne Ingeborg; Johansson, Boo

    2014-02-01

    The present longitudinal study investigates continuity and change in the personality dimensions of extraversion and neuroticism among the oldest-old. Overall disease load, self-rated health, functional capacity, impaired vision and hearing, self-reported cognitive impairment, and measured cognitive status were tested for their role as potentially relevant late-life predictors of personality change. The sample consists of 408 individuals aged 80-98 in the Swedish OCTO-Twin Study who completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory at four measurement occasions during a 6-year period. Growth curve analyses revealed an age-related linear decrease in extraversion and stability in neuroticism. More extraverted individuals were more educated and perceived their health and cognition as better. Notably, only hearing impairment was found to be related to a steeper age-related decline in extraversion. A life span developmental model focusing on health-related changes can improve our understanding of personality change in late life.

  9. Lifetime according to health status among the oldest olds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Petersen, Inge; Jeune, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: policy makers face increasing demands for care of the aged and therefore need more information about the health status of very old people. The purpose of this study was to quantify the average lifetime according to health status among the oldest olds in Denmark. METHODS: the 2......,258 participants (63% of all survivors) in the 1905 Danish cohort survey were interviewed in 1998 and re-assessed in 2000, 2003 and 2005. Lifetime according to self-rated health status, physical independence and being cognitively intact was estimated. Physical independence was defined as the ability to get up from....... The lifetime in physical independence was 2.0 years for men and 2.4 years for women, and both men and women spent an average of 1.1 years in a state of physical independence without cognitive impairment. CONCLUSION: even at ages 92-93, a substantial proportion of the remaining lifetime is spent in reasonably...

  10. Modeling the oldest old: personas to design technology-based solutions for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Blaine; Zaslavksy, Oleg; Wilamowska, Katarzyna M; Demiris, George; Thompson, Hilaire J

    2011-01-01

    There is a recognized need to develop information technology for the delivery of care services to older adults. However, little attention has been paid to the design of information technology for the oldest old demographic. We made novel use of data from observations, focus groups and cluster analysis of oldest old participant characteristics from a pilot study in a community setting to iteratively construct personas for the design of information technology for the oldest old. The resulting two personas, "Hazel" and "Rose", capture different abilities of members of the oldest old demographic group. In addition, we provide a list of eleven design recommendations to guide the design of technology that supports the abilities of people like Hazel and Rose. The resulting personas, design recommendations and persona construction method can be useful tools for informaticians and designers of new systems for the oldest old.

  11. Association study of FOXO3A SNPs and aging phenotypes in Danish oldest-old individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soerensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne; Dato, Serena; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2015-02-01

    FOXO3A variation has repeatedly been reported to associate with human longevity, yet only few studies have investigated whether FOXO3A variation also associates with aging-related traits. Here, we investigate the association of 15 FOXO3A tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1088 oldest-old Danes (age 92-93) with 4 phenotypes known to predict their survival: cognitive function, hand grip strength, activity of daily living (ADL), and self-rated health. Based on previous studies in humans and foxo animal models, we also explore self-reported diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and bone (femur/spine/hip/wrist) fracture. Gene-based testing revealed significant associations of FOXO3A variation with ADL (P = 0.044) and bone fracture (P = 0.006). The single-SNP statistics behind the gene-based analysis indicated increased ADL (decreased disability) and reduced bone fracture risk for carriers of the minor alleles of 8 and 10 SNPs, respectively. These positive directions of effects are in agreement with the positive effects on longevity previously reported for these SNPs. However, when correcting for the test of 9 phenotypes by Bonferroni correction, bone fracture showed borderline significance (P = 0.054), while ADL did not (P = 0.396). Although the single-SNP associations did not formally replicate in another study population of oldest-old Danes (n = 1279, age 94-100), the estimates were of similar direction of effect as observed in the Discovery sample. A pooled analysis of both study populations displayed similar or decreased sized P-values for most associations, hereby supporting the initial findings. Nevertheless, confirmation in additional study populations is needed.

  12. Association study of FOXO3ASNPs and aging phenotypes in Danish oldest-old individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soerensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne; Dato, Serena; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    FOXO3Avariation has repeatedly been reported to associate with human longevity, yet only few studies have investigated whether FOXO3Avariation also associates with aging-related traits. Here, we investigate the association of 15 FOXO3Atagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1088 oldest-old Danes (age 92–93) with 4 phenotypes known to predict their survival: cognitive function, hand grip strength, activity of daily living (ADL), and self-rated health. Based on previous studies in humans and foxo animal models, we also explore self-reported diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and bone (femur/spine/hip/wrist) fracture. Gene-based testing revealed significant associations of FOXO3Avariation with ADL (P = 0.044) and bone fracture (P = 0.006). The single-SNP statistics behind the gene-based analysis indicated increased ADL (decreased disability) and reduced bone fracture risk for carriers of the minor alleles of 8 and 10 SNPs, respectively. These positive directions of effects are in agreement with the positive effects on longevity previously reported for these SNPs. However, when correcting for the test of 9 phenotypes by Bonferroni correction, bone fracture showed borderline significance (P = 0.054), while ADL did not (P = 0.396). Although the single-SNP associations did not formally replicate in another study population of oldest-old Danes (n = 1279, age 94–100), the estimates were of similar direction of effect as observed in the Discovery sample. A pooled analysis of both study populations displayed similar or decreased sized P-values for most associations, hereby supporting the initial findings. Nevertheless, confirmation in additional study populations is needed. PMID:25470651

  13. No Association between Variation in Longevity Candidate Genes and Aging-related Phenotypes in Oldest-old Danes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soerensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne; Debrabant, Birgit; Mengel-From, Jonas; Dato, Serena; Thinggaard, Mikael; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2016-06-01

    In this study we explored the association between aging-related phenotypes previously reported to predict survival in old age and variation in 77 genes from the DNA repair pathway, 32 genes from the growth hormone 1/ insulin-like growth factor 1/insulin (GH/IGF-1/INS) signalling pathway and 16 additional genes repeatedly considered as candidates for human longevity: APOE, APOA4, APOC3, ACE, CETP, HFE, IL6, IL6R, MTHFR, TGFB1, SIRTs 1, 3, 6; and HSPAs 1A, 1L, 14. Altogether, 1,049 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 1,088 oldest-old (age 92-93 years) Danes and analysed with phenotype data on physical functioning (hand grip strength), cognitive functioning (mini mental state examination and a cognitive composite score), activity of daily living and self-rated health. Five SNPs showed association to one of the phenotypes; however, none of these SNPs were associated with a change in the relevant phenotype over time (7 years of follow-up) and none of the SNPs could be confirmed in a replication sample of 1,281 oldest-old Danes (age 94-100). Hence, our study does not support association between common variation in the investigated longevity candidate genes and aging-related phenotypes consistently shown to predict survival. It is possible that larger sample sizes are needed to robustly reveal associations with small effect sizes.

  14. What doctors need to know: Prescribing or not for the oldest old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydd, Angela; Fleming, Anne

    2016-08-01

    Given the global increase in the number of people over the age of 85, there is a growing body of work concerning this group, termed the oldest old. Much of this work is confined to the literature specialising in geriatrics and the more generic health care papers refer to 'older people' with little definition of what is meant by 'older'. Iatrogenesis (ill health caused by doctors) is a major issue and general practitioners (GPs) need practical help in prescribing for the oldest old. This paper presents a narrative review of the literature on prescribing and the oldest old. The results showed that all papers sourced referred to prescribing for the 'old' as those aged over 65, with only scant mention of oldest old. Yet prescribing for the oldest old involves clinical judgement and knowledge of the patient. It includes weighing up what will do good, cause no harm and is acceptable to the individual. GPs have to make treatment choices mostly in isolation from colleagues, during time-limited consultations and with few relevant guidelines on managing multi-morbidities in the oldest old. A major issue in prescribing for people over the age of 85 is that guidelines for diseases are based on trials with younger adults, outline the best practice for one disease in isolation (i.e. not in the presence of other diseases) and take little account of the interactions between the drugs used in managing several diseases in frail older people. There is a growing body of work, however, calling for specialist services for the oldest old.

  15. Ambulance Transport of the Oldest Old in Tokyo: A Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Yasuharu; Abe, Toshikazu; Ishimatsu, Shinichi; Hinohara, Shigeaki

    2010-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated ambulance utilization in people aged 85 years or older, ie, the oldest old. Methods We conducted a 1-year population-based observational study of patients transported by ambulance to emergency departments in Tokyo, Japan, which has a population of about 12 million. Demographic data, symptoms/events associated with ambulance transport, and the proportion of hospital admissions were recorded. Transport rates by age and sex were calculated using data for the background population and ambulance transports, and the 10 most frequent symptoms/events requiring transport were compared between the oldest old and those aged 65 to 84 years. Results Of the 642 764 patients who were transported to hospitals by ambulances, 59 570 (9%) were aged ≥85 years; 64% were women. The annual ambulance transport rate for this population was 250 per 1000/year and was significantly greater than the rate (90 per 1000/year) for those aged 65 to 84 years. The highest rate was for men aged 85 to 99 years (292 per 1000/year). Among the oldest old, the most frequent reason for ambulance transport was fall (38.5 per 1000/year), and the symptom most likely to result in hospital admission was dyspnea. Conclusions The ambulance transport rate for the oldest old was high, particularly among men aged ≥95 years. To reduce the need for ambulance transport among the oldest old, preventive care is needed to reduce falls and acute exacerbations of cardiac and respiratory disorders. PMID:20814165

  16. Personality, life events and coping in the oldest-old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P; Poon, L W; Clayton, G M; Lee, H S; Fulks, J S; Johnson, M A

    1992-01-01

    This paper compares older adults in their sixties, eighties, and 100s on personality, experience of life events, and coping. A secondary goal was to test a structural model of adaptation. Participants (165) filled out a personality inventory, life-event lists, and coping and mental health measures. Results revealed differences in personality: centenarians scored higher on dominance, suspiciousness, and imagination. While centenarians scored lower on active behavioral coping than other age groups, they used cognitive strategies when coping with health and family events. Results from the structural equation model indicated that extraversion and anxiety predicted morale and mental health.

  17. Perceptions by the oldest old of successful aging, Vitality 90+ Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosraty, Lily; Jylhä, Marja; Raittila, Taina; Lumme-Sandt, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    To discover how 90-91-year-olds see a good old age and identify the dimensions of good and successful aging that appear in their talk. Life-story interviews with 45 community-dwelling nonagenarians (25 women and 20 men), conducted in the context of the Vitality 90+ Study. In the interviews the respondents were asked to give their opinions about a good old age and its constituents. The answers were subjected to thematic analysis with an inductive approach. The dimensions identified in most popular theories of successful aging, such as the physical, the cognitive, the psychological and social functioning, were also found in our study. But we were also able to identify new themes that have rarely been mentioned in previous studies of successful aging. These themes were "living circumstances", emphasizing the importance of having one's own home and living there as long as possible, "independence" in relation to various aspects of life and a "good death". The respondents saw themselves as having a good old age. Definitions of a good old age provided by the oldest old themselves give new insights into the concept of successful aging. Good health is important, but more in the sense of being pain-free than of being disease-free. Social and cognitive aspects seem to be more important than physical health. The important things for our nonagenarian respondents were to continue living independently, preferably in their own homes, and to have a quick and easy death rather than being institutionalized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Trust in health information sources differs between young/middle and oldest old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thai; Chaudhuri, Shomir; White, Cathy; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Examine differences in trust of health information sources between the oldest old and young/middle old. Cross-sectional survey using convenience sampling. Eleven retirement communities. Older adults ≥65 years (N = 353). Self-rated trust in health information sources. Mann-Whitney U-test or Fisher exact test to compare trust between age groups; multinomial ordered logistic regression analyses to model trust in Internet information sources. The overall survey response rate was 26.6%. Differences in trust were identified between oldest old (n = 108) and young/middle old (n = 245) for pharmacist (p sources. In the oldest old, we found associations between levels of trust in Internet sources and frequency of Internet use (β = 4.13, p inform the design of resources to support the information-seeking process. When planning widespread distribution of health information to these distinct groups, program developers need to consider these differences.

  19. Motor Unit Changes Seen With Skeletal Muscle Sarcopenia in Oldest Old Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Theodore A.; van der Meulen, Jack H.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Kuzon, William M.; Faulkner, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia leads to many changes in skeletal muscle that contribute to atrophy, force deficits, and subsequent frailty. The purpose of this study was to characterize motor unit remodeling related to sarcopenia seen in extreme old age. Whole extensor digitorum longus muscle and motor unit contractile properties were measured in 19 adult (11–13 months) and 12 oldest old (36–37 months) Brown-Norway rats. Compared with adults, oldest old rats had significantly fewer motor units per muscle, smaller muscle cross-sectional area, and lower muscle specific force. However, mean motor unit force generation was similar between the two groups due to an increase in innervation ratio by the oldest old rats. These findings suggest that even in extreme old age both fast- and slow-twitch motor units maintain the ability to undergo motor unit remodeling that offsets some effects of sarcopenia. PMID:24077596

  20. Impact of Vitamin D Receptor VDR rs2228570 Polymorphism in Oldest Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Glocke

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcitriol, a key player in the regulation of mineral metabolism, influences, directly or by increasing plasma Ca2+ and phosphate levels, a multitude of physiological functions, such as bone mineralization, cell proliferation, immune response, carbohydrate metabolism, blood pressure, platelet reactivity, gastric acid secretion, cognitive function and mood. Calcitriol is mainly effective by stimulation of the Vitamin D receptor VDR. The responsiveness of VDR may be affected by gene variants, such as the FokI polymorphism (rs2228570. The GG gene variant is expected to be more active than the GA or AA gene variant. The present study explored the impact of VDR rs2228570 on survival and health of oldest old individuals (> 90 years. Methods: 101 individuals > 90 years were examined and genotyped. As a result, the prevalence of GG, GA & AA was 36 (10 ♂, 26♀, 52 (24 ♂, 28♀ and 13 (4 ♂, 9♀, respectively, a prevalence not significantly different from the frequency in public available dbSNP and a population (n = 208 of young volunteers (average age 49 years. Results: As compared to carriers of GG, carriers of AA and/or GA displayed significantly (p lower diastolic blood pressure (significant only in ♂, higher instrumental activity of daily life (IADL score and more frequent hospital visits (significant only in ♂, significantly lower prevalence of depression (significant in ♀+♂, renal disease (significant only in ♀, allergy, peptic ulcer and urolithiasis (significant only in ♂, as well as significantly higher prevalence of transitoric ischemic attacks. In a younger population a German version of the NEO-FFI, allowing reliable and valid assessment of personality, revealed decreased neuroticism (significant only in ♂ and increased extraversion in AA carriers. Conclusion: The Vitamin D receptor gene variant VDR rs2228570 has only little impact on life span but may affect a variety of pathophysiologically relevant functions

  1. Predictive factors of urinary tract infections among the oldest old in the general population. a population-based prospective follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cools Herman JM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infections (UTI are common among the oldest old and may lead to a few days of illness, delirium or even to death. We studied the incidence and predictive factors of UTI among the oldest old in the general population. Methods The Leiden 85-plus Study is a population-based prospective follow-up study of 86-year-old subjects in Leiden, The Netherlands. Information on the diagnosis of UTI was obtained annually during four years of follow-up from the medical records and interviews of treating physicians. A total of 157 men and 322 women aged 86 years participated in the study. Possible predictive factors were collected at baseline, including history of UTI between the age of 85 and 86 years, aspects of functioning (cognitive impairment (Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE 4, disability in activities of daily living (ADL, and co-morbidities. Results The incidence of UTI from age 86 through 90 years was 11.2 (95% confidence interval (CI 9.4, 13.1 per 100 person-years at risk. Multivariate analysis showed that history of UTI between the age of 85 and 86 years (hazard ratio (HR 3.4 (95% CI 2.4, 5.0, impaired cognitive function (HR 1.9 (95% CI 1.3, 2.9, disability in daily living (HR 1.7 (95% CI 1.1, 2.5 and urine incontinence (HR 1.5 (95% CI 1.0, 2.1 were independent predictors of an increased incidence of UTI from age 86 onwards. Conclusions Within the oldest old, a history of UTI between the age of 85 and 86 years, cognitive impairment, ADL disability and urine incontinence are independent predictors of developing UTI. These predictive factors could be used to target preventive measures to the oldest old at high risk of UTI.

  2. Ageing, Health and Life Satisfaction of the Oldest Old: An Analysis for Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    This analysis uses data from the German Socio-Economic Panel and the Survey on Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe to assess the effect of ageing and health on the life satisfaction of the oldest old (defined as 75 and older). We observe a U-shaped relationship between age and levels of life satisfaction for individuals aged between 16 and 65.…

  3. Age Differences in Loneliness from Late Adolescence to Oldest Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Maike; Hawkley, Louise C.

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to common stereotypes, loneliness is not restricted to old age but can occur at any life stage. In this study, we used data from a large, nationally representative German study (N = 16,132) to describe and explain age differences in loneliness from late adolescence to oldest old age. The age distribution of loneliness followed a complex…

  4. The Old and the Oldest-old: Do They Have Different Perspectives on Adjustment to Aging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia von Humboldt

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: The outcomes presented in this paper stressed the varied perspectives concerning AtA, contoured in two different models, and the need of considering these when designing and implementing programs in health care for the old and the oldest-old.

  5. Household Context and Subjective Well-Being among the Oldest Old in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feinian; Short, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of household context to subjective well-being among the oldest old (aged 80 years and older) in China. Using data from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey, the authors find that living arrangements have strong implications for elderly emotional health. First, living alone is associated with…

  6. A Population-Based Study of Cholesterol Measurements in the Oldest Old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gils, Charlotte; Christensen, Kaare; Nybo, Mads

    2015-01-01

    old has not been described on a population basis. Therefore, the number of lipid measurements in the period 2002-2012 was evaluated for people aged 85+ years. METHODS: The Laboratory Information System and the Population Register at Statistics Denmark were used for retrieving data on people aged 85....... CONCLUSION: Despite the uncertainty regarding lipid-lowering treatment in the oldest old, the percentage of people having a cholesterol measurement increased significantly during the study period. Whether this increase in cholesterol measurements leads to increased prescription of lipid-lowering medication......BACKGROUND: Effect of lipid-lowering treatment in the oldest old is a matter of debate as there is no unequivocal evidence of statins being beneficial among the oldest. The need for cholesterol measurements is therefore also questionable, but the frequency of cholesterol measurements in the oldest...

  7. [The social construction of the "oldest old" in a young-old society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrhein, L

    2013-01-01

    In gerontology and public discourse, old age is often described as a double reality--the potentials and resources of older people contrast with the deficits and burdens of the oldest old. The polarisation into a desired higher age and a feared old age mirrors society's treatment of age and ageing: everybody wants to get old, but nobody wants to be old. Very old age in a young-old society is defined as the "other" that deviates from the ideals of activity, productivity and youthfulness and thus acts as a cultural anti-model. Whereas higher age is conceived as the fulfilment of middle age, "real" age begins with high age. Based on a multilevel model of the social construction of age categories, this article depicts the institutional, cultural, interactive and individual production of the "oldest old".

  8. Increased alcohol use over the past 20 years among the oldest old in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelfve Susanne

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS - Increased alcohol consumption among old people, reported in many countries, will likely present a major challenge to public health and policy in the future. In Sweden, current knowledge about old people’s alcohol consumption is incomplete because of limited historical data and a dearth of nationally representative studies. We describe the frequency of alcohol consumption among the oldest old in Sweden over a 20-year period by sex, age, education, living situation, mobility and Activities of Daily Living. METHODS - We used repeated cross-sectional survey data from the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD, conducted in 1992, 2002 and 2011. The samples were nationally representative of the Swedish population aged 77+, with response rates of 95.4%, 84.4% and 86.2% (total n=2007. Self-reported consumption frequency was measured with the question “How often do you drink alcoholic beverages, such as wine, beer or spirits?” RESULTS - Frequency of alcohol consumption increased among the oldest old from 1992 to 2011. The proportion reporting no or less-than-monthly alcohol consumption decreased, whereas the proportion reporting weekly consumption increased. This was true for men, women and most age and educational groups. The period change in consumption frequency was not explained by changes in demographic factors, living situation or functional capacity during the study period. CONCLUSIONS - Alcohol use increased among the oldest old in Sweden during the 20-year study period. More liberal attitudes toward alcohol could contribute to the increased use. The increase in weekly alcohol consumers suggests an increase in the number of older risk consumers.

  9. [Factors related to life satisfaction in young-old, old, and oldest-old women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Kae-Hwa; Lee, Hyun Ji

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of life satisfaction and the significant factors which impact on life satisfaction of young-old (60-69 yr), old (70-79 yr), and oldest-old (80 yr or above) women. The participants for this study were 289 elderly Korean women living in the city of Daegu and Kyongpook province. The data were collected using structured questionnaires. ANOVA, Chi-square, and multiple regression with the SPSS program were used to analyze the data. There were statistically significant differences among young-old, old, and oldest-old women regarding the existence of spouse, income, educational status, and religions. The model including variables related to physical, psychological, financial, and social aspects of life, explained variance of life satisfaction of elderly women differently, such as 55% of young-old, 37% of old, and 66% of oldest-old. Finally, self-esteem was the only predictor in explaining the level of life satisfaction among old women regardless age. Based on the findings of the study, implications for practical services for elderly women and recommendations of further study are provided. Nursing interventions should be developed to improve life satisfaction of elderly women according to age differences.

  10. Suicide in the oldest old: an observational study and cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyor, Mark; Tan, Lynnette Pei Lin; Schaffer, Ayal; Gallagher, Damien; Shulman, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The older population are at a high risk for suicide. This study sought to learn more about the characteristics of suicide in the oldest-old and to use a cluster analysis to determine if oldest-old suicide victims assort into clinically meaningful subgroups. Data were collected from a coroner's chart review of suicide victims in Toronto from 1998 to 2011. We compared two age groups (65-79 year olds, n = 335, and 80+ year olds, n = 191) and then conducted a hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis using Ward's method to identify distinct clusters in the 80+ group. The younger and older age groups differed according to marital status, living circumstances and pattern of stressors. The cluster analysis identified three distinct clusters in the 80+ group. Cluster 1 was the largest (n = 124) and included people who were either married or widowed who had significantly more depression and somewhat more medical health stressors. In contrast, cluster 2 (n = 50) comprised people who were almost all single and living alone with significantly less identified depression and slightly fewer medical health stressors. All members of cluster 3 (n = 17) lived in a retirement residence or nursing home, and this group had the highest rates of depression, dementia, other mental illness and past suicide attempts. This is the first study to use the cluster analysis technique to identify meaningful subgroups among suicide victims in the oldest-old. The results reveal different patterns of suicide in the older population that may be relevant for clinical care. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Periodontal disease in the oldest-old living in Kungsholmen, Sweden: findings from the KEOHS project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Russell, Stefanie Luise; Avlund, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: The Kungsholmen Elders Oral Health Study evaluated the oral health status of generally healthy, community-dwelling persons aged 80 years and over living in Stockholm, Sweden. This paper reports periodontal disease findings and evaluates the distribution by sociodemographic factors. METHODS......-analysis of the differences in proportion of participants with SP revealed that the difference by sex also increased by age. CONCLUSIONS: These findings document the substantial and ongoing impact of periodontal disease in a sample of generally healthy, community dwelling older adults and underscore the importance...... of continued periodontal disease prevention and treatment in the oldest-old....

  12. Food Habits, Lifestyle Factors and Mortality among Oldest Old Chinese: The Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS)

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    There are few studies reporting the association between lifestyle and mortality among the oldest old in developing countries. We examined the association between food habits, lifestyle factors and all-cause mortality in the oldest old (≥80 years) using data from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS). In 1998/99, 8959 participants aged 80 years and older took part in the baseline survey. Follow-up surveys were conducted every two to three years until 2011. Food habits were ...

  13. What factors affect life satisfaction (LS) among the oldest-old?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkvist, Asa; Ekström, Henrik; Elmståhl, Sölve

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined the association between LS in the oldest-old and not only health-related, but also psychological and socio-economical factors. The aim of this study was to examine LS in relation to functional capacity, locus of control (LoC) health status and other factors previously known to influence LS in the oldest-old. The study population consisted of 681 individuals aged 78-98 years, drawn from the longitudinal population study "Good Aging in Skåne" (GÅS), part of a national survey (SNAC) who fulfilled a questionnaire. In a regression model was shown that the number of symptoms, marital status, LoC, especially internal and powerful others, depressive mood and age significantly could predict life satisfaction three years later. Specific diagnoses like stroke, dementia and cardiac disease were not related to LS. Independence in physical functioning was related to unchanged LS, stratified for age and gender during a 3-year follow-up. The clinical implications of this study are that attention should be paid to recognizing and treating factors that affect LS and are reachable for medical intervention. Relieving symptoms and paying attention to personality factors that modify LS seem to be key-factors in the care of elderly.

  14. Nephroprevention in the oldest old with chronic kidney disease: Special considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Carlos G; Vilas, Manuel; Onuigbo, Macaulay

    2015-02-06

    Nephroprevention strategies are crucial for handling chronic kidney disease (CKD) complications, and slowing its progression. However, these preventative measures should be guided by major geriatrics principles in order to help nephrologists to adequately handle the oldest old with CKD. These geriatric concepts consist of taking into account the relevance of choosing an individualized therapy, handling clinical frailty, and keeping a geriatric perspective which means that a good quality of life is sometimes a more important therapeutic objective in octogenarians than merely prolonging life. Even though nephroprevention strategies for treating the oldest old with CKD are basically similar to those applied to younger patients such as low sodium and protein diet, optimized hemoglobin levels, blood pressure and metabolic control, the treating physician or care provider must at all times be ready to make fundamental adjustments and tweak patient care paradigms and objectives if and when the initial therapeutic options applied have caused unintended clinical consequences and complications. Additionally, the sarcopenia status should also be evaluated and treated in very old CKD patients.

  15. Trends in chronic diseases among the oldest-old in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Jane K. L.; Tey, Nai Peng

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the prevalence of several chronic diseases among the oldest-old in China. Data came from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) of 4 waves collected in 2002, 2005, 2008 and 2011, filtered to include individuals aged 80 and above. Bivariate and logistic regression methods were used in analyses. There were significant differences in the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, chronic heart diseases, stroke/cardiovascular diseases, cancer and dementia, which generally saw an increase across the 4 waves. By contrast, prevalence of Parkinson was not significantly different over the 4 waves. Logistic regression results revealed that since 2002, hypertension had been significantly higher in subsequent waves in 2005, 2008 and 2011. Stroke had also shown significant increase in the 2008 and 2011 waves. Other chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer, Parkinson and dementia were only found to be significantly higher in the recent 2011 wave compared to the initial wave in 2002. Arthritis, which initially increased in earlier waves, had dropped significantly in the recent 2011 wave. However, respiratory conditions had been significantly lower since the initial wave in 2002. Generally, findings confirmed the increasing trend of chronic morbidity in recent years among the oldest-old in China. Long life expectancy coupled with chronic morbidity in very late age will duly have societal and economic implications.

  16. Thrombolytic treatment in the oldest-old patient with acute ischemic stroke: an update on current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Maioli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ischemic stroke rises exponentially with age, with a steep increase in the age interval between 75 and 85 years. Thrombolytic therapy restores cerebral blood flow in patients with acute ischemic stroke of any etiology by using drugs that dissolve blood clots. Infusion for 1 h of alteplase at the dose of 0.9 mg/kg within 3 h of the start of the symptoms is associated to a 30% increase in the likelihood of gaining a favorable outcome with respect to placebo. There is strong evidence that selected patients with ischemic stroke may benefit from intravenous thrombolysis when treated within 3 h. The aim of the study was to evaluate available evidence for the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy in patients with ischemic stroke aged 80 years and over. Compared to younger stroke patients treated with thrombolytic therapy, those aged 80 years and over have higher acute mortality due to symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. However, functional outcome at six months is significantly better for over-80-year-olds than younger patients. There is a need for screening tools that take into account pre-stroke functional and cognitive status that are able to identify those over-80-year-old patients with ischemic stroke who can most benefit from thrombolytic treatment. Available evidence supports further recruitment of oldest-old patients into ongoing trials of thrombolysis.

  17. Advance directives and power of attorney for health care in the oldest-old - results of the AgeQualiDe study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Tobias; Rodriguez, Francisca S; Wiese, Birgitt; van der Leeden, Carolin; Heser, Kathrin; Bickel, Horst; In der Schmitten, Jürgen; Koenig, Hans-Helmut; Weyerer, Siegfried; Mamone, Silke; Mallon, Tina; Wagner, Michael; Weeg, Dagmar; Fuchs, Angela; Brettschneider, Christian; Werle, Jochen; Scherer, Martin; Maier, Wolfgang; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2017-04-13

    Completion of advance directives (ADs) and power of attorney (POA) documents may protect a person's autonomy in future health care situations when the individual lacks decisional capacity. As such situations become naturally much more common in old age, we specifically aimed at providing information on (i) the frequency of ADs/POA in oldest-old individuals and (ii) factors associated with having completed ADs/POA. We analyzed data of oldest-old primary care patients (85+ years; including community-dwelling and institutionalized individuals) within the German AgeQualiDe study. Patients were initially recruited via their general practitioners (GPs). We calculated frequencies of ADs and POA for health care with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and used multivariable logistic regression analysis to evaluate the association between having ADs and POA and participants' socio-demographic, cognitive, functional, and health-related characteristics. Among 868 GP patients participating in AgeQualiDe (response = 90.9%), n = 161 had dementia and n = 3 were too exhausted/ill to answer the questions. Out of the remaining 704 (81.1%) dementia-free patients (mean age = 88.7 years; SD = 3.0), 69.0% (95%-CI = 65.6-72.4) stated to having ADs and 64.6% (95%-CI = 61.1-68.2) to having a POA for health care. Individual characteristics did not explain much of the variability of the presence/absence of ADs and POA (regression models: Nagelkerke's R(2) = 0.034/0.051). The most frequently stated reasons for not having ADs were that the older adults trust their relatives or physicians to make the right decisions for them when necessary (stated by 59.4% and 44.8% of those without ADs). Among the older adults with ADs, the majority had received assistance in its preparation (79.0%), most frequently from their children/grandchildren (38.3%). Children/grandchildren were also the most frequently stated group of designated persons (76.7%) for those with a POA for health care. Our

  18. How to classify the oldest old according to their health status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cevenini, Elisa; Cotichini, Rodolfo; Stazi, Maria Antonietta

    2013-01-01

    The health status of the oldest old, the fastest increasing population segment worldwide, progressively becomes more heterogeneous, and this peculiarity represents a major obstacle to their classification. We compared the effectiveness of four previously proposed criteria (Franceschi et al., 2000......-funded project GEHA, followed for a six-year-survival. Main findings were: (i) "healthy" subjects varied within a large range, i.e. 5.2% (Gondo), 8.7% (Evert), 17.7% (Franceschi), and 28.5% (Andersen-Ranberg); (ii) Central Italy subjects showed better health than those from Northern and Southern Italy; (iii......) mortality risk was correlated with health status independently of geographical areas; and (iv) 90+ males, although fewer in number, were healthier than females, but with no survival advantage. In conclusion, we identified a modified version of Andersen-Ranberg criteria, based on the concomitant assessment...

  19. Genetic and environmental influences on self-reported reduced hearing in the old and oldest old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; Frederiksen, H; Hoffman, H J

    2001-01-01

    : The prevalence of self-reported reduced hearing corresponded to previous studies and showed the expected age and sex dependence. Concordance rates, odds ratios, and correlations were consistently higher for monozygotic twin pairs than for dizygotic twin pairs in all age and sex categories, indicating heritable......-reported reduced hearing in both men and women age 70 and older. Because self-reports of reduced hearing involve misclassification, this estimate of the genetic influence on hearing disabilities is probably conservative. Hence, genetic and environmental factors play a substantial role in reduced hearing among...... the old and oldest old. This suggests that clinical epidemiological studies of age-related hearing loss should include not only information on environmental exposures but also on family history of hearing loss and, if possible, biological samples for future studies of candidate genes for hearing loss....

  20. Super DNAging-New insights into DNA integrity, genome stability and telomeres in the oldest old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzke, Bernhard; Neubauer, Oliver; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Reductions in DNA integrity, genome stability, and telomere length are strongly associated with the aging process, age-related diseases as well as the age-related loss of muscle mass. However, in people reaching an age far beyond their statistical life expectancy the prevalence of diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes or dementia, is much lower compared to "averagely" aged humans. These inverse observations in nonagenarians (90-99 years), centenarians (100-109 years) and super-centenarians (110 years and older) require a closer look into dynamics underlying DNA damage within the oldest old of our society. Available data indicate improved DNA repair and antioxidant defense mechanisms in "super old" humans, which are comparable with much younger cohorts. Partly as a result of these enhanced endogenous repair and protective mechanisms, the oldest old humans appear to cope better with risk factors for DNA damage over their lifetime compared to subjects whose lifespan coincides with the statistical life expectancy. This model is supported by study results demonstrating superior chromosomal stability, telomere dynamics and DNA integrity in "successful agers". There is also compelling evidence suggesting that life-style related factors including regular physical activity, a well-balanced diet and minimized psycho-social stress can reduce DNA damage and improve chromosomal stability. The most conclusive picture that emerges from reviewing the literature is that reaching "super old" age appears to be primarily determined by hereditary/genetic factors, while a healthy lifestyle additionally contributes to achieving the individual maximum lifespan in humans. More research is required in this rapidly growing population of super old people. In particular, there is need for more comprehensive investigations including short- and long-term lifestyle interventions as well as investigations focusing on the mechanisms causing DNA damage, mutations, and telomere

  1. The clinical outcomes of oldest old patients with tuberculosis treated by regimens containing rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin HS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Huang-Shen Lin,1,2 Chun-Wen Cheng,3 Ming-Shyan Lin,4 Yen-Li Chou,5 Pey-Jium Chang,2 Jing-Chi Lin,6 Jung-Jr Ye3 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chia-Yi, 2Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, 4Division of Cardiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Yunlin, 5Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chia-Yi, 6Division of Allergy and Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chia-Yi, Taiwan Objectives: To investigate the clinical characteristics, adverse drug reactions, and outcomes of the oldest old patients (aged ≥80 years with tuberculosis (TB treated with rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide (RIP-containing regimens. Design: A retrospective chart review study. Setting: A 1,200-bed tertiary teaching hospital in southwest Taiwan. Participants: We conducted a retrospective observational study between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. Seven hundred adult patients (aged ≥18 years with TB treated with RIP-containing anti-TB regimens were reviewed, including 161 oldest old patients. Outcome measures: Clinical outcomes included clinical responsiveness and microbiological eradication. Adverse outcomes included drug-induced hepatitis, and other symptoms included gastrointestinal upset (eg, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, or dyspepsia, skin rash, joint pain, and hyperuricemia. Results: Compared with the non-oldest old adult patients, the oldest old patients more frequently had hepatitis (P=0.014, gastrointestinal upset (P=0.029, and unfavorable outcomes (P<0.001. In a multivariate analysis, hepatitis during treatment (adjusted odds ratio

  2. Prevalence of dementia in the oldest old: the Monzino 80-plus population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucca, Ugo; Tettamanti, Mauro; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Tiraboschi, Pietro; Landi, Cristina; Sacco, Leonardo; Garrì, Mariateresa; Ammesso, Sonia; Bertinotti, Chiara; Biotti, Anna; Gargantini, Elena; Piedicorcia, Alessandro; Nobili, Alessandro; Pasina, Luca; Franchi, Carlotta; Djade, Codjo Djignefa; Riva, Emma; Recchia, Angela

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological studies commonly include too few of the oldest old to provide accurate prevalence rates of dementia in older age groups. Estimates of the number of those affected, necessary for healthcare planning, are thus flawed. The objective is to estimate the prevalence of dementia and levels of dementia severity in a very large population of oldest old and to investigate the relation between age and dementia prevalence in the extreme ages. The Monzino 80-plus is a population-based study among residents 80 years or older in Varese province, Italy. Dementia cases were identified using a one-phase design. The survey was conducted in the participant's place of residence, whether home or institution. Both participants and informants were interviewed. Information was available for 2504 of the 2813 residents (89%). In all, 894 individuals (714 women and 180 men) met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (fourth edition) criteria for dementia, for a standardized prevalence of 25.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23.4, 27.2%), 28.5% (95% CI: 26.2, 30.9) in women and 18.6% (95% CI: 15.2, 21.9) in men. Age-specific prevalence estimates of dementia increased with age from 15.7% at age 80 to 84 years to 65.9% at age 100 years and higher. For women, prevalence continued to rise after age 100 years, from 64.8% at age 100 to 101 years to 76.1% at age 102 to 107 years. After age 85 years prevalence rates tended to rise linearly, on average 2.6% per year in women and 1.8% in men. About 80% of the cases were moderate or severe. The frequency of mild dementia decreased and that of severe dementia increased with age. One-quarter of 80-plus year olds are affected by dementia, mostly moderate or severe. Prevalence rates of dementia do not level off, but continue to rise gradually even in the extreme ages. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Why are the oldest old less generous? Explanations for the unexpected age-related drop in charitable giving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Wiepking (Pamala); R.N. James III (Russell)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractABSTRACT Previous research has demonstrated that the generally positive relationship between age and the presence of charitable giving becomes negative at the oldest ages. We investigate potential causes of this drop in charitable giving among the oldest old including changes in health,

  4. Sense of meaning in life among the oldest old people living in a rural area in northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsén, Elisabeth; Norberg, Astrid; Lundman, Berit

    2015-09-01

    Having meaning in life is important for all people, and according to Erikson's developmental theory, this is especially true for older adults. However, there are few studies about meaning in life focusing on the oldest old. The aim of our study was to illuminate the sense of meaning in life in the oldest old living in northern Sweden. The study has a qualitative explorative and interpretative design. We interviewed three men and seven women between 85 and 95 years old and analysed the interviews using qualitative content analysis. Our findings revealed the following four themes: 'Creating space for living', 'Living in connection with others and nature', 'Seeing oneself as a link between generations' and 'Having trust in God'. The sense of meaning in life in the oldest old was linked to regarding oneself as having a mission to carry out and to finding beauty, joy and happiness in life. The sense of meaning involved transferring to coming generations what earlier generations had left and having a deeply rooted faith in being taken care of from birth to the afterlife. When caring for the oldest old, it is important to take their experiences of sense of meaning in life into consideration and to focus on ways to maintain important sources of meaning in life. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. No Association between Variation in Longevity Candidate Genes and Aging-related Phenotypes in Oldest-old Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne; Debrabant, Birgit;

    2016-01-01

    additional genes repeatedly considered as candidates for human longevity: APOE, APOA4, APOC3, ACE, CETP, HFE, IL6, IL6R, MTHFR, TGFB1, SIRTs 1, 3, 6; and HSPAs 1A, 1L, 14. Altogether, 1,049 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 1,088 oldest-old (age 92-93 years) Danes and analysed...

  6. Proximity to death is associated with frequency of GP contacts in the oldest old: the Leiden 85-plus study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, J.W.; Lemmens, S.P.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.H.; Gussekloo, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: the relationship between proximity to death and the amount of care provided by general practitioners (GPs) is largely unknown. Objective: to examine the influence of the proximity to death on the frequency and length of GP contacts in the oldest old. Study design: this population-based f

  7. Lifestyle Factors and Dementia in the Oldest-old: The 90+ Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini-Hill, Annlia; Kawas, Claudia H; Corrada, Maria M

    2016-01-01

    Dementia incidence increases exponentially with age even in people aged 90 years and above. Because therapeutic regimens are limited, modification of lifestyle behaviors may offer the best means for disease control. To test the hypotheses that lifestyle factors are related to lower risk of dementia in the oldest-old, we analyzed data from The 90+ Study, a population-based longitudinal cohort study initiated in 2003. This analysis included 587 participants (mean age=93 y) seen in-person and determined not to have dementia at enrollment. Information on lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol, caffeine, vitamin supplements, exercise, and other activities) was obtained at enrollment and was available from data collected 20 years previously. After an average follow-up of 36 months, 268 participants were identified with incident dementia. No variable measured 20 years previously was associated with risk. Engagement in specific social/mental activities and intakes of antioxidant vitamin supplements and caffeine at time of enrollment were, associated with significantly reduced risks. When these variables were analyzed together, the HRs changed little and remained significant for reading (0.54, P=0.01) and going to church/synagogue (HR=0.66, Pdementia, participation in activities and caffeine and supplemental vitamin intake around age 90 warrant further investigation.

  8. Preditores cardiovasculares da mortalidade em idosos longevos Cardiovascular mortality predictors in the oldest old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Pedro Marafon

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é investigar a associação entre fatores de risco e morbidade cardiovascular com mortalidade em idosos longevos. Noventa e um por cento da população com idade ³ 80 anos (n = 193 de Veranópolis, Rio Grande do Sul, no ano de 1996, foram avaliados para a detecção de fatores de risco e morbidade cardiovascular. Acompanhou-se esta população durante 3 anos e registraram-se os casos de óbitos. Os dados foram analisados por análise univariada e multivariada por regressão logística. Ocorreram 41 (21% óbitos (20 homens e 21 mulheres. As mortes foram distribuídas ao longo do período estudado como se segue: 3 (7,3% no primeiro ano, 8 (19,5% no segundo ano e 30 (73,2% no terceiro ano. Observou-se associação significativa de óbito com as seguintes características: pressão arterial diastólica (PAD, colesterol total (CT, LDL-C, ApoA-I, acidente vascular encefálico prévio (AVC, bloqueio do ramo direito (BRD e hipertrofia ventricular esquerda (HVE ao ECG. Os sobreviventes apresentaram níveis mais elevados de PAD, CT, LDL-C e ApoA-I. AVC, BRD e HVE. A análise multivariada mostrou que as variáveis eram fatores de risco independentes. Os fatores de risco cardiovascular parecem atuar de forma diferenciada em longevos.This article investigates the association between cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the oldest old. In 1996, 91% of the population ³ 80 years of age from Veranópolis, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, were evaluated to detect cardiovascular risk factors and morbidity. The sample was followed up for three years, with the assessment of deaths. The analysis was done using univariate statistics and multivariate logistic regression analysis. There were 41 deaths (21%: 20 men and 21 women. Deaths were distributed by year as follow: 03 (7.3% in the first year, 08 (19.5% in the second, and 30 (73.2% in the third. There was a significant and independent association

  9. Food Habits, Lifestyle Factors and Mortality among Oldest Old Chinese: The Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zumin; Zhang, Tuohong; Byles, Julie; Martin, Sean; Avery, Jodie C; Taylor, Anne W

    2015-09-09

    There are few studies reporting the association between lifestyle and mortality among the oldest old in developing countries. We examined the association between food habits, lifestyle factors and all-cause mortality in the oldest old (≥80 years) using data from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS). In 1998/99, 8959 participants aged 80 years and older took part in the baseline survey. Follow-up surveys were conducted every two to three years until 2011. Food habits were assessed using an in-person interview. Deaths were ascertained from family members during follow-up. Cox and Laplace regression were used to assess the association between food habits, lifestyle factors and mortality risk. There were 6626 deaths during 31,926 person-years of follow-up. Type of staple food (rice or wheat) was not associated with mortality. Daily fruit and vegetable intake was inversely associated with a higher mortality risk (hazard ratios (HRs): 0.85 (95% CI (confidence interval) 0.77-0.92), and 0.74 (0.66-0.83) for daily intake of fruit and vegetables, respectively). There was a positive association between intake of salt-preserved vegetables and mortality risk (consumers had about 10% increase of HR for mortality). Fruit and vegetable consumption were inversely, while intake of salt-preserved vegetables positively, associated with mortality risk among the oldest old. Undertaking physical activity is beneficial for the prevention of premature death.

  10. Coexisting severe frailty and malnutrition predict mortality among the oldest old in nursing homes: A 1-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tomohiko; Takayama, Keita; Ishii, Hideaki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Eguchi, Katsuhiko; Nishida, Yuusuke

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of coexisting severe frailty and malnutrition with all-cause mortality among the oldest old in nursing homes. This study was conducted among all subjects (n=160) aged 85 years and older who lived in two nursing homes of Japan. Information about the health status of participants was gathered from history, medical documentation, test assessing frailty, according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging-Clinical Frailty Scale (CSHA-CFS) and the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form (MNA-SF). Seventy five residents (46.9%) were identified as affected by coexisting severe frailty and malnutrition. After a 12-month follow-up period, 42 (26.3%) residents died. In the Cox regression analysis, coexisting severe frailty and malnutrition, and heart failure were associated with mortality during the 12-month follow-up period among the oldest old nursing home residents (adjusted HR 10.89, 95% CI 4.04-29.33, pmalnutrition are very frequent, and coexisting severe frailty and malnutrition are associated with all-cause mortality among the oldest old in nursing homes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Food Habits, Lifestyle Factors and Mortality among Oldest Old Chinese: The Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zumin Shi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are few studies reporting the association between lifestyle and mortality among the oldest old in developing countries. We examined the association between food habits, lifestyle factors and all-cause mortality in the oldest old (≥80 years using data from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS. In 1998/99, 8959 participants aged 80 years and older took part in the baseline survey. Follow-up surveys were conducted every two to three years until 2011. Food habits were assessed using an in-person interview. Deaths were ascertained from family members during follow-up. Cox and Laplace regression were used to assess the association between food habits, lifestyle factors and mortality risk. There were 6626 deaths during 31,926 person-years of follow-up. Type of staple food (rice or wheat was not associated with mortality. Daily fruit and vegetable intake was inversely associated with a higher mortality risk (hazard ratios (HRs: 0.85 (95% CI (confidence interval 0.77–0.92, and 0.74 (0.66–0.83 for daily intake of fruit and vegetables, respectively. There was a positive association between intake of salt-preserved vegetables and mortality risk (consumers had about 10% increase of HR for mortality. Fruit and vegetable consumption were inversely, while intake of salt-preserved vegetables positively, associated with mortality risk among the oldest old. Undertaking physical activity is beneficial for the prevention of premature death.

  12. Delirium is a strong risk factor for dementia in the oldest-old: a population-based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz Terrera, Graciela; Keage, Hannah; Rahkonen, Terhi; Oinas, Minna; Matthews, Fiona E.; Cunningham, Colm; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Sulkava, Raimo; MacLullich, Alasdair M. J.; Brayne, Carol

    2012-01-01

    .1–3.5, P = 0.02), but in those with a history of delirium, there was no significant relationship (odds ratio 1.2, 95% confidence interval 0.2–6.7, P = 0.85). This trend for odds ratios to be closer to unity in the delirium and dementia group was observed for neuritic amyloid, apolipoprotein ε status, presence of infarcts, α-synucleinopathy and neuronal loss in substantia nigra. These findings are the first to demonstrate in a true population study that delirium is a strong risk factor for incident dementia and cognitive decline in the oldest-old. However, in this study, the relationship did not appear to be mediated by classical neuropathologies associated with dementia. PMID:22879644

  13. DIFFERENTIAL COGNITIVE ABILITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MACCOBY, ELEANOR E.; RAU, LUCY

    THE RELATIONSHIP OF PATTERNS OF COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND PERSONALITY TRAITS WERE INVESTIGATED IN THIS STUDY OF 6 GROUPS OF CHILDREN (120) IN GRADE 5. SCORES ON THE PRIMARY MENTAL ABILITIES TEST, IOWA ACHIEVEMENT TEST, AND CALIFORNIA TEST OF MENTAL MATURITY WERE USED AS MEASURES OF COGNITIVE PROCESSES. (JK)

  14. Information and Communication Technology Use Is Related to Higher Well-Being Among the Oldest-Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Tamara; Reed, Andrew E; Carr, Dawn C

    2017-09-01

    Older adults often prioritize socially meaningful goals over informational goals. Thus, we predicted that using information and communication technology (ICT) in service of socially meaningful versus informational goals relates to higher well-being among the oldest-old. We surveyed 445 adults aged 80+ (mean = 84, range = 80-93; 64% female; 26% non-White) online or via telephone. Participants reported motivations for ICT use (connect with others, learn new information) and rated their psychological and physical well-being (i.e., life satisfaction, loneliness, goal attainment, subjective health, functional limitations). We conducted regression and mediation analyses to test our hypothesis. Participants used ICT more to connect with friends/family (M = 3.66, SD = 1.28) than to learn information (M = 2.61, SD = 1.44), p informational motivations mediated the relationships between ICT use and physical well-being. Older adults aged 80+ use ICT less than other generations, but may have much to gain. Using social versus informational technologies may enhance multiple aspects of well-being in different ways during very late life. Highlighting such benefits may increase ICT adoption among the oldest-old.

  15. Social engagement and health in younger, older, and oldest-old adults in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Katie E; Walker, Erin Jackson; Brown, Jennifer Silva; Volaufova, Julia; LaMotte, Lynn R; Welsh, David A; Su, L Joseph; Jazwinski, S Michal; Ellis, Rebecca; Wood, Robert H; Frisard, Madlyn I

    2013-02-01

    Social support has been shown to influence health outcomes in later life. In this study, we focus on social engagement as an umbrella construct that covers select social behaviors in a life span sample that included oldest-old adults, a segment of the adult population for whom very little data currently exist. We examined relationships among social engagement, positive health behaviors, and physical health to provide new evidence that addresses gaps in the extant literature concerning social engagement and healthy aging in very old adults. Participants were younger (21-59 years), older (60-89 years), and oldest-old (90-97 years) adults (N = 364) in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS). Linear regression analyses indicated that age, gender, and hours spent outside of the house were significantly associated with self-reported health. The number of clubs and hours outside of home were more important factors in the analyses of objective health status than positive health behaviors, after considering age group and education level. These data strongly suggest that social engagement remains an important determinant of physical health into very late adulthood. The discussion focuses on practical applications of these results including social support interventions to maintain or improve late-life health.

  16. Association study of FOXO3A SNPs and aging phenotypes in Danish oldest-old individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne; Dato, Serena

    2015-01-01

    -old Danes (age 92-93) with 4 phenotypes known to predict their survival: cognitive function, hand grip strength, activity of daily living (ADL), and self-rated health. Based on previous studies in humans and foxo animal models, we also explore self-reported diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease......, osteoporosis, and bone (femur/spine/hip/wrist) fracture. Gene-based testing revealed significant associations of FOXO3A variation with ADL (P = 0.044) and bone fracture (P = 0.006). The single-SNP statistics behind the gene-based analysis indicated increased ADL (decreased disability) and reduced bone fracture...

