WorldWideScience

Sample records for oil water interfaces

  1. Brine crude oil interactions at the oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    mechanisms. The ion specific interaction between fines and polar fractions of crude oil at the oil-water interface has been less explored. In this study the relative affinity between different ions and the oil surface was determined. The experiments prove the importance of Ca2+, SO42-, and HPO42- ions...... emulsion formation at 0.05 mol/1. The amount of emulsion formation showed significant dependency on the type of acid doped in oil. Experiments demonstrate that the brine solution can alter the micro forces at the oil-water interface, and this ion specific interaction leads to oil emulsion formation......The impact of brine salinity and its ionic composition on oil displacement efficiency has been investigated extensively in recent years due to the potential of enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Wettability alterations through relative interactions at the mineral surface have been the basis of proposed...

  2. Bioinspired oil strider floating at the oil/water interface supported by huge superoleophobic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueli; Gao, Jun; Xue, Zhongxin; Chen, Li; Lin, Ling; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Shutao

    2012-06-26

    Oil pollution to aquatic devices, especially to those oil-cleaning devices and equipment-repairing robots during oil spill accidents, has drawn great attention and remains an urgent problem to be resolved. Developing devices that can move freely in an oil/water system without contamination from oil has both scientific and practical importance. In nature, the insect water strider can float on water by utilizing the superhydrophobic supporting force received by its legs. Inspired by this unique floating phenomenon, in this article, we designed a model device named "oil strider" that could float stably at the oil/water interface without contamination by oil. The floating capability of the oil strider originated from the huge underwater superoleophobic supporting force its "legs" received. We prepared the micro/nanohierarchical structured copper-oxide-coated copper wires, acting as the artificial legs of oil strider, by a simple base-corrosion process. The surface structures and hydrophilic chemical components of the coatings on copper wires induced the huge superoleophobic force at the oil/water interface, to support the oil strider from sinking into the oil. Experimental results and theoretical analysis demonstrate that this supporting force is mainly composed of three parts: the buoyancy force, the curvature force, and the deformation force. We anticipate that this artificial oil strider will provide a guide for the design of smart aquatic devices that can move freely in an oil/water system with excellent oil repellent capability, and be helpful in practical situations such as oil handling and oil spill cleanup.

  3. Active oil-water interfaces: buckling and deformation of oil drops by bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria are unicellular organisms that seek nutrients and energy for growth, division, and self-propulsion. Bacteria are also natural colloidal particles that attach and self-assemble at liquid-liquid interfaces. Here, we present experimental results on active oil-water interfaces that spontaneously form when bacteria accumulate or grow on the interface. Using phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, we simultaneously observed the dynamics of adsorbed Alcanivorax bacteria and the oil-water interface within microfluidic devices. We find that, by growing and dividing, adsorbed bacteria form a jammed monolayer of cells that encapsulates the entire oil drop. As bacteria continue to grow at the interface, the drop buckles and the interface undergoes strong deformations. The bacteria act to stabilize non-equilibrium shapes of the oil-phase such wrinkling and tubulation. In addition to presenting a natural example of a living interface, these findings shape our understanding of microbial degradation of oil and may have important repercussions on engineering interventions for oil bioremediation.

  4. Bacterial Swimming at Air/Water and Oil/Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael; Huang, Athena; Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay

    2012-02-01

    The microbes inhabiting the planet over billions of years have adapted to diverse physical environments of water, soil, and interfaces between water and either solid or air. Following recent studies on bacterial swimming and accumulation near solid surfaces, we turn our attention to the behavior of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at water/air and water/oil interfaces. The latter is motivated by relevance to microbial degradation of crude oil in light of the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Our ongoing study suggests that Caulobacter swarmer cells tend to get physically trapped at both water/air and water/oil interfaces, accumulating at the surface to a greater degree than boundary confinement properties like that of solid surfaces would predict. At the water/air interface, swimmers move in tight circles at half the speed of swimmers in the bulk fluid. At the water/oil interface, swimming circles are even tighter with further reduced swimming speed. We report experimental data and present preliminary analysis of the findings based on low Reynolds number hydrodynamics, the known surface tension, and surface viscosity at the interface. The analysis will help determine properties of the bacterium such as their surface charge and hydrophobicity.

  5. Adsorption dynamics of colloidal ellipsoids at oil-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anna; Rogers, W. Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    Nonspherical particles at immiscible fluid interfaces have strong interactions with each other and with the curvature of the host interface. However, the dynamics of nonspherical colloidal particles attaching to an interface have not yet been studied. We use digital holographic microscopy to image micron-sized polystyrene ellipsoids breaching an oil-water interface at hundreds of frames per second. We show that the particle height and polar angle have large fluctuations, but both change approximately logarithmic with time, likely due to contact line pinning on the surface of the particle. Equilibrium is reached on a timescale at least three orders of magnitude slower than that expected from Langevin dynamics simulations. We also find that all the trajectories collapse into straight lines when we plot particle polar angle as a function of particle height, unlike the trajectories seen in simulation. The differences between experiment and simulation suggest that contact line pinning and the shape of the three phase contact line may strongly influence the dynamics of particle adsorption.

  6. Mechanical Characterization of Molecular Assemblies at Oil/Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wa

    The self-assembly of charged molecules in liquid phases and their ability to form functional layers at immiscible interfaces are areas of great interest. However, the implementation of these assemblies is often limited by a lack of understanding of the detailed assembly mechanisms. In order to enhance the performance of interfacial assemblies it is essential to be able to characterize the physical and mechanical properties of assembled layers, as well as develop model systems that will allow us to examine the factors that govern their interaction with the surrounding environment. The key purpose of this thesis is to develop an understanding of some of the important factors influencing interfacial assemblies at immiscible liquid interfaces. The first portion of the work involves mechanical characterization of interfacial layers formed by large amphiphilic molecules. The study of block and gradient copolymers, reveals the effect of copolymer sequence distribution on the ability of these molecules to form interfacial assemblies. Specifically, the unique network structure formed by gradient copolymers at oil/water interfaces enables us to create a robust membrane at the interface by ionic crosslinking. The second part of this thesis explores smaller molecule assemblies at liquid interfaces, including commonly used commercial surfactant (span 80) and nano particles (graphene oxide). Both studies demonstrate an interesting correlation between molecular structure and overall properties of the assembled layers. Factors such as interfacial density, particle sizes and pH can greatly influence the structure of the assembled layers, resulting in interesting phenomena such as spontaneous emulsification, wrinkling and layer collapse. The bulk of the oil/water interface study was performed using axisymmetric drop shape analysis (DSA), which successfully quantifies the mechanical tension in the interfacial layer. This analysis was further extended by a development of a double

  7. Infrared Spectroscopy of Bilberry Extract Water-in-Oil Emulsions: Sensing the Water-Oil Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Kiefer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Water-in-oil (w/o emulsions are of great interest in many areas of the life sciences, including food technology, bioprocess engineering, and pharmaceuticals. Such emulsions are complex multi-component systems and the molecular mechanisms which lead to a stable emulsion are yet to be fully understood. In this work, attenuated total reflection (ATR infrared (IR spectroscopy is applied to a series of w/o emulsions of an aqueous anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract dispersed in a medium chain triglyceride (MCT oil phase. The content of the emulsifier polyglycerin-polyricinoleat (PGPR has been varied systematically in order to investigate whether or not its concentration has an impact on the molecular stabilization mechanisms. The molecular stabilization is accessed by a careful analysis of the IR spectrum, where changes in the vibrational frequencies and signal strengths indicate alterations of the molecular environment at the water/oil interface. The results suggest that adding emulsifier in excess of 1% by weight does not lead to an enhanced stabilization of the emulsion.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopy of Bilberry Extract Water-in-Oil Emulsions: Sensing the Water-Oil Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Johannes; Frank, Kerstin; Zehentbauer, Florian M; Schuchmann, Heike P

    2016-04-14

    Water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions are of great interest in many areas of the life sciences, including food technology, bioprocess engineering, and pharmaceuticals. Such emulsions are complex multi-component systems and the molecular mechanisms which lead to a stable emulsion are yet to be fully understood. In this work, attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy is applied to a series of w/o emulsions of an aqueous anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract dispersed in a medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil phase. The content of the emulsifier polyglycerin-polyricinoleat (PGPR) has been varied systematically in order to investigate whether or not its concentration has an impact on the molecular stabilization mechanisms. The molecular stabilization is accessed by a careful analysis of the IR spectrum, where changes in the vibrational frequencies and signal strengths indicate alterations of the molecular environment at the water/oil interface. The results suggest that adding emulsifier in excess of 1% by weight does not lead to an enhanced stabilization of the emulsion.

  9. Spreading of oil from protein stabilised emulsions at air/water interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, E.P.; Bos, M.A.; Kuijpers, A.J.; Wijnen, M.E.; Walstra, P.

    2002-01-01

    Spreading of a drop of an emulsion made with milk proteins on air/water interfaces was studied. From an unheated emulsion, all oil molecules could spread onto the air/water interface, indicating that the protein layers around the oil globules in the emulsion droplet were not coherent enough to

  10. Computational study of effect of water finger on ion transport through water-oil interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Nobuaki; Wang, Lingjian; Morita, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    When an ion transports from water to oil through water-oil interface, it accompanies hydrated water molecules and transiently forms a chain of water, called "water finger." We thoroughly investigated the role of the water finger in chloride ion transport through water-dichloromethane interface by using molecular dynamics technique. We developed a proper coordinate w to describe the water finger structure and calculated the free energy landscape and the friction for the ion transport as a function of ion position z and the water finger coordinate w. It is clearly shown that the formation and break of water finger accompanies an activation barrier for the ion transport, which has been overlooked in the conventional free energy curve along the ion position z. The present analysis of the friction does not support the hypothesis of augmented local friction (reduced local diffusion coefficient) at the interface. These results mean that the experimentally observed rate constants of interfacial ion transfer are reduced from the diffusion-limited one because of the activation barrier associated to the water finger, not the anomalous local diffusion. We also found that the nascent ion just after the break of water finger has excessive hydration water than that in the oil phase.

  11. Solid Nanoparticles That Catalyze Biofuel Upgrade Reactions at the Water/Oil Interface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steven Crossley; Jimmy Faria; Min Shen; Daniel E. Resasco

    2010-01-01

    ... of crude products greatly complicates purification procedures. Here, we report a family of solid catalysts that can stabilize water-oil emulsions and catalyze reactions at the liquid/liquid interface...

  12. Surfactant controlled switching of water-in-oil wetting behaviour of porous silica films grown at oil-water interfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish M Kulkarni; Rajdip Bandyopadhyaya; Ashutosh Sharma

    2008-11-01

    Selective permeation of oil and water across a porous medium, as in oil recovery operations, depends on the preferential wetting properties of the porous medium. We show a profound influence of surfactants in wetting of porous media and thus demonstrate a new route for the control of water-in-oil wetting of porous substrates by changing the concentration of surfactants in an aqueous sub-phase below the substrate. This strategy is employed to engineer partial reversible wetting transitions on a porous silica film. The film itself is grown and stabilized on a flat, macroscopic interface between an oil phase and an aqueous sub-phase. On increasing the surfactant (CTAB) concentration in the sub-phase, contact angle of a water drop (placed on the oil side of the film) changes from 140° to 16° in 25 min by diffusion of the surfactant across the porous film. On further replacement of the sub-phase with pure water, diffusion of the surfactant from the water drop back to the sub-phase was slower, increasing the contact angle in the process from 16° to 90° in 2 h. Wettability control by a cationic surfactant (CTAB) was found to be much faster (6 deg/min) than that offered by an anionic surfactant, SDS (0.05 deg/min). Switching of the surface wettability due to the surfactant diffusion may have implications in oil-water separation, chemical bed reactors and microfluidic devices.

  13. Conjugated polymelectrolyte assembly at water-oil interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Huang, Caili; Thomas, Russell; Russell Team

    Conjugated polyelectrolytes featured with conjugated backbone and functional side chains are interesting optoelectronic materials and widely used to modify electrodes in electronic devices such as light emitting diodes and solar cells to enhance device performance. Conjugated polyelectrolyte can be designed to have alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic side chains, and thus inducing interesting surface and interface properties. In this work, we using polyfluorene based material, to study its behavior at water-toluene interface. The aliphatic side-chains will favorably interact with toluene, and amine side-chains will interact with water, making this material a good surfactant. At interface the polymer chain is stretched to a Janus type of geometry. Flattened molecules will assemble into ultra thin films via pi-pi intermolecular stacking, and thus creating barriers between liquids. When liquid volume is reduced, jamming at interface will show up. These properties are strongly affected by the environment of the liquids, such as temperature and PH values, and polyelectrolyte diffusion to interfaces. This study leads to new methods to structure liquids using single component, which can be extended to applications such as electro-spinning or fabricate flow devices.

  14. Experimental study of oil-water interface layers dilatation rheological properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Oil-water interface layers dilatation rheological properties have been measured with the liquid-liquid interface film pressure measurement apparatus, which was based on the principles of Langmuir film balance. Experimental results show that it is possible to form the interface-associ- ated material caused by the attraction of the dispersion forces at the pure alkane-water interface. The type of material is sensitive to the interfacial pressure. Under the influence of the interfacial pressure, the stability of the interface associated materials decreases with the increase of the number of alkane carbons.

  15. Self-motion of soap at an oil-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Satoshi; Hiromatsu, Shin-ichi

    2005-03-01

    The self-motion of a sodium oleate (soap) disk at an oil/water interface was investigated as an autonomous system under nonequilibrium and isothermal conditions. The oleate molecules that developed from the disk transferred to both the toluene and water phases during self-motion. When the sodium oleate disk was removed from the toluene/water interface, the interfacial tension nearly recovered to the value without the disk. The duration of the motion increased as the volume of both phases increased. These results suggest that this self-motion continues due to a significant transfer of oleate molecules from the interface to both phases.

  16. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Hase, M; Hamada, T; Yoshikawa, K; Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The lipid vesicle can then be transported back into the oil phase. This novel experimental procedure may be a useful tool for creating a model cellular system, which, together with a microreactor, is applicable as a micrometer-scale biochemical reaction field.

  17. Effect of interaction heterogeneity on colloidal arrangements at a curved oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mina; Lee, Daeyeon; Park, Bum Jun

    2015-01-14

    We report the unique arrangement behaviour of colloidal particles at a curved oil-water interface. Particles trapped at a centrosymmetrically curved oil-water interface, formed by placing an oil lens at a neat air-water interface, organize into diverse arrangement structures due to electrostatic repulsion under the gravitational field. To reveal a possible mechanism behind the observed diversity, we investigate the interactions between pairs of particles at the curved oil-water interface. The magnitude of electrostatic repulsive interactions between pairs of particles is determined by minimizing the total potential of the particle pairs. We show that the pair interactions are quite heterogeneous, following a Gamma distribution. Using the experimentally determined pair potential and the heterogeneity in the potential as input parameters for Monte Carlo simulations, we show that such interaction heterogeneity affects the particle arrangements at the curved interface and results in an observed diversity in the particle arrangement structures. We believe that this work prompts further experimental and simulation studies to extensively understand hierarchical relations from small scale measurements (e.g., pair interactions and heterogeneity) to bulk scale properties (e.g., microstructure and interfacial rheology).

  18. Conformational changes to deamidated wheat gliadins and b-casein upon adsorption to oil-water emulsion interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Benjamin T.; Zhai, Jiali; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning

    2012-01-01

    The conformation of deamidated gliadins and b-casein in solution and adsorbed at the interface of oil-inwater emulsions was studied using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and front-facefluorescence spectroscopy. Deamidation led to partial unfolding of gliadins in solution. The a....... In contrast, b-casein adopted a more ordered structure upon adsorption to these two oil/water interfaces, the a-helix content increased from 5.5% (in solution) to 20% and 22.5% respectively after adsorption to tricaprin/water and hexadecane/water interfaces. Both deamidated gliadins and b-casein have...... to oil/water interfaces. The hydrophobicity of the oil phase also has an impact on the conformation of each protein upon adsorption to the oil/water interfaces e systematic trends were observed between oil phase polarity from: i) tryptophan fluorescence emission maxima, and ii) the ahelix content...

  19. Interaction of Alcanivorax borkumensis with a Surfactant Decorated Oil-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookstaver, Michelle; Bose, Arijit; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-06-01

    Alcanivorax borkumensis is a hydrocarbon degrading bacterium linked to oil degradation around oil spill sites. It is known to be a surface bacterium leading to substantial interaction with the oil-water interface. Because of its abundance in oil spill regions, it has great potential to be used actively in oil spill remediation. Dispersants are thought to be important in the creation of oil-in-water emulsions that are meant to aid in the biodegradation process by bacteria. Although it is likely that some sort of dispersant will be used again in the case of another oil spill, to date, no studies have shown the impact of dispersants on the bacteria population. Corexit 9500 was the main dispersant used during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, but little is known about its effect on the bacteria community. We built an experimental platform to quantitatively measure the transient growth of Alcanivorax borkumensis at the interface of oil and water. To our knowledge, this is the first study of how A. borkumensis interacts with a surfactant decorated oil-water interface. We use COREXIT EC9500A, cetylytrimethylamonium bromide, dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt, l-α-phosphatidylcholine, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and Tween 20 to investigate the impact of dispersants on Alcanivorax borkumensis. We assess the impact of these dispersants on the growth rate, lag time, and maximum concentration of Alcanivorax borkumensis. We show that the charge, structure, and surface activity of these surfactants greatly impact the growth of A. borkumensis. Our results indicated that out of the surfactants tested only Tween 20 assists Acanivorax borkumensis growth. The results of this study will be important in the decision of dispersant use in the future.

  20. Adsorption of polar lipids at the water-oil interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, P; Miller, R; Leser, M; Watzke, H; Fainerman, V B; Holmberg, K

    2008-06-03

    Dietary fat has long been recognized as an essential component in nutrition. However, most of the lipids present in food need to be converted into more bioavailable compounds. Lipases have a crucial role in converting triglycerides into more polar lipids with increased water solubility and a tendency to form micelles. However, the surface active molecules generated by lipolysis may have a detrimental effect on the interfacial biocatalysis. In the present work we evaluate the interfacial properties of lipase-generated molecules during fat digestion. By using the pendant drop technique we assessed the amphiphilic character of fatty acid salts, monoglycerides, and diglycerides as individual surfactants and mixtures. The experimental results are fitted with a mathematical model, which assists in the determination of the interfacial properties of the surfactants. Our results show that monoglycerides have considerably higher interfacial activity than fatty acid salts and diglycerides. Therefore, the interface will soon be dominated by monoglycerides. The pH dependency of the interfacial activity of fatty acids is also explored in the current work. We believe that our results can contribute to a better understanding of the complex interfacial phenomena occurring during fat digestion.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation: The Behavior of Asphaltene in Crude Oil and at the Oil/Water Interface

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Fengfeng

    2014-12-18

    Carboxyl asphaltene is commonly discussed in the petroleum industry. In most conditions, electroneutral carboxyl asphaltene molecules can be deprotonated to become carboxylate asphaltenes. Both in crude oil and at the oil/water interface, the characteristics of anionic carboxylate asphaltenes are different than those of the carboxyl asphaltenes. In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are utilized to study the structural features of different asphaltene molecules, namely, C5 Pe and anionic C5 Pe, at the molecular level. In crude oil, the electroneutral C5 Pe molecules prefer to form a steady face-to-face stacking, while the anionic C5 Pe molecules are inclined to form face-to-face stacking and T-shaped II stacking because of the repulsion of the anionic headgroups. Anionic C5 Pe has a distinct affinity to the oil/water interface during the simulation, while the C5 Pe molecules persist in the crude oil domain. A three-stage model of anionic C5 Pe molecules adsorbed at the oil/water interface is finally developed.

  2. Spreading of partially crystallized oil droplets on an air/water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hotrum, N.E.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Vliet, van T.; Aken, van G.A.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of crystalline fat on the amount and rate of oil spreading out of emulsion droplets onto either a clean or a protein-covered air/water interface was measured for ß-lactoglobulin stabilized emulsions prepared with either anhydrous milk fat or a blend of hydrogenated palm fat and

  3. Spreading of partially crystallized oil droplets on an air/water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hotrum, N.E.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Vliet, van T.; Aken, van G.A.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of crystalline fat on the amount and rate of oil spreading out of emulsion droplets onto either a clean or a protein-covered air/water interface was measured for ß-lactoglobulin stabilized emulsions prepared with either anhydrous milk fat or a blend of hydrogenated palm fat and sunflow

  4. Dynamics of non-spherical colloidal particles near and at oil-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anna; Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Fung, Jerome; Chaudhary, Kundan; Lewis, Jennifer A.; Razavi, Sepideh; Kretzschmar, Ilona; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2014-03-01

    Whereas much is known about how spherical colloidal particles interact with and at oil-water interfaces, not much is known about their non-spherical counterparts. The rotation of non-spherically symmetric particles adds extra degrees of freedom to how such particles interact with each other and the interface, so to study their three-dimensional dynamics we must first be able to image the rotation which has so far only been possible in viscous fluids or for particles with large aspect ratios. Here we track both the three-dimensional translation and the rotation of non-spherical colloidal particles at high speeds using the discrete dipole approximation in conjunction with digital holographic microscopy. We study the dynamics of such particles at an oil-water interface to determine interactions and dynamics prior to or after attachment. We aim to connect these measurements to the formation and stability of Pickering emulsions.

  5. Comparison of the dilational behaviour of adsorbed milk proteins at the air-water and oil-water interfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, A.; Prins, A.

    1996-01-01

    The interfacial dilational properties of two milk proteins, β-casein and β-lactoglobulin, have been compared at the air-water and paraffin oil-water interfaces. The measurements were performed as a function of bulk protein concentration using a modified Langmuir trough technique at a frequency of

  6. Comparison of the dilational behaviour of adsorbed milk proteins at the air-water and oil-water interfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, A.; Prins, A.

    1996-01-01

    The interfacial dilational properties of two milk proteins, β-casein and β-lactoglobulin, have been compared at the air-water and paraffin oil-water interfaces. The measurements were performed as a function of bulk protein concentration using a modified Langmuir trough technique at a frequency of 0.

  7. Volume entrained in the wake of a disc intruding into an oil-water interface

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Ivo R; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2016-01-01

    An object moving through a plane interface into a fluid deforms the interface in such a way that fluid from one side of the interface is entrained into the other side, a phenomenon known as Darwin's drift. We investigate this phenomenon experimentally using a disc which is started exactly at the interface of two immiscible fluids, namely oil and water. First, we observe that due to the density difference between the two fluids the deformation of the interface is influenced by gravity, and show that there exits a time window of universal behavior. Secondly, we show by comparing with boundary integral simulations that, even though the deformation is universal, our results cannot be fully explained by potential flow solutions. We attribute this difference to the starting vortex, which is created in the wake of the disc. Universal behavior is preserved, however, because the size and strength of the vortex shows the same universality as the potential flow solution.

  8. Amphiphilic nanosheet self-assembly at the water/oil interface: computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Wenjun; Zhao, Shuangliang; Song, Xianyu; Fang, Shenwen; Wang, Fen; Zhong, Cheng; Luo, Zhaoyang

    2017-03-15

    In this paper, dissipative particle dynamics simulations are performed to study the interfacial and emulsion stabilizing properties of various systems of amphiphilic nanosheets (ANs) self-assembled at the oil/water (O/W) interface. The ANs have a dimensional symmetry structure that encompasses a triangular-plate at the center and two soft comb-like shells constructed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers. As the simulation results show, the AN molecules are highly oriented in interfacial films with their triangular nanosheets parallel to the O/W interface, while their hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments attempt to immerse into the oil phase and aqueous phase, respectively. These results reveal that the rotation of ANs at oil/water interfaces is greatly restricted, meanwhile, their nanosheet (or planar) configuration facilitates their favorable orientation thereby, thus making the emulsion more stable. At higher concentrations, a wrapped-like or micelle morphology is observed. The O/W emulsions stabilized by ANs were also simulated, and it is interesting to find AN 'patches' at the O/W interface which resembles the leather patches on a football. By introducing the "amphiphilic nanosheet balance" concept, the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) values of ANs were calculated. Due to their properties of two-dimensional symmetry, the HLB values of ANs tend to approximately 1 which reveals a stronger stability for emulsions.

  9. Intermolecular forces in spread phospholipid monolayers at oil/water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingins, James; Pethica, Brian A

    2004-08-31

    The lateral intermolecular forces between phospholipids are of particular relevance to the behavior of biomembranes, and have been approached via studies of monolayer isotherms at aqueous interfaces, mostly restricted to air/water (A/W) systems. For thermodynamic properties, the oil/water (O/W) interface has major advantages but is experimentally more difficult and less studied. A comprehensive reanalysis of the available thermodynamic data on spread monolayers of phosphatidyl cholines (PC) and phosphatidyl ethanolamines (PE) at O/W interfaces is conducted to identify the secure key features that will underpin further development of molecular models. Relevant recourse is made to isotherms of single-chain molecules and of mixed monolayers to identify the contributions of chain-chain interactions and interionic forces. The emphasis is on the properties of the phase transitions for a range of oil phases. Apparent published discrepancies in thermodynamic properties are resolved and substantial agreement emerges on the main features of these phospholipid monolayer systems. In compression to low areas, the forces between the zwitterions of like phospholipids are repulsive. The molecular model for phospholipid headgroup interactions developed by Stigter et al. accounts well for the virial coefficients in expanded phospholipid O/W monolayers. Inclusion of the changes in configuration and orientation of the zwitterion headgroups on compression, which are indicated by the surface potentials in the phase transition region, and inclusion of the energy of chain demixing from the oil phase will be required for molecular modeling of the phase transitions.

  10. Volume entrained in the wake of a disk intruding into an oil-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Madonia, Matteo; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2016-07-01

    An object moving through a plane interface into a fluid deforms the interface in such a way that fluid from one side of the interface is entrained into the other side, a phenomenon known as Darwin's drift. We investigate this phenomenon experimentally using a disk which is started exactly at the interface of two immiscible fluids, namely, oil and water. First, we observe that due to the density difference between the two fluids the deformation of the interface is influenced by gravity and show that there exists a time window of universal behavior. Second, we show by comparing with boundary integral simulations that, even though the deformation is universal, our results cannot be fully explained by potential flow solutions. We attribute this difference to the starting vortex, which is created in the wake of the disk. Besides contributing significantly to entrainment directly, the vortex also influences the interface deformation due to Darwin's drift. Universal behavior is preserved, however, because the size and strength of the vortex shows the same universality as the potential flow solution.

  11. Assembly of Acid-Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes at Oil/Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Hoagland, David; Russell, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The segregation of water-soluble acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at the oil/water interface was induced by dissolving low-molecular-weight amine-terminated polystyrene (PS-NH2) in the oil phase. Salt-bridge interactions between carboxylic acid groups of SWCNTs and amine groups of PS drove assembly of a mixed interfacial film, monitored by pendant drop tensiometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy. The influence of PS end-group functionality, PS and SWCNT concentrations, and degree of SWCNT acid modification on interfacial activity were assessed, and a sharp drop in interfacial tension was observed above a critical SWCNT concentration. Interfacial tensions were low enough to support stable oil/water emulsions. Further experiments, including potentiometric titrations and replacement of SWCNTs by other carboxyl-containing species, demonstrated that the interfacial tension drop reflects the loss of SWCNT charge as pH falls near/below the intrinsic carboxyl dissociation constant; species lacking multivalent carboxylic acid groups are inactive. The interfacial assemblies of SWCNTs appear neither ordered nor oriented. Research Advisor.

  12. The Interface Conditions for Pressures at Oil-water Flood Front in the Porous Media Considering Capillary Pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Xiaolong; Du, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Flood front is the jump interface where fluids distribute discontinuously, whose interface condition is the theoretical basis of a mathematical model of the multiphase flow in porous medium. The conventional interface condition at the jump interface is expressed as the continuous Darcy velocity and fluid pressure (named CPVCM). This paper has inspected it via the studying the water-oil displacement in one dimensional reservoir with considering capillary pressure but ignoring the compressibility and gravity. It is proved theoretically that the total Darcy velocity and total pressure (defined by Antoncev etc.), instead of the Darcy velocities and pressures of water and oil, are continuous at the flood front without considering the compressibility of fluid and porous media. After that, new interface conditions for the pressures and Darcy velocity of each fluid are established, which are collectively named as Jump Pressures and Velocities Conditions Model (JPVCM) because the model has shown the jump pressures and...

  13. Sign of the Casimir-Polder interaction between atoms and oil-water interfaces: Subtle dependence on dielectric properties

    CERN Document Server

    Boström, Mathias; Brevik, Iver; Parsons, Drew F; Sernelius, Bo E

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that Casimir-Polder energies between noble gas atoms (dissolved in water) and oil-water interfaces are highly surface specific. Both repulsion (e.g. hexane) and attraction (e.g. glycerol and cyclodecane) is found with different oils. For several intermediate oils (e.g. hexadecane, decane, and cyclohexane) both attraction and repulsion can be found in the same system. Near these oil-water interfaces the interaction is repulsive in the non-retarded limit and turns attractive at larger distances as retardation becomes important. These highly surface specific interactions may have a role to play in biological systems where the surface may be more or less accessible to dissolved atoms.

  14. Measurements of Submicron Particle Adsorption and Particle Film Elasticity at Oil-Water Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Mohamed S; Hunter, Timothy N; Cayre, Olivier J; York, David W; Reichert, Matthew D; Anna, Shelly L; Walker, Lynn M; Williams, Richard A; Biggs, Simon R

    2016-05-01

    The influence of particle adsorption on liquid/liquid interfacial tension is not well understood, and much previous research has suggested conflicting behaviors. In this paper we investigate the surface activity and adsorption kinetics of charge stabilized and pH-responsive polymer stabilized colloids at oil/water interfaces using two tensiometry techniques: (i) pendant drop and (ii) microtensiometer. We found, using both techniques, that charge stabilized particles had little or no influence on the (dynamic) interfacial tension, although dense silica particles affected the "apparent" measured tension in the pendent drop, due to gravity driven elongation of the droplet profile. Nevertheless, this apparent change additionally allowed the study of adsorption kinetics, which was related qualitatively between particle systems by estimated diffusion coefficients. Significant and real interfacial tension responses were measured using ∼53 nm core-shell latex particles with a pH-responsive polymer stabilizer of poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (pMMA-b-pDMAEMA) diblock copolymer. At pH 2, where the polymer is strongly charged, behavior was similar to that of the bare charge-stabilized particles, showing little change in the interfacial tension. At pH 10, where the polymer is discharged and poorly soluble in water, a significant decrease in the measured interfacial tension commensurate with strong adsorption at the oil-water interface was seen, which was similar in magnitude to the surface activity of the free polymer. These results were both confirmed through droplet profile and microtensiometry experiments. Dilational elasticity measurements were also performed by oscillation of the droplet; again, changes in interfacial tension with droplet oscillation were only seen with the responsive particles at pH 10. Frequency sweeps were performed to ascertain the dilational elasticity modulus, with measured values being significantly higher

  15. Interfacial rheology of asphaltenes at oil-water interfaces and interpretation of the equation of state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Jayant P; Pauchard, Vincent; Couzis, Alexander; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2013-04-16

    In an earlier study, oil-water interfacial tension was measured by the pendant drop technique for a range of oil-phase asphaltene concentrations and viscosities. The interfacial tension was found to be related to the relative surface coverage during droplet expansion. The relationship was independent of aging time and bulk asphaltenes concentration, suggesting that cross-linking did not occur at the interface and that only asphaltene monomers were adsorbed. The present study extends this work to measurements of interfacial rheology with the same fluids. Dilatation moduli have been measured using the pulsating droplet technique at different frequencies, different concentrations (below and above CNAC), and different aging times. Care was taken to apply the technique in conditions where viscous and inertial effects are small. The elastic modulus increases with frequency and then plateaus to an asymptotic value. The asymptotic or instantaneous elasticity has been plotted against the interfacial tension, indicating the existence of a unique relationship, between them, independent of adsorption conditions. The relationship between interfacial tension and surface coverage is analyzed with a Langmuir equation of state. The equation of state also enabled the prediction of the observed relationship between the instantaneous elasticity and interfacial tension. The fit by a simple Langmuir equation of state (EOS) suggests minimal effects of aging and of nanoaggregates or gel formation at the interface. Only one parameter is involved in the fit, which is the surface excess coverage Γ∞ = 3.2 molecules/nm(2) (31.25 Å(2)/molecule). This value appears to agree with flat-on adsorption of monomeric asphaltene structures consisting of aromatic cores composed of an average of six fused rings and supports the hypothesis that nanoaggregates do not adsorb on the interface. The observed interfacial effects of the adsorbed asphaltenes, correlated by the Langmuir EOS, are consistent with

  16. Polymer-Carbon Nanotube Composite Films at the Oil/Water Interface: Assembly and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagland, David; Feng, Tao; Russell, Thomas P.

    2015-03-01

    Efficient carbon nanotube assembly at the oil/water interface was achieved by dissolving cationic polymers in the oil phase and oxidized nanotubes in the water phase, the two components spontaneously forming salt bridges to produce a composite interfacial film of nanoscopic thickness. As seen by pendant drop tensiometry, parameters such as carbon nanotube and polymer concentration, pH, polymer molecular weight, and degree of nanotube oxidation all affect assembly strongly, with measured trends to be described and explained. The frequency-dependent elastic and viscous moduli of films in dilation were characterized by interfacial pendant drop rheology. Structural (fast, minutes) and adsorption/desorption (slow, tens of minutes) relaxations were both noted, and at frequencies intermediate to the two, almost insensitive to assembly parameters, the films displayed expected behaviors for 2D critical gels, i.e., at the crossover between fluid and solid. Tan(delta) was frequency-independent over one to two decades of frequency, and the modulus of linear stress relaxation was a power law in time. Films wrinkled by larger (nonlinear) strains recovered over the structural relaxation time. Support: NSF-sponsored UMass MRSEC and the US DoE Office of Basic Energy Science through Contract DE-FG02-04ER46126.

  17. Wetting behavior of water and oil droplets in three-phase interfaces for hydrophobicity/philicity and oleophobicity/philicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat

    2009-12-15

    Biomimetics, mimicking nature for engineering solutions, provides a model for the development of superhydrophobic/superoleophobic and self-cleaning surfaces. A number of biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces have been developed by using a hydrophobic coating, surface roughness, and the ability to form air pockets between solid and water. Oleophobic surfaces that have the potential for self-cleaning and antifouling from biological and organic contaminants in both air and water need to be studied. The surface tension of oil and organic liquids is lower than that of water, so to create a superoleophobic surface, the surface energy of the solid surface in air should be lower than that of oil. The wetting behavior of water and oil droplets for hydrophobic/philic and oleophobic/philic surfaces in three-phase interfaces was studied. In order to make the surface oleophobic at a solid-air-oil interface, a material with a surface energy lower than that of oil was used. In underwater applications, the oleophobicity/philicity of an oil droplet in water was studied on the surfaces with different surface energies of various interfaces and contact angles of water and oil droplets in air. A model for predicting the contact angles of water and oil droplets was proposed. To validate the model, the wetting behavior of flat and micropatterned surfaces with varying pitch values were studied. Furthermore, the wetting behavior of the nano- and hierarchical structures found in Lotus plant surfaces and the shark skin replica as an example of aquatic animal were also studied. On the basis of the experimental data and the model, the trends were explained.

  18. Isolating Influenza RNA from Clinical Samples Using Microfluidic Oil-Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Francis R.; Wang, Jingjing; Opal, Steven M.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2016-01-01

    The effective and robust separation of biomolecules of interest from patient samples is an essential step in diagnostic applications. We present a platform for the fast extraction of nucleic acids from clinical specimens utilizing paramagnetic PMPs, an oil-water interface, a small permanent magnet and a microfluidic channel to separate and purify captured nucleic acids from lysate in less than one minute, circumventing the need for multiple washing steps and greatly simplifying and expediting the purification procedure. Our device was able to isolate influenza RNA from clinical nasopharyngeal swab samples with high efficiency when compared to the Ambion® MagMAXTM Viral RNA Isolation Kit, sufficiently separating nucleic acid analytes from PCR-inhibiting contaminants within the lysate while also critically maintaining high integrity of the viral genome. We find that this design has great potential for rapid, efficient and sensitive nucleic acid separation from patient sample. PMID:26886007

  19. Competitive Adsorption between B-Casein or B-Lactoglobulin and Model Milk Membrane Lipids at Oil-Water Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, R.; Walstra, P.; Bastiaans, J.; Nieuwenhuijse, H.; Nylander, T.; Paulsson, M.; Bergenstahl, B.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the competitive adsorption between milk proteins and model milk membrane lipids at the oil-water interface and its dependence on the state of the lipid dispersion and the formation of emulsions. Both protein and membrane lipid surface load were determined using a serum

  20. The selective partitioning of the oligomers of polyethoxylated surfactant mixtures between interface and oil and water bulk phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciaa, Alain; Andérez, José; Bracho, Carlos; Lachaise, Jean; Salager, Jean-Louis; Tolosa, Laura; Ysambertt, Fredy

    2006-11-16

    Because their affinities for the oil and water phases vary considerably with the number of ethylene oxide units in their hydrophilic group, the ethoxylated nonionic species occurring in commercial products tend to behave in a non-collective way, with the low ethoxylation oligomers partitioning mostly in the oil phase. This results in a surfactant mixture at the interface which is more hydrophilic than the one which was introduced in the system in the first place. The pseudophase model is used to study the partitioning in Winsor III type systems, and to estimate the deviation of the interfacial mixture composition from the overall one. New results indicate that the selective partitioning into the oil phase increases when the oil phase becomes aromatic, when the total surfactant concentration decreases and when the water-to-oil ratio decreases.

  1. Molecular trajectories provide signatures of protein clustering and crowding at the oil/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McUmber, Aaron C; Larson, Nicholas R; Randolph, Theodore W; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2015-06-02

    Using high throughput single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), we have acquired molecular trajectories of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hen egg white lysozyme during protein layer formation at the silicone oil-water interface. These trajectories were analyzed to determine the distribution of molecular diffusion coefficients, and for signatures of molecular crowding/caging, including subdiffusive motion and temporal anticorrelation of the instantaneous velocity vector. The evolution of these properties with aging time of the interface was compared with dynamic interfacial tension measurements. For both lysozyme and BSA, we observed an overall slowing of protein objects, the onset of both subdiffusive and anticorrelated motion (associated with crowding), and a decrease in the interfacial tension with aging time. For lysozyme, all of these phenomena occurred virtually simultaneously, consistent with a homogeneous model of layer formation that involves gradual crowding of weakly interacting proteins. For BSA, however, the slowing occurred first, followed by the signatures of crowding/caging, followed by a decrease in interfacial tension, consistent with a heterogeneous model of layer formation involving the formation of protein clusters. The application of microrheological methods to single molecule trajectories described here provides an unprecedented level of mechanistic interpretation of interfacial events that occurred over a wide range of interfacial protein coverage.

  2. Attraction of Two Floating Spheres at a Viscous Oil-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Archit; Keiser, Geoff; Yeganeh, Mohsen; Maldarelli, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The aggregation rate of floating particles at a fluid/fluid interface by capillary forces has drawn significant interest. This 2D phenomenon plays a critical role in self-assembly arrangement relevant to pollination processes in biological contexts, the formation of dense particle laden interfaces for stabilizing emulsions in colloid science and in the bottom up assembly of materials in nanotechnologies. We present the first experiments on the merging of two Teflon particles at an interface between a mineral oil and an aqueous phase for a series of particle pairs, interfacial tension and oil viscosity. The separation distance as a function of time and pair aggregation time are both measured by optically following the movement of the particles. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with our theoretical formulation in which a drag correction accounts for the variation in particle depth of immersion.

  3. Competition of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase with its hydrolysis products at the oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, Marco; Rothkötter, Stefanie; Paprosch, Steven; Schmid, Reiner P; Schnitzlein, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of triglycerides yields glycerol and free fatty-acids, provided that the enzyme is non-regioselective. For an Sn-1,3 regioselective enzyme, such as lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus, the final product is no longer glycerol but Sn-2 monoglyceride instead. However, surface active molecules generated by lipolysis may have a detrimental effect on the interfacial biocatalysis since it is known that low molecular weight surfactants can displace proteins from interfaces. By using drop profile analysis tensiometry, we evaluated the interfacial properties of the lipase-generated molecules and their competitive effect on the adsorption behavior of the lipase and on the proceeding lipolysis. Our results show that even at concentration ratios of 8.64×10(-4)M (Sn-2 monoglyceride) to 2.5×10(-7)M (lipase), the final interfacial pressure values are very similar as for the system containing the lipase alone (i.e. ∼26 mN/m). This is a strong indication that monoglycerides, as the most interfacially active products generated during regioselective lipolysis, are expelled from the oil-water interface by the lipase. We attribute this effect to intermolecular lipase-lipase interactions, resulting in a low desorption probability of the lipase. For low oleic acid concentrations, the interfacial tension is solely determined by the lipase, while for higher concentrations, lipase and oleic acid both contribute to the tension values. We propose a hypothesis based on the preferential interaction of oleic acid molecules with hydrophobic sites on the lipase. The pH dependence of the adsorption rate and the interfacial activity of the lipase were also investigated.

  4. Influence of an Additive-Free Particle Spreading Method on Interactions between Charged Colloidal Particles at an Oil/Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Yi, Zonglin; Xing, Xiaochen; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2016-05-17

    The assembly and manipulation of charged colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces represent active areas of fundamental and applied research. Previously, we have shown that colloidal particles can spontaneously generate unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface when spreading solvent is used to disperse them at an oil/water interface. These residual charges in turn affect the long-ranged electrostatic repulsive forces and packing of particles at the interface. To further uncover the influence arising from the spreading solvents on interfacial particle interactions, in the present study we utilize pure buoyancy to drive the particles onto an oil/water interface and compare the differences between such a spontaneously adsorbed particle monolayer to the spread monolayer based on solvent spreading techniques. Our results show that the solvent-free method could also lead particles to spread well at the interface, but it does not result in violent sliding of particles along the interface. More importantly, this additive-free spreading method can avoid the formation of unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface. These findings agree well with our previous hypothesis; namely, those unstable residual charges are triboelectric charges that arise from the violently rubbing of particles on oil at the interface. Therefore, if the spreading solvents could be avoided, then we would be able to get rid of the formation of residual charges at interfaces. This finding will provide insight for precisely controlling the interactions among colloidal particles trapped at fluid/fluid interfaces.

  5. Homogenization conditions affect the oxidative stability of fish oil enriched milk emulsions: oxidation linked to changes in protein composition at the oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit M; Baron, Caroline P; Let, Mette B; Brüggemann, Dagmar A; Pedersen, Lise R L; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2007-03-07

    Fish oil was incorporated into milk under different homogenization temperatures (50 and 72 degrees C) and pressures (5, 15, and 22.5 MPa). Subsequently, the oxidative stability of the milk and changes in the protein composition of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were examined. Results showed that high pressure and high temperature (72 degrees C and 22.5 MPa) resulted in less lipid oxidation, whereas low pressure and low temperature (50 degrees C and 5 MPa) resulted in faster lipid oxidation. Analysis of protein oxidation indicated that especially casein was prone to oxidation. The level of free thiol groups was increased by high temperature (72 degrees C) and with increasing pressure. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) indicated that high temperature resulted in an increase in beta-lactoglobulin adsorbed at the oil-water interface. This was even more pronounced with higher pressure. Less casein seemed to be present at the oil-water interface with increasing pressure. Overall, the results indicated that a combination of more beta-lactoglobulin and less casein at the oil-water interface gave the most stable emulsions with respect to lipid oxidation.

  6. Chemical Analysis of a "Miller-Type" Complex Prebiotic Broth - Part II: Gas, Oil, Water and the Oil/Water-Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Sabrina; Wollrab, Eva; Codutti, Luca; Carlomagno, Teresa; da Costa, Stefan Gomes; Volkmer, Andreas; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J.; Ott, Albrecht

    2016-11-01

    We have analyzed the chemical variety obtained by Miller-Urey-type experiments using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy, gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and two-dimensional gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (GCxGC/MS). In the course of a running Miller-Urey-type experiment, a hydrophobic organic layer emerged besides the hydrophilic aqueous phase and the gaseous phase that were initially present. The gas phase mainly consisted of aromatic compounds and molecules containing C≡C or C≡N triple bonds. The hydrophilic phase contained at least a few thousands of different molecules, primarily distributed in a range of 50 and 500 Da. The hydrophobic phase is characterized by carbon-rich, oil-like compounds and their amphiphilic derivatives containing oxygen with tensioactive properties. The presence of a wide range of oxidized molecules hints to the availability of oxygen radicals. We suggest that they intervene in the formation of alkylated polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the oil/water interface. CARS spectroscopy revealed distinct vibrational molecular signatures. In particular, characteristic spectral bands for cyanide compounds were observed if the broth was prepared with electric discharges in the gaseous phase. The characteristic spectral bands were absent if discharges were released onto the water surface. NMR spectroscopy on the same set of samples independently confirmed the observation. In addition, NMR spectroscopy revealed overall high chemical variability that suggests strong non-linearities due to interdependent, sequential reaction steps.

  7. Chemical Analysis of a "Miller-Type" Complex Prebiotic Broth : Part II: Gas, Oil, Water and the Oil/Water-Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Sabrina; Wollrab, Eva; Codutti, Luca; Carlomagno, Teresa; da Costa, Stefan Gomes; Volkmer, Andreas; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J; Ott, Albrecht

    2016-11-28

    We have analyzed the chemical variety obtained by Miller-Urey-type experiments using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy, gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and two-dimensional gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (GCxGC/MS). In the course of a running Miller-Urey-type experiment, a hydrophobic organic layer emerged besides the hydrophilic aqueous phase and the gaseous phase that were initially present. The gas phase mainly consisted of aromatic compounds and molecules containing C≡C or C≡N triple bonds. The hydrophilic phase contained at least a few thousands of different molecules, primarily distributed in a range of 50 and 500 Da. The hydrophobic phase is characterized by carbon-rich, oil-like compounds and their amphiphilic derivatives containing oxygen with tensioactive properties. The presence of a wide range of oxidized molecules hints to the availability of oxygen radicals. We suggest that they intervene in the formation of alkylated polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the oil/water interface. CARS spectroscopy revealed distinct vibrational molecular signatures. In particular, characteristic spectral bands for cyanide compounds were observed if the broth was prepared with electric discharges in the gaseous phase. The characteristic spectral bands were absent if discharges were released onto the water surface. NMR spectroscopy on the same set of samples independently confirmed the observation. In addition, NMR spectroscopy revealed overall high chemical variability that suggests strong non-linearities due to interdependent, sequential reaction steps.

  8. Particle-stabilizing effects of flavonoids at the oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zijun; Murray, Brent S; Yusoff, Anida; Morgan, Michael R A; Povey, Malcolm J W; Day, Andrea J

    2011-03-23

    It has been shown that some common food flavonoids can act as excellent stabilizers of oil-in-water emulsions through their adsorption as water-insoluble particles to the surface of the oil droplets, i.e., Pickering emulsions are formed. Flavonoids covering a wide range of octanol-water partition coefficients (P) were screened for emulsification behavior by low shear mixing of flavonoid+n-tetradecane in a vortex mixer. Most flavonoids with very high or very low P values were not good emulsifiers, although there were exceptions, such as tiliroside, which is very insoluble in water. When a high shear jet homogenizer was used with 20 vol% oil in the presence of 1 mM tiliroside, rutin, or naringin, much finer emulsions were produced: the average droplet sizes (d32) were 16, 6, and 5 μm, respectively. These results may be highly significant with respect to the delivery of such insoluble compounds to the gut, as well as their digestion and absorption.

  9. Drop-shape analysis of receptor-ligand binding at the oil/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chi-Yang; Carvajal, Daniel; Szleifer, Igal; Shull, Kenneth R

    2008-03-18

    Drop-shape analysis was used to study the binding of streptavidin to biotin at the interface between water and a pendant chloroform droplet. Polyethylene oxide molecules were synthesized with a hydrophobic tail at one end of the molecule and a hydroxyl or biotin group at the other end. The interfacial tension of the water/chloroform interface was measured before and after addition of these amphiphiles to the chloroform phase and before and after addition of streptavidin to the aqueous phase. The hydroxyl-terminated amphiphiles eliminate nonspecific adsorption of the streptavidin to the interface, while streptavidin binds irreversibly to the biotin-terminated molecules. Molecular interactions within this bound layer were studied by measuring changes in the interfacial pressure as the layer is contracted and expanded by changing the volume of the chloroform droplet. A picture of the interfacial structure was obtained from quantitative comparisons between the experimental results and a molecular theory of protein binding to tethered ligands. These comparisons suggest that protein binding is controlled by the extension of the PEO tethers away from the interface.

  10. Appearance of instabilities and fingering from interface in water-oil systems; Surgimento de instabilidades e digitacao a partir da interface em sistemas agua-oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quadri, Marintho B.; Machado, Ricardo A.F.; Nogueira, Andre L.; Lopes, Toni J. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Baptista, Renan M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2003-07-01

    Many operations and procedures in the petroleum industry are related to the immiscible displacement of a fluid by another one, as the secondary recovery of petroleum and pumping operation through pipelines of high viscosity oils. In this context, an stability analysis of the water-oil interface as well as of the factors that leads to the appearance of the viscous fingering phenomenon, represented by the viscous flowing of one phase that penetrates inside of the other one in the form of one or more fingers, is of major importance for the forecast, simulation and control of operations involving this kind of system. From the theories of perturbation and unstable immiscible displacement of fluids, initially conceived for cells of parallel slabs (Hele-Shaw), the authors intend to extend the concepts and adapt the criteria for the three-dimensional geometry in macroscopic scale. (author)

  11. Homogenization conditions affect the oxidative stability of fish oil enriched milk emulsions: oxidation linked to changes in protein composition at the oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit M.; Baron, Caroline P.; Let, Mette B.

    2007-01-01

    Fish oil was incorporated into milk under different homogenization temperatures (50 and 72 °C) and pressures (5, 15, and 22.5 MPa). Subsequently, the oxidative stability of the milk and changes in the protein composition of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were examined. Results showed that h...... casein seemed to be present at the oil−water interface with increasing pressure. Overall, the results indicated that a combination of more β-lactoglobulin and less casein at the oil−water interface gave the most stable emulsions with respect to lipid oxidation....... was increased by high temperature (72 °C) and with increasing pressure. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) indicated that high temperature resulted in an increase in β-lactoglobulin adsorbed at the oil−water interface. This was even more pronounced with higher pressure. Less......Fish oil was incorporated into milk under different homogenization temperatures (50 and 72 °C) and pressures (5, 15, and 22.5 MPa). Subsequently, the oxidative stability of the milk and changes in the protein composition of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were examined. Results showed...

  12. Self assembly of oppositely charged latex particles at oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallamilli, Trivikram; Ragothaman, Srikanth; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2017-01-15

    In this study we explore the self assembly of oppositely charged latex particles at decane water interfaces. Two spreading protocols have been proposed in this context. In the first method oppositely charged particles are mixed prior to spreading at the interface, this is called "premixed-mixtures". In the second protocol negatively charged particles are first spread at the interface at known coverage followed by spreading positively charged particles at known coverage and this is called "sequential-mixtures". In premixed mixtures depending on particle mixing ratio (composition) and total surface coverage a number of 2d structures ranging from 2d crystals, aggregate-crystal coexistence and 2d-gels are observed. A detailed phase diagram of this system has been explored. In sequential-mixtures for the first time we observed a new phase in colloidal monolayers called 2d-bi crystalline domains. These structures consisted regions of two crystal phases of oppositely charged particles separated by a one dimensional chain of alternating positive and negative particles. Phase diagram of this system has also been explored at various combinations of first spread and second spread particles. A possible mechanism leading to formation of these 2d bi crystalline structures has been discussed. A direct visualization of breakage and reformation of particle barriers separating the crystal phases has been demonstrated through videos. Effect of salt in the water sub phase and particle hydrophobicity on domain formation is also investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 水平圆管油水两相界面性质实验%Experiment of horizontal round pipe oil-water interface property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵仕浩; 张国忠; 许道振; 郝迎鹏; 陈沐理

    2012-01-01

    Water phase height is measured by the color step caused by the color differences between diesel and water at the two-phase interface, and a comparison is made between experimental value of water phase height and calculated results in the case of assumed oil-water interface being a plane to indicate that a certain deviation is available. Therefore, oil-water interface concave-convex in the case of blending of different oil-water volume ratios is analyzed based on assumed circular arc interface shape. There is a concave-convex transition point for the oil-water interface changing with the water phase volume fraction, and the corresponding water phase volume fraction is about O.S. Geometrical models for calculation of oil-water interface curvature are given. Oil-water interface curvatures with different water holdups are obtained by the method of numerical resolution and critical water phase volume fraction corresponding to the oil-water interface contact angle under experiment conditions are predicted.%利用柴油与水的颜色差异引起的两相界面处的颜色跃变实现对水相高度的测定,并将水相高度的实验值与假设油水界面为平面时的计算结果进行比较,二者存在一定偏差.因此,基于圆弧形界面形状假设,分析了不同油水体积比混合情况下油水界面的凹凸性,油水界面随水相体积分数变化存在一个凹凸转变点,其对应的水相体积分数约为0.5.给出了油水界面曲率半径计算的几何模型,利用数值求解的方法得到了不同持水率下的油水界面曲率值,预测了实验条件下油水两相界面接触角对应的临界水相体积分数.

  14. Competitive adsorption of surfactants and hydrophilic silica particles at the oil-water interface: interfacial tension and contact angle studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichot, R; Spyropoulos, F; Norton, I T

    2012-07-01

    The effect of surfactants' type and concentration on the interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of hydrophilic silica particles was investigated. Silica particles have been shown to have an antagonistic effect on interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of both W/O and O/W surfactants. Silica particles, combined with W/O surfactant, have no effect on interfacial tension, which is only dictated by the surfactant concentration, while they strongly affect interfacial tension when combined with O/W surfactants. At low O/W surfactant, both particles and surfactant are adsorbed at the interface, modifying the interface structure. At higher concentration, interfacial tension is only dictated by the surfactant. By increasing the surfactant concentration, the contact angle that a drop of aqueous phase assumes on a glass substrate placed in oil media decreases or increases depending on whether the surfactant is of W/O or O/W type, respectively. This is due to the modification of the wettability of the glass by the oil or water induced by the surfactants. Regardless of the surfactant's type, the contact angle profile was dictated by both particles and surfactant at low surfactant concentration, whereas it is dictated by the surfactant only at high concentration.

  15. Interaction between colloidal particles on an oil-water interface in dilute and dense phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Lucia; Law, Adam D; Maestro, Armando; Buzza, D Martin A; Cicuta, Pietro

    2015-05-20

    The interaction between micron-sized charged colloidal particles at polar/non-polar liquid interfaces remains surprisingly poorly understood for a relatively simple physical chemistry system. By measuring the pair correlation function g(r) for different densities of polystyrene particles at the decane-water interface, and using a powerful predictor-corrector inversion scheme, effective pair-interaction potentials can be obtained up to fairly high densities, and these reproduce the experimental g(r) in forward simulations, so are self consistent. While at low densities these potentials agree with published dipole-dipole repulsion, measured by various methods, an apparent density dependence and long range attraction are obtained when the density is higher. This condition is thus explored in an alternative fashion, measuring the local mobility of colloids when confined by their neighbors. This method of extracting interaction potentials gives results that are consistent with dipolar repulsion throughout the concentration range, with the same magnitude as in the dilute limit. We are unable to rule out the density dependence based on the experimental accuracy of our data, but we show that incomplete equilibration of the experimental system, which would be possible despite long waiting times due to the very strong repulsions, is a possible cause of artefacts in the inverted potentials. We conclude that to within the precision of these measurements, the dilute pair potential remains valid at high density in this system.

  16. Volume entrained in the wake of a disk intruding into an oil-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, I.R.; Madonia, M.; Lohse, D.; Meer, van der R.M.

    2016-01-01

    An object moving through a plane interface into a fluid deforms the interface in such a way that fluid from one side of the interface is entrained into the other side, a phenomenon known as Darwin's drift. We investigate this phenomenon experimentally using a disk which is started exactly at the int

  17. Water at Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Hodgson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives...

  18. Heterogeneous nanoparticles at water-oil interfaces: Structure, Order, Diffusion, and Implications for the stability of Pickering emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striolo, Alberto; Luu, Xuan-Cuong; Molecular Science and Engineering Team

    2013-03-01

    Pickering emulsions find applications, e.g., in food processing, personal care products, and drug delivery. The emulsions stability is naturally related to the structural and dynamical properties of the nanoparticles adsorbed at oil-water interfaces. Such properties are investigated here by means of dissipative particle dynamics simulations, informed by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations results (Langmuir2011, 27, (9), 5264-5274). Several nanoparticles are considered, including Janus and homogeneous, and of several different shapes (spherical, elliptical, discoid, etc.) Structural and transport properties are quantified as a function of surface density and system composition. Results for radial distribution functions, hexagonal order parameters, and self-diffusion coefficients are reported. We sometimes find unexpected behavior. For example, self-diffusion coefficient maxima are observed in mixed systems. Implications of such observations on macroscopic observables (i.e., the stability of Pickering emulsions) are discussed. Acknowledgments: NSF

  19. Anomalous system-size dependence of electrolytic cells with an electrified oil-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westbroek, Marise; Boon, Niels; van Roij, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of the charge of the dielectric interface between two bulk liquids not only enables the adjustment of the interfacial tension but also controls the storage capacity of ions in the ionic double layers adjacent to each side of the interface. However, adjusting this interfacial charge by s

  20. Anomalous system-size dependence of electrolytic cells with an electrified oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbroek, Marise; Boon, Niels; van Roij, René

    2015-10-14

    Manipulation of the charge of the dielectric interface between two bulk liquids not only enables the adjustment of the interfacial tension but also controls the storage capacity of ions in the ionic double layers adjacent to each side of the interface. However, adjusting this interfacial charge by static external electric fields is difficult since the external electric fields are readily screened by ionic double layers that form in the vicinity of the external electrodes. This leaves the liquid-liquid interface, which is at a macroscopic distance from the electrodes, unaffected. In this study we show theoretically, in agreement with recent experiments, that control over this surface charge at the liquid-liquid interface is nonetheless possible for macroscopically large but finite closed systems in equilibrium, even when the distance between the electrode and interface is orders of magnitude larger than the Debye screening lengths of the two liquids. We identify a crossover system-size below which the interface and the electrodes are effectively coupled. Our calculations of the interfacial tension for various electrode potentials are in good agreement with recent experimental data.

  1. Urban water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, M. O.; Hinkelmann, R.; Nützmann, G.; Jekel, M.; Singer, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nehls, T.; Barjenbruch, M.

    2014-06-01

    Urban water systems consist of large-scale technical systems and both natural and man-made water bodies. The technical systems are essential components of urban infrastructure for water collection, treatment, storage and distribution, as well as for wastewater and runoff collection and subsequent treatment. Urban aquatic ecosystems are typically subject to strong human influences, which impair the quality of surface and ground waters, often with far-reaching impacts on downstream aquatic ecosystems and water users. The various surface and subsurface water bodies in urban environments can be viewed as interconnected compartments that are also extensively intertwined with a range of technical compartments of the urban water system. As a result, urban water systems are characterized by fluxes of water, solutes, gases and energy between contrasting compartments of a technical, natural or hybrid nature. Referred to as urban water interfaces, boundaries between and within these compartments are often specific to urban water systems. Urban water interfaces are generally characterized by steep physical and biogeochemical gradients, which promote high reaction rates. We hypothesize that they act as key sites of processes and fluxes with notable effects on overall system behaviour. By their very nature, urban water interfaces are heterogeneous and dynamic. Therefore, they increase spatial heterogeneity in urban areas and are also expected to contribute notably to the temporal dynamics of urban water systems, which often involve non-linear interactions and feedback mechanisms. Processes at and fluxes across urban water interfaces are complex and less well understood than within well-defined, homogeneous compartments, requiring both empirical investigations and new modelling approaches at both the process and system level. We advocate an integrative conceptual framework of the urban water system that considers interfaces as a key component to improve our fundamental

  2. Adsorption at air-water and oil-water interfaces and self-assembly in aqueous solution of ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun X; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Webster, John R P; Terry, Ann E

    2015-03-17

    The Tween nonionic surfactants are ethoxylated sorbitan esters, which have 20 ethylene oxide groups attached to the sorbitan headgroup and a single alkyl chain, lauryl, palmityl, stearyl, or oleyl. They are an important class of surfactants that are extensively used in emulsion and foam stabilization and in applications associated with foods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. A range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants, with differing degrees of ethoxylation from 3 to 50 ethylene oxide groups, have been synthesized and characterized by neutron reflection, small-angle neutron scattering, and surface tension. In conjunction with different alkyl chain groups, this provides the opportunity to modify their surface properties, their self-assembly in solution, and their interaction with macromolecules, such as proteins. Adsorption at the air-water and oil-water interfaces and solution self-assembly of the range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants synthesized are presented and discussed.

  3. PREFACE: Water at interfaces Water at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, P.; Rovere, M.

    2010-07-01

    This special issue is devoted to illustrating important aspects and significant results in the field of modeling and simulation of water at interfaces with solutes or with confining substrates, focusing on a range of temperatures from ambient to supercooled. Understanding the behavior of water, in contact with different substrates and/or in solutions, is of pivotal importance for a wide range of applications in physics, chemistry and biochemistry. Simulations of confined and/or interfacial water are also relevant for testing how different its behavior is with respect to bulk water. Simulations and modeling in this field are of particular importance when studying supercooled regions where water shows anomalous properties. These considerations motivated the organization of a workshop at CECAM in the summer of 2009 which aimed to bring together scientists working with computer simulations on the properties of water in various environments with different methodologies. In this special issue, we collected a variety of interesting contributions from some of the speakers of the workshop. We have roughly classified the contributions into four groups. The papers of the first group address the properties of interfacial and confined water upon supercooling in an effort to understand the relation with anomalous behavior of supercooled bulk water. The second group deals with the specific problem of solvation. The next group deals with water in different environments by considering problems of great importance in technological and biological applications. Finally, the last group deals with quantum mechanical calculations related to the role of water in chemical processes. The first group of papers is introduced by the general paper of Stanley et al. The authors discuss recent progress in understanding the anomalies of water in bulk, nanoconfined, and biological environments. They present evidence that liquid water may display 'polymorphism', a property that can be present in

  4. In Situ Assembly of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Nanoparticles at Oil-Water Interfaces as a Versatile Strategy To Form Stable Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Amitesh; John, Vijay T; Bose, Arijit

    2015-09-30

    We report a conceptually new strategy for forming particle-stabilized emulsions. We begin with stable, dilute suspensions of highly hydrophilic nanoparticles in water and hydrophobic nanoparticles in oil. When the two suspensions are mixed, attractive interactions between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic particles cause them to assemble at the oil-water interfaces into partially wettable or Janus-like clusters that effectively stabilize emulsions. By tuning the ratio of hydrophilic to hydrophobic particles in the clusters, both water-in-oil as well as oil-in-water emulsions can be formed. The van der Waals interaction energy between two particle types across an aqueous-organic interface provide a systematic guide to particle and liquid combinations that can form stable emulsions using our strategy, or identify when emulsions will not form. Our experiments and analysis provide a new platform for the formation of particle-stabilized emulsions and can be used to combine particles of different functionalities at emulsion droplet surfaces for generating novel materials.

  5. Adsorption kinetics of 3-alkoxy-2-hydroxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride at oil-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xi-lian; Wang, Xiu-hong; Liu, Jie; Sun, De-zhi; Yin, Bao-lin; Wang, Xiu-jie

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic interfacial tension (DIT) between aqueous solution of 3-alkoxy-2-hydroxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (RnHTAC) and n-octane was measured using spinning drop method. The effects of RnHTAC concentration (the concentration below the CMC) and temperature on DIT have been investigated. The cause of the change of DIT with time has been discussed. The effective diffusion coefficient, Da, and the adsorption barrier, ɛa, have been obtained with extended Word-Tordai equation. The results show that the higher the concentration of the surfactant is, the smaller the DIT will be and the lower the curve of the DIT, and the aqueous RnHTAC solutions follow a mixed diffusion-activation adsorption mechanism. With increase of RnHTAC concentration in the bulk solution, Da decreases and ɛa increases. Da of aqueous R14HTAC solution decreases from 0.090 × 10-13 m2 s-1 to 0.081 × 10-13 m2 s-1 and ɛa increases from 10.12 kJ mol-1 to 11.89 kJ mol-1, with the temperature increasing from 30 °C to 50 °C. This phenomenon indicates that the diffusion tendency becomes weak with the strengthening of the interaction between the surfactant molecules and that the thermo-motion of molecules benefits interface adsorption.

  6. Compression/expansion rheology of oil/water interfaces with adsorbed proteins. Comparison with the air/water surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjamins, J.; Lyklema, J.; Lucassen-Reynders, E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic interfacial tensions and surface dilational moduli were measured for four proteins at three fluid interfaces, as a function of time and concentration. The proteins-ß-casein, ß-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, and ovalbumin - were adsorbed from aqueous solution against air, n-tetradecane,

  7. Compression/expansion rheology of oil/water interfaces with adsorbed proteins. Comparison with the air/water surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjamins, J.; Lyklema, J.; Lucassen-Reynders, E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic interfacial tensions and surface dilational moduli were measured for four proteins at three fluid interfaces, as a function of time and concentration. The proteins-ß-casein, ß-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, and ovalbumin - were adsorbed from aqueous solution against air, n-tetradecane,

  8. Predicting the pKa and stability of organic acids and bases at an oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, M P; Olsson, M H M; Stipp, S L S

    2014-06-10

    We have used density functional theory and the implicit solvent model, COSMO-RS, to investigate how the acidity constant, pKa, of organic acids and bases adsorbed at the organic compound-aqueous solution interface changes, compared to its value in the aqueous phase. The pKa determine the surface charge density of the molecules that accumulate at the fluid-fluid interface. We have estimated the pKa by comparing the stability of the protonated and unprotonated forms of a series of molecules in the bulk aqueous solution and at an interface where parts of each molecule reside in the hydrophobic phase and the rest remains in the hydrophilic phase. We found that the pKa for acids is shifted by ∼1 pH unit to higher values compared to the bulk water pKa, whereas they are shifted to lower values by a similar amount for bases. Because this pKa shift is similar in magnitude for each of the molecules studied, we propose that the pKa for molecules at a water-organic compound interface can easily be predicted by adding a small shift to the aqueous pKa. This shift is general and correlates with the functional group. We also found that the relative composition of molecules at the fluid-fluid interface is not the same as in the bulk. For example, species such as carboxylic acids are enriched at the interface, where they can dominate surface properties, even when they are a modest component in the bulk fluid. For high surface concentrations of carboxylic acid groups at an interface, such as a self-assembled monolayer, we have demonstrated that the pKa depends on the degree of deprotonation through direct hydrogen bonding between protonated and deprotonated acidic headgroups.

  9. Bubble bursting as an aerosol generation mechanism during an oil spill in the deep-sea environment: molecular dynamics simulations of oil alkanes and dispersants in atmospheric air/salt water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Zhang, Zenghui; Ehrenhauser, Franz S; Avij, Paria; Valsaraj, Kalliat T; Hung, Francisco R

    2014-01-01

    Potential of mean force (PMF) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the properties of oil n-alkanes [i.e., n-pentadecane (C15), n-icosane (C20) and n-triacontane (C30)], as well as several surfactant species [i.e., the standard anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and three model dispersants similar to the Tween and Span species present in Corexit 9500A] at air/salt water interfaces. This study was motivated by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, and our simulation results show that, from the thermodynamic point of view, the n-alkanes and the model dispersants have a strong preference to remain at the air/salt water interface, as indicated by the presence of deep free energy minima at these interfaces. The free energy minimum of these n-alkanes becomes deeper as their chain length increases, and as the concentration of surfactant species at the interface increases. The n-alkanes tend to adopt a flat orientation and form aggregates at the bare air/salt water interface. When this interface is coated with surfactants, the n-alkanes tend to adopt more tilted orientations with respect to the vector normal to the interface. These simulation results are consistent with the experimental findings reported in the accompanying paper [Ehrenhauser et al., Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts 2013, in press, (DOI: 10.1039/c3em00390f)]. The fact that these long-chain n-alkanes show a strong thermodynamic preference to remain at the air/salt water interfaces, especially if these interfaces are coated with surfactants, makes these species very likely to adsorb at the surface of bubbles or droplets and be ejected to the atmosphere by sea surface processes such as whitecaps (breaking waves) and bubble bursting. Finally, the experimental finding that more oil hydrocarbons are ejected when Corexit 9500A is present in the system is consistent with the deeper free energy minima observed for the n-alkanes at the air/salt water

  10. A coarse-grain molecular dynamics study of oil-water interfaces in the presence of silica nanoparticles and nonionic surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Parul; Singh, Jayant K.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we have studied the effect of hydrophilic silica nanoparticles (NPs), in the presence of nonionic surfactants (Triethylene glycol monododecyl ether and Tween 20), on the oil-water (n-octane-water, n-dodecane-water and n-hexadecane-water) interfacial tensions (IFTs) at 300 K, using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations based on the MARTINI force field. Simulation results indicate that silica NPs solely do not affect the IFT. However, the silica NPs may or may not increase the IFT of oil-water containing nonionic surfactant, depending on the tendency of the surfactant to adsorb on the surface of NPs. The adsorption occurs due to the formation of hydrogen bonds, and adsorption increases with a decrease in pH, as seen in experimental studies. In this work, we found that the oil-water IFT increases with an increasing amount of adsorption of the surfactant on NPs. At a fixed amount of adsorption of the surfactant on NPs, the IFT behavior is indifferent to the change in concentration of NPs. However, the IFT decreases with an increase in surfactant concentration. We present a detailed analysis of the density profile and intrinsic width of the interface. The IFT behavior is found to correlate extremely well with the intrinsic width of the interface. The current study provides an explanation for the increase in IFT observed in a recent experiment [N. R. Biswal et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 7265-7274 (2016)] for various types of NPs and nonionic surfactant systems.

  11. One-pot system for synthesis, assembly, and display of functional single-span membrane proteins on oil-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunker, Peter J; Asahara, Haruichi; Hung, Kuo-Chan; Landry, Corey; Arriaga, Laura R; Akartuna, Ilke; Heyman, John; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David A

    2016-01-19

    Single-span membrane proteins (ssMPs) represent approximately one-half of all membrane proteins and play important roles in cellular communications. However, like all membrane proteins, ssMPs are prone to misfolding and aggregation because of the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices, making them difficult to study using common aqueous solution-based approaches. Detergents and membrane mimetics can solubilize membrane proteins but do not always result in proper folding and functionality. Here, we use cell-free protein synthesis in the presence of oil drops to create a one-pot system for the synthesis, assembly, and display of functional ssMPs. Our studies suggest that oil drops prevent aggregation of some in vitro-synthesized ssMPs by allowing these ssMPs to localize on oil surfaces. We speculate that oil drops may provide a hydrophobic interior for cotranslational insertion of the transmembrane helices and a fluidic surface for proper assembly and display of the ectodomains. These functionalized oil drop surfaces could mimic cell surfaces and allow ssMPs to interact with cell surface receptors under an environment closest to cell-cell communication. Using this approach, we showed that apoptosis-inducing human transmembrane proteins, FasL and TRAIL, synthesized and displayed on oil drops induce apoptosis of cultured tumor cells. In addition, we take advantage of hydrophobic interactions of transmembrane helices to manipulate the assembly of ssMPs and create artificial clusters on oil drop surfaces. Thus, by coupling protein synthesis with self-assembly at the water-oil interface, we create a platform that can use recombinant ssMPs to communicate with cells.

  12. Thermoresponsive Melamine Sponges with Switchable Wettability by Interface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization for Oil/Water Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhiwen; Zhang, Guangzhao; Deng, Yonghong; Wang, Chaoyang

    2017-03-15

    Here we have obtained a temperature responsive melamine sponge with a controllable wettability between superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity by grafting the octadecyltrichlorosilane and thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) onto the surface of melamine sponge skeletons. The whole process included the silanization in which step the rough surface with low surface energy and the NH2 were provided, and the atom transfer radical polymerization which ensured the successful grafting of PNIPAAm onto the skeleton's surface. The product exhibits a good reversible switch between superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity by changing the temperature below or above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST, about 32 °C) of PNIPAAm, and the modified sponge still retains a good responsiveness after undergoing two temperature switches for 20 cycles. Simultaneously, the functionalized sponges could be used to absorb the oil under water at 37 °C, and they released the absorbed oil in various ways under water at 20 °C, showing wide potential applications including oil/water separation.

  13. Research and Application of Automatic Monitoring Technology for Oil-water Interface%油水界面自动监测技术研究与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李高峰; 付石; 何帆; 陈超生

    2012-01-01

    Crude oil settlement dehydration tank layered aquifer monitoring technology has been a technical problems of research in the field of tank water content monitoring at home and abroad. In this paper,aiming at the problems we has been developed a measure of the entire tank layers water content of the oil-water interface automatically monitor,and measure on each moisture content value with the level of the corresponding relations,the settlement dehydration tank reservoir simultaneous detection of the water layer and the emulsion layer,and be able to calculate a full tank of oil content and moisture content,to achieve its automation remote control.%原油沉降脱水罐分层含水监测技术一直是国内外油罐含水监测领域研完的一项技术难题.文中针对此项难点,研制开发出了一种能测量出整个油罐各层含水的油水界面自动监测仪,同时能测量出每层位含水值跟液位的对应关系,实现对沉降脱水罐油层、水层及乳化层同时检测,并且能计算出全罐含油和含水量,实现其自动化远程控制.

  14. Adsorption of Speckled Sugar bean protein isolate at oil-water interface: Effect of ionic strength and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Nazanin Fatemeh; Koocheki, Arash; Varidi, Mehdi; Kadkhodaee, Rassoul

    2017-02-01

    Speckled Sugar bean protein (0-4%) was used to stabilize sunflower oil in water emulsion (30% oil). To investigate the effect of other components on emulsion properties different salt concentrations (0-0.5M) and pH (3-7) were used. For this purpose, zeta potential, oil droplet size, adsorbed protein, non-adsorbed protein, viscosity, emulsifying capacity, emulsion stability and creaming rate were evaluated. Results showed that protein concentration was the most effective variable affected emulsions characteristics followed by protein-pH interaction as the second effective term. Salt somehow influenced emulsion properties but it had no negative effect on emulsifying capacity, emulsion stability or creaming rate. FTIR spectroscopy revealed that protein fractions with higher sheet secondary structure had better adsorption on oil droplets; while, fractions with helix subunit as the predominant secondary structure had the lowest adsorption capacity. At the end, emulsion properties were optimized based on the different independent and dependent variables. Results confirmed that Speckled Sugar bean protein was resistant to aggregation at high ionic strength. As a result, this protein could perform well as an emulsifier at different pH values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Gelation of a monoclonal antibody at the silicone oil-water interface and subsequent rupture of the interfacial gel results in aggregation and particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shyam B; Lewus, Rachael; Bee, Jared S; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2015-04-01

    The formation of viscoelastic gels by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) at the silicone oil-water interface was studied using interfacial shear rheology. At a concentration of 50 μg/mL, the mAb formed gels in less than 1 h, and the gelation time decreased with increasing protein concentration. To probe the effects of mechanical rupture of the interfacial gel layers, a layer of silicone oil was overlaid on the surface of aqueous solutions of mAb, and the interface was ruptured periodically with a needle. Rupture of the interfacial gel resulted in formation of subvisible particles and substantial losses of mAb monomer, which were detected by microflow imaging and quantified by size-exclusion chromatography, respectively. Resonance mass measurement showed that levels of both protein particles and silicone oil droplets increased as the gel was repeatedly ruptured with a needle. In contrast, in samples wherein the interfacial gels were not ruptured, much lower levels of aggregates and particles were detected. Addition of nonionic surfactants (polysorbate 20 or polysorbate 80) protected against aggregation and protein particle formation, with increased protection seen with increasing surfactant levels, and with the greatest inhibition observed in samples containing polysorbate 80.

  16. Diffusion of Acetic Acid Across Oil/Water Interface in Emulsification-Internal Gelation Process for Preparation of Alginate Gel Beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiu-dong; YU Wei-ting; LIN Jun-zhang; MA Xiao-jun; YUAN Quan

    2007-01-01

    Alginate has been widely used in cell microencapsulation and drug delivery systems in the form of gel beads or microcapsules. Although an alternative novel emulsification-internal gelation technology has been established and both the properties and the potential applications of the beads in drug delivery systems have been studied, the mechanism has not been well understood compared with the traditional droplet method( external gelation technology). On the basis of our previous knowledge that the novel technology is composed of complicatedly consecutive processes with multistep diffusion and re action, and the diffusion of acetic acid across oil/water interface being the prerequisite that determines the occurrence and rate for the reactions and the structures and properties of final produced gel beads, a special emphasis was placed on the diffusion process. With the aid of diffusion modeling and simple experimental design, the diffusion rate constant and diffusion coefficient of acetic acid across oil/water interface were determined to be in the orders of magnitude of 10-6 and 10-16, respectively. This knowledge will be of particular importance in understanding and interpreting the formation, structure of the gel beads and the relationship between the structure and properties and guiding the preparation and quality control of the gel beads.

  17. Competitive adsorption between sugar beet pectin (SBP) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) at the oil/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyang; Al-Assaf, Saphwan; Fang, Yapeng; Phillips, Glyn O

    2013-01-16

    The emulsification performance, stability and competitive adsorption of two natural food emulsifiers, sugar beet pectin (SBP) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) have been investigated. Both can reduce the surface tension and emulsify oil in water. However, due to their different structure and conformation they operate via different mechanisms. Using 15% middle chain triglycerides (MCTs) oil, the amounts of SBP and HPMC adsorbed in emulsions made with these individually and in mixtures were determined. The interfacial concentration (Γ) for SBP stabilized emulsion was ∼1.25mg/m(2) and for HPMC 3.5mg/m(2). The higher adsorption of HPMC was due to multilayer adsorption, whereas SBP adsorbed as a monolayer. Competitive adsorption between SBP and HPMC was also investigated. When the HPMC concentration approached that of adsorbed SBP, the effect of HPMC became dominant and at 1.5wt.% controlled the behavior of the mixed emulsions, which were then almost independent of SBP. The minor role of SBP was mainly to decrease the proportion of large droplets in the emulsion. A model to describe the competitive adsorption between SBP and HPMC is proposed.

  18. 一种压差式油水界面仪的设计与应用%Design and Application of Pressure Differential Oil-Water Interface Equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永亮; 邱宏安; 尚娟

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops a new oil-water interface equipment based on the microchip MSC1210 and pressure differential transmitter. The pressure transmitter with high-precision was used for pressure measurement, and, it applies high precision A/D converter to data collection. To measure and display the height of the oil-water separate interface, relevant software is used to modify parameters. The whole process can indicate and control the discharge time. The application shows that this system runs stably and accurately under industry field environment. The system is practical and worthy of using abroad.%针对目前国内某些油田中油水分离的检测技术仍较为落后的现状,提出一种采用MSC1210单片机为核心的油水界面仪的设计;系统使用高精度的压力变送器进行压力侧量,通过MSC1210的高精度A/D转换器对数据进行采集,使用软件对现场参数进行修正,完成油田开采中对油水界面高度的侧量和显示,指示或控制排放废水或排放油品的时间;应用结果表明,该检测系统在工业现场环境下运行稳定,检测精度高,具有一定的实用和推广价值.

  19. Interface Condition for the Darcy Velocity at the Water-oil Flood Front in the Porous Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Xiaolong; Liang, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Flood front is the jump interface where fluids distribute discontinuously, whose interface condition is the theoretical basis of a mathematical model of the multiphase flow in porous medium. The conventional interface condition at the jump interface is expressed as the continuous Darcy velocity and fluid pressure (named CVCM ). Our study has inspected this conclusions. First, it is revealed that the principle of mass conservation has no direct relation to the velocity conservation, and the former is not the true foundation of the later, because the former only reflects the kinetic characteristic of the fluid particles at one position(the interface), but not the neighborhood of the interface which required by the later. Then the reasonableness of CVCM is queried from the following three aspects:(1)Using Mukat's two phase seepage equation and the mathematical method of apagoge, we have disproved the continuity of each fluid velocity;(2)Since the analytical solution of the equation of Buckley-Leveret equations i...

  20. Magnetic bead droplet immunoassay of oligomer amyloid β for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using micro-pillars to enhance the stability of the oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Kim, Moojong; Kang, Sung Min; Lim, Kun Taek; Kim, Tae Song; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2015-05-15

    Despite scientific progress in the study of Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is still challenging to develop a robust and sensitive methodology for the early diagnosis of AD due to the lack of a decisive biomarker in blood. Recent reports on the oligomer amyloid β (Aβ) as a biomarker demonstrated its possibility for identifying early onset of AD in patients, but its low concentration in blood requires highly reliable detection techniques. To overcome the low reliability and labor-intensive procedures of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we present a magnetic bead-droplet immunoassay platform for simple and highly sensitive detection of oligomer Aβ for the diagnosis of AD. This microchip consists of chambers that contain water-based reagents or oil for consecutive assay procedures, and there are arrays of micro-pillars fabricated between the two adjacent chambers to form robust water-oil interfaces. With the aid of these micro-pillars, magnetic beads can stably pass through each chamber by linearly actuating a magnet along the microchip. The robust water-oil interface and simple procedures of the assay make it possible to obtain reliable results from this microchip. The intensity of the fluorescence at the read-out chamber increased quantitatively and linearly, depending on the amount of serially-diluted standard Aβ solution. The results of the assay indicated that the limit of detection was about 10 pg/mL even though it was done with manual manipulation of the magnet. This platform simplified the complicated ELISA procedure and achieved high sensitivity that was no lower than that of the conventional magnetic bead immunoassay. The magnetic bead-droplet platform reduced the assay time to 45 min, and it also reduced the amount of antibody usage in a single diagnosis significantly (10-30 ng of antibody per single assay). Consequently, this microfluidic chip has strong potential as a feasible system for use in the diagnosis of AD with a fast and

  1. Polarity of the interface in ionic liquid in oil microemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar-Matalobos, María; García-Río, Luis; López-García, Susana; Rodríguez-Dafonte, Pedro

    2011-11-01

    Ionic liquid based microemulsions were characterized by absorption solvatochromic shifts, (1)H NMR and kinetic measurements in order to investigate the properties of the ionic liquid within the restricted geometry provided by microemulsions and the interactions of the ionic liquid with the interface. Experimental results show a significant difference between the interfaces of normal water and the new ionic liquid microemulsions. Absorption solvatochromic shift experiments and kinetic studies on the aminolysis of 4-nitrophenyl laurate by n-decylamine show that the polarity at the interface of the ionic liquid in oil microemulsions (IL/O) is higher than at the interface of water in oil microemulsions (W/O) despite the fact that the polarity of [bmim][BF(4)(-)] is lower than the polarity of water. (1)H NMR experiments showed that an increase in the ionic liquid content of the microemulsion led to an increase in the interaction between [bmim][BF(4)(-)] and TX-100. The reason for the higher polarity of the microemulsions with the ionic liquid can be explained in terms of the incorporation of higher levels of the ionic liquid at the interface of the microemulsions, as compared to water in the traditional systems.