  17. Functional neuroimaging indicators of successful executive control in the oldest old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosano, C; Aizenstein, H; Cochran, J; Saxton, J; De Kosky, S; Newman, A B; Kuller, L H; Lopez, O L; Carter, C S

    2005-12-01

    Attentional control, motor planning abilities, and executive cognitive functions (ECF) rapidly decline with age. In particular, older adults experience difficulty in manipulating selected motor responses in the presence of conflicting or distracting information. To examine age-related changes in the neural substrates of the attentional and motor planning components of ECF, we assessed the patterns of brain activation in 8 cognitively normal older adults (mean age 81.5) and 20 young individuals (mean age 23.0) while they responded to low and high loads of attentional demands of the Preparing to Overcome Prepotency (POP) task. In the POP task, the selection of one out of two possible motor responses in the presence of increasing attentional task loads determines the accuracy of the performance. Older individuals were slower than young adults (P Brodmann areas 7 and 40), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dLPFC: Brodmann areas 9, 45, and 46) bilaterally. Compared to young individuals, older adults had lower activation in dLPFC (Brodmann areas 9, 45, and 46: P = 0.007, P = 0.043, and P = 0.040) and Brodmann area 7, P = 0.002. Activation in Brodmann areas 40 and ACC was similar in the two groups (P > 0.05). Among older adults, the most successful performers were those who responded to increasing task loads with greater activation in PPC (Brodmann area 40), despite lower dLPFC activation. Older adults who are able to perform executive control tasks as well as young adults, also seem to implement speed-accuracy trade-off strategies which may rely on increased parietal activation.

  18. A possible link between exercise-training adaptation and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate- an oldest-old female study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jen Huang, Mu-Tsung Chen, Chin-Lung Fang, Wen-Chih Lee, Sun-Chin Yang, Chia-Hua Kuo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the association between the level of salivary dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S and the magnitude of adaptation to exercise training in insulin sensitivity for aged females. A group of 16 females, aged 80-93 years old, was divided into 2 groups according to their baseline DHEA-S levels: Lower Halves (N = 8 and Upper Halves (N = 8, and participated in a 4-month exercise intervention trial. Insulin response with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, cholesterol, blood pressure (BP, motor performance, and DHEA-S were determined at baseline and 4 months after the training program. Glucose tolerance and body mass index (BMI remained unchanged with training for both groups. Insulin, fasted cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure, reaction time, and locomotive function were significantly lowered by training only in the Upper Halves group. Changes in the area under curve of insulin (IAUC were negatively correlated with the baseline DHEA-S level (R= - 0.60, P < 0.05. The current study provides the first evidence that oldest-old subjects with low DHEA-S level appear to be poor responders to exercise-training adaptations.

  19. Sociodemographic and Lifestyle Statistics of Oldest Old People (>80 Years Living in Ikaria Island: The Ikaria Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are places around the world where people live longer and they are active past the age of 100 years, sharing common behavioral characteristics; these places (i.e., Sardinia in Italy, Okinawa in Japan, Loma Linda in California and Nicoya Peninsula in Costa Rica have been named the “Blue Zones”. Recently it was reported that people in Ikaria Island, Greece, have also one of the highest life expectancies in the world, and joined the “Blue Zones”. The aim of this work work was to evaluate various demographic, lifestyle and psychological characteristics of very old (>80 years people participated in Ikaria Study. Methods. During 2009, 1420 people (aged 30+ men and women from Ikaria Island, Greece, were voluntarily enrolled in the study. For this work, 89 males and 98 females over the age of 80 yrs were studied (13% of the sample. Socio-demographic, clinical, psychological and lifestyle characteristics were assessed using standard questionnaires and procedures. Results. A large proportion of the Ikaria Study's sample was over the age of 80; moreover, the percent of people over 90 were much higher than the European population average. The majority of the oldest old participants reported daily physical activities, healthy eating habits, avoidance of smoking, frequent socializing, mid-day naps and extremely low rates of depression. Conclusion. Modifiable risk factors, such as physical activity, diet, smoking cessation and mid-day naps, might depict the “secrets” of the long-livers; these findings suggest that the interaction of environmental, behavioral together with clinical characteristics may determine longevity. This concept must be further explored in order to understand how these factors relate and which are the most important in shaping prolonged life.

  20. Sociodemographic and lifestyle statistics of oldest old people (>80 years) living in ikaria island: the ikaria study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Chrysohoou, Christina; Siasos, Gerasimos; Zisimos, Konstantinos; Skoumas, John; Pitsavos, Christos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-02-24

    Background. There are places around the world where people live longer and they are active past the age of 100 years, sharing common behavioral characteristics; these places (i.e., Sardinia in Italy, Okinawa in Japan, Loma Linda in California and Nicoya Peninsula in Costa Rica) have been named the "Blue Zones". Recently it was reported that people in Ikaria Island, Greece, have also one of the highest life expectancies in the world, and joined the "Blue Zones". The aim of this work work was to evaluate various demographic, lifestyle and psychological characteristics of very old (>80 years) people participated in Ikaria Study. Methods. During 2009, 1420 people (aged 30+) men and women from Ikaria Island, Greece, were voluntarily enrolled in the study. For this work, 89 males and 98 females over the age of 80 yrs were studied (13% of the sample). Socio-demographic, clinical, psychological and lifestyle characteristics were assessed using standard questionnaires and procedures. Results. A large proportion of the Ikaria Study's sample was over the age of 80; moreover, the percent of people over 90 were much higher than the European population average. The majority of the oldest old participants reported daily physical activities, healthy eating habits, avoidance of smoking, frequent socializing, mid-day naps and extremely low rates of depression. Conclusion. Modifiable risk factors, such as physical activity, diet, smoking cessation and mid-day naps, might depict the "secrets" of the long-livers; these findings suggest that the interaction of environmental, behavioral together with clinical characteristics may determine longevity. This concept must be further explored in order to understand how these factors relate and which are the most important in shaping prolonged life.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in patients with atrophic age-related macular degeneration in oldest old Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, T Q; Guan, H J; Hu, J Y

    2015-12-21

    The aim of this study was to identify disease-associated loci in oldest old Han Chinese with atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This genome-wide association study (GWAS) only included oldest old (≥95 years old) subjects in Rugao County, China. Thirty atrophic AMD patients and 47 age-matched non-AMD controls were enrolled. The study subjects underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were scanned by Genome-Wide Human Mapping SNP 6.0 Arrays and GeneChip Scanner 3000 7G. The results were read and analyzed by the Affymetrix Genotyping Console software. We filtered out the SNPs with a no-call rate ≥10%, MAF P old Han Chinese population. This finding may lead to new strategies for screening of atrophic AMD for Han Chinese.

  2. Associations between functional ability and life satisfaction in the oldest old: results from the longitudinal population study Good Aging in Skåne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enkvist Å

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Åsa Enkvist, Henrik Ekström, Sölve ElmståhlDepartment of Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, SwedenObjectives: To describe change in functional ability in the oldest-old population during 3 years and examine its relation to life satisfaction (LS. A total of 681 individuals aged 78 and older from the population-based study Good Aging in Skåne took part.Methods: Functional ability was assessed using Sonn and Åsberg's Activities of Daily Living (ADL scale and related to LS assessed by Neugarten et al's Life Satisfaction Index A (LSI-A.Results: Fifty-one percent of 87–93-year-olds reported ADL decline during 3 years. Individuals reporting impaired ADL had a mean LSI-A value of 23.0 compared to 26.4 in those unchanged. ADL decline had a stronger negative effect on LS in the younger group (78–84 years, r = 0.207, P < 0.001. In a multiple regression model, one score's decline in ADL capacity corresponded to 1.5 scores lower LS (P < 0.001.Discussion: Effort put into keeping the oldest old on a high level of functional ability has the potential to maintain the LS of this population.Keywords: life satisfaction, functional ability, longitudinal, oldest old

  3. The effect of hospitalization with medical illnesses on the suicide risk in the oldest old: a population-based register study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Vach, Werner; Jeune, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of hospitalization with medical illnesses on the suicide risk in the oldest old (> or = 80) with that in the old (65-79) and middle-aged (52-64) using nationwide data. DESIGN: Event-history analysis using time-varying covariates based on prospective individual-le...... precedes suicide in the oldest old, hospitalization may play an important role in identification of suicidal ideation in older people.......OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of hospitalization with medical illnesses on the suicide risk in the oldest old (> or = 80) with that in the old (65-79) and middle-aged (52-64) using nationwide data. DESIGN: Event-history analysis using time-varying covariates based on prospective individual......-level register data. SETTING: Population-based record linkage. PARTICIPANTS: All persons aged 52 and older living in Denmark during 1996 to 1998 (N=1,684,205). MEASUREMENTS: The studied event is completed suicide. The following time-varying variables are included in the analysis: current age, hospitalization...

  4. The contributing risk factors, prevention and treatment of functional dependence among the oldest-old and elderly subjects%高龄与低龄老人失能影响因素及其防治重点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘殿荣; 谭纪萍; 郭雨禾; 叶光华; 朱林奇; 张军; 李英豪; 邓玉成; 王贵臣

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the risk factors on the functional dependence between the oldest-old and elderly veterans.Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among veterans (≥60 years of age) lived in 44 veterans' communities in Beijing.The socio-demographic information and history of noncommunicable chronic diseases were collected via face-to-face interviews,and the functional status was assessed by the 20-item version of the Activities of Daily Living Scale.Results The risk factors associated with increased hazard of the functional dependence in the oldest-old (≥ 80 years old) were cognitive impairment,extrapyramidal diseases,cerebral infarction,transient ischemic attack,sleep disorders,hypnotics,osteoarthrosis,hypertension and fall with the odds ratio (OR) of 1.241-2.962 (all P < 0.05).Stroke,depression,cognitive impairment,extrapyramidal diseases,sleep disorders,hypnotics,fall,cardiovascular diseases,osteoarthrosis and hearing loss were the risk factors for that in the elderly subjects (aged 60-79 years).The OR was 1.232-5.790 (all P < 0.05).However,avocational activities such as social activity,physical exercise,photography,reading and games,decreased the risk of functional dependence in both the oldest-old and elderly people.Conclusions Neuropsychiatric disorders are the leading causes contributed to the functional dependence among oldest-old and elderly population.Neurodegenerative diseases in the oldest-old,stroke and depression in elderly people should be the priorities in ameliorating disability.Healthy lifestyle and avocational activities could improve the functional status of the oldest-old and elderly population.%目的 探讨80岁及以上高龄人群与低龄老人失能的相关影响因素及其防治重点.方法 调查驻京部队干休所60岁及以上离退休干部人口学信息、生活方式和业余活动及各系统慢性病史,以“日常生活能力20项版本”评价是否存在功能依赖.结果 认知障碍、锥体外系

  5. Cognitive Differentiation in Intergroup Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Walter G.

    1977-01-01

    Black, Chicano, and Anglo students from segregated and integrated schools perceived their ethnic groups as being less differentiated than outgroups. Students in integrated schools perceived outgroups as somewhat less differentiated than students in segregated schools. Intergroup contact, except between highly dissimilar groups, was not an…

  6. The Tokyo Oldest Old Survey on Total Health (TOOTH: A longitudinal cohort study of multidimensional components of health and well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondo Yasuyuki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapid worldwide increase in the oldest old population, considerable concern has arisen about the social and economic burden of diseases and disability in this age group. Understanding of multidimensional structure of health and its life-course trajectory is an essential prerequisite for effective health care delivery. Therefore, we organized an interdisciplinary research team consisting of geriatricians, dentists, psychologists, sociologists, and epidemiologists to conduct a longitudinal observational study. Methods/Design For the Tokyo Oldest Old Survey on Total Health (TOOTH study, a random sample of inhabitants of the city of Tokyo, aged 85 years or older, was drawn from the basic city registry. The baseline comprehensive assessment consists of an in-home interview, a self-administered questionnaire, and a medical/dental examination. To perform a wide variety of biomedical measurements, including carotid ultrasonography and a detailed dental examination, participants were invited to our study center at Keio University Hospital. For those who were not able to visit the study center, we provided the option of a home-based examination, in which participants were simultaneously visited by a geriatrician and a dentist. Of 2875 eligible individuals, a total of 1152 people were recruited, of which 542 completed both the in-home interview and the medical/dental examination, with 442 completed the in-home interview only, and another 168 completed self or proxy-administered data collection only. Carotid ultrasonography was completed in 458 subjects, which was 99.6% of the clinic visitors (n = 460. Masticatory assessment using a colour-changeable chewing gum was completed in 421 subjects, a 91.5% of the clinic visitors. Discussion Our results demonstrated the feasibility of a new comprehensive study that incorporated non-invasive measurements of subclinical diseases and a detailed dental examination aiming at community

  7. 高龄老人代谢综合征的发病率及危险因素分析%Analysis of incidence rate and risk factors of metabolic syndrome in the oldest old

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林娟; 黄绍宽; 陈智超; 黄利红

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study incidence rate and risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MS) in the oldest old. Methods: A total of 229 patients admitted in our home for the aged in May 2010 were divided into oldest old group (n = 126, ≥80 years old) and non-oldest old group (n= 103, 60~79 years old). Measurements were performed on blood glucose, blood lipids, blood uric acid, height, weight, waist circumference and hip circumference, and general clinical data were recorded in all patients. Results: Compared with non-oldest old group, there were significant increase in incidence rates of diabetes mellitus (18.4% vs. 36.5%), hypertension (28.2% vs. 54.0%), hyperlipidemia (33. 0% vs. 57.1%) and obesity (27.2% vs. 46.8%) in oldest old group, P<0. 01 alls incidence rate of MS in oldest old group was significantly higher than that of non-oldest old group (34.9% vs. 17. 5%, P = 0. 0031). Conclusion: Incidence rate of metabolic syndrome in oldest old is higher than that of non-oldest old.%目的:探讨高龄老人代谢综合征(MS)患者的发病率及危险因素分析.方法:于2010年5月对在我院养老的229例患者,分为高龄组(≥80岁,126例)和非高龄组(60~79岁,103例),测定其血糖、血脂、血压、血尿酸、身高、体重、腰围和臀围,记录其一般临床资料.结果:与非高龄组比较,高龄组糖尿病(18.4%比36.5%)、高血压(28.2%比54.0%)、高血脂症(33.0%比57.1%)、肥胖(27.2%比46.8%)发生率均明显升高(P均<0.01);高龄组MS发生率明显高于非高龄组(34.9%比17.5%,P=0.0031).结论:高龄老人代谢综合征发生率较非高龄老人高.

  8. Life satisfaction (LS) and symptoms among the oldest-old: results from the longitudinal population study called Good Aging in Skåne (GÅS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkvist, Asa; Ekström, Henrik; Elmståhl, Sölve

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the prevalence of symptoms in the general population and its' relation to LS in the oldest-old are to our knowledge non-existent. The aim of this study was to describe the frequency and experienced severity of elderly subjects' reported symptoms and how symptoms are related to LS. The study population consisted of 681 individuals aged 78-93 years, drawn from the longitudinal population study, GÅS, part of a national survey (SNAC). Scores on the life satisfaction index were related to scores on a modified version of the Göteborg Quality of Life (GQoL) instrument, covering 32 common symptoms. Musculo-skeletal symptoms like pain were reported by 74%, 80% had depressive symptoms and 68% general fatigue. Less than 6% of men and women reported no metabolic symptoms or symptoms related to the head. In a multiple regression model it was shown that four groups of symptoms could significantly predict LS 3 years later: depression, tension, GI-symptoms and musculo-skeletal symptoms. The clinical implication of this study is that careful attention should be paid to the elderly patients' complaints concerning symptoms in the above areas since this has the potential to significantly increase the patients' satisfaction with life.

  9. Self-awareness of heart failure in the oldest old-an observational study of participants, ≥ 80 years old, with an objectively verified heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selan, Suzana; Siennicki-Lantz, Arkadiusz; Berglund, Johan; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2016-01-20

    One of the primary reasons for hospitalisation among elderly individuals with heart failure (HF) is poor self-care. Self-awareness of having HF may be a key-element in successful self-care. The prevalence of self-awareness of HF, and how it is affected by age-and HF-related factors, remains poorly understood. The aims of the present study were to determine the prevalence of self-awareness of HF in participants, ≥ 80 years of age, and to investigate the association between this self-awareness and age-related and HF-related factors. A single-centre observational study was conducted in which non-hospitalised participants (80+) with objectively verified HF were identified (n = 90). The statement of having HF or not having HF was used to divide the participants into two groups for comparisons: aware or unaware of one's own HF. Logistic regression models were completed to determine the impact of age-and HF-related factors on self-awareness. Twenty-six percent (23/90) were aware of their own HF diagnosis. No significant differences were found between the participants who were aware of their own HF diagnosis and the participants who were not. Neither age-nor HF-related factors had influence on the prevalence of self-awareness. Prevalence of self-awareness of own HF in the oldest old is insufficient, and this self-awareness may be influenced by external factors. One such factor is likely the manner in which the HF diagnosis is relayed to the patient by health care professionals.

  10. 重视高龄老人冠心病诊治特点%Attach importance to the diagnosis and treatment of coronary heart disease in the oldest-old

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王朝晖

    2012-01-01

    China has become an aging society with a rapid growth of the oldest-old (aged over 80 or 85), which is a modern characteristic of population aging. The incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in the oldest-old has increased year by year. As its clinical features differ from average adults, CHD in the oldest-old is prone to be misdiagnosed and missed diagnosed. Thus, more concern and attention should be given to this specific group in accordance with evidence-based medicine, clinical guidelines, individualized therapy, as well as risk factor control. Moreover, treatment program should be adjusted timely according to the clinical features of symptoms and complications of CHD in the oldest-old, so as to increase life span and decrease incidence of cardiovascular events in these patients.%中国已进入了老龄化社会,而人口老龄化的特点是高龄老人(≥80或≥85岁)数量增长迅速,高龄老人冠心病发病率也逐年增加.高龄老人冠心病因其临床特点有别于一般成人冠心病,易导致漏诊和误诊.我们应该关注和重视高龄老人这一特殊群体,基于循证医学依据,遵循临床指南,坚持个体化原则,积极控制多种寇心病的危险因素,针对高龄老人冠心病的临床症状和并发症特点,及时调整治疗方案,进一步延长患者寿命、减少冠心病心血管事件发生.

  11. Differentiation of cognitive abilities across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2009-07-01

    Existing representations of cognitive ability structure are exclusively based on linear patterns of interrelations. However, a number of developmental and cognitive theories predict that abilities are differentially related across ages (age differentiation-dedifferentiation) and across levels of functioning (ability differentiation). Nonlinear factor analytic models were applied to multivariate cognitive ability data from 6,273 individuals, ages 4 to 101 years, who were selected to be nationally representative of the U.S. population. Results consistently supported ability differentiation but were less clear with respect to age differentiation-dedifferentiation. Little evidence for age modification of ability differentiation was found. These findings are particularly informative about the nature of individual differences in cognition and about the developmental course of cognitive ability level and structure.

  12. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan L. Boyd; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in ...

  13. Cognitive Differentiation and Affective Stimulus Value in Vocational Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodden, Jack L.; Klein, Alan J.

    1973-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between cognitive differentiation level and the affective stimulus value of various occupations. Findings of the present investigation, conducted with upper-class college males, were consistent with the findings obtained in previous clinical and social judgment studies. Subjects were cognitively more…

  14. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Ryan L; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning.

  15. Study of multi-dimension effect factors of activities of daily life in the oldest old%高龄老人日常生活活动能力多维度影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷召雪; 施小明; 曾毅; 翟屹; 徐建伟; 柳玉芝

    2012-01-01

    目的 多维度研究高龄老人日常生活活动能力的影响因素.方法 选取7个长寿地区的百岁老人,并匹配选取同性别90~99岁、80 ~ 89岁高龄老人.通过问卷调查所有老人社会人口学、行为生活方式、功能状态与患病情况、基本日常生活活动(ADL)能力和器具性日常生活活动(IADL)能力调查.测量腰围和血压,测定生化指标.采用多因素logistic回归分析ADL和IADL的影响因素.结果 年龄、民族、婚姻状况、居住方式、缺乏身体活动、休闲活动、腹型肥胖、舒张压、甘油三酯水平、认知受损和脑血管疾病是影响ADL的因素,OR (95%CI)值分别为5.10 (2.78, 9.37)、5.39 (2.08, 13.91)、0.48 (0.25, 0.91)、0.25 (0.13,0.49)、2.01 (1.34, 2.98)、0.23 (0.15,0.34)、2.34 (1.56,3.52)、0.98 (0.96,0.99)和0.72 (0.54,0.99)、2.16 (1.26,3.70)和3.46 (1.40,8.52).影响IADL功能的因素包括年龄、性别、民族、自评经济状况、休闲活动、总胆固醇水平和认知受损,OR (95%CI)值分别为3.08 (1.67, 5.68)、1.79 (1.11, 2.89)、1.86 (1.12, 3.11)、0.46 (0.27,0.79)、0.19 (0.07,0.55)、1.19 (1.02,1.39)和3.11 (1.93,5.00).结论 年龄增加、汉族、缺乏身体活动、腹型肥胖、认知受损、脑血管疾病是ADL受损的危险因素,在婚、独居、休闲活动、较高的舒张压和甘油三酯水平是ADL受损的保护因素.年龄增加、汉族、女性、总胆固醇水平和认知受损是IADL功能受损的危险因素,经济状况自评较好和休闲活动是IADL的保护性因素.%Objective To study the effect factors of activities of daily life in the oldest-old in longevity areas. Methods From seven longevity areas, all centenarians were selected and numbered. The old people aged 90-99 and 80-89, according to the age and sex, were appointed by centenarians' codes. Information including socioeconomics and demographic charac teristic, behavior lifestyles, function status and prevalence of diseases

  16. 从照护主体看城市高龄老人照护问题%Study of the urban oldest old care problems from the perspectives of the subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞渤

    2012-01-01

    From the perspective of the subjects of the care,this paper explores the characteristics and problems of the four main sorts of care: self-care,spouse-care,younger-generation-care and housemaid-care.Policies on both burden-reduction and empowerment are recommended regarding to the de-veloping trend of the aging to improve their care qualities,and to promote healthy aging.The study has found that the conflicts of children and their spouses on the care of the oldest old,the conflicts of children's work,the raise of next generation and the care of the oldest old,and intergenerational conflicts in value and lifestyle have caused multiple pressures to the younger-generation-care.Besides,non-professional,and mobility of the housemaid,and the huge differences in the living world between them and the oldest old can also cause a lot of conflicts.%从城市高龄老人照护主体的视角分别探讨了自我照护、配偶照护、子女照护和保姆照护的特点和问题,从给照护主体"减负"与"增能"2个方面提出了政策性建议,以改善高龄老人照护状况。分析认为:子女同配偶在照护老人上的冲突、子女照护老人同工作和抚养下一代之间的冲突以及代际之间的价值观和生活习惯的冲突给子女照护带来了多重压力;保姆的非专业性、流动性及其与老人生活世界的巨大差异使其与高龄老人的需求产生矛盾。

  17. [High ability children and their differential cognitive functioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Riba, S

    2008-01-01

    From the neuroconstructivist point of view, cognitive development is understood as a process of successive and continuous reorganization whose changing mechanisms and differential outcomes (typical and atypical) must be studied. High intellectual abilities are one of their differential manifestations but its concept and nature is confused conditioning the validity of its identification and the efficacy of the interventional programs. To propose a clarifying definition of the nature of high intellectual abilities and their manifestations: giftedness, talent and genious, as well as their cognitive functioning and neurological correlates. A qualitative task analysis is applied to 41 participants with intellectual profiles corresponding to: giftedness, talent and typical intelligence, previously obtained. Results show differences on the cognitive results, not only referred to the quantity of informations produced but in the data organization more complex and hard interrelated among the gifted participants. It must be a differential process of resolution adjusted to each one of the profiles studied.

  18. An experimental-differential investigation of cognitive complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive complexity as defined by differential and experimental traditions was explored to investigate the theoretical advantage and utility of relational complexity (RC theory as a common framework for studying fluid cognitive functions. RC theory provides a domain general account of processing demand as a function of task complexity. In total, 142 participants completed two tasks in which RC was manipulated, and two tasks entailing manipulations of complexity derived from the differential psychology literature. A series of analyses indicated that, as expected, task manipulations influenced item difficulty. However, comparable changes in a psychometric index of complexity were not consistently observed. Active maintenance of information across multiple steps of the problem solving process, which entails strategic coordination of storage and processing that cannot be modelled under the RC framework was found to be an important component of cognitive complexity.

  19. Lower digit symbol substitution score in the oldest old is related to magnetization transfer and diffusion tensor imaging of the white matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay eVenkatraman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Slowing information processing is common among community-dwelling elderly and it predicts greater mortality and disability risk. Slowing information processing is related to brain macro-structural abnormalities. Specifically, greater global atrophy and greater small vessel disease of the white matter have been associated to slower processing speed. However, community-dwelling elderly with such macro-structural abnormalities can maintain processing speed. The roles of brain micro-structure for slow processing in very old adults living in the community is uncertain, as epidemiological studies relating these brain markers to cognition and in the context of other health characteristics are sparse. Hypothesis: Information processing is cross-sectionally associated with white matter micro-structure independent of overt macro-structural abnormalities and also independent of health related characteristics. Methods: Imaging indices of micro-structure (diffusion tensor imaging, DTI, and magnetization transfer imaging, MTI, macro-structure (white matter hyperintensities, gray matter volume, Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST and health characteristics were measured in 272 elderly (mean age 83 years old, 43% men, 40% Black living in the community. Results: The DTI- and MTI-indices of micro-structure from the normal appearing white matter and not from the normal appearing gray matter were associated with DSST score independent of white matter hyperintensities and gray matter volumes. Associations were also independent of age, race, gender, mini-mental score, systolic blood pressure, prevalent myocardial infarction. Interpretation: DTI and MTI indices of normal appearing white matter are indicators of information processing speed in this cohort of very old adults living in the community. Since processing slowing is a potent index of mortality and disability, these indices may serve as biomarkers in prevention or treatment trials of disability.

  20. Talking about living and dying with the oldest old: public involvement in a study on end of life care in care homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Claire

    2011-11-01

    The contribution of the PIRg supported a successful recruitment process that exceeded response rates of other studies in care homes. It safeguarded residents during the conduct of research on a sensitive topic and helped in validating the interview data gathered by the researchers through the discussion groups facilitated by the PIRg. There were power differentials that persisted and affected PIRg participation. The study has showed the value of developing job descriptions and a more formal means of setting out respective expectations. Future research may wish to elicit the views of focal participants in such studies about the mediation of research by public involvement in research.

  1. Talking about living and dying with the oldest old: public involvement in a study on end of life care in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Mathie, Elspeth; Cowe, Marion; Mendoza, Alex; Westwood, Daphne; Munday, Diane; Wilson, Patricia M; Crang, Clare; Froggatt, Katherine; Iliffe, Steve; Manthorpe, Jill; Gage, Heather; Barclay, Stephen

    2011-11-23

    process that exceeded response rates of other studies in care homes. It safeguarded residents during the conduct of research on a sensitive topic and helped in validating the interview data gathered by the researchers through the discussion groups facilitated by the PIRg. There were power differentials that persisted and affected PIRg participation. The study has showed the value of developing job descriptions and a more formal means of setting out respective expectations. Future research may wish to elicit the views of focal participants in such studies about the mediation of research by public involvement in research.

  2. Reading ability and differential cognitive profiles of girls and boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner-Nebot, T; Amador-Campos, J A

    1999-12-01

    To compare the differential cognitive and stylistic profiles of Spanish-speaking girls and boys and the relation between these profiles with subjects' reading scores 50 girls and 50 boys, 8 years old, were assessed on a reading test, the Children's Embedded Figures Test, and the Intellectual Test (Escala Diferencial del Rendimiento Intelectual). Analysis showed differential cognitive profiles for the two sexes. While girls used single, essentially verbal strategies for the reading activity, boys with high reading scores used verbal and perceptual strategies. In general, for girls verbal intelligence scores had correlated the highest with reading scores and lowest with independence on the Children's Embedded Figures Test. For boys the two tests contribute to the explained variance of reading scores. Curiously for scores in reading letters, reading strategies of the two groups seemed inverted.

  3. Oldest Old, Life Satisfaction, and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Several definitions already exist for the “oldest old” or “fourth age,” which comprises the most elderly of the older generation. One populationbased possibility is to define the transition between the third and fourth age as the chronological age at which 50 %of the birth cohort is no longer ali...

  4. The impact of diabetes mellitus on cognitive decline in the oldest of the old : a prospective population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, E.; de Craen, A. J. M.; Biessels, G. J.; Gussekloo, J.; Westendorp, R. G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for the development of cognitive impairment and dementia in the general population up to 75 years of age. As part of the Leiden 85-plus Study we studied the effects of diabetes on cognition in the oldest old. Subjects and methods The Leiden 85-plus

  5. Racial differences in influenza vaccination among older americans 1996–2000: longitudinal analysis of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS and the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ann Marie M

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza is a common and serious public health problem among the elderly. The influenza vaccine is safe and effective. Methods The purpose of the study was to determine whether frequencies of receipt vary by race, age group, gender, and time (progress from 1995/1996 to 2000, and whether any racial differences remain in age groups covered by Medicare. Subjects were selected from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS (12,652 Americans 50–61 years of age (1992–2000 and the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD survey (8,124 community-dwelling seniors aged 70+ years (1993–2000. Using multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders, we estimated the relationship between race, age group, gender, time and the main outcome measure, receipt of influenza vaccination in the last 2 years. Results There has been a clear increase in the unadjusted rates of receipt of influenza vaccination for all groups from 1995/1996 to 2000. However, the proportions immunized are 10–20% higher among White than among Black elderly, with no obvious narrowing of the racial gap from 1995/1996 to 2000. There is an increase in rates from age 50 to age 65. After age 70, the rate appears to plateau. In multivariate analyses, the racial difference remains after adjusting for a series of socioeconomic, health, and health care related variables. (HRS: OR = 0.63 (0.55–0.72, AHEAD: OR = 0.55 (0.44–0.66 Conclusions There is much work left if the Healthy People 2010 goal of 90% of the elderly immunized against influenza annually is to be achieved. Close coordination between public health programs and clinical prevention efforts in primary care is necessary, but to be truly effective, these services must be culturally appropriate.

  6. Social cognitive theory of gender development and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussey, K; Bandura, A

    1999-10-01

    Human differentiation on the basis of gender is a fundamental phenomenon that affects virtually every aspect of people's daily lives. This article presents the social cognitive theory of gender role development and functioning. It specifies how gender conceptions are constructed from the complex mix of experiences and how they operate in concert with motivational and self-regulatory mechanisms to guide gender-linked conduct throughout the life course. The theory integrates psychological and sociostructural determinants within a unified conceptual structure. In this theoretical perspective, gender conceptions and roles are the product of a broad network of social influences operating interdependently in a variety of societal subsystems. Human evolution provides bodily structures and biological potentialities that permit a range of possibilities rather than dictate a fixed type of gender differentiation. People contribute to their self-development and bring about social changes that define and structure gender relationships through their agentic actions within the interrelated systems of influence.

  7. Social cognition in the differential diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders and personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijkers, J.C.L.M.; Vissers, C.Th.W.M.; Verbeeck, W.; Arntz, A.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Average intelligent patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and patients with personality disorders (PD) are expected to show different problems in social cognition. Consequently, measuring social cognition may contribute to a better understanding and differentiation of ASD and PD. Therefore,

  8. Social cognition in the differential diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders and personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijkers, J.C.L.M.; Vissers, C.Th.W.M.; Verbeeck, W.; Arntz, A.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Average intelligent patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and patients with personality disorders (PD) are expected to show different problems in social cognition. Consequently, measuring social cognition may contribute to a better understanding and differentiation of ASD and PD. Therefore,

  9. GxE Interactions Between FOXO Genotypes and Tea Drinking Significantly Affect Cognitive Disability at Advanced Ages in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yi; Chen, Huashuai; Ni, Ting

    2015-01-01

    age 60, and at present time. Based on prior findings from animal and human cell models, we postulate that intake of tea compounds may activate FOXO gene expression, which in turn may positively affect cognitive function in the oldest old population. Our empirical findings imply that the health...... benefits of particular nutritional interventions, including tea drinking, may, in part, depend upon individual genetic profiles....

  10. Spectrum Sensing For Cognitive Radios Through Differential Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Gurugopinath

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a novel Goodness-of-Fit Test driven by differential entropy for spectrum sensing in cognitive radios, under three different noise models – Gaussian, Laplacian and mixture of Gaussians. We analyze the proposed detector under Gaussian noise which models the worst-case. We then analyze by considering the Laplacian noise process which has tails heavier than that of the Gaussian. We generalize the analysis considering the noise to be a mixture of Gaussians, which is often the case with noise and interference in communication systems. We analyze the performance under each of these cases for a large class of practically relevant fading channel models and primary signal models, with emphasis on low Signal-to-Noise ratio regimes. Towards this end, we derive closed form expressions for the distribution of the test statistic under the null hypothesis and the detection threshold that satisfies a constraint on the probability of false-alarm. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that our detection strategy outperforms an existing spectrum sensing technique based on order statistics.

  11. Differentiating Animality from Agency. Towards a Foundation for Cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    The notion of cognition has been difficult to pin down. Embodied and situated approaches to cognition now suggests that agency, construed in terms of perceptionaction coupling, might provide a clear foundation for cognition. Yet, this attempt has problems of its own. First, a demarcation problem: Wh

  12. Differential effects of dietary oils on emotional and cognitive behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Kato

    Full Text Available Several dietary oils have been used preventatively and therapeutically in the setting of neurological disease. However, the mechanisms underlying their influence on brain function and metabolism remain unknown. It was investigated whether 3 types of dietary oils affected emotional behaviors in mice. Wild-type (WT mice and sialyltransferase ST3Gal IV-knockout (KO mice, which exhibit increased emotional and cognitive behaviors, were fed diets containing 20% dietary oils from post-weaning to adulthood. Mice were fed pellets made from control feed AIN93G powder containing 18% fish oil, soybean oil, or a mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-palmitoyl glycerol (POP and 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-3-stearoyl glycerol (SOS, plus 2% soybean oil. Once mice reached adulthood, they were subjected to fear conditioning test to measure cognitive anxiety and forced swim test to measure depression. WT mice fed the POP-SOS diet showed a 0.6-fold decrease in percent freezing with contextual fear compared with WT mice fed the control diet. KO mice fed the fish oil diet showed a 1.4-fold increase in percent freezing with contextual fear compared with KO mice fed the control diet. These findings indicate that response to contextual fear was improved in WT mice that consumed POP-SOS but aggravated in KO mice that consumed fish oils. Furthermore, KO mice showed a 0.4-fold decrease in percent freezing in response to tone fear when they were fed POP-SOS diet compared to a control diet. Thus, POP-SOS diet reduced tone fear level of KO mice until the same level of WT mice. Finally, KO mice fed the soybean oil diet showed a 1.7-fold increase in immobility in the forced swim test compared to KO mice fed the control diet. Taken together, oil-rich diets differentially modulate anxiety and depression in normal and anxious mice. Oils rich in saturated fatty acids may alleviate anxiety more strongly than other oils.

  13. Prevalência de obesidade em idosos longevos e sua associação com fatores de risco e morbidades cardiovasculares Obesity prevalence among oldest-old and its association with risk factors and cardiovascular morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Beatrice Mânica Da Cruz

    2004-04-01

    risk factors and cardiovascular morbidity in the oldest old (>80 years old residing at the municipality of Veranópolis - RS, Brazil. METHODOS: 196 elderly participated in the study (69 male and 127 female, 91% of the population aged >80 until June, 1996. For obesity evaluation and classification, we used the body mass index (BMI and the World Health Organization (WHO and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III criteria. The cardiovascular risk factors investigated were sex, age, systemic hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, diabetes mellitus (DM and smoking. For cardiovascular morbidities, we considered acute myocardial infarction, intermittent claudication and stroke. Waist-hip ratio (W/H, regular consumption of alcoholic beverages and physical activity were investigated too. Results: the obesity prevalence was 23.3% according to WHO (without difference between sex, p=0.124 and 45.6% according to NHANES III criteria (significantly higher in female, p=0.05. Obesity associations with risk factors were sex-dependent (the obese females presented higher levels of systolic blood pressure and glucose, lower levels of HDL-c, and higher systemic hypertension and DM frequencies; while the obese males presented higher levels of diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL-c and higher hypercholesterolemia frequency. W/H and triglycerides, as well as hypertriglyceridemia frequency, were higher in obese people. CONCLUSIONS: the obesity prevalence was high among the long-living elderly, and its association with cardiovascular risk factors was sex-dependent. As regards morbidities, we did not observe differences between obese and non-obese people.

  14. Racial bias in the assessment of cognitive functioning of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R N

    2003-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if the difference in assessed cognition between Black/African-American and White older adults was due differential item functioning (DIF) and/or differences in the effect of background variables. Participants were 15257 adults aged 50 and older surveyed in the Study of Asset and Health Dynamics of the Oldest Old (AHEAD) and Health and Retirement Study (HRS). The cognitive measure was a modified telephone interview for cognitive status. The analytic strategy was a multiple group structural equation model grounded in item response theory. Results suggest that most (89%) of the group difference could be attributed to measurement or structural differences, the remainder being not significantly different from zero (p=0.193). Most items displayed racial DIF, accounting for most of the group difference. After controlling for DIF, the group difference that remained could be attributed to heterogeneity in the effect of background variables. For example, low education was more deleterious for Black/African-Americans, and high income conferred an advantage only for Whites. These findings underscore the importance of efforts to generate culture-fair measurement devices. However, culture-fair assessments may attenuate, but not eliminate, group differences in assessed cognition due to the incommensurate action of background variables

  15. Differentiation of Cognitive Abilities as a Function of Neuroticism Level: A Measurement Equivalence/Invariance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccio, Silvia; Reeve, Charlie L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the differentiation of cognitive abilities as a function of neuroticism. Specifically, we examine Eysenck and White's [Eysenck, H. J., and White, P. O. (1964). Personality and the measurement of intelligence. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 24, 197-201.] hypothesis that cognitive abilities are less differentiated…

  16. Differential cognitive impairment for diverse forms of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borges Monica

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive impairment is a common feature in multiple sclerosis (MS patients and occurs in 60% of all cases. Unfortunately, neurological examination does not always agree with the neuropsychological evaluation in determining the cognitive profile of the patient. On the other hand, psychophysiological techniques such as event-related potentials (ERPs can help in evaluating cognitive impairment in different pathologies. Behavioural responses and EEG signals were recorded during the experiment in three experimental groups: 1 a relapsing-remitting group (RRMS, 2 a benign multiple sclerosis group (BMS and 3 a Control group. The paradigm employed was a spatial attention task with central cues (Posner experiment. The main aim was to observe the differences in the performance (behavioural variables and in the latency and amplitude of the ERP components among these groups. Results Our data indicate that both MS groups showed poorer task performance (longer reaction times and lower percentage of correct responses, a latency delay for the N1 and P300 component, and a different amplitude for the frontal N1. Moreover, the deficit in the BMS group, indexed by behavioural and pyschophysiological variables, was more pronounced compared to the RRMS group. Conclusion The present results suggest a cognitive impairment in the information processing in all of these patients. Comparing both pathological groups, cognitive impairment was more accentuated in the BMS group compared to the RMSS group. This suggests a silent deterioration of cognitive skills for the BMS that is not usually treated with pharmacological or neuropsychological therapy.

  17. Differential effects of MDMA and methylphenidate on social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Yasmin; Hysek, Cédric M; Simmler, Linda D; Crockett, Molly J; Quednow, Boris B; Liechti, Matthias E

    2014-09-01

    Social cognition is important in everyday-life social interactions. The social cognitive effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') and methylphenidate (both used for neuroenhancement and as party drugs) are largely unknown. We investigated the acute effects of MDMA (75 mg), methylphenidate (40 mg) and placebo using the Facial Emotion Recognition Task, Multifaceted Empathy Test, Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition, Social Value Orientation Test and the Moral Judgment Task in a cross-over study in 30 healthy subjects. Additionally, subjective, autonomic, pharmacokinetic, endocrine and adverse drug effects were measured. MDMA enhanced emotional empathy for positive emotionally charged situations in the MET and tended to reduce the recognition of sad faces in the Facial Emotion Recognition Task. MDMA had no effects on cognitive empathy in the Multifaceted Empathy Test or social cognitive inferences in the Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition. MDMA produced subjective 'empathogenic' effects, such as drug liking, closeness to others, openness and trust. In contrast, methylphenidate lacked such subjective effects and did not alter emotional processing, empathy or mental perspective-taking. MDMA but not methylphenidate increased the plasma levels of oxytocin and prolactin. None of the drugs influenced moral judgment. Effects on emotion recognition and emotional empathy were evident at a low dose of MDMA and likely contribute to the popularity of the drug.

  18. The Effect of Differentiation Approach Developed on Creativity of Gifted Students: Cognitive and Affective Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Esra; Özdemir, Ahmet S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to develop a differentiation approach for the mathematics education of gifted middle school students and to determine the effect of the differentiation approach on creative thinking skills of gifted students based on both cognitive and affective factors. In this context, the answer to the following question was searched:…

  19. V. The differential association of adiposity and fitness with cognitive control in preadolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontifex, Matthew B; Kamijo, Keita; Scudder, Mark R; Raine, Lauren B; Khan, Naiman A; Hemrick, Bonnie; Evans, Ellen M; Castelli, Darla M; Frank, Kenneth A; Hillman, Charles H

    2014-12-01

    With the increasing prevalence of sedentary behaviors during childhood, a greater understanding of the extent to which excess adiposity and aerobic fitness relate to cognitive health is of increasing importance. To date, however, the vast majority of research in this area has focused on adiposity or fitness, rather than the possible inter-relationship, as it relates to cognition. Accordingly, this study examined the differential associations between body composition, aerobic fitness, and cognitive control in a sample of 204 (96 female) preadolescent children. Participants completed a modified flanker task (i.e., inhibition) and a switch task (i.e., cognitive flexibility) to assess two aspects of cognitive control. Findings from this study indicate that fitness and adiposity appear to be separable factors as they relate to cognitive control, given that the interaction of fitness and adiposity was observed to be nonsignificant for both the flanker and switch tasks. Fitness exhibited an independent association with both inhibition and cognitive flexibility whereas adiposity exhibited an independent association only with cognitive flexibility. These results suggest that while childhood obesity and fitness appear to both be related to cognitive control, they may be differentially associated with its component processes.

  20. Differential effects of dopamine-directed treatments on cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashby FG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available F Gregory Ashby, Vivian V Valentin, Stella S von Meer Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA Abstract: Dopamine, a prominent neuromodulator, is implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. It has wide-ranging effects on both cortical and subcortical brain regions and on many types of cognitive tasks that rely on a variety of different learning and memory systems. As neuroscience and behavioral evidence for the existence of multiple memory systems and their corresponding neural networks accumulated, so did the notion that dopamine’s role is markedly different depending on which memory system is engaged. As a result, dopamine-directed treatments will have different effects on different types of cognitive behaviors. To predict what these effects will be, it is critical to understand: which memory system is mediating the behavior; the neural basis of the mediating memory system; the nature of the dopamine projections into that system; and the time course of dopamine after its release into the relevant brain regions. Consideration of these questions leads to different predictions for how changes in brain dopamine levels will affect automatic behaviors and behaviors mediated by declarative, procedural, and perceptual representation memory systems. Keywords: dopamine, cognition, memory systems, learning

  1. Differentiation and Integration: Guiding Principles for Analyzing Cognitive Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.; Chen, Zhe

    2008-01-01

    Differentiation and integration played large roles within classic developmental theories but have been relegated to obscurity within contemporary theories. However, they may have a useful role to play in modern theories as well, if conceptualized as guiding principles for analyzing change rather than as real-time mechanisms. In the present study,…

  2. Calculus for cognitive scientists partial differential equation models

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, James K

    2016-01-01

    This book shows cognitive scientists in training how mathematics, computer science and science can be usefully and seamlessly intertwined. It is a follow-up to the first two volumes on mathematics for cognitive scientists, and includes the mathematics and computational tools needed to understand how to compute the terms in the Fourier series expansions that solve the cable equation. The latter is derived from first principles by going back to cellular biology and the relevant biophysics.  A detailed discussion of ion movement through cellular membranes, and an explanation of how the equations that govern such ion movement leading to the standard transient cable equation are included. There are also solutions for the cable model using separation of variables, as well an explanation of why Fourier series converge and a description of the implementation of MatLab tools to compute the solutions. Finally, the standard Hodgkin - Huxley model is developed for an excitable neuron and is solved using MatLab.

  3. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of neuropsychological tests in differentiating Alzheimer's disease from mild cognitive impairment: can the montreal cognitive assessment be better than the cambridge cognitive examination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, José Eduardo; Cecato, Juliana Francisca; Bartholomeu, Daniel; Montiel, José Maria

    2014-05-01

    Considering the lack of studies on measures that increase the diagnostic distinction between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and on the role of the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG) in this, our study aims to compare the utility of the CAMCOG, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) in helping to differentiate AD from MCI in elderly people with >4 years of schooling. A total of 136 elderly subjects - 39 normal controls as well as 52 AD patients and 45 MCI patients treated at the Institute of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Porto Alegre, Brazil - were assessed using the MMSE, CAMCOG, clock drawing test (CDT), verbal fluency test (VF), Geriatric Depression Scale and Pfeffer Functional Activities Questionnaire. The results obtained by means of a receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the MoCA is a better screening test for differentiating elderly subjects with AD from those with MCI than the CAMCOG and MMSE as well as other tests such as the CDT and VF. The MoCA, more than the CAMCOG and the other tests, was shown to be able to differentiate AD from MCI, although, as Roalf et al. [Alzheimers Dement 2013;9:529-537] pointed out, further studies might lead to measures that will improve this differentiation.

  4. Neuropsychological differentiation of adaptive creativity and schizotypal cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Joscelyn E.; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Both creativity and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders have been associated with activation of remote semantic concepts, but this activation results in innovative output in one case and communication disturbances in the other. The present study examined the relationship between monitoring semantic information (which relies on executive brain function), creativity, and characteristics of schizotypy in an undergraduate population. Results indicate that executive function differentiates the use of...

  5. Children with High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome: Can We Differentiate Their Cognitive Profiles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planche, Pascale; Lemonnier, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether children with high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger's syndrome (AS) can be differentiated from each other and from typically developing children on their cognitive profiles. The present study included a total of 45 participants: children with autism (high-functioning autism or Asperger's…

  6. Cognitive and Affective Orientations and Teaching Behaviors--A Study of Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Lya

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that teachers can be differentiated by their cognitive or affective orientations, reflected in the objectives they select and in the stimuli and questions they present in the classroom. Proposes use of aptitude-treatment interactions in order to clarify the best methods to use for personalized teacher training. (JD)

  7. Children with High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome: Can We Differentiate Their Cognitive Profiles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planche, Pascale; Lemonnier, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether children with high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger's syndrome (AS) can be differentiated from each other and from typically developing children on their cognitive profiles. The present study included a total of 45 participants: children with autism (high-functioning autism or Asperger's…

  8. Neuropsychological differentiation of adaptive creativity and schizotypal cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joscelyn E; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Both creativity and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders have been associated with activation of remote semantic concepts, but this activation results in innovative output in one case and communication disturbances in the other. The present study examined the relationship between monitoring semantic information (which relies on executive brain function), creativity, and characteristics of schizotypy in an undergraduate population. Results indicate that executive function differentiates the use of semantic information in creativity and schizotypy. Specification of the balance between executive monitoring and activation of semantic information is important for determining how communication disturbances manifest, and for the measurement of creativity and schizotypy in the general population.

  9. The Mn-superoxide dismutase single nucleotide polymorphism rs4880 and the glutathione peroxidase 1 single nucleotide polymorphism rs1050450 are associated with aging and longevity in the oldest old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soerensen, Mette; Christensen, Kaare; Stevnsner, Tinna; Christiansen, Lene

    2009-05-01

    The free radical theory of aging states that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in age-related accumulation of cellular damage, and consequently influence aging and longevity. Therefore, variation in genes encoding proteins protecting against ROS could be expected to influence variation in aging and life span. The rs4880 and rs1050450 SNPs in the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) genes, respectively, are associated with age-related diseases and appear to affect the activities of the encoded variant proteins. In this study we genotyped these SNPs in 1650 individuals from the Danish 1905 cohort (follow-up time: 1998-2008, age at intake: 92-93 years, number of deaths: 1589 (96.3%)) and investigated the association with aging and longevity. We found decreased mortality of individuals holding either the MnSOD rs4880 C or the GPX1 rs1050450 T alleles (HR (MnSOD(CC/CT))=0.91, P=0, p=0.002 and HR (GPX1(TT/TC))=0.93, p=0.008). Furthermore, a synergetic effect of the alleles was observed (HR=0.76, p=0.001). Finally, moderate positive associations with good self rated health, decreased disability and increased cognitive capacity were observed. Our results thus indicate that genetic variation in MnSOD and GPX1 may be associated with aging and longevity.

  10. Dual Tasking for the Differentiation between Depression and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Florian G.; Hobert, Markus A.; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Hasmann, Sandra E.; Hahn, Tim; Eschweiler, Gerhard W.; Berg, Daniela; Fallgatter, Andreas J.; Maetzler, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of mild cognitive impairment from depression in elderly adults is a clinically relevant issue which is not sufficiently solved. Gait and dual task (DT) parameters may have the potential to complement current diagnostic work-up, as both dementia and depression are associated with changes of gait and DT parameters. Methods: Seven hundred and four participants of the TREND study (Tübinger evaluation of Risk factors for Early detection of NeuroDegeneration) aged 50–80 years were assessed using the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease Plus test battery for testing cognition and Beck's Depression Inventory for evaluation of depression. Based on these results, four groups were defined: acute depressed (N = 53), cognitively mildly impaired (N = 97), acute depressed, and cognitively mildly impaired (N = 15), and controls (N = 536). Participants underwent a 20 m walk and checking boxes task under single (ST) and DT conditions. ST and DT performance and dual task costs (DTC) were calculated. Due to the typical age of increasing incidence of depressive and also cognitive symptoms, the 7th decade was calculated separately. Results: ST speeds of gait and checking boxes, DT walking speed, and walking DTC were significantly different between groups. Healthy controls were the fastest in all paradigms and cognitively mildly impaired had higher DTC than depressed individuals. Additionally, we constructed a multivariate predictive model differentiating the groups on a single-subject level. Conclusion: DT parameters are simply and comfortably measureable, and DTC can easily be determined. The combination of these parameters allows a differentiation of depressed and cognitively mildly impaired elderly adults.

  11. Clustering and switching during a semantic verbal fluency test contribute to differential diagnosis of cognitive impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qianhua Zhao; Qihao Guo; Zhen Hong

    2013-01-01

    The verbal fluency test (VFT) can be dissociated into "clustering" (generating words within subcategories)and "switching" (shifting between clusters),which may be valuable in differential diagnosis.In the current study,we investigated the validity of VFT in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD,n=65),vascular dementia (VaD,n =65),mild cognitive impairment (MCI,n =92),and vascular cognitive impairment without dementia (VCIND,n =76) relative to cognitively normal senior controls (NC,n =374).We found that in the NC group,the total correct score was significantly correlated with age and education; males generated more subcategories; cluster size increased with education,and subcategory and switching decreased with age.A significantly progressive advantage was observed in VFT scores in the sequence NC > MCINCIND > ADNaD,and this significantly discriminated dementia patients from the other groups.AD patients performed better in all four VFT scores than VaD patients.Subcategory and switching scores significantly distinguished AD from VaD patients (AD > VaD; mean difference,0.50 for subcategory,P <0.05; 0.71 for switching,P <0.05).MCI patients scored higher than VCIND patients,but the difference did not reach statistical significance.These results suggest that semantic VFT is useful for the detection of MCI and VCIND,and in the differential diagnosis of cognitive impairment.

  12. Predicting recovery of cognitive function soon after stroke: differential modeling of logarithmic and linear regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Sugimura, Yuko; Yamada, Sumio; Omori, Yoshitsugu; Miyamoto, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive disorders in the acute stage of stroke are common and are important independent predictors of adverse outcome in the long term. Despite the impact of cognitive disorders on both patients and their families, it is still difficult to predict the extent or duration of cognitive impairments. The objective of the present study was, therefore, to provide data on predicting the recovery of cognitive function soon after stroke by differential modeling with logarithmic and linear regression. This study included two rounds of data collection comprising 57 stroke patients enrolled in the first round for the purpose of identifying the time course of cognitive recovery in the early-phase group data, and 43 stroke patients in the second round for the purpose of ensuring that the correlation of the early-phase group data applied to the prediction of each individual's degree of cognitive recovery. In the first round, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores were assessed 3 times during hospitalization, and the scores were regressed on the logarithm and linear of time. In the second round, calculations of MMSE scores were made for the first two scoring times after admission to tailor the structures of logarithmic and linear regression formulae to fit an individual's degree of functional recovery. The time course of early-phase recovery for cognitive functions resembled both logarithmic and linear functions. However, MMSE scores sampled at two baseline points based on logarithmic regression modeling could estimate prediction of cognitive recovery more accurately than could linear regression modeling (logarithmic modeling, R(2) = 0.676, Plinear regression modeling, R(2) = 0.598, P<0.0001). Logarithmic modeling based on MMSE scores could accurately predict the recovery of cognitive function soon after the occurrence of stroke. This logarithmic modeling with mathematical procedures is simple enough to be adopted in daily clinical practice.

  13. Predicting recovery of cognitive function soon after stroke: differential modeling of logarithmic and linear regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Suzuki

    Full Text Available Cognitive disorders in the acute stage of stroke are common and are important independent predictors of adverse outcome in the long term. Despite the impact of cognitive disorders on both patients and their families, it is still difficult to predict the extent or duration of cognitive impairments. The objective of the present study was, therefore, to provide data on predicting the recovery of cognitive function soon after stroke by differential modeling with logarithmic and linear regression. This study included two rounds of data collection comprising 57 stroke patients enrolled in the first round for the purpose of identifying the time course of cognitive recovery in the early-phase group data, and 43 stroke patients in the second round for the purpose of ensuring that the correlation of the early-phase group data applied to the prediction of each individual's degree of cognitive recovery. In the first round, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores were assessed 3 times during hospitalization, and the scores were regressed on the logarithm and linear of time. In the second round, calculations of MMSE scores were made for the first two scoring times after admission to tailor the structures of logarithmic and linear regression formulae to fit an individual's degree of functional recovery. The time course of early-phase recovery for cognitive functions resembled both logarithmic and linear functions. However, MMSE scores sampled at two baseline points based on logarithmic regression modeling could estimate prediction of cognitive recovery more accurately than could linear regression modeling (logarithmic modeling, R(2 = 0.676, P<0.0001; linear regression modeling, R(2 = 0.598, P<0.0001. Logarithmic modeling based on MMSE scores could accurately predict the recovery of cognitive function soon after the occurrence of stroke. This logarithmic modeling with mathematical procedures is simple enough to be adopted in daily clinical practice.

  14. Cognitive-style characteristics as criteria for differential diagnosis of delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Kuznetsov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a psychological study of the relationship of cognitive styles with the development of delusional formations, overvalued ideas and simulative products in order to develop criteria of delirium differential diagnosis. We examined 118 men, ordered at forensic psychological and psychiatric examination, among them delusional symptoms were found in 68 people, and overvalued ideas in 26 people, 24 people simulated delirium. As a method of research, we used pathopsychological experiment and projective techniques and methods that identify particular cognitive style (TAT, Rorschach, Torrance. We found that delusional patients, unlike those simulating a mental disorder, show field independence cognitive style combined with the rigidity that is characteristic also for patients with endogenous overvalued ideas. In personality disorders, we found combination of field independence with the flexibility or with rigidity.

  15. Differential MR/GR Activation in Mice Results in Emotional States Beneficial or Impairing for Cognition

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    Vera Brinks

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroids regulate stress response and influence emotion, learning, and memory via two receptors in the brain, the high‐affinity mineralocorticoid (MR and low‐affinity glucocorticoid receptor (GR. We test the hypothesis that MR- and GR-mediated effects interact in emotion and cognition when a novel situation is encountered that is relevant for a learning process. By adrenalectomy and additional constant corticosterone supplement we obtained four groups of male C57BL/6J mice with differential chronic MR and GR activations. Using a hole board task, we found that mice with continuous predominant MR and moderate GR activations were fast learners that displayed low anxiety and arousal together with high directed explorative behavior. Progressive corticosterone concentrations with predominant action via GR induced strong emotional arousal at the expense of cognitive performance. These findings underline the importance of a balanced MR/GR system for emotional and cognitive functioning that is critical for mental health.

  16. Differential brain shrinkage over 6 months shows limited association with cognitive practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Naftali; Schmiedek, Florian; Rodrigue, Karen M; Kennedy, Kristen M; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lövdén, Martin

    2013-07-01

    The brain shrinks with age, but the timing of this process and the extent of its malleability are unclear. We measured changes in regional brain volumes in younger (age 20-31) and older (age 65-80) adults twice over a 6 month period, and examined the association between changes in volume, history of hypertension, and cognitive training. Between two MRI scans, 49 participants underwent intensive practice in three cognitive domains for 100 consecutive days, whereas 23 control group members performed no laboratory cognitive tasks. Regional volumes of seven brain structures were measured manually and adjusted for intracranial volume. We observed significant mean shrinkage in the lateral prefrontal cortex, the hippocampus, the caudate nucleus, and the cerebellum, but no reliable mean change of the prefrontal white matter, orbital-frontal cortex, and the primary visual cortex. Individual differences in change were reliable in all regions. History of hypertension was associated with greater cerebellar shrinkage. The cerebellum was the only region in which significantly reduced shrinkage was apparent in the experimental group after completion of cognitive training. Thus, in healthy adults, differential brain shrinkage can be observed in a narrow time window, vascular risk may aggravate it, and intensive cognitive activity may have a limited effect on it.

  17. Determinants of muscular and functional vitality in oldest old people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taekema, Diana Gretha

    2012-01-01

    An intriguing question with regard to ageing research is why some people age successfully and why others are burdened with chronic diseases and functional disability. Researchers aim to identify the candidate determinants associated with the preservation of vitality during a long life course. In thi

  18. Musculoskeletal pain and physical functioning in the oldest old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Thinggaard, M; Christensen, K

    2013-01-01

    of the nationwide Danish 1905 cohort study. Musculoskeletal pain was assessed as reported pain in back, hips or knees when moving or resting. Physical performance measures included maximum grip strength and habitual walking speed. Disability in performing activities of daily living was defined as the need...

  19. Differential effects of ischemic vascular disease and Alzheimer's disease on brain atrophy and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ling; Vinters, Harry V; Mack, Wendy J; Weiner, Michael W; Chui, Helena C

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that pathologic measures of arteriosclerosis (AS), cerebral infarction, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are independently correlated with cortical gray matter (CGM) atrophy measured by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we use path analyses to model the associations between these three pathology measures and cognitive impairment, as mediated by CGM atrophy, after controlling for age and education. In this sample of 116 elderly persons followed longitudinally to autopsy (ischemic vascular disease (IVD) program project), differential patterns were observed between AS and atrophy/cognition versus AD and atrophy/cognition. The total effect of AD pathology on global cognition (β = -0.61, s.e. = 0.06) was four times stronger than that of AS (β = -0.15, s.e. = 0.08). The effect of AS on cognition appears to occur through cerebral infarction and CGM atrophy (β = -0.13, s.e. = 0.04). In contrast, the effects of AD pathology on global cognition (β = -0.50, s.e. = 0.07) occur through a direct pathway that is five times stronger than the indirect pathway acting through CGM atrophy (β = -0.09, s.e. = 0.03). The strength of this direct AD pathway was not significantly mitigated by adding hippocampal volume to the model. AD pathology affects cognition not only through brain atrophy, but also via an unmeasured pathway that could be related to synaptic dysfunction before the development of cortical atrophy.

  20. Differential efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy for major depression : A study of prescriptive factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, E.; Smits, N.; Dekker, J.J.M.; Peen, J.; Don, F.J.; Kool, S.; Westra, D.; Hendriksen, M.; Cuijpers, P.; Van, H.L.

    2016-01-01

    Minimal efficacy differences have been found between cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapies for depression, but little is known about patient characteristics that might moderate differential treatment effects. We aimed to generate hypotheses regarding such potential

  1. Differential Effects of Differing Intensities of Acute Exercise on Speed and Accuracy of Cognition: A Meta-Analytical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorris, Terry; Hale, Beverley J.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine, using meta-analytical techniques, the differential effects of differing intensities of acute exercise on speed and accuracy of cognition. Overall, exercise demonstrated a small, significant mean effect size (g = 0.14, p less than 0.01) on cognition. Examination of the comparison between speed and…

  2. Clinical Utility of Short Social Cognitive Tests in Early Differentiation of Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia from Alzheimer’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Christian; Stokholm, Jette; Gade, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Traditional cognitive tests used in clinical practice may not be sensitive enough for the early differentiation of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) from Alzheimer's disease (AD). A growing body of literature has shown that deficits in various aspects of social cognition can...

  3. Cortical Thickness, Surface Area and Subcortical Volume Differentially Contribute to Cognitive Heterogeneity in Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels J H M Gerrits

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is often associated with cognitive deficits, although their severity varies considerably between patients. Recently, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM to show that individual differences in gray matter (GM volume relate to cognitive heterogeneity in PD. VBM does, however, not differentiate between cortical thickness (CTh and surface area (SA, which might be independently affected in PD. We therefore re-analyzed our cohort using the surface-based method FreeSurfer, and investigated (i CTh, SA, and (subcortical GM volume differences between 93 PD patients and 45 matched controls, and (ii the relation between these structural measures and cognitive performance on six neuropsychological tasks within the PD group. We found cortical thinning in PD patients in the left pericalcarine gyrus, extending to cuneus, precuneus and lingual areas and left inferior parietal cortex, bilateral rostral middle frontal cortex, and right cuneus, and increased cortical surface area in the left pars triangularis. Within the PD group, we found negative correlations between (i CTh of occipital areas and performance on a verbal memory task, (ii SA and volume of the frontal cortex and visuospatial memory performance, and, (iii volume of the right thalamus and scores on two verbal fluency tasks. Our primary findings illustrate that i CTh and SA are differentially affected in PD, and ii VBM and FreeSurfer yield non-overlapping results in an identical dataset. We argue that this discrepancy is due to technical differences and the subtlety of the PD-related structural changes.

  4. Differential effects of preterm birth and small gestational age on cognitive and motor development

    OpenAIRE

    Hutton, J; Pharoah, P; Cooke, R.; Stevenson, R

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the differential effects of preterm birth and being small for gestational age on the cognitive and motor ability of the child.
METHODS—A longitudinal cohort of all infants of gestational age ≤ 32 weeks born to mothers resident in the counties of Cheshire and Merseyside in 1980-1 was studied. The children were assessed at the age of 8 to 9 years using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, the Neale analysis of reading ability, and the Stott-Moyes-Henderson test of mot...

  5. TO THE PROBLEM OF DIFFERENTIATION OF NOTIONS IN MODERN COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TRUBAYEVA E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the peculiarities of differentiation of such notions as “frame”, “concept”, “script”, “slot” in cognitive linguistics. The analysis reveals that the storage and possibility of using of information are caused by the frame language structures representing a kind of «narration concentrates», the contexts of encyclopedic type expressing the maximum knowledge of a situation, presented in the symbolical coding on the certain basis. So the interpretation and verification of the axiological bases of frames may contribute to better understanding of any fiction.

  6. Association between anemia and 3-year all-cause mortality among oldest old people in longevity ;areas in China%中国长寿地区高龄老年人贫血及其3年死亡风险关系的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕跃斌; 殷召雪; 罗杰斯; 施小明; 曾毅

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨中国长寿地区80岁以上老年人贫血及其3年死亡风险的关系。方法2009年6月中国老年健康影响因素跟踪调查(CLHLS)项目在中国7个长寿地区选取929名80岁以上老年人进行问卷调查、身体测量和血生化检测,于2012年8月随访生存结局。采用Cox比例风险模型分析贫血和不同Hb水平对死亡风险的影响。结果929名老年人贫血患病率为49.6%,贫血主要类型为正常细胞性贫血。经3年随访共计447人死亡,死亡率为49.8%,其中贫血组为56.0%,高于非贫血组的43.3%(P<0.01)。校正混杂因素后,贫血组3年死亡风险高于非贫血组25%(HR=1.25,95%CI:1.03~1.52),除正常细胞性贫血与老年人死亡风险的无关外,大细胞性贫血、单纯小细胞性贫血和小细胞低色素性贫血与老年人的高死亡风险相关联,高龄老年人不同类型贫血的死亡风险存在性别差异。与低Hb水平者相比,高Hb水平者死亡风险较低(HR=0.87,95%CI:0.77~0.99),且女性更显著。结论贫血或低Hb水平与中国长寿地区高龄老年人较高的死亡风险相关联。%Objective To explore the association between anemia and 3-year all-cause mortality among the oldest old people in longevity areas in China. Methods In August 2012, questionnaire survey,health examination and blood test were conducted among 929 old people aged≥80 years in 7 longevity areas in China,who were included in Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey(CLHLS)2009. Cox regression model was used to evaluate the association between anemia or different hemoglobin levels and mortality. Results Among the 929 subjects,the prevalence of anemia was 49.6%,the main form of anemia was normocytic anemia. During the three year follow-up period,a total of 447 subjects died,the overall mortality was 49.8%(56.0%in subjects with anemia and 43.3% in subjects without anemia). Compared with the subjects

  7. A score based on screening tests to differentiate mild cognitive impairment from subjective memory complaints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It is not easy to differentiate patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI from subjective memory complainers (SMC. Assessments with screening cognitive tools are essential, particularly in primary care where most patients are seen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of screening cognitive tests and to propose a score derived from screening tests. Elderly subjects with memory complaints were evaluated using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE and the Brief Cognitive Battery (BCB. We added two delayed recalls in the MMSE (a delayed recall and a late-delayed recall, LDR, and also a phonemic fluency test of letter P fluency (LPF. A score was created based on these tests. The diagnoses were made on the basis of clinical consensus and neuropsychological testing. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used to determine area under the curve (AUC, the sensitivity and specificity for each test separately and for the final proposed score. MMSE, LDR, LPF and delayed recall of BCB scores reach statistically significant differences between groups (P=0.000, 0.03, 0.001 and 0.01, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and AUC were MMSE: 64%, 79% and 0.75 (cut off <29; LDR: 56%, 62% and 0.62 (cut off <3; LPF: 71%, 71% and 0.71 (cut off <14; delayed recall of BCB: 56%, 82% and 0.68 (cut off <9. The proposed score reached a sensitivity of 88% and 76% and specificity of 62% and 75% for cut off over 1 and over 2, respectively. AUC were 0.81. In conclusion, a score created from screening tests is capable of discriminating MCI from SMC with moderate to good accurancy.

  8. Differential cognitive outcomes in the Hypertensive Old People in Edinburgh study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, John M; Whalley, Lawrence J

    2005-03-15

    Hypertension is associated with cognitive impairment in older adults. The Hypertensive Old People in Edinburgh (HOPE) study reported improved scores in two psychometric tests in those subjects with the greatest fall in diastolic blood pressure during a 24-week randomised, double-blind trial of captopril versus bendrofluazide in 81 elderly hypertensive people with mild cognitive impairment. Three hundred and eighty-seven of the original sample of 603 older people with and without hypertension and/or cognitive impairment from which the trial subsample was drawn were available for adequate psychometric testing 4 years later. Blood pressure was related prospectively to Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), a measure of fluid intelligence, but not memory differences. RPM scores were obtained at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and at the end of the randomised controlled trial. For subjects on captopril mean scores at each time point adjusted for blood pressure change were 27.6 (95% CI 25.5-29.6), 27.2 (95% CI 25.1-29.2), 28.4 (95% CI 26.6-30.3) and 28.9 (95% CI 26.9-30.9), and for bendrofluazide 27.1 (95% CI 25.1-29.0), 28.9 (95% CI 26.9-30.9), 28.9 (95% CI 27.2-30.7) and 28.7 (95% CI 26.8-30.6). There was a significant improvement in scores for those on bendrofluazide compared with captopril at week 6 (F=8.10, p=0.006, partial eta2=0.11). There were no significant effects for either drug or blood pressure at any time point for tests of memory. Future trials of the effects of antihypertensive therapy on cognition should focus more on outcomes other than memory. Early differential effects of therapeutic agents may not be maintained.

  9. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677C>T and methionine synthase 2756A>G mutations: no impact on survival, cognitive functioning, or cognitive decline in nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bathum, Lise; von Bornemann Hjelmborg, Jacob; Christiansen, Lene

    2007-01-01

    homocysteine level. METHODS: We examined the effect of the MTHFR 677C>T and MTR 2756A>G genotypes on baseline cognitive functioning, cognitive decline over 5 years measured in three assessments, and survival in a population-based cohort of 1581 nonagenarians. Cognitive functioning was assessed by using......BACKGROUND: Several reports have shown an association between homocysteine, cognitive functioning, and survival among the oldest-old. Two common polymorphisms in the genes coding for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C>T) and methionine synthase (MTR 2756A>G) have an impact on plasma...... the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and five brief cognitive tests (cognitive composite). RESULTS: There are no differences in MMSE score (p =.83) or in cognitive composite (p =.56) at intake as a function of genotype tested by analysis of variance, whereas sex and social group have a impact on MMSE...

  10. Differential influences of unilateral tDCS over the intraparietal cortex on numerical cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eArtemenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuro-imaging research identified the bilateral intraparietal sulcus (IPS to be a key area associated with number processing. However, causal structure-function relationships are hard to evaluate from neuro-imaging techniques such as fMRI. Nevertheless, brain stimulation methods like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS allow for investigating the functional relevance of the IPS for number processing. Following up on a study using bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS over the IPS, the current study aimed at evaluating the differential lateralized functional contributions of the left and right IPS to number processing using unilateral bi-cephalic tDCS over either the left or right IPS. Results indicated a right lateralization for the processing of the place-value structure of the Arabic number system. Importantly, the processing of number magnitude information was not affected by unilateral IPS corroborating the assumption that number magnitude is processed in the bilateral IPS. Taken together, these data suggest that even though number magnitude is represented bilaterally, the left and right IPS seem to contribute differentially to numerical cognition with respect to the processing of specific other aspects of numerical information.

  11. Differential Item Functioning Assessment in Cognitive Diagnostic Modeling: Application of the Wald Test to Investigate DIF in the DINA Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Likun; de la Torre, Jimmy; Nandakumar, Ratna

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing examinees' responses using cognitive diagnostic models (CDMs) has the advantage of providing diagnostic information. To ensure the validity of the results from these models, differential item functioning (DIF) in CDMs needs to be investigated. In this article, the Wald test is proposed to examine DIF in the context of CDMs. This study…

  12. Preterm Infants Who Are Prone to Distress: Differential Effects of Parenting on 36-Month Behavioral and Cognitive Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlmann, Julie; Hane, Amanda; Burnson, Cynthia; Maleck, Sarah; Hamburger, Elizabeth; Shah, Prachi E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The differential susceptibility (DS) model suggests that temperamentally prone-to-distress infants may exhibit adverse outcomes in negative environments but optimal outcomes in positive environments. This study explored temperament, parenting, and 36-month cognition and behavior in preterm infants using the DS model. We hypothesized…

  13. Preterm Infants Who Are Prone to Distress: Differential Effects of Parenting on 36-Month Behavioral and Cognitive Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlmann, Julie; Hane, Amanda; Burnson, Cynthia; Maleck, Sarah; Hamburger, Elizabeth; Shah, Prachi E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The differential susceptibility (DS) model suggests that temperamentally prone-to-distress infants may exhibit adverse outcomes in negative environments but optimal outcomes in positive environments. This study explored temperament, parenting, and 36-month cognition and behavior in preterm infants using the DS model. We hypothesized…

  14. Differential validity for cognitive ability tests in employment and educational settings: not much more than range restriction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Philip L; Le, Huy; Oh, In-Sue; Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Buster, Maury A; Robbins, Steve B; Campion, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The concept of differential validity suggests that cognitive ability tests are associated with varying levels of validity across ethnic groups, such that validity is lower in certain ethnic subgroups than in others. A recent meta-analysis has revived the viability of this concept. Unfortunately, data were not available in this meta-analysis to correct for range restriction within ethnic groups. We reviewed the differential validity literature and conducted 4 studies. In Study 1, we empirically demonstrated that using a cognitive ability test with a common cutoff decreases variance in test scores of Black subgroup samples more than in White samples. In Study 2, we developed a simulation that examined the effects of range restriction on estimates of differential validity. Results demonstrated that different levels of range restriction for subgroups can explain the apparent observed differential validity results in employment and educational settings (but not military settings) when no differential validity exists in the population. In Study 3, we conducted a simulation in which we examined how one corrects for range restriction affects the accuracy of these corrections. Results suggest that the correction approach using a common range restriction ratio for various subgroups may create or perpetuate the illusion of differential validity and that corrections are most accurate when done within each subgroup. Finally, in Study 4, we conducted a simulation in which we assumed differential validity in the population. We found that range restriction artificially increased the size of observed differential validity estimates when the validity of cognitive ability tests was assumed to be higher among Whites. Overall, we suggest that the concept of differential validity may be largely artifactual and current data are not definitive enough to suggest such effects exist.

  15. Voxel-based moprhometry in the differential diagnosis of posttraumatic cognitive impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Odinak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain injury (BI is a major cause of cognitive impairments (CI in young people. However, many aspects of their development remain unstudied. In particular, the role of neurodegenerative and vascular processes in the occurrence of posttraumatic disorders of higher cortical functions is still unclear. Voxel-based morphometry is one of the current neuroimaging techniques. Objective: to comprehensively study a change in the volume indicators of a number of brain structures in patients with posttraumatic, vascular, and amnestic CI.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 123 patients who were divided into 5 groups: 1 20 examinees without CI (a control group; 2 22 patients with mild and moderate CI and a history of mild recurrent CI; 3 19 patients with moderate posttraumatic CI after severe brain contusion; 4 41 patients with moderate vascular CI; 5 21 patients with moderate amnestic CI. Before divided into the groups, all the patients underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing, which enabled different aspects of cognitive performance to be assessed.Results. Atrophic changes were ascertained to be uncharacteristic for the patients who had sustained mild recurrent BI. At the same time, the patients with severe consequences of BI showed a significant decrease in the volume of brain regions, primarily in that of frontal and temporal lobes. A combined comprehensive assessment of the results obtained in the group analysis using SPM8 and calculating absolute volume values using MRICroN allowed one to more accurately understand the nature of neurodegenerative changes. Comparative assessment of the data obtained in the posttraumatic, vascular, and amnestic CI groups identified a number of differences in both the distribution of atrophic changes and their level, which can be of great importance for the differential diagnosis of these conditions.

  16. A framework to categorize students as learners based on their cognitive practices while learning differential equations and related concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, Debasree

    2013-12-01

    There are numerous theories that offer cognitive processes of students of mathematics, all documenting various ways to describe knowledge acquisition leading to successful transitions from one stage to another, be it characterized by Dubinsky's encapsulation, Sfard's reification or Piaget's equilibration. We however are interested in the following question. Who succeeds at making the leap and can we describe the attributes that set them apart from the ones that do not? In this article, we offer a framework to categorize students as learners based on their individual approaches towards learning concepts in differential equations and related concepts - as demonstrated by their efforts to resolve a conflict, conserve and rebuild their cognitive structures.

  17. Functional integrity of thalamocortical circuits differentiates normal aging from mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero, Jose L; Atienza, Mercedes; Gomez-Herrero, German; Cruz-Vadell, Abel; Gil-Neciga, Eulogio; Rodriguez-Romero, Rafael; Garcia-Solis, David

    2009-12-01

    Resonance in thalamocortical networks is critically involved in sculpting oscillatory behavior in large ensembles of neocortical cells. Neocortical oscillations provide critical information about the integrity of thalamocortical circuits and functional connectivity of cortical networks, which seem to be significantly disrupted by the neuronal death and synapse loss characterizing Alzheimer's disease (AD). By applying a novel analysis methodology to overcome volume conduction effects between scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements, we were able to estimate the temporal activation of EEG-alpha sources in the thalamus and parieto-occipital regions of the cortex. We found that synaptic flow underlying the lower alpha band (7.5-10 Hz) was abnormally facilitated in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) as compared to healthy elderly individuals, particularly from thalamus to cortex (approximately 38% higher). In addition, the thalamic generator of lower alpha oscillations was also abnormally activated in patients with MCI. Regarding the upper alpha subdivision (10.1-12.5 Hz), both controls and patients with MCI showed a bidirectional decrease of thalamocortical synaptic transmission, which was age-dependent only in the control group. Altogether, our results suggest that functional dynamics of thalamocortical networks differentiate individuals at high risk of developing AD from healthy elderly subjects, supporting the hypothesis that neurodegeneration mechanisms are active years before the patient is clinically diagnosed with dementia.

  18. Differential effects of psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder symptoms on cognitive and fear processing in female offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Marja E.; Vitale, Jennifer E.; Curtin, John J.; Newman, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    Psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder (APD) have long been considered important risk factors for criminal behavior and incarceration. However, little is known about the psychobiological underpinnings that give rise to the disinhibited behavior of female offenders. Using an instructed fear-conditioning paradigm and a sample of incarcerated female offenders, we manipulated attentional focus and cognitive load to characterize and differentiate between the dysfunctional cognitive and affective processes associated with these syndromes. We used fear-potentiated startle (FPS) and event-related potentials as measures of affective and cognitive processing, respectively. After controlling for APD symptoms, psychopathic women displayed greater FPS while attending directly to threat-relevant stimuli and displayed less FPS while performing a demanding task that directed attention to threat-irrelevant information. Conversely, controlling for psychopathy, women with high APD symptoms displayed less overall FPS, especially when instructed to focus on threat-relevant stimuli. However, as the demands on cognitive resources increased, they displayed greater FPS. For both psychopathy and APD, analysis of the event-related potentials qualified these findings and further specified the abnormal cognitive processes associated with these two syndromes. Overall, simultaneous analysis of psychopathy and APD revealed distinct patterns of cognitive processing and fear reactivity. PMID:22886692

  19. Differential effects of psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder symptoms on cognitive and fear processing in female offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Marja E; Baskin-Sommers, Arielle R; Vitale, Jennifer E; Curtin, John J; Newman, Joseph P

    2012-12-01

    Psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder (APD) have long been considered important risk factors for criminal behavior and incarceration. However, little is known about the psychobiological underpinnings that give rise to the disinhibited behavior of female offenders. Using an instructed fear-conditioning paradigm and a sample of incarcerated female offenders, we manipulated attentional focus and cognitive load to characterize and differentiate between the dysfunctional cognitive and affective processes associated with these syndromes. We used fear-potentiated startle (FPS) and event-related potentials as measures of affective and cognitive processing, respectively. After controlling for APD symptoms, psychopathic women displayed greater FPS while attending directly to threat-relevant stimuli and displayed less FPS while performing a demanding task that directed attention to threat-irrelevant information. Conversely, controlling for psychopathy, women with high APD symptoms displayed less overall FPS, especially when instructed to focus on threat-relevant stimuli. However, as the demands on cognitive resources increased, they displayed greater FPS. For both psychopathy and APD, analysis of the event-related potentials qualified these findings and further specified the abnormal cognitive processes associated with these two syndromes. Overall, simultaneous analysis of psychopathy and APD revealed distinct patterns of cognitive processing and fear reactivity.

  20. Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to differentiate between Healthy Aging subjects, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer’s Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Oghabian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Back ground: Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia which is still difficult to be differentiated from other types of brain disorders. Moreover, Mild Cognitive Impairment refers to the presence of cognitive impairments that is not severe enough to meet the criteria of dementia, and its diagnosis in early stages is so critical. There is currently no distinct method available for diagnosing Alzheimer's or Mild Cognitive Impairment, and their diagnosis needs a combination of different methods and assessments.

    Methods: Our goal in this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fMRI imaging in differentiating between Alzheimer's, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI and Healthy Aging. To prove fMRI's ability, we compared resting-state brain activation patterns between these three groups of subjects using Independent Component Algorithm (ICA. We examined 40 age- and sex-matched subjects, 15 elderly, 11 MCI and 14 Alzheimer's subjects.

    Results: The results show that during a certain resting-state session, healthy aging brain benefits from larger area and greater intensity of activation (compared with MCI and Alzheimer's group in Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC region of the brain, as part of Default Mode Network.

    Conclusion: This difference in activation pattern can be used as a diagnostic criterion in using fMRI for differentiating between Alzheimer's disease (AD, MCI and Healthy Aging.


    Keywords: fMRI, Default Mode Network, Alzheimer's, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Resting-State

  1. Differential Effects of Cognitive Load on University Wind Students' Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cognitive load during practice on university wind students' learning. Cognitive load was manipulated through instrument family (woodwind or brass) and the amount of repetition used in practice (highly repetitive or random). University woodwind and valved-brass students (N = 46)…

  2. Differential effects of olanzapine and risperidone on cognition in schizophrenia? A saccadic eye movement study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broerse, A; Crawford, TJ; den Boer, JA

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that novel antipsychotics have positive effects on certain cognitive functions in schizophrenia. The present study investigated this claim by means of saccadic paradigms, which provide a selective index of cognitive function. Thirty-three first-episode schizophrenic patients w

  3. Differential Item Functioning Comparisons on a Performance-Based Alternate Assessment for Students with Severe Cognitive Impairments, Autism and Orthopedic Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitusis, Cara Cahalan; Maneckshana, Behroz; Monfils, Lora; Ahlgrim-Delzell, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Differential Item Functioning (DIF) by disability groups on an on-demand performance assessment for students with severe cognitive impairments. Researchers examined the presence of DIF for two comparisons. One comparison involved students with severe cognitive impairments who served as the reference group…

  4. Differential Item Functioning Comparisons on a Performance-Based Alternate Assessment for Students with Severe Cognitive Impairments, Autism and Orthopedic Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitusis, Cara Cahalan; Maneckshana, Behroz; Monfils, Lora; Ahlgrim-Delzell, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Differential Item Functioning (DIF) by disability groups on an on-demand performance assessment for students with severe cognitive impairments. Researchers examined the presence of DIF for two comparisons. One comparison involved students with severe cognitive impairments who served as the reference group…

  5. Reduced neural differentiation between self-referential cognitive and emotional processes in women with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpiet, Sigrid; Herwig, Uwe; Opialla, Sarah; Scheerer, Hanne; Habermeyer, Viola; Jäncke, Lutz; Brühl, Annette B

    2015-09-30

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is associated with disturbed emotion regulation. Psychotherapeutic interventions using mindfulness elements have shown effectiveness in reducing clinical symptoms, yet little is known about their underlying neurobiology. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, 19 female BPD patients and 19 healthy controls were compared during mindful introspection, cognitive self-reflection and a neutral condition. The activation pattern in the right dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) in BPD patients was different from that in healthy subject when directing attention onto their emotions and bodily feelings in contrast to cognitively thinking about themselves. Mindful introspection compared with the neutral condition was associated with higher activations in bilateral motor/pre-motor regions, left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), while cognitive self-reflection activated the right motor and somatosensory cortex, extending into the right supramarginal gyrus (SMG) and superior temporal gyrus (STG) in BPD patients compared with the controls. Results indicate that self-referential cognitive and emotional processes are not clearly differentiated in BPD patients at the neurobiological level. In particular, altered neural mechanism underlying self-referential thinking may be related to some aspects of the typical emotion dysregulation in BPD. Current data support the finding that mindful self-focused attention is effective in regulating amygdala activity in BPD as well as in healthy subjects.

  6. Differential sensitivity to the environment: contribution of cognitive biases and genes to psychological wellbeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, E; Beevers, C G

    2016-01-01

    Negative cognitive biases and genetic variation have been associated with risk of psychopathology in largely independent lines of research. Here, we discuss ways in which these dynamic fields of research might be fruitfully combined. We propose that gene by environment (G × E) interactions may be mediated by selective cognitive biases and that certain forms of genetic ‘reactivity' or ‘sensitivity' may represent heightened sensitivity to the learning environment in a ‘for better and for worse' manner. To progress knowledge in this field, we recommend including assessments of cognitive processing biases; examining G × E interactions in ‘both' negative and positive environments; experimentally manipulating the environment when possible; and moving beyond single-gene effects to assess polygenic sensitivity scores. We formulate a new methodological framework encapsulating cognitive and genetic factors in the development of both psychopathology and optimal wellbeing that holds long-term promise for the development of new personalized therapies. PMID:27431291

  7. Cognitive profiles of schizotypal dimensions in a community cohort: Common properties of differential manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannopoulou, Leda; Karamaouna, Penny; Zouraraki, Chrysoula; Roussos, Panos; Bitsios, Panos; Giakoumaki, Stella G

    2016-11-01

    Studies assessing the effects of schizotypal dimensions (i.e., positive, negative, and disorganized) on cognitive functions have yielded mixed findings. In the present study, we administered an extensive battery of cognitive tasks to a community sample and defined the schizotypal dimensions according to a more analytical four-factor model, whereby positive schizotypy is further divided into cognitive-perceptual and paranoid. Two hundred healthy community participants were assessed for schizotypy with the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire; assessment of cognitive functions included set shifting, working memory, processing speed, verbal fluency, attention switching, planning/problem solving, strategy formation, and abstract reasoning. Associations between cognitive tasks and schizotypy were examined with hierarchical multiple linear regressions. We also divided our subjects into groups based on whether or not their scores in the negative, positive, and cognitive-perceptual factors fell in the upper 10% of the scores of a large community normative sample in Greece and examined between-group differences. Applying both dimensional and categorical approaches, we showed that (a) attention-switching impairment is a "core" deficit of both negative and paranoid schizotypy, (b) impaired working memory and set shifting are associated mainly with negative and to a lesser extent paranoid schizotypy, (c) paranoid schizotypy is associated with reduced performance in tasks requiring intact frontotemporal connectivity, and (d) cognitive-perceptual and disorganized schizotypy are not associated with any cognitive functions. Our findings further support the more analytical four-factor categorization of schizotypy and suggest that the discrepancies in the findings so far might be due to a more "generalized" definition of the schizotypal dimensions. They also add further in the early formulation of the profile of the high-schizotypal individuals seeking psychiatric help so that

  8. Differential Brain Shrinkage Over Six Months Shows Limited Association with Cognitive Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Raz, N.; Schmiedek, F.; K. Rodrigue; K Kennedy; Lindenberger, U; Lövdén, M.

    2013-01-01

    The brain shrinks with age, but the timing of this process and the extent of its malleability are unclear. We measured changes in regional brain volumes in younger (age 20–31) and older (age 65–80) adults twice over a six months period, and examined the association between changes in volume, history of hypertension, and cognitive training. Between two MRI scans, 49 participants underwent intensive practice in three cognitive domains for 100 consecutive days, whereas 23 control group members p...

  9. Differential effects of water-based exercise on the cognitive function in independent elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Daisuke; Seko, Chihiro; Hashitomi, Tatsuya; Sengoku, Yasuo; Nomura, Takeo

    2015-04-01

    Physical exercise has been reported to be the most effective method to improve cognitive function and brain health, but there is as yet no research on the effect of water-based exercise. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of water-based exercise with and without cognitive stimuli on cognitive and physical functions. The design is a single-blind randomized controlled study. Twenty-one participants were randomly assigned to a normal water-based exercise (Nor-WE) group or a cognitive water-based exercise (Cog-WE) group. The exercise sessions were divided into two exercise series: a 10-min series of land-based warm-up, consisting of flexibility exercises, and a 50-min series of exercises in water. The Nor-WE consisted of 10 min of walking, 30 min of strength and stepping exercise, including stride over, and 10 min of stretching and relaxation in water. The Cog-WE consisted of 10 min of walking, 30 min of water-cognitive exercises, and 10 min of stretching and relaxation in water. Cognitive function, physical function, and ADL were measured before the exercise intervention (pre-intervention) and 10 weeks after the intervention (post-intervention). Participation in the Cog-WE performed significantly better on the pegboard test and the choice stepping reaction test and showed a significantly improved attention, memory, and learning, and in the general cognitive function (measured as the total score in the 5-Cog test). Participation in the Nor-WE dramatically improved walking ability and lower limb muscle strength. Our results reveal that the benefits elderly adults may obtain from water-based exercise depend on the characteristics of each specific exercise program. These findings highlight the importance of prescription for personalized water-based exercises to elderly adults to improve cognitive function.

  10. Differential effects of single-dose escitalopram on cognitive and affective interference during Stroop task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffer Gustaf Rahm

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Our aim was to study the regulatory role of serotonin (5-HT on two key nodes in the cognitive control networks - the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. We hypothesized that increasing the levels of 5-HT would preferentially modulate the activity in ACC during cognitive control during interference by negative affects compared to cognitive control during interference by a superimposed cognitive task. Methods: We performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation on 11 healthy individuals, comparing the effects of the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor escitalopram on brain oxygenation level dependent signals in the ACC and the DLPFC using affective and cognitive counting Stroop paradigms (aStroop and cStroop. Results: Escitalopram significantly decreased the activity in rostral ACC during aStroop compared to cStroop (p< 0.05. In the absence of escitalopram, both aStroop and cStroop significantly activated ACC and DLPFC (Z≥2.3, p< 0.05. Conclusion: We conclude that escitalopram in a region and task specific manner modified the cognitive control networks and preferentially decreased activity induced by affective interference in the ACC.

  11. Pain reporting in older adults: the influence of cognitive impairment - results from the Cambridge City >75 Cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docking, Rachael E; Fleming, Jane; Brayne, Carol; Zhao, Jun; Macfarlane, Gary J; Jones, Gareth T

    2014-08-01

    Evidence suggests that while disabling back pain (BP), and rheumatic diseases associated with pain, continues to increase with age, the prevalence of non-disabling BP reaches a plateau, or even decreases, in the oldest old. This study aimed to determine whether this age-related pattern of non-disabling BP is a function of increasing cognitive impairment. Cross-sectional study of adults aged >77 years. Participants answered interviewer-administered questions on BP and cognitive function, assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination, categorised into normal versus mild, moderate or severe impairment. The relationship between cognitive function and BP was examined using multinomial logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex and residence. Of 1174 participants with BP data, 1126 (96%) completed cognitive assessments. The relationship between cognitive function and BP differed for disabling and non-disabling BP. Across categories of cognitive impairment, increasingly higher prevalence of disabling BP was reported, compared to those with normal cognition, although this was not statistically significant (odds ratio (OR) = 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.7-4.6). No association was found between cognitive function and non-disabling BP (OR = 0.8; 95% CI = 0.4-1.6). This study found no association between the reporting of BP and level of cognitive impairment, suggesting that increasing cognitive impairment is an inadequate explanation for age-related decline in self-reported non-disabling BP. Future research should determine the reasons for the decline in non-disabling pain in older adults, although, meanwhile, it is important to ensure that this group receive appropriate pain assessment and pain management. Prevalence of non-disabling back pain decreases in the oldest old.Some have proposed that this may be a function of cognitive impairment in older age, and an increasing inability to adequately report pain.Our findings do not support this hypothesis.

  12. Differential age-related gray and white matter impact mediates educational influence on elders' cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaqué-Alcázar, Lídia; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Valls-Pedret, Cinta; Vidal-Piñeiro, Dídac; Fernández-Cabello, Sara; Bargalló, Núria; Ros, Emilio; Bartrés-Faz, David

    2017-04-01

    High education, as a proxy of cognitive reserve (CR), has been associated with cognitive advantage amongst old adults and may operate through neuroprotective and/or compensation mechanisms. In neuromaging studies, indirect evidences of neuroprotection can be inferred from positive relationships between CR and brain integrity measures. In contrast, compensation allows high CR elders to sustain greater brain damage. We included 100 cognitively normal old-adults and investigated the associations and interactions between education, speed of processing (SP), memory and two brain integrity measures: cortical thickness (CTh) of gray matter (GM) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in the white matter (WM). High education was associated with better cognitive performance, enlarged CTh in frontal lobe areas and reduced measures of FA in several areas. Better SP performance in higher educated subjects was related to more preserved GM and WM, while memory status amongst high educated elders was better explained by a putative compensatory mechanism and independently from cerebrovascular risk indicators. Moreover, we analyzed the direct effect of age on measures of brain integrity and found a stronger negative effect on WM than in CTh, which was accentuated amongst the high CR sample. Our study suggests that the cognitive advantage associated to high education among healthy aging is related to the coexistence of both neuroprotective and compensatory mechanisms. In particular, high educated elders seem to have greater capacity to counteract a more abrupt age impact on WM integrity.

  13. Delayed voluntary exercise does not enhance cognitive performance after hippocampal injury: an investigation of differentially distributed exercise protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogensen, Elise; Gram, Marie Gajhede; Sommer, Jens Bak; Vilsen, Christina Rytter; Mogensen, Jesper; Malá, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary exercise has previously been shown to enhance cognitive recovery after acquired brain injury (ABI). The present study evaluated effects of two differentially distributed protocols of delayed, voluntary exercise on cognitive recovery using an allocentric place learning task in an 8-arm radial maze. Fifty-four Wistar rats were subjected to either bilateral transection of the fimbria-fornix (FF) or to sham surgery. Twenty-one days postinjury, the animals started exercising in running wheels either for 14 consecutive days (FF/exercise daily [ExD], sham/ExD) or every other day for 14 days (FF/exercise every second day [ExS], sham/ExS). Additional groups were given no exercise treatment (FF/not exercise [NE], sham/NE). Regardless of how exercise was distributed, we found no cognitively enhancing effects of exercise in the brain injured animals. Design and protocol factors possibly affecting the efficacy of post-ABI exercise are discussed. PMID:27807517

  14. Development of Planning Abilities in Normal Aging: Differential Effects of Specific Cognitive Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köstering, Lena; Stahl, Christoph; Leonhart, Rainer; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2014-01-01

    In line with the frontal hypothesis of aging, the ability to plan ahead undergoes substantial change during normal aging. Although impairments on the Tower of London planning task were reported earlier, associations between age-related declines and specific cognitive demands on planning have not been studied. Here we investigated the impact of…

  15. Switching from Reaching to Navigation: Differential Cognitive Strategies for Spatial Memory in Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonti, Vittorio; Cioni, Giovanni; Berthoz, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Navigational and reaching spaces are known to involve different cognitive strategies and brain networks, whose development in humans is still debated. In fact, high-level spatial processing, including allocentric location encoding, is already available to very young children, but navigational strategies are not mature until late childhood. The…

  16. Differential effects of blueberry polyphenols on age-associated neuroinflammation and cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term effects of oxidative stress and inflammatory insults are thought to contribute to the decrements in cognitive performance seen in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. In previous studies, we have shown the beneficial effects of various dark-colored berry fruits in reversing age-related de...

  17. Differential Effects of Cognitive, Affective, and Proprioceptive Instructional Approaches on Vocabulary Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Ula Price; Manzo, Anthony V.

    The effectiveness of three instructional approaches was investigated in a study of how best to facilitate vocabulary acquisition. The three approaches were (1) the cognitive approach, a method employing dictionary worksheets and patterned after the most commonly used method of teaching vocabulary; (2) the affective approach, which urged students…

  18. Cognitive functioning differentially predicts different dimensions of older drivers' on-road safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksan, Nazan; Anderson, Steve W; Dawson, Jeffrey; Uc, Ergun; Rizzo, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    The extent to which deficits in specific cognitive domains contribute to older drivers' safety risk in complex real-world driving tasks is not well understood. We selected 148 drivers older than 70 years of age both with and without neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer disease-AD and Parkinson disease-PD) from an existing driving database of older adults. Participant assessments included on-road driving safety and cognitive functioning in visuospatial construction, speed of processing, memory, and executive functioning. The standardized on-road drive test was designed to examine multiple facets of older driver safety including navigation performance (e.g., following a route, identifying landmarks), safety errors while concurrently performing secondary navigation tasks ("on-task" safety errors), and safety errors in the absence of any secondary navigation tasks ("baseline" safety errors). The inter-correlations of these outcome measures were fair to moderate supporting their distinctiveness. Participants with diseases performed worse than the healthy aging group on all driving measures and differences between those with AD and PD were minimal. In multivariate analyses, different domains of cognitive functioning predicted distinct facets of driver safety on road. Memory and set-shifting predicted performance in navigation-related secondary tasks, speed of processing predicted on-task safety errors, and visuospatial construction predicted baseline safety errors. These findings support broad assessments of cognitive functioning to inform decisions regarding older driver safety on the road and suggest navigation performance may be useful in evaluating older driver fitness and restrictions in licensing.

  19. Tracing Differential Pathways of Risk: Associations among Family Adversity, Cortisol, and Cognitive Functioning in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suor, Jennifer H.; Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.; Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante; Manning, Liviah G.

    2015-01-01

    Guided by family risk and allostasis theoretical frameworks, the present study utilized a prospective longitudinal design to examine associations among family risk experiences, basal cortisol patterns, and cognitive functioning in children. The sample included 201 low-income children living within a midsize city in the Northeastern United States.…

  20. Parkinson's Disease and Dopaminergic Therapy--Differential Effects on Movement, Reward and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, J. B.; Hughes, L.; Ghosh, B. C. P.; Eckstein, D.; Williams-Gray, C. H.; Fallon, S.; Barker, R. A.; Owen, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are very common in Parkinson's disease particularly for "executive functions" associated with frontal cortico-striatal networks. Previous work has identified deficits in tasks that require attentional control like task-switching, and reward-based tasks like gambling or reversal learning. However, there is a complex…

  1. Neuropsychological Method in the Differential Diagnosis of Cognitive Impairment in Children and Adolescents with Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergienko A.A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the neuropsychological techniques which are applied in the clinical practice in child psychiatry. It describes a system of qualitative and quantitative neuropsychological diagnostics. The role of neuropsychological analysis of the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia spectrum disorders in children and adolescents is reflected. Hierarchical cluster analysis according to neuropsychological diagnosis helps in the establishing the psychiatric diagnosis.