  2. Creating biocompatible oil-water interfaces without synthesis: direct interactions between primary amines and carboxylated perfluorocarbon surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJournette, Cheryl J; Kim, Joonyul; Medlen, Haley; Li, Xiangpeng; Vincent, Luke J; Easley, Christopher J

    2013-11-05

    Currently, one of the most prominent methods used to impart biocompatibility to aqueous-in-oil droplets is to synthesize a triblock copolymer surfactant composed of perfluoropolyether and polyether blocks. The resulting surfactants (EA surfactant, KryJeffa, etc.) allow generation of highly biocompatible droplet surfaces while maintaining the heat stability of the starting material. However, production of these surfactants requires expertise in synthetic organic chemistry, creating a barrier to widespread adoption in the field. Herein, we describe a simple alternative to synthetic modification of surfactants to impart biocompatibility. We have observed that aqueous-in-oil droplet surfaces can be made biocompatible and heat stable by merely exploiting binding interactions between polyetherdiamine additives in the aqueous phase and carboxylated perfluorocarbon surfactants in the oil phase. Droplets formed under these conditions are shown to possess biocompatible surfaces capable of supporting picoliter-scale protein assays, droplet polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and droplet DNA amplification with isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). Droplets formed with polyetherdiamine aqueous additives are stable enough to withstand temperature cycling during PCR (30-40 cycles at 60-94 °C) while maintaining biocompatibility, and the reaction efficiency of RPA is shown to be similar to that with a covalently modified surfactant (KryJeffa). The binding interaction was confirmed with various methods, including FT-IR spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and fluorescence microscopy. Overall, our results suggest that, by simply introducing a commercially-available, polyetherdiamine additive (Jeffamine ED-900) to the aqueous phase, researchers can avoid synthetic methods in generating biocompatible droplet surfaces capable of supporting DNA and protein analysis at the subnanoliter scale.

  3. Effects of Interactions Among Surfactants,Water and Oil on Equilibrium Configuration of Surfactant-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Yin-quan; SUN Zhi-bo; XIE Yun; ZOU Xian-wu

    2004-01-01

    The distribution and configuration of surfactants at interface in surfactant-water-oil systems have been investigated using discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. There exists a certain equilibrium concentration of surfactants at interface for the systems with certain interactions among surfactant, water and oil. The interface length and equilibrium morphology of the systems are dependent on the equilibrium concentration of surfactants at interface and the total amount of surfactants. The interaction strengths among surfactant, water and oil determine the equilibrium concentration of surfactants at interface. Three typical configurations of surfactants at interface have been observed: ① surfactant molecules are perpendicular to the interface and arranged closely; ② perpendicular to the interface and arranged at interval of two particles; ③ lie down in the interface partly.

  4. Interfacial Polymerization of Dopamine in a Pickering Emulsion: Synthesis of Cross-Linkable Colloidosomes and Enzyme Immobilization at Oil/Water Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yanning; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-07-15

    Colloidosomes are promising carriers for immobilizing enzyme for catalytic purposes in aqueous/organic media. However, they often suffer from one or more problems regarding catalytic performance, stability, and recyclability. Here, we report a novel approach for the synthesis of cross-linkable colloidosomes by the selective polymerization of dopamine at oil/water interfaces in a Pickering emulsion. An efficient enzyme immobilization method was further developed by covalently bonding enzymes to the polydopamine (PDA) layer along with the formation of such colloidosomes with lipase as a model enzyme. In this enzyme system, the PDA layer served as a cross-linking layer and enzyme support for simultaneously enhancing the colloidosomes' stability and improving surface availability of the enzymes for catalytic reaction. It was found that the specific activity of lipases immobilized on the colloidosome shells was 8 and 1.4 times higher than that of free lipase and encapsulated lipase positioned in the aqueous cores of colloidosomes, respectively. Moreover, the immobilized lipases demonstrated excellent operational stability and recyclability, retaining 86.6% of enzyme activity after 15 cycles. It is therefore reasonable to expect that this novel approach for enzyme immobilization has great potential to serve as an important technique for the construction of biocatalytic systems.

  5. Ordering of solid microparticles at liquid crystal-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Hsin; Koenig, Gary M; de Pablo, Juan J; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2008-12-25

    We report a study of the organization of solid microparticles at oil-water interfaces, where the oil is a thermotropic liquid crystal (LC). The study was motivated by the proposition that microparticle organization and LC ordering would be coupled at these interfaces. Surfactant-functionalized polystyrene microparticles were spread at air-water interfaces at prescribed densities and then raised into contact with supported films of nematic 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). Whereas this method of sample preparation led to quantitative transfer of microparticles from the air-water interface to an isotropic oil-water interface, forces mediated by the nematic order of 5CB were observed to rapidly displace microparticles laterally across the interface of the water upon contact with nematic 5CB, thus leading to a 65% decrease in the density of microparticles at the LC-water interface. These lateral forces were determined to be caused by microparticle-induced deformation of the LC, the energy of which was estimated to be approximately 10(4) kT. We also observed microparticles transferred to the LC-water interface to assemble into chainlike structures that were not seen when using isotropic oils, indicating the presence of LC-mediated interparticle interactions at this interface. Optical textures of the LC in the vicinity of the microparticles were consistent with formation of topological defects with dipolar symmetry capable of promoting the chaining of the microparticles. The presence of microparticles at the interface also impacted the ordering of the LCs, including a transition from parallel to perpendicular ordering of the LC with increasing microparticle density. These observations, when combined, demonstrate that LC-mediated interactions can direct the assembly of solid microparticles at LC-water interfaces and that the ordering of the LC is also strongly coupled to the presence of microparticles.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Quan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  7. Preparation of liquid-core nanocapsules from poly[(ethylene oxide)-co-glycidol] with multiple hydrophobic linoleates at an oil-water interface and its encapsulation of pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yong; Wang, Guowei; Huang, Junlian

    2007-06-01

    A convenient approach is provided to prepare liquid-core nanocapsules by cross-linking an amphiphilic copolymer at an oil-water interface. The hydrophilic copolymer poly[(ethylene oxide)-co-glycidol] was prepared by anionic polymerization of ethylene oxide and ethoxyethyl glycidyl ether first, then the hydroxyl groups on the backbone were recovered after hydrolysis and partly modified by hydrophobic conjugated linoleic acid. The copolymer with multiple linoleate pendants was absorbed at an oil-water interface and then cross-linked to form stable nanocapsules. The mean diameter of the nanocapsule was below 350 nm, and the size distribution was relatively narrow (<0.2) at low concentrations of oil in acetone (<10 mg/mL). The particle size could be tuned easily by variation of the emulsification conditions. The nanocapsule was stable in water for at least 5 months, and the shell maintained its integrity after removal of the oily core by solvent. Pyrene was encapsulated in these nanocapsules, and a loading efficiency as high as 94% was measured by UV spectroscopy.

  8. The Behavior of Water at the Interface with Polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Selemon; Tsige, Mesfin

    2012-02-01

    Solid-aqueous interfaces are of great importance in many industrial applications ranging from oil recovery to biotechnology. The behavior of interfacial water differs drastically from that of the bulk liquid and strongly depends on the atomistic details of the surface itself. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used extensively to study the structure and dynamics of the interface between a polymeric thin film and water. Using a fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation, we have examined the structure and dynamics of water and atactic polystyrene (aPS) chains near the aPS-water interface. In this talk, we present results for the contact angle of water and the interfacial surface tension at the aPS-water interface.

  9. Predicting the pKa and stability of organic acids and bases at an oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Olsson, Mats Henrik Mikael; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    charge density of the molecules that accumulate at the fluid-fluid interface. We have estimated the pKa by comparing the stability of the protonated and unprotonated forms of a series of molecules in the bulk aqueous solution and at an interface where parts of each molecule reside in the hydrophobic...... phase and the rest remains in the hydrophilic phase. We found that the pKa for acids is shifted by ∼1 pH unit to higher values compared to the bulk water pKa, whereas they are shifted to lower values by a similar amount for bases. Because this pKa shift is similar in magnitude for each of the molecules...

  10. Multi-interface Level Sensors and New Development in Monitoring and Control of Oil Separators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuqiang Yang

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In the oil industry, huge saving may be made if suitable multi-interface levelmeasurement systems are employed for effectively monitoring crude oil separators andefficient control of their operation. A number of techniques, e.g. externally mounteddisplacers, differential pressure transmitters and capacitance rod devices, have beendeveloped to measure the separation process with gas, oil, water and other components.Because of the unavailability of suitable multi-interface level measurement systems, oilseparators are currently operated by the trial-and-error approach. In this paper someconventional techniques, which have been used for level measurement in industry, and newdevelopment are discussed.

  11. Characterization of Emulsions of Fish Oil and Water by Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    to the many double bonds. Emulsions of fish oil in water are potential candidates for a delivery system of fish oil to food products. It has been suggested that oxidation of oil-in-water emulsions is initiated at the interface between oil and water. It has also been proposed that oxidation is to some extent...... dependent on the ultra structure of the emulsion; including the size of oil droplets, their distribution and the thickness of the interface between oil and water. This interface is stabilized by macromolecules such as proteins, phospholipids and hydrocolloids. The main objective of this study...... is to characterize fish oil in water emulsions with respect to oil droplet size, distribution, and ultimately to view the structure and thickness of the interface layer. A freeze-fractured surface viewed at low temperatures under the scanning electron microscope is a promising strategy to reveal variations...

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of adsorption of an oil-water-surfactant mixture on calcite surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Guiwu; Zhang Xuefen; Shao Changjin; Yang Hong

    2009-01-01

    An interface super molecular structure model for oil-water-surfactant mixture and calcite was established. By using a molecular dynamics method, the effects of rhamnolipid, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate and sodium hexadecyl sulfonate on the interface adsorption behavior of oil molecules were investigated. It was found that these three surfactants could reduce oil-calcite interface binding energy, and play a role of oil-displacing agent.

  13. Effect of Substrate-Water Interaction on the Wetting Behavior in Water-Oil and Substrate-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yin-quan; Zou Xian-wu; Jin Zhun-zhi

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the substrate-water interaction on the wetting behavior in water-oil and surfactant-water-oil systems confined by one substrate which has the preferential interaction to one species of particles have been investigated by using the free energy analysis and discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. As the preferential interaction between the substrate and water particles varies from small repulsion to large attraction, the partial drying, partial wetting and complete wetting state are observed in sequence. In addition, the wetting behavior of surfactant aqueous solution on the substrate is not only dependent on the interaction, but also limited by the maximum equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface.

  14. Effect of Substrate-Water Interaction on the Wetting Behavior in Water-Oil and Substrate-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuanYin-quan; ZouXian-wu; JinZhun-zhi

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the substrate-water interaction on the wetting behavior in water-oil and surfactant-water-oil systerns confined by one substrate which has the preferential interaction to one species of particles have been investigated by using the free energy analysis and discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. As the preferential interaction between the substrate and water particles varies from small repulsion to large attraction, the partial drying, partial wetting and complete wetting state are observed in sequence. In addition, the wetting behavior of surfactant aqueous solution on the substrate is not only dependent on the interaction, but also limited by the maximum equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface.

  15. Zeta potential in oil-water-carbonate systems and its impact on oil recovery during controlled salinity water-flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew D.; Al-Mahrouqi, Dawoud; Vinogradov, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory experiments and field trials have shown that oil recovery from carbonate reservoirs can be increased by modifying the brine composition injected during recovery in a process termed controlled salinity water-flooding (CSW). However, CSW remains poorly understood and there is no method to predict the optimum CSW composition. This work demonstrates for the first time that improved oil recovery (IOR) during CSW is strongly correlated to changes in zeta potential at both the mineral-water and oil-water interfaces. We report experiments in which IOR during CSW occurs only when the change in brine composition induces a repulsive electrostatic force between the oil-brine and mineral-brine interfaces. The polarity of the zeta potential at both interfaces must be determined when designing the optimum CSW composition. A new experimental method is presented that allows this. Results also show for the first time that the zeta potential at the oil-water interface may be positive at conditions relevant to carbonate reservoirs. A key challenge for any model of CSW is to explain why IOR is not always observed. Here we suggest that failures using the conventional (dilution) approach to CSW may have been caused by a positively charged oil-water interface that had not been identified.

  16. Analytic model for the electrowetting properties of oil-water-solid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalli, Andrea; Bera, B.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2016-01-01

    The competitive wetting of oil and aqueous electrolytes on solid surfaces depends strongly on the surface charge of the solid-water and the water-oil interface. This charge density is generally not known a priori but changes as ions adsorb or desorb from or to the interfaces, depending on the

  17. Interaction Mechanism of Oil-in-Water Emulsions with Asphaltenes Determined Using Droplet Probe AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen; Zhang, Ling; Xie, Lei; Lu, Xi; Liu, Qingxia; Mantilla, Cesar A; van den Berg, Frans G A; Zeng, Hongbo

    2016-03-15

    Emulsions with interface-active components at the oil/water interface have long been of fundamental and practical interest in many fields. In this work, the interaction forces between two oil droplets in water in the absence/presence of asphaltenes were directly measured using droplet probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) and analyzed using a theoretical model based on Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effects of disjoining pressure. It was revealed that the interaction forces measured between two pristine oil droplets (i.e., toluene) could be well described by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, while an additional steric interaction should be included in the presence of asphaltenes in the oil. The surface interaction and the stability of oil droplets in aqueous solution were demonstrated to be significantly influenced by the asphaltenes concentration in oil, salt concentration, pH, and presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+)) in water. Adsorbed asphaltenes at the oil/water interface led to more negative surface potential of the oil/water interface and also induced steric repulsion between oil droplets, inhibiting the drop coalescence and stabilizing the oil-in-water emulsion. Lower pH of aqueous solution could lead to less negative surface potential and weaken the repulsion between oil droplets. Addition of divalent ions (Ca(2+)) was found to disrupt the protecting effects of adsorbed asphaltenes at oil/water interface and induce coalescence of oil droplets. Our results provide a useful methodology for quantifying the interaction forces and investigating the properties of asphaltenes at the oil/water interfaces and provide insights into the stabilization mechanism of oil-in-water emulsions due to asphaltenes in oil production and water treatment.

  18. Partition and water/oil adsorption of some surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmouri, Rawad; Zedde, Chantal; Routaboul, Corinne; Micheau, Jean-Claude; Pimienta, Véronique

    2008-10-02

    Adsorption isotherms have been determined at the water/oil interface for five biphasic systems involving surfactants (non-ionic and ionic) present in both phases at partition equilibrium. The systems studied were polyoxyethylene(23)lauryl ether (Brij35) in water/hexane and four ionic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and a series of three tetraalkylammonium dodecylsulfate (TEADS, TPADS, and TBADS) in water/CH 2Cl 2. Interfacial tension measurements performed at the water/air and water/oil interfaces provided all the necessary information for the determination of the adsorption parameters by taking partition into account. These measurements also allowed the comparison of the adsorption properties at both interfaces which showed an increase of the adsorption equilibrium constant and a decrease of the maximum surface concentration at the water/oil interface compared to water/air. The values of the critical aggregation concentration showed, in all cases, that only the surfactant dissolved in the aqueous phase contribute to the decrease of the water/oil interfacial tension. In the case of the four ionic surfactants, the critical aggregation concentration obtained in biphasic conditions were lowered because of the formation of mixed surfactant-CH 2Cl 2 aggregates.

  19. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  20. Naphthenic acids hydrates of gases: influence of the water/oil interface on the dispersing properties of an acidic crude oil; Acides naphteniques hydrates de gaz de l'interface eau/huile sur les proprietes dispersantes d'un brut acide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arla, D.

    2006-01-15

    Nowadays, the development of offshore oil production under increasing water depths (high pressures and low temperatures) has led oil companies to focus on gas hydrates risks. Hydrates are crystals containing gas and water molecules which can plug offshore pipelines. It has been shown that some asphaltenic crude oils stabilize water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) during several months and exhibit very good anti-agglomerant properties avoiding hydrate plugs formation. In this work, we have studied the 'anti-hydrate' properties of a West African acidic crude oil called crude AH. This oil contains naphthenic acids, RCOOH hydrocarbons which are sensitive to both the pH and the salinity of the water phase.The emulsifying properties of the crude AH have firstly been explored. It has been shown that heavy resins and asphaltenes are the main compounds of the crude AH responsible for the long term stability of the W/O emulsions whereas the napthenates RCOO{sup -} lead to less stable W/O emulsions. Dealing with hydrates, the crude AH exhibits moderate anti-agglomerant properties due to the presence of heavy resins and asphaltenes. However, the naphthenates RCOO{sup -} drastically increase the formation of hydrate plugs. Moreover, it has been pointed out that hydrate particles agglomeration accelerates the kinetics of hydrate formation and enhances the water/oil separation. In order to explain these behaviours, a mechanism of agglomeration by 'sticking' between a hydrate particle and a water droplet has been proposed. Finally, we have developed a model which describes the physico-chemical equilibria of the naphthenic acids in the binary system water/crude AH, in order to transpose the results obtained in the laboratory to the real oil field conditions. (author)

  1. Structural characterization of water-metal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryczko, Kevin; Tamblyn, Isaac

    2017-08-01

    We analyze and compare the structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water next to prototypical metals including Pt, graphite, and graphene. Our results are built on Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) generated using density functional theory (DFT) which explicitly include van der Waals (vdW) interactions within a first principles approach. All calculations reported use large simulation cells, allowing for an accurate treatment of the water-electrode interfaces. We have included vdW interactions through the use of the optB86b-vdW exchange correlation functional. Comparisons with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange correlation functional are also shown. We find an initial peak, due to chemisorption, in the density profile of the liquid water-Pt interface not seen in the liquid water-graphite interface, liquid water-graphene interface, nor interfaces studied previously. To further investigate this chemisorption peak, we also report differences in the electronic structure of single water molecules on both Pt and graphite surfaces. We find that a covalent bond forms between the single water molecule and the Pt surface but not between the single water molecule and the graphite surface. We also discuss the effects that defects and dopants in the graphite and graphene surfaces have on the structure and dynamics of liquid water.

  2. Concentrations of anesthetics across the water-membrane interface; the Meyer-Overton hypothesis revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; New, M. H.; Chipot, C.

    1998-01-01

    The free energies of transferring a variety of anesthetic and nonanesthetic compounds across water-oil and water-membrane interfaces were obtained using computer simulations. Anesthetics exhibit greatly enhanced concentrations at these interfaces, compared to nonanesthetics. The substitution of the interfacial solubilites of the anesthetics for their bulk lipid solubilities in the Meyer-Overton relation, was found to give a better correlation, indicating that the potency of an anesthetic is directly proportional to its solubility at the interface.

  3. Chemical physics of water-water interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, Mark; Erné, Ben H; Tromp, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    A brief review is given on recent progress in experimental and theoretical investigations of the interface between coexisting aqueous phases of biopolymers. The experimental aspects are introduced using results obtained from a model system consisting of aqueous mixtures of nongelling gelatin and dex

  4. Can Oil Float Completely Submerged in Water?

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Saurabh; Chatterjee, Souvick

    2013-01-01

    Droplet formation in a system of two or more immiscible fluids is a celebrated topic of research in the fluid mechanics community. In this work, we propose an innovative phenomenon where oil when injected drop-wise into a pool of water moves towards the air-water interface where it floats in a fully submerged condition. The configuration, however, is not stable and a slight perturbation to the system causes the droplet to burst and float in partially submerged condition. The droplet contour is analyzed using edge detection. Temporal variation of a characteristic length of the droplet is analyzed using MATLAB image processing. The constraint of small Bond Number established the assumption of lubrication regime in the thin gap. A brief theoretical formulation also showed the temporal variation of the gap thickness

  5. Chemical physics of water-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vis, Mark; Erné, Ben H; Tromp, Robert H

    2016-03-08

    A brief review is given on recent progress in experimental and theoretical investigations of the interface between coexisting aqueous phases of biopolymers. The experimental aspects are introduced using results obtained from a model system consisting of aqueous mixtures of nongelling gelatin and dextran. The focus is on the interfacial tension and interfacial electric potential (Donnan potential). These quantities are experimentally accessible and can be shown to be closely related.

  6. Heat transfer in protein-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lervik, Anders; Bresme, Fernando; Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick; Miguel Rubi, J

    2010-02-21

    We investigate using transient non-equilibrum molecular dynamics simulation the temperature relaxation process of three structurally different proteins in water, namely; myoglobin, green fluorescence protein (GFP) and two conformations of the Ca(2+)-ATPase protein. By modeling the temperature relaxation process using the solution of the heat diffusion equation we compute the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the proteins, as well as the thermal conductance of the protein-water interface. Our results indicate that the temperature relaxation of the protein can be described using a macroscopic approach. The protein-water interface has a thermal conductance of the order of 100-270 MW K(-1) m(-2), characteristic of water-hydrophilic interfaces. The thermal conductivity of the proteins is of the order of 0.1-0.2 W K(-1) m(-1) as compared with approximately 0.6 W K(-1) m(-1) for water, suggesting that these proteins can develop temperature gradients within the biomolecular structures that are larger than those of aqueous solutions. We find that the thermal diffusivity of the transmembrane protein, Ca(2+)-ATPase is about three times larger than that of myoglobin or GFP. Our simulation shows that the Kapitza length of these structurally different proteins is of the order of 1 nm, showing that the protein-water interface should play a major role in defining the thermal relaxation of biomolecules.

  7. A many-body dissipative particle dynamics study of forced water-oil displacement in capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Zhuang, Lin; Li, Xuefeng; Dong, Jinfeng; Lu, Juntao

    2012-01-17

    The forced water-oil displacement in capillary is a model that has important applications such as the groundwater remediation and the oil recovery. Whereas it is difficult for experimental studies to observe the displacement process in a capillary at nanoscale, the computational simulation is a unique approach in this regard. In the present work, the many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD) method is employed to simulate the process of water-oil displacement in capillary with external force applied by a piston. As the property of all interfaces involved in this system can be manipulated independently, the dynamic displacement process is studied systematically under various conditions of distinct wettability of water in capillary and miscibility between water and oil as well as of different external forces. By analyzing the dependence of the starting force on the properties of water/capillary and water/oil interfaces, we find that there exist two different modes of the water-oil displacement. In the case of stronger water-oil interaction, the water particles cannot displace those oil particles sticking to the capillary wall, leaving a low oil recovery efficiency. To minimize the residual oil content in capillary, enhancing the wettability of water and reducing the external force will be beneficial. This simulation study provides microscopic insights into the water-oil displacement process in capillary and guiding information for relevant applications.

  8. Combustion of Coal/Oil/Water Slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, R. O.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed test setup would measure combustion performance of new fuels by rapidly heating a droplet of coal/oil/water mixture and recording resulting explosion. Such mixtures are being considered as petroleum substitutes in oil-fired furnaces.

  9. Evolution of fluid-fluid interface in porous media as the model of gas-oil fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerasela-Iliana Calugaru

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a generalized model for describing deformations of the mobile interface separating two immiscible weakly compressible fluids in a weakly deformable porous medium. It describes a gravity non-equilibrium processes, including evolution of the gravitational instability and can be reduced in two cases. This paper deals with the first case in which elastic perturbations are propagating much slower than gravity perturbations. The obtained model has analytical solutions and is applied to simulate the behavior of oil-gas or water-oil interface in oil-gas reservoirs.

  10. Physical chemistry of colloids and interfaces in oil production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toulhoat, H.; Lecourtier, J. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    The field of colloid and interface science is nowadays the topic of numerous scientific meetings. For want of basic understanding, the problems to which engineer is faced in drilling and oil production operations do not find optimal solutions. Colloid and interface phenomena govern many such problems. Misunderstandings in oil field operations have enormous financial consequences ranging from delays in well drilling to poor evaluations of reserves and low recoveries. The need for advances in colloid and interface science applicable to production process development has been recognized for a long time by the oil industry, and most of its research centers support active programs for that purpose. These proceedings bring important new results on problems like the wettability of reservoir rocks, the relationships between structure and properties of complex drilling fluids, and the transport of colloidal particles and foams in porous media. These proceedings are subdivided into three parts: Interfacial phenomena, complex fluids and colloids in porous media. Five plenary lectures, 27 oral conferences and 36 poster communications have been presented.

  11. Asphaltene and solids-stabilized water-in-oil emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztukowski, Danuta M.

    Water-in-crude oil emulsions are a problem in crude oil production, transportation, and processing. Many of these emulsions are stabilized by asphaltenes and native oilfield solids adsorbed at the oil-water interface. Design of effective emulsion treatments is hampered because there is a lack of understanding of the role asphaltenes and solids play in stabilizing these emulsions. In this work, the structural, compositional and rheological properties of water/hydrocarbon interfaces were determined for model emulsions consisting of water, toluene, heptane, asphaltenes and native oilfield solids. The characteristics of the interface were related to the properties of asphaltenes and native solids. Emulsion stability was correlated to interfacial rheology. A combination of vapour pressure osmometry, interfacial tension and emulsion gravimetric studies indicated that asphaltenes initially adsorb at the interface as a monolayer of self-associated molecular aggregates. It was demonstrated why it is necessary to account for asphaltene self-association when interpreting interfacial measurements. The interfacial area of Athabasca asphaltenes was found to be approximately 1.5 nm2 and did not vary with concentration or asphaltene self-association. Hence, more self-associated asphaltenes simply formed a thicker monolayer. The interfacial monolayer observed in this work varied from 2 to 9 nm in thickness. The asphaltene monolayer was shown to adsorb reversibly only at short interface aging times. The film gradually reorganizes at the interface to form a rigid, irreversibly adsorbed network. The elastic and viscous moduli can be modeled using the Lucassen-van den Tempel (LVDT) model when the aging time is less than 10 minutes. An increase in film rigidity can be detected with an increase in the total elastic modulus. Increased film rigidity was shown to reduce the rate of coalescence in an emulsion and increase overall emulsion stability (reduce free water resolution). The rate of

  12. Modelling heterogeneous interfaces for solar water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Ping, Yuan; Galli, Giulia

    2017-04-01

    The generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight offers a promising approach for producing scalable and sustainable carbon-free energy. The key of a successful solar-to-fuel technology is the design of efficient, long-lasting and low-cost photoelectrochemical cells, which are responsible for absorbing sunlight and driving water splitting reactions. To this end, a detailed understanding and control of heterogeneous interfaces between photoabsorbers, electrolytes and catalysts present in photoelectrochemical cells is essential. Here we review recent progress and open challenges in predicting physicochemical properties of heterogeneous interfaces for solar water splitting applications using first-principles-based approaches, and highlights the key role of these calculations in interpreting increasingly complex experiments.

  13. Modelling heterogeneous interfaces for solar water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Ping, Yuan; Galli, Giulia

    2017-01-09

    The generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight others a promising approach for producing scalable and sustainable carbon-free energy. The key of a successful solar-to-fuel technology is the design of efficient, long-lasting and low-cost photoelectrochemical cells, which are responsible for absorbing sunlight and driving water splitting reactions. To this end, a detailed understanding and control of heterogeneous interfaces between photoabsorbers, electrolytes and catalysts present in photoelectrochemical cells is essential. Here we review recent progress and open challenges in predicting physicochemical properties of heterogeneous interfaces for solar water splitting applications using first-principles-based approaches, and highlights the key role of these calculations in interpreting increasingly complex experiments.

  14. Sequential adsorption of an irreversibly adsorbed nonionic surfactant and an anionic surfactant at an oil/aqueous interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Stephanie M; Anna, Shelley L; Walker, Lynn M

    2015-04-14

    Aerosol-OT (AOT) and Tween 80 are two of the main surfactants in commercial dispersants used in response to oil spills. Understanding how multicomponent surfactant systems interact at oil/aqueous interfaces is crucial for improving both dispersant design and application efficacy. This is true of many multicomponent formulations; a lack of understanding of competition for the oil/water interface hinders formulation optimization. In this study, we have characterized the sequential adsorption behavior of AOT on squalane/aqueous interfaces that have been precoated with Tween 80. A microtensiometer is used to measure the dynamic interfacial tension of the system. Tween 80 either partially or completely irreversibly adsorbs to squalane/aqueous interfaces when rinsed with deionized water. These Tween 80 coated interfaces are then exposed to AOT. AOT adsorption increases with AOT concentration for all Tween 80 coverages, and the resulting steady-state interfacial tension values are interpreted using a Langmuir isotherm model. In the presence of 0.5 M NaCl, AOT adsorption significantly increases due to counterion charge screening of the negatively charged head groups. The presence of Tween 80 on the interface inhibits AOT adsorption, reducing the maximum surface coverage as compared to a clean interface. Tween 80 persists on the interface even after exposure to high concentrations of AOT.

  15. Langmuir films of petroleum at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Vinícius C C; Severino, Divinomar; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Zaniquelli, Maria E D; Ramos, Ana Paula; Baptista, Maurício S

    2009-11-03

    Understanding the behavior of petroleum films at the air/water interface is crucial for dealing with oil slicks and reducing the damages to the environment, which has normally been attempted with studies of Langmuir films made of fractions of petroleum. However, the properties of films from whole petroleum samples may differ considerably from those of individual fractions. Using surface pressure and surface potential measurements and Brewster angle and fluorescence microscopy, we show that petroleum forms a nonhomogeneous Langmuir film at the air-water interface. The surface pressure isotherms for petroleum Langmuir films exhibit gas (G), liquid-expanded (LE), and liquid-condensed phases, with almost no hysteresis in the compression-decompression cycles. Domains formed upon compression from the G to the LE phase were accompanied by an increase in fluorescence intensity with excitation at 400-440 nm owing to an increase in the surface density of the chromophores in the petroleum film. The surface pressure and the fluorescence microscopy data pointed to self-assembling domains into a pseudophase in thermodynamic equilibrium with other less emitting petroleum components. This hypothesis was supported by Brewster angle microscopy images, whereby the appearance of water domains even at high surface pressures confirms the tendency of petroleum to stabilize emulsion systems. The results presented here suggest that, for understanding the interaction with water, it may be more appropriate to use the whole petroleum samples rather than its fractions.

  16. Interfacial properties of asphaltenes at toluene-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkar, Sharli; Pauchard, Vincent; Farooq, Umer; Couzis, Alexander; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2015-05-05

    Asphaltenes are "n-alkane insoluble" species in crude oil that stabilize water-in-oil emulsions. To understand asphaltene adsorption mechanisms at oil-water interfaces and coalescence blockage, we first studied the behavior in aliphatic oil-water systems in which asphaltenes are almost insoluble. They adsorbed as monomers, giving a unique master curve relating interfacial tension (IFT) to interfacial coverage through a Langmuir equation of state (EoS). The long-time surface coverage was independent of asphaltene bulk concentration and asymptotically approached the 2-D packing limit for polydisperse disks. On coalescence, the surface coverage exceeded the 2-D limit and the asphaltene film appeared to become solidlike, apparently undergoing a transition to a soft glassy material and blocking further coalescence. However, real systems consist of mixtures of aliphatic and aromatic components in which asphaltenes may be quite soluble. To understand solubility effects, we focus here on how the increased bulk solubility of asphaltenes affects their interfacial properties in comparison to aliphatic oil-water systems. Unlike the "almost irreversible" adsorption of asphaltenes where the asymptotic interfacial coverage was independent of the bulk concentration, an equilibrium surface pressure, dependent on bulk concentration, was obtained for toluene-water systems because of adsorption being balanced by desorption. The equilibrium surface coverage could be obtained from the short- and long-term Ward-Tordai approximations. The behavior of the equilibrium surface pressure with the equilibrium surface coverage was then derived. These data for various asphaltene concentrations were used to determine the EoS, which for toluene-water could also be fitted by the Langmuir EoS with Γ∞ = 3.3 molecule/nm(2), the same value as that found for these asphaltenes in aliphatic media. Asphaltene solubility in the bulk phase only appears to affect the adsorption isotherm but not the Eo

  17. Model description of dibenzothiophene mass transfer in oil/water dispersions with respect to biodesulfurization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, C.L.M.; Leeuwen, van M.; Polderman, H.G.; Janssen, A.J.H.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed in order to describe the mass transfer rate of dibenzothiophene within the oil droplet to the oil/water interface of droplets created in a stirred tank reactor. The mass transfer rate of dibenzothiophene was calculated for various complex hydrocarbon distillates an

  18. Excess chemical potential of small solutes across water--membrane and water--hexane interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The excess chemical potentials of five small, structurally related solutes, CH4, CH3F, CH2F2, CHF3, and CF4, across the water-glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer and water-hexane interfaces were calculated at 300, 310, and 340 K using the particle insertion method. The excess chemical potentials of nonpolar molecules (CH4 and CF4) decrease monotonically or nearly monotonically from water to a nonpolar phase. In contrast, for molecules that possess permanent dipole moments (CH3F, CH2F, and CHF3), the excess chemical potentials exhibit an interfacial minimum that arises from superposition of two monotonically and oppositely changing contributions: electrostatic and nonelectrostatic. The nonelectrostatic term, dominated by the reversible work of creating a cavity that accommodates the solute, decreases, whereas the electrostatic term increases across the interface from water to the membrane interior. In water, the dependence of this term on the dipole moment is accurately described by second order perturbation theory. To achieve the same accuracy at the interface, third order terms must also be included. In the interfacial region, the molecular structure of the solvent influences both the excess chemical potential and solute orientations. The excess chemical potential across the interface increases with temperature, but this effect is rather small. Our analysis indicates that a broad range of small, moderately polar molecules should be surface active at the water-membrane and water-oil interfaces. The biological and medical significance of this result, especially in relation to the mechanism of anesthetic action, is discussed.

  19. Adsorption layer properties of alkyltrimethylammonium bromides at interfaces between water and different alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucic, N; Kovalchuk, N M; Aksenenko, E V; Fainerman, V B; Miller, R

    2013-11-15

    We measured the interfacial tensions of aqueous solutions against different oil phases using drop profile analysis tensiometry (PAT-1, Sinterface Technologies, Germany) for decyl- and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C10TAB and C12TAB) in phosphate buffer (10 mM, pH7). The following alkanes were used as oil phases: hexane, heptane, octane, nonane, decane, dodecane and tetradecane. The obtained equilibrium interfacial tension isotherms were fitted by the Frumkin Ionic Compressibility model (FIC). The surfactants adsorb at the water/oil interface in competition with the oil molecules. At high surfactant surface coverage this competitive adsorption is manifested in two ways. First, for short chain surfactants, the oil molecules are embedded into the adsorption layer. Second, for long chain surfactants, the short alkane chains of the oil molecules are squeezed out from the adsorption layer due to strong mutual interaction between surfactants' chains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Liquid ordering at the Brushite-{010}-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsic, J.; Kaminski, D.M.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Vlieg, E.

    2004-01-01

    Using surface x-ray diffraction, we have determined the atomic structure of the {010} interface of brushite, CaHPO4.2(H2O), with water. Since this biomineral contains water layers as part of its crystal structure, special ordering properties at the interface are expected. We found that this interfac

  1. Dispersion of oil into water using lecithin-Tween 80 blends: The role of spontaneous emulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehm, David A; Rokke, David J; Paul, Prakash G; Lee, Han Seung; Vizanko, Brent S; McCormick, Alon V

    2017-02-01

    Lecithin-rich mixtures of the nontoxic surfactants lecithin and Tween 80 are effective marine oil spill dispersants, but produce much higher oil-water interfacial tension than other, comparably effective dispersants. This suggests interfacial phenomena other than interfacial tension influence lecithin-Tween 80 dispersants' effectiveness. The interface between seawater and dispersant-crude oil mixtures was studied using light microscopy, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, and droplet coalescence tests. Lecithin:Tween 80 ratio was varied from 100:0 to 0:100 and wt% dispersant in the oil was varied from 1.25 to 10wt%. Tween 80-rich dispersants cause oil-into-water spontaneous emulsification, while lecithin-rich dispersants primarily cause water-into-oil spontaneous emulsification. Possible mechanisms for this spontaneous emulsification are discussed, in light of images of spontaneously emulsifying interfaces showing no bursting microstructures, interfacial gel, or phase inversion, and negligible interfacial turbulence. Dispersant loss into seawater due to oil-into-water spontaneous emulsification may explain why Tween 80-rich dispersants are less effective than lecithin-rich dispersants with comparable interfacial tension, although longer droplet coalescence times observed for Tween 80-rich, self-emulsifying dispersant-oil mixtures may mitigate the effects of dispersant leaching. Conversely, surfactant retention in oil via lecithin-rich dispersants' water-into-oil emulsification may explain why lecithin-Tween 80 dispersants are as effective as dispersants containing other surfactant blends which produce lower interfacial tension.

  2. Emulsification technique affects oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard

    In oil-in-water emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface. The properties of the emulsifier used, and the structure at the interface is therefore expected to be of great importance for lipid oxidation in emulsions. Previous studies have shown that e...... of this study was to compare lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared by two different kinds of high pressure homogenizers i.e. a microfluidizer and a two valve high pressure homogenizer. Emulsions were made with equal droplet sizes, and with either 1% sodium caseinate or 1% whey protein.......g. homogenization pressure can affect how proteins locate themselves at the interface of an emulsion. The hypothesis is therefore that emulsions produced with different emulsification equipments differ in their oxidative stability due to differences in the behaviour of the proteins at the interface. The aim...

  3. Emulsification technique affects oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard

    In oil-in-water emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface. The properties of the emulsifier used, and the structure at the interface is therefore expected to be of great importance for lipid oxidation in emulsions. Previous studies have shown that e...... of this study was therefore to compare lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared by two different kinds of high pressure homogenizers i.e. a microfluidizer and a two valve high pressure homogenizer. Emulsions were made with equal droplet sizes, and with either 1% sodium caseinate or 1% whey.......g. homogenization pressure can affect how proteins locate themselves at the interface of an emulsion. The hypothesis is therefore that emulsions produced with different emulsification equipments differ in their oxidative stability due to differences in the behaviour of the proteins at the interface. The aim...

  4. Water management in the oil sands industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauls, R. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Water management issues at Alberta's 4 oil sand deposits were discussed. The 4 deposits include the Peace River, Athabasca, Wabasca and Cold Lake deposits, with the Athabasca deposit being the largest and the only surface-mineable deposit. Large quantities of water are needed to extract bitumen from oil sands. This paper addressed water volume withdrawal from the Athabasca River, the primary source of water for the surface-mining oil sands industry. It also addressed Muskeg River watershed integrity, quality of water withdrawn from reclaimed landscapes, groundwater contamination, and ecological viability of end-pit lakes. Currently, half of Syncrude's oil sand is transported from mine to extraction plant by conveyor belts. The other half is pipelined as a warm water slurry. By 2005, all transport will be by pipeline. The oil sand is mixed with hot water, steam and surfactants to condition it for extraction. Seventy-nine per cent of the water used by Syncrude is recycled water and the remainder comes from the Athabasca River. Syncrude diverts 2.5 to 3 barrels of water from the Athabasca River for every barrel of oil produced. This paper discussed the in-stream flow needs of the Athabasca River based on protection of aquatic ecosystems. Flow needs are addressed by the Cumulative Effects Management Association (CEMA). The paper states that the proportion of annual flow withdrawn from the Athabasca River is too low to have a significant impact on aquatic systems, but the main concern lies in water use during low flow periods, typically during the winter months. Developers will likely come under pressure to develop off-site reservoirs to store water for use during these low-flow periods. tabs., figs.

  5. A mass spectrometer with a membrane interface for oil concentration monitoring in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatskii, V. V.; Elokhin, V. A.; Nikolaev, V. I.; Ershov, T. D.; Elizarov, A. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    An immersion mass spectrometer with a membrane interface was used for oil detection and oil concentration measurements in seawater by measuring in situ the concentrations of three hydrocarbons: benzene, toluene, and xylene in the region of the specialized Primorsk oil loading seaport in the Gulf of Finland. The recorded mass spectra demonstrated the possibility of measuring the oil concentration in seawater and determining the grade of oil products. The use of a mass spectrometer with a membrane separator interface allows measurements of hydrocarbon concentration with high accuracy, which is currently not provided in commercially available monitors.

  6. Recent experimental advances on hydrophobic interactions at solid/water and fluid/water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hongbo; Shi, Chen; Huang, Jun; Li, Lin; Liu, Guangyi; Zhong, Hong

    2015-03-15

    Hydrophobic effects play important roles in a wide range of natural phenomena and engineering processes such as coalescence of oil droplets in water, air flotation of mineral particles, and folding and assembly of proteins and biomembranes. In this work, the authors highlight recent experimental attempts to reveal the physical origin of hydrophobic effects by directly quantifying the hydrophobic interaction on both solid/water and fluid/water interfaces using state-of-art nanomechanical techniques such as surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For solid hydrophobic surfaces of different hydrophobicity, the range of hydrophobic interaction was reported to vary from ∼10 to >100 nm. With various characterization techniques, the very long-ranged attraction (>100 nm) has been demonstrated to be mainly attributed to nonhydrophobic interaction mechanisms such as pre-existing nanobubbles and molecular rearrangement. By ruling out these factors, intrinsic hydrophobic interaction was measured to follow an exponential law with decay length of 1-2 nm with effective range less than 20 nm. On the other hand, hydrophobic interaction measured at fluid interfaces using AFM droplet/bubble probe technique was found to decay with a much shorter length of ∼0.3 nm. This discrepancy of measured decay lengths is proposed to be attributed to inherent physical distinction between solid and fluid interfaces, which impacts the structure of interface-adjacent water molecules. Direct measurement of hydrophobic interaction on a broader range of interfaces and characterization of interfacial water molecular structure using spectroscopic techniques are anticipated to help unravel the origin of this rigidity-related mismatch of hydrophobic interaction and hold promise to uncover the physical nature of hydrophobic effects. With improved understanding of hydrophobic interaction, intrinsic interaction mechanisms of many biological and chemical pathways can be better

  7. Oil sands mining water use and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Long, D.; Fitch, M. [Golder Associates Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    There are currently 4 bitumen mining operations operating along the Athabasca River in northern Alberta. This paper presented details of the water licences, historical water use, present water use, and future plans for water management in relation to oil sands mining operations. The study was based on work currently conducted for the Oil Sands Developers Group (OSDG) and Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), as well as on mine site water balance analyses for proposed mines in the region. Typical mine site water balances were discussed, and water use rates for the mining operations were reviewed. The new Athabasca River water management framework may require that mines provide additional water storage or delayed reclamation of mine areas in order to offset water losses during winter low-flow periods. New regulations may also reduce the requirement for make-up water. The study also noted that release criteria are still being developed for on-site water within closed-loop mine operations. The oil sands industry will need to balance various factors related to water use in the future. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  8. "Phantom ion effect" and the contact potential of the water-vapor interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Yan

    2008-09-28

    The contact (junction) potential between water-vapor and water-oil interfaces is studied theoretically. Unlike the previous studies, we show that ionic contribution to the contact potential vanishes when the concentration of aqueous electrolyte goes to zero. The incorrect prediction of a large ionic contribution to the junction potential in the infinite dilution limit, obtained in the earlier studies, is traced back to the inappropriate use of the grand-canonical ensemble for strongly inhomogeneous Coulomb systems. It is shown that for these systems, the thermodynamic limit is not reached even when the number of particles is astronomically large, on the order of 10(24). There is, therefore, no equivalence between statistical ensembles. For realistic, finite size systems, canonical calculation predicts a vanishing ionic contribution to the junction potentials of water-vapor and water-oil interfaces even for very concentrated electrolyte solutions.