  2. Development of Planning Abilities in Normal Aging: Differential Effects of Specific Cognitive Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köstering, Lena; Stahl, Christoph; Leonhart, Rainer; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2014-01-01

    In line with the frontal hypothesis of aging, the ability to plan ahead undergoes substantial change during normal aging. Although impairments on the Tower of London planning task were reported earlier, associations between age-related declines and specific cognitive demands on planning have not been studied. Here we investigated the impact of…

  3. Parkinson's Disease and Dopaminergic Therapy--Differential Effects on Movement, Reward and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, J. B.; Hughes, L.; Ghosh, B. C. P.; Eckstein, D.; Williams-Gray, C. H.; Fallon, S.; Barker, R. A.; Owen, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are very common in Parkinson's disease particularly for "executive functions" associated with frontal cortico-striatal networks. Previous work has identified deficits in tasks that require attentional control like task-switching, and reward-based tasks like gambling or reversal learning. However, there is a complex relationship…

  4. Differential spontaneous recovery across cognitive abilities during detoxification period in alcohol-dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Géraldine; Luminet, Olivier; Cordovil de Sousa Uva, Mariana; Zorbas, Alexis; Maurage, Pierre; de Timary, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    There is a lack of consensus regarding the extent to which cognitive dysfunctions may recover upon cessation of alcohol intake by alcohol-dependents (AD), and the divergent findings are most likely due to methodological differences between the various studies. The present study was aimed at conducting a very strict longitudinal study of cognitive recovery in terms of assessment points, the duration of abstinence, control of age and duration of the addiction, and by use of individual analyses in addition to mean group comparisons. Our study further focused on the 2-3 week phase of alcohol detoxification that is already known to positively affect many biological, emotional, motivational, as well as neural variables, followed by longer-term therapies for which good cognitive functioning is needed. 41 AD inpatients undergoing a detoxification program, and 41 matched controls, were evaluated twice in terms of five cognitive functions (i.e., short-term memory, working memory, inhibition, cognitive flexibility, and verbal fluency) within a three-week interval [on the first day (T1) and the 18th day (T2) of abstinence for AD patients]. Emotional (positive and negative affectivity and depression) and motivational (craving) variables were also measured at both evaluation times. Although verbal fluency, short-term memory, and cognitive flexibility did not appear to be affected, the patients exhibited impaired inhibition and working memory at T1. While no recovery of inhibition was found to occur, the average working memory performance of the patients was comparable to that of the controls at T2. Improvements in emotional and motivational dimensions were also observed, although they did not correlate with the ones in working memory. Individual analysis showed that not all participants were impaired or recover the same functions. While inhibition deficits appear to persist after 18 days of detoxification, deficits in working memory, which is a central component of cognition

  5. Differential spontaneous recovery across cognitive abilities during detoxification period in alcohol-dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Géraldine; Luminet, Olivier; Cordovil de Sousa Uva, Mariana; Zorbas, Alexis; Maurage, Pierre; de Timary, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Objective There is a lack of consensus regarding the extent to which cognitive dysfunctions may recover upon cessation of alcohol intake by alcohol-dependents (AD), and the divergent findings are most likely due to methodological differences between the various studies. The present study was aimed at conducting a very strict longitudinal study of cognitive recovery in terms of assessment points, the duration of abstinence, control of age and duration of the addiction, and by use of individual analyses in addition to mean group comparisons. Our study further focused on the 2–3 week phase of alcohol detoxification that is already known to positively affect many biological, emotional, motivational, as well as neural variables, followed by longer-term therapies for which good cognitive functioning is needed. Methods 41 AD inpatients undergoing a detoxification program, and 41 matched controls, were evaluated twice in terms of five cognitive functions (i.e., short-term memory, working memory, inhibition, cognitive flexibility, and verbal fluency) within a three-week interval [on the first day (T1) and the 18th day (T2) of abstinence for AD patients]. Emotional (positive and negative affectivity and depression) and motivational (craving) variables were also measured at both evaluation times. Results Although verbal fluency, short-term memory, and cognitive flexibility did not appear to be affected, the patients exhibited impaired inhibition and working memory at T1. While no recovery of inhibition was found to occur, the average working memory performance of the patients was comparable to that of the controls at T2. Improvements in emotional and motivational dimensions were also observed, although they did not correlate with the ones in working memory. Individual analysis showed that not all participants were impaired or recover the same functions. Conclusions While inhibition deficits appear to persist after 18 days of detoxification, deficits in working memory, which

  6. Depression in early, middle and late adolescence: differential evidence for the cognitive diathesis-stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braet, Caroline; Van Vlierberghe, Leen; Vandevivere, Eva; Theuwis, Lotte; Bosmans, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive theory is a prominent framework to study depression in both adults and adolescents. This theory stated that dysfunctional schemas are moderators (known as diathesis) in the association of current stress and psychopathology. However, in adolescents, less evidence has been found so far to corroborate the importance of these schemas. This study aimed to investigate in a cross-sectional design the moderating role of adolescents' early maladaptive schemas (EMS) on depressive symptoms. This will be studied in relation to both important daily stressors (i.e., maternal, paternal and peer rejection) and stressful life events. Adolescents (N = 228, age 12-18 years), selected from inpatient and outpatient clinical settings and a non-referred sample, completed questionnaires and interviews measuring psychopathology, cognitive schemas, peer rejection, maternal and paternal rejection, and stressful life events. Parents completed questionnaires about their adolescent measuring psychopathology, stressful life events and peer rejection, as well as their own parental behaviour. Correlational analyses revealed significant associations between the study variables. Evidence was found for an interaction effect between the adolescents' EMS and peer rejection in explaining depressive symptoms, but only in late adolescents. Stress induced by maternal and, in lesser extent, paternal rejection is contributing to depressive symptoms primarily in younger and to lesser extent in older age groups. The quality of peer relationships becomes an increasingly salient source of distress as adolescence unfolds and is certainly an important mechanism affecting depression in adolescence. Maladaptive schemas only start functioning as a cognitive diathesis in late adolescence, increasing depression in response to peer-related distress. Since maladaptive schemas are not yet operating as cognitive vulnerability factors in early and middle adolescence, early interventions for depressive disorders

  7. Differential effect of motivational features on training improvements in school-based cognitive training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eKatz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive training often utilizes game-like motivational features to keep participants engaged. It is unclear how these elements, such as feedback, rewards, and theming impact player performance during training. Recent research suggests that motivation and engagement are closely related to improvements following cognitive training. We hypothesized that training paradigms featuring game-like motivational elements would be more effective than a version with no motivational elements. Five distinct motivational features were chosen for examination: a real-time scoring system, theme changes, prizes, end-of-session certificates, and scaffolding to explain the lives and leveling system included in the game. One version of the game was created with all these motivational elements included, and one was created with all of them removed. Other versions removed a single element at a time. Seven versions of a game-like n-back working memory task were then created and administered to 128 students in 2nd through 8th grade at school-based summer camps in southeastern Michigan. The inclusion of real-time scoring during play, a popular motivational component in both entertainment games and cognitive training, was found to negatively impact training improvements over the three day period. Surprisingly, scaffolding to explain lives and levels also negatively impacted training gains. The other game adjustments did not significantly impact training improvement compared to the original version of the game with all features included. These findings are preliminary and are limited by both the small sample size and the brevity of the intervention. Nonetheless, these findings suggest that certain motivational elements may distract from the core cognitive training task, reducing task improvement, especially at the initial stage of learning.

  8. Differential cognitive effects of energy drink ingredients: caffeine, taurine, and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Grace E; Mahoney, Caroline R; Brunyé, Tad T; Gardony, Aaron L; Taylor, Holly A; Kanarek, Robin B

    2012-10-01

    Energy drinks containing caffeine, taurine, and glucose may improve mood and cognitive performance. However, there are no studies assessing the individual and interactive effects of these ingredients. We evaluated the effects of caffeine, taurine, and glucose alone and in combination on cognitive performance and mood in 24-hour caffeine-abstained habitual caffeine consumers. Using a randomized, double-blind, mixed design, 48 habitual caffeine consumers (18 male, 30 female) who were 24-hour caffeine deprived received one of four treatments (200 mg caffeine/0 mg taurine, 0 mg caffeine/2000 mg taurine, 200 mg caffeine/2000 mg taurine, 0 mg caffeine/0 mg taurine), on each of four separate days, separated by a 3-day wash-out period. Between-participants treatment was a glucose drink (50 g glucose, placebo). Salivary cortisol, mood and heart rate were measured. An attention task was administered 30-minutes post-treatment, followed by a working memory and reaction time task 60-minutes post-treatment. Caffeine enhanced executive control and working memory, and reduced simple and choice reaction time. Taurine increased choice reaction time but reduced reaction time in the working memory tasks. Glucose alone slowed choice reaction time. Glucose in combination with caffeine, enhanced object working memory and in combination with taurine, enhanced orienting attention. Limited glucose effects may reflect low task difficulty relative to subjects' cognitive ability. Caffeine reduced feelings of fatigue and increased tension and vigor. Taurine reversed the effects of caffeine on vigor and caffeine-withdrawal symptoms. No effects were found for salivary cortisol or heart rate. Caffeine, not taurine or glucose, is likely responsible for reported changes in cognitive performance following consumption of energy drinks, especially in caffeine-withdrawn habitual caffeine consumers.

  9. Differential Effects of Acute and Regular Physical Exercise on Cognition and Affect

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Michael E.; Davis, F Caroline; VanTieghem, Michelle R.; Whalen, Paul J.; Bucci, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of regular exercise versus a single bout of exercise on cognition, anxiety, and mood were systematically examined in healthy, sedentary young adults who were genotyped to determine brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) allelic status (i.e., Val-Val or Val66Met polymorphism). Participants were evaluated on novel object recognition (NOR) memory and a battery of mental health surveys before and after engaging in either a) a four-week exercise program, with exercise on the final te...

  10. Are cognitive control and stimulus-driven processes differentially linked to inattention and hyperactivity in preschoolers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carlin J; Miller, Scott R; Healey, Dione M; Marshall, Katie; Halperin, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Temperament and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are both typically viewed as biologically based behavioural constructs. There is substantial overlap between ADHD symptoms and specific temperamental traits, such as effortful control, especially in young children. Recent work by Martel and colleagues ( 2009 , 2011 ) suggests that cognitive control temperamental processes are more closely related to inattention symptoms, whereas stimulus-driven temperamental processes are linked to hyperactivity-impulsivity. The present study tested a model of temperament and ADHD symptoms in typically developing preschoolers and those at risk for ADHD using structural equation modelling. Data were from larger study on ADHD in a short-term longitudinal sample with parent/teacher reports and neurocognitive testing. Participants included 214 preschool children (72.9% male) from diverse ethnic/racial backgrounds and a wide range of socioeconomic status from a large metropolitan center. Cognitive control processes, such as effortful control, but not stimulus-driven processes, are related to inattention and hyperactivity. In contrast, stimulus-driven processes, such as emotional reactivity, were related only to hyperactivity symptoms longitudinally. These results suggest that early temperament behaviours and cognitive processes may be indicators of later childhood behavioural difficulties with lasting consequences.

  11. QoS Differential Scheduling in Cognitive-Radio-Based Smart Grid Networks: An Adaptive Dynamic Programming Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rong; Zhong, Weifeng; Xie, Shengli; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yun

    2016-02-01

    As the next-generation power grid, smart grid will be integrated with a variety of novel communication technologies to support the explosive data traffic and the diverse requirements of quality of service (QoS). Cognitive radio (CR), which has the favorable ability to improve the spectrum utilization, provides an efficient and reliable solution for smart grid communications networks. In this paper, we study the QoS differential scheduling problem in the CR-based smart grid communications networks. The scheduler is responsible for managing the spectrum resources and arranging the data transmissions of smart grid users (SGUs). To guarantee the differential QoS, the SGUs are assigned to have different priorities according to their roles and their current situations in the smart grid. Based on the QoS-aware priority policy, the scheduler adjusts the channels allocation to minimize the transmission delay of SGUs. The entire transmission scheduling problem is formulated as a semi-Markov decision process and solved by the methodology of adaptive dynamic programming. A heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) architecture is established for the scheduling problem. By the online network training, the HDP can learn from the activities of primary users and SGUs, and adjust the scheduling decision to achieve the purpose of transmission delay minimization. Simulation results illustrate that the proposed priority policy ensures the low transmission delay of high priority SGUs. In addition, the emergency data transmission delay is also reduced to a significantly low level, guaranteeing the differential QoS in smart grid.

  12. Differential effects of acute and regular physical exercise on cognition and affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, M E; Davis, F C; Vantieghem, M R; Whalen, P J; Bucci, D J

    2012-07-26

    The effects of regular exercise versus a single bout of exercise on cognition, anxiety, and mood were systematically examined in healthy, sedentary young adults who were genotyped to determine brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) allelic status (i.e., Val-Val or Val66Met polymorphism). Participants were evaluated on novel object recognition (NOR) memory and a battery of mental health surveys before and after engaging in either (a) a 4-week exercise program, with exercise on the final test day, (b) a 4-week exercise program, without exercise on the final test day, (c) a single bout of exercise on the final test day, or (d) remaining sedentary between test days. Exercise enhanced object recognition memory and produced a beneficial decrease in perceived stress, but only in participants who exercised for 4 weeks including the final day of testing. In contrast, a single bout of exercise did not affect recognition memory and resulted in increased perceived stress levels. An additional novel finding was that the improvements on the NOR task were observed exclusively in participants who were homozygous for the BDNF Val allele, indicating that altered activity-dependent release of BDNF in Met allele carriers may attenuate the cognitive benefits of exercise. Importantly, exercise-induced changes in cognition were not correlated with changes in mood/anxiety, suggesting that separate neural systems mediate these effects. These data in humans mirror recent data from our group in rodents. Taken together, these current findings provide new insights into the behavioral and neural mechanisms that mediate the effects of physical exercise on memory and mental health in humans.

  13. Intelligence, creativity, and cognitive control: The common and differential involvement of executive functions in intelligence and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Mathias; Jauk, Emanuel; Sommer, Markus; Arendasy, Martin; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2014-09-01

    Intelligence and creativity are known to be correlated constructs suggesting that they share a common cognitive basis. The present study assessed three specific executive abilities - updating, shifting, and inhibition - and examined their common and differential relations to fluid intelligence and creativity (i.e., divergent thinking ability) within a latent variable model approach. Additionally, it was tested whether the correlation of fluid intelligence and creativity can be explained by a common executive involvement. As expected, fluid intelligence was strongly predicted by updating, but not by shifting or inhibition. Creativity was predicted by updating and inhibition, but not by shifting. Moreover, updating (and the personality factor openness) was found to explain a relevant part of the shared variance between intelligence and creativity. The findings provide direct support for the executive involvement in creative thought and shed further light on the functional relationship between intelligence and creativity.

  14. Intelligence, creativity, and cognitive control: The common and differential involvement of executive functions in intelligence and creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Mathias; Jauk, Emanuel; Sommer, Markus; Arendasy, Martin; Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    2014-01-01

    Intelligence and creativity are known to be correlated constructs suggesting that they share a common cognitive basis. The present study assessed three specific executive abilities – updating, shifting, and inhibition – and examined their common and differential relations to fluid intelligence and creativity (i.e., divergent thinking ability) within a latent variable model approach. Additionally, it was tested whether the correlation of fluid intelligence and creativity can be explained by a common executive involvement. As expected, fluid intelligence was strongly predicted by updating, but not by shifting or inhibition. Creativity was predicted by updating and inhibition, but not by shifting. Moreover, updating (and the personality factor openness) was found to explain a relevant part of the shared variance between intelligence and creativity. The findings provide direct support for the executive involvement in creative thought and shed further light on the functional relationship between intelligence and creativity. PMID:25278640

  15. The differential item functioning and structural equivalence of a nonverbal cognitive ability test for five language groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Schaap

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: For a number of years, eliminating a language component in testing by using nonverbal cognitive tests has been proposed as a possible solution to the effect of groups’ languages (mother tongues or first languages on test performance. This is particularly relevant in South Africa with its 11 official languages.Research purpose: The aim of the study was to determine the differential item functioning (DIF and structural equivalence of a nonverbal cognitive ability test (the PiB/SpEEx Observance test [401] for five South African language groups.Motivation for study: Cultural and language group sensitive tests can lead to unfair discrimination and is a contentious workplace issue in South Africa today. Misconceptions about psychometric testing in industry can cause tests to lose credibility if industries do not use a scientifically sound test-by-test evaluation approach.Research design, approach and method: The researcher used a quasi-experimental design and factor analytic and logistic regression techniques to meet the research aims. The study used a convenience sample drawn from industry and an educational institution.Main findings: The main findings of the study show structural equivalence of the test at a holistic level and nonsignificant DIF effect sizes for most of the comparisons that the researcher made.Practical/managerial implications: This research shows that the PIB/SpEEx Observance Test (401 is not completely language insensitive. One should see it rather as a language-reduced test when people from different language groups need testing.Contribution/value-add: The findings provide supporting evidence that nonverbal cognitive tests are plausible alternatives to verbal tests when one compares people from different language groups.

  16. Differentially Severe Cognitive Effects of Compromised Cerebral Blood Flow in Aged Mice: Association with Myelin Degradation and Microglia Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilly Wolf

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS models the effects of compromised cerebral blood flow on brain structure and function in mice. We compared the effects of BCAS in aged (21 month and young adult (3 month female mice, anticipating a differentially more severe effect in the older mice. Four weeks after surgery there was a significant age by time by treatment interaction on the radial-arm water maze (RAWM; p = 0.014: on the first day of the test, latencies of old mice were longer compared to the latencies of young adult mice, independent of BCAS. However, on the second day of the test, latencies of old BCAS mice were significantly longer than old control mice (p = 0.049, while latencies of old controls were similar to those of the young adult mice, indicating more severe impairment of hippocampal dependent learning and working memory by BCAS in the older mice. Fluorescence staining of myelin basic protein (MBP showed that old age and BCAS both induced a significant decrease in fluorescence intensity. Evaluation of the number oligodendrocyte precursor cells demonstrated augmented myelin replacement in old BCAS mice (p < 0.05 compared with young adult BCAS and old control mice. While microglia morphology was assessed as normal in young adult control and young adult BCAS mice, microglia of old BCAS mice exhibited striking activation in the area of degraded myelin compared to young adult BCAS (p < 0.01 and old control mice (p < 0.05. These findings show a differentially more severe effect of cerebral hypoperfusion on cognitive function, myelin integrity and inflammatory processes in aged mice. Hypoperfusion may exacerbate degradation initiated by aging, which may induce more severe neuronal and cognitive phenotypes.

  17. Apraxia for differentiating Alzheimer’s disease from subcortical vascular dementia and mild cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan S

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Serhat Ozkan,1 Demet Ozbabalik Adapinar,1 Nese Tuncer Elmaci,2 Didem Arslantas31Department of Neurology, Eskisehir Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Eskisehir, Turkey; 2Department of Neurology, Marmara University Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Public Health, Eskisehir Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Eskisehir, TurkeyAbstract: Although ideomotor limb apraxia is considered to be a typical sign of cortical pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, it has been also reported in subcortical neurodegenerative diseases and vascular lesions. We aimed to investigate the difference between AD, subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI patients by means of ideomotor limb apraxia frequency and severity. Ninety-six AD, 72 SVaD, and 84 MCI patients were assessed with the mini-mental status examination (MMSE, clinical dementia rating (CDR and the apraxia screening test of TULIA (AST. Apraxia was significantly more frequent in the AD patients (32.3% than in both of the SVaD (16.7% and MCI (4.8% patients. The frequency of apraxia was also significantly higher in SVaD patients than in MCI patients. AD patients had significantly lower apraxia scores than both SVaD and MCI patients. In addition, a significant difference was found between SVaD and MCI patients in terms of apraxia scores. These results suggest that the widespread belief of the association between apraxia and cortical dementias is not exactly correct. The significant difference between both of the dementia groups and the MCI patients suggests that the absence of apraxia can be an indicator for MCI diagnosis.Keywords: apraxia, Alzheimer’s disease, subcortical vascular dementia, mild cognitive impairment

  18. DIFFERENTIAL KINETICS IN ALTERATION AND RECOVERY OF COGNITIVE PROCESSES FROM A CHRONIC SLEEP RESTRICTION IN YOUNG HEALTHY MEN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Alexandre Rabat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic sleep restriction (CSR induces neurobehavioral deficits in young and healthy people with a morning failure of sustained attention process. Testing both the kinetic of failure and recovery of different cognitive processes (i.e. attention, executive under CSR and their potential links with subject’s capacities (stay awake, baseline performance, age and with some biological markers of stress and anabolism would be useful in order to understand the role of sleep debt on human behavior. Twelve healthy subjects spent 14 days in laboratory with 2 baseline days (B1 and B2, 8h TIB followed by 7 days of sleep restriction (SR1-SR7, 4h TIB, 3 sleep recovery days (R1-R3, 8h TIB and 2 more ones 8 days later (R12-R13. Subjective sleepiness (KSS, maintenance of wakefulness latencies (MWT were evaluated 4 times a day (10:00, 12:00 a.m. and 2:00, 4:00 p.m. and cognitive tests were realized at morning (8:30 a.m. and evening (6:30 p.m. sessions during B2, SR1, SR4, SR7, R2, R3 and R13. Saliva (B2, SR7, R2, R13 and blood (B1, SR6, R1, R12 samples were collected in the morning. Cognitive processes were differently impaired and recovered with a more rapid kinetic for sustained attention process. Besides, a significant time of day effect was only evidenced for sustained attention failures that seemed to be related to subject’s age and their morning capacity to stay awake. Executive processes were equally disturbed/recovered during the day and this failure/recovery process seemed to be mainly related to baseline subject’s performance and to their capacity to stay awake. Morning concentrations of testosterone, cortisol and α-amylase were significantly decreased at SR6-SR7, but were either and respectively early (R1, tardily (after R2 and no recovered (R13. All these results suggest a differential deleterious and restorative effect of CSR on cognition through biological changes of the stress pathway and subject’s capacity (ClinicalTrials-NCT01989741.

  19. Differential Kinetics in Alteration and Recovery of Cognitive Processes from a Chronic Sleep Restriction in Young Healthy Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabat, Arnaud; Gomez-Merino, Danielle; Roca-Paixao, Laura; Bougard, Clément; Van Beers, Pascal; Dispersyn, Garance; Guillard, Mathias; Bourrilhon, Cyprien; Drogou, Catherine; Arnal, Pierrick J; Sauvet, Fabien; Leger, Damien; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) induces neurobehavioral deficits in young and healthy people with a morning failure of sustained attention process. Testing both the kinetic of failure and recovery of different cognitive processes (i.e., attention, executive) under CSR and their potential links with subject's capacities (stay awake, baseline performance, age) and with some biological markers of stress and anabolism would be useful in order to understand the role of sleep debt on human behavior. Twelve healthy subjects spent 14 days in laboratory with 2 baseline days (B1 and B2, 8 h TIB) followed by 7 days of sleep restriction (SR1-SR7, 4 h TIB), 3 sleep recovery days (R1-R3, 8 h TIB) and two more ones 8 days later (R12-R13). Subjective sleepiness (KSS), maintenance of wakefulness latencies (MWT) were evaluated four times a day (10:00, 12:00 a.m. and 2:00, 4:00 p.m.) and cognitive tests were realized at morning (8:30 a.m.) and evening (6:30 p.m.) sessions during B2, SR1, SR4, SR7, R2, R3 and R13. Saliva (B2, SR7, R2, R13) and blood (B1, SR6, R1, R12) samples were collected in the morning. Cognitive processes were differently impaired and recovered with a more rapid kinetic for sustained attention process. Besides, a significant time of day effect was only evidenced for sustained attention failures that seemed to be related to subject's age and their morning capacity to stay awake. Executive processes were equally disturbed/recovered during the day and this failure/recovery process seemed to be mainly related to baseline subject's performance and to their capacity to stay awake. Morning concentrations of testosterone, cortisol and α-amylase were significantly decreased at SR6-SR7, but were either and respectively early (R1), tardily (after R2) and not at all (R13) recovered. All these results suggest a differential deleterious and restorative effect of CSR on cognition through biological changes of the stress pathway and subject's capacity (ClinicalTrials-NCT01989741).

  20. Diagnostic differentiation of mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease using a hippocampus-dependent test of spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Kuven; Minati, Ludovico; Contarino, Valeria; Prioni, Sara; Wood, Ruth; Cooper, Rebecca; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Chan, Dennis

    2015-08-01

    The hippocampus is one of the earliest brain regions affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and tests of hippocampal function have the potential to detect AD in its earliest stages. Given that the hippocampus is critically involved in allocentric spatial memory, this study applied a short test of spatial memory, the 4 Mountains Test (4MT), to determine whether test performance can differentiate mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with and without CSF biomarker evidence of underlying AD and whether the test can distinguish patients with MCI and mild AD dementia when applied in different cultural settings. Healthy controls (HC), patients with MCI, and mild AD dementia were recruited from study sites in UK and Italy. Study numbers were: HC (UK 20, Italy 10), MCI (UK 21, Italy 14), and AD (UK 11, Italy 9). Nineteen UK MCI patients were grouped into CSF biomarker-positive (MCI+, n = 10) and biomarker-negative (MCI-, n = 9) subgroups. Behavioral data were correlated with hippocampal volume and cortical thickness of the precuneus and posterior cingulate gyrus. Spatial memory was impaired in both UK and Italy MCI and AD patients. Test performance additionally differentiated between MCI+ and MCI- subgroups (P = 0.001). A 4MT score of ≤8/15 was associated with 100% sensitivity and 90% specificity for detection of early AD (MCI+ and mild AD dementia) in the UK population, and with 100% sensitivity and 50% specificity for detection of MCI and AD in the Italy sample. 4MT performance correlated with hippocampal volume in the UK population and cortical thickness of the precuneus in both study populations. In conclusion, performance on a hippocampus-sensitive test of spatial memory differentiates MCI due to AD with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. The observation that similar diagnostic sensitivity was obtained in two separate study populations, allied to the scalability and usability of the test in community memory clinics, supports future application of the 4MT

  1. Could language deficits really differentiate Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) from mild Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsantali, E; Economidis, D; Tsolaki, M

    2013-01-01

    Naming abilities seem to be affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, though MCI individuals tend to exhibit greater impairments in category fluency. In this study we: (1) detect language deficits of amnestic MCIs (aMCIs) and mild AD (mAD) participants and present their language performance (the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination - BDAE scores) according to educational level, (2) study the diagnostic value of language deficits according to the cognitive state of the participants. One hundred nineteen participants, 38 normal controls (NC), 28 aMCIs and 53 mADs, were recruited randomly as outpatients of 2 clinical departments and administered clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging assessment. Language abilities were assessed by the adapted Greek edition of the BDAE (2nd edition). Our results indicate that verbal fluency, auditory, reading comprehension and narrative ability are the main language abilities to be affected in mADs, although they are almost intact in NCs and less vulnerable in aMCIs. Narrative ability seems to be significantly impaired in mADs but not so in aMCIs. Six language subtests of the BDAE assess safely the above deficits. This brief version of the BDAE discriminated mADs from the other 2 groups 92.5% of the time, NCs 86.8% and aMCI 67.9% of the time in order to save time and to be accurate in clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stronger activation and deactivation in archery experts for differential cognitive strategy in visuospatial working memory processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeehye; Kim, Yang-Tae; Song, Hui-Jin; Lee, Hui Joong; Lee, Jongmin; Jung, Tae-Du; Lee, Gunyoung; Kwon, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Gu; Chang, Yongmin

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that elite athletes have higher performance in perception, planning, and execution in sports activities relative to novices. It remains controversial, however, whether any differences in basic cognitive functions between experts and novices exist. Furthermore, few studies have directly used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural activation and deactivation differences between experts and novices while performing visuospatial working memory (WM) tasks. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in neural activation and deactivation associated with working memory components in processing visuospatial information between archery experts and novices. To this end, we employed a judgment of line orientation (JLO) task, which has a strong WM component. With regard to brain activation, archery experts displayed higher activation in cortical areas associated with visuospatial attention and working memory, including the middle frontal cortex, supplemental motor area, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex than that of the novices during the performance of the JLO task. With regard to brain deactivation, archery experts exhibited stronger task-related deactivation in cortical areas, such as the paracentral cortex/precuneus and the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex related to the default network, than that of the novices. These results suggest that the archery experts have a strategy that demands greater use of neural correlates associated with visuospatial working memory and attention in addition to greater use of DMN in visuospatial working memory task not directly tied to their domain of expertise.

  3. Presynaptic proteins complexin-I and complexin-II differentially influence cognitive function in early and late stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Miguel, Alfredo; Sawada, Ken; Jones, Andrea A; Thornton, Allen E; Barr, Alasdair M; Leurgans, Sue E; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; Honer, William G

    2017-03-01

    Progressive accumulation of Alzheimer's disease-related pathology is associated with cognitive dysfunction. Differences in cognitive reserve may contribute to individual differences in cognitive function in the presence of comparable neuropathology. The protective effects of cognitive reserve could contribute differentially in early versus late stages of the disease. We investigated presynaptic proteins as measures of brain reserve (a subset of total cognitive reserve), and used Braak staging to estimate the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Antemortem evaluations of cognitive function, postmortem assessments of pathologic indices, and presynaptic protein analyses, including the complexins I and II as respective measures of inhibitory and excitatory terminal function, were assayed in multiple key brain regions in 418 deceased participants from a community study. After covarying for demographic variables, pathologic indices, and overall synapse density, lower brain complexin-I and -II levels contributed to cognitive dysfunction (P < 0.01). Each complexin appeared to be dysregulated at a different Braak stage. Inhibitory complexin-I explained 14.4% of the variance in global cognition in Braak 0-II, while excitatory complexin-II explained 7.3% of the variance in Braak V-VI. Unlike other presynaptic proteins, complexins did not colocalize with pathologic tau within neuritic plaques, suggesting that these functional components of the synaptic machinery are cleared early from dystrophic neurites. Moreover, complexin levels showed distinct patterns of change related to memory challenges in a rat model, supporting the functional specificity of these proteins. The present results suggest that disruption of inhibitory synaptic terminals may trigger early cognitive impairment, while excitatory terminal disruption may contribute relatively more to later cognitive impairment.

  4. Cognitive neuropsychological analysis of differential reading and spelling disorder mechanisms in a patient with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kosei; Uno, Akira

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if differential reading and spelling mechanisms were involved in a Japanese patient with aphasia. In our case, the patient scored low on all of the administered reading tasks, suggesting that both the reading lexical and non-lexical routes were impaired. In contrast, his writing-to-dictation score for Kana nonwords was high, suggesting that the spelling non-lexical route was intact. However, the patient scored low on a writing-to-dictation task comprised of high-familiarity Kanji words. The spelling lexical route was thought to be impaired. Therefore, the mechanism(s) involved in reading and spelling may differ in this case.

  5. Cognitive Machine-Learning Algorithm for Cardiac Imaging: A Pilot Study for Differentiating Constrictive Pericarditis From Restrictive Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Partho P; Huang, Yen-Min; Bansal, Manish; Ashrafi, Ali; Fisher, Matt; Shameer, Khader; Gall, Walt; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-06-01

    Associating a patient's profile with the memories of prototypical patients built through previous repeat clinical experience is a key process in clinical judgment. We hypothesized that a similar process using a cognitive computing tool would be well suited for learning and recalling multidimensional attributes of speckle tracking echocardiography data sets derived from patients with known constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy. Clinical and echocardiographic data of 50 patients with constrictive pericarditis and 44 with restrictive cardiomyopathy were used for developing an associative memory classifier-based machine-learning algorithm. The speckle tracking echocardiography data were normalized in reference to 47 controls with no structural heart disease, and the diagnostic area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the associative memory classifier was evaluated for differentiating constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy. Using only speckle tracking echocardiography variables, associative memory classifier achieved a diagnostic area under the curve of 89.2%, which improved to 96.2% with addition of 4 echocardiographic variables. In comparison, the area under the curve of early diastolic mitral annular velocity and left ventricular longitudinal strain were 82.1% and 63.7%, respectively. Furthermore, the associative memory classifier demonstrated greater accuracy and shorter learning curves than other machine-learning approaches, with accuracy asymptotically approaching 90% after a training fraction of 0.3 and remaining flat at higher training fractions. This study demonstrates feasibility of a cognitive machine-learning approach for learning and recalling patterns observed during echocardiographic evaluations. Incorporation of machine-learning algorithms in cardiac imaging may aid standardized assessments and support the quality of interpretations, particularly for novice readers with limited experience. © 2016

  6. [Differential and ontogenetic meaningfulness of iconic, linguistic and formal codes on cognitive development: new questions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, J

    1990-01-01

    Man is a semiotic functioning animal, i.e. civilizations are units of symbolic (architectural), iconic, linguistic, formal, etc...) organizations. These units can only initially develop when enabled--but not necessarily produced--by a material base of a bio-physical nature, namely the central nervous system. In short, taking but three more academic factors, images, texts, and algebra, for example, are grasped by this material base. However, it is clear that the effects produced on children (and on adults, for that matter) are not equal. Scholastic goals, however, emphasize "fables" and "equations" whereas social mediatization emphasizes "images" and economic mediatization "equations". Hence the problems of appropriation of linguistic codes. To show the danger of an imbalance in these appropriations, the concept of differential semanticization is called upon: images are over-semanticized, with identification at risk; algebra is under-semanticized, at risks of obsessionalization. Texts, themselves, call upon the imagination and not on an imaginary structure imposed by a multivocal iconic pressure nor an imaginary structure rarefied by the prevalence of systems with univocal elements. Hence the importance of reading and writing for maintaining a nondepersonalizing semiotic balance.

  7. Emotional and cognitive stimuli differentially engage the default network during inductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldaief, Mark C; Deckersbach, Thilo; Carlson, Lindsay E; Beucke, Jan C; Dougherty, Darin D

    2012-04-01

    The brain's default network (DN) is comprised of several cortical regions demonstrating robust intrinsic connectivity at rest. The authors sought to examine the differential effects of emotional reasoning and reasoning under certainty upon the DN through the employment of an event-related fMRI design in healthy participants. Participants were presented with syllogistic arguments which were organized into a 2 × 2 factorial design in which the first factor was emotional salience and the second factor was certainty/uncertainty. We demonstrate that regions of the DN were activated both during reasoning that is emotionally salient and during reasoning which is more certain, suggesting that these processes are neurally instantiated on a network level. In addition, we present evidence that emotional reasoning preferentially activates the dorsomedial (dMPFC) subsystem of the DN, whereas reasoning in the context of certainty activates areas specific to the DN's medial temporal (MTL) subsystem. We postulate that emotional reasoning mobilizes the dMPFC subsystem of the DN because this type of reasoning relies upon the recruitment of introspective and self-relevant data such as personal bias and temperament. In contrast, activation of the MTL subsystem during certainty argues that this form of reasoning involves the recruitment of mnemonic and semantic associations to derive conclusions.

  8. Discussion of Syndrome Differentiation of TCM from Perspective of Cognitive Psychology%从认知心理学角度探析中医辨证过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢菁; 朴恩希; 贾春华

    2011-01-01

    从认知心理学信息加工论的角度对中医辨证的认知理论基础、认知模式以及影响中医辨证过程的心理因素进行了初步探讨.中医辨证过程实际上是医生有意识地运用中医药理论知识和临床经验,对患者所表现的症状信息进行一系列连续加工的认知心理过程.问题解决理论和模式识别原型理论的相关观点对认识、理解中医辨证的思维过程和认知模式有一定的启示作用.医生作为辨证的主体,其专业的中医药理论结构、独特的临床经验、灵感与顿悟思维、性格特征以及情绪、动机等心理因素对中医辨证过程有着十分重要的影响,客观上反映了中医辨证过程存在着主体差异性、模式多样性、灵活性的认知特点.%This article discussed the cognitive theory, cognitive model and psychological influenced factors in syndrome differentiation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) from the perspective of Cognitive Information Processing. Syndrome differentiation is a series continuous cognitive processing of the doctor consciously uses Chinese theoretical knowledge and clinical experience when faced with patients' symptoms. Problem Solving Theory and Prototype Theory of Pattern Recognition in Cognitive Psychology have inspiration to understand the essence of syndrome differentiation. As subject of syndrome differentiation, doctors' professional theoretical structure, unique clinical experience, inspiration and insight thinking, character and emotion, motivation and other psychological factors have very important influence on differentiation processing. It objectively reflects that the differentiation processing has cognitive characteristics of individual differences, pattern diversity and flexibility.

  9. Differential efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy and pharmacological treatments for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Meca, Julio; Rosa-Alcázar, Ana I; Iniesta-Sepúlveda, Marina; Rosa-Alcázar, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a meta-analysis about the differential efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), pharmacological and combined treatment for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The literature research and the application of the inclusion criteria enabled us to locate 18 studies, yielding a total of 24 independent comparisons between a treated (10 pharmacological, 11 CBT, and 3 combined interventions) and a control group. All types of interventions were efficacious in reducing obsessive-compulsive symptoms, with effect sizes adjusted by the type of control group of d=1.203 for CBT, d=0.745 for pharmacological treatments, and d=1.704 for mixed treatments. Depression, anxiety and other secondary responses were also improved, especially with CBT interventions. The analysis of moderator variables showed that the CBT protocol and the total of intervention hours exhibited a significant influence on the effect size. Within pharmacological treatment, clomipramine (d=1.305) was more efficacious than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (d=0.644), but its adverse effects were more severe. Finally, the clinical implications of the results are discussed.

  10. Mode of Effective Connectivity within a Putative Neural Network Differentiates Moral Cognitions Related to Care and Justice Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceda, Ricardo; James, G. Andrew; Ely, Timothy D.; Snarey, John; Kilts, Clinton D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Moral sensitivity refers to the interpretive awareness of moral conflict and can be justice or care oriented. Justice ethics is associated primarily with human rights and the application of moral rules, whereas care ethics is related to human needs and a situational approach involving social emotions. Among the core brain regions involved in moral issue processing are: medial prefrontal cortex, anterior (ACC) and posterior (PCC) cingulate cortex, posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), insula and amygdala. This study sought to inform the long standing debate of whether care and justice moral ethics represent one or two different forms of cognition. Methodology/Principal Findings Model-free and model-based connectivity analysis were used to identify functional neural networks underlying care and justice ethics for a moral sensitivity task. In addition to modest differences in patterns of associated neural activity, distinct modes of functional and effective connectivity were observed for moral sensitivity for care and justice issues that were modulated by individual variation in moral ability. Conclusions/Significance These results support a neurobiological differentiation between care and justice ethics and suggest that human moral behavior reflects the outcome of integrating opposing rule-based, self-other perspectives, and emotional responses. PMID:21364916

  11. When synesthesia and savant abilities are mistaken for hallucinations and delusions: contribution of a cognitive approach for their differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Lucie; Barbier, Jacques-Edouard; Cason, Nia; Bakchine, Serge; Ehrlé, Nathalie

    2017-02-17

    Schizophrenia is characterized by hallucinations, delusions, disorganized speech and behavior, and other symptoms that cause social or occupational dysfunction. However, some of these symptoms, such as hallucinations and delusions, can be indicative of other phenomena such as synesthesia and savant abilities. The aim of this paper is to highlight how neurological and psychiatric conditions can be confused and how formal neuropsychological evaluations can be necessary to distinguish them. We report the case of a young woman, VA, who perceived sounds as colors and claimed to have elaborated complex astrophysical reasoning, despite having experienced difficulties at school, especially in mathematics. VA also had difficulties to orient herself, to develop social relationships, and often became confused by daily life situations. These elements were considered as symptoms of schizophrenia. Evaluations revealed that VA exhibited savant abilities in astrophysics and colored-hearing synesthesia. We also found evidence of higher-than-average cognitive functioning. In complex cases, neuropsychological and formal evaluations are necessary to establish a differential diagnosis. Moreover, the case highlights the link between synesthesia and savant abilities.

  12. Mode of effective connectivity within a putative neural network differentiates moral cognitions related to care and justice ethics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cáceda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Moral sensitivity refers to the interpretive awareness of moral conflict and can be justice or care oriented. Justice ethics is associated primarily with human rights and the application of moral rules, whereas care ethics is related to human needs and a situational approach involving social emotions. Among the core brain regions involved in moral issue processing are: medial prefrontal cortex, anterior (ACC and posterior (PCC cingulate cortex, posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS, insula and amygdala. This study sought to inform the long standing debate of whether care and justice moral ethics represent one or two different forms of cognition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Model-free and model-based connectivity analysis were used to identify functional neural networks underlying care and justice ethics for a moral sensitivity task. In addition to modest differences in patterns of associated neural activity, distinct modes of functional and effective connectivity were observed for moral sensitivity for care and justice issues that were modulated by individual variation in moral ability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support a neurobiological differentiation between care and justice ethics and suggest that human moral behavior reflects the outcome of integrating opposing rule-based, self-other perspectives, and emotional responses.

  13. Age differential effects of severity of visual impairment on mortality among older adults in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Danan; Zhou, Junshan; Yong, Vanessa; Sautter, Jessica; Saito, Yasuhiko

    2013-10-01

    We use a population-based longitudinal survey in China from 2002 to 2005 to examine age differentials in the association between severity of visual impairment and mortality risk in older adults. Controlling for numerous factors and baseline health, a substantial age difference is found. Young-old women and men aged 65 to 79 with severe visual impairments have 161% (hazard ratio = 2.61) and 52% (hazard ratio = 1.52) higher risk of death respectively as compared to their unimpaired counterparts. Mild impairment does not increase mortality risk among young-old adults, while both mild and severe impairment increase mortality risk by 33% and 32% for women and 24% and 34% for men among the oldest-old as a whole when all factors are controlled for. We conclude that visual impairment is an independent predictor of mortality and severe visual impairment likely plays a stronger role in determining mortality risk among young-old adults than among the oldest-old.

  14. Cultural Factors Affecting the Differential Performance of Israeli and Palestinian Children on the Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josman, Naomi; Abdallah, Taisir M.; Engel-Yeger, Batya

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive performance is essential for children's functioning and may also predict school readiness. The suitability of Western standardized assessments for cognitive performance among children from different cultures needs to be elaborated. This study referred to the existence of differences in cognitive performance between and within children…

  15. Amelioration of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury induced cognitive deficits after neuronal differentiation of transplanted human neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurlock, Markus S; Ahmed, Aminul Islam; Rivera, Karla N; Yokobori, Shoji; Lee, Stephanie W; Sam, Pingdewinde N; Shear, Deborah A; Hefferan, Michael P; Hazel, Thomas G; Johe, Karl K; Gajavelli, Shyam; Tortella, Frank C; Bullock, Ross

    2017-03-01

    Penetrating traumatic brain injury (PTBI) is one of the major cause of death and disability worldwide. Previous studies in penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI), a PTBI rat model revealed widespread peri-lesional neurodegeneration, similar to that seen in humans following gunshot wound to head, which is unmitigated by any available therapies to date. Therefore, we evaluated human neural stem cell (hNSC) engraftment to putatively exploit the potential of cell therapy that has been seen in other central nervous system injury models. Towards this, green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled hNSCs (400,000 per animal) were transplanted in immunosuppressed Sprague Dawley (SD), Fisher, and athymic (ATN) PBBI rats one week after injury. Tacrolimus (3mg/kg two days prior to transplantation, then 1mg/kg/day), Methylprednisolone (10mg/kg on day of transplant, 1mg/kg/week thereafter), and Mycophenolate mofetil (30mg/kg/day) for seven days following transplantation were used to confer immunosuppression. Engraftment in SD and ATN was comparable at 8-weeks post transplantation. Evaluation of hNSC differentiation and distribution revealed increased neuronal differentiation of transplanted cells with time. At 16-weeks post-transplantation neither cell proliferation nor glial lineage markers expression was detected. Transplanted cell morphology was similar to neighboring host neurons and there was relatively little migration of cells from the peri-transplant site. By 16 weeks, GFP positive processes extended both rostro-caudally and bilaterally into parenchyma, spreading along host white matter tracts, traversing internal capsule, extending ~13 mm caudally from transplantation site reaching into the brain stem. In a Morris water maze test at 8-weeks post-transplantation, animals with transplants had shorter latency to platform compared to vehicle treated animals. However, weak injury-induced cognitive deficits in the control group at the delayed time point confounded benefits

  16. Differential Effects of Meal Challenges on Cognition, Metabolism, and Biomarkers for Apolipoprotein E ɛ4 Carriers and Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Angela J; Bayer, Jennifer L; Baker, Laura D; Cholerton, Brenna; VanFossen, Brian; Trittschuh, Emily; Rissman, Robert A; Donohue, Michael C; Moghadam, Setareh H; Plymate, Stephen R; Craft, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    High intake of saturated fat (SF) and glycemic index (GI) foods is a risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Meal challenges may elucidate mechanisms that contribute to this risk, enabling development of targeted interventions. To assess cognitive and metabolic changes after a meal high in SF and GI calories (HIGH) versus a meal low in these macronutrients (LOW) in older adults with and without cognitive impairment, and with and without the apolipoprotein E4 risk factor. 46 adults with either cognitive impairment (CI) or normal cognition (NC) ingested a LOW (25% total fat, 7% SF, GI 70) in a blinded random fashion. Participants then underwent cognitive testing and blood sampling for metabolic and Alzheimer's disease biomarkers. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and Spearman correlations. E4-adults with NC demonstrated lower delayed memory scores after the HIGH compared to the LOW meal, whereas normal E4+ and CI E4- groups had higher scores after the HIGH meal (ANOVA p = 0.03). These findings were associated with meal-induced changes in glucose (p = 0.05), insulin (p = 0.004), triglycerides (p cognitive performance of adults without CI may worsen following high SF and sugar meals, whereas adults with CI or those at risk for CI due to E4 status may benefit acutely from such meals. Furthermore, plasma Aβ was affected by meal type, suggesting a relationship between metabolic response and amyloid regulation.

  17. Differential effect of cognitive training on executive functions and reading abilities in children with ADHD and in children with ADHD comorbid with reading difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi

    2015-06-01

    The comorbidity of ADHD and reading difficulties (ADHD + RD) is believed to be a disability distinct from ADHD alone, with unique challenges faced by individuals suffering from one disability versus the other. We aimed to examine the differential effect of 8 weeks of cognitive training on reading abilities and on executive functions, through use of the Wisconsin task, in children with ADHD and in children with ADHD + RD. Greater impairments in reading and executive functions, especially in speed of processing, were found in the comorbid group at baseline. The comorbid group showed greater improvements in most measures after training as well. We propose that the cognitive training used in the present study affected not only the immediate abilities of executive functioning but also the secondary ability of reading, especially in the comorbid group, by improving in particular, speed of processing. We suggest that a differential approach should be taken when treating children with ADHD + RD versus treating ADHD children.

  18. Differential lexical correlates of social cognition and metacognition in schizophrenia; a study of spontaneously-generated life narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Benjamin; Minor, Kyle S; Lysaker, Paul H

    2015-04-01

    Social cognition and metacognition have been identified as important cognitive domains in schizophrenia, which are separable from general neurocognition and predictive of functional and treatment outcomes. However, one challenge to improved models of schizophrenia has been the conceptual overlap between the two. One tool used in previous research to develop cognitive models of psychopathology is language analysis. In this article we aimed to clarify distinctions between social cognition and metacognition in schizophrenia using computerized language software. Fifty-eight (n=58) individuals with schizophrenia completed the Metacognitive Assessment Scale Abbreviated and measures of social cognition using the Hinting, Eyes, BLERT and Picture Arrangement test. A lexical analysis of participants' speech using Language Inquiry and Word Count software was conducted to examine relative frequencies of word types. Lexical characteristics were examined for their relationships to social cognition and metacognition. We found that lexical characteristics indicative of cognitive complexity were significantly related to level of metacognitive capacity while social cognition was related to second-person pronoun use, articles, and prepositions, and pronoun use overall. The relationships between lexical variables and metacognition persisted after controlling for demographics, verbal intelligence, and overall word count, but the same was not true for social cognition. Our findings provided support for the view that metacognition requires more synthetic and complex verbal and linguistic operations, while social cognition is associated with the representation and clear identification of others. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in hospitalisation, surgical procedures, and survival among the oldest-old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oksuzyan, Anna; Jeune, Bernard; Juel, Knud

    2013-01-01

    with more active treatment of the recent cohorts of old-aged persons and reduced age inequalities in the Danish healthcare system. No increase in post-operative mortality suggests that the selection of older patients eligible for a surgical treatment is likely to be based on the health status of old...

  20. BK Lyncis: The Oldest Old Nova?... And a Bellwether for Cataclysmic-Variable Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, Joseph; Kemp, Jonathan; de Miguel, Enrique; Krajci, Thomas; Foote, Jerry; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Campbell, Tut; Roberts, George; Cejudo, David; Dvorak, Shawn; Vanmunster, Tonny; Koff, Robert; Skillman, David; Harvey, David; Martin, Brian; Rock, John; Boyd, David; Oksanen, Arto; Morelle, Etienne; Ulowetz, Joseph; Kroes, Anthony; Sabo, Richard; Jensen, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the results of a 20-year campaign to study the light curves of BK Lyncis, a nova-like star strangely located below the 2-3 hour orbital period gap in the family of cataclysmic variables. Two apparent "superhumps" dominate the nightly light curves - with periods 4.6% longer, and 3.0% shorter, than P_orb. The first appears to be associated with the star's brighter states (V~14), while the second appears to be present throughout and becomes very dominant in the low state (V~15.7). Starting in the year 2005, the star's light curve became indistinguishable from that of a dwarf nova - in particular, that of the ER UMa subclass. Reviewing all the star's oddities, we speculate: (a) BK Lyn is the remnant of the probable nova on 30 December 101, and (b) it has been fading ever since, but has taken ~2000 years for the accretion rate to drop sufficiently to permit dwarf-nova eruptions. If such behavior is common, it can explain other puzzles of CV evolution. One: why the ER UMa class even exists (because all...

  1. Sociodemographic Effects on the Onset and Recovery of ADL Disability among Chinese Oldest-old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available By pooling the data from the three waves (1998, 2000, and 2002 of the Chinese Longitudinal Health and Longevity Survey, this study examines the association of sociodemographic factors with the onset and recovery of ADL disability including changes in functional status before dying. The results show that the sociodemographic factors play some specific roles in disability dynamics at very high ages even after controlling for a rich set of confounders. Our results also point out that the conventional method, which excludes the information of ADL changes before dying due to unavailability of the data, overestimates the effects of age, gender, ethnicity, and living alone on disability transitions whereas it underestimates the effects of SES, although such discrepancies are not very big compared with the results including information of ADL changes before dying.

  2. Predictive capacity of anthropometric indicators for abdominal fat in the oldest old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Ribeiro Santos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are a growing public health problem that affects most people over the age of 65 years and abdominal obesity is one of the risk factors for the development of these diseases. There are several methods that can be used to measure body fat, but their accuracy needs to be evaluated, especially in specific populations such as the elderly. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of anthropometric indicators to estimate the percentage of abdominal fat in subjects aged 80 years or older. A total of 125 subjects ranging in age from 80 to 95 years (83.5 ± 3, including 79 women (82.4 ± 3years and 46 men (83.6 ± 3 years, were studied. The following anthropometric indicators were used: body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist-hip ratio (WHR, and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR. The percentage of abdominal fat was measured by DEXA. Sensitivity and specificity were analyzed using an ROC curve. The sensitivity, specificity and AUC were 0. 578, 0. 934 and 0. 756 for BMI, respectively; 0.703, 0.820 and 0.761 for WC; 0.938, 0.213 and 0.575 for WHR, and 0.984, 0.344 and 0.664 for WHtR. BMI and WC were the anthropometric indicators with the largest area under the curve and were therefore more adequate to identify the presence or absence of abdominal obesity.

  3. What matters for life satisfaction among the oldest-old? Evidence from China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ng, Sor Tho; Tey, Nai Peng; Asadullah, M. Niaz

    2017-01-01

    .... Logistic regression is used to analyse the effects of socio-demographic, economic, health, instrumental activities of daily living, family and community factors on life satisfaction and depression...

  4. The heritability of telomere length among the elderly and oldest-old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Claus; Graakjaer, Jesper; Petersen, Hans Christian;

    2005-01-01

    A tight link exists between telomere length and both population doublings of a cell culture and age of a given organism. The more population doublings of the cell culture or the higher the age of the organism, the shorter the telomeres. The proposed model for telomere shortening, called the end...... replication problem, explains why the telomere erodes at each cellular turnover. Telomere length is regulated by a number of associated proteins through a number of different signaling pathways. The determinants of telomere length were studied using whole blood samples from 287 twin pairs aged 73 to 95 years....... Structural equation models revealed that a model including additive genetic effects and non-shared environment was the best fitting model and that telomere length was moderately heritable, with an estimate that was sensitive to the telomere length standardization procedure. Sex-specific analyses showed lower...