  9. Characterization of water-in-crude oil emulsions in oil spill response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The formation of water-in-crude oil emulsions occurs when crude oils are spilled into sea. The water-in-crude oil emulsionssignificantly change the properties of the spilled crude oils and in turn influence the choices made relating to oil spill countermeasures. Thewater-in-crude oil emulsions were characterized using various techniques in this study. The environmental scanning electron microscopyobservation of water droplets in the emulsions is also presented. It is a powerful tool in emulsion observations.

  10. Viscosity of oil and water mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, A.E.; Hall, A.R.W. [National Engineering Laboratory, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    A study was performed to investigate the apparent viscosity of oil and water mixtures using the pressure loss along a horizontal pipe. Water fractions between 100% to 5% were examined at three flow velocities and three temperatures. Four combinations of crude oil and saline solution were used. Tests found that the mixture viscosity exhibited a peak at the position of phase inversion. The value of this maximum viscosity depended upon the temperature and fluid combination used, but not the velocity. Physical properties of the fluids were important factors in the viscosity/water fraction behaviour. (author)

  11. Numerical Study of Water Control with Downhole Oil-Water Separation Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Khor Yin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The maturing oil fields with increasing water production can pose a challenging produced water handling and disposal issues. This paper presents a numerical study of a motorless hydrocyclone to enhance understanding of the downhole oil-water separation. The turbulence of fluid flow is obtained using K-ε Realizable Turbulence model for complex swirl dominated flow, while the interface between hydrocarbon and water is described using the Discrete Phase model. In this approach, factors which contribute to the hydrocyclone separation instability were discussed. Discussion is then extended to the relationship of residence time with pressure difference between overflow and underflow. These pressure differences are able to relate to pressure condition for high water cut well which require downhole separation.

  12. Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, S. N.; Gordon, B. P.; McWilliams, L.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that aqueous-phase processing of atmospheric α-dicarbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal (MG) could constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected due to the fact that its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form diols, as well as the fact that MG can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active but an improved description of its surface behaviour is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation, in addition to understanding its gas-to-particle partitioning and cloud forming potential. Here, we employ a combined experimental and theoretical approach involving vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFS), surface tensiometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations to study MG's surface adsorption, in both the presence and absence of salts. We are particularly interested in determining MG's hydration state at the surface. Our experimental results indicate that MG slowly adsorbs to the air-water interface and strongly perturbs the water structure there. This perturbation is enhanced in the presence of NaCl. Together our experimental and theoretical results suggest that singly-hydrated MG is the dominant form of MG at the surface.

  13. The calming effect of oil on water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozi, Peter; Cordray, Kimberly; Griffin, William; Behroozi, Feredoon

    2007-05-01

    The calming effect of oil on water has been known since ancient times. Benjamin Franklin was the first to investigate the effect, but the underlying mechanism for this striking phenomenon remains elusive. We used a miniature laser interferometer to measure the amplitude of surface waves to a resolution of ±5nm, making it possible to determine the effect of an oil monolayer on the attenuation of capillary waves and the surface dilational modulus of the monolayer. We present attenuation data on pure water, water covered by olive oil, water covered by a fatty acid, and a water-acetone mixture for comparison. From the attenuation data at frequencies between 251 and 551Hz, we conclude that the calming effect of oil on surface waves is principally due to the dissipation of wave energy caused by the Gibbs surface elasticity of the monolayer, with only a secondary contribution from the reduction in surface tension. Our data also indicate that the surface-dilational viscosity of the oil monolayer is negligible and plays an insignificant role in calming the waves.

  14. Emulsifier for water-in-oil emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weete, J.D.; Griffith, G.L.

    1990-07-24

    This patent describes a water-in-oil emulsion. It comprises: a continuous oil phase, a discontinuous aqueous phase, and an emulsion stabilizing amount of a thermally altered lecithin composition which has been prepare by heating lecithin at a temperature in the range of from about 100{degrees}C, to about 250{degrees}C, for a period of time ranging from about 15 to about 480 minutes.

  15. Natural attenuation of organic contaminants at the interface between groundwater and surface water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middeldorp, P.; Staps, S.; Rijnaarts, H. [TNO-MEP Environment, Energy and Process Innovation, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Roelofsen, F.; Valstar, J. [TNO-NITG, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Smits, J. [WL/Delf Hydraulics (Netherlands)

    2003-07-01

    There are strong indications that the interface between groundwater and surface water plays an important role in the natural degradation of organic contaminants (NA-interface). This is especially the case for mobile contaminants that are relatively persistent in an anaerobic (subsurface) environment, and are mineralised relatively easy under more oxidized environmental conditions (e.g. benzene, chlorobenzene, vinyl chloride, the light aliphatic fraction of mineral oil, etc.). These compounds are often also present as degradation products of natural or stimulated in situ biodegradation processes. Previous investigations have indicated indirectly that NA-interface processes contribute to a reduction of contaminant flux into surface water systems. Until now, no straightforward assessment and quantification of NA-interface has been performed. Moreover, limit values for allowable influx of contamination from a site into a surface water system do not exist. This prevents a possible beneficial use of NA-interface processes as a part of a cost-effective and integrated soil and water quality management. This project aims to gain more understanding of the occurrence of NA-interface processes, to quantify their contribution to emission reduction towards the surface water system and, in case of substantial contribution, to promote application of NA-interface as a part of a cost-effective integrated environmental management of contaminated sites and surrounding water bodies. The project's starting point is that the surface water is regarded as an object of risk and not as a reactor. Thus, effective degradation in the interface does not move environmental problems to surface water systems, but eliminates contaminants by natural occurring processes, thus protecting the aquatic ecosystem. (orig.)

  16. Liquid ordering at the Brushite- { 010 } water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsic, J.; Kaminski, D.; Poodt, P.; Vlieg, E.

    2004-06-01

    Using surface x-ray diffraction, we have determined the atomic structure of the { 010 } interface of brushite, CaHPO4 ·2 ( H2 O ) , with water. Since this biomineral contains water layers as part of its crystal structure, special ordering properties at the interface are expected. We found that this interface consists of two water bilayers with different ordering properties. The first water bilayer is highly ordered and can be considered as part of the brushite crystal structure. Surprisingly, the second water bilayer exhibits no in-plane order, but shows only layering in the perpendicular direction. We propose that the low level of water ordering at the interface is correlated with the low solubility of brushite in water.

  17. A new Experimental Rig for Oil Burning on Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Nicholas L.; Sørensen, Martin X.; Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne;

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental apparatus, the Crude Oil Flammability Apparatus (COFA), has been developed to study in-situ burning of crude and pure oils spilled on water in a controlled laboratory environment with large water-to-oil ratios. The parameters and phenomena studied for an asphaltic crude oil...

  18. Dynamics of a Water Droplet over a Sessile Oil Droplet: Compound Droplets Satisfying a Neumann Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, R; Dhiman, S; Sen, A K; Shen, Amy Q

    2017-06-13

    We report the dynamics of compound droplets with a denser liquid (water) droplet over a less dense sessile droplet (mineral oil) that satisfies the Neumann condition. For a fixed size of an oil droplet, depending on the size of the water droplet, either it attains the axisymmetric position or tends to migrate toward the edge of the oil droplet. For a water droplet-to-oil droplet at volume ratio Vw/Vo ≥ 0.05, stable axisymmetric configuration is achieved; for Vw/Vo droplet is observed. The stability and migration of water droplets of size above and below critical size, respectively, are explained using the force balance at the three-phase contact line and film tension. The larger and smaller droplets that initially attain the axisymmetric position or some radial position, respectively, evaporate continuously and thus migrate toward the edge of the oil droplet. The radial location and migration of the water droplets of different initial sizes with respect to time are studied. Experiments with water droplets on a flat oil-air interface did not show migration, which signified the role of the curved oil-air interface for droplet migration. Finally, coalescence of water droplets of size above the critical size at the axisymmetric position is demonstrated. Our compound droplet studies could be beneficial for applications involving droplet transport where contamination due to direct contact and pinning of droplets on solid surfaces is of concern. Migration and coalescence of water droplets on curved oil-air interfaces could open new frontiers in chemical and biological applications including multiphase processing and biological interaction of cells and atmospheric chemistry.

  19. Influence of fat crystals in the oil phase on stability of oil-in-water emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Coalescence at rest and during flow was studied in emulsions of paraffin oil in water with several surfactants and with crystals of solid paraffin or tristearate in the oil phase. Solid fat in the oil phase was estimated by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. Without crystals, oil-in-water emulsions

  20. Petroleum, oil field waters, and authigenic mineral assemblages - Are they in metastable equilibrium in hydrocarbon reservoirs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Harold C.; Knox, Annette M.; Owens, Christine E.; Shock, Everett L.

    1993-07-01

    The hypothesis that although the presence of carboxylic acids and carboxylate anions in oil field waters is commonly attributed to the thermal maturation of kerogen or bacterial degradation of hydrocarbons during water-washing of petroleum in relatively shallow reservoirs, they may have also been produced in deeper reservoirs by the hydrolysis of hydrocarbons in petroleum at the oil-water interface is tested. Calculations were carried out to determine the distribution of species with the minimum Gibbs free energy in overpressured oil field waters in the Texas Gulf Coast assuming metastable equilibrium among calcite, albite, and a representative spectrum of organic and inorganic aqueous species at reservoir temperatures and pressures. The hypothesis that homogeneous equilibrium obtains among carboxylate and carbonate species in oil field waters is confirmed.

  1. Interfaces Select Specific Stereochemical Conformations: The Isomerization of Glyoxal at the Liquid Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Kais, Sabre; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Francisco, Joseph S; Gladich, Ivan

    2017-01-11

    Interfacial chemistry involving glyoxal at aerosol surfaces is postulated to catalyze aerosol growth. This chemistry remains speculative due to a lack of detailed information concerning the physicochemical behavior of glyoxal at the interface of atmospheric aerosols. Here, we report results from high-level electronic structure calculations as well as both classical and Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of glyoxal solvation at the air/liquid water interface. When compared to the gas phase, the trans to cis isomerization of glyoxal at the liquid water interface is found to be catalyzed; additionally, the trans conformation is selectively solvated within the bulk to a greater degree than is the cis conformation. These two processes, i.e., the catalytic effect at the water interface and the differentially selective solvation, act to enhance the concentration of the cis isomer of glyoxal at the water interface. This has important consequences for the interpretation of experiments and for the modeling of glyoxal chemistry both at the interface of water clouds and at aerosols. Broader implications of this work relate to describing the role of interfaces in selecting specific stereo molecular structures at interfacial environments.

  2. Destruction of secondary water-oil emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abashev, R.G.; Isayev, M.G.; Nikolayeva, T.M.; Zheryakova, N.I.

    1984-01-01

    The article advances a number of requirements for the object, methods and means of destroying secondary water-oil emulsions (WOE) which currently cannot be recovered. By using the latest advances in science: chemistry of oil and surfactants, physicochemical surface phenomena, physical mechanics of dispersed systems, hydrodynamics and engineering chemistry jointly with the fundamentals of economics, efficient solutions are indicated for stabilization of the composition and property of WOE, and their destruction in a stationary technological process. A flowsheet is established for the recommended technology.

  3. STABILITY OF WATER-IN-OIL-IN-WATER MULTIPLE EMULSIONS: INFLUENCE OF THE INTERFACIAL PROPERTIES OF MILK FAT GLOBULE MEMBRANE

    OpenAIRE

    J.G. Dzul-Cauich; C. Lobato-Calleros; J.P. Pérez-Orozco; J. Alvarez-Ramirez; E.J. Vernon-Carter

    2013-01-01

    The interfacial shear viscosity (r¡iJlt) and the creep compliance-time (J(t» behavior of mi1k fat globule membrane (MFGM) films (4, 5 and 6% w/w) formed at the water-oil interface were evaluated. Films with higher MFGM concentration displayed higher r¡int and interfacial viscoelastic properties. When esters of polyglycerol and polyriciniolate fatty acids (PGPR) were added to the oil phase, a competitive adsorption at the interface took place between PGPR and MFGM which caused a decrease in th...

  4. Understanding the liquid-liquid (water-hexane) interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Sohail; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2017-10-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the interfacial thermal resistance of nanoscale hexane-water interfaces subject to an applied heat flux. Our studies show that these liquid-liquid interfaces exhibit behavior significantly dissimilar to that of solid-liquid and solid-vapor interfaces. Notably, the thermal resistance of a hexane-water interface is contingent on the interfacial temperature gradient alone with negligible dependence on the mean interfacial temperature, while the solid-liquid dependent strongly on the interfacial temperature. Application of a heat flux also increases the interface thickness significantly as compared to an equilibrium isothermal interface. Since liquid-liquid interfaces have been proposed for diverse applications, e.g., sensors for wastewater treatment and for extraction of toxic ions from water, they can be designed to be wider by applying a heat flux. This may allow the interface to be used for other applications not possible currently because of the very limited thickness of the interface in isothermal systems.

  5. 40 CFR 63.686 - Standards: Oil-water and organic-water separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Oil-water and organic-water... Operations § 63.686 Standards: Oil-water and organic-water separators. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air emissions from oil-water separators and organic-water separators for...

  6. Effect of Alkali on Daqing Crude Oil/Water Interfacial Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Jixiang; Li Mingyuan; Lin Meiqin; Wu Zhaoliang

    2007-01-01

    Alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) flooding using sodium hydroxide as the alkali component to enhance oil recovery in Daqing Oilfield,northeast China has been successful,but there are new problems in the treatment of produced crude. The alkali added forms stable water-in-crude oil emulsion,hence de-emulsification process is necessary to separate oil and water. The problems in enhanced oil recovery with ASP flooding were investigated in laboratory by using fractions of Daqing crude oil. The oil was separated into aliphatics,aromatics,resin and asphaltene fractions. These fractions were then mixed with an additive-free jet fuel to form model oils. The interfacial properties,such as interfacial tension and interfacial pressure of the systems were also measured,which together with the molecular parameters of the fractions were all used to investigate the problems in the enhanced oil recovery. In our work,it was found that sodium hydroxide solution reacts with the acidic hydrogen in the fractions of crude oil and forms soap-like interfacially active components,which accumulate at the crude oil-water interface.

  7. Topology and stability of a water-soybean-oil swirling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Luis; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reveals and explains the flow topology and instability hidden in an experimental study by Tsai et al. [Tsai et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 031002(R) (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.031002. Water and soybean oil fill a sealed vertical cylindrical container. The rotating top disk induces the meridional circulation and swirl of both fluids. The experiment shows a flattop interface shape and vortex breakdown in the oil flow developing as the rotation strength R eo increases. Our numerical study shows that vortex breakdown occurs in the water flow at R eo=300 and in the oil flow at R eo=941 . As R eo increases, the vortex breakdown cell occupies most of the water domain and approaches the interface at R eo around 600. The rest of the (countercirculating) water separates from the axis as the vortex breakdown cells in the oil and water meet at the interface-axis intersection. This topological transformation of water flow significantly contributes to the development of the flattop shape. It is also shown that the steady axisymmetric flow suffers from shear-layer instability, which emerges in the water domain at R eo=810 .

  8. Purified oleosins at air-water interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikiforidis, C.V.; Ampatzidis, C.; Lalou, S.; Scholten, E.; Karapantsios, T.D.; Kiosseoglou, V.

    2013-01-01

    Oleosins are low molecular mass proteins that are distinguished from other proteins for their extended central hydrophobic domain which covers almost half of its entity. For this work, they were extracted from isolated maize germ oil bodies. The purification steps included washing with diethylether

  9. Purified oleosins at air-water interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikiforidis, C.V.; Ampatzidis, C.; Lalou, S.; Scholten, E.; Karapantsios, T.D.; Kiosseoglou, V.

    2013-01-01

    Oleosins are low molecular mass proteins that are distinguished from other proteins for their extended central hydrophobic domain which covers almost half of its entity. For this work, they were extracted from isolated maize germ oil bodies. The purification steps included washing with diethylether

  10. Theoretical study on wettability of graphene/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Takayoshi

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the interaction energy between water clusters and graphene model compound by using density functional theory. The mono- and multi-layer interaction of water on graphene models are regarded as the low and high contact angles, which correspond to the wettability of interface, respectively. We clearly found the size dependency of water molecules on graphene model compound for the wettability.

  11. Reconstitution of cortical actin networks within water-in-oil emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Shah, Enas; Malik-Garbi, Maya; Keren, Kinneret

    2015-01-01

    We describe the reconstitution of dynamic cortical actin networks within cell-like compartments. The approach is based on encapsulation of Xenopus egg extract within water-in-oil emulsions. The growth of cortical actin networks is catalyzed by an amphiphilic actin nucleation-promoting factor that localizes to the water/oil interface. We first describe the preparation of cell-free Xenopus egg extract that provides all the soluble components of the actin machinery. We then describe the preparation of the amphiphilic, fluorescent actin nucleation-promoting factor that directs actin polymerization to the interface. Finally, we describe the steps required for assembly of dynamic actin cortices within water-in-oil emulsions, including the emulsification process and the sample preparation procedures. We provide recommendations for handling sensitive system components and discuss potential uses of this reconstitution approach for cytoskeletal research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Imaging of oil layers, curvature and contact angle in a mixed-wet and a water-wet carbonate rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamaljit; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of wettability of carbonate rocks on the morphologies of remaining oil after sequential oil and brine injection in a capillary-dominated flow regime at elevated pressure. The wettability of Ketton limestone was altered in situ using an oil phase doped with fatty acid which produced mixed-wet conditions (the contact angle where oil contacted the solid surface, measured directly from the images, θ=180°, while brine-filled regions remained water-wet), whereas the untreated rock (without doped oil) was weakly water-wet (θ=47 ± 9°). Using X-ray micro-tomography, we show that the brine displaces oil in larger pores during brine injection in the mixed-wet system, leaving oil layers in the pore corners or sandwiched between two brine interfaces. These oil layers, with an average thickness of 47 ± 17 µm, may provide a conductive flow path for slow oil drainage. In contrast, the oil fragments into isolated oil clusters/ganglia during brine injection under water-wet conditions. Although the remaining oil saturation in a water-wet system is about a factor of two larger than that obtained in the mixed-wet rock, the measured brine-oil interfacial area of the disconnected ganglia is a factor of three smaller than that of oil layers.

  13. Ion adsorption-induced wetting transition in oil-water-mineral systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bera, B.; Sîretanu, Igor; Maestro, Armando; Duits, Michael H.G.; Cohen Stuart, Martinus Abraham; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Collins, I

    2015-01-01

    The relative wettability of oil and water on solid surfaces is generally governed by a complex competition of molecular interaction forces acting in such three-phase systems. Herein, we experimentally demonstrate how the adsorption of in nature abundant divalent Ca2+ cations to solid-liquid interfac

  14. Ion adsorption-induced wetting transition in oil-water-mineralsystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Bera, B.; Cavalli, Andrea; Sîretanu, Igor; Maestro, Armando; Duits, Michael H.G.; Cohen Stuart, Martinus Abraham; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Stocker, I.; Collins, I

    2015-01-01

    The relative wettability of oil and water on solid surfaces is generally governed by a complex competition of molecular interaction forces acting in such three-phase systems. Herein, we experimentally demonstrate how the adsorption of in nature abundant divalent Ca2+ cations to solid-liquid interfac

  15. Studies on water-in-oil products from crude oils and petroleum products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingas, Merv; Fieldhouse, Ben

    2012-02-01

    Water-in-oil mixtures such as emulsions, often form and complicate oil spill countermeasures. The formation of water-in-oil mixtures was studied using more than 300 crude oils and petroleum products. Water-in-oil types were characterized by resolution of water at 1 and 7 days, and some after 1 year. Rheology measurements were carried out at the same intervals. The objective of this laboratory study was to characterize the formed water-in-oil products and relate these properties to starting oil properties. Analysis of the starting oil properties of these water-in-oil types shows that the existence of each type relates to the starting oil viscosity and its asphaltene and resin contents. This confirms that water-in-oil emulsification is a result of physical stabilization by oil viscosity and chemical stabilization by asphaltenes and resins. This stabilization is illustrated using simple graphical techniques. Four water-in-oil types exist: stable, unstable, meso-stable and entrained. Each of these has distinct physical properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of dodecanol on the adsorption kinetics of SDS at the water-hexane interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, A; Mucic, N; Vollhardt, D; Fainerman, V B; Miller, R

    2010-11-15

    Even though sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) is the most frequently studied surfactant, its properties at liquid interfaces are not easily accessible. This is mainly caused by the fact that in aqueous solution SDS is subject to hydrolysis, by which the homologous dodecanol (C12OH) is formed. Due to its enormously high surface activity it competes with SDS at the interface. We demonstrate here that this "natural" impurity C12OH does not remarkably affect the adsorption dynamics of SDS at the water/hexane interface, due to its high solubility in hexane. Therefore, the dynamic adsorption properties can be determined independent of disturbing dodecanol effects. The surfactant adsorbs diffusion controlled and the interfacial tension isotherm at the water/hexane interface is well described by a Frumkin model. However complementary experiments via direct admixture of dodecanol in hexane indicate a significant decrease in interfacial tension of the water-hexane interface at concentrations higher than 10(-3) mol/l in hexane. This condition may happen when the oil phase is distributed as small droplets in a high concentrated solution of SDS. The distribution coefficient of C12OH between water and hexane is estimated from adsorption experiments to be K(p)=c(o)/c(w)=6.7×10(3).

  17. A new Experimental Rig for Oil Burning on Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Nicholas L.; Sørensen, Martin X.; Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental apparatus, the Crude Oil Flammability Apparatus (COFA), has been developed to study in-situ burning of crude and pure oils spilled on water in a controlled laboratory environment with large water-to-oil ratios. The parameters and phenomena studied for an asphaltic crude oil...... was heated. Similar results were found regarding the flame height which reached a steady flame height. The pure fuels, n-Octane and dodecane, produced a much higher steady flame height than the crude oil, however they did not reach boilover, though dodecane showed boilover tendencies. Theoretical predictions...... of in-situ burning as an alternative response technique for oil spills on water....

  18. Discrimination of fish oil and mineral oil slicks on sea water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Dowall, J.

    1969-01-01

    Fish oil and mineral oil slicks on sea water can be discriminated by their different spreading characteristics and by their reflectivities and color variations over a range of wavelengths. Reflectivities of oil and oil films are determined using a duel beam reflectance apparatus.

  19. Study of Oil/Water Interfacial Tension of Vacuum Residual Fractions from Iranian Light Crude Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭勃; 李明远; 赵锁奇; 吴肇亮; JohanSjoblom; HaraldHoiland

    2003-01-01

    The vacuum residual from Iranian Light crude oil are separated into a series of 16 narrow fractions according to the molecular weight by the supercritical fluid extraction and fractional (SFEF) technology. The chemical element and the UV spectrum of each fraction are analyzed. The effects of several factors on the interfacial tension are investigated, which are the fraction concentration in oil phase, the ratio of oil component, the salts dissolved in the water phase and the pH value. The interfacial tension decreases rapidly as the concentration of the residual fraction in the oil increases, showing a higher interfacial activity of the fraction. The interfacial tension changes, as the amount of absorption or the state of the fractions in the interface changes resulting from different ratios of oil, different kinds or concentrations of salts in water, and different pH values. It is concluded that the intrfacial tension changes regularly, corresponding to the regular molecular parameters of the vacuum residual fractions.

  20. Drag Reduction in Oil-water Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Edomwonyi-Otu, L. C.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid-liquid flows occur in many chemical and process industries including the petroleum industry where crude oil and its derivatives are transported over long distances often in mixtures with water. Depending on flow conditions and pipe geometry different flow patterns can appear ranging from fully separated to dispersed ones. The addition of small amounts of some polymeric materials to one of the phases has been found to change the flow patterns and their boundaries and reduce the friction...

  1. The excess proton at the air-water interface: The role of instantaneous liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giberti, Federico; Hassanali, Ali A.

    2017-06-01

    The magnitude of the pH of the surface of water continues to be a contentious topic in the physical chemistry of aqueous interfaces. Recent theoretical studies have shown little or no preference for the proton to be at the surface compared to the bulk. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we revisit the propensity of the excess proton for the air-water interface with a particular focus on the role of instantaneous liquid interfaces. We find a more pronounced presence for the proton to be at the air-water interface. The enhanced water structuring around the proton results in the presence of proton wires that run parallel to the surface as well as a hydrophobic environment made up of under-coordinated topological defect water molecules, both of which create favorable conditions for proton confinement at the surface. The Grotthuss mechanism within the structured water layer involves a mixture of both concerted and closely spaced stepwise proton hops. The proton makes excursions within the first solvation layer either in proximity to or along the instantaneous interface.

  2. Oil flow in deep waters: comparative study between light oils and heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreolli, Ivanilto [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    Ultra deeper waters fields are being exploited due to technological development. Under this scenario, the flow design is accomplished through pipelines subjected to low temperature and high pressure. Moreover, these flow lines are usually long causing a fast fluid cooling, which may affect flow assurance in some cases. Problems during topsides production plant's restart might occur if the oil is viscous and even in steady state a significant different behavior can be noticed, if compared to a less viscous oil. A comparison between light and heavy oil through a case study with the objective to show some heavy oil flow particularities is the purpose of this paper. Permanent and transient analyses for a specific geometry are presented. The results showed that thermal and proper viscosity modeling are required for heavy oil flow, differently from that of light oil flow, due to the exponential viscosity dependence to temperature and because the predominant laminar regime. In addition, on heavier and heavier oil flow systems, it is essential to consider exportation system's restart. (author)

  3. Molecular dynamics study of the water/n-alkane interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations on the interface between liquid water and liquid n-alkane (including octane, nonane, decane, undecane and dodecane) have been performed with the purpose to study the interfacial properties: (Ⅰ) density profile; (Ⅱ) molecular orientation; (Ⅲ) interfacial tension and the temperature effect on the interfacial tension. Simulation results show that at the interface the structures of both water and n-alkane are different from those in the bulk. Water has an orientational preference due to the number of hydrogen bonds per molecule maximized. N-alkane has a more lateral orientation with respect to the interface in order to be in close contact with water. The calculated individual phase bulk density and interfacial tension of water/n-alkane systems are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental ones.

  4. Inorganic impurity removal from waste oil and wash-down water by Acinetobacter johnsonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Qi, Hui; Zhang, Xianming; Chen, Guoxu

    2012-11-15

    The removal of the abundant inorganic impurities in waste oil has been one of the most significant issues in waste oil reclamation. Acinetobacter johnsonii isolated from waste oil in aerobic process was employed to remove the inorganic impurities in waste oil and wash-down water. The biological process was developed through the primary mechanism research on the impurity removal and the optimization of the various parameters, such as inoculum type, inoculum volume and disposal temperature and time. The results showed that waste oil and wash-down water were effectively cleansed under the optimized conditions, with inorganic impurity and turbidity below 0.5% and 100 NTU from the initial values of 2% and 300 NTU, respectively. Sulfide, the main hazardous matter during waste oil reclamation, was also reduced within 1mg/L. After the biotreatment, the oil-water interface was clear in favor of its separation to benefit the smooth reclamation of waste oil and wash-down water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Anisotropic diffusion of volatile pollutants at air-water interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-ping CHEN; Jing-tao CHENG; Guang-fa DENG

    2013-01-01

    The volatile pollutants that spill into natural waters cause water pollution. Air pollution arises from the water pollution because of volatilization. Mass exchange caused by turbulent fluctuation is stronger in the direction normal to the air-water interface than in other directions due to the large density difference between water and air. In order to explore the characteristics of anisotropic diffusion of the volatile pollutants at the air-water interface, the relationship between velocity gradient and mass transfer rate was established to calculate the turbulent mass diffusivity. A second-order accurate smooth transition differencing scheme (STDS) was proposed to guarantee the boundedness for the flow and mass transfer at the air-water interface. Simulations and experiments were performed to study the trichloroethylene (C2HCl3) release. By comparing the anisotropic coupling diffusion model, isotropic coupling diffusion model, and non-coupling diffusion model, the features of the transport of volatile pollutants at the air-water interface were determined. The results show that the anisotropic coupling diffusion model is more accurate than the isotropic coupling diffusion model and non-coupling diffusion model. Mass transfer significantly increases with the increase of the air-water relative velocity at a low relative velocity. However, at a higher relative velocity, an increase in the relative velocity has no effect on mass transfer.

  6. Anisotropic diffusion of volatile pollutants at air-water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ping CHEN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The volatile pollutants that spill into natural waters cause water pollution. Air pollution arises from the water pollution because of volatilization. Mass exchange caused by turbulent fluctuation is stronger in the direction normal to the air-water interface than in other directions due to the large density difference between water and air. In order to explore the characteristics of anisotropic diffusion of the volatile pollutants at the air-water interface, the relationship between velocity gradient and mass transfer rate was established to calculate the turbulent mass diffusivity. A second-order accurate smooth transition differencing scheme (STDS was proposed to guarantee the boundedness for the flow and mass transfer at the air-water interface. Simulations and experiments were performed to study the trichloroethylene (C2HCl3 release. By comparing the anisotropic coupling diffusion model, isotropic coupling diffusion model, and non-coupling diffusion model, the features of the transport of volatile pollutants at the air-water interface were determined. The results show that the anisotropic coupling diffusion model is more accurate than the isotropic coupling diffusion model and non-coupling diffusion model. Mass transfer significantly increases with the increase of the air-water relative velocity at a low relative velocity. However, at a higher relative velocity, an increase in the relative velocity has no effect on mass transfer.

  7. Interfacial behaviour of sodium stearoyllactylate (SSL) as an oil-in-water pickering emulsion stabiliser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurukji, D; Pichot, R; Spyropoulos, F; Norton, I T

    2013-11-01

    The ability of a food ingredient, sodium stearoyllactylate (SSL), to stabilise oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions against coalescence was investigated, and closely linked to its capacity to act as a Pickering stabiliser. Results showed that emulsion stability could be achieved with a relatively low SSL concentration (≥0.1 wt%), and cryogenic-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) visualisation of emulsion structure revealed the presence of colloidal SSL aggregates adsorbed at the oil-water interface. Surface properties of SSL could be modified by altering the size of these aggregates in water; a faster decrease in surface tension was observed when SSL dispersions were subjected to high pressure homogenisation (HPH). The rate of SSL adsorption at the sunflower oil-water interface also increased after HPH, and a higher interfacial tension (IFT) was observed with increasing SSL concentration. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) enabled a comparison of the thermal behaviour of SSL in aqueous dispersions with SSL-stabilised O/W emulsions. SSL melting enthalpy depended on emulsion interfacial area and the corresponding DSC data was used to determine the amount of SSL adsorbed at the oil-water interface. An idealised theoretical interfacial coverage calculation based on Pickering emulsion theory was in general agreement with the mass of SSL adsorbed as predicted by DSC.

  8. Gelation of polymers adsorbed at a water-air interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Bonekamp, B.C.; Fraaye, J.G.E.M.

    1986-01-01

    Rheological data on air—water interfaces with adsorbed water-soluble polymer layers are presented which prove the existence of a surface gel. The gel is found to behave thixotropically and its yield stress is determined under various conditions. The gelation seems to be related to the lack of relaxa

  9. Modeling porous structure of oil-pressboard interface and its effect on electric field distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司马文霞; 姜赤龙; 毛文奇; 唐信

    2015-01-01

    The oil−pressboard insulation is a typical composite insulation system widely used in the design and manufactory of large power apparatus. The implement of oil−pressboard insulation may lead to surface electrification and discharge at the interface under certain condition. It is of significant importance to take an insight into the phenomenon occurring at the interface. Through experiment, the pressboard is found as a porous material. The interface changes abruptly from bulk pressboard to the bulk oil as a result of the porous structure. A new model is proposed which divides the interface into bulk oil region, transition region, and bulk pressboard region. The width of the transition region is decided according to the microtome figure. The effective permittivity of the transition region is calculated using a new model based on fractal theory. The model is validated and compared with previous calculation model. The effect of the existence of transition region on the electric field distribution is discussed.

  10. Infrared polarimetric sensing of oil on water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenault, David B.; Vaden, Justin P.; Mitchell, Douglas A.; DeMicco, Erik D.

    2016-10-01

    Infrared polarimetry is an emerging sensing modality that offers the potential for significantly enhanced contrast in situations where conventional thermal imaging falls short. Polarimetric imagery leverages the different polarization signatures that result from material differences, surface roughness quality, and geometry that are frequently different from those features that lead to thermal signatures. Imaging of the polarization in a scene can lead to enhanced understanding, particularly when materials in a scene are at thermal equilibrium. Polaris Sensor Technologies has measured the polarization signatures of oil on water in a number of different scenarios and has shown significant improvement in detection through the contrast improvement offered by polarimetry. The sensing improvement offers the promise of automated detection of oil spills and leaks for routine monitoring and accidents with the added benefit of being able to continue monitoring at night. In this paper, we describe the instrumentation, and the results of several measurement exercises in both controlled and uncontrolled conditions.

  11. Identifying Oil, Oil-water and Water Reservoirs by the Method of Grey Poly-category

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Huangsheng

    1994-01-01

    @@ Grey Poly-category is a branch of Grey System belonging to System Theory. According to the System Theory, a fully determinable figure is called White Figure, a fully undeterminable figure is called Black Figure, and the figure between them is called Grey Figure. On the same principle, a fully determinable system,a fully undeterminable, and a partial determinable and partial undeterminable system are called White, Black and Grey System respectively. For the oil, oil-water and water reservoirs, each type of reservoirs has its different log response values. These values are grey figures, not a fixed figure, and then, the system made of the figures is a Grey System.

  12. Produced water management - clean and safe oil and gas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference contains 22 presentations on topics within pollution sources and abatement, discharge reductions, water analysis and monitoring, water production, treatment and injection, enhanced recovery, condensate water, produced water markets, separation technologies for oil/gas/condensate and water, oil removal from solids, environmental risks of oil and gas production and environmental impacts on ecosystems and fisheries. Some oil field case histories are presented. The main focus is on the northern areas such as the North Sea, the north Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea, and technological aspects (tk)

  13. Calibration of Mineralization Degree for Dynamic Pure-water Measurement in Horizontal Oil-water Two-phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weihang; Li, Lei; Kong, Lingfu; Liu, Xingbin

    2016-08-01

    In order to solve the problem of dynamic pure-water electrical conductivity measurement in the process of calculating water content of oil-water two-phase flow of production profile logging in horizontal wells, a six-group local-conductance probe (SGLCP) is proposed to measure dynamic pure-water electrical conductivity in horizontal oil-water two-phase flow. The structures of conductance sensors which include the SGLCP and ring-shaped conductance probe (RSCP) are analyzed by using the finite-element method (FEM). In the process of simulation, the electric field distribution generated by the SGLCP and RSCP are investigated, and the responses of the measuring electrodes are calculated under the different values of the water resistivity. The static experiments of the SGLCP and RSCP under different mineralization degrees in horizontal oil-water two-phase flow are carried out. Results of simulation and experiments demonstrate a nice linearity between the SGLCP and RSCP under different mineralization degrees. The SGLCP has also a good adaptability to stratified flow, stratified flow with mixing at the interface and dispersion of oil in water and water flow. The validity and feasibility of pure-water electrical conductivity measurement with the designed SGLCP under different mineralization degrees are verified by experimental results.

  14. Sustainable water management in Alberta's oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, Bill; Usher, Robyn; Roach, Andrea [CH2M HILL, Englewood, CO (United States); Lambert, Gord; Kotecha, Prit [Suncor Energy Inc., Calgary (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers forecast published in 2011 predicts that oil production from oil sands will increase by 50% in the next 3 years and double by 2020. This rate of growth will result in significant pressure on water resources; water use per barrel of oil sands production is comparable to other energy resources - about 2.5 barrels of fresh water per barrel of oil produced are used by mining operations and 0.5 barrels by in-situ operations. Suncor Energy Inc. (Suncor) was the first company to develop the oil sands in northern Alberta and holds one of the largest oil sands positions in Canada. In 2010, Suncor announced plans to increase production to more than 1 million barrels of oil equivalent per day by 2020, which it plans to achieve through oil sands production growth of approximately 10% per year. Because water supply and potential impacts to water quality are critical to its future growth, in 2010-2011 Suncor conducted a risk assessment to identify water-related business risks related to its northern Alberta operations. The assessment identified more than 20 high level business risks in strategic water risk areas including water supply, water reuse, storm water management, groundwater, waste management and river water return. The risk assessment results prompted development of a strategic roadmap to guide water stewardship across Suncor's regional operations. The roadmap describes goals, objectives, and specific activities for each of six key water risk areas, and informs prioritization and selection of prospective water management activities. Suncor is not only exploring water within its own boundaries, but is also collaborating with other oil sands producers to explore ways of integrating its water systems through industry consortia; Suncor is a member of the Oil Sands Leadership Initiative and of the recently formed Canadian Oil Sands Innovation Alliance, among others. (author)

  15. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts.

  16. Treatment of Oil & Gas Produced Water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, Brian P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Production of oil and gas reserves in the New Mexico Four Corners Region results in large volumes of "produced water". The common method for handling the produced water from well production is re-injection in regulatory permitted salt water disposal wells. This is expensive (%7E $5/bbl.) and does not recycle water, an ever increasingly valuable commodity. Previously, Sandia National Laboratories and several NM small business tested pressure driven membrane-filtration techniques to remove the high TDS (total dissolved solids) from a Four Corners Coal Bed Methane produced water. Treatment effectiveness was less than optimal due to problems with pre-treatment. Inadequate pre-treatment allowed hydrocarbons, wax and biological growth to foul the membranes. Recently, an innovative pre-treatment scheme using ozone and hydrogen peroxide was pilot tested. Results showed complete removal of hydrocarbons and the majority of organic constituents from a gas well production water. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report was made possible through funding from the New Mexico Small Business Administration (NMSBA) Program at Sandia National Laboratories. Special thanks to Juan Martinez and Genaro Montoya for guidance and support from project inception to completion. Also, special thanks to Frank McDonald, the small businesses team POC, for laying the ground work for the entire project; Teresa McCown, the gas well owner and very knowledgeable- fantastic site host; Lea and Tim Phillips for their tremendous knowledge and passion in the oil & gas industry.; and Frank Miller and Steve Addleman for providing a pilot scale version of their proprietary process to facilitate the pilot testing.

  17. Interfacial properties of dissolved crude oil components in produced water

    OpenAIRE

    Eftekhardadkhah, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Produced water is a mixture of water trapped in underground formations and injection water that is brought to the surface along with oil or gas. In general, produced water is a mixture of dispersed oil in water (o/w), dissolved organic compounds (including hydrocarbons), residual concentration of chemical additives from the production line, heavy metals, dissolved minerals and suspended solids.In the year 2011, 131 million m3 of produced water were discharged on the Norwegian Continental Shel...

  18. Nylon 6,6 Nonwoven Fabric Separates Oil Contaminates from Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A Ortega

    Full Text Available Industrial oil spills into aquatic environments can have catastrophic environmental effects. First responders to oil spills along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico in the southern United States have used spunbond nylon fabric bags and fences to separate spilled oil and oil waste from contaminated water. Low area mass density spunbond nylon is capable of sorbing more than 16 times its mass in low viscosity crude oil and more than 26 times its mass in higher viscosity gear lube oil. Nylon bags separated more than 95% of gear lube oil contaminate from a 4.5% oil-in-water emulsion. Field testing of spunbond nylon fences by oil spill first responders has demonstrated the ability of this material to contain the oily contaminate while allowing water to flow through. We hypothesize that the effectiveness of nylon as an oil filter is due to the fact that it is both more oleophilic and more hydrophilic than other commonly used oil separation materials. The nylon traps oil droplets within the fabric or on the surface, while water droplets are free to flow through the fabric to the water on the opposite side of the fabric.

  19. Nylon 6,6 Nonwoven Fabric Separates Oil Contaminates from Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erin S.; Ortega, Albert E.