  5. The effect of hospitalization with medical illnesses on the suicide risk in the oldest old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Vach, Werner; Jeune, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    -level register data. SETTING: Population-based record linkage. PARTICIPANTS: All persons aged 52 and older living in Denmark during 1996 to 1998 (N=1,684,205). MEASUREMENTS: The studied event is completed suicide. The following time-varying variables are included in the analysis: current age, hospitalization...

  6. Cognitive Impairment, Depression, and Cooccurrence of Both among the Elderly in Panama: Differential Associations with Multimorbidity and Functional Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcibiades E. Villarreal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment and depression are common mental health problems among the elderly, although few studies have examined their cooccurrence in older adults in Latin America. The purpose of this study was to examine cognitive impairment, depression, and cooccurrence of the two conditions and associated factors in a sample of older adults in Panama. This study included 304 community-dwelling elderly (≥65 years individuals. Participants underwent a clinical interview and assessments of cognitive function by the Minimental State Examination and depressive symptoms by the Geriatric Depression Scale. Limitations in basic (BADL and instrumental (IADL activities in daily living and the presence of chronic illnesses were recorded. Multinomial regression analysis revealed that cooccurrence of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms was explained by increasing age (OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.20, 8.30, low education (OR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.33, 8.38, having four or more chronic conditions (OR: 11.5, 95% CI: 2.84, 46.63, and BADL limitations (OR: 5.0, 95% CI: 1.26, 19.68. Less education and limitations in BADL and IADL increased the odds of cognitive impairment alone, while less education and three or more chronic conditions increased the odds of depression alone. These findings underscore the relevance of assessing cognitive impairment in the elderly as part of a long-term approach to managing depression and vice versa.

  7. Comparison of the quick mild cognitive impairment (Qmci) screen and the SMMSE in screening for mild cognitive impairment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Caoimh, Rónán

    2012-09-01

    differentiating mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal cognition (NC) is difficult. The AB Cognitive Screen (ABCS) 135, sensitive in differentiating MCI from dementia, was modified to improve sensitivity and specificity, producing the quick mild cognitive impairment (Qmci) screen.

  8. Estrogen agonist genistein differentially influences the cognitive and motor disorders in an ovariectomized animal model of Parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Arbabi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurological disorder associated with motor disabilities and cognitive dysfunction as well. Evidence indicates that PD occurs less frequently in women than men, confirming a role for steroid hormones in protection of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. It is reported that soy genistein, an estrogen agonist phytoestrogen, display neuroprotective effects against neuronal death. In this study we evaluated the effect of genistein in animal models of Parkinsonism (P and Parkinsonism + ovariectomized (OP. Materials and Methods: The experiments were carried out on the control, P and OP animals. Learning and memory abilities were evaluated using Morris water maze. The latency and speed of locating the platform were measured as cognitive indices. Motor behaviors were assessed by testing the animals in rota rod and the latency to fall from the rod was scored. Results: We found that Parkinsonism leads to the cognitive and motor disabilities; ovariectomy intensified these disorders. Whereas genistein treatment improved the maze performances in both P and OP animals it failed to influence the kinetic problems. Genistein displayed a neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic neurons. Conclusion: Positive impact of genistein on the spatial learning and memory may reflect its effects on the nigrostriatal pathway and striatum. Nevertheless, ineffectiveness of genistein on the motor disorders, despite its neuroprotective impacts, led us to conclude that the cognitive improvement by genistein may also contribute to its effects in other areas of brain.

  9. Children born after unplanned pregnancies and cognitive development at 3 years: social differentials in the United Kingdom Millennium Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Rochebrochard, Elise; Joshi, Heather

    2013-09-15

    Children born after an unplanned pregnancy have poorer developmental scores. This could arise from less favorable parenting but also could reflect confounding from the socioeconomic circumstances. In a large representative sample in the United Kingdom, the Millennium Cohort Study (2001-2005), cognitive delay at 3 years was explored with the Bracken Assessment. Its association with unplanned pregnancy was studied in logistic models controlling for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the family, the child's characteristics, and parenting behavior. Stratification by the mother's educational level (grouped into 3 categories) was explored. Of 12,182 children included in the analysis, 41% were born after a pregnancy reported by the mother to have been a "surprise." Such unplanned pregnancies were associated in univariate analysis with more cognitive delay. Among mothers with a low or middle level of education, this association vanished when socioeconomic circumstances were controlled. Among mothers with a high level of education, the risk of cognitive delay remained significantly and unexplainedly raised after unplanned pregnancies, despite controlling for socioeconomic characteristics and parental behavior. In conclusion, for socially disadvantaged children, having resulted from an unplanned pregnancy does not seem to increase their already disproportionate risk of cognitive delay. Births after unplanned conceptions are mainly a symptom rather than a source of disadvantage.

  10. Differential effects of erythropoietin on neural and cognitive measures of executive function 3 and 7 days post-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla; Inkster, Becky; O'Sullivan, Ursula; Selvaraj, Sudhakar; Goodwin, Guy M; Harmer, Catherine J

    2008-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) has neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects and improves cognitive function in animal models of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric illness. In humans, weekly Epo administration over 3 months improves cognitive function in schizophrenia. The neural underpinnings and time-course of this effect of Epo are currently unknown. It is also unclear whether the cognitive improvement reflects direct neurobiological actions or is secondary to hematological effects. We therefore assessed the actions of single administration of Epo (40,000 IU) vs. saline to healthy volunteers on cognitive and neural measures of executive function using a verbal fluency task and N-back working memory (WM) paradigm during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on day 3 and 7 after administration in two separate cohorts of subjects. Epo modulated neuronal response in a fronto-parietal network during WM performance at both time points; on day 3 after administration, activation was increased in left-hemisphere frontal and cingulate cortex and reduced in the right parietal cortex; in contrast, neural response was enhanced in a right-lateralized fronto-parietal network and reduced in left-side regions 1 week post-administration. In addition, Epo-treated volunteers displayed improved verbal fluency performance 1 week post-administration. These effects occurred in the absence of changes in hematological measures suggesting that they reflect direct neurobiological actions of Epo. The findings are consistent with enduring effects of Epo on neurotrophic signaling and induction of neurochemical changes over time in neural networks typically affected in neuropsychiatric illness. The present study supports the notion that Epo may have clinical applications in the treatment of psychiatric disorder characterized by cognitive dysfunction.

  11. Considering structural connectivity in the triple code model of numerical cognition: differential connectivity for magnitude processing and arithmetic facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Elise; Suchan, Julia; Moeller, Korbinian; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Knops, André; Wood, Guilherme; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Willmes, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The current study provides a generalizable account of the anatomo-functional associations as well as the connectivity of representational codes underlying numerical processing as suggested by the triple code model (TCM) of numerical cognition. By evaluating the neural networks subserving numerical cognition in two specific and substantially different numerical tasks with regard to both grey matter localizations as well as white matter tracts we (1) considered the possibility of additional memory-related cortex areas crucial for arithmetic fact retrieval (e.g., the hippocampus); (2) specified the functional involvement of prefrontal areas in number magnitude processing, and, finally; (3) identified the connections between these anatomo-functional instantiations of the representations involved in number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval employing probabilistic fiber tracking. The resulting amendments to the TCM are summarized in a schematic update, and ideas concerning the possible functional interplay between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval are discussed.

  12. How art changes your brain: differential effects of visual art production and cognitive art evaluation on functional brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolwerk, Anne; Mack-Andrick, Jessica; Lang, Frieder R; Dörfler, Arnd; Maihöfner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Visual art represents a powerful resource for mental and physical well-being. However, little is known about the underlying effects at a neural level. A critical question is whether visual art production and cognitive art evaluation may have different effects on the functional interplay of the brain's default mode network (DMN). We used fMRI to investigate the DMN of a non-clinical sample of 28 post-retirement adults (63.71 years ±3.52 SD) before (T0) and after (T1) weekly participation in two different 10-week-long art interventions. Participants were randomly assigned to groups stratified by gender and age. In the visual art production group 14 participants actively produced art in an art class. In the cognitive art evaluation group 14 participants cognitively evaluated artwork at a museum. The DMN of both groups was identified by using a seed voxel correlation analysis (SCA) in the posterior cingulated cortex (PCC/preCUN). An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was employed to relate fMRI data to psychological resilience which was measured with the brief German counterpart of the Resilience Scale (RS-11). We observed that the visual art production group showed greater spatial improvement in functional connectivity of PCC/preCUN to the frontal and parietal cortices from T0 to T1 than the cognitive art evaluation group. Moreover, the functional connectivity in the visual art production group was related to psychological resilience (i.e., stress resistance) at T1. Our findings are the first to demonstrate the neural effects of visual art production on psychological resilience in adulthood.

  13. Semi-quantitative analysis of perfusion of Brodmann areas in the differential diagnosis of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease, fronto-temporal dementia and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranfaglia, Cristina; Palumbo, Barbara; Siepi, Donatella; Sinzinger, Helmut; Parnetti, Lucilla

    2009-01-01

    Different perfusion defects reflect neurological damage characteristics of different kinds of dementia. Our aim was to investigate the role of brain single photon emission tomography (SPET) with semiquantitative analysis of Brodmann areas in dementia, by technetium-99m - hexamethyl-propylenamine- oxime ((99m)Tc-HMPAO) brain SPET with semiquantitative analysis of Brodmann areas in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We studied 75 patients, 25 with AD (NiNCDS ADRDA criteria), 25 with FTD (Lund and Manchester criteria), 25 with MCI (EADC criteria). After i.v. injection of 740MBq of (99m)Tc-HMPAO, each patient underwent brain SPET. A software application was used able to map the SPET brain image to a stereotaxic atlas (Talairach), providing an affine co-registration by blocks of data defined in the Talairach space. A normal database calculating voxel by voxel the mean and the standard deviation of the measured values was built. Functional SPET data of 3D regions of interest (ROI) of predefined Brodmann's area templates were compared with those of a database of healthy subjects of the same age and gender. Mean values obtained in the Brodmann area ROI in the different groups of patients studied were evaluated. Our results showed that different Brodmann areas were significantly impaired in the different categories of dementia subjects. Both areas 37 (temporal gyrus) and 39 (angular gyrus) of AD patients (mean+/-SD: 37L= -1.6+/-1.0; 37R= -1.5+/-1.1; 39L= -2.3+/-1.3; 39R= -1.9+/-1.2) showed significant hypoperfusion (Pareas 40 (supramarginal gyrus) (40L= -2.6+/-1.0; 40R= -2.3+/-1.1) with respect to MCI patients (40L= -1.8+/-0.9; 40R= -1.7+/-1.2). Finally, FTD patients showed significant hypoperfusion (Pareas 47 (frontal association cortex) (47L= -1.8+/-0.8; 47R= -1.1+/-0.8) in comparison with MCI subjects (47L= -1.2+/-0.9; 47R= -0.9+/-0.9). In conclusion, our results suggest that semiquantitative

  14. Differential effects of emotionally versus neutrally cued autobiographical memories on performance of a subsequent cognitive task: Effects of task difficulty

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    Kymberly eYoung

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Attention is a limited resource, and in order to improve processing of the attended information, competing processes must be suppressed. Although it is well established that an experimentally induced change in mood state comprises one type of competing process that can impair performance on a subsequent task, no study has investigated whether an emotionally valenced autobiographical memory (AM also can alter performance on a subsequent task. We therefore examined the effects of AM recall on cognitive performance. Healthy participants (n=20 per experiment recalled AMs in response to positive, negative, and neutral cue words. Following each AM participants completed a simple perceptual task (Experiment 1 or solved moderately difficult subtraction problems (Experiment 2. In Experiment 1 participants performed less accurately following exposure to positive or negative versus neutral cue words (ps<0.001, and also were less accurate following negative versus positive cue words (p<0.001. In Experiment 2, in contrast, no difference in accuracy or response times reached statistical significance. Performance accuracy even trended towards being higher following exposure to negative versus neutral cue words (p=0.08. The results of Experiment 1 suggested that recalling emotionally salient AMs reduces the attention directed toward a simple continuous performance task administered immediately following the AM task, conceivably due to persistent contemplation of the AM. The negative results of Experiment 2 suggested that the effect of AMs on attention was attenuated, however, by increasing the difficulty of the subsequent task. Our results have implications for patients with MDD, as performing cognitively demanding tasks may allow them to attenuate the impairing effects of negative rumination on cognition.

  15. A randomised placebo-controlled trial to differentiate the acute cognitive and mood effects of chlorogenic acid from decaffeinated coffee.

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    David A Camfield

    Full Text Available In the current study, sixty healthy older adults aged 50 years or older, and who were light to moderate coffee drinkers, were administered 6g of a decaffeinated green coffee blend (NESCAFÉ Green Blend coffee; GB or 540mg pure chlorogenic acids (CGA or placebo in a double-blind acute cross-over design, with cognitive and mood assessments pre-dose, 40-mins and 120-mins post-dose. The primary outcome measure was accuracy in Rapid Visual Information Processing (RVIP. Secondary cognitive outcome measures included RVIP reaction time as well as Inspection time (IT, Jensen Box decision/reaction times, serial subtraction and N-Back working memory. Secondary mood measures included Bond-Lader and caffeine Research visual analogue scales (VAS. No significant treatment effects were found for the primary outcome measure, although significant effects were found amongst secondary measures. Overall, CGA in isolation was not found to significantly improve cognitive function relative to placebo whereas the GB was found to improve sustained attention as measured by the N-Back task in comparison to placebo overall (t=2.45,p=.05, as well as decision time on a 2-choice reaction time task (Jensen box in comparison to placebo at 40 minutes post-dose (t=2.45,p=.05. Similarly, GB was found to improve alertness on both the Bond-Lader at 120 minutes relative to CGA (t=2.86, p=0.02 and the caffeine Research VAS relative to CGA (t=3.09, p=0.009 and placebo (t=2.75,p=0.02 at 120 minutes post-dose. Both the GB and CGA were also found to significantly improve symptoms of headache at 120 minutes relative to placebo (t=2.51,p=0.03 and t=2.43,p=.04 respectively, whilst there was a trend towards a reduction in jitteriness with GB and CGA in comparison to placebo at 40 minutes post-dose (t=2.24,p=0.06 and t=2.20,p=0.06 respectively. These findings suggest that the improvements in mood observed with GB, but not the improvements in cognitive function, are likely to some extent to be

  16. Differential Application of a Cue Card Strategy for Solving Fraction Problems: Exploring Instructional Utility of the Cognitive Assessment System.

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    Joseph, Laurice M.; Hunter, Amanda D.

    2001-01-01

    Explored the differential application of a self-regulatory strategy on mathematics performance among three eighth-graders with learning disabilities and diverse planning abilities. Found that all students improved on fraction probes as a function of using a cue card strategy. The student with high planning ability demonstrated consistent…

  17. Functional Connectivity of the Subcallosal Cingulate Cortex And Differential Outcomes to Treatment With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy or Antidepressant Medication for Major Depressive Disorder.

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    Dunlop, Boadie W; Rajendra, Justin K; Craighead, W Edward; Kelley, Mary E; McGrath, Callie L; Choi, Ki Sueng; Kinkead, Becky; Nemeroff, Charles B; Mayberg, Helen S

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to inform the first-line treatment choice between cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or an antidepressant medication for treatment-naive adults with major depressive disorder by defining a neuroimaging biomarker that differentially identifies the outcomes of remission and treatment failure to these interventions. Functional MRI resting-state functional connectivity analyses using a bilateral subcallosal cingulate cortex (SCC) seed was applied to 122 patients from the Prediction of Remission to Individual and Combined Treatments (PReDICT) study who completed 12 weeks of randomized treatment with CBT or antidepressant medication. Of the 122 participants, 58 achieved remission (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HAM-D] score ≤7 at weeks 10 and 12), and 24 had treatment failure (treatment and outcome. Receiver operating characteristic curves constructed using brain connectivity measures were used to determine possible classification rates for differential treatment outcomes. The resting-state functional connectivity of the following three regions with the SCC was differentially associated with outcomes of remission and treatment failure to CBT and antidepressant medication and survived application of the subsample permutation tests: the left anterior ventrolateral prefrontal cortex/insula, the dorsal midbrain, and the left ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Using the summed SCC functional connectivity scores for these three regions, overall classification rates of 72%-78% for remission and 75%-89% for treatment failure was demonstrated. Positive summed functional connectivity was associated with remission with CBT and treatment failure with medication, whereas negative summed functional connectivity scores were associated with remission to medication and treatment failure with CBT. Imaging-based depression subtypes defined using resting-state functional connectivity differentially identified an individual's probability of remission or

  18. Reader-Text Interactions: How Differential Text and Question Types Influence Cognitive Skills Needed for Reading Comprehension.

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    Eason, Sarah H; Goldberg, Lindsay F; Young, Katherine M; Geist, Megan C; Cutting, Laurie E

    2012-08-01

    Current research has shown that comprehension can vary based on text and question types, and that readers' word recognition and background knowledge may account for these differences. Other reader characteristics such as semantic and syntactic awareness, inferencing, planning/organizing have also all been linked to reading comprehension, but have not been examined with regard to specific text and question types. The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between reader characteristics, text types, and question types, in children aged 10-14. We sought to compare children's performance when comprehending narrative, expository, and functional text, as well as to explore differences between children's performance on comprehension questions that assess their literal or inferential comprehension of a passage. To examine such differences, we analyzed the degree to which distinct cognitive skills (semantic and syntactic awareness, inferencing, planning/organizing) contribute to performance on varying types of texts and questions. This study found main effects of text and question types, as well as an interaction in which relations between question types varied between text types. Analyses indicated that higher order cognitive skills, including the ability to make inferences and to plan and organize information, contribute to comprehension of more complex text (e.g., expository vs. narrative) and question types (e.g., inferential vs. literal), and therefore are important components of reading for later elementary and middle school students. These findings suggest that developing these skills in early elementary school may better equip students for comprehending the texts they will encounter in higher grades.

  19. HuCNS-SC Human NSCs Fail to Differentiate, Form Ectopic Clusters, and Provide No Cognitive Benefits in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease

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    Samuel E. Marsh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs can improve cognition in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, AD is a protracted disorder, and prior studies have examined only short-term effects. We therefore used an immune-deficient model of AD (Rag-5xfAD mice to examine long-term transplantation of human NSCs (StemCells Inc.; HuCNS-SCs. Five months after transplantation, HuCNS-SCs had engrafted and migrated throughout the hippocampus and exhibited no differences in survival or migration in response to β-amyloid pathology. Despite robust engraftment, HuCNS-SCs failed to terminally differentiate and over a quarter of the animals exhibited ectopic human cell clusters within the lateral ventricle. Unlike prior short-term experiments with research-grade HuCNS-SCs, we also found no evidence of improved cognition, no changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and no increase in synaptic density. These data, while disappointing, reinforce the notion that individual human NSC lines need to be carefully assessed for efficacy and safety in appropriate long-term models.

  20. Bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS with two active electrodes of the same polarity modulates bilateral cognitive processes differentially [corrected].

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    Elise Klein

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is an innovative method to explore the causal structure-function relationship of brain areas. We investigated the specificity of bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS with two active electrodes of the same polarity (e.g., cathodal on both hemispheres applied to intraparietal cortices bilaterally using a combined between- and within-task approach. Regarding between-task specificity, we observed that bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS affected a numerical (mental addition but not a control task (colour word Stroop, indicating a specific influence of tDCS on numerical but not on domain general cognitive processes associated with the bilateral IPS. In particular, the numerical effect of distractor distance was more pronounced under cathodal than under anodal stimulation. Moreover, with respect to within-task specificity we only found the numerical distractor distance effect in mental addition to be modulated by direct current stimulation, whereas the effect of target identity was not affected. This implies a differential influence of bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS on the recruitment of different processing components within the same task (number magnitude processing vs. recognition of familiarity. In sum, this first successful application of bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS with two active electrodes of the same polarity in numerical cognition research corroborates the specific proposition of the Triple Code Model that number magnitude information is represented bilaterally in the intraparietal cortices.

  1. Pro-inflammatory S100A9 Protein as a Robust Biomarker Differentiating Early Stages of Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Istvan; Jia, Xueen; Johansson, Per; Wang, Chao; Moskalenko, Roman; Steinau, Andreas; Forsgren, Lars; Wågberg, Thomas; Svensson, Johan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2016-01-20

    Pro-inflammatory protein S100A9 was established as a biomarker of dementia progression and compared with others such as Aβ(1-42) and tau-proteins. CSF samples from 104 stringently diagnosed individuals divided into five subgroups were analyzed, including nondemented controls, stable mild cognitive impairment (SMCI), mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease (MCI-AD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) patients. ELISA, dot-blotting, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used as research methods. The S100A9 and Aβ(1-42) levels correlated with each other: their CSF content decreased already at the SMCI stage and declined further under MCI-AD, AD, and VaD conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis also revealed involvement of both Aβ(1-42) and S100A9 in the amyloid-neuroinflammatory cascade already during SMCI. Tau proteins were not yet altered in SMCI; however their contents increased during MCI-AD and AD, diagnosing later dementia stages. Thus, four biomarkers together, reflecting different underlying pathological causes, can accurately differentiate dementia progression and also distinguish AD from VaD.

  2. Differential cognitive responses to guqin music and piano music in Chinese subjects: an event-related potential study.

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    Zhu, Wei-Na; Zhang, Jun-Jun; Liu, Hai-Wei; Ding, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Zhou, Chang-Le

    2008-02-01

    To compare the cognitive effects of guqin (the oldest Chinese instrument) music and piano music. Behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) data in a standard two-stimulus auditory oddball task were recorded and analyzed. This study replicated the previous results of culture-familiar music effect on Chinese subjects: the greater P300 amplitude in frontal areas in a culture-familiar music environment. At the same time, the difference between guqin music and piano music was observed in N1 and later positive complex (LPC: including P300 and P500): a relatively higher participation of right anterior-temporal areas in Chinese subjects. The results suggest that the special features of ERP responses to guqin music are the outcome of Chinese tonal language environments given the similarity between Guqinos tones and Mandarin lexical tones.

  3. Emotion-Based Cognition in Mice Is Differentially Influenced by Dose and Chemical Form of Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid.

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    Laugero, Kevin D; Adkins, Yuriko; Mackey, Bruce E; Kelley, Darshan S

    2017-09-08

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a major constituent, and primary omega-3 fatty acid, in the brain. Evidence suggests that DHA consumption may promote cognitive functioning and prevent cognitive decline, and these effects may be particularly relevant in the context of fear or stress. However, the potency and efficacy of dietary DHA may depend on the form of DHA (e.g., phospholipid; PL vs. triglyceride; TG). In this study, we compared in mice the effects of consuming PL and TG forms of DHA on associative, avoidance (fear) based learning and memory. Diets consisted of either no DHA or 1%, 2%, and 4% PL- or TG-DHA. After 4 weeks on the test diets (n = 12/group), we used the 3-day passive avoidance (PA) and elevated plus maze (EPM) to examine fear and fear-associated learning and memory. We found a significant (p < 0.05) diet by time interaction in the PA and EPM. Compared to the control and the 1% TG-DHA group, mice consuming the diet supplemented with 1% PL-DHA displayed a significantly greater latency by test day 2 in the 3-day PA. No differences in latency between any of the groups were observed during trials 1 and 3. Mice consuming the 2% PL-DHA diet spent significantly more time frequenting the open arms during the first minute, but not the last 4 min, of the test. Compared to all other groups, mice fed the 4% TG-DHA diet had increased spleen, liver, and visceral fat weight. Consumption of the lower dose PL-DHA may confer enhanced efficacy, particularly on fear-based learning behavior.

  4. Emotion-Based Cognition in Mice Is Differentially Influenced by Dose and Chemical Form of Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Laugero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA is a major constituent, and primary omega-3 fatty acid, in the brain. Evidence suggests that DHA consumption may promote cognitive functioning and prevent cognitive decline, and these effects may be particularly relevant in the context of fear or stress. However, the potency and efficacy of dietary DHA may depend on the form of DHA (e.g., phospholipid; PL vs. triglyceride; TG. In this study, we compared in mice the effects of consuming PL and TG forms of DHA on associative, avoidance (fear based learning and memory. Diets consisted of either no DHA or 1%, 2%, and 4% PL- or TG-DHA. After 4 weeks on the test diets (n = 12/group, we used the 3-day passive avoidance (PA and elevated plus maze (EPM to examine fear and fear-associated learning and memory. We found a significant (p < 0.05 diet by time interaction in the PA and EPM. Compared to the control and the 1% TG-DHA group, mice consuming the diet supplemented with 1% PL-DHA displayed a significantly greater latency by test day 2 in the 3-day PA. No differences in latency between any of the groups were observed during trials 1 and 3. Mice consuming the 2% PL-DHA diet spent significantly more time frequenting the open arms during the first minute, but not the last 4 min, of the test. Compared to all other groups, mice fed the 4% TG-DHA diet had increased spleen, liver, and visceral fat weight. Consumption of the lower dose PL-DHA may confer enhanced efficacy, particularly on fear-based learning behavior.

  5. Differential diagnosis between dementia and psychiatric disorders: Diagnostic criteria and supplementary exams Recommendations of the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology

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    Cássio M.C. Bottino

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2005, the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology published recommendations for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease These recommendations were updated following a review of evidence retrieved from national and international studies held on PUBMED, SCIELO and LILACS medical databases. The main aims of this review article are as follows: 1 to present the evidence found on Brazilian (LILACS, SCIELO and International (MEDLINE databases from articles published up to May 2011, on the differential diagnosis of these psychiatric disorders and dementia, with special focus on Dementia due to Alzheimer's and vascular dementia, including a review of supplementary exams which may facilitate the diagnostic process; and 2 to propose recommendations for use by clinicians and researchers involved in diagnosing patients with dementia. Differential diagnosis between dementia and other neuropsychiatric disorders should always include assessments for depression, delirium, and use of psychoactive substances, as well as investigate the use of benzodiazepines, anti-epileptics and pattern of alcohol consumption.

  6. Emotional valence and semantic relatedness differentially influence false recognition in mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, and healthy elderly.

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    Brueckner, Katja; Moritz, Steffen

    2009-03-01

    This study examined whether patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who are at higher risk for later Alzheimer disease (AD) display deficits comparable to patients with diagnosed dementia. We assessed 27 patients with MCI, 36 patients with AD, and 20 healthy older adults with an emotional variant of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott-paradigm. Participants studied four lists that were semantically related to a nonpresented critical theme word. These theme words were either depression-related (i.e., loneliness) or delusion-related (betrayal) or had a positive (holidays) or neutral (window) valence. Despite a normal overall emotional memory and a normal corrected overall false recognition, patients with MCI, as predicted, produced as many false memories as patients with AD. On closer examination, both patient groups showed enhanced false memories to unrelated stimuli and a significant bias to falsely remember stimuli with a positive valence. We conclude that although patients with MCI are not distinguishable from healthy older adults in terms of their overall emotional recognition, positively valenced memories and more specifically false positive memories may represent the signature of a breakdown of emotional memory along the continuum between normal aging and AD.

  7. Differential diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease using structural MRI cortical thickness, hippocampal shape, hippocampal texture, and volumetry

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    Lauge Sørensen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a brain T1-weighted structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI biomarker that combines several individual MRI biomarkers (cortical thickness measurements, volumetric measurements, hippocampal shape, and hippocampal texture. The method was developed, trained, and evaluated using two publicly available reference datasets: a standardized dataset from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI and the imaging arm of the Australian Imaging Biomarkers and Lifestyle flagship study of ageing (AIBL. In addition, the method was evaluated by participation in the Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Dementia (CADDementia challenge. Cross-validation using ADNI and AIBL data resulted in a multi-class classification accuracy of 62.7% for the discrimination of healthy normal controls (NC, subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD. This performance generalized to the CADDementia challenge where the method, trained using the ADNI and AIBL data, achieved a classification accuracy 63.0%. The obtained classification accuracy resulted in a first place in the challenge, and the method was significantly better (McNemar's test than the bottom 24 methods out of the total of 29 methods contributed by 15 different teams in the challenge. The method was further investigated with learning curve and feature selection experiments using ADNI and AIBL data. The learning curve experiments suggested that neither more training data nor a more complex classifier would have improved the obtained results. The feature selection experiment showed that both common and uncommon individual MRI biomarkers contributed to the performance; hippocampal volume, ventricular volume, hippocampal texture, and parietal lobe thickness were the most important. This study highlights the need for both subtle, localized measurements and global measurements in order to discriminate NC, MCI, and AD simultaneously based on a single

  8. Transcranial direct current stimulation facilitates cognitive multi-task performance differentially depending on anode location and subtask.

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    Melissa eScheldrup

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to facilitate acquisition of real world cognitive multi-tasks that require long periods of training (e.g., air traffic control, intelligence analysis, medicine. Non-invasive brain stimulation – specifically transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS – has promise as a method to speed multi-task training. We hypothesized that during acquisition of the complex multi-task Space Fortress, subtasks that require focused attention on ship control would benefit from tDCS aimed at the dorsal attention network while subtasks that require redirection of attention would benefit from tDCS aimed at the right hemisphere ventral attention network. We compared effects of 30 min prefrontal and parietal stimulation to right and left hemispheres on subtask performance during the first 45 min of training. The strongest effects both overall and for ship flying (control and velocity subtasks were seen with a right parietal (C4 to left shoulder montage, shown by modeling to induce an electric field that includes nodes in both dorsal and ventral attention networks. This is consistent with the re-orienting hypothesis that the ventral attention network is activated along with the dorsal attention network if a new, task-relevant event occurs while visuospatial attention is focused (Corbetta et al., 2008. No effects were seen with anodes over sites that stimulated only dorsal (C3 or only ventral (F10 attention networks. The speed subtask (update memory for symbols benefited from an F9 anode over left prefrontal cortex. These results argue for development of tDCS as a training aid in real world settings where multi-tasking is critical.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood flow in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: a differential diagnosis from idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

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    El Sankari Soraya

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI enables quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF flow and total cerebral blood (tCBF flow and may be of value for the etiological diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. This investigation aimed to study CSF flow and intracerebral vascular flow in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD and patients with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI and to compare the results with patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH and with healthy elderly volunteers (HEV. Methods Ten a-MCI and 9 mild AD patients were identified in a comprehensive neurological and neuropsychological assessment. They underwent brain MRI; PC-MRI pulse sequence was performed with the following parameters: two views per segment; flip angle: 25° for vascular flow and 20° for CSF flow; field-of-view (FOV: 14 × 14 mm²; matrix: 256 × 128; slice thickness: 5 mm; with one excitation for exams on the 3 T machine, and 2 excitations for the 1.5 T machine exams. Velocity (encoding sensitization was set to 80 cm/s for the vessels at the cervical level, 10 or 20 cm/s for the aqueduct and 5 cm/s for the cervical subarachnoid space (SAS. Dynamic flow images were analyzed with in-house processing software. The patients' results were compared with those obtained for HEVs (n = 12, and for NPH patients (n = 13, using multivariate analysis. Results Arterial tCBF and the calculated pulsatility index were significantly greater in a-MCI patients than in HEVs. In contrast, vascular parameters were lower in NPH patients. Cervical CSF flow analysis yielded similar values for all four populations. Aqueductal CSF stroke volumes (in μl per cardiac cycle were similar in HEVs (34 ± 17 and AD patients (39 ± 18. In contrast, the aqueductal CSF was hyperdynamic in a-MCI patients (73 ± 33 and even more so in NPH patients (167 ± 89. Conclusion Our preliminary data show that a-MCI patients present with high systolic

  10. The Effects of a Brief Acceptance-based Behavior Therapy vs. Traditional Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Public Speaking Anxiety: Differential Effects on Performance and Verbal Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Lisa Hayley

    Individuals with public speaking phobia experience fear and avoidance that can cause extreme distress, impaired speaking performance, and associated problems in psychosocial functioning. Most extant interventions for public speaking phobia focus on the reduction of anxiety and avoidance, but neglect performance. Additionally, very little is known about the relationship between verbal working memory and social performance under conditions of high anxiety. The current study compared the efficacy of two cognitive behavioral treatments, traditional Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (tCBT) and acceptance-based behavior therapy (ABBT), in enhancing public speaking performance via coping with anxiety. Verbal working memory performance, as measured by the backwards digit span (BDS), was measured to explore the relationships between treatment type, anxiety, performance, and verbal working memory. We randomized 30 individuals with high public speaking anxiety to a 90-minute ABBT or tCBT intervention. As this pilot study was underpowered, results are examined in terms of effect sizes as well as statistical significance. Assessments took place at pre and post-intervention and included self-rated and objective anxiety measurements, a behavioral assessment, ABBT and tCBT process measures, and backwards digit span verbal working memory tests. In order to examine verbal working memory during different levels of anxiety and performance pressure, we gave each participant a backwards digit span task three times during each assessment: once under calm conditions, then again while experiencing anticipatory anxiety, and finally under conditions of acute social performance anxiety in front of an audience. Participants were asked to give a video-recorded speech in front of the audience at pre- and post-intervention to examine speech performance. Results indicated that all participants experienced a very large and statistically significant decrease in anxiety (both during the speech and BDS

  11. Separating neural and vascular effects of caffeine using simultaneous EEG-FMRI: differential effects of caffeine on cognitive and sensorimotor brain responses.

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    Diukova, Ana; Ware, Jennifer; Smith, Jessica E; Evans, C John; Murphy, Kevin; Rogers, Peter J; Wise, Richard G

    2012-08-01

    The effects of caffeine are mediated through its non-selective antagonistic effects on adenosine A(1) and A(2A) adenosine receptors resulting in increased neuronal activity but also vasoconstriction in the brain. Caffeine, therefore, can modify BOLD FMRI signal responses through both its neural and its vascular effects depending on receptor distributions in different brain regions. In this study we aim to distinguish neural and vascular influences of a single dose of caffeine in measurements of task-related brain activity using simultaneous EEG-FMRI. We chose to compare low-level visual and motor (paced finger tapping) tasks with a cognitive (auditory oddball) task, with the expectation that caffeine would differentially affect brain responses in relation to these tasks. To avoid the influence of chronic caffeine intake, we examined the effect of 250 mg of oral caffeine on 14 non and infrequent caffeine consumers in a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study. Our results show that the task-related BOLD signal change in visual and primary motor cortex was significantly reduced by caffeine, while the amplitude and latency of visual evoked potentials over occipital cortex remained unaltered. However, during the auditory oddball task (target versus non-target stimuli) caffeine significantly increased the BOLD signal in frontal cortex. Correspondingly, there was also a significant effect of caffeine in reducing the target evoked response potential (P300) latency in the oddball task and this was associated with a positive potential over frontal cortex. Behavioural data showed that caffeine also improved performance in the oddball task with a significantly reduced number of missed responses. Our results are consistent with earlier studies demonstrating altered flow-metabolism coupling after caffeine administration in the context of our observation of a generalised caffeine-induced reduction in cerebral blood flow demonstrated by arterial spin labelling (19

  12. Learning in Interaction: Contributions to a Cognitive Science of Education. Oceanside School Project Concerned with the Effect of Differential Classroom Organization on the Learning of Classroom Discourse Rules and Cognitive Content. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael

    This report, addressed to the broad audience of cognitive scientists, examines research on cognitive change. In the introduction, background considerations are made, previous research is reviewed, and the report itself is outlined. The first chapter, "Finding Goals Outside the Laboratory," discusses how laboratory tasks can obscure research goals…

  13. The tumor necrosis factor alpha -308G>A polymorphism is associated with dementia in the oldest old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruunsgaard, Helle; Benfield, Thomas L; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -308 G>A promoter gene polymorphism is a risk factor in age-related dementia and longevity. DESIGN: A cross-sectional and a longitudinal study. SETTING: A population-based sample of Danish centenarians. PARTICIPANTS: One...

  14. The influences of childlessness on the psychological well-being and social network of the oldest old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikström Josefin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ELSA 85 project is a population-based study with the purpose to learn more about the "elderly elderly". The aim of this part of the ELSA 85 study is to explore the effects of childlessness on the psychological wellbeing, living situation and social support of 85-year old individuals. Methods A postal questionnaire was sent to all (650 85-year old men and women living in Linköping Municipality in 2007. Psychological well-being and social network was measured using a number of questions. Results 496 individuals participated in the study. No differences in psychological wellbeing were found between the 85-year olds who were childless and those who were parents. The childless 85-year olds were less likely to have relatives close by and to receive help than those who were parents. Individuals of both groups were equally likely to end up in institutional care, to have friends close by and to be in contact with neighbours. Conclusions Even though elderly childless individuals have social networks of less support potential than those who are parents there are no differences in certain psychological wellbeing indicators between the two groups. Apparently, childless elderly individuals find ways to cope with whatever negative effects of childlessness they may have experienced.

  15. Differential neural activation patterns in patients with Parkinson's disease and freezing of gait in response to concurrent cognitive and motor load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Shine

    Full Text Available Freezing of gait is a devastating symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD that is exacerbated by the processing of cognitive information whilst walking. To date, no studies have explored the neural correlates associated with increases in cognitive load whilst performing a motor task in patients with freezing. In this experiment, 14 PD patients with and 15 PD patients without freezing of gait underwent 3T fMRI while performing a virtual reality gait task. Directions to walk and stop were presented on the viewing screen as either direct cues or as more cognitively indirect pre-learned cues. Both groups showed a consistent pattern of BOLD response within the Cognitive Control Network during performance of the paradigm. However, a between group comparison revealed that those PD patients with freezing of gait were less able to recruit the bilateral anterior insula, ventral striatum and the pre-supplementary motor area, as well as the left subthalamic nucleus when responding to indirect cognitive cues whilst maintaining a motor output. These results suggest that PD patients with freezing of gait are unable to properly recruit specific cortical and subcortical regions within the Cognitive Control Network during the performance of simultaneous motor and cognitive functions.

  16. Differential Neural Activation Patterns in Patients with Parkinson's Disease and Freezing of Gait in Response to Concurrent Cognitive and Motor Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine, James M.; Matar, Elie; Ward, Philip B.; Bolitho, Samuel J.; Pearson, Mark; Naismith, Sharon L.; Lewis, Simon J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing of gait is a devastating symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) that is exacerbated by the processing of cognitive information whilst walking. To date, no studies have explored the neural correlates associated with increases in cognitive load whilst performing a motor task in patients with freezing. In this experiment, 14 PD patients with and 15 PD patients without freezing of gait underwent 3T fMRI while performing a virtual reality gait task. Directions to walk and stop were presented on the viewing screen as either direct cues or as more cognitively indirect pre-learned cues. Both groups showed a consistent pattern of BOLD response within the Cognitive Control Network during performance of the paradigm. However, a between group comparison revealed that those PD patients with freezing of gait were less able to recruit the bilateral anterior insula, ventral striatum and the pre-supplementary motor area, as well as the left subthalamic nucleus when responding to indirect cognitive cues whilst maintaining a motor output. These results suggest that PD patients with freezing of gait are unable to properly recruit specific cortical and subcortical regions within the Cognitive Control Network during the performance of simultaneous motor and cognitive functions. PMID:23382821

  17. Depressive symptoms in later life: differential impact of social support and motivational processes on depression in individuals with and without cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankhauser, Sonja; Drobetz, Reinhard; Mortby, Moyra; Maercker, Andreas; Forstmeier, Simon

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the role of a motivational process based on a composite of four subcomponents (self-efficacy, decision regulation, activation regulation and motivation regulation), as a mediator of the relationship between social support and depression assessed with the Geriatric Depression Scale in cognitively impaired and unimpaired individuals. Participants were 229 adults with a mean age of 74 years (range: 52-94 years). The sample comprised 64 participants diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 47 participants diagnosed with early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD), and a group of 118 participants without any cognitive impairment. In this cross-sectional study, bivariate correlations and linear regression models were used to assess the association between the predictor variables and depression. Linear regression models were controlled for age, gender, education, cognitive status, cognitive impairment and activities. In the total sample, social support (β = -0.15, p processes (β = -0.41, p processes. While motivational processes were associated with depression in all three groups (no impairment: β = -0.61, p cognitively impaired individuals, while motivational processes remain relevant.

  18. Decline in Memory, Visuospatial Ability, and Crystalized Cognitive Abilities in Older Adults: Normative Aging or Terminal Decline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bendayan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the pattern of change in multiple measures of cognitive abilities in a sample of oldest-old adults, comparing two different time metrics (chronological age and time to death and therefore examining both underlying conceptual assumptions (age-related change and terminal decline. Moreover, the association with individual characteristics as sex, education, and dementia diagnosis was also examined. Measures of cognitive status (Mini-Mental State Examination and the Swedish Clock Test and tests of crystallized (knowledge and synonyms, memory (verbal memory, nonverbal long-term memory, recognition and correspondence, and short-term memory, and visuospatial ability were included. The sample consisted of 671 older Swedish adult participants of the OCTO Twin Study. Linear mixed models with random coefficients were used to analyse change patterns and BIC indexes were used to compare models. Results showed that the time to death model was the best option in analyses of change in all the cognitive measures considered (except for the Information Test. A significant cognitive decline over time was found for all variables. Individuals diagnosed with dementia had lower scores at the study entrance and a faster decline. More educated individuals performed better in all the measures of cognition at study entry than those with poorer education, but no differences were found in the rate of change. Differences were found in age, sex, or time to death at baseline across the different measures. These results support the terminal decline hypothesis when compared to models assuming that cognitive changes are driven by normative aging processes.

  19. A Combined Cognitive Stimulation and Physical Exercise Programme (MINDVital) in Early Dementia: Differential Effects on Single- and Dual-Task Gait Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Laura; Lim, Wee Shiong; Chan, Mark; Ali, Noorhazlina; Chong, Mei Sian

    2016-01-01

    Gait disorders are common in early dementia, with particularly pronounced dual-task deficits, contributing to the increased fall risk and mobility decline associated with cognitive impairment. This study examines the effects of a combined cognitive stimulation and physical exercise programme (MINDVital) on gait performance under single- and dual-task conditions in older adults with mild dementia. Thirty-nine patients with early dementia participated in a multi-disciplinary rehabilitation programme comprising both physical exercise and cognitive stimulation. The programme was conducted in 8-week cycles with participants attending once weekly, and all participants completed 2 successive cycles. Cognitive, functional performance and behavioural symptoms were assessed at baseline and at the end of each 8-week cycle. Gait speed was examined under both single- (Timed Up and Go and 6-metre walk tests) and dual-task (animal category and serial counting) conditions. A random effects model was performed for the independent effect of MINDVital on the primary outcome variable of gait speed under dual-task conditions. The mean age of patients enroled in the rehabilitation programme was 79 ± 6.2 years; 25 (64.1%) had a diagnosis of Alzheimer's dementia, and 26 (66.7%) were receiving a cognitive enhancer therapy. There was a significant improvement in cognitive performance [random effects coefficient (standard error) = 0.90 (0.31), p = 0.003] and gait speed under both dual-task situations [animal category: random effects coefficient = 0.04 (0.02), p = 0.039; serial counting: random effects coefficient = 0.05 (0.02), p = 0.013], with reduced dual-task cost for gait speed [serial counting: random effects coefficient = -4.05 (2.35), p = 0.086] following successive MINDVital cycles. No significant improvement in single-task gait speed was observed. Improved cognitive performance over time was a significant determinant of changes in dual-task gait speed [random effects coefficients

  20. Positive and negative social exchanges and cognitive aging in young-old adults: differential associations across family, friend, and spouse domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Tim D; Gerstorf, Denis; Pearson, Elissa; Ryan, Lindsay H; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2014-03-01

    We examined how positive and negative social exchanges with friends, family, and spouses were related to cognitive aging in episodic and working memory, and perceptual speed. To do so, we used a large sample of cognitively intact young-old participants from the PATH Through Life Study (PATH; aged 60 to 64 years at baseline, n = 1,618) who were assessed on 3 occasions over 8 years. Additional replication analyses were conducted using the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), which provided data on episodic memory. The main analysis of PATH Through Life showed that positive exchanges with friends and family were associated with less decline in perceptual speed, with these associations attenuated by adjustment for physical functioning and depressive symptoms. Negative exchanges with spouses were associated with poorer working memory performance. Positive exchanges with friends were associated with better initial episodic memory in both PATH and HRS. More frequent negative exchanges with friends and family were associated with better episodic memory in the PATH sample. However, these findings were not replicated in HRS. Our findings provide indirect support for the role of social exchange quality in contributing to cognitive enrichment. However, the inconsistent pattern of results across cognitive and social exchange domains points to possibilities of reverse causality, and may also indicate that social exchange quality plays a less important role for cognitive enrichment than other psychosocial characteristics.

  1. Divergent pathways to influence: Cognition and behavior differentially mediate the effects of optimism on physical and mental quality of life in Chinese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Jonathan E; Yang, Fang; Pang, Joyce S; Lai, Ching-Man; Ho, Roger Cm; Mak, Kwok-Kei

    2015-07-01

    Previous research has indicated that both cognitive and behavioral variables mediate the positive effect of optimism on quality of life; yet few attempts have been made to accommodate these constructs into a single explanatory framework. Adopting Fredrickson's broaden-and-build perspective, we examined the relationships between optimism, self-rated health, resilience, exercise, and quality of life in 365 Chinese university students using path analysis. For physical quality of life, a two-stage model, in which the effects of optimism were sequentially mediated by cognitive and behavioral variables, provided the best fit. A one-stage model, with full mediation by cognitive variables, provided the best fit for mental quality of life. This suggests that optimism influences physical and mental quality of life via different pathways. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Differentiation in Data Analysis & Probability, PreK-Grade 2: A Content Companion for Ongoing Assessment, Grouping Students, Targeting Instruction, and Adjusting Levels of Cognitive Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Cox, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This book applies the author's easy but effective differentiation strategies to the data analysis and probability content standard. Taking the foundational elements of differentiation in this book, it helps you: (1) assess students' math abilities quickly and efficiently; (2) group children by need; (3) target instruction to meet every student's…

  3. Differentiation in Data Analysis & Probability, PreK-Grade 2: A Content Companion for Ongoing Assessment, Grouping Students, Targeting Instruction, and Adjusting Levels of Cognitive Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Cox, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This book applies the author's easy but effective differentiation strategies to the data analysis and probability content standard. Taking the foundational elements of differentiation in this book, it helps you: (1) assess students' math abilities quickly and efficiently; (2) group children by need; (3) target instruction to meet every student's…

  4. Differential effects of the computer-tailored FATaintPHAT programme on dietary behaviours according to sociodemographic, cognitive and home environmental factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezendam, N.P.M.; Burg, J.; Borsboom, G.; Empelen, P.van; Oenema, A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore whether the effects on dietary behaviours of a computer-tailored intervention aimed to prevent excessive weight gain among adolescents, FATaintPHAT, were moderated by sociodemographic, cognitive and home environmental factors. DESIGN: A two-group cluster randomized trial. Poten

  5. Differentiating the Role of Three Self-Compassion Components in Buffering Cognitive-Personality Vulnerability to Depression among Chinese in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Celia C. Y.; Mak, Winnie W. S.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that sociotropy, autonomy, and self-criticism are cognitive-personality vulnerability styles contributing significantly to the development of depression symptoms, but little is known about the factors that may protect sociotropic, autonomous, and self-critical individuals against mental health problems. The present study examined…

  6. Differential Effects of the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Val158Met Genotype on the Cognitive Function of Schizophrenia Patients and Healthy Japanese Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimine, Shoko; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Kaneda, Ayako; Kaneko, Sunao

    2013-01-01

    Background The functional polymorphism Val158Met in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene has been associated with differences in prefrontal cognitive functions in patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals. Several studies have indicated that the Met allele is associated with better performance on measures of cognitive function. We investigated whether the COMT Val158Met genotype was associated with cognitive function in 149 healthy controls and 118 patients with schizophrenia. Methods Cognitive function, including verbal memory, working memory, motor speed, attention, executive function and verbal fluency, was assessed by the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS-J). We employed a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a multiple regression analysis to determine the associations between the COMT Val158Met genotype and the BACS-J measurements. Results The one-way ANOVA revealed a significant difference in the scores on the Tower of London, a measure of executive function, between the different Val158Met genotypes in the healthy controls (p = 0.023), and a post-hoc analysis showed significant differences between the scores on the Tower of London in the val/val genotype group (18.6 ± 2.4) compared to the other two groups (17.6 ± 2.7 for val/met and 17.1 ± 3.2 for met/met; p = 0.027 and p = 0.024, respectively). Multiple regression analyses revealed that executive function was significantly correlated with the Val158Met genotype (p = 0.003). However, no evidence was found for an effect of the COMT on any cognitive domains of the BACS-J in the patients with schizophrenia. Conclusion These data support the hypothesis that the COMT Val158Met genotype maintains an optimal level of dopamine activity. Further studies should be performed that include a larger sample size and include patients on and off medication, as these patients would help to confirm our findings. PMID:24282499

  7. Differential effects of the catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met genotype on the cognitive function of schizophrenia patients and healthy Japanese individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Tsuchimine

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The functional polymorphism Val158Met in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene has been associated with differences in prefrontal cognitive functions in patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals. Several studies have indicated that the Met allele is associated with better performance on measures of cognitive function. We investigated whether the COMT Val158Met genotype was associated with cognitive function in 149 healthy controls and 118 patients with schizophrenia. METHODS: Cognitive function, including verbal memory, working memory, motor speed, attention, executive function and verbal fluency, was assessed by the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS-J. We employed a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and a multiple regression analysis to determine the associations between the COMT Val158Met genotype and the BACS-J measurements. RESULTS: The one-way ANOVA revealed a significant difference in the scores on the Tower of London, a measure of executive function, between the different Val158Met genotypes in the healthy controls (p = 0.023, and a post-hoc analysis showed significant differences between the scores on the Tower of London in the val/val genotype group (18.6 ± 2.4 compared to the other two groups (17.6 ± 2.7 for val/met and 17.1 ± 3.2 for met/met; p = 0.027 and p = 0.024, respectively. Multiple regression analyses revealed that executive function was significantly correlated with the Val158Met genotype (p = 0.003. However, no evidence was found for an effect of the COMT on any cognitive domains of the BACS-J in the patients with schizophrenia. CONCLUSION: These data support the hypothesis that the COMT Val158Met genotype maintains an optimal level of dopamine activity. Further studies should be performed that include a larger sample size and include patients on and off medication, as these patients would help to confirm our findings.