    2016-01-01

    Industrial oil spills into aquatic environments can have catastrophic environmental effects. First responders to oil spills along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico in the southern United States have used spunbond nylon fabric bags and fences to separate spilled oil and oil waste from contaminated water. Low area mass density spunbond nylon is capable of sorbing more than 16 times its mass in low viscosity crude oil and more than 26 times its mass in higher viscosity gear lube oil. Nylon bags separated more than 95% of gear lube oil contaminate from a 4.5% oil-in-water emulsion. Field testing of spunbond nylon fences by oil spill first responders has demonstrated the ability of this material to contain the oily contaminate while allowing water to flow through. We hypothesize that the effectiveness of nylon as an oil filter is due to the fact that it is both more oleophilic and more hydrophilic than other commonly used oil separation materials. The nylon traps oil droplets within the fabric or on the surface, while water droplets are free to flow through the fabric to the water on the opposite side of the fabric. PMID:27411088

  20. Horizontal one-dimensional redistribution of oil and water with hysteresis due to oil entrapment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.I.J. van Dijke; S.E.A.T.M. van der Zee

    1998-01-01

    textabstractRedistribution of oil and water in a long horizontal column, including oil entrapment by water, is described by a nonlinear diffusion problem with a spatially varying diffusion coefficient. This problem admits a similarity solution that was found previously for redistribution of water

  1. Electroacoustic and ultrasonic attenuation measurements of droplet size and zeta-potential of alkane-in-water emulsions: effects of oil solubility and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerdjev, Alex M; Beattie, James K

    2008-08-28

    The effects of oil solubility and composition on the zeta potential and drop size of oil-in-water emulsions stabilised by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were studied by electroacoustics and ultrasonic attenuation. The zeta-potentials of toluene and alkane emulsions were found to decrease (be less negative) as the water solubility of the dispersed oil phase increased. The zeta-potentials also depended on the composition of mixed oils, becoming more negative with increasing mole fraction of an insoluble oil (hexadecane). As the water solubility of the dispersed oil phase increased, the conductance within the Stern layer relative to the diffuse layer (K/K) increased, which is interpreted as due to the displacement of the shear plane further into the diffuse layer. The shear plane was calculated to increase from approximately 0.50 nm at the insoluble oil-water interface (hexadecane) to approximately 2.5 nm at a soluble oil-water interface of toluene. The lowering of the zeta-potentials of the soluble oils is ascribed to the shift of the shear plane into the diffuse layer, resulting in a more diffuse interface. The total surface conductance of the mixed oils was related to the log of the oil solubility and decreased from approximately 7 x 10(-9) Omega(-1) to 3 x 10(-9) Omega(-1) with increasing oil solubility from hexadecane to toluene, respectively. The lower surface conductance at the soluble oil-water interface is attributed to a reduction in the dielectric constant of the water inside of the shear plane, caused by the presence of the soluble oil.

  2. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-04-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules.

  3. [Pollution hazard for water bodies at oil production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zholdakova, Z I; Beliaeva, N I

    2015-01-01

    In the paper there have been summarizes the concepts of the danger of the pollution ofwater bodies in oil production (the most dangerous are reagents used in the drilling, drilling waste, oil and petrochemicals, oil biodestructors. There was shown the danger of the spread of oil pollution. New indices, presenting a hazard during drilling and oil production have been substantiated The tasks aimed to the improvement of the standards and methods of the control of the water pollution by oil, as well as of the documents regulating the conditions of environmental protection during the drilling have been conceived.

  4. Oil biodegradation. Water droplets in oil are microhabitats for microbial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckenstock, Rainer U; von Netzer, Frederick; Stumpp, Christine; Lueders, Tillmann; Himmelberg, Anne M; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philipp; Harir, Mourad; Hosein, Riad; Haque, Shirin; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2014-08-08

    Anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons, typically occurring at the oil-water transition zone, influences the quality of oil reservoirs. In Pitch Lake, Trinidad and Tobago--the world's largest asphalt lake--we found that microorganisms are metabolically active in minuscule water droplets (1 to 3 microliters) entrapped in oil. Pyrotag sequencing of individual droplet microbiomes revealed complex methanogenic microbial communities actively degrading the oil into a diverse range of metabolites, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. High salinity and water-stable isotopes of the droplets indicate a deep subsurface origin. The 13.5% water content and the large surface area of the droplets represent an underestimated potential for biodegradation of oil away from the oil-water transition zone. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Combustion of oil on water: an experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-02-01

    This study determined how well crude and fuel oils burn on water. Objectives were: (1) to measure the burning rates for several oils; (2) to determine whether adding heat improves the oils' combustibility; (3) to identify the conditions necessary to ignite fuels known to be difficult to ignite on ocean waters (e.g., diesel and Bunker C fuel oils); and (4) to evaluate the accuracy of an oil-burning model proposed by Thompson, Dawson, and Goodier (1979). Observations were made about how weathering and the thickness of the oil layer affect the combustion of crude and fuel oils. Nine oils commonly transported on the world's major waterways were tested. Burns were first conducted in Oklahoma under warm-weather conditions (approx. 30/sup 0/C) and later in Ohio under cold-weather conditions (approx. 0/sup 0/C to 10/sup 0/C).

  6. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics at interfaces: fluorescent DNA probes at the dodecane/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Giuseppe; Vauthey, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Although the interfaces between two isotropic media are of primary importance in many areas of science and technology, their properties are only partially understood. Our strategy to obtain an insight into these properties is to investigate the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of environment-sensitive molecular probes at liquid interfaces using time-resolved surface second harmonic generation, and to compare it with the dynamics of the same molecules in bulk solutions. Additionally, this approach gives rich information on how the chemical reactivity may change when going from the bulk phase to the interface. This is illustrated by an investigation performed with a series of fluorescent DNA probes at the dodecane/water interface without and with the presence of DNA in the aqueous phase. Substantial differences in the conformation of these cyanine dyes (aggregated or not) and in the excited-state dynamics are observed when going from bulk solutions to the interface. Moreover, the presence of double-stranded DNA in the aqueous phase induces some chirality at the interface.

  7. Competitive Adsorption of Naphthenic Acids and Polyaromatic Molecules at a Toluene-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklebrhan, Robel B; Jian, Cuiying; Choi, Phillip; Xu, Zhenghe; Sjöblom, Johan

    2016-12-22

    The early-stage competitive co-adsorption of interfacially active naphthenic acids (NAs) and polyaromatic (PA) molecules to a toluene-water interface from the bulk toluene phase was studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The NA molecules studied had the same polar functional group but different cycloaliphatic nonpolar tails, and a perylene bisimide (PBI)-based molecule was used as a representative PA compound. The results from our simulations suggest that the size and structural features of NA molecules greatly influence the interfacial activity of PA molecules and partitioning of NA molecules at the toluene-water interface. At low concentrations of PA (∼2.3 wt %) and NA (∼0.4 wt %) molecules, NA molecules containing large cycloaliphatic rings (e.g., four rings) or with a very long aliphatic tail (e.g., carbon chain length of 14) were observed to impede the migration of PA molecules to the interface, whereas small NA molecules containing two cycloaliphatic rings had little effect on the adsorption of PA molecules at the toluene-water interface. At high NA concentrations, the adsorption of PA molecules (∼5.75-17.25 wt %) was greatly hindered by the presence of small NA molecules (∼1.6-4.8 wt %) due to the solvation of PA nanoaggregates in the bulk. Adsorption mechanisms of PA and NA molecules at toluene-water interfaces were clarified through a detailed analysis on the interactions among different species in the system. The results obtained from this work provide insights into designing appropriate chemical demulsifiers or co-demulsifiers for breaking water-in-oil emulsions of great industrial applications.

  8. Interactions of anesthetics with the water-hexane interface. A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipot, C.; Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1997-01-01

    The free energy profiles characterizing the transfer of nine solutes across the liquid-vapor interfaces of water and hexane and across the water-hexane interface were calculated from molecular dynamics simulations. Among the solutes were n-butane and three of its halogenated derivatives, as well as three halogenated cyclobutanes. The two remaining molecules, dichlorodifluoromethane and 1,2-dichloroperfluoroethane, belong to series of halo-substituted methanes and ethanes, described in previous studies (J. Chem. Phys. 1996, 104, 3760; Chem. Phys. 1996, 204, 337). Each series of molecules contains structurally similar compounds that differ greatly in anesthetic potency. The accuracy of the simulations was tested by comparing the calculated and the experimental free energies of solvation of all nine compounds in water and in hexane. In addition. the calculated and the measured surface excess concentrations of n-butane at the water liquid-vapor interface were compared. In all cases, good agreement with experimental results was found. At the water-hexane interface, the free energy profiles for polar molecules exhibited significant interfacial minima, whereas the profiles for nonpolar molecules did not. The existence of these minima was interpreted in terms of a balance between the free energy contribution arising from solute-solvent interactions and the work to form a cavity that accommodates the solute. These two contributions change monotonically, but oppositely, across the interface. The interfacial solubilities of the solutes, obtained from the free energy profiles, correlate very well with their anesthetic potencies. This is the case even when the Meyer-Overton hypothesis, which predicts a correlation between anesthetic potency and solubility in oil, fails.

  9. Thermodynamics of surface defects at the aspirin/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julian; Zheng, Chen; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-09-01

    We present a simulation scheme to calculate defect formation free energies at a molecular crystal/water interface based on force-field molecular dynamics simulations. To this end, we adopt and modify existing approaches to calculate binding free energies of biological ligand/receptor complexes to be applicable to common surface defects, such as step edges and kink sites. We obtain statistically accurate and reliable free energy values for the aspirin/water interface, which can be applied to estimate the distribution of defects using well-established thermodynamic relations. As a show case we calculate the free energy upon dissolving molecules from kink sites at the interface. This free energy can be related to the solubility concentration and we obtain solubility values in excellent agreement with experimental results.

  10. Ultra structure of oil-in-water emulsions a comparison of different microscopy- and preparation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Loussert, C.; Humbel, B.M.

    We compare chemical fixation/ room temperature embedding in resin, cryofixation/ freeze substitution, and cryofixation/cryo imaging (freeze-fracture cryo-SEM) on several oil-in-water food emulsions. This is for visualization of the structure and thickness of the emulsifying layers consisting...... of the samples while ensuring at the same time that the samples are stabilized so they do not collapse when the water is removed.These protocols give an interesting view of the emulsions and the organisation of the interface layer surrounding the oil droplets. With cryofixation we could image more details...... of combining different microscopic approaches to access the ultra structure of the oil-in-water emulsions due to their complexity and instability....

  11. Molecular dynamics of the water liquid-vapor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the equilibrium interface between liquid water and its vapor at 325 K are presented. For the TIP4P model of water intermolecular pair potentials, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. The most common orientations of water molecules have the C2 nu molecular axis roughly parallel to the interface. The distributions are quite broad and therefore compatible with the intermolecular correlations characteristic of bulk liquid water. All near-neighbor pairs in the outermost interfacial layers are hydrogen bonded according to the common definition adopted here. The orientational preferences of water molecules near a free surface differ from those near rigidly planar walls which can be interpreted in terms of patterns found in hexagonal ice 1. The mean electric field in the interfacial region is parallel to the mean polarization which indicates that attention cannot be limited to dipolar charge distributions in macroscopic descriptions of the electrical properties of this interface. The value of the surface tension obtained is 132 +/- 46 dyn/cm, significantly different from the value for experimental water of 68 dyn/cm at 325 K.

  12. Molecular dynamics of the water liquid-vapor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the equilibrium interface between liquid water and its vapor at 325 K are presented. For the TIP4P model of water intermolecular pair potentials, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. The most common orientations of water molecules have the C2 nu molecular axis roughly parallel to the interface. The distributions are quite broad and therefore compatible with the intermolecular correlations characteristic of bulk liquid water. All near-neighbor pairs in the outermost interfacial layers are hydrogen bonded according to the common definition adopted here. The orientational preferences of water molecules near a free surface differ from those near rigidly planar walls which can be interpreted in terms of patterns found in hexagonal ice 1. The mean electric field in the interfacial region is parallel to the mean polarization which indicates that attention cannot be limited to dipolar charge distributions in macroscopic descriptions of the electrical properties of this interface. The value of the surface tension obtained is 132 +/- 46 dyn/cm, significantly different from the value for experimental water of 68 dyn/cm at 325 K.

  13. Ignitability of crude oil and its oil-in-water products at arctic temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranellone, Raymond T; Tukaew, Panyawat; Shi, Xiaochuan; Rangwala, Ali S

    2017-02-15

    A novel platform and procedure were developed to characterize the ignitability of Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude oil and its water-in-oil products with water content up to 60% at low temperatures (-20-0°C). Time to ignition, critical heat flux, in-depth temperature profiles were investigated. It was observed that a cold boundary and consequent low oil temperature increased the thermal inertia of the oil/mixture and consequently the time to sustained ignition also increased. As the water content in the ANS water-in-oil mixture increased, the critical heat flux for ignition was found to increase. This is mainly because of an increase in the thermal conductivity of the mixture with the addition of saltwater. The results of the study can be used towards design of ignition strategies and technologies for in situ burning of oil spills in cold climates such as the Arctic.

  14. Hydrodynamics of a fixed camphor boat at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhiraj; Akella, Sathish; Singh, Ravi; Mandre, Shreyas; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when introduced at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and the camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface. This radial spreading of camphor is due to Marangoni forces setup by the camphor concentration gradient. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of this process for a camphor tablet held fixed at the air-water interface. During the initial transient, the time-dependent spread radius R (t) of camphor scales algebraically with time t (R (t) ~t 1 / 2) in agreement with empirical scalings reported for spreading of volatile oils on water surface. But unlike surfactants, the camphor stops spreading when the influx of camphor from the tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the outflux of camphor due to evaporation, and a steady-state condition is reached. The spreading camphor however, shears the underlying fluid and sets up bulk convective flow. We explain the coupled steady-state dynamics between the interfacial camphor spreading and bulk convective flow with a boundary layer approximation, supported by experimental evidence. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  15. interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipayan Sanyal

    2005-01-01

    macroscopic conservation equations with an order parameter which can account for the solid, liquid, and the mushy zones with the help of a phase function defined on the basis of the liquid fraction, the Gibbs relation, and the phase diagram with local approximations. Using the above formalism for alloy solidification, the width of the diffuse interface (mushy zone was computed rather accurately for iron-carbon and ammonium chloride-water binary alloys and validated against experimental data from literature.

  16. Room-temperature synthesis of wurtzite ZnS at the oil--water interface and its photocatalytic performance%纤锌矿ZnS在油--水界面处的室温制备及光催化性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁小红; 赵轩; 邱国飞; 贾晓明

    2015-01-01

    Room-temperature synthesis of ZnS was controlled at the oil- water liquid- liquid interface. Combining with polymer films which were modified by hydroxyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers ( SAMs) as flexible substrates, nanocrystalline ZnS films were fabricated on the substrates. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the ZnS films have a hexagonal wurtzite structure, which is the high-temperature polymorph of sphalerite. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations show that the ZnS films consist of nanoparticles with the diameter of 30-50 nm. Photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange by these prod-ucts under UV-light irradiation was observed, which confirmed the photocatalytic degradation ability of the nanocrystalline ZnS films to organics. In view of the results, a facile one-step method, combining the oil- water interface with the SAMs-modified substrate, was proposed for fabricating the wurtzite ZnS functional films without any additive at room temperature. The relationship between photocata-lytic performance and the morphology of the products was also discussed.%通过控制硫化锌室温成核反应在油-水液-液界面处进行,并采用羟基端基自组装分子层修饰的聚合物膜作为柔性衬底,最终在衬底表面制得硫化锌纳米晶膜. X射线衍射表征显示产物为高温稳定的纤锌矿结构. 扫描电镜和透射电镜观察发现硫化锌膜由粒径30~50 nm的颗粒构成. 产物对甲基橙的光催化降解研究证实在紫外光辅助下硫化锌纳米晶膜对有机物的降解能力. 鉴于上述结果,提出了一种结合油-水液-液界面及自组装分子层功能化的衬底,在室温且无添加剂条件下一步制备高温稳定相ZnS功能膜的方法,并分析了产物形貌与光催化性能间的关系.

  17. The determination of water in crude oil and transformer oil reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Sam A; Hagwood, Charles

    2003-05-01

    The measurement of the amount of water in oils is of significant economic importance to the industrial community, particularly to the electric power and crude oil industries. The amount of water in transformer oils is critical to their normal function and the amount of water in crude oils affects the cost of the crude oil at the well head, the pipeline, and the refinery. Water in oil Certified Reference Materials (CRM) are essential for the accurate calibration of instruments that are used by these industries. Three NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) have been prepared for this purpose. The water in these oils has been measured by both coulometric and volumetric Karl Fischer methods. The compounds (such as sulfur compounds) that interfere with the Karl Fischer reaction (interfering substances) and inflate the values for water by also reacting with iodine have been measured coulometrically. The measured water content of Reference Material (RM) 8506a Transformer Oil is 12.1+/-1.9 mg kg(-1) (plus an additional 6.2+/-0.9 mg kg(-1) of interfering substances). The measured water content of SRM 2722 Sweet Crude Oil, is 99+/-6 mg kg(-1) (plus an additional 5+/-2 mg kg(-1) of interfering substances). The measured water content of SRM 2721 Sour Crude Oil, is 134+/-18 mg kg(-1) plus an additional 807+/-43 mg kg(-1) of interfering substances. Interlaboratory studies conducted with these oil samples (using SRM 2890, water saturated 1-octanol, as a calibrant) are reported. Some of the possible sources of bias in these measurements were identified, These include: improperly calibrated instruments, inability to measure the calibrant accurately, Karl Fischer reagent selection, and volatilization of the interfering substances in SRM 2721.

  18. Unusual properties of water at hydrophilic/hydrophobic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gun'ko, V M; Turov, V V; Bogatyrev, V M; Zarko, V I; Leboda, R; Goncharuk, E V; Novza, A A; Turov, A V; Chuiko, A A

    2005-12-30

    The behaviour of water at mosaic hydrophilic/hydrophobic surfaces of different silicas and in biosystems (biomacromolecules, yeast cells, wheat seeds, bone and muscular tissues) was studied in different dispersion media over wide temperature range using 1H NMR spectroscopy with layer-by-layer freezing-out of bulk water (close to 273 K) and interfacial water (180 water and water bound to hydrophilic/hydrophobic interfaces can be assigned to different structural types. There are (i) weakly associated interfacial water (1H NMR chemical shift delta(H) = 1.1-1.7 ppm) that can be assigned to high-density water (HDW) with collapsed structure (CS), representing individual molecules in hydrophobic pockets, small clusters and interstitial water with strongly distorted hydrogen bonds or without them, and (ii) strongly associated interfacial water (delta(H) = 4-5 ppm) with larger clusters, nano- and microdomains, and continuous interfacial layer with both HDW and low-density water (LDW). The molecular mobility of weakly associated bound water is higher (because hydrogen bonds are distorted and weakened and their number is smaller than that for strongly associated water) than that of strongly associated bound water (with strong hydrogen bonds but nevertheless weaker than that in ice Ih) that results in the difference in the temperature dependences of the 1H NMR spectra at T waters are also appear in changes in the IR and TSDC spectra.

  19. Hydraulic Systems with Tap Water versus Bio-oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    1997-01-01

    Deals with the advantages of using pure tap water hydraulics versus bio-oils for suiteable applications. Focus is in particular on food processing industry.......Deals with the advantages of using pure tap water hydraulics versus bio-oils for suiteable applications. Focus is in particular on food processing industry....

  20. Absorption of water and lubricating oils into porous nylon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Oil and water absorption from air into sintered porous nylon can be described by infiltration into the pores of the material. This process can be modeled by a diffusion-like mechanism. For water absorption, we find a formal diffusion coefficient of 1.5 x 10(exp -4)sq cm/min when the nylon is initially dry. The diffusion coefficient is 4 x 10(exp -6)sq cm/min when the nylon is oil-impregnated prior to air exposure. In a 52% RH atmosphere, dry nylon absorbs 3% w/w water, and oil-impregnated nylon absorbs 0.6% w/w water. For oil absorption there are three steps: (1) surface absorption and infiltration into (2) larger and (3) smaller pores. Surface absorption is too fast to be measured in these experiments. The diffusion coefficient for the second step is 6 x 10(exp -4)sq cm/min for SRG-60 oil into dry nylon and 4 x 10(exp -4)sq cm/min for air-equilibrated nylon. The diffusion coefficient for the third step is about 1 x 10(exp -6)sq cm/min for both cases. The total amount of oil absorbed is 31% w/w. The interaction between water and nylon is not as strong as that between water and cotton-phenolic: oil can replace water, and only a small amount of water can enter previously oil-impregnated nylon.

  1. Experiments in which oil, water and colloidal particles meet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the results are reported of experimental studies in which oil, water and colloidal particles meet. Colloidal particles are particles that have at least one characteristic length scale in the range between a few nanometers (nm) and several micrometers (μm). Mixtures of oil and water,

  2. User interface for ground-water modeling: Arcview extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, M.-S.; Whittemore, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulation for ground-water modeling often involves handling large input and output data sets. A geographic information system (GIS) provides an integrated platform to manage, analyze, and display disparate data and can greatly facilitate modeling efforts in data compilation, model calibration, and display of model parameters and results. Furthermore, GIS can be used to generate information for decision making through spatial overlay and processing of model results. Arc View is the most widely used Windows-based GIS software that provides a robust user-friendly interface to facilitate data handling and display. An extension is an add-on program to Arc View that provides additional specialized functions. An Arc View interface for the ground-water flow and transport models MODFLOW and MT3D was built as an extension for facilitating modeling. The extension includes preprocessing of spatially distributed (point, line, and polygon) data for model input and postprocessing of model output. An object database is used for linking user dialogs and model input files. The Arc View interface utilizes the capabilities of the 3D Analyst extension. Models can be automatically calibrated through the Arc View interface by external linking to such programs as PEST. The efficient pre- and postprocessing capabilities and calibration link were demonstrated for ground-water modeling in southwest Kansas.

  3. In-Situ Burning of Crude Oil on Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens

    in the small scale water basin. Boilovers were also observed during the burning of a heavy crude oil with a substantial light fraction without a water layer, however, which suggests that water is not essential for boilover occurrence. Further studies are required to determine the conditions under which......The fire dynamics and fire chemistry of in-situ burning of crude oil on water was studied in order to improve predictions on the suitability of this oil spill response method. For this purpose, several operational parameters were studied to determine the factors that control the burning efficiency...... of in-situ burning, i.e. the amount of oil (in wt%) removed from the water surface by the burning process. The burning efficiency is the main parameter for expressing the oil removal effectiveness of in-situ burning as response method and is thus relevant for suitability predictions of in-situ burning...

  4. Dynamic Stabilization of Metal Oxide–Water Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBriarty, Martin E.; von Rudorff, Guido Falk; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Eng, Peter J.; Blumberger, Jochen; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2017-02-08

    The interaction of water with metal oxide surfaces plays a crucial role in the catalytic and geochemical behavior of metal oxides. In a vast majority of studies, the interfacial structure is assumed to arise from a relatively static lowest energy configuration of atoms, even at room temperature. Using hematite (α-Fe2O3) as a model oxide, we show through a direct comparison of in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering with density functional theory-based molecular dynamics simulations that the structure of the (1102) termination is dynamically stabilized by picosecond water exchange. Simulations show frequent exchanges between terminal aquo groups and adsorbed water in locations and with partial residence times consistent with experimentally determined atomic sites and fractional occupancies. Frequent water exchange occurs even for an ultrathin adsorbed water film persisting on the surface under a dry atmosphere. The resulting time-averaged interfacial structure consists of a ridged lateral arrangement of adsorbed water molecules hydrogen bonded to terminal aquo groups. Surface pKa prediction based on bond valence analysis suggests that water exchange will influence the proton-transfer reactions underlying the acid/base reactivity at the interface. Our findings provide important new insights for understanding complex interfacial chemical processes at metal oxide–water interfaces.

  5. Nonfouling capture-release substrates based on polymer brushes for separation of water-dispersed oil droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Khooi Y; Hughes, Trevor L; Nagl, Michaela; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2012-12-01

    We have demonstrated capture and release of underwater-oil droplets based on fouling-resistant surfaces coated with pH-responsive polymer brushes. In response to the change of environmental pH, oil droplets were captured on the polymer brush-modified surfaces in the high adhesion state. As the droplet volume increased upon coalescence with other oil droplets in the aqueous phase, the captured droplets eventually self-released from the surfaces under the influence of buoyancy and rose to the air-water interface. The fact that the polymer brush surfaces were partially oil-wettable (high oil-in-water contact angles) enabled the adhesion but not the spreading of oil droplets. This allowed buoyancy release of oil droplets and led to fouling-resistant surfaces that could be reused for capture-release of more oil droplets. The practicality and versatility of this oil droplet capture-release system was demonstrated using monodisperse and polydisperse hydrocarbon oil compositions in purified water, tap water, and brines in which the salt concentration was as high as that of seawater.

  6. Adsorption of alkyltrimethylammonium bromides at water/alkane interfaces: competitive adsorption of alkanes and surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainerman, V B; Mucic, N; Pradines, V; Aksenenko, E V; Miller, R

    2013-11-12

    The adsorption of members of the homologous series of alkyl trimethylammonium bromides (C(n)TAB) is studied at water/alkane interfaces by drop profile analysis tensiometry. The results are discussed in terms of a competitive adsorption process of alkane and surfactant molecules. A thermodynamic model, derived originally for the adsorption of surfactant mixtures, is adapted such that it describes a competitive adsorption of the surfactant molecules from the aqueous phase and alkane molecules from the oil phase. This new model involves the interspecies attraction coefficient, which mutually increases the adsorption activities of the alkane and C(n)TAB. The effects of the alkyl chain length n of C(n)TABs and the influence of the number of C atoms in the alkane chain are discussed, and the physical quantities are compared to those determined at the aqueous solution/air interface. The new theoretical model for aqueous solution/oil interfaces is also compared to a theory that does not consider the adsorption of alkane. The proposed new model demonstrates good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Research on Dispersed Oil Droplets Breakage and Emulsification in the Dynamic Oil and Water Hydrocyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangdong Guo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Oil and water dynamic hydrocyclone is one type of facilities that separate two phases or multiple phases applied widely in the fields such as food processing, environmental protection, biological pharmacy, petroleum and chemistry. The dispersed oil droplets in the dynamic oil and water hydrocyclone were often broken into small drops by shear force, which decreased the separation efficiency of dynamic oil-water hydrocyclone greatly. To avoid the breakage of the oil droplets, the turbulence field and the velocity field of the dynamic hydrocyclone were studied by the software of Fluent to analyze the main reason that led to breakage of oil droplets. Results indicated that the deformation of oil droplets was caused by the viscous shear force; the breakage of oil droplets was caused by the Reynolds shear stress and the local pressure fluctuations. The main area that the drops were prone to breakup of the dynamic hydrocyclone is that the rotating grating nearby, the wall boundary layer of the drum and center axis of the drum. Finally, the breakage of oil droplets and emulsification of oil and water in the dynamic hydrocyclone were verified by the experiments.

  8. Organic synthesis reactions on-water at the organic-liquid water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Richard N; Coyne, Anthony G

    2016-10-25

    Organic reactions that occur at the water interface for water-insoluble compounds, and reactions in water solution for water soluble compounds, has added a powerful dimension to prospects for organic synthesis under more beneficial economic and environmental conditions. Many organic molecules are partially soluble in water and reactions that appear as heterogeneous mixtures and suspensions may involve on-water and in-water reaction modes occurring simultaneously. The behavior of water molecules and organic molecules at this interface is discussed in the light of reported theoretical and experimental studies. The on-water catalytic effect, relative to neat reactions or organic solvents, ranges from factors of several hundred times to 1-2 times and it depends on the properties of reactant compounds. In some cases when on-water reactions produce quantitative yields of water-insoluble products they can reach ideal synthetic aspirations.

  9. Reacting chemistry at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Morgan, Thomas; Huwel, Lutz; Graham, William

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interaction with gas-liquid interfaces is becoming increasingly important in biological applications, chemical analysis and medicine. It introduces electrons, new ionic species and reactive species and contributes to chemical and electrical self-organization at the interface. To provide insight into the associated physics and chemistry at work in the evolution of the plasma in the air-water interface (AWI), a time-dependent one-dimensional modelling has been developed. The numerical simulation is used to solve the kinetic equations and help identify the important reaction mechanisms and describe the phenomena associated with hundreds of reacting pathways in gas-phase and liquid-phase AWI chemistry. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K04998.

  10. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    Proton transfer reactions at the interface of water with hydrophobic media, such as air or lipids, are ubiquitous on our planet. These reactions orchestrate a host of vital phenomena in the environment including, for example, acidification of clouds, enzymatic catalysis, chemistries of aerosol and atmospheric gases, and bioenergetic transduction. Despite their importance, however, quantitative details underlying these interactions have remained unclear. Deeper insight into these interfacial reactions is also required in addressing challenges in green chemistry, improved water quality, self-assembly of materials, the next generation of micro-nanofluidics, adhesives, coatings, catalysts, and electrodes. This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigation of proton transfer reactions at the air-water interface as a function of hydration gradients, electrochemical potential, and electrostatics. Since emerging insights hold at the lipid-water interface as well, this work is also expected to aid understanding of complex biological phenomena associated with proton migration across membranes. Based on our current understanding, it is known that the physicochemical properties of the gas-phase water are drastically different from those of bulk water. For example, the gas-phase hydronium ion, H3O +(g), can protonate most (non-alkane) organic species, whereas H 3O+(aq) can neutralize only relatively strong bases. Thus, to be able to understand and engineer water-hydrophobe interfaces, it is imperative to investigate this fluctuating region of molecular thickness wherein the 'function' of chemical species transitions from one phase to another via steep gradients in hydration, dielectric constant, and density. Aqueous interfaces are difficult to approach by current experimental techniques because designing experiments to specifically sample interfacial layers (quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics to simulate our experiments toward gaining insight at the

  11. Dynamic Stabilization of Metal Oxide–Water Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBriarty, Martin E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Physical Sciences Division; von Rudorff, Guido Falk [Univ. College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Stubbs, Joanne E. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Center for Advanced Radiation Sources (CARS); Eng, Peter J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Center for Advanced Radiation Sources (CARS); Blumberger, Jochen [Univ. College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Physical Sciences Division

    2017-02-08

    Metal oxide growth, dissolution, and redox reactivity depend on the structure and dynamics at the interface with aqueous solution. We present the most definitive analysis to date of the hydrated naturally abundant r-cut (11$\\bar{0}$2) termination of the iron oxide hematite (α-Fe2O3). In situ synchrotron X-ray scattering analysis reveals a ridged lateral arrangement of adsorbed water molecules hydrogen bonded to terminal aquo groups. Large-scale hybrid-functional density functional theory-based molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations show how this structure is dynamically stabilized by picosecond exchange between aquo groups and adsorbed water, even under nominally dry conditions. Surface pKa prediction based on bond valence analysis suggests that water exchange may influence the proton transfer reactions associated with acid/base reactivity at the interface. Our findings rectify inconsistencies between existing models and may be extended to resolving more complex electrochemical phenomena at metal oxide-water interfaces.

  12. Comparison of Pickering and network stabilization in water-in-oil emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Supratim; Tran, Tu; Rousseau, Dérick

    2011-06-07

    We compared the efficacy of Pickering crystals, a continuous phase crystal network, and a combination thereof against sedimentation and dispersed phase coalescence in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions. Using 20 wt % water-in-canola oil emulsions as our model, glycerol monostearate (GMS) permitted Pickering-type stabilization, whereas simultaneous usage of hydrogenated canola oil (HCO) and glycerol monooleate (GMO) primarily led to network-stabilized emulsions. A minimum of 4 wt % GMS or 10 wt % HCO was required for long-term sedimentation stability. Although there were no significant differences between the two in mean droplet size with time, the free water content of the network-stabilized emulsions was higher than Pickering-stabilized emulsions, suggesting higher instability. Microscopy revealed the presence of crystal shells around the dispersed phase in the GMS-stabilized emulsions, whereas in the HCO-stabilized emulsion, spherulitic growth in the continuous phase and on the droplet surface occurred. The displacement energy (E(disp)) to detach crystals from the oil-water interface was ∼10(4) kT, and was highest for GMS crystals. Thermal cycling to induce dispersed phase coalescence of the emulsions resulted in desorption of both GMS and GMO from the interface, which we ascribed to solute-solvent hydrogen bonding between the emulsifier molecules and the solvent oil, based on IR spectra. Overall, Pickering crystals were more effective than network crystals for emulsion stabilization. However, the thermal stability of all emulsions was hampered by the diffusion of the molten emulsifiers from the interface.

  13. Microencapsulation using an oil-in-water-in-air 'dry water emulsion'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Benjamin O; Weaver, Jonathan V M; Wang, Weixing; Spiller, David G; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2011-08-07

    We describe the first example of a tri-phasic oil-in-water-in-air 'dry water emulsion'. The method combines highly stable oil-in-water emulsions prepared using branched copolymer surfactants, with aqueous droplet encapsulation using 'dry water' technology.

  14. Strategies for Efficient Microfiltration of Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishzadeh, Tohid; Priezjev, Nikolai

    2011-11-01

    This study addresses the issue of the separation of oil droplets from water for oil spill mitigation and produced water treatment. The effective separation of oil-in-water dispersions involves high flux of water through a membrane and, at the same time, high rejection rate of oil droplets, while avoiding membrane fouling. In this study, the effects of transmembrane pressure and crossflow velocity on rejection of oil droplets by pores of different cross-section are investigated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation. We found that in the absence of crossflow, the critical transmembrane pressure, which is required for the oil droplet entry into a circular pore of given surface hydrophobicity, agrees well with analytical predictions based on the Young-Laplace equation. With increasing crossflow velocity, the shape of the oil droplet residing at the pore entrance is elongated along the flow and the critical pressure increases. In the case of pores with an elliptical cross-section, the water flux through the membrane is enhanced, in agreement with simple analytical considerations. The results of the numerical simulations are used to outline strategies for the experimental design of porous filters for oil spill remediation and produced water treatment applications.

  15. Simulating shock-bubble interactions at water-gelatin interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Stefan; Kaiser, Jakob; Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Adams, Nikolaus

    2016-11-01

    Biomedical problems are often driven by fluid dynamics, as in vivo organisms are usually composed of or filled with fluids that (strongly) affected their physics. Additionally, fluid dynamical effects can be used to enhance certain phenomena or destroy organisms. As examples, we highlight the benign potential of shockwave-driven kidney-stone lithotripsy or sonoporation (acoustic cavitation of microbubbles) to improve drug delivery into cells. During the CTR SummerProgram 2016 we have performed axisymmetric three-phase simulations of a shock hitting a gas bubble in water near a gelatin interface mimicking the fundamental process during sonoporation. We used our multi-resolution finite volume method with sharp interface representation (level-set), WENO-5 shock capturing and interface scale-separation and compared the results with a diffuse-interface method. Qualitatively our simulation results agree well with the reference. Due to the interface treatment the pressure profiles are sharper in our simulations and bubble collapse dynamics are predicted at shorter time-scales. Validation with free-field collapse (Rayleigh collapse) shows very good agreement. The project leading to this application has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement No 667483).

  16. Effects of Concentration and Conformation of Surfactants on Phase Separation of Surfactant-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁银权; 邹宪武; 刘昊阳

    2004-01-01

    The effects of surfactants on the phase separation of surfactant-water-oil systems have been investigated by using discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. The phase separation speed and equilibrium configuration are dependent on the surfactant concentration and conformation. The equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface remains constant. With the increasing surfactant concentration, the equilibrium configuration crosses over from the disperse phase to the bicontinuous one. The crossover concentration is estimated. The conformation of the surfactant has little effect on the equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface,while it affects the equilibrium configuration after phase separation.

  17. A water and hydrocarbon emulsion for extracting residual oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verderevskiy, Yu.L.; Abramzon, A.A.; Gusev, V.I.; Kulikov, Yu.M.; Petrov, A.G.; Starosud, A.N.; Tavrin, A.Ye.; Zheranin, V.L.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to improve the oil displacing properties of the composition in conditions of high mineralization of the stratum waters and to reduce the cost of the emulsion. To do this, the water and hydrocarbon emulsion for extracting residual oil, which includes water, liquid hydrocarbons, water and oil soluble surfacants (PAV), contains oxyethylated alkylphenol of the OP-10 type as the water soluble surfacant and contains oxytehylated alkylphenol of the OP-4 type as the oil soluble surfacant in the following component relationship (percent by mass): oxyethylated alkylphenol of the OP-4 type, 3.9 to 5.5; oxyethylated alkylphenol of the OP-10 type, 0.1 to 0.2; liquid hydrocargon, 40 to 41 and water, the remainder.

  18. Structure and Dynamics of Water at Carbon-Based Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Martí

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Water structure and dynamics are affected by the presence of a nearby interface. Here, first we review recent results by molecular dynamics simulations about the effect of different carbon-based materials, including armchair carbon nanotubes and a variety of graphene sheets—flat and with corrugation—on water structure and dynamics. We discuss the calculations of binding energies, hydrogen bond distributions, water’s diffusion coefficients and their relation with surface’s geometries at different thermodynamical conditions. Next, we present new results of the crystallization and dynamics of water in a rigid graphene sieve. In particular, we show that the diffusion of water confined between parallel walls depends on the plate distance in a non-monotonic way and is related to the water structuring, crystallization, re-melting and evaporation for decreasing inter-plate distance. Our results could be relevant in those applications where water is in contact with nanostructured carbon materials at ambient or cryogenic temperatures, as in man-made superhydrophobic materials or filtration membranes, or in techniques that take advantage of hydrated graphene interfaces, as in aqueous electron cryomicroscopy for the analysis of proteins adsorbed on graphene.

  19. Powder wettability at a static air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupas, Julien; Forny, Laurent; Ramaioli, Marco

    2015-06-15

    The reconstitution of a beverage from a dehydrated powder involves several physical mechanisms that determine the practical difficulty to obtain a homogeneous drink in a convenient way and within an acceptable time for the preparation of a beverage. When pouring powder onto static water, the first hurdle to overcome is the air-water interface. We propose a model to predict the percentage of powder crossing the interface in 45 s, namely the duration relevant for this application. We highlight theoretically the determinant role of the contact angle and of the particle size distribution. We validate experimentally the model for single spheres and use it to predict the wettability performance of commercial food powders for different contact angles and particles sizes. A good agreement is obtained when comparing the predictions and the wettability of the tested powders.

  20. Experimental and computational studies of water drops falling through model oil with surfactant and subjected to an electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Ervik, Åsmund; Munkejord, Svend Tollak; Müller, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The behaviour of a single sub-millimetre-size water drop falling through a viscous oil while subjected to an electric field is of fundamental importance to industrial applications such as crude oil electrocoalescers. Detailed studies, both experimental and computational, have been performed previously, but an often challenging issue has been the characterization of the fluids. As numerous authors have noted, it is very difficult to have a perfectly clean water-oil system even for very pure model oils, and the presence of trace chemicals may significantly alter the interface behaviour. In this work, we consider a well- characterized water-oil system where controlled amounts of a surface active agent (Span 80) have been added to the oil. This addition dominates any trace contaminants in the oil, such that the interface behaviour can also be well-characterized. We present the results of experiments and corresponding two-phase- flow simulations of a falling water drop covered in surfactant and subjected to a mono...

  1. Surface complexation at calcium mineral-water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Liuming

    1994-01-01

    Surface reactions occurring at solid-water interfaces in calcium mineral-ligands systems have been studied. Both hydrous apatite and fluorite surfaces show clear amphoteric properties. An ion exchange process between lattice ions of F- on fluorite and OH- ions in bulk solution is discovered. The surface adsorption of Alizarin Red S and sodium oleate are determined. Surface chemical reaction models are established based on acidbase potentiometric titrations, solubility, adsorption and zeta-pot...

  2. Microbiological treatment of oil mill waste waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranalli, A.

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments of the biological treatment of the oil mill waste waters, deriving from continuous system, have been carried out with selected mutant ferments, adapted to rather forced toxic conditions. The commercial microbio formulations SNKD, LLMO and PSBIO have been utilized; the last two are liquid suspensions, constituted by living micro-organisms that, in contrast to those frozen or lyophilized, do not need be revitalized before their use and became completely active in short time. The experiments with the SNKD biological preparation were carried out both on filtered oil mill outflows (type A with an initial COD of approximately 43 g/l and on waste water dephenolized by Caro-acid (type B with a COD equal to 30 g/l. The experiments with LLMO and PSBIO complexes were conduced both on oil mill outflows filtered and diluted (ratio 1:0.5 with an initial COD equal to 44 g/l (type C, and on waste water that were filtered and preventatively subjected to a cryogenic treatment (type D, with an initial COD of approximately 22 g/l. The residual COD with the microbio formulation SNKD, was about 15 g/l (type A and 5 g/l (type B; with the PSBIO It was about 7 g/l (type C and 1.5 g/l (type D; with the microbio formulation LLMO it resulted in 6 g/l (type C and 1.3 g/l (type D.

    Han sido efectuadas pruebas de tratamiento biológico de alpechines, provenientes de sistemas continuos, con fermentos seleccionados adaptados a condiciones de toxicidad muy elevadas. Han sido utilizadas las formulaciones microbianas SNKD, LLMO y PSBIO; las dos últimas son suspensiones líquidas, constituidas por microorganismos vivos, los cuales a diferencia de los liofilizados o congelados, no deben ser revitalizados antes del uso; estos tienen una fase «lag» más breve y entran antes en completa actividad. Las pruebas con la preparación biológica SNKD han sido efectuadas en los alpechines filtrados (tipo A con DQO inicial alrededor de 43 g/l, y también con alpech

  3. SPECIATION OF HEAVY METALS AT WATER-SEDIMENT INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Ferronato

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to understand the equilibrium relationship between the heavy metals concentrations in superficial water and pore water. At  water-sediment interface, the equilibrium rapidly changed and it is influenced by chemico-physical parameters of aquatic ecosystems. The hydraulic safety of Bologna plain (North Italy depends on network of artificial canals and they are related with natural rivers of Reno basin (Reno river and its tributaries. The natural and artificial water courses flowed in agricultural, urban and industrial land. The heavy metals concentration in water and sediment discriminated the human pressure on the land and their spatial distribution in sediment could predict the hazard of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. We compared the heavy metals concentrations in pore water and superficial water determined in natural rivers and artificial canals, and more pollution in artificial canals than natural rivers was found. Furthermore, the coefficient of partition (log Kd between water and sediments was calculated to evaluate the bioavailability of heavy metals adsorbed on the sediments. The heavy metals extracted in deionised water at equilibrium after 16 h showed higher concentrations than those determined directly on water samples.