  8. Short-term testosterone manipulations do not affect cognition or motor function but differentially modulate emotions in young and older male rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian; Maguire-Herring, Vanessa; Rose, Christian M; Gore, Heather E; Ferrigno, Stephen; Novak, Melinda A; Lacreuse, Agnès

    2014-11-01

    Human aging is characterized by declines in cognition and fine motor function as well as improved emotional regulation. In men, declining levels of testosterone (T) with age have been implicated in the development of these age-related changes. However, studies examining the effects of T replacement on cognition, emotion and fine motor function in older men have not provided consistent results. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are excellent models for human cognitive aging and may provide novel insights on this issue. We tested 10 aged intact male rhesus monkeys (mean age=19, range 15-25) on a battery of cognitive, motor and emotional tasks at baseline and under low or high T experimental conditions. Their performance was compared to that of 6 young males previously tested in the same paradigm (Lacreuse et al., 2009; Lacreuse et al., 2010). Following a 4-week baseline testing period, monkeys were treated with a gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (Depot Lupron, 200 μg/kg) to suppress endogenous T and were tested on the task battery under a 4-week high T condition (injection of Lupron+T enanthate, 20 mg/kg, n=8) or 4-week low T condition (injection of Lupron+oil vehicle, n=8) before crossing over to the opposite treatment. The cognitive tasks consisted of the Delayed Non-Matching-to-Sample (DNMS), the Delayed Response (DR), and the Delayed Recognition Span Test (spatial-DRST). The emotional tasks included an object Approach-Avoidance task and a task in which monkeys were played videos of unfamiliar conspecifics in different emotional context (Social Playbacks). The fine motor task was the Lifesaver task that required monkeys to remove a Lifesaver candy from rods of different complexity. T manipulations did not significantly affect visual recognition memory, working memory, reference memory or fine motor function at any age. In the Approach-Avoidance task, older monkeys, but not younger monkeys, spent more time in proximity of novel objects in the high T condition

  9. Differential activation and tyrosine hydroxylase distribution in the hippocampal, pallial and midbrain brain regions in response to cognitive performance in Indian house crows exposed to abrupt light environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufique, S K Tahajjul; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    Disruption of the cyclic feature of the day-night environment can cause negative effects on daily activity and advanced brain functions such as learning, memory and decision-making behaviour. These functions in songbirds, including corvids, involve the hippocampus, pallium and midbrain, as revealed by ZENK (a neuronal activation marker) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expressions. TH is rate-limiting marker enzyme of the biosynthesis of dopamine, widely implicated in learning and memory. Here, we measured ZENK and TH immunoreactivity in the hippocampal, pallial and midbrain regions in response to cognitive performance (learning-memory retrieval) tests in Indian house crows (Corvus splendens) exposed to constant light environment (LL) with controls on 12h light:12h darkness. Along with the decay of circadian rhythm in activity behaviour, LL caused a significant decline in the cognitive performance. There was also a decrease under LL in the activity of neurons in the hippocampus, medial and central caudal nidopallium, and hyperpallium apicale, which are widely distributed with TH-immunoreactive fibres. Further, under LL, TH- immunoreactive neurons were reduced in number in midbrain dopamine synthesis sites, the venteral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN), with a negative correlation of co-localized ZENK/TH- immunoreactive cells on errors during the association tasks. These results show decreased activity of learning and memory neural systems, and underscore the role of dopamine in reduced cognitive performance of diurnal corvids with disrupted circadian rhythms under an abrupt light environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring the Utility of Background and Cognitive Variables in Explaining Latent Differential Item Functioning: An Example of the PISA 2009 Reading Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Fang; Jiao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) may be caused by an interaction of multiple manifest grouping variables or unexplored manifest variables, which cannot be detected by conventional DIF detection methods that are based on a single manifest grouping variable. Such DIF may be detected by a latent approach using the mixture item response theory…

  11. Analysis of Nonequivalent Assessments across Different Linguistic Groups Using a Mixed Methods Approach: Understanding the Causes of Differential Item Functioning by Cognitive Interviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Isabel; Padilla, José-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) can undermine the validity of cross-lingual comparisons. While a lot of efficient statistics for detecting DIF are available, few general findings have been found to explain DIF results. The objective of the article was to study DIF sources by using a mixed method design. The design involves a quantitative phase…

  12. Exploring the Utility of Background and Cognitive Variables in Explaining Latent Differential Item Functioning: An Example of the PISA 2009 Reading Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Fang; Jiao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) may be caused by an interaction of multiple manifest grouping variables or unexplored manifest variables, which cannot be detected by conventional DIF detection methods that are based on a single manifest grouping variable. Such DIF may be detected by a latent approach using the mixture item response theory…

  13. Grounded cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2008-01-01

    Grounded cognition rejects traditional views that cognition is computation on amodal symbols in a modular system, independent of the brain's modal systems for perception, action, and introspection. Instead, grounded cognition proposes that modal simulations, bodily states, and situated action underlie cognition. Accumulating behavioral and neural evidence supporting this view is reviewed from research on perception, memory, knowledge, language, thought, social cognition, and development. Theories of grounded cognition are also reviewed, as are origins of the area and common misperceptions of it. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues are raised whose future treatment is likely to affect the growth and impact of grounded cognition.

  14. Visual Cues Contribute Differentially to Audiovisual Perception of Consonants and Vowels in Improving Recognition and Reducing Cognitive Demands in Listeners With Hearing Impairment Using Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Shahram; Lidestam, Björn; Danielsson, Henrik; Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2017-09-18

    We sought to examine the contribution of visual cues in audiovisual identification of consonants and vowels-in terms of isolation points (the shortest time required for correct identification of a speech stimulus), accuracy, and cognitive demands-in listeners with hearing impairment using hearing aids. The study comprised 199 participants with hearing impairment (mean age = 61.1 years) with bilateral, symmetrical, mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss. Gated Swedish consonants and vowels were presented aurally and audiovisually to participants. Linear amplification was adjusted for each participant to assure audibility. The reading span test was used to measure participants' working memory capacity. Audiovisual presentation resulted in shortened isolation points and improved accuracy for consonants and vowels relative to auditory-only presentation. This benefit was more evident for consonants than vowels. In addition, correlations and subsequent analyses revealed that listeners with higher scores on the reading span test identified both consonants and vowels earlier in auditory-only presentation, but only vowels (not consonants) in audiovisual presentation. Consonants and vowels differed in terms of the benefits afforded from their associative visual cues, as indicated by the degree of audiovisual benefit and reduction in cognitive demands linked to the identification of consonants and vowels presented audiovisually.

  15. Differential contribution of APP metabolites to early cognitive deficits in a TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Valentine; Héraud, Céline; Bott, Jean-Bastien; Herbeaux, Karine; Strittmatter, Carole; Mathis, Chantal; Goutagny, Romain

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative pathology commonly characterized by a progressive and irreversible deterioration of cognitive functions, especially memory. Although the etiology of AD remains unknown, a consensus has emerged on the amyloid hypothesis, which posits that increased production of soluble amyloid β (Aβ) peptide induces neuronal network dysfunctions and cognitive deficits. However, the relative failures of Aβ-centric therapeutics suggest that the amyloid hypothesis is incomplete and/or that the treatments were given too late in the course of AD, when neuronal damages were already too extensive. Hence, it is striking to see that very few studies have extensively characterized, from anatomy to behavior, the alterations associated with pre-amyloid stages in mouse models of AD amyloid pathology. To fulfill this gap, we examined memory capacities as well as hippocampal network anatomy and dynamics in young adult pre-plaque TgCRND8 mice when hippocampal Aβ levels are still low. We showed that TgCRND8 mice present alterations in hippocampal inhibitory networks and γ oscillations at this stage. Further, these mice exhibited deficits only in a subset of hippocampal-dependent memory tasks, which are all affected at later stages. Last, using a pharmacological approach, we showed that some of these early memory deficits were Aβ-independent. Our results could partly explain the limited efficacy of Aβ-directed treatments and favor multitherapy approaches for early symptomatic treatment for AD.

  16. Associations between social network characteristics, cognitive function, and quality of life among residents in a dementia special care unit: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Katherine M; Pachucki, Mark C

    2016-02-09

    Social integration has a significant influence on physical and mental health. Older adults experience an increased risk of social isolation as their social networks contract. The purpose of this study is to examine associations between dementia special care unit residents' overall well-being and cognition with structural aspects of their coresident relationships. Measures of social network structure were calculated from self-reported social contact data within three cohorts of residents in one dementia special care unit. Pearson correlations were used to describe associations between overall quality of life and cognition, with network characteristics indicative of social integration. Approximately half the ties sent or received were reciprocated and positive associations were found between social integration and quality of life. However, inconsistent associations were found between social integration and cognitive function. Friendship ties were more frequent between people of adjacent cognitive status categories. In addition, comparing across personal networks, residents tended to be tied to residents of higher quality of life status (43.3%, n = 13 personal networks) as opposed to lower (30%, n = 9 networks) or same (26.7%, n = 8 networks). There is a strong positive correlation between quality of life and respondent's betweenness centrality, suggesting that individuals with high quality of life tend to be important intermediaries between others in the community. Among the "oldest old," quality of life and cognitive function are unevenly distributed, yet these health indicators tend to cluster in social networks. This reinforces that while quality of life may be highly individual, it is in part linked to relationships with others. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Mindfulness facets as differential mediators of short and long-term effects of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy in diabetes outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haenen, Sharon; Nyklíček, Ivan; VAN Son, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that mindfulness-based interventions reduce psychological distress in various medical populations. However, it has hardly been studied if these effects are mediated by an increase in mindfulness. The aim of this study was to examine mediating effects...... of various mindfulness facets on effects of a Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) on perceived stress and mood. METHODS: Outpatients with diabetes types 1 and 2 and low levels of emotional wellbeing were randomized into a group receiving MBCT (n=70) or a waiting-list control group (n=69). Primary...... outcomes were mood and perceived stress. Before, after and at follow-up (6months post intervention) relevant questionnaires were completed. RESULTS: Mediation analysis using bootstrap resampling indicated that increases in total mindfulness and the facets observing and nonreactivity mediated the effects...

  18. Cognitive ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    2010-10-01

    Cognitive ecology is the study of cognitive phenomena in context. In particular, it points to the web of mutual dependence among the elements of a cognitive ecosystem. At least three fields were taking a deeply ecological approach to cognition 30 years ago: Gibson's ecological psychology, Bateson's ecology of mind, and Soviet cultural-historical activity theory. The ideas developed in those projects have now found a place in modern views of embodied, situated, distributed cognition. As cognitive theory continues to shift from units of analysis defined by inherent properties of the elements to units defined in terms of dynamic patterns of correlation across elements, the study of cognitive ecosystems will become an increasingly important part of cognitive science.

  19. Music is as distracting as noise: the differential distraction of background music and noise on the cognitive test performance of introverts and extraverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Adrian; Strbac, Lisa

    2002-02-20

    Previous research has found that introverts' performance on complex cognitive tasks is more negatively affected by distracters, e.g. music and background television, than extraverts' performance. This study extended previous research by examining whether background noise would be as distracting as music. In the presence of silence, background garage music and office noise, 38 introverts and 38 extraverts carried out a reading comprehension task, a prose recall task and a mental arithmetic task. It was predicted that there would be an interaction between personality and background sound on all three tasks: introverts would do less well on all of the tasks than extraverts in the presence of music and noise but in silence performance would be the same. A significant interaction was found on the reading comprehension task only, although a trend for this effect was clearly present on the other two tasks. It was also predicted that there would be a main effect for background sound: performance would be worse in the presence of music and noise than silence. Results confirmed this prediction. These findings support the Eysenckian hypothesis of the difference in optimum cortical arousal in introverts and extraverts.

  20. Cognition and differentiation of tourism,tourism industry and tourism science%旅游、旅游业和旅游学的认识与辨析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昆欣

    2012-01-01

    旅游、旅游业与旅游学是三个各自不同而相互关联的概念。但学界和业界对三者的界定与认识均尚欠明晰。文章在前人研究基础上对三个概念、属性及研究方法进行了辨析与梳理。认为三者具有不同的定义,分属不同的范畴,拥有不同的研究方法及研究对象。但旅游业的产业属性、旅游学学科分支的构建与旅游的基本属性密切相关。%Tourism,tourism industry and tourism science are three different concepts with mutual relations.However,the definition and cognition for them in the academic and industrial fields are not clear enough.On the basis of previous studies,this article does a great quantity discrimination and carding from three concepts,properties and research methods.This article believes they have different definitions,belong to different categories,and they have different research methods and research objects.Tourism industrial property and construction of tourism branch are closely related to the basic properties of tourism.

  1. Catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met genotype in healthy and personality disorder individuals: Preliminary results from an examination of cognitive tests hypothetically differentially sensitive to dopamine functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie W Leung

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Winnie W Leung1, Margaret M McClure1, Larry J Siever1,2, Deanna M Barch3, Philip D Harvey1,21Department of Veterans Affairs, VISN 3 Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC, Bronx, NY, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 3Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USAAbstract: A functional polymorphism of the gene coding for Catechol-O-methyltrasferase (COMT, an enzyme responsible for the degradation of the catecholamine dopamine (DA, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, is associated with cognitive deficits. However, previous studies have not examined the effects of COMT on context processing, as measured by the AX-CPT, a task hypothesized to be maximally relevant to DA function. 32 individuals who were either healthy, with schizotypal personality disorder, or non-cluster A, personality disorder (OPD were genotyped at the COMT Val158Met locus. Met/Met (n = 6, Val/Met (n = 10, Val/Val (n = 16 individuals were administered a neuropsychological battery, including the AX-CPT and the N-back working memory test. For the AX-CPT, Met/Met demonstrated more AY errors (reflecting good maintenance of context than the other genotypes, who showed equivalent error rates. Val/Val demonstrated disproportionately greater deterioration with increased task difficulty from 0-back to 1-back working memory demands as compared to Met/Met, while Val/Met did not differ from either genotypes. No differences were found on processing speed or verbal working memory. Both context processing and working memory appear related to COMT genotype and the AX-CPT and N-back may be most sensitive to the effects of COMT variation.Keywords: COMT, dopamine, context processing, working memory, schizotypal personality disorder

  2. Assessing normative cut points through differential item functioning analysis: An example from the adaptation of the Middlesex Elderly Assessment of Mental State (MEAMS for use as a cognitive screening test in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutlay Sehim

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Middlesex Elderly Assessment of Mental State (MEAMS was developed as a screening test to detect cognitive impairment in the elderly. It includes 12 subtests, each having a 'pass score'. A series of tasks were undertaken to adapt the measure for use in the adult population in Turkey and to determine the validity of existing cut points for passing subtests, given the wide range of educational level in the Turkish population. This study focuses on identifying and validating the scoring system of the MEAMS for Turkish adult population. Methods After the translation procedure, 350 normal subjects and 158 acquired brain injury patients were assessed by the Turkish version of MEAMS. Initially, appropriate pass scores for the normal population were determined through ANOVA post-hoc tests according to age, gender and education. Rasch analysis was then used to test the internal construct validity of the scale and the validity of the cut points for pass scores on the pooled data by using Differential Item Functioning (DIF analysis within the framework of the Rasch model. Results Data with the initially modified pass scores were analyzed. DIF was found for certain subtests by age and education, but not for gender. Following this, pass scores were further adjusted and data re-fitted to the model. All subtests were found to fit the Rasch model (mean item fit 0.184, SD 0.319; person fit -0.224, SD 0.557 and DIF was then found to be absent. Thus the final pass scores for all subtests were determined. Conclusion The MEAMS offers a valid assessment of cognitive state for the adult Turkish population, and the revised cut points accommodate for age and education. Further studies are required to ascertain the validity in different diagnostic groups.

  3. Temporal control of behaviour in children with differential reinforcement of low rates schedule: the role of age, language and cognitive functioning on temporal regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Mélissa; Forget, Jacques; Clément, Céline

    2015-10-01

    Research on temporal regulation in children has been prolific until early 1990s and has received a very limited attention since then. However, the studies focussed mainly on very short durations, and many questions raised at that time remain unanswered (Clément et al., 2007). The scope of this study was to evaluate temporal control in children with differential reinforcement of low-rates (DRL) schedule. Objectives were (a) to evaluate the performance in DRL with two distinct durations; (b) to evaluate the relationship between performance, IQ and language; and (c) to observe children's response patterns across the sessions. Eleven children aged from 2.6 to 7 years old were exposed to a DRL 5s and a DRL 20s schedule. No significant correlation was observed between language, IQ and the performance in DRL. In DRL 5s, seven children adjusted their responses and six in DRL 20s. Age was positively correlated to performance in DRL 5s, while the response patterns in DRL 20s were hardly predictable. In both conditions, children aged from 4.6 years old showed a lower proportion of bursting responses, a lower rate of response, a larger proportion of reinforced responses and a higher optimisation coefficient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Membrane differential filtration is safe and effective for the long-term treatment of Refsum syndrome--an update of treatment modalities and pathophysiological cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, R; Gäckler, D; Thiele, A; Muselmann, L; Kingreen, H; Klingel, R

    2003-08-01

    Refsum's disease is a complex and difficult to diagnose storage disease caused by complex autosomal recessive peroxisomal disorder in which mutations of phytanolyl/pristanoyl-CoA-hydroxilase are the main cause. Poorly metabolised phytanic acid (PA), pristanic acid (PrA) and picolenic acid (PiA) accumulates in fatty tissues, myelin sheaths, heart, kidneys and retina, leading to retinitis pigmentosa, peripheral dissociative polyneuropathy, cerebellar ataxia ("sailors" walk), renal, cardiac and liver impairment. 65% of plasma PA and PrA is localized within VLDL, LDL and HDL lipoprotein particles. Dietary restriction of PA is mostly not sufficient to prevent acute attacks and stabilize the progressive course. LDL and VLDL bound PA/PrA can be effectively eliminated from plasma with extracorporal LDL-apheresis using membrane differential filtration. Mostly additive malnutrition will become worse the clinical picture. Latest experience with black cumin oil (nigella sativa) in a dose of 3 g/day shows a support and a regression of some malnutrition effects in PA restricted dietary and a supportive effect to MDF.

  5. Social cognition is not associated with cognitive reserve in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrencic, Louise M; Kurylowicz, Lisa; Valenzuela, Michael J; Churches, Owen F; Keage, Hannah A D

    2016-01-01

    Social and general cognitive abilities decline in late life. Those with high cognitive reserve display better general cognitive performance in old age; however, it is unknown whether this is also the case for social cognition. A total of 115 healthy older adults, aged 60-85 years (m = 44, f = 71) were assessed using The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT-R; social cognition), the Lifetime of Experiences Questionnaire (LEQ; cognitive reserve), and the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI-II; general cognitive ability). The LEQ did not predict performance on any TASIT-R subtest: Emotion Evaluation Test (β = -.097, p = .325), Social Inference - Minimal (β = -.004, p = .972), or Social Inference - Enriched (β = -.016, p = .878). Sensitivity analyses using two alternative cognitive reserve measures, years of education and the National Adult Reading Test, supported these effects. Cognitive reserve was strongly related to WASI-II performance. Unlike general cognitive ability, social cognition appears unaffected by cognitive reserve. Findings contribute to the emerging understanding that cognitive reserve differentially affects individual cognitive domains, which has implications for the theoretical understanding of cognitive reserve and its brain correlates. Cognitive measures unbiased by cognitive reserve may serve as best indicators of brain health, free of compensatory mechanisms.

  6. Intelligence Differentiation in Adult Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Francisco J.; Colom, Robert; Juan-Espinosa, Manuel; Garcia, Luis F.

    2003-01-01

    Results for 3,340 participants taking a battery of cognitive tests and an analysis of the Spanish standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III support the differentiation of intelligence across the range of ability, with WAIS-III results more supportive of the differentiation theory. (SLD)

  7. Visual cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of essays covering issues in visual cognition presenting experimental techniques from cognitive psychology, methods of modeling cognitive processes on computers from artificial intelligence, and methods of studying brain organization from neuropsychology. Topics considered include: parts of recognition; visual routines; upward direction; mental rotation, and discrimination of left and right turns in maps; individual differences in mental imagery, computational analysis and the neurological basis of mental imagery: componental analysis.

  8. COGNITIVE ECONOMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIMBALL, MILES

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive economics is the economics of what is in people’s minds. It is a vibrant area of research (much of it within behavioural economics, labour economics and the economics of education) that brings into play novel types of data, especially novel types of survey data. Such data highlight the importance of heterogeneity across individuals and highlight thorny issues for welfare economics. A key theme of cognitive economics is finite cognition (often misleadingly called “bounded rationality”), which poses theoretical challenges that call for versatile approaches. Cognitive economics brings a rich toolbox to the task of understanding a complex world. PMID:28149186

  9. Visual cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This collection of research papers on visual cognition first appeared as a special issue of Cognition: International Journal of Cognitive Science. The study of visual cognition has seen enormous progress in the past decade, bringing important advances in our understanding of shape perception, visual imagery, and mental maps. Many of these discoveries are the result of converging investigations in different areas, such as cognitive and perceptual psychology, artificial intelligence, and neuropsychology. This volume is intended to highlight a sample of work at the cutting edge of this research area for the benefit of students and researchers in a variety of disciplines. The tutorial introduction that begins the volume is designed to help the nonspecialist reader bridge the gap between the contemporary research reported here and earlier textbook introductions or literature reviews.

  10. Cognitive impairments in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahgol Tavakoli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings indicated that WMS-III and WAIS-R can differentiate patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy from normal subjects. However, the obtained cognitive profile could not differentiate between the right and the left TLE.

  11. Which part of the Quick mild cognitive impairment screen (Qmci) discriminates between normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment and dementia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Caoimh, Rónán

    2013-05-01

    the Qmci is a sensitive and specific test to differentiate between normal cognition (NC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of the subtests of the Qmci to determine which best discriminated NC, MCI and dementia.

  12. Cognitive Performance and Cognitive Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Journal of Behavioral Development, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Investigates (1) the relationships between cognitive performance and cognitive styles and predictive possibilities and (2) performance differences by sex, school, grade, and income in 92 Indian adolescents. Assessment measures included Liquid Conservation, Islands, Goat-Lion, Hanoi-Tower, Rabbits (Piagetian); Block Design (WISC-R); Paper Cutting…

  13. Cognitive Neuropsychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, studies in cognitive neuropsychology have reported single cases or small groups of patients with seemingly selective impairments of specific cognitive processes or modules. Many studies, particularly older ones, have used simple and coarse tasks to show that patients are disproport......Traditionally, studies in cognitive neuropsychology have reported single cases or small groups of patients with seemingly selective impairments of specific cognitive processes or modules. Many studies, particularly older ones, have used simple and coarse tasks to show that patients...... for cognitive neuropsychology are opened up. The questions addressed in this symposium is whether the questions posed by cognitive neuropsychology are still relevant, and whether new methods can spark a new interest in the field, or if the time has passed when the observation of single and double dissociations...... in patients’ test performance can inform theories of (normal) cognitive function. In four talks, this symposium will present and discuss methods for investigating impairment patterns in neuropsychological patients: 1) a talk on basic assumptions and statistical methods in single case methodology; 2) a talk...

  14. Cultural Change, Human Activity, and Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvain, Mary; Munroe, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Differential cognitive performance across cultural contexts has been a standard result in comparative research. Here we discuss how societal changes occurring when a small-scale traditional community incorporates elements from industrialized society may contribute to cognitive development, and we illustrate this with an analysis of the cognitive…

  15. Cultural Change, Human Activity, and Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvain, Mary; Munroe, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Differential cognitive performance across cultural contexts has been a standard result in comparative research. Here we discuss how societal changes occurring when a small-scale traditional community incorporates elements from industrialized society may contribute to cognitive development, and we illustrate this with an analysis of the cognitive…

  16. Cognitive anthropology is a cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boster, James S

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive anthropology contributes to cognitive science as a complement to cognitive psychology. The chief threat to its survival has not been rejection by other cognitive scientists but by other cultural anthropologists. It will remain a part of cognitive science as long as cognitive anthropologists research, teach, and publish.

  17. Semiotic aspects of cognitive development: illustrations from early mathematical cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J; Varelas, M

    1993-07-01

    The premise of this article is that cognitive development involves both conceptual and semiotic achievements. From this perspective, the authors emphasize the distinctness of the semiotic issues and develop a differentiated appreciation of semiotic aspects of cognition, particularly in the field of elementary mathematical cognition. The authors provide semiotic analyses of the differences between counting, adding, and multiplying and of the conventional place-value sign system. The authors introduce the concept of the field of reference of a sign, the differentiation of the field into foreground and background, and the dynamics within the field of reference. Finally, the authors relate these ideas to the dynamics between two dimensions of semiotic relations: the sign-referent dimension and the sign-sign dimension.

  18. Detecting cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease using a brief cognitive screening tool: Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabel Chade

    Full Text Available Abstract Detecting cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is crucial for good clinical practice given the new therapeutic possibilities available. When full neuropsychological evaluations are not available, screening tools capable of detecting cognitive difficulties become crucial. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate whether the Spanish version of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE is capable of detecting cognitive difficulties in patients with Parkinson's disease and discriminating their cognitive profile from patients with dementia. Methods: 77 early dementia patients (53 with Alzheimer's Disease and 24 with Frontotemporal Dementia, 22 patients with Parkinson's disease, and 53 healthy controls were evaluated with the ACE. Results: Parkinson's disease patients significantly differed from both healthy controls and dementia patients on ACE total score. Conclusions: This study shows that the Spanish version of the ACE is capable of detecting patients with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and is able to differentiate them from patients with dementia based on their general cognitive status.

  19. Losing the Ability in Activities of Daily Living in the Oldest Old: A Hierarchic Disability Scale from the Newcastle 85+ Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Andrew; Collerton, Joanna; Davies, Karen; Bond, John; Robinson, Louise; Jagger, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the order in which 85 year olds develop difficulty in performing a wide range of daily activities covering basic personal care, household care and mobility. Design Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a cohort study. Setting Newcastle upon Tyne and North Tyneside, UK. Participants Individuals born in 1921, registered with participating general practices. Measurements Detailed health assessment including 17 activities of daily living related to basic personal care, household care and mobility. Questions were of the form ‘Can you …’ rather than ‘Do you…’ Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to confirm a single underlying dimension for the items and Mokken Scaling was used to determine a subsequent hierarchy. Validity of the hierarchical scale was assessed by its associations with known predictors of disability. Results 839 people within the Newcastle 85+ study for whom complete information was available on self-reported Activities of Daily Living (ADL). PCA confirmed a single underlying dimension; Mokken scaling confirmed a hierarchic scale where ‘Cutting toenails’ was the first item with which participants had difficulty and ‘feeding’ the last. The ordering of loss differed between men and women. Difficulty with ‘shopping’ and ‘heavy housework’ were reported earlier by women whilst men reported ‘walking 400 yards’ earlier. Items formed clusters corresponding to strength, balance, lower and upper body involvement and domains specifically required for balance and upper/lower limb functional integrity. Conclusion This comprehensive investigation of ordering of ability in activities in 85 year olds will inform researchers and practitioners assessing older people for onset of disability and subsequent care needs. PMID:22355385

  20. Edith Guilley, Christian J. Lalive d’Epinay (dir., The Closing Chapters of Long Lives. Results from the 10-Year Swilsoo Study on the Oldest Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Varro

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Comment lire une telle étude ? De par-deçà ou de par-delà le tombeau ? Certes, le titre a bien l’air de « fermer le chapitre » de ces longues vies, de ces vies des « plus vieux des vieux »… Mais le lecteur peut trouver un certain réconfort dans la prise de conscience qu’objectivement la vieillesse n’arrête pas de reculer : nous en sommes au 4e âge, où « vivre au-delà de 80 ans constitue une nouvelle étape de la vie » (Préface. Et la perspective adoptée par les auteurs est résolument orientée...

  1. Embodying cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Kristian Møller Moltke; Aggerholm, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, research on cognition has undergone a reformation, which is necessary to take into account when evaluating the cognitive and behavioural aspects of therapy. This reformation is due to the research programme called Embodied Cognition (EC). Although EC may have become...... the theoretical authority in current cognitive science, there are only sporadic examples of EC-based therapy, and no established framework. We aim to build such a framework on the aims, methods and techniques of the current third-wave of CBT. There appears to be a possibility for cross-fertilization between EC...... and CBT that could contribute to the development of theory and practice for both of them. We present a case-study of an EC-based model of intervention for working with self-control in cerebral palsy.We centre the results of the study and its discussion on how we should understand and work with self...

  2. Spatial cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary Kister; Remington, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Spatial cognition is the ability to reason about geometric relationships in the real (or a metaphorical) world based on one or more internal representations of those relationships. The study of spatial cognition is concerned with the representation of spatial knowledge, and our ability to manipulate these representations to solve spatial problems. Spatial cognition is utilized most critically when direct perceptual cues are absent or impoverished. Examples are provided of how human spatial cognitive abilities impact on three areas of space station operator performance: orientation, path planning, and data base management. A videotape provides demonstrations of relevant phenomena (e.g., the importance of orientation for recognition of complex, configural forms). The presentation is represented by abstract and overhead visuals only.

  3. Cognitive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and its relation and potential over current artificial intelligence architectures. Machine learning models that learn from data and previous knowledge will play an increasingly important role in all levels of cognition as large real world digital environments (such as the Internet) usually are too complex...... to be modeled within a limited set of predefined specifications. There will inevitably be a need for robust decisions and behaviors in novel situations that include handling of conflicts and ambiguities based on the capability and knowledge of the artificial cognitive system. Further, there is a need......, cognitive psychology, and semantics. However, machine learning for signal processing plays a key role at all the levels of the cognitive processes, and we expect this to be a new emerging trend in our community in the coming years. Current examples of the use of machine learning for signal processing...

  4. Cognitive Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decline tend to occur in parallel as the disease progresses. Significant cognitive impairment in PD is often associated with: Caregiver distress Worse day-to-day function Diminished quality of life Poorer treatment outcomes Greater medical costs due to ...

  5. Cognitive remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolato, Beatrice; Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Köhler, Cristiano A

    2016-01-01

    dysfunction in MDD. Several other novel agents may be repurposed as cognitive enhancers for MDD treatment, including minocycline, insulin, antidiabetic agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, S-adenosyl methionine, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, melatonin, modafinil......BACKGROUND: Cognitive dysfunction in major depressive disorder (MDD) encompasses several domains, including but not limited to executive function, verbal memory, and attention. Furthermore, cognitive dysfunction is a frequent residual manifestation in depression and may persist during the remitted...... phase. Cognitive deficits may also impede functional recovery, including workforce performance, in patients with MDD. The overarching aims of this opinion article are to critically evaluate the effects of available antidepressants as well as novel therapeutic targets on neurocognitive dysfunction in MDD...

  6. Cognitive Robotics

    OpenAIRE

    Levesque, Hector J.; Lakemeyer, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    This chapter is dedicated to the memory of Ray Reiter. It is also an overview of cognitive robotics, as we understand it to have been envisaged by him.1 Of course, nobody can control the use of a term or the direction of research. We apologize in advance to those who feel that other approaches to cognitive robotics and related problems are inadequately represented here.

  7. Cognitive technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Mello, Alan; Figueiredo, Fabrício; Figueiredo, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the next generation optical networks as well as mobile communication technologies. The reader will find chapters on Cognitive Optical Network, 5G Cognitive Wireless, LTE, Data Analysis and Natural Language Processing. It also presents a comprehensive view of the enhancements and requirements foreseen for Machine Type Communication. Moreover, some data analysis techniques and Brazilian Portuguese natural language processing technologies are also described here. .

  8. Cognitive Linguistics

    OpenAIRE

    Nyord, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive linguistics is an influential branch of linguistics, which has played an increasing role in different areas of Egyptology over the last couple of decades. Concepts from cognitive linguistics have been especially influential in the study of determinatives/classifiers in the hieroglyphic script, but they have also proven useful to elucidate a number of other questions, both narrowly linguistic and more broadly cultural historical.

  9. Enoxaparin treatment administered at both early and late stages of amyloid beta deposition improves cognition of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice with differential effects on brain A beta levels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, N.M.; Dijk, L. van; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der; Kiliaan, A.J.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Enoxaparin (Enox), a low molecular weight heparin, has been shown to lower brain amyloid beta (A beta) load in a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease. However, the effect of Enox on cognition was not studied. Therefore, we examined the effect of peripheral Enox treatment on cognition and brain A beta

  10. Offloading Cognition onto Cognitive Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Dror, Itiel

    2008-01-01

    "Cognizing" (i.e., thinking, understanding, knowing, and having the capacity to do what cognizers can do) is a mental state. Systems without mental states, such as cognitive technology, can sometimes also do some of what cognizers can do, but that does not make them cognizers. Cognitive technology allows cognizers to offload some of the functions they would otherwise have had to execute with their own brains and bodies alone; it also extends cognizers' performance powers beyond those of brains and bodies alone. Language itself is a form of cognitive technology that allows cognizers to offload some of their brain functions onto the brains of other cognizers. Language also extends cognizers' individual and joint performance powers, distributing the load through interactive and collaborative cognition. Reading, writing, print, telecommunications and computing further extend cognizers' capacities. And now the web, with its distributed network of cognizers, digital databases and sofware agents, has become the Cogn...

  11. The Tractable Cognition thesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rooij, I.J.E.I. van

    2008-01-01

    ...: Human cognitive capacities are constrained by computational tractability. This thesis, if true, serves cognitive psychology by constraining the space of computational-level theories of cognition...

  12. On the specificity of face cognition compared with general cognitive functioning across adult age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Andrea; Wilhelm, Oliver; Schmiedek, Florian; Herzmann, Grit; Sommer, Werner

    2011-09-01

    Face cognition is considered a specific human ability, clearly differentiable from general cognitive functioning. Its specificity is primarily supported by cognitive-experimental and neuroimaging research, but recently also from an individual differences perspective. However, no comprehensive behavioral data are available, which would allow estimating lifespan changes of the covariance structure of face-cognition abilities and general cognitive functioning as well as age-differences in face cognition after accounting for interindividual variability in general cognition. The present study aimed to fill this gap. In an age-heterogeneous (18-82 years) sample of 448 adults, we found no factorial dedifferentiation between face cognition and general cognition. Age-related differences in face memory were still salient after taking into account changes in general cognitive functioning. Face cognition thus remains a specific human ability compared with general cognition, even until old age. We discuss implications for models of cognitive aging and suggest that it is necessary to include more explicitly special social abilities in those models.

  13. Cognitive linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Vyvyan

    2012-03-01

    Cognitive linguistics is one of the fastest growing and influential perspectives on the nature of language, the mind, and their relationship with sociophysical (embodied) experience. It is a broad theoretical and methodological enterprise, rather than a single, closely articulated theory. Its primary commitments are outlined. These are the Cognitive Commitment-a commitment to providing a characterization of language that accords with what is known about the mind and brain from other disciplines-and the Generalization Commitment-which represents a dedication to characterizing general principles that apply to all aspects of human language. The article also outlines the assumptions and worldview which arises from these commitments, as represented in the work of leading cognitive linguists. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:129-141. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1163 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  14. Cognitive fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkey, Roderick; Kilts, Clint

    2007-11-01

    Recent neuroscientific research shows that the health of your brain isn't, as experts once thought, just the product of childhood experiences and genetics; it reflects your adult choices and experiences as well. Professors Gilkey and Kilts of Emory University's medical and business schools explain how you can strengthen your brain's anatomy, neural networks, and cognitive abilities, and prevent functions such as memory from deteriorating as you age. The brain's alertness is the result of what the authors call cognitive fitness -a state of optimized ability to reason, remember, learn, plan, and adapt. Certain attitudes, lifestyle choices, and exercises enhance cognitive fitness. Mental workouts are the key. Brain-imaging studies indicate that acquiring expertise in areas as diverse as playing a cello, juggling, speaking a foreign language, and driving a taxicab expands your neural systems and makes them more communicative. In other words, you can alter the physical makeup of your brain by learning new skills. The more cognitively fit you are, the better equipped you are to make decisions, solve problems, and deal with stress and change. Cognitive fitness will help you be more open to new ideas and alternative perspectives. It will give you the capacity to change your behavior and realize your goals. You can delay senescence for years and even enjoy a second career. Drawing from the rapidly expanding body of neuroscience research as well as from well-established research in psychology and other mental health fields, the authors have identified four steps you can take to become cognitively fit: understand how experience makes the brain grow, work hard at play, search for patterns, and seek novelty and innovation. Together these steps capture some of the key opportunities for maintaining an engaged, creative brain.

  15. Cognitive maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minder, Bettina; Laursen, Linda Nhu; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2014-01-01

    . Conceptual clustering is used to analyse and order information according to concepts or variables from within the data. The cognitive maps identified are validated through the comments of some of the same experts. The study presents three cognitive maps and respective world-views explaining how the design...... and innovation field are related and under which dimensions they differ. The paper draws preliminary conclusions on the implications of the different world- views on the innovation process. With the growing importance of the design approach in innovation e.g. design thinking, a clear conception...

  16. Cognitive maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minder, Bettina; Laursen, Linda Nhu; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2014-01-01

    . Conceptual clustering is used to analyse and order information according to concepts or variables from within the data. The cognitive maps identified are validated through the comments of some of the same experts. The study presents three cognitive maps and respective world-views explaining how the design...... and innovation field are related and under which dimensions they differ. The paper draws preliminary conclusions on the implications of the different world- views on the innovation process. With the growing importance of the design approach in innovation e.g. design thinking, a clear conception...

  17. Cognitive Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocking, Rodney R.; Mestre, Jose P.

    The focus of this paper is on cognitive science as a model for understanding the application of human skills toward effective problem-solving. Sections include: (1) "Introduction" (discussing information processing framework, expert-novice distinctions, schema theory, and learning process); (2) "Application: The Expert-Novice…

  18. Moral Cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleim, Stephan; Clausen, Jens; Levy, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Research on moral cognition is a growing and heavily multidisciplinary field. This section contains chapters addressing foundational psychological, neuroscientific, and philosophical issues of research on moral decision-making. Further- more, beyond summarizing the state of the art of their respecti

  19. Neighborhood Influences on Late Life Cognition in the ACTIVE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M. Sisco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low neighborhood-level socioeconomic status has been associated with poorer health, reduced physical activity, increased psychological stress, and less neighborhood-based social support. These outcomes are correlates of late life cognition, but few studies have specifically investigated the neighborhood as a unique source of explanatory variance in cognitive aging. This study supplemented baseline cognitive data from the ACTIVE (Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly study with neighborhood-level data to investigate (1 whether neighborhood socioeconomic position (SEP predicts cognitive level, and if so, whether it differentially predicts performance in general and specific domains of cognition and (2 whether neighborhood SEP predicts differences in response to short-term cognitive intervention for memory, reasoning, or processing speed. Neighborhood SEP positively predicted vocabulary, but did not predict other general or specific measures of cognitive level, and did not predict individual differences in response to cognitive intervention.

  20. Potential of Cognitive Computing and Cognitive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive computing and cognitive technologies are game changers for future engineering systems, as well as for engineering practice and training. They are major drivers for knowledge automation work, and the creation of cognitive products with higher levels of intelligence than current smart products. This paper gives a brief review of cognitive computing and some of the cognitive engineering systems activities. The potential of cognitive technologies is outlined, along with a brief description of future cognitive environments, incorporating cognitive assistants - specialized proactive intelligent software agents designed to follow and interact with humans and other cognitive assistants across the environments. The cognitive assistants engage, individually or collectively, with humans through a combination of adaptive multimodal interfaces, and advanced visualization and navigation techniques. The realization of future cognitive environments requires the development of a cognitive innovation ecosystem for the engineering workforce. The continuously expanding major components of the ecosystem include integrated knowledge discovery and exploitation facilities (incorporating predictive and prescriptive big data analytics); novel cognitive modeling and visual simulation facilities; cognitive multimodal interfaces; and cognitive mobile and wearable devices. The ecosystem will provide timely, engaging, personalized / collaborative, learning and effective decision making. It will stimulate creativity and innovation, and prepare the participants to work in future cognitive enterprises and develop new cognitive products of increasing complexity. http://www.aee.odu.edu/cognitivecomp

  1. Neural correlates of cognitive improvements following cognitive remediation in schizophrenia: a systematic review of randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Isaac

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive impairments are a core feature in schizophrenia and are linked to poor social functioning. Numerous studies have shown that cognitive remediation can enhance cognitive and functional abilities in patients with this pathology. The underlying mechanism of these behavioral improvements seems to be related to structural and functional changes in the brain. However, studies on neural correlates of such enhancement remain scarce. Objectives: We explored the neural correlates of cognitive enhancement following cognitive remediation interventions in schizophrenia and the differential effect between cognitive training and other therapeutic interventions or patients’ usual care. Method: We searched MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and ScienceDirect databases for studies on cognitive remediation therapy in schizophrenia that used neuroimaging techniques and a randomized design. Search terms included randomized controlled trial, cognitive remediation, cognitive training, rehabilitation, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, near infrared spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging. We selected randomized controlled trials that proposed multiple sessions of cognitive training to adult patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder and assessed its efficacy with imaging techniques. Results: In total, 15 reports involving 19 studies were included in the systematic review. They involved a total of 455 adult patients, 271 of whom received cognitive remediation. Cognitive remediation therapy seems to provide a neurobiological enhancing effect in schizophrenia. After therapy, increased activations are observed in various brain regions mainly in frontal – especially prefrontal – and also in occipital and anterior cingulate regions during working memory and executive tasks. Several studies provide evidence of an improved functional connectivity after cognitive training, suggesting a

  2. Entrepreneurial Cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zichella, Giulio

    in the experiment were selected based on their entrepreneurial intentions, with a high degree of comparability and a limited impact of prior entrepreneurial experience. The data include measures of behavior in situations of risk and uncertainty with real monetary incentives, risk perception, and a number...... of individual characteristics, including personality traits, cognitive biases, and demographics. In the first essay, I explore how individuals with and without entrepreneurial intentions differ in terms of risk behavior by testing their sensitivity to prior monetary outcomes and an increasing degree of risk...... faced with risk and uncertainty. The purpose of this dissertation is to contribute to this latter stream of research by examining how individuals differ in their cognition and behaviors in situations of risk and uncertainty in a controlled environment. More specifically, the dissertation explores how...

  3. Cognitive Fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-25

    approaches vary but most involve machine learning and data mining techniques and specific computational methods will be highlighted. Digital traces from...dynamics (which are a behavioral biometric) with linguistic features (Juola et al. 2013). Linguistic features include lexical statis- tics (e.g., word...concerning aggregated features suggesting the possibility of similar computational approaches in cap- turing a cognitive fingerprint. Prior work in Web

  4. Nonquantum Cognition

    CERN Document Server

    Ghose, Partha

    2012-01-01

    The Hilbert space structure of classical field theory is proposed as a general theoretical framework to model human cognitive processes which do not often follow classical (Bayesian) probability principles. This leads to an extension of the circumplex model of affect and a Poincar\\'{e} sphere representation. A specific toy field theoretic model of the brain as a coherent structure in the presence of noise is also proposed that agrees qualitatively with Pavlovian fear conditioning studies.

  5. Can cognitive science create a cognitive economics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chater, Nick

    2015-02-01

    Cognitive science can intersect with economics in at least three productive ways: by providing richer models of individual behaviour for use in economic analysis; by drawing from economic theory in order to model distributed cognition; and jointly to create more powerful 'rational' models of cognitive processes and social interaction. There is the prospect of moving from behavioural economics to a genuinely cognitive economics.

  6. Differential characters

    CERN Document Server

    Bär, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Providing a systematic introduction to differential characters as introduced by Cheeger and Simons, this text describes important concepts such as fiber integration, higher dimensional holonomy, transgression, and the product structure in a geometric manner. Differential characters form a model of what is nowadays called differential cohomology, which is the mathematical structure behind the higher gauge theories in physics.  

  7. Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive learning objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nancy E

    2015-07-01

    Information professionals who train or instruct others can use Bloom's taxonomy to write learning objectives that describe the skills and abilities that they desire their learners to master and demonstrate. Bloom's taxonomy differentiates between cognitive skill levels and calls attention to learning objectives that require higher levels of cognitive skills and, therefore, lead to deeper learning and transfer of knowledge and skills to a greater variety of tasks and contexts.

  8. 50 Years of Cognitive Aging Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nicole D; Craik, Fergus I M

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this Introduction to the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences special issue on "50 Years of Cognitive Aging Theory" are to provide a brief overview of cognitive aging research prior to 1965 and to highlight significant developments in cognitive aging theory over the last 50 years. Historical and recent theories of cognitive aging were reviewed, with a particular focus on those not directly covered by the articles included in this special issue. Prior to 1965, cognitive aging research was predominantly descriptive, identifying what aspects of intellectual functioning are affected in older compared with younger adults. Since the mid-1960s, there has been an increasing interest in how and why specific components of cognitive domains are differentially affected in aging and a growing focus on cognitive aging neuroscience. Significant advances have taken place in our theoretical understanding of how and why certain components of cognitive functioning are or are not affected by aging. We also know much more now than we did 50 years ago about the underlying neural mechanisms of these changes. The next 50 years undoubtedly will bring new theories, as well as new tools (e.g., neuroimaging advances, neuromodulation, and technology), that will further our understanding of cognitive aging. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Cognitive Phenotypes, Brain Morphometry and the Detection of Cognitive Decline in Preclinical AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Jacobson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying a preclinical phase of Alzheimer’s Disease (PCAD that is distinct from cognitive changes in healthy aging continues to be a major research focus. Combining neuropsychological and neuroimaging methodologies should improve our ability to differentiate healthy from pathological aging, although studies that utilize both methods often result in equivocal findings, possibly due to variability in cognitive test performance that may be capturing distinct phenotypes. One method of capturing this cognitive variability is to utilize contrasting neuropsychological tests to identify subgroups representative of distinct cognitive phenotypes, and determine whether differences in brain morphometry support these classifications. We review several approaches to defining cognitive subgroups, and we consider the possibility that cognitive asymmetry might provide one means of identifying both functional and structural changes associated with aging and dementia.

  10. Vitamin C Status and Cognitive Function: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travica, Nikolaj; Ried, Karin; Sali, Avni; Scholey, Andrew; Hudson, Irene; Pipingas, Andrew

    2017-08-30

    Vitamin C plays a role in neuronal differentiation, maturation, myelin formation and modulation of the cholinergic, catecholinergic, and glutaminergic systems. This review evaluates the link between vitamin C status and cognitive performance, in both cognitively intact and impaired individuals. We searched the PUBMED, SCOPUS, SciSearch and the Cochrane Library from 1980 to January 2017, finding 50 studies, with randomised controlled trials (RCTs, n = 5), prospective (n = 24), cross-sectional (n = 17) and case-control (n = 4) studies. Of these, 36 studies were conducted in healthy participants and 14 on cognitively impaired individuals (including Alzheimer's and dementia). Vitamin C status was measured using food frequency questionnaires or plasma vitamin C. Cognition was assessed using a variety of tests, mostly the Mini-Mental-State-Examination (MMSE). In summary, studies demonstrated higher mean vitamin C concentrations in the cognitively intact groups of participants compared to cognitively impaired groups. No correlation between vitamin C concentrations and MMSE cognitive function was apparent in the cognitively impaired individuals. The MMSE was not suitable to detect a variance in cognition in the healthy group. Analysis of the studies that used a variety of cognitive assessments in the cognitively intact was beyond the scope of this review; however, qualitative assessment revealed a potential association between plasma vitamin C concentrations and cognition. Due to a number of limitations in these studies, further research is needed, utilizing plasma vitamin C concentrations and sensitive cognitive assessments that are suitable for cognitively intact adults.

  11. Benefits of hormone therapy estrogens depend on estrogen type: 17β-estradiol and conjugated equine estrogens have differential effects on cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors and increase tryptophan hydroxylase-2 mRNA levels in dorsal raphe nucleus subregions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoko Hiroi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Decreased serotonin (5-HT function is associated with numerous cognitive and affective disorders. Women are more vulnerable to these disorders and have a lower rate of 5-HT synthesis than men. Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN are a major source of 5-HT in the forebrain and play a critical role in regulation of stress-related disorders. In particular, polymorphisms of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TpH2, the brain-specific, rate-limiting enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis are implicated in cognitive and affective disorders. Administration of 17β-estradiol (E2, the most potent naturally circulating estrogen in women and rats, can have beneficial effects on cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. Moreover, E2 increases TpH2 mRNA in specific subdivisions of the DRN. Although conjugated equine estrogens (CEE are a commonly prescribed estrogen component of hormone therapy in menopausal women, there is a marked gap in knowledge regarding how CEE affects these behaviors and the brain 5-HT system. Therefore, we compared the effects of E2 and CEE treatments on TpH2 mRNA and on behavior. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized, administered either vehicle, E2, or CEE, and tested on a battery of cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. The brains of these animals were subsequently analyzed for TpH2 mRNA. E2 increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and mid DRN, corroborating previous findings. However, CEE increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and rostral, but not the mid DRN, suggesting that distinct estrogens can have subregion-specific effects on TpH2 gene expression. We also found differential correlations between the level of TpH2 mRNA in specific DRN subregions and behavior, depending on the type of behavior. These distinct associations imply that cognition, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors are modulated by unique serotonergic neurocircuitry, opening the possibility of novel avenues of targeted treatment

  12. Face and object cognition across adult age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Andrea; Wilhelm, Oliver; Herzmann, Grit; Sommer, Werner

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the specificity of face compared with object cognition from an individual differences and aging perspective by determining the amount of overlap between these abilities at the level of latent constructs across age. Confirmatory factor analytic models tested the specificity of speed and accuracy measures for face and object cognition (N = 448; 18 to 88 years). Accuracy measures were distinguishable and slightly dedifferentiated across age, which was not due to loss of visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. There was no face specificity for speed measures. These results support the specificity of face cognition from differential and developmental perspective only for performance accuracy.