  4. Polydopamine Films from the Forgotten Air/Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzio, Florian; Payamyar, Payam; Schneider, Anne; Winterhalter, Mathias; Bour, Jérôme; Addiego, Frédéric; Krafft, Marie-Pierre; Hemmerle, Joseph; Ball, Vincent

    2014-10-02

    The formation of polydopamine under mild oxidation conditions from dopamine solutions with mechanical agitation leads to the formation of films that can functionalize all kinds of materials. In the absence of stirring of the solution, we report the formation of polydopamine films at the air/water interface (PDA A/W) and suggest that it arises from an homogeneous nucleation process. These films grow two times faster than in solution and can be deposited on hydrophilic or hydrophobic substrates by the Langmuir-Schaeffer technique. Thanks to this new method, porous and hydrophobic materials like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes can be completely covered with a 35 nm thick PDA A/W film after only 3h of reaction. Finally the oxidation of a monomer followed by a polymerization in water is not exclusive to polydopamine since we also transferred polyaniline functional films from the air/water interface to solid substrates. These findings suggest that self-assembly from a solution containing hydrophilic monomers undergoing a chemical transformation (here oxidation and oligomerization) could be a general method to produce films at the liquid/air interface.

  5. Mitigation of Oil in Water Column: Concept Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Project No. 4702 7. Author(s) Alexander Balsley, Dr. Michele Fitzpatrick, Peter A. Tebeau 8. Performing Report No. RDC UDI # 1291 9...of Mexico . Figure A-4. Sorbent pom-poms from the Detroit River 1996. Figure A-5. Vessel-Submerged Oil Recovery System. Mitigation of Oil in... Mexico Droplets from chemical and possibly natural dispersion. None Mitigation of Oil in Water Column: Concept Development B-2 UNCLAS//Public

  6. Oil spill dispersants. Risk assessment for Swedish waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, C.; Lager, H.; Fejes, J.

    2001-12-01

    IVL has compiled a list of the international usage of oil spill dispersants and presents the technical limitations with the use of such agents as well as the biological effects of these chemical products. IVL, has also conducted an analysis of the pros and cons to using dispersants against oil spills in waters and has applied this with a risk assessment of chemical methods to combat oil spills in the Kattegat and Skagerrak and the Baltic Sea.

  7. Identification of a wagging vibrational mode of water molecules at the water/vapor interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Angela; Neipert, Christine; Ridley, Christina; Space, Brian; Moore, Preston B

    2005-05-01

    An improved time correlation function description of sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy was applied to theoretically describe the water/vapor interface. The resulting spectra compare favorably in shape and relative magnitude to extant experimental results in the O-H stretching region of water. Further, the SFG spectra show a well-defined intermolecular mode at 875 cm(-1) that has significant intensity. The resonance is due to a wagging mode localized on a single water molecule. It represents a well-defined population of water molecules at the interface that, along with the free O-H modes, represent the dominant interfacial species.

  8. Separation kinetics of an oil-in-water emulsion under enhanced gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    The breakup of crude oil emulsions to produce clean oil and water phases is an important task in crude oil processing. We have investigated the demulsification kinetics of a model oil-in-water emulsion in a centrifugal field to mimic the forces acting on emulsion droplets in oil/water separators

  9. Effect of hydro-oleophobic perfluorocarbon chain on interfacial behavior and mechanism of perfluorooctane sulfonate in oil-water mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Pingping; Deng, Shubo; Du, Ziwen; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon chain of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is not only hydrophobic but also oleophobic, and its effect on PFOS distribution in oil-water mixture and underlying mechanism are unclear. For the first time, we propose that PFOS can emulsify oil-water mixture only in the presence of air, completely different from hydrocarbon surfactants. The perfluorocarbon chain repels hydrophobic compounds and its oleophobicity increases with decreasing polarity of organic solvents. The formed emulsion in oil phase contains high concentrations of PFOS, resulting in PFOS decrease in water. The increase of shaking speed and time as well as oil and air volume all increase the emulsification and decrease PFOS concentrations in water. During the settling process, the emulsion gradually disappears and the concentrated PFOS is released into water. The emulsification mechanism of PFOS based on air bubbles is proposed, and PFOS partitions to the interfaces of air bubbles with the hydro-oleophobic perfluorocarbon chain stretching into air bubbles and the polar head in water. This study clarifies the ambiguous understanding of the oleophobicity of perfluorocarbon chain in PFOS, and it is helpful for the understanding of the transport and fate of PFOS at oil-water interfaces in aquatic environments as well as the enhanced removal of PFOS from wastewater. PMID:28300199

  10. Effect of hydro-oleophobic perfluorocarbon chain on interfacial behavior and mechanism of perfluorooctane sulfonate in oil-water mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Pingping; Deng, Shubo; Du, Ziwen; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-03-16

    Perfluorocarbon chain of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is not only hydrophobic but also oleophobic, and its effect on PFOS distribution in oil-water mixture and underlying mechanism are unclear. For the first time, we propose that PFOS can emulsify oil-water mixture only in the presence of air, completely different from hydrocarbon surfactants. The perfluorocarbon chain repels hydrophobic compounds and its oleophobicity increases with decreasing polarity of organic solvents. The formed emulsion in oil phase contains high concentrations of PFOS, resulting in PFOS decrease in water. The increase of shaking speed and time as well as oil and air volume all increase the emulsification and decrease PFOS concentrations in water. During the settling process, the emulsion gradually disappears and the concentrated PFOS is released into water. The emulsification mechanism of PFOS based on air bubbles is proposed, and PFOS partitions to the interfaces of air bubbles with the hydro-oleophobic perfluorocarbon chain stretching into air bubbles and the polar head in water. This study clarifies the ambiguous understanding of the oleophobicity of perfluorocarbon chain in PFOS, and it is helpful for the understanding of the transport and fate of PFOS at oil-water interfaces in aquatic environments as well as the enhanced removal of PFOS from wastewater.

  11. Oil filaments produced by an impeller in a water stirred thank

    CERN Document Server

    Sanjuan-Galindo, Rene; Ascanio, Gabriel; Zenit, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    In this video, the mechanism followed to disperse an oil phase in water using a Scaba impeller in a cylindrical tank is presented. Castor oil (viscosity = 500 mPas) is used and the Reynolds number was fixed to 24,000. The process was recorded with a high-speed camera. Initially, the oil is at the air water interface. At the beginning of the stirring, the oil is dragged into the liquid bulk and rotates around the impeller shaft, then is pushed radially into the flow ejected by the impeller. In this region, the flow is turbulent and exhibits velocity gradients that contribute to elongate the oil phase. Viscous thin filaments are generated and expelled from the impeller. Thereafter, the filaments are elongated and break to form drops. This process is repeated in all the oil phase and drops are incorporated into the dispersion. Two main zones can be identified in the tank: the impeller discharge characterized by high turbulence and the rest of the flow where low velocity gradients appear. In this region surface f...

  12. Dynamic Polymer Brush at Polymer/Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hideaki; Inoue, Kazuma; Ito, Kohzo; Inutsuka, Manabu; Tanaka, Keiji; Yamada, Norifumi

    2015-03-01

    A layer of polymer chains tethered by one end to a surface is called polymer brush and known to show various unique properties such as anti-fouling. The surface segregation phenomena of copolymers with surface-active blocks should be useful for preparing such a brush layer in spontaneous process. We report hydrophilic polymer brushes formed at the interface between water and polymer by the segregation of amphiphilic diblock copolymers blended in a crosslinked rubbery matrix and call it ``dynamic polymer brush.'' In this system, the hydrophilic block with high surface energy avoids air surface, but segregates to cover the interface between hydrophobic elastomer and water. The structures of the brush layers at D2O/polymer interfaces were measured by neutron reflectivity. The dynamic polymer brush layer surprisingly reached 75% of the contour length of the chain and 2.7 chains/nm2. The brush density was surprisingly comparable to the polymer brush fabricated by the ``grafting-from'' method. We will discuss the dependence of the brush structure on molecular weight and block fraction of amphiphilic block copolymers. Such a surprisingly thick and dense polymer brush were induced by the large enthalpy gain of hydration of hydrophilic block.

  13. Free-Standing Graphene Oxide-Palygorskite Nanohybrid Membrane for Oil/Water Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueting; Su, Yanlei; Liu, Yanan; Li, Yafei; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2016-03-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an emerging kind of building block for advanced membranes with tunable passageway for water molecules. To synergistically manipulate the channel and surface structures/properties of GO-based membranes, the different building blocks are combined and the specific interfacial interactions are designed in this study. With vacuum-assisted filtration self-assembly, palygorskite nanorods are intercalated into adjacent GO nanosheets, and GO nanosheets are assembled into laminate structures through π-π stacking and cation cross-linking. The palygorskite nanorods in the free-standing GOP nanohybrid membranes take a 3-fold role, rendering enlarged mass transfer channels, elevating hydration capacity, and creating hierarchical nanostructures of membrane surfaces. Accordingly, the permeate fluxes from 267 L/(m(2) h) for GO membrane to 1867 L/(m(2) h) for GOP membrane. The hydration capacity and hierarchical nanostructures synergistically endow GOP membranes with underwater superoleophobic and low oil-adhesive water/membrane interfaces. Moreover, by rationally imparting chemical and physical joint defense mechanisms, the GOP membranes exhibit outstanding separation performance and antifouling properties for various oil-in-water emulsion systems (with different concentration, pH, or oil species). The high water permeability, high separation efficiency, as well as superior anti-oil-fouling properties of GOP membranes enlighten the great prospects of graphene-based nanostructured materials in water purification and wastewater treatment.

  14. Oil field produced water discharges into wetlands in Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Approximately 600 oil field produced water discharges are permitted in Wyoming by the State’s Department of Environmental Quality's (WDEQ) National Pollutant...

  15. Nonlinear Dynamic Characteristics of Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhaoqi; Han, Yunfeng; Ren, Yingyu; Yang, Qiuyi; Jin, Ningde

    2016-08-01

    In this article, the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of oil-in-water emulsions under the addition of surfactant were experimentally investigated. Firstly, based on the vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow experiment in 20 mm inner diameter (ID) testing pipe, dynamic response signals of oil-in-water emulsions were recorded using vertical multiple electrode array (VMEA) sensor. Afterwards, the recurrence plot (RP) algorithm and multi-scale weighted complexity entropy causality plane (MS-WCECP) were employed to analyse the nonlinear characteristics of the signals. The results show that the certainty is decreasing and the randomness is increasing with the increment of surfactant concentration. This article provides a novel method for revealing the nonlinear dynamic characteristics, complexity, and randomness of oil-in-water emulsions with experimental measurement signals.

  16. Protonated Melamine Sponge for Effective Oil/Water Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Feng; Huang, Hsiang-Ching; Chen, Liang-Ting

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we fabricated a superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic protonated melamine sponge for effective separation of water-rich immiscible oil/water mixtures with extremely high separation efficiency. This protonated melamine sponge exhibited excellent antifouling properties and could be used to separate oil/water mixtures continuously for up to 12 h without any increase in the oil content in filtrate. Moreover, our compressed protonated melamine sponge could separate both surfactant-free and -stabilized oil-in-water emulsions with high separation efficiencies. The high performance of this protonated melamine sponge and its efficient, energy- and cost-effective preparation suggest that it has great potential for use in practical applications.

  17. Produced Water Treatment for Beneficial Use: Emulsified Oil Removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waisi, B.I.H.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel carbon material, high accessible surface area, interconnected porosity, and stable nanofiber nonwoven media for emulsified oil droplets separation from oily wastewater, in particular for oilfields produced water treatment, is discussed in this thesis. Firstly, the quantity

  18. Water footprints of products of oil palm plantations and palm oil mills in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttayakul, Phetrada; H-Kittikun, Aran; Suksaroj, Chaisri; Mungkalasiri, Jitti; Wisansuwannakorn, Ruthairat; Musikavong, Charongpun

    2016-01-15

    The water footprint (WF) of fresh fruit bunches (FFBs) from oil palm plantations and crude palm oil (CPO) from palm oil mills in southern and eastern Thailand were determined over 25 years. Climatic conditions, soil characteristics, and the characteristics of oil palm growth were considered. The WF of FFBs was 1063 m(3)/ton (t) on average. Green, blue, and grey waters comprised of 68, 18, and 14% of total WF, respectively. The oil palm plantations in Thailand required smaller amounts of indirect blue water. The average WF for producing a ton of CPO of seven mills was 5083 m(3). Most of the waters used in the mills originated from indirect green, blue and grey waters from the plantations. The direct blue water used in the mills had less impact on the total WF, lower than 1% of the total WF. Average percentages of green, blue, and grey waters of 69, 16, and 15% of total WF were determined for the mills, respectively. The water deprivation of the FFBs and CPO ranged from 0.73-12.9 and 3.44-58.3 m(3)H2Oeq/t, respectively. In 2013, the CPO production in Thailand including green, blue, and grey waters from plantation and blue water from mills required 11,343 million m(3) water. If the oil palm variety Suratthani 7 is used in the plantation, it would increase the yield from 15.2 to 22.8 t FFBs/ha-year and decrease the WF to 888 m(3)/t FFBs. The average value of the oil extraction rate (OER) of mills was 18.1%. With an increase in the OER of 1%, a reduction of the WF of 250 m(3)/t CPO or 5.1% of total WF could be obtained.

  19. Removal of oil droplets from contaminated water using magnetic carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Lin, Kun-Yi; Jing, Benxin; Krylova, Galyna; Sigmon, Ginger E; McGinn, Paul; Zhu, Yingxi; Na, Chongzheng

    2013-08-01

    Water contaminated by oil and gas production poses challenges to the management of America's water resources. Here we report the design, fabrication, and laboratory evaluation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for oil-water separation. As revealed by confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy, the magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) remove oil droplets through a two-step mechanism, in which MCNTs are first dispersed at the oil-water interface and then drag the droplets with them out of water by a magnet. Measurements of removal efficiency with different initial oil concentration, MCNT dose, and mixing time show that kinetics and equilibrium of the separation process can be described by the Langmuir model. Separation capacity qt is a function of MCNT dose m, mixing time t, and residual oil concentration Ce at equilibrium: [Formula in text] where qmax, kw, and K are maximum separation capacity, wrapping rate constant, and equilibrium constant, respectively. Least-square regressions using experimental data estimate qmax = 6.6(± 0.6) g-diesel g-MCNT(-1), kw = 3.36(± 0.03) L g-diesel(-1) min(-1), and K = 2.4(± 0.2) L g-diesel(-1). For used MCNTs, we further show that over 80% of the separation capacity can be restored by a 10 min wash with 1 mL ethanol for every 6 mg MCNTs. The separation by reusable MCNTs provides a promising alternative strategy for water treatment design complementary to existing ones such as coagulation, adsorption, filtration, and membrane processes.

  20. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF PURIFICATION PROCESS OF OIL CONTAMINATED WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С. Бойченко

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Sorption properties of carbonic sorbents on natural raw materials for purification of waste waters frompetroleum products are investigated. Temperature influence on sumption properties of sorbents on naturalraw materials to increase the purification degree of water ecosystem is studied. Mathematical model ofpurification process of oil contaminated waters is developed

  1. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF PURIFICATION PROCESS OF OIL CONTAMINATED WATERS

    OpenAIRE

    С. Бойченко; Кучер, О.; Л. Павлюх

    2012-01-01

    Sorption properties of carbonic sorbents on natural raw materials for purification of waste waters frompetroleum products are investigated. Temperature influence on sumption properties of sorbents on naturalraw materials to increase the purification degree of water ecosystem is studied. Mathematical model ofpurification process of oil contaminated waters is developed

  2. Water Flooding Development and Enhanced Oil Recovery of Daqing Oilfields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Zefu; Yue Dengtai; Rong Jiashu

    1997-01-01

    @@ The Daqing oil region consists of typical sand oilfields formed by a large inland shallow water lake basin and riverdelta. It is characterized by multiple reservoirs, extreme heterogeneity, and insufficient natural oil reservoir energy. A comparatively long period of high stable yield and high efficiency recovery was achieved in the initial stage of development through the use of the hydraulic pressure drive technique, which manually injected water to maintain formation pressure.

  3. Ice Nucleation Near the Surfactant-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Caleb; Cantrell, Will; Taylor, Caroline

    2008-03-01

    Ice nucleation is a fundamental component of the atmospheric mechanisms driving the formation of clouds. Atmospheric nucleation occurs with a variety of compounds and conditions, but understanding the behavior of water is key in all cases. We have used multiscale molecular simulations to study heterogeneous nucleation in clouds, probing the influence of long-chain alcohols on the freezing of water droplets. Ice nucleation occurs at a finite distance from the heterogeneous surface, due to the disruption of the hydrogen bond network in response to the surfactant-water interface. The penetration depth of the disturbance is found to be dependent upon the chain length and surface organization, as well as the acidity of the terminal alcohol group.

  4. Water at an electrochemical interface - a simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, Adam; Reed, Stewart; Madden, Paul; Chandler, David

    2008-08-22

    The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the properties of water in an aqueous ionic solution close to an interface with a model metallic electrode are described. In the simulations the electrode behaves as an ideally polarizable hydrophilic metal, supporting image charge interactions with charged species, and it is maintained at a constant electrical potential with respect to the solution so that the model is a textbook representation of an electrochemical interface through which no current is passing. We show how water is strongly attracted to and ordered at the electrode surface. This ordering is different to the structure that might be imagined from continuum models of electrode interfaces. Further, this ordering significantly affects the probability of ions reaching the surface. We describe the concomitant motion and configurations of the water and ions as functions of the electrode potential, and we analyze the length scales over which ionic atmospheres fluctuate. The statistics of these fluctuations depend upon surface structure and ionic strength. The fluctuations are large, sufficiently so that the mean ionic atmosphere is a poor descriptor of the aqueous environment near a metal surface. The importance of this finding for a description of electrochemical reactions is examined by calculating, directly from the simulation, Marcus free energy profiles for transfer of charge between the electrode and a redox species in the solution and comparing the results with the predictions of continuum theories. Significant departures from the electrochemical textbook descriptions of the phenomenon are found and their physical origins are characterized from the atomistic perspective of the simulations.

  5. Stable highly hydrophobic and oleophilic meshes for oil water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingjun; Cui, Zhe; Xiao, Yi; Chen, Qingmin

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes a simple method for fabricating both highly hydrophobic and oleophilic meshes by coating thin fluoro-containing films. The static contact angle of such meshes is greater than 150° for water, and close to 0° for kerosene, xylene and toluene. These meshes can separate water from oil effectively without resorting to any extra power or chemical agent. Moreover, they exhibited stable water resisting, anti-chemical erosion and anti-hot aging properties. It promises as a candidate for the separation of oil and water.

  6. Layered double hydroxide functionalized textile for effective oil/water separation and selective oil adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Ge, Lei; Li, Wei; Wang, Xiuzhong; Li, Feng

    2015-01-14

    The removal of oil and organic pollutants from water is highly desired due to frequent oil spill accidents, as well as the increase of industrial oily wastewater. Here, superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textile has been successfully prepared for the application of effective oil/water separation and selective oil adsorption. This textile was fabricated by functionalizing the commercial textile with layered double hydroxide (LDH) microcrystals and low surface energy molecules. The LDH microcrystals were immobilized on the microfibers of the textile through an in situ growth method, and they formed a nestlike microstructure. The combination of the hierarchical structure and the low surface energy molecules made the textile superhydrophobic and superoleophilic. Further experiments demonstrated that the as-prepared textile not only can be applied as effective membrane materials for the separation of oil and water mixtures with high separation efficiency (>97%), but also can be used as a bag for the selective oil adsorption from water. Thus, such superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textile is a very promising material for the application of oil spill cleanup and industrial oily wastewater treatment.

  7. Distribution of Complex Chemicals in Oil-Water Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad

    . In order to inhibit gas hydrate formation in subsea pipelines monoethylene glycol (MEG) and methanol are injected in large amounts. It is important to know the distribution of these chemicals in oil and water systems for economical operation of a production facility and to evaluate their impact on marine...... life. Furthermore distribution of chemicals is important information for downstream processing of oil and gas. The purpose of this project is the experimental measurement and the thermodynamic modeling of distribution of these complex chemicals in oil-water systems. Traditionally distribution...... and limited information about the molecular structure of production chemicals the correlation could only be obtained for few families like alcohols, glycols and alkanolamines with varying degree of reliability. In order to develop a thermodynamic model for the distribution of chemicals in oil-water systems...

  8. Closed Pore Structured NiCo2O4-Coated Nickel Foams for Stable and Effective Oil/Water Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zheng, Xi; Yan, Zhanheng; Tian, Dongliang; Ma, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaofang; Jiang, Lei

    2017-08-30

    To solve the serious problem caused by oily wastewater pollution, unique interface designs, for example, membranes with superwetting properties such as superhydrophobicity/superoleophilicity and superhydrophilicity/underwater superoleophobicity, provide a good way to achieve oil/water separation. Here, inspired by the liquid storage property of the honeycomb structure, we propose a strategy to fabricate NiCo2O4-coated nickel foams for stable and efficient oil/water separation. NiCo2O4 with a closed-pore structure was formed by assembling nanoflakes with a micro/nanoscale hierarchical structure. Compared with nickel foam coated by NiCo2O4 with an open-pore structure (NiCo2O4 nanowires), the enclosed nanostructure of NiCo2O4 nanoflakes can firmly hold water for a more stable superhydrophilic/underwater superoleophobic interface. As a consequence, the NiCo2O4-nanoflake-coated nickel foam has a larger oil breakthrough pressure than the NiCo2O4-nanowire-coated nickel foam because of a slightly larger oil advancing angle and a lower underwater oil adhesion force, which makes it more stable and efficient for oil/water separation. Moreover, the NiCo2O4-coated nickel foams have excellent chemical and mechanical stability, and they are reusable for oil-water separation. This work will be beneficial for the design and development of stable underwater superoleophobic self-cleaning materials and related device applications, such as oil/water separation.

  9. Radiolytic hydrogen generation at silicon carbide–water interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schofield, Jennifer [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Reiff, Sarah C. [Radiation Laboratory and Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Pimblott, Simon M. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); LaVerne, Jay A., E-mail: laverne.1@nd.edu [Radiation Laboratory and Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    While many of the proposed uses of SiC in the nuclear industry involve systems that are assumed to be dry, almost all materials have dissociated chemisorbed water associated with their surface, which can undergo chemistry in radiation fields. Silicon carbide α-phase and β-phase nanoparticles with water were irradiated with γ-rays and 5 MeV {sup 4}He ions followed by the determination of the production of molecular hydrogen, H{sub 2}, and characterization of changes in the particle surface. The yields of H{sub 2} from SiC–water slurries were always greater than expected from a simple mixture rule indicating that the presence of SiC was influencing the production of H{sub 2} from water, probably through an energy transfer from the solid to liquid phase. Although the increase in H{sub 2} yields was modest, a decrease in the water mass percentage led to an increase in H{sub 2} yields, especially for very low amounts of water. Surface analysis techniques included diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), nitrogen absorption with the Brunauer – Emmett – Teller (BET) methodology for surface area determination, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Little change in the SiC surface was observed following radiolysis except for some conversion of β-phase SiC to the α-phase and the formation of SiO{sub 2} with He ion radiolysis. - Highlights: • SiC–water interfaces were irradiated with γ-rays and 5 MeV He ions. • Hydrogen production from SiC–water slurries was greater than that for pure water. • Raman spectroscopy shows conversion of the α-phase SiC to the β-phase. • He ion radiolysis resulted in the formation of SiO{sub 2} on the surface.

  10. Features of mixing micellar muds with oil and water in their influence on efficiency of oil displacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Y.; Lu, G.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study was made of the process of mixing micellar muds (MM) and different composition with oil and water (a total of 150 samples), and also the influence of this mixing on the efficient displacement of oil with the use of MM to increase oil output. It has been indicated that the process of mixing MM with oil and water can be examined as a process of diffusion. It is described by the second law of Fick. In this case the coefficient of diffusion depends on the concentration of salt in water: with an increase in concentration of salt in water, the coefficient of diffusion of MM in water is diminished, and in oil increases. In addition, the coefficient of diffusion depends on the viscosity of MM, and is higher if the initial concentration of the diffused substance is high. It was found that in the process of mixing MM with oil in water, emulsification of dilution and selected emulsification and MM of different compositions can be divided into four types: does not emulsify in oil and water; does not emulsify in oil, but emulsifies in water; emulsifies in oil but does not emulsify in water, and emulsifies in oil and water. It was established that of the aforementioned four types of MM, type one has the highest effective displacement of oil. Injection initially of MM of type two, and then type 3 results in even higher efficiency of oil displacement.

  11. Simultaneous extraction of oil- and water-soluble phase from sunflower seeds with subcritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravber, Matej; Knez, Željko; Škerget, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the subcritical water extraction is proposed as an alternative and greener processing method for simultaneous removal of oil- and water-soluble phase from sunflower seeds. Extraction kinetics were studied at different temperatures and material/solvent ratios in a batch extractor. Degree of hydrothermal degradation of oils was observed by analysing amount of formed free fatty acids and their antioxidant capacities. Results were compared to oils obtained by conventional methods. Water soluble extracts were analysed for total proteins, carbohydrates and phenolics and some single products of hydrothermal degradation. Highest amount of oil was obtained at 130 °C at a material/solvent ratio of 1/20 g/mL after 30 min of extraction. For all obtained oils minimal degree of hydrothermal degradation could be identified. High antioxidant capacities of oil samples could be observed. Water soluble extracts were degraded at temperatures ≥100 °C, producing various products of hydrothermal degradation.

  12. Determination of oil/water and octanol/water distribution coefficients from aqueous solutions from four fossil fuels. [MS thesis; in oil-water and octanol-water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.L.

    1984-07-01

    Liquid fossil fuels, both petroleum and synthetically derived oils, are exceedingly complex mixtures of thousands of components. The effect of many of these energy-related components on the environment is largely unknown. Octanol/water distribution coefficients relate both to toxicity and to the bioaccumulation potential of chemical components. Use of these partition data in conjunction with component concentrations in the oils in environmental models provides important information on the fate of fossil fuel components when released to the environment. Octanol/water distribution data are not available for many energy-related organic compounds, and those data that are available have been determined for individual components in simple, one-component octanol/water equilibrium mixtures. In this study, methods for determining many octanol/water distribution coefficients from aqueous extracts of oil products were developed. Sample aqueous mixtures were made by equilibrating liquid fossil fuels with distilled water. This approach has the advantage of detecting interactions between components of interest and other sample components. Compound types studied included phenols, nitrogen bases, hydrocarbons, sulfur heterocyclic compounds, and carboxylic acids. Octanol/water distribution coefficients that were determined in this study ranged from 9.12 for aniline to 67,600 for 1,2-dimethylnaphthalene. Within a compound type, distribution coefficients increased logarithmically with increasing alkyl substitution and molecular weight. Additionally, oil/water distribution data were determined for oil components. These data are useful in predicting maximum environmental concentrations in water columns. 96 references, 26 figures, and 40 tables.

  13. Colloidal templating at a cholesteric-oil interface: assembly guided by an array of disclination lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintuvuori, J S; Pawsey, A C; Stratford, K; Cates, M E; Clegg, P S; Marenduzzo, D

    2013-05-03

    We simulate colloids (radius R ~ 1 μm) trapped at the interface between a cholesteric liquid crystal and an immiscible oil at which the helical order (pitch p) in the bulk conflicts with the orientation induced at the interface, stabilizing an ordered array of disclinations. For a weak anchoring strength W of the director field at the colloidal surface, this creates a template, favoring particle positions either on top of or midway between defect lines, depending on α=R/p. For small α, optical microscopy experiments confirm this picture, but for larger α no templating is seen. This may stem from the emergence at moderate W of a rugged energy landscape associated with defect reconnections.

  14. Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruple, John; Keiter, Robert

    2010-12-31

    Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not – unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nation’s future.

  15. Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruple, John [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Keiter, Robert [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not – unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nation’s future.

  16. Oil capture from a water surface by a falling sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, Linda; McLaughlin, Clare; Witelski, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    When a spherical particle is dropped from rest into an oil lens that floats on top of a water surface, a portion of the oil adheres to the sphere. Once the sphere comes to rest at the subsurface, the oil forms a pendant drop that remains attached in equilibrium to the sphere effectively removing oil from the water surface. Best fit solutions of the Laplace equation to experimental profiles are used to investigate the parameter dependence of the radius of curvature and the filling and contact angles at the three-phase contact line of the pendant drop for spheres with different wetting properties, densities and radii. The volume of oil captured by a sphere increases with a sphere's mass and diameter. However, lighter and smaller spheres capture more oil relative to their own volume than do heavier and larger spheres (scaling with the sphere mass ~M - 0 . 544) and are thus more efficient at removing oil from a water surface. The authors wish to acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation Grant Nos. DMS-0707755 and DMS-0968252.

  17. Efficacy of experimental Newcastle disease water-in-oil oil-emulsion vaccines formulated from squalane and squalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, H D; Xie, Z X

    1990-01-01

    Water-in-oil inactivated Newcastle disease oil-emulsion vaccines were formulated with the terpene oils squalane or squalene, or mixtures thereof, and injected into 4-week-old broilers. Vaccine efficacy based on hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) titers was comparable to that of control mineral oil vaccines. Tissue reaction to intramuscular injection of the terpene oil emulsion vaccines was greatly reduced 3 weeks post-vaccination compared with that of mineral oil-based vaccine. Viscosity of the terpene oil vaccines was satisfactory but increased three to four times that of mineral oil vaccine when the antigen phase volume increased from 5% to 20%.

  18. The Use of Demulsifiers for Separating Water from Anthracene Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zečević, N.

    2008-03-01

    increasing aromaticity. It is also used for determination of the Bureau of Mines Correlation Index (BMCI,2 which is obtained either from density and midboiling point, or from density andviscosity for those feedstocks which cannot be distilled completely. This index is used by the carbon black industry as an important criteria for feedstock evaluation.The sulphur fraction in feedstocks should not exceed w = 2.5 ·10–2, because a higher content greatly affects the quality of carbon black, pollutes the atmosphere, and accelerates corrosion of the facility. The maximum sulphur content in the typical hydrocarbon feedstock is w = 1.2 · 10–2.3. A very important factor of hydrocarbon feedstock is the fraction of alkaline earth metals, especially sodium and potassium. The maximum sodium fraction may be w = 20·10–6, while the maximum potassium fraction is w = 2·10 –6.The maximum fraction of asphalthenes is w = 15 ·10–2. Asphalthenes, determined as pentane-insoluble matter, provide indications concerning the possibility of grit formation. Another very important factor is the temperature range of distillation, which should be low enough, because the hydrocarbon feedstock must evaporize before entering the hot region of the reactor. The viscosity, the pour point, and for safety reasons, the flash point determines the handling properties and storage conditions of the feedstock.In addition, the water fraction in the hydrocarbon feedstock is one of the most important factors. The water fraction in hydrocarbon feedstock influences the handling properties of the same. The maximum water fraction in hydrocarbon feedstock may be w = 2.0·10–2, and desirably below w = 1.0·10–2. A higher water fraction represent a considerable impact on the financial construction. Also, it is very difficult to manipulate such feedstock, especially unloading, and in the production of oil-furnace carbon black. Namely, every water fraction higher than w = 2.0·10–2 in the hydrocarbon feedstock

  19. The effect of the aging over the viscosity and the stability of oil emulsion kind water-oil; Efeito do envelhecimento sobre viscosidade e estabilidade de emulsoes de petroleo do tipo agua-oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramalho, Joao Batista V. Silva [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Setor de Tecnologia de Processamento e Transporte]. E-mail: jramalho@cenpes.petrobras.com.br

    2000-07-01

    During the process of oil producing, is common the appearance of emulsions formed by drops of water scattered in the oil, balanced by the presence of natural emulsifiers in the interface region. Those emulsions present higher viscosities to the dehydrated oil, influencing in the design of the transference, processing and production equipment. According as those emulsions get older, increase the absorption of those emulsifiers in the interface and, therefore, increase the stability of those emulsions. The results of the tests, in laboratory, are presented with the emulsion synthesized with 50% water content in volume, being appraised the dynamic viscosity and the efficiency of water-oil gravitational separation in the first day in which the emulsion was prepared, in the 15 deg C, 30 deg C, 45 deg C and 60 deg C following days, when were observed increments on the viscosity and in the emulsion stability in function of the aging. (author)

  20. Selection of potential cold water marine species for testing of oil dispersants, and chemically dispersed oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R.A. [Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2000-07-01

    A study regarding marine species for toxicity testing for Alaska conditions was presented and the potential adverse impacts of a large marine oil spill in cold water were discussed with the objective to determine if the spill should be treated by the use of oil dispersants. Without dispersion, the oil can pollute marine epifauna and can deposit on beaches. The decision to apply dispersants to a marine oil spill requires knowledge of the toxicity of the undispersed oil to pelagic marine life occurring via natural dispersion as opposed to the toxicity of the oil-dispersant mixture. Most standard toxicity tests apply to warm water species. This paper discussed the need to have a standard test species relevant to Alaska waters for toxicity testing. In this study, toxicity testing was done according to the methods of the Chemical Response to Oil Spills : Ecological Effects Research Forum (CROSERF). The testing included capturing adult species in the winter and holding them until larval hatching. Toxicity testing was completed in a narrow time frame before hatching ceased. Many chemical samples were tested. Topsmelt, urchins, shellfish, mysids, copepods, pink salmon fry, and tidepool sculpin were considered by the author to be the most useful for certain types of toxicity testing. 29 refs.

  1. Oil palm plantation effects on water quality in Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, K. M.; Curran, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    Global demand for palm oil has stimulated a 7-fold increase in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) plantation area in Indonesia since 1990. Expansion will continue as Indonesia plans to double current production by 2020. Oil palm fertilizers, effluent from oil palm mills, and erosion from land clearing and roads threaten river water quality near plantations. These rivers provide essential ecosystem services including water for drinking, cooking, and washing. Robust empirical measurements of plantation expansion impacts on water resources are necessary to discern the effects of agribusiness on local livelihoods and ecosystems. In Ketapang District, West Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo, we evaluated the effects of land cover change on water quality by assessing water chemistry in streams draining four end-member watersheds ( ~600-1900 ha watershed-1): Logged forest, mixed agro-forest dominated by rubber and upland rice fallows, young oil palm forest (0-5 years), and old oil palm forest (10-15 years). To assess land cover change, we used CLASLite software to derive fractional cover from a time series (1989-2008) of Landsat data. Nearest neighbor classification and post-classification change detection yielded classes including primary forest, logged forest, secondary forest regrowth, smallholder agriculture, and oil palm. Stream water quality (temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, optical chlorphyll, and pH) and quantity (discharge) were quantified with the YSI 6600-V2 sonde. The sonde was deployed in each stream for month-long intervals 2-3 times from 2009-2010. Such extended deployment captures episodic events such as intense storms and allows examination of interdiel dynamics by sampling continuously and at high frequency, every 10 minutes. We find that across the Ketapang District study region (~12,000 km2), oil palm has cleared mostly forests (49%) and agroforests (39%). What are the impacts of such land cover changes on water quality? Compared to forests and

  2. Cleaning of Oil Fouling with Water Enabled by Zwitterionic Polyelectrolyte Coatings: Overcoming the Imperative Challenge of Oil-Water Separation Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ke; Duan, Haoran; Chen, George Y; Liu, Xiaokong; Yang, Wensheng; Wang, Dayang

    2015-09-22

    Herein we report a self-cleaning coating derived from zwitterionic poly(2-methacryloyloxylethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) brushes grafted on a solid substrate. The PMPC surface not only exhibits complete oil repellency in a water-wetted state (i.e., underwater superoleophobicity), but also allows effective cleaning of oil fouled on dry surfaces by water alone. The PMPC surface was compared with typical underwater superoleophobic surfaces realized with the aid of surface roughening by applying hydrophilic nanostructures and those realized by applying smooth hydrophilic polyelectrolyte multilayers. We show that underwater superoleophobicity of a surface is not sufficient to enable water to clean up oil fouling on a dry surface, because the latter circumstance demands the surface to be able to strongly bond water not only in its pristine state but also in an oil-wetted state. The PMPC surface is unique with its described self-cleaning performance because the zwitterionic phosphorylcholine groups exhibit exceptional binding affinity to water even when they are already wetted by oil. Further, we show that applying this PMPC coating onto steel meshes produces oil-water separation membranes that are resilient to oil contamination with simply water rinsing. Consequently, we provide an effective solution to the oil contamination issue on the oil-water separation membranes, which is an imperative challenge in this field. Thanks to the self-cleaning effect of the PMPC surface, PMPC-coated steel meshes can not only separate oil from oil-water mixtures in a water-wetted state, but also can lift oil out from oil-water mixtures even in a dry state, which is a very promising technology for practical oil-spill remediation. In contrast, we show that oil contamination on conventional hydrophilic oil-water separation membranes would permanently induce the loss of oil-water separation function, and thus they have to be always used in a completely water-wetted state, which significantly

  3. [Near infrared spectroscopy study on water content in turbine oil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with successive projections algorithm (SPA) was investigated for determination of water content in turbine oil. Through the 57 samples of different water content in turbine oil scanned applying near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, with the water content in the turbine oil of 0-0.156%, different pretreatment methods such as the original spectra, first derivative spectra and differential polynomial least squares fitting algorithm Savitzky-Golay (SG), and successive projections algorithm (SPA) were applied for the extraction of effective wavelengths, the correlation coefficient (R) and root mean square error (RMSE) were used as the model evaluation indices, accordingly water content in turbine oil was investigated. The results indicated that the original spectra with different water content in turbine oil were pretreated by the performance of first derivative + SG pretreatments, then the selected effective wavelengths were used as the inputs of least square support vector machine (LS-SVM). A total of 16 variables selected by SPA were employed to construct the model of SPA and least square support vector machine (SPA-LS-SVM). There is 9 as The correlation coefficient was 0.975 9 and the root of mean square error of validation set was 2.655 8 x 10(-3) using the model, and it is feasible to determine the water content in oil using near infrared spectroscopy and SPA-LS-SVM, and an excellent prediction precision was obtained. This study supplied a new and alternative approach to the further application of near infrared spectroscopy in on-line monitoring of contamination such as water content in oil.

  4. Interfacial behaviour between oil/water systems using ionic surfactants from regional vegetable industry and animal pet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Francisco Klebson G.; Alves, Juan V.A.; Dantas, Tereza N. Castro; Dutra Junior, Tarcilio V.; Barros Neto, Eduardo L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Interfacial tension (IFT) is one of the most important physical properties in the study of fluid-fluid interfaces. In this research the surfactants - saponified coconut oil, saponified castor oil, saponified soybean oil, saponified sunflower oil and basis soap - were synthesized in laboratory, using carboxylic acids from regional industry and animal fat (bovine fat). This study focuses on the search of a high-efficient, low-cost, and safe for the environment flooding system to be applied in enhanced oil recovery. The principal aim of this work is the obtaining of interfacial tensions between oil/water systems, using the developed ionic surfactants. Results showed that the studied surfactants are able to reduce the IFT between oil and brine. The surfactant that was more effective in reducing the IFT value was the one from animal fat. The composition, as well as the kind of the bond, as saturated or unsaturated, of the surfactants has influence in the IFT value. The ionic surfactants from regional industry and animal fat besides presenting low cost propitiate very low interfacial tensions between oil and brine, favoring the interactions with residual oil and thus increasing oil recovery. (author)

  5. Physical and Oxidative Stability of Fish Oil-In-Water Emulsions Stabilized with Fish Protein Hydrolysates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Moreno, Pedro Jesús; Guadix, Antonio; Guadix, Emilia M.

    2016-01-01

    The emulsifying and antioxidant properties of fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) for the physical and oxidative stabilization of 5% (by weight) fish oil-in-water emulsions were investigated. Muscle proteins from sardine (Sardina pilchardus) and small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) were......% yielded a physically stable emulsion with low concentration of unsaturated aldehydes. These results show the potential of FPH as alternative protein emulsifiers for the production of oxidatively stable fish oil-in-water emulsions....... hydrolyzed to degrees of hydrolysis (DH) of 3-4-5-6% with subtilisin. Sardine hydrolysates with low DH, 3% and 4%, presented the most effective peptides to physically stabilize emulsions with smaller droplet size. This implied more protein adsorbed at the interface to act as physical barrier against...

  6. Alkyl Chain Length Dependent Structural and Orientational Transformations of Water at Alcohol-Water Interfaces and Its Relevance to Atmospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Jahur A; Namboodiri, V; Mathi, P; Singh, Ajay K

    2017-04-06

    Although the hydrophobic size of an amphiphile plays a key role in various chemical, biological, and atmospheric processes, its effect at macroscopic aqueous interfaces (e.g., air-water, oil-water, cell membrane-water, etc.), which are ubiquitous in nature, is not well understood. Here we report the hydrophobic alkyl chain length dependent structural and orientational transformations of water at alcohol (CnH2n+1OH, n = 1-12)-water interfaces using interface-selective heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (HD-VSFG) and Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) spectroscopic techniques. The HD-VSFG results reveal that short-chain alcohols (CnH2n+1OH, n alcohols (CnH2n+1OH, n > 4, i.e., beyond 1-butanol) make the interfacial water more strongly H-bonded and reversely orientated; the OH stretch band maximum appears at ∼3200 cm(-1), and the H atoms are pointed away from the bulk water, that is, "H-up" oriented. Interestingly, for the alcohol of intermediate chain length (CnH2n+1OH, n = 4, i.e, 1-butanol), the interface is quite unstable even after hours of its formation and the time-averaged result is qualitatively similar to that of the long-chain alcohols, indicating a structural/orientational crossover of interfacial water at the 1-butanol-water interface. pH-dependent HD-VSFG measurements (with H2O as well as isotopically diluted water, HOD) suggest that the structural/orientational transformation of water at the long-chain alcohol-water interface is associated with the adsorption of OH(-) anion at the interface. Vibrational mapping of the water structure in the hydration shell of OH(-) anion (obtained by Raman-MCR spectroscopy of NaOH in HOD) clearly shows that the water becomes strongly H-bonded (OH stretch max. ≈ 3200 cm(-1)) while hydrating the OH(-) anion. Altogether, it is conceivable that alcohols of different hydrophobic chain lengths that are present in the troposphere will differently affect the interfacial electrostatics and

  7. Adsorption at the biocompatible α-pinene-water interface and emulsifying properties of two eco-friendly surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Cayado, Luis Alfonso; Ramírez, Pablo; Alfaro, María Carmen; Ruíz, Manuela; Muñoz, José

    2014-10-01

    In this contribution, we provide an accurate characterization at the α-pinene/water interface of two commercial polyoxytheylene glycerol ester surfactants which differ in the number of ethylene oxide (EO) groups, comprising a systematic analysis of interfacial pressure isotherms, dynamic curves, interfacial rheology and emulsifying properties. Polyoxyethylene glycerol esters derived from cocoa oil are non-ionic surfactants obtained from a renewable source which fulfill the environmental and toxicological requirements to be used as eco-friendly emulsifying agents. α-Pinene is a renewable biosolvent completely insoluble in water, which could find numerous applications. Interfacial rheology and equilibrium interfacial pressure data fitted a rigorous reorientation model that assumes that the surfactant molecules, when adsorbed at the interface, can acquire two orientations. The surfactant with the highest number of EO groups (Levenol C201) turned out to be more surface active at the α-pinene/water interface. In addition, the surfactant with the lowest number of EO groups (Levenol H&B) is solubilized into the adjacent oil phase. Slightly concentrated α-pinene emulsions were obtained using both surfactants. Nevertheless, more stable α-pinene emulsions with smaller droplet sizes and lower polidispersity were obtained when Levenol C201 was used as emulsifier instead of Levenol H&B. The systematic characterization presented in this work provides important new findings on the interfacial and emulsifying properties of polyoxytheylene glycerol ester surfactants, which can be applied in the rational development of new biocompatible products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of structure-property relationships of Tween 80 surfactants in water and at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xueming; Huston, Kyle J; Larson, Ronald G

    2014-11-13

    We build a united atom model for Tween 80 (polyoxyethylene sorbitan oleates), based on the GROMOS53A6(OXY+D) force field, and apply it to two stereoisomers, three constitutional isomers, and three structures with one, two, and three tails, to represent components in the Tween 80 commercial mixture. In a preassembled micelle containing 60 molecules, the distribution of Tween tail and ethylene oxide head groups is found to be insensitive to stereoisomerization but sensitive to changes in relative lengths of the four polyoxyethylene head groups. At the air-water and oil-water interfaces, the interfacial tension is significantly lower for the constitutional isomer with a shorter W headgroup, which attaches the tail to the sorbitan ring, and for Tween 80 isomers with more than one tail group. The results indicate the possible scope for improvement in the design of polyoxyethylene sorbitan oleates with improved surface tension reduction or better spreading at the oil-water interface. We also report surfactant component distribution profiles within preassembled micelles and at interfaces that can be used for validating coarse-grained surfactant models needed for simulation of self-assembly of Tween 80 surfactant mixtures.

  9. Adsorption of 1-Monoglycerides at the Hexane/Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami; Motomura

    1999-12-15

    The interfacial tension of a hexane solution of 1-monolaurin against water was measured as a function of temperature and concentration under atmospheric pressure. The thermodynamic quantity changes associated with the adsorption of 1-monolaurin were evaluated and compared with those of the previously reported 1-monomyristin. The decrease of two carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon chain results in a slight expansion of the 1-monolaurin adsorbed film and in a slight decrease in entropy and energy changes compared with those of the 1-monomyristin system. The large negative value of the entropy change at a high concentration is related to the restricted orientation of the polar head group of 1-monolaurin at the hexane/water interface due to the strong interaction between the large hydrophilic group of 1-monolaurin and the water molecules, as in the 1-monomyristin system. The origin of the distinction in the entropy change behavior between the adsorption from the hexane phase and water phase was discussed. The usefulness of an easier calculation process for the partial molar entropy change is verified by comparison with the usual reliable value and with the entropy of adsorption. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  10. Molecular simulation of the magnetite-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bylaska, Eric J.

    2003-03-01

    This paper reports molecular dynamics simulations of the magnetite (001)-water interface, both in pure water and in the presence of a 2.3 molal solution of NaClO 4. The simulations are carried out using a potential model designed to allow the protonation states of the surface functional groups to evolve dynamically through the molecular dynamics trajectory. The primary structural quantities investigated are the populations of the surface functional groups, the distribution of electrolyte in the solution, and the surface hydrogen bonding relationships. The surface protonation states are dominated by extensive hydrolysis of interfacial water molecules, giving rise to a dipolar surface dominated by FeOH2+-OH 2-OH - arrangements. Triply coordinated, more deeply buried, surface sites are inert, probably due to the relative lack of solvent in their vicinity. The electrolyte distribution is oscillatory, arranging preferentially in layers defined by the solvating water molecules. The presence of electrolyte has a negligible effect on the protonation states of the surface functional groups. Steady-state behavior is obtained for the protonation states of the surface functional groups and hydrogen-bonding network. Although the overall structure of the electrolyte distribution is fairly well established, the electrolyte distribution has not fully equilibrated, as evidenced by the asymmetry in the distribution from the top to the bottom of the slab.

  11. Quantification of the recovered oil and water fractions during water flooding laboratory experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Halim, Amalia Yunita; Shapiro, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    During core flooding experiments where water is injected in residual oil saturated core plugs, the fluids are often produced in small amounts. Oil and water come out of the core and are collected in glass vials using a fraction collector. Quantification of these fluids is often difficult since th...... the volume might be less than a few microliters. In this study, we approach the determination of the oil volumes in flooding effluents using predetermined amounts of the North Sea oil with synthetic seawater. The UV/visible spectroscopy method and low-field NMR spectrometry are compared...... for this determination, and an account of advantages and disadvantages of each method is given. Both methods are reproducible with high accuracy. The NMR method was capable of direct quantification of both oil and water fractions, while the UV/visible spectroscopy quantifies only the oil fraction using a standard curve....

  12. Upgrading of crude algal bio-oil in supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Peigao; Savage, Phillip E

    2011-01-01

    We determined the influence of a Pt/C catalyst, high-pressure H2, and pH on the upgrading of a crude algal bio-oil in supercritical water (SCW). The SCW treatment led to a product oil with a higher heating value (∼42 MJ/kg) and lower acid number than the crude bio-oil. The product oil was also lower in O and N and essentially free of sulfur. Including the Pt/C catalyst in the reactor led to a freely flowing liquid product oil with a high abundance of hydrocarbons. Overall, many of the properties of the upgraded oil obtained from catalytic treatment in SCW are similar to those of hydrocarbon fuels derived from fossil fuel resources. Thus, this work shows that the crude bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction of a microalga can be effectively upgraded in supercritical water in the presence of a Pt/C catalyst. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Dynamics of a Water-Lipid Bilayer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer in water. The total length of analyzed trajectories is 5ns. The calculated width of the bilayer agrees well with the experimentally measured value. The interior of the membrane is in a highly disordered fluid state. Atomic density profile, orientational and conformational distribution functions, and order parameters indicate that disorder increases toward the center of the bilayer. Analysis of out-of-plane thermal fluctuations of the bilayer surfaces occurring at the time scale of the present calculations reveals that the distribution of modes agrees with predictions of the capillary wave model. Fluctuations of both bilayer surfaces are uncorrelated, yielding Gaussian distribution of instantaneous widths of the membrane. Fluctuations of the width produce transient thinning defects in the bilayer which occasionally span almost half of the membrane. The leading mechanism of these fluctuations is the orientational and conformational motion of head groups rather than vertical motion of the whole molecules. Water considerably penetrates the head group region of the bilayer but not its hydrocarbon core. The total net excess dipole moment of the interfacial water points toward the aqueous phase, but the water polarization profile is non-monotonic. Both water and head groups significantly contribute to the surface potential across the interface. The calculated sign of the surface potential is in agreement with that from experimental measurements, but the value is markedly overestimated. The structural and electrical properties of the water-bilayer system are discussed in relation to membrane functions, in particular transport of ions and nonelectrolytes across membranes.

  14. Molecular Dynamics of a Water-Lipid Bilayer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer in water. The total length of analyzed trajectories is 5ns. The calculated width of the bilayer agrees well with the experimentally measured value. The interior of the membrane is in a highly disordered fluid state. Atomic density profile, orientational and conformational distribution functions, and order parameters indicate that disorder increases toward the center of the bilayer. Analysis of out-of-plane thermal fluctuations of the bilayer surfaces occurring at the time scale of the present calculations reveals that the distribution of modes agrees with predictions of the capillary wave model. Fluctuations of both bilayer surfaces are uncorrelated, yielding Gaussian distribution of instantaneous widths of the membrane. Fluctuations of the width produce transient thinning defects in the bilayer which occasionally span almost half of the membrane. The leading mechanism of these fluctuations is the orientational and conformational motion of head groups rather than vertical motion of the whole molecules. Water considerably penetrates the head group region of the bilayer but not its hydrocarbon core. The total net excess dipole moment of the interfacial water points toward the aqueous phase, but the water polarization profile is non-monotonic. Both water and head groups significantly contribute to the surface potential across the interface. The calculated sign of the surface potential is in agreement with that from experimental measurements, but the value is markedly overestimated. The structural and electrical properties of the water-bilayer system are discussed in relation to membrane functions, in particular transport of ions and nonelectrolytes across membranes.

  15. Texture optimization of water-in-oil emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre-Aghazarian, V; Piccerelle, P; Reynier, J P; Joachim, J; Phan-Tan-Luu, R; Sergent, M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this research is to demonstrate the effect of variations in certain parameters of the oily phase (OP) in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions on rheological and texture properties of finished products. The formulated emulsions were selected according to an optimal experimental procedure. The applied variations were nature of the OP, its volume fraction, the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) value, and the surfactant proportion. Results are presented for the followed tests carried out on the emulsions: texture analysis, rheology, and particle size analysis. The oils used in the study were sweet almond oil, liquid paraffin, maize oil, cyclomethicone, dimethicone, and wheat germ oil. The resulting data demonstrate a notable influence of the volume fraction oil on hardness, viscosity, adhesiveness, and cohesiveness of W/O emulsions. Emulsion hardness and viscosity increased as the OP percentage increased; this effect being even more pronounced for the vegetable oils. In contrast, emulsion adhesiveness and cohesiveness decreased as the volume fraction oil increased. The HLB value of the surfactant mixture of the emulsion also influenced hardness, adhesiveness, and elasticity, increasing or decreasing as HLB value did.

  16. Three-phase interactions and interfacial transport phenomena in coacervate/oil/water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardelle, Gregory; Erni, Philipp

    2014-04-01

    Complex coacervation is an associative liquid/liquid phase separation resulting in the formation of two liquid phases: a polymer-rich coacervate phase and a dilute continuous solvent phase. In the presence of a third liquid phase in the form of disperse oil droplets, the coacervate phase tends to wet the oil/water interface. This affinity has long been known and used for the formation of core/shell capsules. However, while encapsulation by simple or complex coacervation has been used empirically for decades, there is a lack of a thorough understanding of the three-phase wetting phenomena that control the formation of encapsulated, compound droplets and the role of the viscoelasticity of the biopolymers involved. In this contribution, we review and discuss the interplay of wetting phenomena and fluid viscoelasticity in coacervate/oil/water systems from the perspective of colloid chemistry and fluid dynamics, focusing on aspects of rheology, interfacial tension measurements at the coacervate/solvent interface, and on the formation and fragmentation of three-phase compound drops.

  17. Rain Drops and Oil Slicks: Impact of Water Droplets on a Surface Oil Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, David; Morra, David; Katz, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Petroleum spills in aquatic environments form oil slicks on the water surface. These slicks, the thickness of which ranges from microns to several millimeters, negatively impact the natural environment and economic resources. While dispersion of these slicks as small droplets by breaking waves has long been investigated, the dispersive power of another environmental flow, rainfall, has not been considered. The impact of a water drop on a floating layer of immiscible fluid introduces a challenging flow physics problem. Our experimental observations examine processes occurring when falling water droplets impact on floating layers of sweet petroleum crude oil of various thicknesses and dispersant concentrations. The latter alter the surface tension by orders of magnitude. Impact events recorded at high-speed, using UV light to cause oil fluorescence, show the expected formation of modified multiphase Worthington jets, air cavities, as well as breakup of the slicks into clouds of oil droplets and oil-coated bubbles. The latter rise back to the surface and pop. Results include droplet size and spatial distributions as a function of rainfall momentum, oil properties, and processes involved. Sponsored by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  18. Adsorption of Small Molecules at Water--Hexane and Water--Membrane Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.

    1996-03-01

    The interaction of solutes with aqueous interfaces plays a significant role in a variety of physical processes, including general anesthesia and atmospheric chemistry. We present molecular dynamics results for the transfer of several small solutes across water liquid--vapor, water--hexane and water--GMO bilayer membrane interfaces. (A. Pohorille and M. A. Wilson, J. Chem. Phys. (in press, 1995).)^, (A. Pohorille, P. CIeplak, and M. A. Wilson, Chem. Phys. (in press, 1995).) The free energies of transferring small polar molecules across the interface exhibit fairly deep minima while those of nonpolar molecules do not. This is due to a balance between nonelectrostatic contributions --- primarily the work required to create a cavity large enough to accommodate the solute --- and the solute--solvent electrostatic interactions.^1 The surface excess of solute is calculated and compared with experimental results from the Gibbs adsorption isotherm. The interfacial solubilities correlate with measured anesthetic potencies of these compounds, implying that the binding sites for anesthetics are located near the water--membrane interface.

  19. The structure and dynamics of Nano Particles encapsulated by the SDS monolayer collapse at the water/TCE interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenxiong

    2016-11-01

    The super-saturated surfactant monolayer collapses with the nanoparticles (NPs) at the water/trichloroethylene (TCE) interface are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results show that sodium alkyl sulfate (SDS) monolayer collapse is initiated by buckling and followed primarily by budding and the bud encapsulating the NPs and oil molecules. The developed bud detaches from the monolayer into a water phase and forms the swollen micelle emulsion with NPs and oil molecules. We investigate the wavelength of the initial budding and the theoretical description of the budding process. The wavelength of the monolayer increases with bending modulus. The energy barrier of the budding can be easily overcome by thermal fluctuation energy, which indicates that budding process proceeds rapidly.

  20. Ultrasonic splitting of oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Jens; König, Ralf; Benes, Ewald

    1999-01-01

    Standing resonant ultrasonic wave fields can be utilized for liquid–liquid separation of the dispersed particles and the fluid caused by the acoustic radiation pressure and the induced particle agglomeration or coagulation/coalescence process. For the splitting of oil-in-water emulsions...... emulsion samples have been investigated. The quality of the ultrasonic-induced particle separation/coagulation process is characterized by physical–chemical analysis of the separated oil- and water phase and by determining the change of the particle size distribution of the initial emulsion due...... of up to 24 W/cm2 into the sonication volume. The chosen resonance frequency is kept stable by automatic frequency control utilizing the maximum true power criterion. Physically and chemically well-defined low and high density pure laboratory and also industrially used cooling-lubricating oil-in-water...

  1. Olive oil waste waters: Controlled fermentation and materials recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, F.; Montedoro, G.F.; Pozzi, V. (Tuscia Univ., Viterbo (Italy). Detp. di Agrobiologia e Agrochimica Perugia Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Industrie Agrarie UNIECO s.c.r.l., Reggio Emilia (Italy))

    Land and water pollution due to waste water and oils deriving from the processing of olives to produce oil represents a serious environmental problem for Spain, Italy and Greece. This paper reports and discusses the results (time dependent enzyme activity) of performance tests on an innovative fermentation process to be used in olive oil waste water anaerobic digestion. An outline is then given of a demonstration depolymerization/materials recovery (including polyphenols, enzymes, etc.) process scheme based on the the tested fermentation method. The fermentation process tests involved the use of an albidus yeast in an Applikon bench scale experimental device. Process parameters were varied to determine optimum fermentation conditions. The European Communities sponsored one cubic meter/day demonstration plant utilizes a preliminary treatment process based on the use of gelatin, bentonite and polyclar.

  2. Artificial photosynthesis challenges: water oxidation at nanostructured interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Mauro; Sartorel, Andrea; Toma, Francesca Maria; Puntoriero, Fausto; Scandola, Franco; Campagna, Sebastiano; Prato, Maurizio; Bonchio, Marcella

    2011-01-01

    Innovative oxygen evolving catalysts, taken from the pool of nanosized, water soluble, molecular metal oxides, the so-called polyoxometalates (POMs), represent an extraordinary opportunity in the field of artificial photosynthesis. These catalysts possess a highly robust, totally inorganic structure, and can provide a unique mimicry of the oxygen evolving center in photosynthetic II enzymes. As a result POMs can effect H₂O oxidation to O₂ with unprecedented efficiency. In particular, the tetra-ruthenium based POM [Ru(IV) ₄(μ-OH)₂(μ-O)₄(H₂O)₄(γ-SiW(10)O(36))₂](10-), Ru₄(POM), displays fast kinetics, electrocatalytic activity powered by carbon nanotubes and exceptionally light-driven performance. A broad perspective is presented herein by addressing the recent progress in the field of metal-oxide nano-clusters as water oxidation catalysts, including colloidal species. Moreover, the shaping of the catalyst environment plays a fundamental role by alleviating the catalyst fatigue and stabilizing competent intermediates, thus responding to what are the formidable thermodynamic and kinetic challenges of water splitting. The design of nano-interfaces with specifically tailored carbon nanostructures and/or polymeric scaffolds opens a vast scenario for tuning electron/proton transfer mechanisms. Therefore innovation is envisaged based on the molecular modification of the hybrid photocatalytic center and of its environment.

  3. Interfacial phenomena at the compressed co2-water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bharatwaj

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Compressed CO2 is considered to be a viable alternative to toxic volatile organic solvents with potential applications in areas including separation reactions, and materials formation processes. Thus an interest in CO2 stems from the fact that it is very inexpensive, has low toxicity, and is not a regulated. However, compressed CO2 has a zero dipole moment and weak van der Waals forces and thus is a poor solvent for both polar and most high molecular weight solutes, characteristics that severely restrict its applicability. In order to overcome this inherent inability, surfactant-stabilized organic and aqueous dispersions in CO2 have been proposed. This work will discuss fundamentals and recent advances in the design of amphiphiles for the novel CO2-water interface.

  4. Metal contaminant fluxes across the sediment water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frogner-Kockum, Paul; Göransson, Peter; Åslund, Henrik; Ländell, Märta; Stevens, Rodney; Tengberg, Anders; Göransson, Gunnel; Ohlsson, Yvonne

    2016-10-15

    To date, most estimates of contaminant fluxes across the sediment/water interface in risk assessments have been done using diffusive flux models. However, the reliability of these is limited as the overall flux from the sediment may have contributions caused by advection and bioturbation. We found through a comparison of modelled fluxes versus measured fluxes, that the methods Benthic Flux Chamber and surface leaching tests in a risk assessment context showed similar magnitude while calculated fluxes deviated at least by a factor of 100 from measured fluxes. This may be explained by the flux contribution in connection with bioturbation. The chamber-measured fluxes of copper were low compared to those of zinc and cobalt, but this is consistent with leaching tests that indicated copper to be more strongly bound. Risk assessments based on total concentrations may be misleading.

  5. [Mineral oil drinking water pollution accident in Slavonski Brod, Croatia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medverec Knežević, Zvonimira; Nadih, Martina; Josipović, Renata; Grgić, Ivanka; Cvitković, Ante

    2011-12-01

    On 21 September 2008, heavy oil penetrated the drinking water supply in Slavonski Brod, Croatia. The accident was caused by the damage of heat exchange units in hot water supply. The system was polluted until the beginning of November, when the pipeline was treated with BIS O 2700 detergent and rinsed with water. Meanwhile, water samples were taken for chemical analysis using spectrometric and titrimetric methods and for microbiological analysis using membrane filtration and total plate count. Mineral oils were determined with infrared spectroscopy. Of the 192 samples taken for mineral oil analysis, 55 were above the maximally allowed concentration (MAC). Five samples were taken for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene analysis (BTEX), but none was above MAC. Epidemiologists conducted a survey about health symptoms among the residents affected by the accident. Thirty-six complained of symptoms such as diarrhoea, stomach cramps, vomiting, rash, eye burning, chills, and gastric disorders.This is the first reported case of drinking water pollution with mineral oil in Slavonski Brod and the accident has raised a number of issues, starting from poor water supply maintenance to glitches in the management of emergencies such as this.

  6. Conversion of Crude Oil to Methane by a Microbial Consortium Enriched From Oil Reservoir Production Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina eBerdugo-Clavijo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil is an important process occurring in petroleum reservoirs and other oil-containing environments such as contaminated aquifers. In this process, syntrophic bacteria degrade hydrocarbon substrates to products such as acetate, and/or H2 and CO2 that are then used by methanogens to produce methane in a thermodynamically dependent manner. We enriched a methanogenic crude oil-degrading consortium from production waters sampled from a low temperature heavy oil reservoir. Alkylsuccinates indicative of fumarate addition to C5 and C6 n-alkanes were identified in the culture (above levels found in controls, corresponding to the detection of an alkyl succinate synthase gene (assA in the culture. In addition, the enrichment culture was tested for its ability to produce methane from residual oil in a sandstone-packed column system simulating a mature field. Methane production rates of up 5.8 μmol CH4/g of oil/day were measured in the column system. Amounts of produced methane were in relatively good agreement with hydrocarbon loss showing depletion of more than 50% of saturate and aromatic hydrocarbons. Microbial community analysis revealed that the enrichment culture was dominated by members of the genus Smithella, Methanosaeta, and Methanoculleus. However, a shift in microbial community occurred following incubation of the enrichment in the sandstone columns. Here, Methanobacterium sp. were most abundant, as were bacterial members of the genus Pseudomonas and other known biofilm forming organisms. Our findings show that microorganisms enriched from petroleum reservoir waters can bioconvert crude oil components to methane both planktonically and in sandstone-packed columns as test systems. Further, the results suggest that different organisms may contribute to oil biodegradation within different phases (e.g., planktonic versus sessile within a subsurface crude oil reservoir.

  7. Closed Process of Shale Oil Recovery from Circulating Washing Water by Hydrocyclones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The conventional oil recovery system in the Fushun oil shale retorting plant has a low oil recovery rate. A large quantity of fresh water is used in the system, thereby consuming a considerable amount of water and energy, as well as polluting the environment. This study aims to develop a closed process of shale oil recovery from the circulating washing water for the Fushun oil shale retorting plant. The process would increase oil yield and result in clean production. In this process, oil/water hydrocyclone groups were applied to decrease the oil content in circulating water and to simultaneously increase oil yield. The oil sludge was removed by the solid/liquid hydrocyclone groups effectively, thereby proving the smooth operation of the devices and pipes. As a result, the oil recovery rate has increased by 5.3 %, which corresponds to 230 tonnes a month.

  8. Study on the New Grinding Fluids of Oils on Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏源迁; 钱怡; 中村隆; 松原十三生

    2003-01-01

    To fulfill a zero-emission in the process of grinding and thoroughly eliminate the influences of the conventional grinding fluids on the eco-environment as well as save up electric energy and reduce in production costs, the new grinding fluids of botanic oils on water were developed, in which a lot of tiny water droplets attached with micro oil films were blown to the machining area by a compressing air-jet so good as to produce lubricating and cooling roles.In this study, grinding performances of the new fluids were investigated by comparison to the conventional ones such as emulsion on the plane NC grinder.

  9. Ion Transfer Voltammetry Associated with Two Polarizable Interfaces Within Water and Moderately Hydrophobic Ionic Liquid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Jingdong;

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical system composed of two polarizable interfaces (the metallic electrode|water and water|ionic liquid interfaces), namely two‐polarized‐interface (TPI) technique, has been proposed to explore the ion transfer processes between water and moderately hydrophobic ionic liquids (W...... to an extremely narrow polarized potential window (ppw) caused by these moderately hydrophobic ionic components. In this article, we show that TPI technique has virtually eliminated the ppw limitation based on a controlling step of concentration polarization at the electrode|water interface. With the aid...

  10. Synergistic performance of lecithin and glycerol monostearate in oil/water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran-Valero, María I; Ruiz-Henestrosa, Víctor M Pizones; Pilosof, Ana M R

    2017-03-01

    The effects of the combination of two low-molecular weight emulsifiers (lecithin and glycerol-monostearate (GMS)) on the stability, the dynamic interfacial properties and rheology of emulsions have been studied. Different lecithin/GMS ratios were tested in order to assess their impact in the formation and stabilization of oil in water emulsions. The combination of the two surfactants showed a synergistic behaviour, mainly when combined at the same ratio. The dynamic film properties and ζ-potential showed that lecithin dominated the surface of oil droplets, providing stability to the emulsions against flocculation and coalescence, while allowing the formation of small oil droplets. At long times of adsorption, all of the mixtures showed similar interfacial activity. However, higher values of interfacial pressure at the initial times were reached when lecithin and GMS were at the same ratio. Interfacial viscoelasticity and viscosity of mixed films were also similar to that of lecithin alone. On the other hand, emulsions viscosity was dominated by GMS. The synergistic performance of lecithin-GMS blends as stabilizers of oil/water emulsions is attributed to their interaction both in the bulk and at the interface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Water holdup measurement of oil-water two-phase flow in a horizontal well using a dual-circle conductance probe array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijun; Zhang, Wen; Cao, Zhang; Zhao, Jiayu; Xie, Ronghua; Liu, Xingbin; Hu, Jinhai

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a minimum root-mean-square error (RMSE)-based method for a dual-circle conductance probe array to measure the water holdup of an oil-water two-phase flow in a horizontal oil well. The dual-circle conductance probe array consisting of 24 conductance probes, half of which are equidistantly distributed on a 34 mm radius inner circle and the other half on a 48 mm radius outer circle, is used to estimate the oil-water interface and hence the water holdup in the horizontal oil well. For the same water holdup, the number of probes immersed in water may vary with varying the azimuth angle due to the limited number of probes. The limited number of probes and unknown azimuth angle of the probe array in the oil well limit the measurement accuracy of the water holdup. In order to obtain a better water holdup estimate, a water holdup measurement method based on the minimum RMSE was proposed to decrease the effects of the limited number of probes and unknown azimuth angle of the probe array. To verify the proposed method, numerical simulations were carried out and compared with the commonly used equi-weight estimate method; results showed that the RMSE of the water holdup estimates obtained using the proposed method is smaller than that when using the equi-weight estimate method. Experiments were implemented in a 16 m long and 125 mm inner diameter horizontal pipe on an industrial-scale experimental multiphase flow setup in the Daqing Oil Field, China. The RMSEs of water holdup estimates obtained using the proposed and equi-weight estimate methods are 0.0632 and 0.0690, respectively, showing that the proposed method is better than the equi-weight estimate method.

  12. Eco-Friendly Superwetting Material for Highly Effective Separations of Oil/Water Mixtures and Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Feng; Yang, Sheng-Yi; Kuo, Shiao-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Because the treatment of oily wastewater, generated from many industrial processes, has become an increasing environmental concern, the search continues for simple, inexpensive, eco-friendly, and readily scalable processes for fabricating novel materials capable of effective oil/water separation. In this study we prepared an eco-friendly superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-modified cotton that mediated extremely efficient separations of mixtures of oil/water and oil/corrosive solutions. This PVP-modified cotton exhibited excellent antifouling properties and could be used to separate oil/water mixtures continuously for up to 20 h. Moreover, the compressed PVP-modified cotton could separate both surfactant-free and -stabilized oil-in-water emulsions with fluxes of up to 23,500 L m−2 h−1 bar−1—a level one to two orders of magnitude higher than that possible when using traditional ultrafiltration membranes having similar rejection properties. The high performance of our PVP-modified cotton and its green, low-energy, cost-effective preparation suggest its great potential for practical applications. PMID:28216617

  13. Oil sand process-affected water treatment using coke adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamal El-Din, M.; Pourrezaei, P.; Chelme-Ayala, P.; Zubot, W. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Oil sands operations generate an array of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) that will eventually be released to the environment. This water must be evaluated within conventional and advanced water treatment technologies. Water management strategies propose options for increased reuse and recycling of water from settling ponds, as well as safe discharge. This presentation outlined the typical composition of OSPW. Constituents of concern in OSPW include suspended solids, hydrocarbons, salts, ammonia, trace metals, and dissolved organics such as naphthenic acids (NAs). Petroleum coke is one of the by-products generated from bitumen extraction in the oil sands industry and can be used as one of the possible treatment processes for the removal of organic compounds found in OSPW. Activated carbon adsorption is an effective process, able to adsorb organic substances such as oils, radioactive compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, poly aromatic hydrocarbons and various halogenated compounds. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the production of activated carbon from petroleum coke using steam as the activation media; to determine the factors affecting the absorption of NAs; and to evaluate the activated coke adsorption capacity for the reduction of NAs and dissolved organic carbons present in OSPW. It was concluded that petroleum non-activated coke has the ability to decrease COD, alkalinity, and NA concentration. tabs., figs.

  14. Bioinspired materials for water supply and management: water collection, water purification and separation of water from oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-08-06

    Access to a safe supply of water is a human right. However, with growing populations, global warming and contamination due to human activity, it is one that is increasingly under threat. It is hoped that nature can inspire the creation of materials to aid in the supply and management of water, from water collection and purification to water source clean-up and rehabilitation from oil contamination. Many species thrive in even the driest places, with some surviving on water harvested from fog. By studying these species, new materials can be developed to provide a source of fresh water from fog for communities across the globe. The vast majority of water on the Earth is in the oceans. However, current desalination processes are energy-intensive. Systems in our own bodies have evolved to transport water efficiently while blocking other molecules and ions. Inspiration can be taken from such to improve the efficiency of desalination and help purify water containing other contaminants. Finally, oil contamination of water from spills or the fracking technique can be a devastating environmental disaster. By studying how natural surfaces interact with liquids, new techniques can be developed to clean up oil spills and further protect our most precious resource.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. Chitosan microspheres applied for removal of oil from produced water in the oil industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabel Cristina da Silva Grem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The discharge of oily wastewaters in the environment is steadily increasing, causing serious damages. Among various treatment methods, adsorption is generally considered the most appropriate, since it can remove both organic and inorganic pollutants. Adsorption using low-cost alternative biopolymers for removal of contaminants from wastewater has been widely investigated. In this context, chitosan has been drawing particular attention because, among its many applications, it can be used in the treatment of aqueous effluents. In this study, microspheres were prepared by reticulation of chitosan with sodium triphosphate (STP and studied for the treatment of water containing crude oil. The microspheres were regular and had surface pores. These microspheres were packed in treatment columns and their ability to remove oil was measured with a fluorometer, by the difference in the oil concentration before and after passing through the column. The microspheres that presented porosity about 80 % were highly efficient in oil removal, with rates above 90%.

  16. Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Computerens interface eller grænseflade har spredt sig overalt. Mobiltelefoner, spilkonsoller, pc'er og storskærme indeholder computere – men computere indbygges også i tøj og andre hverdagslige genstande, så vi konstant har adgang til digitale data. Interface retter fokus mod, hvordan den digita...

  17. Development of a centrifugal in-line separator for oil-water flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The world energy consumption will increase in the next decades. However, many aging oil fields are showing a steady decline in oil production. And they are producing increasing amounts of water, making the separation of the oil from the oil-water mixture an important processing step. In-line separa

  18. WATGEN: an algorithm for modeling water networks at protein-protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Schiewe, Alexandra J; Haworth, Ian S

    2007-11-15

    Water molecules at protein-protein interfaces contribute to the close packing of atoms and ensure complementarity between the protein surfaces, as well as mediating polar interactions. Therefore, modeling of interface water is of importance in understanding the structural basis of biomolecular association. We present an algorithm, WATGEN, which predicts locations for water molecules at a protein-protein or protein-peptide interface, given the atomic coordinates of the protein and peptide. A key element of the WATGEN algorithm is the prediction of water sites that can form multiple hydrogen bonds that bridge the binding interface. Trial calculations were performed on water networks predicted by WATGEN at 126 protein-peptide interfaces (X-ray resolutions algorithm predicts 72 and 88% of these sites within 1.5 and 2.0 A, respectively. The predicted number of water molecules at each interface was much higher than the number of water molecules identified experimentally. Therefore, random placement of the same number of water molecules as that predicted at each interface was performed as a control, and resulted in only 22 and 40% of water sites placed within 1.5 and 2.0 A of experimental sites, respectively. Based on these data, we conclude that WATGEN can accurately predict the location of water molecules at a protein-peptide interface, and this may be of value for understanding the energetics and specificity of biomolecular association. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Contact angles at the water-air interface of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofinskaya, O. A.; Kosterin, A. V.; Kosterina, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Contact angles at the water-air interface have been measured for triturated preparations of clays and soils in order to assess changes in their hydrophobic properties under the effect of oil hydrocarbons. Tasks have been to determine the dynamics of contact angle under soil wetting conditions and to reveal the effect of chemical removal of organic matter from soils on the hydrophilicity of preparations. The potentialities of static and dynamic drop tests for assessing the hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties of soils have been estimated. Clays (kaolinite, gumbrine, and argillite) have been investigated, as well as plow horizons of soils from the Republic of Tatarstan: heavy loamy leached chernozem, medium loamy dark gray forest soil, and light loamy soddy-calcareous soil. The soils have been contaminated with raw oil and kerosene at rates of 0.1-3 wt %. In the uncontaminated and contaminated chernozem, capillary water capacity has been maintained for 250 days. The contact angles have been found to depend on the degree of dispersion of powdered preparation, the main type of clay minerals in the soil, the presence and amount of oxidation-resistant soil organic matter, and the soil-water contact time. Characteristic parameters of mathematical models for drop behavior on triturated preparations have been calculated. Contamination with hydrocarbons has resulted in a reliable increase in the contact angles of soil preparations. The hydrophobization of soil surface in chernozem is more active than in soils poorer in organic matter. The complete restoration of the hydrophilic properties of soils after hydrocarbon contamination is due to the oxidation of easily oxidizable organic matter at the low content of humus, or to wetting during several months in the absence of the mazut fraction.

  20. Theoretical vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of water near lipid and surfactant monolayer interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, S.; Gruenbaum, S. M.; Skinner, J. L. [Theoretical Chemistry Institute and Department of Chemistry, 1101 University Ave., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    Understanding the structure of water near cell membranes is crucial for characterizing water-mediated events such as molecular transport. To obtain structural information of water near a membrane, it is useful to have a surface-selective technique that can probe only interfacial water molecules. One such technique is vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. As model systems for studying membrane headgroup/water interactions, in this paper we consider lipid and surfactant monolayers on water. We adopt a theoretical approach combining molecular dynamics simulations and phase-sensitive VSFG to investigate water structure near these interfaces. Our simulated spectra are in qualitative agreement with experiments and reveal orientational ordering of interfacial water molecules near cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic interfaces. OH bonds of water molecules point toward an anionic interface leading to a positive VSFG peak, whereas the water hydrogen atoms point away from a cationic interface leading to a negative VSFG peak. Coexistence of these two interfacial water species is observed near interfaces between water and mixtures of cationic and anionic lipids, as indicated by the presence of both negative and positive peaks in their VSFG spectra. In the case of a zwitterionic interface, OH orientation is toward the interface on the average, resulting in a positive VSFG peak.

  1. Water orientation and hydrogen-bond structure at the fluorite/water interface

    CERN Document Server

    Khatib, Rémi; Bonn, Mischa; Perez-Haro, María-José; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sulpizi1, Marialore

    2016-01-01

    Water in contact with mineral interfaces is important for a variety of different processes. Here, we present a combined theoretical-experimental study which provides a quantitative, molecular-level understanding of the ubiquitous and important flourite-water interface. Our results show that, at low pH, the surface is positively charged, causing a substantial degree of water ordering. The surface charge originates primarily from the dissolution of fluoride ions, rather than from adsorption of protons to the surface. At high pH we observe the presence of Ca-OH species pointing into the water. These OH groups interact remarkably weakly with the surrounding water, and are responsible for the free OH signature in the SFG spectrum, which can be explained from local electronic structure effects. The quantification of the surface termination, near-surface ion distribution and water arrangement is enabled by a combination of advanced phase-resolved Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation spectra of flourite-water interfa...

  2. Trapping and assembly of living colloids at water-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Sarah D; Goulian, Mark; Lee, Daeyeon; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2015-03-07

    We study the assembly of inert and living colloids in a two-phase water-water system that provides an environment that can sustain bacteria, providing a new structure with rich potential to confine and structure microbial communities. The water-water system, formed via phase separation of a casein and xanthan mixture, forms a 3-D structure of coexisting casein-rich and xanthan-rich phases. Fluorescent labelling and confocal microscopy reveal the attachment of these living colloids, including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, at the interface between the two phases. Inert colloids also become trapped at the interfaces, suggesting that the observed attachment can be attributed to capillarity. Over time, these structures coarsen and eventually degrade, illustrating the dynamic nature of these systems. This system lays the foundation for future studies of the interplay of physicochemical properties of the fluid interfaces and bulk phases and microbial responses they provoke to induce complex spatial organization, to study species which occupy distinct niches, and to optimize efficient microbial cross-feeding or protection from competitors.

  3. Trapping and Assembly of Living Colloids at Water/Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Sarah D.; Goulian, Mark; Lee, Daeyeon; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    2017-01-01

    We study the assembly of colloids in a two phase water-water system that provides an environment that can sustain bacteria, providing a new structure with rich potential to confine and structure living colloids. The water-water system, formed via phase separation of a casein and xanthan mixture, forms a 3-D structure of coexisting casein-rich and xanthan-rich phases. Fluorescent labelling and confocal microscopy reveal the attachment of these living colloids, including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, at the interface between the two phases. Inert colloids also become trapped at the interfaces, suggesting that the observed attachment can be attributed to capillarity. Over time, these structures coarsen and eventually degrade, illustrating the dynamic nature of these systems. This system lays the foundation for future studies of the interplay of physicochemical properties of the fluid interfaces and bulk phases and microbial responses they provoke to induce complex spatial organization, to study species which occupy distinct niches, and to optimize efficient microbial cross-feeding or protection from competitors. PMID:25600991

  4. The molecular structure of the interface between water and a hydrophobic substrate is liquid-vapor like.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Adam P; Chandler, David

    2014-11-14

    With molecular simulation for water and a tunable hydrophobic substrate, we apply the instantaneous interface construction [A. P. Willard and D. Chandler, "Instantaneous liquid interfaces," J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 1954-1958 (2010)] to examine the similarity between a water-vapor interface and a water-hydrophobic surface interface. We show that attractive interactions between a hydrophobic surface and water affect capillary wave fluctuations of the instantaneous liquid interface, but these attractive interactions have essentially no effect on the intrinsic interface. The intrinsic interface refers to molecular structure in terms of distances from the instantaneous interface. Further, the intrinsic interface of liquid water and a hydrophobic substrate differs little from that of water and its vapor. The same is not true, we show, for an interface between water and a hydrophilic substrate. In that case, strong directional substrate-water interactions disrupt the liquid-vapor-like interfacial hydrogen bonding network.

  5. Design and application of water-in-oil emulsions for use in lipstick formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Révérend, B J D; Taylor, M S; Norton, I T

    2011-06-01

    The addition of water to lipsticks in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion is an attractive opportunity for cosmetics manufacturers to deliver hydrophilic molecules to the consumers, as well as improving the moisturizing properties. In this work, the effect of the emulsifier type and water content on the structural properties of the designed products was investigated. It has been shown that PGPR leads to smaller droplets than the other emulsifiers tested. This was attributed to the ability of PGPR to form elastic interfaces that slow the coalescence between droplets during the process. It was also observed that crystals of wax tend to form structures at the interface upon cooling that prevent coalescence during storage. These structures also prevent leakage of water into the continuous phase. No effect of the water content on the melting properties of the emulsions was observed. Upon addition of more than 10% water, softening of the material was measured, due to the overall decrease in solid content. Addition of crystalline material (hard paraffin) was successfully used to reinstate the material properties. © 2011 The Authors. ICS © 2011 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  6. Viscosity of water-in-oil emulsions. Variation with temperature and water volume fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, Marco A.; Caldas, Jorge Navaes [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Rua General Canabarro, 500, Maracana, Rio, CEP 2057-900 (Brazil); Oliveira, Roberto C. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Cenpes, Cidade Universitaria (Brazil); Rajagopal, Krishnaswamy [LATCA-Laboratorio de Termodinamica e Cinetica Aplicada-Escola de Quimica, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, UFRJ, Cidade Universitaria, C.P. 68452, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2005-09-15

    Water-in-oil emulsions are important in the petroleum industry in production operations, where the water content of the emulsion can be as high as 60% in volume, also in petroleum refining operations where generally the water content is low. The effective viscosity of water-in-oil emulsions depends mainly on the volume fraction of dispersed phase and temperature, along with several minor effects, such as shear rate, average droplet size, droplet size distribution, viscosity and density of oil. Using six different crude oils, the effective viscosities of several synthetic water-in-oil emulsions are measured at atmospheric pressure using a dynamic viscosimeter for different shear rates, temperatures and volume fractions of the dispersed phase. The ASTM equation, method D-341, for describing viscosity as a function of temperature is extended to include the variation of dispersed phase volume fraction. The proposed equation gives good correlation between the measured viscosities of water-in-oil emulsions as a function of temperature and the volume fraction of water.

  7. Spontaneous charging and crystallization of water droplets in oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, J.; Zwanikken, J.W.; Bier, Markus; Baarsma, Arjen; Oloumi, Yasha; Spelt, Mischa; van Roij, R.H.H.G.

    2008-01-01

    We study the spontaneous charging and the crystallization of spherical micron-sized water-droplets dispersed in oil by numerically solving, within a Poisson-Boltzmann theory in the geometry of a spherical cell, for the density profiles of the cations and anions in the system. We take into account

  8. Dielectric Properties of Flocculated Water-in-Oil Emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skodvin, T.

    1995-12-31

    When an offshore oil field is near completion, water occupies a large fraction of the available pore volume. Thus, in collecting the oil and gas reserves, one has to deal with a high co-production of either formation- or injected water. This doctoral thesis focuses on the effect of water-in-oil emulsions on the dielectric properties, in particular the effect of flocculation. Various dielectric models are applied to obtain methods for qualitative and quantitative characterization of the flocculated state. Permittivity and measurement of dielectric properties are discussed as a basis for the interpretation of the dielectric properties of the emulsions. Various flocculation models are presented. It is concluded that the dielectric properties of water-in-oil emulsions are strongly influenced by continuously ongoing processes in the system. Because of flocculation and sedimentation the traditional dielectric mixture models cannot satisfactorily predict the dielectric behaviour. The experimentally obtained permittivities for the emulsions can be reproduced by including flocculation in the models and treating the floc aggregates as spheroids or subsystems with dielectric properties given by the degree of flocculation. The models discussed have difficulties reproducing the complete frequency behaviour found experimentally. This is probably because the dielectric relaxation may be influenced by processes not included in the models, such as the effects of dipolar or multipolar interactions between the droplets. For further research it is recommended that rheological and dielectric measurements be combined. 227 refs., 61 figs., 16 tabs.