  13. Differential manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Kosinski, Antoni A

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of differential topology form the center of many mathematical disciplines such as differential geometry and Lie group theory. Differential Manifolds presents to advanced undergraduates and graduate students the systematic study of the topological structure of smooth manifolds. Author Antoni A. Kosinski, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Rutgers University, offers an accessible approach to both the h-cobordism theorem and the classification of differential structures on spheres.""How useful it is,"" noted the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, ""to have a single, sho

  14. Cognitive processes in CBT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, E.S.; Vrijsen, J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Automatic cognitive processing helps us navigate the world. However, if the emotional and cognitive interplay becomes skewed, those cognitive processes can become maladaptive and result in psychopathology. Although biases are present in most mental disorders, different disorders are characterized by

  15. Music and Cognitive Extension

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kersten, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Extended cognition holds that cognitive processes sometimes leak into the world (Dawson, 2013). A recent trend among proponents of extended cognition has been to put pressure on phenomena thought to be safe havens for internalists...

  16. Music and Cognitive Extension

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luke Kersten

    2015-01-01

    Extended cognition holds that cognitive processes sometimes leak into the world (Dawson, 2013). A recent trend among proponents of extended cognition has been to put pressure on phenomena thought to be safe havens for internalists...

  17. Cognitive Function, Origin, and Evolution of Musical Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Perlovsky

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive function of music, its origin, and evolution has been a mystery until recently. Here we discuss a theory of a fundamental function of music in cognition and culture. Music evolved in parallel with language. The evolution of language toward a semantically powerful tool required freeing from uncontrolled emotions. Knowledge evolved fast along with language. This created cognitive dissonances, contradictions among knowledge and instincts, which differentiated consciousness. To sustain evolution of language and culture, these contradictions had to be unified. Music was the mechanism of unification. Differentiated emotions are needed for resolving cognitive dissonances. As knowledge has been accumulated, contradictions multiplied and correspondingly more varied emotions had to evolve. While language differentiated psyche, music unified it. Thus the need for refined musical emotions in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of cognition. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music.

  18. The Effects of a Brief Acceptance-Based Behavioral Treatment Versus Traditional Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Public Speaking Anxiety: An Exploratory Trial Examining Differential Effects on Performance and Neurophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Lisa H; Forman, Evan M; Herbert, James D; Bradley, Lauren E; Foster, Elizabeth E; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Ruocco, Anthony C

    2016-09-01

    Individuals with public speaking anxiety (PSA) experience fear and avoidance that can cause extreme distress, impaired speaking performance, and associated problems in psychosocial functioning. Most extant interventions for PSA emphasize anxiety reduction rather than enhancing behavioral performance. We compared the efficacy of two brief cognitive-behavioral interventions, a traditional cognitive-behavior treatment (tCBT) and an acceptance-based behavior treatment (ABBT), on public speaking performance and anxiety in a clinical sample of persons with PSA. The effects of treatment on prefrontal brain activation were also examined. Participants (n = 21) were randomized to 90 min of an ABBT or a tCBT intervention. Assessments took place at pre- and post-treatment and included self-rated anxiety and observer-rated performance measures, a behavioral assessment, and prefrontal cortical activity measurements using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Exploratory results indicated that participants in the ABBT condition experienced greater improvements in observer-rated performance relative to those in the tCBT condition, while those in the tCBT condition experienced greater reductions in subjective anxiety levels. Individuals in the ABBT condition also exhibited a trend toward greater treatment-related reductions in blood volume in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex relative to those who received tCBT. Overall, these findings preliminarily suggest that acceptance-based treatments may free more cognitive resources in comparison with tCBT, possibly resulting in greater improvements in objectively rated behavioral performances for ABBT interventions.

  19. COGNITIVE COMPETENCE COMPARED TO COGNITIVE INDEPENDENCE AND COGNITIVE ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina B. Shmigirilova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at identifying the essence of the cognitive competence concept in comparison with the concepts of cognitive independence and activity.Methods: The methodology implies a theoretical analysis of psychopedagogical and methodological materials on the cognitive competence formation; generalized teaching experience; empirical methods of direct observations of educational process in the secondary school classrooms; interviews with school teachers and pupils.Results: The research outcomes reveal a semantic intersection between the cognitive competence, independence and activity, and their distinctive features. The paper emphasizes the importance of cognitive competence as an adaptive mechanism in situations of uncertainty and instability.Scientific novelty: The author clarifies the concept of cognitive competence regarding it as a multi-component and systematic characteristic of a personality.Practical significance: The research findings can be used by specialists in didactics developing the teaching techniques of cognitive competence formation for schoolchildren.

  20. Longitudinal associations between activity and cognition vary by age, activity type, and cognitive domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielak, Allison A M; Gerstorf, Denis; Anstey, Kaarin J; Luszcz, Mary A

    2014-12-01

    The demonstration of correlated change is critical to understanding the relationship between activity engagement and cognitive functioning in older adulthood. Changes in activity have been shown to be related to changes in cognition, but little attention has been devoted to how this relationship may vary between specific activity types, cognitive domains, and age groups. Participants initially aged 65-98 years (M = 77.46 years) from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing (n = 1,321) completed measurements of activity (i.e., cognitive, group social, one-on-one social, and physical) and cognition (i.e., perceptual speed, and immediate and delayed episodic memory) at baseline, 2, 8, 11, and 15 years later. Bivariate latent growth curve models covarying for education, sex, and baseline age and medical conditions revealed multiple positive-level relations between activity and cognitive performance, but activity level was not related to later cognitive change. Change in perceptual speed over 15 years was positively associated with change in cognitive activity, and change in immediate episodic memory was positively associated with change in one-on-one social activity. Old-old adults showed a stronger change-change covariance for mentally stimulating activity in relation to perceptual speed than did young-old adults. The differentiation by activity type, cognitive domain, and age contributes to the growing evidence that there is variation in the way cognitive ability at different ages is related to activity.

  1. Modafinil combined with cognitive training: pharmacological augmentation of cognitive training in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulou, Panayiota G; Lewis, Shôn W; Drake, Richard J; Reichenberg, Abraham; Emsley, Richard; Kalpakidou, Anastasia K; Lees, Jane; Bobin, Tracey; Gilleen, James K; Pandina, Gahan; Applegate, Eve; Wykes, Til; Kapur, Shitij

    2015-08-01

    Several efforts to develop pharmacological treatments with a beneficial effect on cognition in schizophrenia are underway, while cognitive remediation has shown modest effects on cognitive performance. Our goal was to test if pharmacological augmentation of cognitive training would result in enhancement of training-induced learning. We chose modafinil as the pharmacological augmenting agent, as it is known to have beneficial effects on learning and cognition. 49 participants with chronic schizophrenia were enroled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study across two sites and were randomised to either modafinil (200mg/day) or placebo. All participants engaged in a cognitive training program for 10 consecutive weekdays. The primary outcome measure was the performance on the trained tasks and secondary outcome measures included MATRICS cognitive battery, proxy measures of everyday functioning and symptom measures. 84% of the participants completed all study visits. Both groups showed significant improvement in the performance of the trained tasks suggesting potential for further learning. Modafinil did not induce differential enhancement on the performance of the trained tasks or any differential enhancement of the neuropsychological and functional measures compared to placebo. Modafinil showed no significant effects on symptom severity. Our study demonstrated that combining pharmacological compounds with cognitive training is acceptable to patients and can be implemented in large double-blind randomised controlled trials. The lack of differential enhancement of training-induced learning raises questions, such as choice and optimal dose of drug, cognitive domains to be trained, type of cognitive training, intervention duration and chronicity of illness that require systematic investigation in future studies.

  2. Conceptions of cognition for cognitive engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Olle

    2011-01-01

    that there is not anything special about the biological boundary of the skin and skull per se, rather than some positive claim about where the boundaries of extended or distributed cognitive systems really are. I also examine the role of the concept of cognition in the theoretical frameworks of Distributed Cognition, Joint...... as part of the development of a new understanding of what cognition is and where the boundaries of cognitive systems are. Cognition, it is claimed, is not just situated or embedded, but extended and distributed in the world. My main question in this article is what the practical significance...... is of this framing of an expanded unit of analysis in a cognitive vocabulary. I focus on possible consequences for how cognitive engineering practitioners think about function allocation in system design, and on what the relative benefits and costs are of having a common framework and vocabulary for talking about...

  3. Differential meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; A. Ponse

    2008-01-01

    A meadow is a zero totalised field (0^{-1}=0), and a cancellation meadow is a meadow without proper zero divisors. In this paper we consider differential meadows, i.e., meadows equipped with differentiation operators. We give an equational axiomatization of these operators and thus obtain a finite b

  4. The cognitive/affective distinction of job insecurity: Validation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cognitive/affective distinction of job insecurity: Validation and differential relations. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... Job insecurity as a work-related stressor is well established through three ...

  5. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Barbu, Viorel

    2016-01-01

    This textbook is a comprehensive treatment of ordinary differential equations, concisely presenting basic and essential results in a rigorous manner. Including various examples from physics, mechanics, natural sciences, engineering and automatic theory, Differential Equations is a bridge between the abstract theory of differential equations and applied systems theory. Particular attention is given to the existence and uniqueness of the Cauchy problem, linear differential systems, stability theory and applications to first-order partial differential equations. Upper undergraduate students and researchers in applied mathematics and systems theory with a background in advanced calculus will find this book particularly useful. Supplementary topics are covered in an appendix enabling the book to be completely self-contained.

  6. Cognitive Function, Origin, and Evolution of Musical Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Leonid Perlovsky

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive function of music, its origin, and evolution has been a mystery until recently. Here we discuss a theory of a fundamental function of music in cognition and culture. Music evolved in parallel with language. The evolution of language toward a semantically powerful tool required freeing from uncontrolled emotions. Knowledge evolved fast along with language. This created cognitive dissonances, contradictions among knowledge and instincts, which differentiated consciousness. To sustain ...

  7. Characterizing healthy samples for studies of human cognitive aging

    OpenAIRE

    Geldmacher, David S.; Levin, Bonnie E.; Wright, Clinton B.

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the cognitive declines associated with aging, and differentiating them from the effects of disease in older adults, are important goals for human neuroscience researchers. This is also an issue of public health urgency in countries with rapidly aging populations. Progress toward understanding cognitive aging is complicated by numerous factors. Researchers interested in cognitive changes in healthy older adults need to consider these complexities when they design and interpre...

  8. Differential games

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2006-01-01

    This volume lays the mathematical foundations for the theory of differential games, developing a rigorous mathematical framework with existence theorems. It begins with a precise definition of a differential game and advances to considerations of games of fixed duration, games of pursuit and evasion, the computation of saddle points, games of survival, and games with restricted phase coordinates. Final chapters cover selected topics (including capturability and games with delayed information) and N-person games.Geared toward graduate students, Differential Games will be of particular interest

  9. Music cognition and the cognitive sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Marcus; Rohrmeier, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Why should music be of interest to cognitive scientists, and what role does it play in human cognition? We review three factors that make music an important topic for cognitive scientific research. First, music is a universal human trait fulfilling crucial roles in everyday life. Second, music has an important part to play in ontogenetic development and human evolution. Third, appreciating and producing music simultaneously engage many complex perceptual, cognitive, and emotional processes, rendering music an ideal object for studying the mind. We propose an integrated status for music cognition in the Cognitive Sciences and conclude by reviewing challenges and big questions in the field and the way in which these reflect recent developments. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  10. COGNITIVE COMPETENCE COMPARED TO COGNITIVE INDEPENDENCE AND COGNITIVE ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The research is aimed at identifying the essence of the cognitive competence concept in comparison with the concepts of cognitive independence and activity.Methods: The methodology implies a theoretical analysis of psychopedagogical and methodological materials on the cognitive competence formation; generalized teaching experience; empirical methods of direct observations of educational process in the secondary school classrooms; interviews with school teachers and pupils.Results: The researc...

  11. Differential topology

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Amiya

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a systematic and comprehensive account of the theory of differentiable manifolds and provides the necessary background for the use of fundamental differential topology tools. The text includes, in particular, the earlier works of Stephen Smale, for which he was awarded the Fields Medal. Explicitly, the topics covered are Thom transversality, Morse theory, theory of handle presentation, h-cobordism theorem, and the generalised Poincaré conjecture. The material is the outcome of lectures and seminars on various aspects of differentiable manifolds and differential topology given over the years at the Indian Statistical Institute in Calcutta, and at other universities throughout India. The book will appeal to graduate students and researchers interested in these topics. An elementary knowledge of linear algebra, general topology, multivariate calculus, analysis, and algebraic topology is recommended.

  12. Cognitive Dimensions of Numerical Rule Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzman, Thomas G.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Developmental differences in reasoning ability and item processing demands are analyzed in a study of cognitive determinants of number analogy performance in two IQ levels of elementary school children and college students. The amount of solution-related information in working memory was the crucial processing demand. Process differentiations of…

  13. Differential Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Stoker, J J

    2011-01-01

    This classic work is now available in an unabridged paperback edition. Stoker makes this fertile branch of mathematics accessible to the nonspecialist by the use of three different notations: vector algebra and calculus, tensor calculus, and the notation devised by Cartan, which employs invariant differential forms as elements in an algebra due to Grassman, combined with an operation called exterior differentiation. Assumed are a passing acquaintance with linear algebra and the basic elements of analysis.

  14. Differential Krull dimension in differential polynomial extensions

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnov, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the differential Krull dimension of differential polynomials over a differential ring. We prove a differential analogue of Jaffard's Special Chain Theorem and show that differential polynomial extensions of certain classes of differential rings have no anomaly of differential Krull dimension.

  15. The Matter of Style: Manifestations of Personality in Cognition, Learning, and Teaching. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messick, Samuel

    The historical roots of cognitive styles are traced in differential psychology, psychoanalytic ego psychology, gestalt and cognitive-developmental psychology to illuminate the varied theoretical issues that energize (and fragment) style research. Optimal measurement of cognitive styles as information-processing regularities and as intra-individual…

  16. Cortical thickness changes correlate with cognition changes after cognitive training: Evidence from a Chinese community study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan eJiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether changes in cortical thickness correlated with cognitive function changes in healthy older adults after receiving cognitive training interventions. Moreover, it also aimed to examine the differential impacts of a multi-domain and a single-domain cognitive training interventions. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanning was performed on participants 65 to 75 years of age using the Siemens 3.0 T Trio Tim with the MPRAGE sequence. The cortical thickness was determined using FreeSurfer software. Cognitive functioning was evaluated using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS. There were significant group × time interaction effects on the left supramarginal, the left frontal pole cortical regions; and a marginal significant group × time interaction effects on visuospatial/constructional and delayed memory scores. In a multi-domain cognitive training group, a number of cortical region changes were significantly positively correlated with changes in attention, delayed memory, and the total score, but significantly negatively correlated with changes in immediate memory and language scores. In the single-domain cognitive training group, some cortical region changes were significantly positively associated with changes in immediate memory, delayed memory, and the total score, while they were significantly negatively associated with changes in visuospatial/constructional, language, and attention scores. Overall, multi-domain cognitive training offered more advantages in visuospatial/constructional, attention, and delayed memory abilities, while single-domain cognitive training benefited immediate memory ability more effectively. These findings suggest that healthy older adults benefit more from the multi-domain cognitive training than single-domain cognitive training. Cognitive training has impacted on cortical thickness changes in healthy elderly

  17. A cognitive model's view of animal cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney D'MELLO, Stan FRANKLIN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Although it is a relatively new field of study, the animal cognition literature is quite extensive and difficult to synthesize. This paper explores the contributions a comprehensive, computational, cognitive model can make toward organizing and assimilating this literature, as well as toward identifying important concepts and their interrelations. Using the LIDA model as an example, a framework is described within which to integrate the diverse research in animal cognition. Such a framework can provide both an ontology of concepts and their relations, and a working model of an animal’s cognitive processes that can compliment active empirical research. In addition to helping to account for a broad range of cognitive processes, such a model can help to comparatively assess the cognitive capabilities of different animal species. After deriving an ontology for animal cognition from the LIDA model, we apply it to develop the beginnings of a database that maps the cognitive facilities of a variety of animal species. We conclude by discussing future avenues of research, particularly the use of computational models of animal cognition as valuable tools for hypotheses generation and testing [Current Zoology 57 (4: 499–513, 2011].

  18. Constraint Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Basin, David; Viganò, Luca

    2010-01-01

    , under the assumption that the original constraint-based approach has these properties. Practically, as a concrete case study, we have integrated this technique into OFMC, a state-of-the-art model-checker for security protocol analysis, and demonstrated its effectiveness by extensive experimentation. Our......We introduce constraint differentiation, a powerful technique for reducing search when model-checking security protocols using constraint-based methods. Constraint differentiation works by eliminating certain kinds of redundancies that arise in the search space when using constraints to represent...

  19. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Guggenheimer, Heinrich W

    1977-01-01

    This is a text of local differential geometry considered as an application of advanced calculus and linear algebra. The discussion is designed for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate study, and presumes of readers only a fair knowledge of matrix algebra and of advanced calculus of functions of several real variables. The author, who is a Professor of Mathematics at the Polytechnic Institute of New York, begins with a discussion of plane geometry and then treats the local theory of Lie groups and transformation groups, solid differential geometry, and Riemannian geometry, leading to a

  20. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Graustein, William C

    2006-01-01

    This first course in differential geometry presents the fundamentals of the metric differential geometry of curves and surfaces in a Euclidean space of three dimensions. Written by an outstanding teacher and mathematician, it explains the material in the most effective way, using vector notation and technique. It also provides an introduction to the study of Riemannian geometry.Suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students, the text presupposes a knowledge of calculus. The first nine chapters focus on the theory, treating the basic properties of curves and surfaces, the mapping of

  1. Cognitive Reserve in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment: The Importance of Occupational Complexity as a Buffer of Declining Cognition in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feldberg Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive reserve is the ability to optimize performance through differential recruitment of brain networks, which may reflect the use of alternative cognitive strategies. Work is one of the most important sources of cognitive stimulation during adulthood. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI represents an intermediate status between normal aging and dementia. As a consequence, this is considered a risk group regarding cognition. In order to study the probable association between occupational complexity and cognitive performance in a group of patients with MCI, a non-probabilistic intentional sample was dispensed on a group of 80 patients. Occupational complexity was explored by the Questionnaire on Agency of Labor Activity (CAAL, according to its acronym in Spanish and a set of neuropsychological tests, which assessed cognitive performance in different areas: memory, attention, language and executive function, were administered. Results reveal that occupational complexity is associated to cognitive performance of elderly adults with MCI. With respect to working with Data, an increase in neuropsychological tests that demand high levels of attention and imply processing speed and working memory can be noted. Regarding the complexity of working with People, an association between the level of occupational complexity and an increase in verbal abilities and verbal reasoning can be seen. On the other hand, working with Things could be associated with better performance in specific areas of cognition such as visuospatial abilities. These results add up as empirical evidence to the fields of cognitive neurology and gerontology and to the cognitive reserve hypothesis, showing how complex environments can enhance cognition in old age. It adds evidence that help to understand which psychological, social and labor factors intervene in the cognitive reserve of an elder adult in cognitive risk.

  2. [Communication disorders: differential diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Castelló, J; Briceño-Cuadros, S

    To evaluate components of clinical semiology in the differential diagnosis of communication disorders (TC) and their possible biological markers. We consider two groups, according to the communication disorders themselves and their effects on social interaction. In the first case both aspects are affected in parallel and in the second it is predominantly social interaction which is affected. In the first groups we studied dyslalias, dyrhrythmias, acquired aphasias, TC relation to epilepsy, types of seizures and EEG discharges. The dysphasia of development and epilepsy may be associated by chance, as a result of the same cause or the epilepsy be responsible for the TC, either because of seizures or continuously (acquired epileptic aphasia, SLK). Based on personal data and the literature we studied the semiology, possible biological markers and differential diagnosis. We consider disorders of neurone migration and metabolic alterations of initial neuropsychological semiology and cerebellar anomalies involved in cognitive functions. In the second group we assessed autism, generalized disorders of development and particular syndromes with semantic pragmatic TC. The development of language cannot be separated from other aspects of neurological maturation. One cannot affirm that there is a direct relationship between epilepsy and TC, although this does occur in some cases. We accept the hypothesis that SLK, POCSL and atypical EPB are clinical forms of the same syndrome of epilepsy. Recognition of the cognitive affective cerebellar syndrome by its involvement in social executive function, language and personality characterizes certain conditions (Williams, Asperger, fragile X, autism). A progressive rational battery of complementary studies on clinical data is essential to determine biological markers in syndromes which still lack them.

  3. Methodology of determining student’s cognitive styles and its application for teaching physics

    OpenAIRE

    Grebenev, Igor V; Lozovskaya, Ludmila B; Morozova, Ekaterina O.

    2014-01-01

    A psychological foundation of differentiation of learning on the basis of students’ individual characteristics (cognitive styles) with orientation to physics education in high school is discussed. The computer testing technique for preliminary determination of students’ cognitive styles is proposed. It is based on the assumed connection between test parameters and parameters of degree of manifestation of cognitive style. The combined method of refining students’ cognitive styles, based on the...

  4. Cortical Thickness Changes Correlate with Cognition Changes after Cognitive Training: Evidence from a Chinese Community Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijuan; Cao, Xinyi; Li, Ting; Tang, Yingying; Li, Wei; Wang, Jijun; Chan, Raymond C; Li, Chunbo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether changes in cortical thickness correlated with cognitive function changes in healthy older adults after receiving cognitive training interventions. Moreover, it also aimed to examine the differential impacts of a multi-domain and a single-domain cognitive training interventions. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning was performed on participants 65-75 years of age using the Siemens 3.0 T Trio Tim with the Magnetization Prepared Rapid Gradient Echo (MPRAGE) sequence. The cortical thickness was determined using FreeSurfer Software. Cognitive functioning was evaluated using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). There were significant group × time interaction effects on the left supramarginal, the left frontal pole cortical regions; and a marginal significant group × time interaction effects on visuospatial/constructional and delayed memory scores. In a multi-domain cognitive training group, a number of cortical region changes were significantly positively correlated with changes in attention, delayed memory, and the total score, but significantly negatively correlated with changes in immediate memory and language scores. In the single-domain cognitive training group, some cortical region changes were significantly positively associated with changes in immediate memory, delayed memory, and the total score, while they were significantly negatively associated with changes in visuospatial/constructional, language, and attention scores. Overall, multi-domain cognitive training offered more advantages in visuospatial/constructional, attention, and delayed memory abilities, while single-domain cognitive training benefited immediate memory ability more effectively. These findings suggest that healthy older adults benefit more from the multi-domain cognitive training than single-domain cognitive training. Cognitive training has impacted on cortical thickness changes in

  5. Cognitive Levels Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Martin; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The Cognitive Levels Matching Project trains teachers to guide students' skill acquisition and problem-solving processes by assessing students' cognitive levels and adapting their teaching materials accordingly. (MLF)

  6. Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, their relationship with baseline functional and cognitive status, and their utility in predicting mortality in nonagenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formiga, Francesc; Ferrer, Assumpta; Chivite, David; Pinto, Xavier; Cuerpo, Sandra; Pujol, Ramón

    2011-07-01

    Little is known about the role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in oldest-old subjects. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between HDL-C levels and physical and cognitive performance indicators in nonagenarians, and also to determine the influence of HDL-C levels on the 3-year mortality risk. The data analyzed were taken from the NonaSantfeliu Study. Functional status was determined by the Lawton-Brody Index (LI) for instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and the Barthel Index (BI) for basic activities (BADL). Cognition was assessed using the Spanish version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MEC). The sample consisted of 49 women (79%) and 13 men, aged 94.3 ± 2.6 years. Mean HDL-C levels were 60 ± 16 mg/dL, and 16 subjects (25.8%) had low HDL-C values. HDL-C levels did correlate with BI (r = 0.28, P = 0.02) and LI (r = 0.32, P = 0.01), but not with MEC (r = 0.18, P = 0.15). Normal HDL-C levels at baseline were significantly associated with higher BI scores (P < 0.006, odds ratio [OR] = 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.05) and a lower number of prescription drugs used (P < 0.04, OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.49-0.99). Baseline HDL-C levels were significantly lower among the group of nonagenarians who died within the 3 years of follow up (P = 0.02). However, after adjusting for potential confounders, the association between HDL-C and mortality lost significance. Higher levels of HDL-C correlate with better functional status and less use of prescribed drugs in nonagenarians. However, the relationship between low HDL-C levels and long-term mortality in this population remains unclear. © 2011 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. Promising medical treatment for childhood psycho-cognitive problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parvaneh Karimzadeh; Sepideh Tabarestani

    2010-01-01

    Subclinical electroencephalogram discharges in children with psycho-cognitive problems are not uncommon. However, the clinical importance and relationship to cognitive deficits, as well as indications for medical treatment, are not well understood. Transient cognitive impairment, which accompanies electroencephalogram discharges, could negatively influence cognitive abilities over time. Studies have suggested that treatment with antiepileptic drugs normalizes electroencephalogram results, thereby preventing electrical paroxysmal discharges that could be harmful to the developing brain. Physicians should attempt to differentiate between corresponding factors, such as subtle seizures, nature of underlying etiology, stable cognitive deficits,seizure-inducing effects, and potential side effects of antiepileptic drugs prior to initiation of medical treatment for definitive diagnosis of transient cognitive impairment and its consequences. Therefore,appropriate criteria for patient selection and proper guidelines for medical therapy, should be addressed in future studies.

  8. Interactive Team Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Myers, Christopher W.; Duran, Jasmine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team…

  9. Handbook of Spatial Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, David, Ed.; Nadel, Lynn, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial cognition is a branch of cognitive psychology that studies how people acquire and use knowledge about their environment to determine where they are, how to obtain resources, and how to find their way home. Researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including neuroscience, cognition, and sociology, have discovered a great deal about how…

  10. The Tractable Cognition thesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, I.J.E.I. van

    2008-01-01

    The recognition that human minds/brains are finite systems with limited resources for computation has led some researchers to advance the Tractable Cognition thesis: Human cognitive capacities are constrained by computational tractability. This thesis, if true, serves cognitive psychology by

  11. The Tractable Cognition Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Iris

    2008-01-01

    The recognition that human minds/brains are finite systems with limited resources for computation has led some researchers to advance the "Tractable Cognition thesis": Human cognitive capacities are constrained by computational tractability. This thesis, if true, serves cognitive psychology by constraining the space of computational-level theories…

  12. The Tractable Cognition thesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, I.J.E.I. van

    2008-01-01

    The recognition that human minds/brains are finite systems with limited resources for computation has led some researchers to advance the Tractable Cognition thesis: Human cognitive capacities are constrained by computational tractability. This thesis, if true, serves cognitive psychology by constra

  13. The Tractable Cognition Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Iris

    2008-01-01

    The recognition that human minds/brains are finite systems with limited resources for computation has led some researchers to advance the "Tractable Cognition thesis": Human cognitive capacities are constrained by computational tractability. This thesis, if true, serves cognitive psychology by constraining the space of computational-level theories…

  14. Interactive Team Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Myers, Christopher W.; Duran, Jasmine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team…

  15. Handbook of Spatial Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, David, Ed.; Nadel, Lynn, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial cognition is a branch of cognitive psychology that studies how people acquire and use knowledge about their environment to determine where they are, how to obtain resources, and how to find their way home. Researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including neuroscience, cognition, and sociology, have discovered a great deal about how…

  16. Differential topology

    CERN Document Server

    Margalef-Roig, J

    1992-01-01

    ...there are reasons enough to warrant a coherent treatment of the main body of differential topology in the realm of Banach manifolds, which is at the same time correct and complete. This book fills the gap: whenever possible the manifolds treated are Banach manifolds with corners. Corners add to the complications and the authors have carefully fathomed the validity of all main results at corners. Even in finite dimensions some results at corners are more complete and better thought out here than elsewhere in the literature. The proofs are correct and with all details. I see this book as a reliable monograph of a well-defined subject; the possibility to fall back to it adds to the feeling of security when climbing in the more dangerous realms of infinite dimensional differential geometry. Peter W. Michor

  17. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kreyszig, Erwin

    1991-01-01

    An introductory textbook on the differential geometry of curves and surfaces in three-dimensional Euclidean space, presented in its simplest, most essential form, but with many explanatory details, figures and examples, and in a manner that conveys the theoretical and practical importance of the different concepts, methods and results involved. With problems at the end of each section, and solutions listed at the end of the book. Includes 99 illustrations.

  18. Cultural constraints on music perception and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Steven J; Demorest, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that music, like language, is both a biological predisposition and a cultural universal. While humans naturally attend to and process many of the psychophysical cues present in musical information, there is a great - and often culture-specific - diversity of musical practices differentiated in part by form, timbre, pitch, rhythm, and other structural elements. Musical interactions situated within a given cultural context begin to influence human responses to music as early as one year of age. Despite the world's diversity of musical cultures, the majority of research in cognitive psychology and the cognitive neuroscience of music has been conducted on subjects and stimuli from Western music cultures. From the standpoint of cognitive neuroscience, identification of fundamental cognitive and neurological processes associated with music requires ascertaining that such processes are demonstrated by listeners from a broad range of cultural backgrounds and in relation to various musics across cultural traditions. This chapter will review current research regarding the role of enculturation in music perception and cognition and the degree to which cultural influences are reflected in brain function. Exploring music cognition from the standpoint of culture will lead to a better understanding of the core processes underlying perception and how those processes give rise to the world's diversity of music forms and expressions.

  19. Informant-reported cognitive symptoms that predict amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek-Ahmadi Michael

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differentiating amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI from normal cognition is difficult in clinical settings. Self-reported and informant-reported memory complaints occur often in both clinical groups, which then necessitates the use of a comprehensive neuropsychological examination to make a differential diagnosis. However, the ability to identify cognitive symptoms that are predictive of aMCI through informant-based information may provide some clinical utility in accurately identifying individuals who are at risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD. Methods The current study utilized a case-control design using data from an ongoing validation study of the Alzheimer's Questionnaire (AQ, an informant-based dementia assessment. Data from 51 cognitively normal (CN individuals participating in a brain donation program and 47 aMCI individuals seen in a neurology practice at the same institute were analyzed to determine which AQ items differentiated aMCI from CN individuals. Results Forward stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis which controlled for age and education showed that 4 AQ items were strong indicators of aMCI which included: repetition of statements and/or questions [OR 13.20 (3.02, 57.66]; trouble knowing the day, date, month, year, and time [OR 17.97 (2.63, 122.77]; difficulty managing finances [OR 11.60 (2.10, 63.99]; and decreased sense of direction [OR 5.84 (1.09, 31.30]. Conclusions Overall, these data indicate that certain informant-reported cognitive symptoms may help clinicians differentiate individuals with aMCI from those with normal cognition. Items pertaining to repetition of statements, orientation, ability to manage finances, and visuospatial disorientation had high discriminatory power.

  20. [Cognitive aging in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Nadine

    2011-09-01

    The development of studies of aging patients with schizophrenia results from their increasing life expectancy in accordance with that of the general population, but remains far below that one. Studies devoted to cognitive deficits in these patients globally show various complex cognitive deficits, which usually remain stable in their evolution. However, some patients develop a severe cognitive decline after 65 years, following a long institutionalization. Complex cognitive functions particularly deserve to be systematically explored in patients presenting with cognitive complaints and/or communication difficulties. As an example, we present the case report of a patient showing a theory of mind deficit.

  1. Normal cognitive aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Caroline N; Natelson Love, Marissa C; Triebel, Kristen L

    2013-11-01

    Even those who do not experience dementia or mild cognitive impairment may experience subtle cognitive changes associated with aging. Normal cognitive changes can affect an older adult's everyday function and quality of life, and a better understanding of this process may help clinicians distinguish normal from disease states. This article describes the neurocognitive changes observed in normal aging, followed by a description of the structural and functional alterations seen in aging brains. Practical implications of normal cognitive aging are then discussed, followed by a discussion of what is known about factors that may mitigate age-associated cognitive decline.

  2. Documentary and Cognitive Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondebjerg, Ib

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the benefits of using cognitive theory in documentary film studies. The article outlines general aspects of cognitive theory in humanities and social science, however the main focus is on the role of narrative, visual style and emotional dimensions of different types...... of documentaries. Dealing with cognitive theories of film and media and with memory studies, the article analyses how a cognitive approach to documentaries can increase our under-standing of how documentaries influence us on a cognitive and emotional level and contribute to the forming of our social and cultural...

  3. Extended spider cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japyassú, Hilton F; Laland, Kevin N

    2017-05-01

    There is a tension between the conception of cognition as a central nervous system (CNS) process and a view of cognition as extending towards the body or the contiguous environment. The centralised conception requires large or complex nervous systems to cope with complex environments. Conversely, the extended conception involves the outsourcing of information processing to the body or environment, thus making fewer demands on the processing power of the CNS. The evolution of extended cognition should be particularly favoured among small, generalist predators such as spiders, and here, we review the literature to evaluate the fit of empirical data with these contrasting models of cognition. Spiders do not seem to be cognitively limited, displaying a large diversity of learning processes, from habituation to contextual learning, including a sense of numerosity. To tease apart the central from the extended cognition, we apply the mutual manipulability criterion, testing the existence of reciprocal causal links between the putative elements of the system. We conclude that the web threads and configurations are integral parts of the cognitive systems. The extension of cognition to the web helps to explain some puzzling features of spider behaviour and seems to promote evolvability within the group, enhancing innovation through cognitive connectivity to variable habitat features. Graded changes in relative brain size could also be explained by outsourcing information processing to environmental features. More generally, niche-constructed structures emerge as prime candidates for extending animal cognition, generating the selective pressures that help to shape the evolving cognitive system.

  4. Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Vieira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Several reviews of the literature support the idea that cognitive deficits observed in a large percentage of patients with schizophrenia are responsible for the cognitive performance deficit and functional disability associated with the disease. The grow- ing importance of neurocognition in Psychiatry, especially with regard to planning strategies and rehabilitative therapies to improve the prognosis of patients contrib- utes to the interest of achieving this literature review on cognitive rehabilitation in schizophrenia. In this work, drawn from research in the areas of schizophrenia, cog- nition, cognitive rehabilitation and cognitive remediation (2000-2012 through PubMed and The Cochrane Collaboration, it is intended, to describe the types of psychological and behavioral therapies recommended in the treatment of cognitive disabilities in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. This review will also highlight the clinical and scientific evidence of each of these therapies, as their effect on cognitive performance, symptoms and functionality in patients with schizophrenia.

  5. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy & Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Gulbrandsen, Knut Arild

    coaching module in the graduate curriculum for students of psychology is a rewarding introduction to cognitive behavioural approaches, since it allows combination of traditional lectures with “action-reflection-learning” workshops, during which students train cognitive behavioural techniques in their own......Coaching is an expanding area of professional work, and recent years have brought forward the notion of cognitive coaching (Costa, 2006; Oestrich, 2005) which adapts theory and techniques from cognitive therapy to serve self-enhancement in non-clinical populations. We suggest that a cognitive...... repertoire. The skills needed for cognitive coaching reflect all therapeutic techniques but at a less advanced psychotherapeutic level, and still prepare for future clinical work and development. In the poster, we summarise a cognitive coaching course syllabus as well as results from data collected...

  6. Social cognition in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Dragan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with schizophrenia display alterations in social cognition, as well as in the realm of neurocognition. It is still unclear to what extent these two cognitive domains represent two separate dimensions or different expressions of a unified deficit. Tasks used to assess social cognition subcomponents cover basic social cognition, such as mentalisation, data collection and making conclusions, source monitoring and characteristics of life-styles. The variety of findings of various studies is probably related to the fact that most studies considered social cognition as one-dimensional construct represented, for example, by unique measurements of emotional recognition. Research results dealing with social cognition suggest that the impairment of social cognition is the characteristic feature of schizophrenia and have important implications for the development, course and outcome of this disorder.

  7. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy & Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Gulbrandsen, Knut Arild

    Coaching is an expanding area of professional work, and recent years have brought forward the notion of cognitive coaching (Costa, 2006; Oestrich, 2005) which adapts theory and techniques from cognitive therapy to serve self-enhancement in non-clinical populations. We suggest that a cognitive...... coaching module in the graduate curriculum for students of psychology is a rewarding introduction to cognitive behavioural approaches, since it allows combination of traditional lectures with “action-reflection-learning” workshops, during which students train cognitive behavioural techniques in their own...... repertoire. The skills needed for cognitive coaching reflect all therapeutic techniques but at a less advanced psychotherapeutic level, and still prepare for future clinical work and development. In the poster, we summarise a cognitive coaching course syllabus as well as results from data collected...

  8. Deconstructing and Reconstructing Cognitive Performance in Sleep Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Melinda L.; Gunzelmann, Glenn; Whitney, Paul; Hinson, John M.; Belenky, Gregory; Rabat, Arnaud; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mitigation of cognitive impairment due to sleep deprivation in operational settings is critical for safety and productivity. Achievements in this area are hampered by limited knowledge about the effects of sleep loss on actual job tasks. Sleep deprivation has different effects on different cognitive performance tasks, but the mechanisms behind this task-specificity are poorly understood. In this context it is important to recognize that cognitive performance is not a unitary process, but involves a number of component processes. There is emerging evidence that these component processes are differentially affected by sleep loss. Experiments have been conducted to decompose sleep-deprived performance into underlying cognitive processes using cognitive-behavioral, neuroimaging and cognitive modeling techniques. Furthermore, computational modeling in cognitive architectures has been employed to simulate sleep-deprived cognitive performance on the basis of the constituent cognitive processes. These efforts are beginning to enable quantitative prediction of the effects of sleep deprivation across different task contexts. This paper reviews a rapidly evolving area of research, and outlines a theoretical framework in which the effects of sleep loss on cognition may be understood from the deficits in the underlying neurobiology to the applied consequences in real-world job tasks. PMID:22884948

  9. Diagnosis of vascular cognitive impairment and its main categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez García, P L; Rodríguez García, D

    2015-05-01

    A review of current criteria for the diagnosis of categories related with vascular cognitive impairment, in particular the nomenclature, diagnostic criteria, and differential clinical-radiological findings. The criteria for the diagnosis of vascular cognitive impairment have evolved, but available criteria were designed basically for differentiating between vascular dementia and dementia due to Alzheimer disease, and for research purposes. Nevertheless, in clinical practice precise elements are required for: 1) Clinical diagnosis of dementia and mild cognitive impairment; 2) Clinical and neuroimaging criteria for identification of the various cerebrovascular lesions associated with cognitive dysfunction, and 3) A formulation of the aetiogenic-pathogenic relationship between cognitive impairment and cerebrovascular lesions. For this reason, a review was carried out on the diagnostic elements of vascular cognitive impairment categories, classification, and their most relevant characteristics. It highlights the characteristic for the diagnosis of multi-infarction dementia, strategic single infarct dementia, small vessel disease with dementia, mixed dementia, and vascular mild cognitive impairment. Standardisation is required, by a multidisciplinary expert team, as regards nomenclature and criteria for the diagnosis of the full spectrum associated with vascular cognitive impairment and especially for vascular dementia and its categories. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlet, Philippe G

    2007-01-01

    This book gives the basic notions of differential geometry, such as the metric tensor, the Riemann curvature tensor, the fundamental forms of a surface, covariant derivatives, and the fundamental theorem of surface theory in a selfcontained and accessible manner. Although the field is often considered a classical one, it has recently been rejuvenated, thanks to the manifold applications where it plays an essential role. The book presents some important applications to shells, such as the theory of linearly and nonlinearly elastic shells, the implementation of numerical methods for shells, and

  11. Differential topology

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemin, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Differential Topology provides an elementary and intuitive introduction to the study of smooth manifolds. In the years since its first publication, Guillemin and Pollack's book has become a standard text on the subject. It is a jewel of mathematical exposition, judiciously picking exactly the right mixture of detail and generality to display the richness within. The text is mostly self-contained, requiring only undergraduate analysis and linear algebra. By relying on a unifying idea-transversality-the authors are able to avoid the use of big machinery or ad hoc techniques to establish the main

  12. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, FG

    2013-01-01

    Based on his extensive experience as an educator, F. G. Tricomi wrote this practical and concise teaching text to offer a clear idea of the problems and methods of the theory of differential equations. The treatment is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students and addresses only questions that can be resolved with rigor and simplicity.Starting with a consideration of the existence and uniqueness theorem, the text advances to the behavior of the characteristics of a first-order equation, boundary problems for second-order linear equations, asymptotic methods, and diff

  13. Cognition as coordinated non-cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalou, Lawrence W; Breazeal, Cynthia; Smith, Linda B

    2007-06-01

    We propose that cognition is more than a collection of independent processes operating in a modular cognitive system. Instead, we propose that cognition emerges from dependencies between all of the basic systems in the brain, including goal management, perception, action, memory, reward, affect, and learning. Furthermore, human cognition reflects its social evolution and context, as well as contributions from a developmental process. After presenting these themes, we illustrate their application to the process of anticipation. Specifically, we propose that anticipations occur extensively across domains (i.e., goal management, perception, action, reward, affect, and learning) in coordinated manners. We also propose that anticipation is central to situated action and to social interaction, and that many of its key features reflect the process of development.

  14. Cognitive Robotics, Embodied Cognition and Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    Cognitive Robotics , Embodied Cognition and Human-Robot Interaction Greg Trafton, Ph.D Naval Research Laboratory Wednesday, November 3, 2010 Report...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cognitive Robotics , Embodied Cognition and Human-Robot Interaction 5a. CONTRACT...that cognition is for action (embodied cognition) • We are building embodied models for cognitive robotics and human-robot interaction • Online

  15. Cognitive Dynamic Systems: A Technical Review of Cognitive Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, Krishanth; Schwering, Taralyn; Sarraf, Saman

    2016-01-01

    We start with the history of cognitive radar, where origins of the PAC, Fuster research on cognition and principals of cognition are provided. Fuster describes five cognitive functions: perception, memory, attention, language, and intelligence. We describe the Perception-Action Cyclec as it applies to cognitive radar, and then discuss long-term memory, memory storage, memory retrieval and working memory. A comparison between memory in human cognition and cognitive radar is given as well. Atte...

  16. Moral cognition in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Jonathan; Langdon, Robyn; Brüne, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Disordered moral behaviour and understanding of moral rules were described early in the literature on schizophrenia; however, moral cognition has received scant attention in spite of a large literature focused on social cognitive impairments and violent behaviour in schizophrenia. We conducted a narrative synthesis of the literature on violence, moral judgement and schizophrenia. Initial empirical research into moral cognition in schizophrenia did not fully account for the basic- and social-cognitive deficits now known to characterise schizophrenia. Importantly, research into moral cognition in autism and psychopathy, disorders in part characterised by social cognitive impairments indicates subtle patterns of difference to the moral cognition of control participants. Recent neuroeconomic studies of moral cognition in schizophrenia have indicated that individuals with schizophrenia display subtle dysfunction in their fairness-related behaviours, but not in their propensity to engage in altruistic punishment. Further research has the potential to broaden our understanding of what is intact and what is impaired in moral cognition in schizophrenia and also to inform our theories of the structures subserving moral judgement in the general population. Furthermore, a more thorough understanding of moral cognitive impairments in schizophrenia may have implications for both legal process and psychosocial rehabilitation.

  17. Explaining embodied cognition results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoff, George

    2012-10-01

    From the late 1950s until 1975, cognition was understood mainly as disembodied symbol manipulation in cognitive psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and the nascent field of Cognitive Science. The idea of embodied cognition entered the field of Cognitive Linguistics at its beginning in 1975. Since then, cognitive linguists, working with neuroscientists, computer scientists, and experimental psychologists, have been developing a neural theory of thought and language (NTTL). Central to NTTL are the following ideas: (a) we think with our brains, that is, thought is physical and is carried out by functional neural circuitry; (b) what makes thought meaningful are the ways those neural circuits are connected to the body and characterize embodied experience; (c) so-called abstract ideas are embodied in this way as well, as is language. Experimental results in embodied cognition are seen not only as confirming NTTL but also explained via NTTL, mostly via the neural theory of conceptual metaphor. Left behind more than three decades ago is the old idea that cognition uses the abstract manipulation of disembodied symbols that are meaningless in themselves but that somehow constitute internal "representations of external reality" without serious mediation by the body and brain. This article uniquely explains the connections between embodied cognition results since that time and results from cognitive linguistics, experimental psychology, computational modeling, and neuroscience.

  18. Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichgans, Martin; Leys, Didier

    2017-02-03

    Cerebrovascular disease typically manifests with stroke, cognitive impairment, or both. Vascular cognitive impairment refers to all forms of cognitive disorder associated with cerebrovascular disease, regardless of the specific mechanisms involved. It encompasses the full range of cognitive deficits from mild cognitive impairment to dementia. In principle, any of the multiple causes of clinical stroke can cause vascular cognitive impairment. Recent work further highlights a role of microinfarcts, microhemorrhages, strategic white matter tracts, loss of microstructural tissue integrity, and secondary neurodegeneration. Vascular brain injury results in loss of structural and functional connectivity and, hence, compromise of functional networks within the brain. Vascular cognitive impairment is common both after stroke and in stroke-free individuals presenting to dementia clinics, and vascular pathology frequently coexists with neurodegenerative pathology, resulting in mixed forms of mild cognitive impairment or dementia. Vascular dementia is now recognized as the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, and there is increasing awareness that targeting vascular risk may help to prevent dementia, even of the Alzheimer type. Recent advances in neuroimaging, neuropathology, epidemiology, and genetics have led to a deeper understanding of how vascular disease affects cognition. These new findings provide an opportunity for the present reappraisal of vascular cognitive impairment. We further briefly address current therapeutic concepts.

  19. Improving clinical cognitive testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Seth A.; Barrett, A.M.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Chatterjee, Anjan; Coslett, H. Branch; D'Esposito, Mark; Finney, Glen R.; Gitelman, Darren R.; Hart, John J.; Lerner, Alan J.; Meador, Kimford J.; Pietras, Alison C.; Voeller, Kytja S.; Kaufer, Daniel I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the evidence basis of single-domain cognitive tests frequently used by behavioral neurologists in an effort to improve the quality of clinical cognitive assessment. Methods: Behavioral Neurology Section members of the American Academy of Neurology were surveyed about how they conduct clinical cognitive testing, with a particular focus on the Neurobehavioral Status Exam (NBSE). In contrast to general screening cognitive tests, an NBSE consists of tests of individual cognitive domains (e.g., memory or language) that provide a more comprehensive diagnostic assessment. Workgroups for each of 5 cognitive domains (attention, executive function, memory, language, and spatial cognition) conducted evidence-based reviews of frequently used tests. Reviews focused on suitability for office-based clinical practice, including test administration time, accessibility of normative data, disease populations studied, and availability in the public domain. Results: Demographic and clinical practice data were obtained from 200 respondents who reported using a wide range of cognitive tests. Based on survey data and ancillary information, between 5 and 15 tests in each cognitive domain were reviewed. Within each domain, several tests are highlighted as being well-suited for an NBSE. Conclusions: We identified frequently used single-domain cognitive tests that are suitable for an NBSE to help make informed choices about clinical cognitive assessment. Some frequently used tests have limited normative data or have not been well-studied in common neurologic disorders. Utilizing standardized cognitive tests, particularly those with normative data based on the individual's age and educational level, can enhance the rigor and utility of clinical cognitive assessment. PMID:26163433

  20. Embodied social cognition

    CERN Document Server

    Lindblom, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This book clarifies the role and relevance of the body in social interaction and cognition from an embodied cognitive science perspective. Theories of embodied cognition have during the last decades offered a radical shift in explanations of the human mind, from traditional computationalism, to emphasizing the way cognition is shaped by the body and its sensorimotor interaction with the surrounding social and material world. This book presents a theoretical framework for the relational nature of embodied social cognition, which is based on an interdisciplinary approach that ranges historically in time and across different disciplines. It includes work in cognitive science, artificial intelligence, phenomenology, ethology, developmental psychology, neuroscience, social psychology, linguistics, communication, and gesture studies. The theoretical framework is illustrated by empirical work that provides some detailed observational fieldwork on embodied actions captured in three different episodes of spontaneous s...

  1. Open-Minded Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Erika; Ottati, Victor; Wilson, Chase; Kim, Soyeon

    2015-11-01

    The present research conceptualizes open-minded cognition as a cognitive style that influences how individuals select and process information. An open-minded cognitive style is marked by willingness to consider a variety of intellectual perspectives, values, opinions, or beliefs-even those that contradict the individual's opinion. An individual's level of cognitive openness is expected to vary across domains (such as politics and religion). Four studies develop and validate a novel measure of open-minded cognition, as well as two domain-specific measures of religious and political open-minded cognition. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (controlling for acquiescence bias) are used to develop the scales in Studies 1 to 3. Study 4 demonstrates that these scales possess convergent and discriminant validity. Study 5 demonstrates the scale's unique predictive validity using the outcome of Empathic Concern (Davis, 1980). Study 6 demonstrates the scale's unique predictive validity using the outcomes of warmth toward racial, religious, and sexual minorities.

  2. The Role of Maternal Cognitive Ability in Child Health

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Rubalcava; Graciela Teruel

    2004-01-01

    The literature on child health suggests mother`s schooling is a key determinant of child health. Little is known of how other sources of maternal human capital contribute to her children`s health. This paper investigates the differential returns on child health of three sources of maternal human capital: schooling, cognitive ability and childhood background. Conditional on schooling and mother`s height, we first analyze the effect of maternal cognitive ability on her children`s health. Next, ...

  3. Bloom’s taxonomy of cognitive learning objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Information professionals who train or instruct others can use Bloom’s taxonomy to write learning objectives that describe the skills and abilities that they desire their learners to master and demonstrate. Bloom’s taxonomy differentiates between cognitive skill levels and calls attention to learning objectives that require higher levels of cognitive skills and, therefore, lead to deeper learning and transfer of knowledge and skills to a greater variety of tasks and contexts.

  4. Situated Entrepreneurial Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Dew, Nicholas; Grichnik, Dietmar; Mayer-Haug, Katrin; Read, Stuart; Brinckmann, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijmr.12051 This paper reviews and integrates research from both within and outside the entrepreneurship field under the label of ‘situated cognition’. Situated cognition is the notion that cognitive activity inherently involves perception and action in the context of a human body situated in a real-world environment. The review concentrates on three areas of the situated cognition literature that hav...

  5. Cognitive wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This brief examines the current research in cognitive wireless networks (CWNs). Along with a review of challenges in CWNs, this brief presents novel theoretical studies and architecture models for CWNs, advances in the cognitive information awareness and delivery, and intelligent resource management technologies. The brief presents the motivations and concepts of CWNs, including theoretical studies of temporal and geographic distribution entropy as well as cognitive information metrics. A new architecture model of CWNs is proposed with theoretical, functional and deployment architectures suppo

  6. Cognitive Protocol Stack Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-30

    directly related to the protocol stack, e.g., environmental or positioning data) that can be exploited to design and test novel cognitive networking ...quality of service (QoS) is challenging. Currently, 5G technologies are being developed to answer the need for further increasing network capacity, and...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: In the ARO “Cognitive Protocol Stack Design" project we proposed cognitive networking solutions published in international

  7. Simulating motivated cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevarter, William B.

    1991-01-01

    A research effort to develop a sophisticated computer model of human behavior is described. A computer framework of motivated cognition was developed. Motivated cognition focuses on the motivations or affects that provide the context and drive in human cognition and decision making. A conceptual architecture of the human decision-making approach from the perspective of information processing in the human brain is developed in diagrammatic form. A preliminary version of such a diagram is presented. This architecture is then used as a vehicle for successfully constructing a computer program simulation Dweck and Leggett's findings that relate how an individual's implicit theories orient them toward particular goals, with resultant cognitions, affects, and behavior.

  8. Is social cognition embodied?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Alvin; de Vignemont, Frederique

    2009-04-01

    Theories of embodied cognition abound in the literature, but it is often unclear how to understand them. We offer several interpretations of embodiment, the most interesting being the thesis that mental representations in bodily formats (B-formats) have an important role in cognition. Potential B-formats include motoric, somatosensory, affective and interoceptive formats. The literature on mirroring and related phenomena provides support for a limited-scope version of embodied social cognition under the B-format interpretation. It is questionable, however, whether such a thesis can be extended. We show the limits of embodiment in social cognition.

  9. Embodied Cognition of Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume T Vallet

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Embodiment is revolutionizing the way we consider cognition by incorporating the influence of our body and of the current context within cognitive processing. A growing number of studies which support this view of cognition in young adults stands in stark contrast with the lack of evidence in favor of this view in the field of normal aging and neurocognitive disorders. Nonetheless, the validation of embodiment assumptions on the whole spectrum of cognition is a mandatory step in order for embodied cognition theories to become theories of human cognition. More pragmatically, aging populations represent a perfect target to test embodied cognition theories due to concomitant changes in sensory, motor and cognitive functioning that occur in aging (these theories predict direct interactions between them. Finally, the new perspectives on cognition provided by these theories might also open new research avenues and new clinical applications in the field of aging. The present article aims at showing the value and interest to explore embodiment in normal and abnormal aging as well as introducing some potential theoretical and clinical applications.

  10. Networks in Cognitive Science

    CERN Document Server

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Chater, Nick; Christiansen, Morten H

    2013-01-01

    Networks of interconnected nodes have long played a key role in cognitive science, from artificial neural networks to spreading activation models of semantic memory. Recently, however, a new Network Science has been developed, providing insights into the emergence of global, system-scale properties in contexts as diverse as the Internet, metabolic reactions or collaborations among scientists. Today, the inclusion of network theory into cognitive sciences, and the expansion of complex systems science, promises to significantly change the way in which the organization and dynamics of cognitive and behavioral processes are understood. In this paper, we review recent contributions of network theory at different levels and domains within the cognitive sciences.

  11. COgnitive-Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona A. H. M. Cleutjens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD has been considered a disease of the lungs, often caused by smoking. Nowadays, COPD is regarded as a systemic disease. Both physical effects and effects on brains, including impaired psychological and cognitive functioning, have been demonstrated. Patients with COPD may have cognitive impairment, either globally or in single cognitive domains, such as information processing, attention and concentration, memory, executive functioning, and self-control. Possible causes are hypoxemia, hypercapnia, exacerbations, and decreased physical activity. Cognitive impairment in these patients may be related to structural brain abnormalities, such as gray-matter pathologic changes and the loss of white matter integrity which can be induced by smoking. Cognitive impairment can have a negative impact on health and daily life and may be associated with widespread consequences for disease management programs. It is important to assess cognitive functioning in patients with COPD in order to optimize patient-oriented treatment and to reduce personal discomfort, hospital admissions, and mortality. This paper will summarize the current knowledge about cognitive impairment as extrapulmonary feature of COPD. Hereby, the impact of smoking on cognitive functioning and the impact of cognitive impairment on smoking behaviour will be examined.

  12. COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory conducts basic and applied human research studies to characterize cognitive performance as influenced by militarily-relevant contextual and physical...

  13. Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment, No Dementia : EEG Global Power Independently Predicts Vascular Impairment and Brain Symmetry Index Reflects Severity of Cognitive Decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheorajpanday, Rishi V. A.; Marien, Peter; Nagels, Guy; Weeren, Arie J. T. M.; Saerens, Jos; van Putten, Michel J. A. M.; De Deyn, Peter P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose:Vascular cognitive impairment, no dementia (vCIND) is a prevalent and potentially preventable disorder. Clinical presentation of the small-vessel subcortical subtype may be insidious, and differential difficulties can arise with mild cognitive impairment. We investigated EEG p

  14. Stress and Cognition: A Cognitive Psychological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Lyle E., Jr.; Yaroush, Rita A.

    2003-01-01

    Research in cognitive psychology has made a significant contribution to our understanding of how acute and chronic stress affect performance. It has done so by identifying some of the factors that contribute to operator error and by suggesting how operators might be trained to respond more effectively in a variety of circumstances. The major purpose of this paper was to review the literature of cognitive psychology as it relates to these questions and issues. Based on the existence of earlier reviews (e.g., Hamilton, & Warburton, 1979; Hockey, 1983) the following investigation was limited to the last 15 years (1988-2002) and restricted to a review of the primary peer-reviewed literature. The results of this examination revealed that while cognitive psychology has contributed in a substantive way to our understanding of stress impact on various cognitive processes, it has also left many questions unanswered. Concerns about how we define and use the term stress and the gaps that remain in our knowledge about the specific effects of stressors on cognitive processes are discussed in the text.

  15. Serotonergic 5-HT7 receptors and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarri, Antonella; Pompili, Assunta

    2014-01-01

    The abundant distribution of serotonin (5-HT) in different areas of the central nervous system can explain the involvement of this neurotransmitter in the regulation of several functions, such as sleep, pain, feeding, and sexual and emotional behaviors. Moreover, the serotonergic system is also involved in other more complex roles, such as cognition, including learning and memory processes. Recent studies led to the discovery of various types and subtypes of receptors differentially associated to cognitive mechanisms. 5-HT7 is the most recently discovered receptor for 5-HT; therefore, it is also one of the least well characterized. Studies exist hypothesizing the role of 5-HT7 on the modulation of learning and memory processes and other cognitive functions. Moreover, much attention has been devoted to the possible role of 5-HT7 receptors in psychiatric disorders. Therefore, the aim of this review is to clarify the behavioral role of the recently discovered 5-HT7 type receptor and highlight its involvement in the cognitive functions, with particular attention to the modulation of learning and memory processes, thus providing a basis to obtain new therapeutic agents and strategies for the treatment of cognitive disorders.

  16. COGNITIVE SYSTEMS. REDEFINING THE COOPERATION BETWEEN MAN AND SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana-Aderina MOISUC

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive systems appeared as a response to the real challenges brought by the Big Data phenomenon. It was found that the solutions for solving difficult problems caused by this phenomenon could be brought by using artificial intelligence tools. In this context a convergence between Big Data and Artificial Intelligence happened, which determined the start of a new stage in system development, namely the era of cognitive systems. The potential of these systems is given by the characteristics that differentiate them from other systems. The cognitive systems offered solutions and were used with success in complex projects from the medical and financial sectors. The architecture of cognitive systems is complex. These systems are designed so that they use artificial intelligence tools when processing source content, producing analytical solutions which can be used in the decision process. In this paper base concepts, the characteristics and architecture of cognitive systems, the benefits brought by the development and use of them were presented.

  17. Methodology of determining student's cognitive styles and its application for teaching physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenev, Igor V; Lozovskaya, Ludmila B; Morozova, Ekaterina O

    2014-01-01

    A psychological foundation of differentiation of learning on the basis of students' individual characteristics (cognitive styles) with orientation to physics education in high school is discussed. The computer testing technique for preliminary determination of students' cognitive styles is proposed. It is based on the assumed connection between test parameters and parameters of degree of manifestation of cognitive style. The combined method of refining students' cognitive styles, based on the observations of their learning activity, is proposed. Personality traits, characterizing particular cognitive styles, are determined.

  18. Cognitive training for dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konta, Brigitte

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the HTA report is to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive training methods to treat cognitive disorders of dementia and other diseases with cognitive deficits. For this purpose, a systematic literature search was carried out first based on the DIMDI superbase retrieval. The identified publications were judged and selected by two independent, methodically competent experts. 33 publications were included in the report. Based on the studies for a normal cognitive development in old age a theory that healthy older people have a considerable capacity reserve for an improved performance in abstract abilities of thinking can be assumed. The first symptoms for older people at risk for dementia are a reduced cognitive capacity reserve. Cognitive training methods therefore focus abilities of abstract memory. Apart from types of dementia another two groups of diseases with cognitive deficits were included in the HTA report: cerebral lesions and schizophrenic psychoses. Studies with mild as well as forms of dementia heavy forms including the Alzheimer disease were included. The described training methods were very heterogeneous with regard to their contents, the temporal sequence and the outcome parameter. The studies were methodically partly contestable. Approximately a third of the studies of all publications could show improvements in the cognitive achievements by the training. Three studies concerning cognitive training methods in case of cerebral lesions were included. All three studies demonstrated a significant improvement in the training group in some outcome parameters. Special cognitive training methods were used for the treatment of cognitive deficits at schizophrenic psychoses. The neurocognitive training (NET, the "Cognitive Remediation Therapy" as well as the strategic training with coaching proved to be effective. The studies, however, were hardly comparable and very heterogeneous in detail. Summarising the cognitive training

  19. [Subjective cognition in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, S; Aubin, G; Stip, E

    2017-02-01

    Given the extent, magnitude and functional significance of the neurocognitive deficits of schizophrenia, growing attention has been paid recently to patients' self-awareness of their own deficits. Thus far, the literature has shown either that patients fail to recognize their cognitive deficits or that the association between subjective and objective cognition is weak in schizophrenia. The reasons for this lack of consistency remain unexplained but may have to do, among others, with the influence of potential confounding clinical variables and the choice of the scale used to measure self-awareness of cognitive deficits. In the current study, we sought to examine the relationships between subjective and objective cognitive performance in schizophrenia, while controlling for the influence of sociodemographic and psychiatric variables. Eighty-two patients with a schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (DSM-IV criteria) were recruited. Patients' subjective cognitive complaints were evaluated with the Subjective Scale to Investigate Cognition in Schizophrenia (SSTICS), the most frequently used scale to measure self-awareness of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Neurocognition was evaluated with working memory, planning and visual learning tasks taken from Cambridge Neuropsychological Tests Automated Battery. The Stroop Color-Word test was also administered. Psychiatric symptoms were evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia. The relationships between subjective and objective cognition were evaluated with multivariate hierarchic linear regression analyses, taking into consideration potential confounders such as sociodemographic and psychiatric variables. Finally, a factor analysis of the SSTICS was performed. For the SSTICS total score, the regression analysis produced a model including two predictors, namely visual learning and Stoop interference performance, explaining a moderate portion of the variance

  20. Negative symptom improvement during cognitive rehabilitation: results from a 2-year trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I; Greenwald, Deborah P; Hogarty, Susan S; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2013-08-30

    Cognitive rehabilitation has shown beneficial effects on cognition in patients with schizophrenia, which may also help to improve negative symptoms due to overlapping pathophysiology between these two domains. To better understand the possible relationship between these areas, we conducted an exploratory analysis of the effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) on negative symptoms. Early course schizophrenia outpatients (n=58) were randomized to 2 years of CET or an Enriched Supportive Therapy (EST) control condition. Results revealed significant and medium-sized (d=0.61) differential improvements favoring CET in overall negative symptoms, particularly social withdrawal, affective flattening, and motor retardation. Neurocognitive improvement was associated with reduced negative symptoms in CET, but not EST patients. No relationships were observed between improvements in emotion processing aspects of social cognition, as measured by the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, and negative symptoms. CET represents an effective cognitive rehabilitation intervention for schizophrenia that may also have benefits to negative symptoms. Future studies specifically designed to examine negative symptoms during the course of cognitive rehabilitation are needed.

  1. Corpora and cultural cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    2017-01-01

    Cultural cognition is, to a great extent, transmitted through language and, consequently, reflected and replicated in language use. Cultural cognition may be instantiated in various patterns of language use, such as the discursive behavior of constructions. Very often, such instantiations can...

  2. Functional and cognitive grammars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Siewierska

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of the functional approach and cognitive approach to the nature of language and its relation to other aspects of human cognition. The paper starts with a brief discussion of the origins and the core tenets of the two approaches in Section 1. Section 2 discusses the similarities and differences between the three full-fledged structural functional grammars subsumed in the functional approach: Halliday's Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG), Dik's Functional Grammar (FG), and Van Valin's Role and Reference Grammar (RRG). Section 3 deals with the major features of the three cognitive frameworks: Langacker's Cognitive Grammar (CG), Goldberg's Cognitive Construction Grammar (CCG), and Croft's Radical Construction Grammar (RCG). Section 4 compares the two approaches and attempts to provide a unified functional-cognitive grammar. In the last section, the author concludes the paper with remarks on the unidirectional shift from functional grammar to cognitive grammar that may indicate a reinterpretation of the traditional relationship between functional and cognitive models of grammar.

  3. Learning and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gr ver Aukrust, Vibeke, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This collection of 58 articles from the recently-published third edition of the International Encyclopedia of Education focuses on learning, memory, attention, problem solving, concept formation, and language. Learning and cognition is the foundation of cognitive psychology and encompasses many topics including attention, memory, categorization,…

  4. Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stage between the expected cognitive decline of normal aging and the more-serious decline of dementia. It can involve problems with memory, language, thinking and judgment that are greater than normal age-related changes. If you have mild cognitive impairment, you may ...

  5. Embodiment and social cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niedenthal, P.M.; Eelen, J.; Maringer, M.; Decety, J.; Cacioppo, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter briefly reviews models of the conceptual system on which most research in social cognition research was based until very recently. It then outlines the principles of another account, which is the theory of embodied or grounded cognition. Relevant research findings are presented to demon

  6. Is Cognitive Style Bipolar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, David H.

    This study assessed the bipolarity of cognitive style for 970 clients of the Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation, a vocational guidance service. The 462 male and 508 female examinees were aged 14 to 65 years, with a median age of 24 years. Three cognitive style tests were investigated: (1) the Kagan Matching Familiar Figures Test (KMFFT); (2) the…

  7. Transcending Cognitive Individualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerubavel, Eviatar; Smith, Eliot R.

    2010-01-01

    Advancing knowledge in many areas of psychology and neuroscience, underlined by dazzling images of brain scans, appear to many professionals and to the public to show that people are on the way to explaining cognition purely in terms of processes within the individual's head. Yet while such cognitive individualism still dominates the popular…

  8. [Cognitive deterioration after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J.; Rasmussen, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction are important and common complications after surgery. Risk factors are first of all increasing age and type of surgery, whereas the type of anaesthesia does not seem to play an important role. Mortality is higher among patients with cognitive...

  9. The social life of cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Joanna; Voiklis, John; Malle, Bertram F

    2015-02-01

    We begin by illustrating that long before the cognitive revolution, social psychology focused on topics pertaining to what is now known as social cognition: people's subjective interpretations of social situations and the concepts and cognitive processes underlying these interpretations. We then examine two questions: whether social cognition entails characteristic concepts and cognitive processes, and how social processes might themselves shape and constrain cognition. We suggest that social cognition relies heavily on generic cognition but also on unique concepts (e.g., agent, intentionality) and unique processes (e.g., projection, imitation, joint attention). We further suggest that social processes play a prominent role in the development and unfolding of several generic cognitive processes, including learning, attention, and memory. Finally, we comment on the prospects of a recently developing approach to the study of social cognition (social neuroscience) and two potential future directions (computational social cognition and social-cognitive robotics). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. New Views on Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Jerome

    1976-01-01

    Reviews recent empirical findings toward three cognitive developmental perspectives: the fears of infancy, the discontinuous quality of stages in cognitive functioning, and the capacity for resilience in cognitive development. (DEP)

  11. Situated clinical cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpka, T

    1995-10-01

    The features characterizing study of clinical cognition in situ are formulated as: Re-cognition of context, culture, history and affect. Socializing and phenomenalistic elements are again included in the research agenda. Interest for representations: an analysis level is reserved for the symbols, rules and images relevant to define in models of clinical cognition. De-emphasis on computer modeling: investigations focus on the 'functional systems' in which computers are involved. Rootedness in classical philosophical problems: issues concerning situated clinical cognition are connected to the width of available theoretical literature. Belief in interdisciplinary studies: productive interactions between the new and traditional disciplines is anticipated, implying that new shared methods have to be developed. When scientific perspectives are broadened, a new balance has to be found between the relevance of the subject of study and methodological rigor. The situated clinical cognition framework is to allow for moving between models, theories, and perspectives, as it does not presuppose a singular model of clinical thinking.

  12. Cognitive and Learning Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Clayton

    People with cognitive disabilities are gaining in a long struggle for recognition of their right to control their lives. In the information society access to the Web is essential to this control. Cognitive barriers to this access are diverse, reflecting the complexity of human cognitive faculties. These barriers are not well managed in current accessibility practice and policy, in part because cognitive accessibility, like usability, cannot be reduced to a checklist of simple attributes. Advances in representing the meaning as well as the form of information, and in supporting configurable presentation and interaction methods, will yield progress. Increased inclusion of people with cognitive disabilities in the processes of technology development and policy making will also pay off.

  13. Documentary and Cognitive Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondebjerg, Ib

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the benefits of using cognitive theory in documentary film studies. The article outlines general aspects of cognitive theory in humanities and social science, however the main focus is on the role of narrative, visual style and emotional dimensions of different types...... of documentaries. Dealing with cognitive theories of film and media and with memory studies, the article analyses how a cognitive approach to documentaries can increase our under-standing of how documentaries influence us on a cognitive and emotional level and contribute to the forming of our social and cultural...... imagination. The article analyses case studies of documentaries dealing with climate change and the environment and documentaries dealing with social history....

  14. Uncertainty and Cognitive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal eMushtaq

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A growing trend of neuroimaging, behavioural and computational research has investigated the topic of outcome uncertainty in decision-making. Although evidence to date indicates that humans are very effective in learning to adapt to uncertain situations, the nature of the specific cognitive processes involved in the adaptation to uncertainty are still a matter of debate. In this article, we reviewed evidence suggesting that cognitive control processes are at the heart of uncertainty in decision-making contexts. Available evidence suggests that: (1 There is a strong conceptual overlap between the constructs of uncertainty and cognitive control; (2 There is a remarkable overlap between the neural networks associated with uncertainty and the brain networks subserving cognitive control; (3 The perception and estimation of uncertainty might play a key role in monitoring processes and the evaluation of the need for control; (4 Potential interactions between uncertainty and cognitive control might play a significant role in several affective disorders.

  15. Cognitive Dynamic Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Miguel, Ignacio; Duran, Ramon J.; Jimenez, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    learning with the aim of improving performance. In this paper, we review the fundamentals of cognitive networks and focus on their application to the optical networking area. In particular, a number of cognitive network architectures proposed so far, as well as their associated supporting technologies......The use of cognition is a promising element for the control of heterogeneous optical networks. Not only are cognitive networks able to sense current network conditions and act according to them, but they also take into account the knowledge acquired through past experiences; that is, they include......, are reviewed. Moreover, several applications, mainly developed in the framework of the EU FP7 Cognitive Heterogeneous Reconfigurable Optical Network (CHRON) project, are also described....

  16. Estrogens, inflammation and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, April; Feher, Anita; McPhee, Lucy; Jessa, Ailya; Oh, Soojin; Einstein, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The effects of estrogens are pleiotropic, affecting multiple bodily systems. Changes from the body's natural fluctuating levels of estrogens, through surgical removal of the ovaries, natural menopause, or the administration of exogenous estrogens to menopausal women have been independently linked to an altered immune profile, and changes to cognitive processes. Here, we propose that inflammation may mediate the relationship between low levels of estrogens and cognitive decline. In order to determine what is known about this connection, we review the literature on the cognitive effects of decreased estrogens due to oophorectomy or natural menopause, decreased estrogens' role on inflammation--both peripherally and in the brain--and the relationship between inflammation and cognition. While this review demonstrates that much is unknown about the intersection between estrogens, cognition, inflammation, we propose that there is an important interaction between these literatures.

  17. Hydration and cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sécher, M; Ritz, P

    2012-04-01

    A clinical link exists between severe dehydration and cognitive performance. Using rapid and severe water loss induced either by intense exercise and/or heat stress, initial studies suggested there were alterations in short-term memory and cognitive function related to vision, but more recent studies have not all confirmed these data. Some studies argue that water loss is not responsible for the observations made, and studies compensating water losses have failed to prevent the symptoms. Studies in children have suggested that drinking extra water helps cognitive performance, but these data rely on a small number of children. In older adults (mean age around 60) the data are not strong enough to support a relationship between mild dehydration and cognitive function. Data on frail elderly and demented people are lacking. Methodological heterogeneity in these studies are such that the relationship between mild dehydration and cognitive performance cannot be supported.

  18. Mild Cognitive Impairment is Associated with Selected Functional Markers: Integrating Concurrent, Longitudinal, and Stability Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolcos, Sanda; MacDonald, Stuart W.S.; Braslavsky, Anna; Camicioli, Richard; Dixon, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We examined functional performance on multiple indicators for two cognitive status groups: (a) not impaired controls (NIC) and (b) mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We identified functional markers associated with differences, changes, and stability in cognitive status. Method In the Victoria Longitudinal Study (VLS) we examined cognitive status group effects in (a) cross-sectional functional performance, (b) longitudinal stability, (c) longitudinal functional performance change, and (d) functional marker prediction of later cognitive status. We assembled markers from five continuous clusters of MCI-related functional factors: biological vitality, activity lifestyle, psychosocial affect, subjective health, and global cognition. We used a cross-sectional sample and a two-wave longitudinal sample, stratified by age (mid-old, old-old) and cognitive status (MCI, NIC). Results First, cross-sectional results showed that eight markers differentiated MCI and NIC adults, with the latter performing uniformly better. The groups differed on diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, positive and negative affect, MMSE, and the lifestyle indicators of self-maintenance, travel, and novel cognitive activities. Second, Wave1 to Wave2 stabilities in cognitive status classification were high. Third, several markers differentiated the stable (NIC-to-NIC, MCI-to-MCI) from the unstable (NIC-to-MCI, MCI-to-NIC) cognitive status groups. Fourth, five relevant markers for identifying older adults at risk for cognitive status changes were: diastolic blood pressure, self-maintenance activities, novel cognitive activities, positive affect, and global cognitive status. Conclusion Selected risk and protective factors differentiate persons classified with MCI from those not currently cognitively impaired, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. PMID:22251311

  19. An Introduction to Cognitive Musicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haumann, Niels Trusbak

    2015-01-01

    This historical-scientific introduction to Cognitive Musicology introduces the 150 years of research and discoveries in the psychology of music that partly presuppose the more recent discipline of Cognitive Musicology. Atomistic, Gestalt, functionalist, testing, behaviorist, cognitive, and neuros......This historical-scientific introduction to Cognitive Musicology introduces the 150 years of research and discoveries in the psychology of music that partly presuppose the more recent discipline of Cognitive Musicology. Atomistic, Gestalt, functionalist, testing, behaviorist, cognitive...

  20. Comparison of montreal cognitive assessment and mini-mental state examination in evaluating cognitive domain deficit following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kwok Chu Wong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cognitive deficits are common after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH, and clinical evaluation is important for their management. Our hypothesis was that the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCa is superior to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE in screening for cognitive domain deficit in aSAH patients. METHODS: We carried out a prospective observational and diagnostic accuracy study on Hong Kong aSAH patients aged 21 to 75 years who had been admitted within 96 hours of ictus. The domain-specific neuropsychological assessment battery, the MoCA and MMSE were administered 2-4 weeks and 1 year after ictus. A cognitive domain deficit was defined as a cognitive domain z score <-1.65 (below the fifth percentile. Cognitive impairment was defined as two or more cognitive domain deficits. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov of the US National Institutes of Health (NCT01038193. RESULTS: Both the MoCA and the MMSE were successful in differentiating between patients with and without cognitive domain deficits and cognitive impairment at both assessment periods. At 1 year post-ictus, the MoCA produced higher area under the curve scores for cognitive impairment than the MMSE (MoCA, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.97 versus MMSE, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.66 to 0.83, p = 0.009. INTERPRETATION: Cognitive domain deficits and cognitive impairment in patients with aSAH can be screened with the MoCA in both the subacute and chronic phases.

  1. On differential characteristic classes

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Man-Ho

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we give explicit formulas of differential characteristic classes of principal $G$-bundles with connections and prove their expected properties. In particular, we obtain explicit formulas for differential Chern classes, differential Pontryagin classes and differential Euler class. Furthermore, we show that the differential Chern class is the unique natural transformation from (Simons-Sullivan) differential $K$-theory to (Cheeger-Simons) differential characters that is compatible ...

  2. 中文版蒙特利尔认知评估量表在阿尔茨海默病与血管性痴呆中的应用研究%The application of Montreal Cognitive Assessment Chinese version in differentiation of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾功伟; 殷樱; 贾朗; 虞乐华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the use of the Chinese version of Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) in differentiating Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD).Methods A total of 62 patients with AD and 54 patients with VD were recruited for this study.All subjects were subject to examination using MoCA to collect information in terms of their visuospatial/executive function,attention,language,abstraction delayed recall and orientation.The demographic data of the subjects was also were collected and analyzed.Results It was shown that there were statistically significant differences between the AD and VD patients with regard to their scores of visuospatial / executive,attention,delayed recall (P < 0.05).The rate of diagnostic coincidence was 100% in AD patients using MoCA Chinese version,and 98.15% in VD patients,with a statistically significant difference between the two groups.There was high correlation in all items of MoCA between the two evaluators (ICC:0.911 ~1.000).Conclusion Montreal Cognitive Assessment Chinese version can be used for the diagnosis of AD and VD,and the scale can help differentiate AD and VD.%目的 探讨中文版蒙特利尔认知评估量表(MoCA)在阿尔茨海默病(AD)及血管性痴呆(VD)中的应用.方法 选取62例AD患者(AD组)和54例VD患者(VD组),采用王炜等翻译的中文版MoCA量表对2组患者的视空间与执行能力、命名、注意力等子项目进行评分.评分后,对2组患者各子项目评分、诊断吻合率及中文版MoCA量表的组间信度进行比较分析.结果 2组患者在视空间与执行能力、注意力、延迟回忆及总分等方面比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).AD组与VD组患者的诊断吻合率分别为100.00%和98.15%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).2名评定员对患者所进行的MoCA量表评分呈高度相关性,ICC值:0.911 ~1.000,95%可信区间波动范围较小.结论 中文版MoCA量表可用于AD和VD的诊断,且对AD和VD有一定

  3. The effects of affective and cognitive empathy on adolescents’ behavior and outcomes in conflicts with mothers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Lissa, Caspar J.; Hawk, Skyler T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304354562; Meeus, Wim H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070442215

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated whether manipulations of affective and cognitive empathy have differential effects on observed behavior and self-reported outcomes in adolescent–mother conflict discussions. We further examined how these situational empathy inductions interact with preexisting empathic

  4. Specific Mindfulness Skills Differentially Predict Creative Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Matthijs; Nevicka, Barbara; Ten Velden, Femke S

    2014-05-23

    Past work has linked mindfulness to improved emotion regulation, interpersonal skills, and basic cognitive abilities, but is unclear about the relation between mindfulness and creativity. Studies examining effects of mindfulness on factors pertinent to creativity suggest a uniform and positive relation, whereas work on specific mindfulness skills suggests that mindfulness skills may differentially predict creativity. To test whether the relation between mindfulness and creativity is positive and uniform (the uniform hypothesis) or differentially depends on particular components of mindfulness (the differential hypothesis), we conducted four studies in which mindfulness skills were measured, extensively trained, or manipulated with a short, incidental meditation session. Results supported a differential relation between mindfulness and creativity: Only the ability to observe and attend to various stimuli consistently and positively predicted creativity. Results regarding other mindfulness skills were less consistent. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  5. Cognitive aging in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age-related impairments in cognitive functions represent a growing clinical and social issue. Genetic and behavioral characterization of animal models can provide critical information on the intrinsic and environmental factors that determine the deterioration or preservation of cognitive abilities throughout life. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Behavior of wild-type, mutant and gamma-irradiated zebrafish (Danio rerio was documented using image-analysis technique. Conditioned responses to spatial, visual and temporal cues were investigated in young, middle-aged and old animals. The results demonstrate that zebrafish aging is associated with changes in cognitive responses to emotionally positive and negative experiences, reduced generalization of adaptive associations, increased stereotypic and reduced exploratory behavior and altered temporal entrainment. Genetic upregulation of cholinergic transmission attenuates cognitive decline in middle-aged achesb55/+ mutants, compared to wild-type siblings. In contrast, the genotoxic stress of gamma-irradiation accelerates the onset of cognitive impairment in young zebrafish. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings would allow the use of powerful molecular biological resources accumulated in the zebrafish field to address the mechanisms of cognitive senescence, and promote the search for therapeutic strategies which may attenuate age-related cognitive decline.

  6. Cognitive impairment in affective psychoses: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Emre; Yücel, Murat; Pantelis, Christos

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that cognitive impairment should be included in the diagnostic criteria of schizophrenia. One of the main arguments in support of this suggestion has been the hope that cognitive impairment can help distinguish schizophrenia from bipolar disorder (BD). However, recent evidence shows that cognitive deficits occur in BD and persist beyond euthymia. Further, mood disorders with psychotic features might be expected to manifest greater cognitive impairment, which further complicates the potential to differentiate these disorders. The goal of the current meta-analysis was to examine the magnitude and characteristics of cognitive impairments in affective psychoses (AP). A systematic search of the existing literature sourced 27 studies that met the inclusion criteria. These studies compared cognitive performances of 763 patients with AP (550 BD and 213 major depressive disorder) and 1823 healthy controls. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses were used to examine the effects of moderator variables. Meta-analyses of these studies showed that patients with AP were impaired in all 15 cognitive tasks with large effect sizes for most measures. There were no significant differences between the magnitude of impairments between the BD and major depressive disorder groups. The largest effect size was found for symbol coding, stroop task, verbal learning, and category fluency, reflecting impairments in elementary and complex aspects of attentional processing, as well as learning and memory. In general, the pattern of cognitive impairments in AP was similar to reported findings in euthymic patients with BD, but relatively more pronounced.

  7. Dietary antioxidants, cognitive function and dementia--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Georgina E; Bryan, Janet; Murphy, Karen J

    2013-09-01

    Antioxidant compounds, contained in fruit, vegetables and tea, have been postulated to have a protective effect against age-related cognitive decline by combating oxidative stress. However, recent research on this subject has been conflicting. The aim of this systematic review was to consider current epidemiological and longitudinal evidence for an association between habitual dietary intake of antioxidants and cognition, with consideration given to both cognitive functioning and risk for dementia and its subtypes, including Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Searches of electronic databases were undertaken to identify peer-reviewed journal articles that reported on associations between antioxidant intakes (vitamins C, E, flavonoids, carotenoids) and cognitive function or risk for dementia. Eight cross-sectional and 13 longitudinal studies were identified and included in the review. There were mixed findings for the association between antioxidant intake, cognition and risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Large heterogeneity in study design, differential control of confounders, insufficient measures of cognitive performance, and difficulties associated with dietary assessment may contribute to the inconsistent findings. Overall, findings do not consistently show habitual intakes of dietary antioxidants are associated with better cognitive performance or a reduced risk for dementia. Future intervention trials are warranted to elucidate the effects of a high intake of dietary antioxidants on cognitive functioning, and to explore effects within a whole dietary pattern.

  8. Neurocognitive mechanisms of cognitive control: The role of prefrontal cortex in action selection, response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Segalowitz, S.J.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; Carter, C.S.

    2004-01-01

    Convergent evidence highlights the differential contributions of various regions of the prefrontal cortex in the service of cognitive control, but little is understood about how the brain determines and communicates the need to recruit cognitive control, and how such signals instigate the implementa

  9. Gender Differences in the Maintenance of Response to Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmingham, Kim L.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine potential differential responses in men and women to cognitive behavior therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Fifty-two men and 56 women diagnosed with PTSD participated in randomized controlled trials of cognitive behavior therapy for PTSD. Participants were randomly allocated to either (a) exposure-only…

  10. Calculation Abilities in Young Children with Different Patterns of Cognitive Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Nancy C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the arithmetic calculation abilities of kindergarten and first-grade children (n=108) with different patterns of cognitive functioning: low language, low spatial ability, general delays, and nonimpaired. Nonverbal, story, and number fact problems were differentially sensitive to variation in cognitive ability. (Author/JDD)

  11. Growth of Cognitive Skills in Preschoolers: Impact of Sleep Habits and Learning-Related Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunjoo; Molfese, Victoria J.; Beswick, Jennifer; Jacobi-Vessels, Jill; Molnar, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study used a longitudinal design to identify how sleep habits and learning-related behaviors impact the development of cognitive skills in preschoolers (ages 3-5). Sixty- seven children with parental report and cognitive skill assessment data were included. Scores on the Differential Ability Scales (C. Elliott, 1990)…

  12. Prevalência de obesidade em idosos longevos e sua associação com fatores de risco e morbidades cardiovasculares Obesity prevalence among oldest-old and its association with risk factors and cardiovascular morbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana Beatrice Mânica Da Cruz; Marília Siqueira Campos Almeida; Carla Helena Augustin Schwanke; Emílio Hideyuki Moriguchi

    2004-01-01

    OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a prevalência de obesidade e sua associação com fatores de risco e morbidades cardiovasculares em idosos longevos (com idade > 80 anos) residentes em Veranópolis-RS, Brasil. MÉTODOS: Participaram do estudo 196 idosos (69 homens e 127 mulheres), 91% da população > 80 anos até julho de 1996. Para avaliação e classificação da obesidade, utilizou-se o índice de massa corporal (IMC) e os critérios diagnósticos da Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS) e do National Health and Nutrit...

  13. Occupational cognitive requirements and late-life cognitive aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Lindsay R.; Weuve, Jennifer; Wilson, Robert S.; Bultmann, Ute; Evans, Denis A.; de Leon, Carlos F. Mendes

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To examine whether occupational cognitive requirements, as a marker of adulthood cognitive activity, are associated with late-life cognition and cognitive decline.Methods:Main lifetime occupation information for 7,637 participants aged >65 years of the Chicago Health and Aging Project

  14. Where Is Cognition? Emotion and Cognition in Second Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, John H.

    1994-01-01

    Argues that the brain is the seat of cognition, that cognitive processes are neutral processes, and that, in the brain, affect and cognition are distinguishable but inseparable. This perspective allows a reconceptualization of the affective filter in terms of the brain's stimulus appraisal system, which interacts with cognition to promote or…

  15. Principles of minimal cognition : Casting cognition as sensorimotor coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Marc van; Keijzer, F.A.; Franken, Daan

    2006-01-01

    Within the cognitive sciences, cognition tends to be interpreted from an anthropocentric perspective, involving a stringent set of human capabilities. Instead, we suggest that cognition is better explicated as a much more general biological phenomenon, allowing the lower bound of cognition to extend

  16. Occupational cognitive requirements and late-life cognitive aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Lindsay R.; Weuve, Jennifer; Wilson, Robert S.; Bultmann, Ute; Evans, Denis A.; de Leon, Carlos F. Mendes

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To examine whether occupational cognitive requirements, as a marker of adulthood cognitive activity, are associated with late-life cognition and cognitive decline.Methods:Main lifetime occupation information for 7,637 participants aged >65 years of the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHA

  17. Mutually Augmented Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesdorf, Florian; Pangercic, Dejan; Bubb, Heiner; Beetz, Michael

    In mac, an ergonomic dialog-system and algorithms will be developed that enable human experts and companions to be integrated into knowledge gathering and decision making processes of highly complex cognitive systems (e.g. Assistive Household as manifested further in the paper). In this event we propose to join algorithms and methodologies coming from Ergonomics and Artificial Intelligence that: a) make cognitive systems more congenial for non-expert humans, b) facilitate their comprehension by utilizing a high-level expandable control code for human experts and c) augment representation of such cognitive system into “deep representation” obtained through an interaction with human companions.

  18. Social cognition in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael F; Leitman, David I

    2008-07-01

    Social cognition in schizophrenia is a rapidly emerging area of study. Because the number and diversity of studies in this area have increased, efforts have been made to better define terms and provide organizing frameworks. A key challenge confronting the study of social cognition in schizophrenia is building bridges between clinical scientists and social neuroscientists. The articles in this theme summarize data-based studies that have attempted to build or strengthen such bridges to better understand the neural bases of social cognitive impairment in schizophrenia.

  19. Values and judgements of wage differentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, J

    1991-09-01

    This study examined the relationship between value priorities as assessed by the Rokeach Value Survey (RVS) and judgements of wage differentials. Students completed the RVS and judged the fairness of the wages for a number of jobs. Judgements of fairness were related to differences in value priorities but the justifications provided did not relate to these value priorities or draw on similar systems. The results are discussed in relation to the question of whether or not values are systematically organized, core cognitive constructs.

  20. Impact of computer animations in cognitive learning: differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altıparmak, Kemal

    2014-11-01

    In mathematic courses, construction of some concepts by the students in a meaningful way may be complicated. In such circumstances, to embody the concepts application of the required technologies may reinforce learning process. Onset of learning process over daily life events of the student's environment may lure their attention and may enable them to gain from the preliminary knowledge. Therefore, a good initiation may be realized in the course of meaningful learning. The underlying meaning of the abstract concepts by computer animations may be accomplished in class environments. That study is conducted searching out to discover the effects of animations over the learning process in mathematic courses. The study was performed over the 58 university freshman students selected randomly. Thirty-two students constituted the experiment group and 26 students constituted the control group. Computer animations-aided instruction model in constructive form were applied on the experiment group and non-computer-aided instruction model in constructive form were implemented on the control group. Student academic success via a test method developed by explored group with confidence rate .819 (Cronbach's alpha) revealed that data were evaluated by two-way variance analyses. The findings provided from the final test shows that the experiment group students were significantly higher according to the control group students in terms of academic success average scores. Computer animations were observed to be significant to assimilate the derivative concept in a discrete way over the students, to appeal their attention, animations of real life events observed to transform the abstract meanings in the events to a concrete manner. Students of whom the concrete stage is constructed meaningfully found to be tactful in reaching to semi-abstract and abstract stages.

  1. Social Class Differentiation in Cognitive Development Among Black Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Mark; And Others

    In a longitudinal study of 89 black children from different social classes, while there were no significant SES differences on the Cattell Infant Intelligence Scale at 18 and 24 months of age, there was a highly significant 23 point Mean IQ difference between children from welfare and middle class black families on the Stanford-Binet at 3 years of…

  2. Aerobic and Cognitive Exercise (ACE) Pilot Study for Older Adults: Executive Function Improves with Cognitive Challenge While Exergaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, Nicole; Shah, Nikita; Cohen, Katherine; Hogan, Michael J; Mulkerrin, Eamon; Arciero, Paul J; Cohen, Brian D; Kramer, Arthur F; Anderson-Hanley, Cay

    2015-11-01

    Dementia cases are increasing worldwide; thus, investigators seek to identify interventions that might prevent or ameliorate cognitive decline in later life. Extensive research confirms the benefits of physical exercise for brain health, yet only a fraction of older adults exercise regularly. Interactive mental and physical exercise, as in aerobic exergaming, not only motivates, but has also been found to yield cognitive benefit above and beyond traditional exercise. This pilot study sought to investigate whether greater cognitive challenge while exergaming would yield differential outcomes in executive function and generalize to everyday functioning. Sixty-four community based older adults (mean age=82) were randomly assigned to pedal a stationary bike, while interactively engaging on-screen with: (1) a low cognitive demand task (bike tour), or (2) a high cognitive demand task (video game). Executive function (indices from Trails, Stroop and Digit Span) was assessed before and after a single-bout and 3-month exercise intervention. Significant group × time interactions were found after a single-bout (Color Trails) and after 3 months of exergaming (Stroop; among 20 adherents). Those in the high cognitive demand group performed better than those in the low cognitive dose condition. Everyday function improved across both exercise conditions. Pilot data indicate that for older adults, cognitive benefit while exergaming increased concomitantly with higher doses of interactive mental challenge.

  3. Concentrated Differential Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Dwork, Cynthia; Rothblum, Guy N.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce Concentrated Differential Privacy, a relaxation of Differential Privacy enjoying better accuracy than both pure differential privacy and its popular "(epsilon,delta)" relaxation without compromising on cumulative privacy loss over multiple computations.

  4. Brain enhancement through cognitive training: a new insight from brain connectome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko eTaya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the recent advances in neurotechnology and the progress in understanding of brain cognitive functions, improvements of cognitive performance or acceleration of learning process with brain enhancement systems is not out of our reach anymore, on the contrary, it is a tangible target of contemporary research. Although a variety of approaches have been proposed, we will mainly focus on cognitive training interventions, in which learners repeatedly perform cognitive tasks to improve their cognitive abilities. In this review article, we propose that the learning process during the cognitive training can be facilitated by an assistive system monitoring cognitive workloads using EEG biomarkers, and the brain connectome approach can provide additional valuable biomarkers for facilitating leaners' learning processes. For the purpose, we will introduce studies on the cognitive training interventions, EEG biomarkers for cognitive workload, and human brain connectome. As cognitive overload and mental fatigue would reduce or even eliminate gains of cognitive training interventions, a real-time monitoring of cognitive workload can facilitate the learning process by flexibly adjusting difficulty levels of the training task. Moreover, cognitive training interventions should have effects on brain sub-networks, not on a single brain region, and graph theoretical network metrics quantifying topological architecture of the brain network can differentiate with respect to individual cognitive states as well as to different individuals' cognitive abilities, suggesting that the connectome is a valuable approach for tracking the learning progress. Although only a few studies have exploited the connectome approach for studying alterations of the brain network induced by cognitive training interventions so far, we believe that it would be a useful technique for capturing improvements of cognitive functions.

  5. Creativity and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1980-01-01

    The article focuses on research on improving creativity, including early efforts to enhance, operationalize, and define creativity. Studies dealing with behavioral management of creativity are discussed, as are those concerning the effects of self-statements and cognition. (CL)

  6. Language and Cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo

    and of its crucial notion of habit with the so-called “extended mind hypothesis” and ii) the application of such a framework on cognitive linguistic conceptions of language. This was necessary to develop a sound conceptual reflection on how social and intersubjective linguistic activities put to play......The Ph.D dissertation “Language and Cognition” addresses the way social uses of language – e.g. on the media, or in conversation – shape the way we think and act. Cognitive sciences have started focusing on embodiment and joint cognition – the way in which cognitive processes are deeply shaped...... by bodily structures and activities as well as by social and intersubjective dynamics of coordination. The current investigation adds to the picture the role of language using theoretical analysis, corpus linguistics and experimental behavioural techniques. The aim was indeed to develop a framework...

  7. Cognitive Computing for Security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debenedictis, Erik [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rothganger, Fredrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aimone, James Bradley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Marinella, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, Brian Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warrender, Christina E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mickel, Patrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Final report for Cognitive Computing for Security LDRD 165613. It reports on the development of hybrid of general purpose/ne uromorphic computer architecture, with an emphasis on potential implementation with memristors.

  8. Cognitive load theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Paul A.; Kirschner, Femke; Paas, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Kirschner, P. A., Kirschner, F. C., & Paas, F. (2009). Cognitive load theory. In E. M. Anderman & L. H. Anderman (Eds.). Psychology of classroom learning: An encyclopedia, Volume 1, a-j (pp. 205-209). Detroit, MI: Macmillan Reference.

  9. Advances in Animal Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Jennifer

    2016-11-30

    This editorial endorses a diverse approach to the study of animal cognition and emphasizes the theoretical and applied gains that can be made by embracing this approach. This diversity emerges from cross-talk among scientists trained in a variety of backgrounds and theoretical approaches, who study a variety of topics with a range of species. By shifting from an anthropocentric focus on humans and our closest living relatives, and the historic reliance on the lab rat or pigeon, modern students of animal cognition have uncovered many fascinating facets of cognition in species ranging from insects to carnivores. Diversity in both topic and species of study will allow researchers to better understand the complex evolutionary forces giving rise to widely shared and unique cognitive processes. Furthermore, this increased understanding will translate into more effective strategies for managing wild and captive populations of nonhuman species.

  10. Social cognitive radio networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xu

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents research results on social cognitive radio networks, a transformational and innovative networking paradigm that promotes the nexus between social interactions and cognitive radio networks. Along with a review of the research literature, the text examines the key motivation and challenges of social cognitive radio network design. Three socially inspired distributed spectrum sharing mechanisms are introduced: adaptive channel recommendation mechanism, imitation-based social spectrum sharing mechanism, and evolutionarily stable spectrum access mechanism. The brief concludes with a discussion of future research directions which ascertains that exploiting social interactions for distributed spectrum sharing will advance the state-of-the-art of cognitive radio network design, spur a new line of thinking for future wireless networks, and enable novel wireless service and applications.

  11. Cognitive psychological theories of suicidal behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saška Roškar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Suicidal behaviour is a consequence of simultaneous influences of many factors. Basically it can be regarded as a consequence of an interplay of two risk factors, namely genetic and environmental, which express themselves in the form of sociological, biological and psychological factors. It is difficult to find a theory of suicidal behaviour which would cover or consider all factors, and although present theories are overlapping, they emphasize different risk factors. More recent studies are focusing on neuropsychological and cognitive functioning of suicidal persons. The most cited psychological theory of suicidal behaviour is the Cry of Pain model which understands the suicidal behaviour as a consequence of a situation signaling defeat, entrapment and no rescue, which subsequently can lead to feelings of hopelessness. The psychobiological theory of two vulnerability components of sucidal behaviour extends existing psychological theories and helps to understand why some persons with depressive disorder engage in suicidal behaviour and the other don't. Both theories imply impaired cognitive abilities in suicidal persons. It is still not entirely understood if these cognitive impairments can be regarded as a state or a trait feature. What happens with cognitive functions after the initial crisis is over, explains the Theory of differential activation. The purpose of the present paper is to introduce and combine these theories and discuss their practical implications.

  12. Is Distributed Cognition Group Level Cognition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Kirk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that recent arguments from group problem solving and task performance to emergent group level cognition that rest on the social parity and related principles are invalid or question begging. The paper shows that standard attributions of problem solving or task performance to groups require only multiple agents of the outcome, not a group agent over and above its members, whether or not any individual member of the group could have accomplished the task independently.

  13. Social Cognition, Social Skill, and the Broad Autism Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Noah J.; Nowlin, Rachel B.; Pinkham, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Social-cognitive deficits differentiate parents with the "broad autism phenotype" from non-broad autism phenotype parents more robustly than other neuropsychological features of autism, suggesting that this domain may be particularly informative for identifying genetic and brain processes associated with the phenotype. The current study…

  14. Cognitive mapping as a learning method in hypermedia design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, Svetoslav; Aroyo, Lora; Kommers, Piet; Ivanov, Ivan

    1997-01-01

    AThe effectiveness of cognitive mapping is defined operationally in the terms of general beneficial, differential, and compensation effects. The contribution of the concept mapping method will mainly be discussed in the context of student assignments in an ill-structured hypermedia design environmen

  15. Midsagittal Brain Shape Correlation with Intelligence and Cognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Emiliano; Martin-Loeches, Manuel; Burgaleta, Miguel; Colom, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Brain shape might influence cognitive performance because of the relationships between functions, spatial organization, and differential volumetric development of cortical areas. Here we analyze the relationships between midsagittal brain shape variation and a set of basic psychological measures. Coordinates in 2D from 102 MRI-scanned young adult…

  16. Ritual and embodied cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.; Klocova, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Dette kapitel introducerer et embodied cognition tilgang til studiet af religiøse ritualer. Da tilgangen rummer forskellige elementer fra forskellige discipliner bliver disse opsummeret i "4E approach", nemlig kognition som embodied, embedded, extended og enactive.......Dette kapitel introducerer et embodied cognition tilgang til studiet af religiøse ritualer. Da tilgangen rummer forskellige elementer fra forskellige discipliner bliver disse opsummeret i "4E approach", nemlig kognition som embodied, embedded, extended og enactive....

  17. Summary: Cognition in 2014

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the 79th Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology on Cognition held on May 28–June 2, 2014 was to survey recent advances in cognitive neuroscience and assess future prospects. The symposium succeeded beyond the dreams of the organizers and the participants were treated to an extraordinarily rich feast of 58 long talks, six short talks, and 137 posters. Equally important to the success of the symposium was the perfect setting for informal scientific exchange between 260 ...

  18. Emotion, Cognition, and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, R. J.

    2002-11-01

    Emotion is central to the quality and range of everyday human experience. The neurobiological substrates of human emotion are now attracting increasing interest within the neurosciences motivated, to a considerable extent, by advances in functional neuroimaging techniques. An emerging theme is the question of how emotion interacts with and influences other domains of cognition, in particular attention, memory, and reasoning. The psychological consequences and mechanisms underlying the emotional modulation of cognition provide the focus of this article.

  19. Cognitive Dynamic Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Miguel, Ignacio; Duran, Ramon J.; Lorenzo, Ruben M.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive networks are a promising solution for the control of heterogeneous optical networks. We review their fundamentals as well as a number of applications developed in the framework of the EU FP7 CHRON project.......Cognitive networks are a promising solution for the control of heterogeneous optical networks. We review their fundamentals as well as a number of applications developed in the framework of the EU FP7 CHRON project....

  20. Cognitive Processes in Writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莹

    2009-01-01

    Writing has become one of important topic to discuss in the new age.Its theories could be generally learnt,but its nature needs to handle in specific contents.In another words,every one who can write must generate his/her thinking or cognitive processes.Because writing thinking is to do meaningful activities,how to solove writing problems could be managed through cognitive process.