  9. Synthesis of hydroxytyrosyl alkyl ethers from olive oil waste waters

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Fernández-Bolaños; Mariana Trujillo; Guillermo Rodríguez; Raquel Mateos; Gema Pereira-Caro; Andrés Madrona; Espartero, José L.

    2009-01-01

    The preparation of a new type of derivatives of the naturally occurring antioxidant hydroxytyrosol is reported. Hydroxytyrosyl alkyl ethers were obtained in high yield by a three-step procedure starting from hydroxytyrosol isolated from olive oil waste waters. Preliminary results obtained by the Rancimat method have shown that these derivatives retain the high protective capacity of free hydroxytyrosol.

  10. Synthesis of Hydroxytyrosyl Alkyl Ethers from Olive Oil Waste Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fernández-Bolaños

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of a new type of derivatives of the naturally occurring antioxidant hydroxytyrosol is reported. Hydroxytyrosyl alkyl ethers were obtained in high yield by a three-step procedure starting from hydroxytyrosol isolated from olive oil waste waters. Preliminary results obtained by the Rancimat method have shown that these derivatives retain the high protective capacity of free hydroxytyrosol.

  11. Formulation and stability of topical water in oil emulsion containing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To formulate the water in oil (W/O) emulsion of corn silk (CS) extract and to evaluate its ... physical stability of the formulation was evaluated by monitoring these parameters over a period .... level of significance adopted was p < 0.05.

  12. Produced water treatment for beneficial use: emulsified oil removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waisi, Basma

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel carbon material, high accessible surface area, interconnected porosity, and stable nanofiber nonwoven media for emulsified oil droplets separation from oily wastewater, in particular for oilfields produced water treatment, is discussed in this thesis. Firstly, the quantity a

  13. Produced water treatment for beneficial use: emulsified oil removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waisi, B.I.H.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel carbon material, high accessible surface area, interconnected porosity, and stable nanofiber nonwoven media for emulsified oil droplets separation from oily wastewater, in particular for oilfields produced water treatment, is discussed in this thesis. Firstly, the quantity a

  14. Electrospraying of water in oil emulsions for thin film coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.K.I.; Maan, A.A.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospraying of water-in-oil emulsions was investigated to produce thin edible barriers. A reproducible model surface was used, namely cellulose membranes of which permeability is well-established. PGPR-based emulsions were stable during electrospraying and produced a fine stable jet spray; emuls

  15. Factors governing partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fredrick, E.; Walstra, P.; Dewettinck, K.

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of the instability mechanism partial coalescence in oil-in-water food emulsions show a discrepancy. On the one hand, it needs to be avoided in order to achieve an extended shelf life in food products like sauces, creams and several milk products. On the other hand, during the manufa

  16. Factors governing partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fredrick, E.; Walstra, P.; Dewettinck, K.

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of the instability mechanism partial coalescence in oil-in-water food emulsions show a discrepancy. On the one hand, it needs to be avoided in order to achieve an extended shelf life in food products like sauces, creams and several milk products. On the other hand, during the

  17. Structure and dynamics of water molecules confined in triglyceride oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Carien C M; Velikov, Krassimir P; Bakker, Huib J

    2016-10-26

    Though it is commonly known that a small amount of water can be present in triglyceride oil, a molecular picture of how water molecules organize in the oil phase is lacking. We investigate the hydrogen-bond configuration and dynamics of water in triacetin, tributyrin and trioctanoin using linear infrared and time-resolved two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy of the water hydroxyl stretch vibration. We identify water molecules with a single strong hydrogen bond to the triglyceride, water molecules with two weaker hydrogen bonds to the triglycerides, and water clusters. These species do not interconvert on the 20 ps timescale of the experiment, as evidenced by the absence of cross-peaks in the 2DIR spectrum. The vibrational response of water molecules with a single strong hydrogen bond to the triglyceride depends strongly on the excitation frequency, revealing the presence of different subspecies of singly-bound water molecules that correspond to different hydrogen-bond locations. In contrast, the water molecules with two weaker hydrogen bonds to the triglyceride correspond to a single, specific hydrogen-bond configuration; these molecules likely bridge the carbonyl groups of adjacent triglyceride molecules, which can have considerable influence on liquid triglyceride properties.

  18. Stabilization mechanisms of oil-in-water emulsions by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Thais Caldas Paiva; da Silva, Vanessa Martins; Gombert, Andreas Karoly; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-07-01

    A multiphase system is commonly formed during the oil production by microbial route, which can lead to stable emulsions hindering product recovery. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of emulsion stabilization by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to contribute with processes development of oil production by fermentation. A model system using hexadecane as oil phase and yeast suspension as aqueous phase was used to prepare O/W emulsions. The yeast was subjected to different treatments as inactivation (autoclaving) and washing before to be resuspended in water. The washing water (water from the first washing) and suspension of commercial yeast (active) were also used as aqueous phase. After 24h of preparation, the emulsions separated into three phases: top (cream), intermediate, and bottom phase. The top or cream phase was a concentrated emulsion that kept stable during seven days, except for those prepared from washed yeast that were stable only for a short period of time. Emulsions prepared with washed yeast showed higher cell adhesion to the droplets interface, which implied in a higher amount of yeast into the cream phase in comparison to other formulations. Therefore, yeast cells adhesion plays a role on emulsion stability, but the greater contribution was provided by cell material dispersed into the aqueous phase, regardless of cell viability.

  19. Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Computerens interface eller grænseflade har spredt sig overalt. Mobiltelefoner, spilkonsoller, pc'er og storskærme indeholder computere – men computere indbygges også i tøj og andre hverdagslige genstande, så vi konstant har adgang til digitale data. Interface retter fokus mod, hvordan den digitale...... kunst og kultur skabes, spredes og opleves igennem interfaces. Forfatterne undersøger og diskuterer interfacets æstetik, ideologi og kultur – og analyserer aktuel interfacekunst på tværs af musik, kunst, litteratur og film. Bogen belyser interfacets oprindelse i den kolde krigs laboratorier og dets...

  20. De-emulsifiers for water-in-crude oil-emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaki, N. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst. (EPRI), Cairo (Egypt); Al-Sabagh, A. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst. (EPRI), Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-01-01

    The efficiency of 18 different polyalkylphenols-polyalkylene-polyamines-formaldehyde ethoxylates (PAPAFE) in the deemulsification of water-in-crude oil-emulsion were studied. In this respect, two naturally occurring Egyptian water-in-curde oil-emulsions were used to test the investigated de-emulsifiers. The effect of the variation in the molecular structure of the (PAPAFE) on their de-emulsification potency is investigated. The investigation reveals that de-emulsifiers containing nonyl phenol reduce crude oil-water interfacial tension (IFT) and are more efficient than those containing dodecyl phenol. PAPAFE containing more amino groups are found to have better emulsion breaking ability. This is attributed to their enhanced ability to solubilize asphaltenes, which are the prime motivators for crude oil-water emulsion stability. They drag asphaltenes crosslinked at the water-crude oil interface and consequently, resulting in a substantial decrease in emulsion stability. There exists an optimum hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) for the investigated PAPAFE, ranging from 12 to 13.5 at which their maximum de-emulsification ability is attained. All studied PAPAFE showed increased de-emulsification performance by increasing the temperature from 50 to 70 C. Increasing the temperature reduces the viscosity of the crude oil continuous phase and increases the rate of diffusion of both the surfactant molecules and the dispersed water droplets. This will cause an increase in the rate of coalescence of the water droplets. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wurde die Wirkung von 18 verschiedenen Polyalkylphenolpolyalkylenpolyamine-formaldehydethoxylaten (PAPAFE) bei der Demulgierung von Wasser-in-Rohoel-Emulsionen untersucht. Zwei in Aegypten natuerlich vorkommende Wasser-in-Rohoel-Emulsionen wurden fuer die Versuche eingesetzt, dabei wurde der Einfluss der molekularen Struktur der PAPAFEs auf das Demulgiervermoegen untersucht. Es zeigte sich, dass Demulgatoren mit Nonylphenol die

  1. Case Studies of Water Shut-Off Treatments in Oil and Gas Production Wells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sławomir Falkowicz; Stanisław Dubiel; Renata Cicha-Szot

    2012-01-01

      Case Studies of Water Shut-Off Treatments in Oil and Gas Production Wells In this study some of the experimental results of water shut-off treatments in oil and gas production wells were presented...

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF DEMULSIFIER FORMULATION FOR SEPARATION OF WATER FROM CRUDE OIL EMULSIONS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hajivand, P; Vaziri, A

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, various water-soluble and oil-soluble demulsifiers were selected for separation of water from crude oil emulsions and their productivity measured using the Bottle-test method at 70...

  3. Successful strategies for water management in the oil sands region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.; Baker, M. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada). Oil Sands Division

    2004-07-01

    Since large quantities of water are required for oil sand mining, water withdrawals from rivers located near oil sand mining facilities may increase. This paper referred to the water-based extraction process at the Muskeg River Mine operated by Albian Sands Energy. Although water is recycled and reused as much as possible, drought conditions in Alberta have raised concerns about the potential increased rates of water withdrawal during seasonal low flow periods. Measures have been taken to manage river withdrawals and ensure sustainability of aquatic resources. A committee has been established under the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA) to develop a management system for the Athabasca River. The committee includes stakeholders from federal and provincial governments, First Nations, non-government groups and industry. This paper describes the challenges facing oil sands developers in the region with particular emphasis on the role that the newly developed management system called 'Instream Flow Needs', will have on the cumulative water withdrawal from the Athabasca River. 9 figs.

  4. Influence of pumpkin seed oil in continuous phase on droplet size and stability of water-in-oil emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolovski Branislava G.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to contribute to the optimized production of water-in-oil emulsions with pumpkin seed oil in the oil phase using a high-speed homogenizer. Pumpkin seed oil is a valuable natural source of essential fatty acids and biologically active micronutrients that contribute to its nutritive value and medical uses, and reduce interfacial tension between water and the oil phases. Therefore, pumpkin seed oil can be considered as a prosperous oil phase whose use can possibly decrease the amount of some emulsifier that is normally involved in every emulsification process. A central composite rotatable experimental design was implemented to analyze the impact of the contents of polyglycerol polyricinoleate and pumpkin seed oil in the continuous phase, as well as water phase content in the emulsion on droplet size distribution and the response surface methodology was used to obtain optimal conditions for water-in-oil emulsion preparation. Mean size diameter of water droplets was in a range from 400 to 850 nm, with mean peak width of 100 to 220 nm, respectively. The influence of all three investigated factors on the emulsification was determined. Additionally, the emulsions prepared with pumpkin seed oil showed a higher stability during the storage time compared to the emulsions with sunflower oil.

  5. Interaction of monovalent ions with the water liquid-vapor interface - A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    Results of molecular dynamics calculations are presented for a series of ions at infinite dilution near the water liquid-vapor interface. The free energies of ion transfer from the bulk to the interface are discussed, as are the accompanying changes of water structure at the surface and ion mobilities as a function of their proximity to the interface. It is shown that simple dielectric models do not provide an accurate description of ions at the water surface. The results of the study should be useful in the development of better models incorporating the shape and molecular structure of the interface.

  6. Interaction of monovalent ions with the water liquid-vapor interface - A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    Results of molecular dynamics calculations are presented for a series of ions at infinite dilution near the water liquid-vapor interface. The free energies of ion transfer from the bulk to the interface are discussed, as are the accompanying changes of water structure at the surface and ion mobilities as a function of their proximity to the interface. It is shown that simple dielectric models do not provide an accurate description of ions at the water surface. The results of the study should be useful in the development of better models incorporating the shape and molecular structure of the interface.

  7. Selective separation of oil and water with mesh membranes by capillarity

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Yuanlie

    2016-05-29

    The separation of oil and water from wastewater generated in the oil-production industries, as well as in frequent oil spillage events, is important in mitigating severe environmental and ecological damage. Additionally, a wide arrange of industrial processes require oils or fats to be removed from aqueous systems. The immiscibility of oil and water allows for the wettability of solid surfaces to be engineered to achieve the separation of oil and water through capillarity. Mesh membranes with extreme, selective wettability can efficiently remove oil or water from oil/water mixtures through a simple filtration process using gravity. A wide range of different types of mesh membranes have been successfully rendered with extreme wettability and applied to oil/water separation in the laboratory. These mesh materials have typically shown good durability, stability as well as reusability, which makes them promising candidates for an ever widening range of practical applications. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Selective separation of oil and water with mesh membranes by capillarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuanlie; Chen, Hua; Liu, Yun; Craig, Vincent S J; Lai, Zhiping

    2016-09-01

    The separation of oil and water from wastewater generated in the oil-production industries, as well as in frequent oil spillage events, is important in mitigating severe environmental and ecological damage. Additionally, a wide arrange of industrial processes require oils or fats to be removed from aqueous systems. The immiscibility of oil and water allows for the wettability of solid surfaces to be engineered to achieve the separation of oil and water through capillarity. Mesh membranes with extreme, selective wettability can efficiently remove oil or water from oil/water mixtures through a simple filtration process using gravity. A wide range of different types of mesh membranes have been successfully rendered with extreme wettability and applied to oil/water separation in the laboratory. These mesh materials have typically shown good durability, stability as well as reusability, which makes them promising candidates for an ever widening range of practical applications.

  9. Developing High Water-cut Oil Fields Deeply to Enhance Their Oil Recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Dakuang

    1994-01-01

    @@ There are 283 developed oil fields in China onshore area by the end of 1993. Most of them are in the later development stage with high water cut. The overall average water cut in these oilfields reaches 80.4%.Some old ones, such as Shengtuo, Gudao and Zhengdong,which have been put on production since 60's or 70's, have a water cut of higher than 90%and are in the extra high water-cut development stage. The recovery factors of these oilfields in terms of the recoverable reserves, which is 63.1%on average and even higher than 80% in some old fields, are also high. A lot of field data show that the distribution of oil and water in the reservoir exhibits new features differing from that in the earlier development stage. Because of the serious interlayer and intralayer heterogeneity of non--marine sandbodies both horizontally and vertically, and the complicated structural features due to the cross cutting of numerous faults, the distribution of the remaining oil in the case of such high recovery and high water cut is in a very dispersed state forming a very complex picture just like the stars in the sky. However some regularities and some relatively abundant regions still exist.

  10. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation

    OpenAIRE

    Philip S. Brown; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work...

  11. NUTRIENT CONTENT IN SUNFLOWERS IRRIGATED WITH OIL EXPLORATION WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADERVAN FERNANDES SOUSA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation using produced water, which is generated during crude oil and gas recovery and treated by the exploration industry, could be an option for irrigated agriculture in semiarid regions. To determine the viability of this option, the effects of this treated water on the nutritional status of plants should be assessed. For this purpose, we examined the nutritional changes in sunflowers after they were irrigated with oil - produced water and the effects of this water on plant biomass and seed production. The sunflower cultivar BRS 321 was grown for three crop cycles in areas irrigated with filtered produced water (FPW, reverse osmosis - treated produced water (OPW, or ground water (GW. At the end of each cycle, roots, shoots, and seeds were collected to examine their nutrient concentrations. Produced water irrigation affected nutrient accumulation in the sunflower plants. OPW irrigation promoted the accumulation of Ca, Na, N, P, and Mg. FPW irrigation favored the accumulation of Na in both roots and shoots, and biomass and seed production were negatively affected. The Na in the shoots of plants irrigated with FPW increased throughout the three crop cycles. Under controlled conditions, it is possible to reuse reverse osmosis - treated produced water in agriculture. However, more long - term research is needed to understand its cumulative effects on the chemical and biological properties of the soil and crop production.

  12. Adsorption of egg phosphatidylcholine to an air/water and triolein/water bubble interface: use of the 2-dimensional phase rule to estimate the surface composition of a phospholipid/triolein/water surface as a function of surface pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsche, Matthew A; Wang, Libo; Small, Donald M

    2010-03-11

    Phospholipid monolayers play a critical role in the structure and stabilization of biological interfaces, including all membranes, the alveoli of the lungs, fat droplets in adipose tissue, and lipoproteins. The behavior of phospholipids in bilayers and at an air-water interface is well understood. However, the study of phospholipids at oil-water interfaces is limited due to technical challenges. In this study, egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) was deposited from small unilamellar vesicles onto a bubble of either air or triolein (TO) formed in a low-salt buffer. The surface tension (gamma) was measured using a drop tensiometer. We observed that EPC binds irreversibly to both interfaces and at equilibrium exerts approximately 12 and 15 mN/m of pressure (Pi) at an air and TO interface, respectively. After EPC was bound to the interface, the unbound EPC was washed out of the cuvette, and the surface was compressed to study the Pi/area relationship. To determine the surface concentration (Gamma), which cannot be measured directly, compression isotherms from a Langmuir trough and drop tensiometer were compared. The air-water interfaces had identical characteristics using both techniques; thus, Gamma on the bubble can be determined by overlaying the two isotherms. Both TO and EPC are surface-active, so in a mixed TO/EPC monolayer, both molecules will be exposed to water. Since TO is less surface-active than EPC, as Pi increases, the TO is progressively ejected. To understand the Pi/area isotherm of EPC on a TO bubble, a variety of TO-EPC mixtures were spread at the air-water interface. The isotherms show an abrupt break in the curve caused by the ejection of TO from the monolayer into a new bulk phase. By overlaying the compression isotherm above the ejection point with a TO bubble compression isotherm, Gamma can be estimated. This allows determination of Gamma of EPC on a TO bubble as a function of Pi.

  13. Structure and dynamics of egg white ovalbumin adsorbed at the air/water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudryashova, E.V.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Hoek, A. van; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2003-01-01

    The molecular properties of egg white ovalbumin adsorbed at the air/water interface were studied using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (TRFA) techniques. Ovalbumin adsorbed at the air/ water interface adopts a characteristic partially unf

  14. Protein-Protein Multilayer Oil-in-Water Emulsions for the Microencapsulation of Flaxseed Oil: Effect of Whey and Fish Gelatin Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustier, Patrick; Achouri, Allaoua; Taherian, Ali R; Britten, Michel; Pelletier, Marylène; Sabik, Hassan; Villeneuve, Sébastien; Mondor, Martin

    2015-10-28

    The impact of whey protein isolate (WPI) and fish gelatin (FG) deposited sequentially at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.75% on the surface of primary oil-in-water emulsions containing 5% flaxseed oil stabilized with either 0.5% fish gelatin or whey protein, respectively, was investigated. The results revealed that the adsorption of WPI/FG or FG/WPI complexes to the emulsion interface led to the formation of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions with different stabilities and different protection degrees of the flaxseed oil. Deposition of FG on the WPI primary emulsion increased the particle size (from 0.53 to 1.58 μm) and viscosity and decreased electronegativity (from -23.91 to -11.15 mV) of the complexes. Different trends were noted with the deposition of WPI on the FG primary emulsion, resulting in decreasing particle size and increasing electronegativity and viscosity to a lower extent. Due to the superior tension-active property of WPI, the amount of protein load in the WPI primary emulsion as well as in WPI/FG complex was significantly higher than the FG counterparts. A multilayer emulsion made with 0.5% WPI/0.75% FG exhibited the lowest oxidation among all of the multilayered emulsions tested (0.32 ppm of hexanal) after 21 days, likely due to the charge effect of FG that may prevent pro-oxidant metals to interact with the flaxseed oil.

  15. A study of the ice-water interface using the TIP4P/2005 water model

    CERN Document Server

    Benet, Jorge; Sanz, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study the ice-water interface under coexistence conditions by means of molecular simulations using the TIP4P/2005 water model. Following the methodology proposed by Hoyt and co-workers [J. J. Hoyt, M. Asta and A. Karma, Phys. Rev. Lett., 86, 5530, (2001)] we measure the interfacial free energy of ice with liquid water by analysing the spectrum of capillary fluctuations of the interface. We get an orientationally averaged interfacial free energy of 27(2) mN/m, in good agreement with a recent estimate obtained from simulation data of the size of critical clusters [E. Sanz, C. Vega, J. R. Espinosa, R. Caballero-Bernal, J. L. F. Abascal and C. Valeriani, JACS, 135, 15008, (2013)]. We also estimate the interfacial free energy of different planes and obtain 27(2), 28(2)and 28(2) mN/m for the basal, the primary prismatic and the secondary prismatic planes respectively. Finally, we inspect the structure of the interface and find that its thickness is of approximately 4-5 molecular diameters. Moreover,...

  16. Unsteady Mass transfer Across the Sediment-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Alexander; Grant, Stanley; Stewardson, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Fluxes across the sediment-water interface (SWI) are of high ecological significance, as they promote biogeochemical processes that support benthic ecosystems within the hyporheic zone. The SWI marks a boundary between the turbulent water column (typically modelled by Navier Stokes equations) and the interstitial pore fluids in the sediment column, which are typically laminar (and modelled by Darcy's law). Although models of these two flow regimes are generally not coupled, flow in the turbulent boundary layer is affected by the sediment permeability and a slip velocity at the SWI, which decays exponentially into the streambed across a characteristic mixing length. Momentum is transferred across this region (known as the Brinkman layer) through the penetration of coherent structures and turbulent mixing, however, these turbulent structures also promote turbulent mass transfer. Mass transfer within the hyporheic zone can be conceptualised in terms of: (1) the downwelling of solutes from the stream; (2) retention of solutes in the sediment; and (3) the upwelling of solutes back into the stream. Recent work by the authors has shown that a mass transfer coefficient can be defined where a downwelling-upwelling unit cell exists across a concentration gradient. Such unit cells are generated at the SWI by pressure variation from: (1) steady-state influences, such as stream geometry and velocity variation; and (2) unsteady pressure waves produced by coherent turbulent structures. With this definition, mass transfer coefficients can be defined for: steady exchange, by adopting the Elliott and Brooks [1997] advective pumping model; and unsteady exchange, induced by streamwise propagation of upwelling-downwelling unit cells migrating downstream with a characteristic celerity associated with turbulent eddies. We hypothesize that beneath the Brinkman layer (where Laplace equation applies) these mass transfer coefficients can be summed to yield the total mass flux. Although, it

  17. Arsenate adsorption mechanisms at the allophane - Water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Y.; Sparks, D.L.; Davis, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated arsenate (As(V)) reactivity and surface speciation on amorphous aluminosilicate mineral (synthetic allophane) surfaces using batch adsorption experiments, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The adsorption isotherm experiments indicated that As(V) uptake increased with increasing [As(V)]0 from 50 to 1000 ??M (i.e., Langmuir type adsorption isotherm) and that the total As adsorption slightly decreased with increasing NaCl concentrations from 0.01 to 0.1 M. Arsenate adsorption was initially (0-10 h) rapid followed by a slow continuum uptake, and the adsorption processes reached the steady state after 720 h. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses suggest that As(V) predominantly forms bidentate binuclear surface species on aluminum octahedral structures, and these species are stable up to 11 months. Solubility calculations and powder XRD analyses indicate no evidence of crystalline AI-As(V) precipitates in the experimental systems. Overall, macroscopic and spectroscopic evidence suggest that the As(V) adsorption mechanisms at the allophane-water interface are attributable to ligand exchange reactions between As(V) and surface-coordinated water molecules and hydroxyl and silicate ions. The research findings imply that dissolved tetrahedral oxyanions (e.g., H2PO42- and H2AsO42-) are readily retained on amorphous aluminosilicate minerals in aquifer and soils at near neutral pH. The innersphere adsorption mechanisms might be important in controlling dissolved arsenate and phosphate in amorphous aluminosilicate-rich low-temperature geochemical environments. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  18. Data on the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldana L. Zalazar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains experimental data and images for the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions. Mentioned data are related to the research article “Effect of stabilizers, oil level and structure on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces bailii and on physical stability of model systems simulating acid sauces” (A.L. Zalazar, M.F. Gliemmo, C.A. Campos, 2016 [1]. Physical characterization of emulsions was performed through the evaluation of Span and Specific Surface Area (SSA determined by light scattering using a Mastersizer. Furthermore, microscopy images were recorded by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM. The latter are presented to collaborate in the analysis of emulsion microstructure.

  19. Data on the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalazar, Aldana L; Gliemmo, María F; Campos, Carmen A

    2016-12-01

    This article contains experimental data and images for the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions. Mentioned data are related to the research article "Effect of stabilizers, oil level and structure on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces bailii and on physical stability of model systems simulating acid sauces" (A.L. Zalazar, M.F. Gliemmo, C.A. Campos, 2016) [1]. Physical characterization of emulsions was performed through the evaluation of Span and Specific Surface Area (SSA) determined by light scattering using a Mastersizer. Furthermore, microscopy images were recorded by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The latter are presented to collaborate in the analysis of emulsion microstructure.

  20. Oil Spill Adsorption Capacity of Activated Carbon Tablets from Corncobs in Simulated Oil-Water Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonalyn V. Maulion

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil spill in bodies of water is one of severe environmental problems that is facing all over the country and in the world. Since oil is an integral part of the economy, increasing trend for its demand and transport of has led to a great treat in the surface water. One of the promising techniques in the removal of the oil spills in water bodies is adsorption using activated carbon form waste material such as corn cobs. The purpose of this study is to determine the adsorption capacity of activated carbon tablets derived from corncobs in the removal of oil. The properties of activated carbon produced have a pH of 7.0, bulk density of 0.26 g//cm3 , average pore size of 45nm, particle size of 18% at 60 mesh and 39% at 80 mesh, iodine number of 1370 mg/g and surface area of 1205 g/m2. The amount of bentonite clay as binder (15%,20%,30%, number of ACT (1,2,3 and time of contact(30,60,90 mins has been varied to determine the optimum condition where the activated carbon will have the best adsorption capacity in the removal of oil. Results showed that at 15% binder, 60 mins contact time and 3 tablets of activated carbon is the optimum condition which give a percentage adsorption of 22.82% of oil. Experimental data also showed that a Langmuir isotherm was the best fit isotherm for adsorption of ACT.

  1. Detachment of deposited colloids by advancing and receding air-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2011-08-16

    Moving air-water interfaces can detach colloidal particles from stationary surfaces. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of advancing and receding air-water interfaces on colloid detachment as a function of interface velocity. We deposited fluorescent, negatively charged, carboxylate-modified polystyrene colloids (diameter of 1 μm) into a cylindrical glass channel. The colloids were hydrophilic with an advancing air-water contact angle of 60° and a receding contact angle of 40°. After colloid deposition, two air bubbles were sequentially introduced into the glass channel and passed through the channel at different velocities (0.5, 7.7, 72, 982, and 10,800 cm/h). The passage of the bubbles represented a sequence of receding and advancing air-water interfaces. Colloids remaining in the glass channel after each interface passage were visualized with confocal microscopy and quantified by image analysis. The advancing air-water interface was significantly more effective in detaching colloids from the glass surface than the receding interface. Most of the colloids were detached during the first passage of the advancing air-water interface, while the subsequent interface passages did not remove significant amounts of colloids. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborate our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface movement were stronger than during the receding movement. Theory indicates that, for hydrophilic colloids, the advancing interface movement generally exerts a stronger detachment force than the receding, except when the hysteresis of the colloid-air-water contact angle is small and that of the channel-air-water contact angle is large.

  2. 40 CFR 63.137 - Process wastewater provisions-oil-water separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process wastewater provisions-oil-water... Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.137 Process wastewater provisions—oil-water separators. (a) For each oil-water separator that receives, manages, or...

  3. 75 FR 76742 - Detecting Oil Leaks From Vessels Into the Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Detecting Oil Leaks From Vessels Into the Water AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... seeks information about the current state of technology to detect loss of oil into the water. DATES... about the current state of technology to detect loss of oil into the water. All information...

  4. Analysis of method of polarization surveying of water surface oil pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    A method of polarization surveying of oil films on the water surface is analyzed. Model calculations of contrasted oil and water obtained with different orientations of the analyzer are discussed. The model depends on the spectral range, water transparency and oil film, and the selection of observational direction.

  5. A Microfluidic Method to Assess Emulsion Stability in Crude-Oil/Water Separators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The control of emulsion stability and droplet size is of crucial importance for oil production, especially for the processes of crude/oil water separation and cleanup of produced water. To recover pure oil and water, coalescence between droplets needs to take place, the extent of which will depend

  6. A Microfluidic Method to Assess Emulsion Stability in Crude-Oil/Water Separators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The control of emulsion stability and droplet size is of crucial importance for oil production, especially for the processes of crude/oil water separation and cleanup of produced water. To recover pure oil and water, coalescence between droplets needs to take place, the extent of which will depend o

  7. Demulsifying water-in-oil-emulsions through chemical addition; Spaltungsmechanismus von Wasser-in-Erdoel-Emulsionen bei Chemikalienzusatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsaridou-Nagel, M. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik; Kragert, B. [Clausthaler Umwelttechnik-Institut GmbH (CUTEC), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    1996-02-01

    The stabilization of water-oil-emulsions happens due to the interfacial layers, which mainly consist of crude oil colloids (asphaltenes and resins). By addition of demulgators the emulsion breaks up. Taking water-soluble demulsifiers the mechanism works because of the displacement of the own crude emulsion stabilizers from the interface and breaking up the emulsion stabilizing layer or by wetting change of the layer by producing interfaced inactive adsorption complexes. Using oil-soluble demulgators the mechanism, besides the displacement of crude-own colloids, is based on neutralization of the stabilization effect by additional emulsion breakers and the break up due to interface eruptions. The most effective demulsifiers is always to be determined for the different stabilized emulsions. Water-soluble demulgators are widely in use. (orig.) [Deutsch] Wasser-in-Oel-Emulsionen sind durch Grenzflaechenfilme stabilisiert, die hauptsaechlich aus Erdoelkolloiden - Asphaltenen und Erdoel-Harzen - bestehen. Die Trennung dieser Emulsionen geschieht durch Zusatz von Demulgatoren. Bei wasserloeslichen Spaltern erfolgt der Spaltungsmechanismus entweder durch Verdraengung der erdoeleigenen Emulsionsstabilisatoren von der Grenzflaeche und Aufreissen des stabilisierenden Films oder durch dessen Umnetzung unter Bildung grenzflaecheninaktiver Adsorptionskomplexe. Bei der Verwendung oelloeslicher Spalter ergeben sich neben der Verdraengung der erdoeleigenen Kolloide auch die Aufhebung deren stabilisierender Wirkung durch zugesetzte Spalter sowie die Spaltung aufgrund von Grenzflaecheneruptionen. Fuer die unterschiedlich stabilisierten Emulsionen muss dabei der jeweils wirksamste Spalter bestimmt werden. Es kommen ueberwiegend wasserloesliche Spalter zum Einsatz. (orig.)

  8. Study of surface activity of piroxicam at the interface of palm oil esters and various aqueous phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkarim, Muthanna Fawzy; Abdullah, Ghassan Zuhair; Chitneni, Mallikarjun; Yam, Mun Fei; Mahdi, Elrashid Saleh; Salman, Ibrahim Muhammad; Ameer, Omar Ziad; Sattar, Munavvar Abdul; Basri, Mahiran; Noor, Azmin Mohd

    2012-04-01

    The surface activity of some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents like ibuprofen was investigated extensively. This fact has attracted the researchers to extend this behavior to other agents like piroxicam. Piroxicam molecules are expected to orient at the interface of oil and aqueous phase. The aim of this study was, firstly, to assess the surface and interfacial tension behaviour of newly synthesised palm oil esters and various pH phosphate buffers. Furthermore, the surface and interfacial tension activity of piroxicam was studied. All the measurements of surface and interfacial tension were made using the tensiometer. The study revealed that piroxicam has no effect on surface tension values of all pH phosphate buffers and palm oil esters. Similarly, various concentrations of piroxicam did not affect the interfacial tensions between the oil phase and the buffer phases. Accordingly, the interfacial tension values of all mixtures of oil and phosphate buffers were considerably high which indicates the immiscibility. It could be concluded that piroxicam has no surface activity. Additionally, there is no surface pressure activity of piroxicam at the interface of plam oil esters and phosphate buffers in the presence of Tweens and Spans.

  9. Monolayers at air-water interfaces: from origins-of-life to nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Hill, Jonathan P

    2011-08-01

    The air-water interface presents several interesting features, namely a) a molecularly flat environment, b) a boundary region between two phases with different dielectric constants, c) permits or promotes dynamic interactions within the interface region, and d) a point of interaction between hydrophobic compounds and aqueous molecules. Accordingly, Langmuir monolayers at the air-water interface have several unique characteristics and properties, which require investigation. In this review-type personal account, typical examples of molecular recognition and molecular patterning at air-water interfaces are first introduced, followed by descriptions of specific and unusual properties of monolayers on water. In addition, two examples of our own results concerning Langmuir monolayers are explained. We have selected examples from two apparently unrelated research areas, these being the origin of life and future nanotechnology, in order to emphasize the diverse scientific contribution of research on monolayers at the air-water interface. Copyright © 2011 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Oil sands water withdrawal challenges and the Athabasca River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.; Baker, M. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada). Calgary Research Centre

    2003-07-01

    Drought conditions in Alberta have raised concerns regarding water withdrawal from the Athabasca River for oil sands development projects in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo in Northeastern Alberta. In particular, concerns have been raised about the potential increased rates of water withdrawal during seasonal low flow periods. A committee has been established under the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA) to develop a management system for the Athabasca River. The committee includes stakeholders from federal and provincial governments, First Nations, non-government groups and industry. This paper describes the challenges facing oil sands developers in the region with particular emphasis on the role that the newly developed management system called 'Instream Flow Needs', will have on the cumulative water withdrawal from the Athabasca River. tabs., figs.

  11. An objective estimation of impurities in oil field stagnant waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abashev, R.G.; Runets, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    Studies and an analysis of published materials are used to establish the predominant role of the mechanical impurities of various origins covered by layers of the heavy components of petroleum products in reducing the injectivity of injection wells for injecting stagnant waters containing concretions. A method is proposed for determining the impurities in the oil field stagnant waters used for flooding; this method makes it possible to obtain more reliable results on the concentration of the concretions responsible in such conditions for the drop in the injectivity of the formation reservoirs. A comparative evaluation of the results from an analysis of the impurities determined by the existing method and the proposed method is given. This method is useful in oil field laboratories in the systematic quality control over injected waters.

  12. Effects of Several Natural Macromolecules on the Stability and Controlled Release Properties of Water-in-Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlong; Shi, Yiheng; Zhu, Yunping; Teng, Chao; Li, Xiuting

    2016-05-18

    Water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions are effective vehicles for embedding application of active compounds but limited by their thermodynamic instability and rapid release properties. The present study added bovine serum albumin, whey protein isolate, whey protein hydrolysate, sodium caseinate, carboxymethylcellulose sodium, fish gelatin, apple pectin, gum arabic, ι-carrageenan, and hydroxypropyl chitosan separately to the internal or external aqueous phase to investigate their effects on the physical stabilities and controlled release properties of W/O/W emulsions. The effects of the natural macromolecules in the internal and external aqueous phases were different and depended upon the macromolecule structure and its mass fraction. The addition of the natural macromolecule strengthened the interfaces of emulsions, which improved the physical stability. The natural macromolecules that improved the stability often did not improve controlled release. Therefore, the balance between these properties needs to be considered when adding natural macromolecules to a W/O/W emulsion.

  13. Coherent description of transport across the water interface: From nanodroplets to climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Trinh, Thuat T.; Lervik, Anders; Badam, Vijay Kumar; Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick

    2016-03-01

    Transport of mass and energy across the vapor-liquid interface of water is of central importance in a variety of contexts such as climate models, weather forecasts, and power plants. We provide a complete description of the transport properties of the vapor-liquid interface of water with the framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Transport across the planar interface is then described by 3 interface transfer coefficients where 9 more coefficients extend the description to curved interfaces. We obtain all coefficients in the range 260-560 K by taking advantage of water evaporation experiments at low temperatures, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics with the TIP4P/2005 rigid-water-molecule model at high temperatures, and square gradient theory to represent the whole range. Square gradient theory is used to link the region where experiments are possible (low vapor pressures) to the region where nonequilibrium molecular dynamics can be done (high vapor pressures). This enables a description of transport across the planar water interface, interfaces of bubbles, and droplets, as well as interfaces of water structures with complex geometries. The results are likely to improve the description of evaporation and condensation of water at widely different scales; they open a route to improve the understanding of nanodroplets on a small scale and the precision of climate models on a large scale.

  14. Recovery of Palm Oil and Valuable Material from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch by Sub-critical Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Kurnin, Nor Azrin; Shah Ismail, Mohd Halim; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Izhar, Shamsul

    2016-01-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) is one of the solid wastes produced in huge volume by palm oil mill. Whilst it still contains valuable oil, approximately 22.6 million tons is generated annually and treated as solid waste. In this work, sub-critical water (sub-cw) was used to extract oil, sugar and tar from spikelet of EFB. The spikelet was treated with sub-cw between 180-280°C and a reaction time of 2 and 5 minutes. The highest yield of oil was 0.075 g-oil/g-dry EFB, obtained at 240°C and reaction time of 5 minutes. Astonishingly, oil that was extracted through this method was 84.5% of that obtained through Soxhlet method using hexane. Yield of oil extracted was strongly affected by the reaction temperature and time. Higher reaction temperature induces the dielectric constant of water towards the non-polar properties of solvent; thus increases the oil extraction capability. Meanwhile, the highest yield of sugar was 0.20 g-sugar/g-dry EFB obtained at 220°C. At this temperature, the ion product of water is high enough to enable maximum sub-critical water hydrolysis reaction. This study showed that oil and other valuable material can be recovered using water at sub-critical condition, and most attractive without the use of harmful organic solvent.

  15. High resolution microprofiling, fractionation and speciation at sediment water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricius, Anne-Lena; Duester, Lars; Ecker, Dennis; Ternes, Thomas A.

    2016-04-01

    Within aquatic environments, the exchange between the sediment and the overlaying water is often driven by steep gradients of, e.g., the oxygen concentration, the redox potential or the pH value at the sediment water interface (SWI). Important transport processes at the SWI are sedimentation and resuspension of particulate matter and diffusional fluxes of dissolved substances. To gain a better understanding of the key factors and processes determining the fate of substances at the SWI, methods with a spatial high resolution are required that enable the investigation of several sediment parameters in parallel to different analytes of interest in the sediment pore water. Moreover, beside the total content, questions concerning the speciation and fractionation are of concern in studying the different (transport) processes. Due to the availability of numerous micro-sensors and -electrodes (e.g., O2, redox potential, pH value, H2S, N2O) and the development of methods for pore water sampling [1], the toolbox to study the heterogeneous and often dynamic conditions at the SWI at a sub-millimetre scale were considerably improved. Nevertheless, the methods available for pore water sampling often require the installation of the sampling devices at the sampling site and/or intensive preparation procedures that may influence the conditions at the area studied and/or the characteristics of the samples taken. By combination of a micro profiling system with a new micro filtration probe head connected to a pump and a fraction collector, a micro profiling and micro sampling system ("missy") was developed that enables for the first time a direct, automate and low invasive sampling of small volumes (preparation procedures followed by inductively plasma-mass spectrometry analyses, it was possible to address not only the total content of metal(loid)s, but also their fractionation (size dependent and micelle mediated) or speciation related distributions along sediment depth profiles in

  16. Tensiometry and dilational rheology of mixed β-lactoglobulin/ionic surfactant adsorption layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Abhijit; Gochev, Georgi; Miller, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    Oscillating drop tensiometry was applied to study adsorbed interfacial layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces formed from mixed solutions of β-lactoglobulin (BLG, 1 μM in 10 mM buffer, pH 7 - negative net charge) and the anionic surfactant SDS or the cationic DoTAB. The interfacial pressure Π and the dilational viscoelasticity modulus |E| of the mixed layers were measured for mixtures of varying surfactant concentrations. The double capillary technique was employed which enables exchange of the protein solution in the drop bulk by surfactant solution (sequential adsorption) or by pure buffer (washing out). The first protocol allows probing the influence of the surfactant on a pre-adsorbed protein layer thus studying the protein/surfactant interactions at the interface. The second protocol gives access to the residual values of Π and |E| measured after the washing out procedure thus bringing information about the process of protein desorption. The DoTAB/BLG complexes exhibit higher surface activity and higher resistance to desorption in comparison with those for the SDS/BLG complexes due to hydrophobization via electrostatic binding of surfactant molecules. The neutral DoTAB/BLG complexes achieve maximum elastic response of the mixed layer. Mixed BLG/surfactant layers at the water/oil interface are found to reach higher surface pressure and lower maximum dilational elasticity than those at the water/air surface. The sequential adsorption mode experiments and the desorption study reveal that binding of DoTAB to pre-adsorbed BLG globules is somehow restricted at the water/air surface in comparison with the case of complex formation in the solution bulk and subsequently adsorbed at the water/air surface. Maximum elasticity is achieved with washed out layers obtained after simultaneous adsorption, i.e. isolation of the most surface active DoTAB/BLG complex. These specific effects are much less pronounced at the W/H interface.

  17. Anomalous transparency of water-air interface for low-frequency sound

    CERN Document Server

    Godin, O A

    2006-01-01

    Sound transmission through water-air interface is normally weak because of a strong mass density contrast. Here we show that the transparency of the interface increases dramatically at low frequencies. Rather counterintuitively, almost all acoustic energy emitted by a sufficiently shallow monopole source under water is predicted to be radiated into atmosphere. Physically, increased transparency at lower frequencies is due to the increasing role of inhomogeneous waves and a destructive interference of direct and surface-reflected waves under water. The phenomenon of anomalous transparency has significant implications for acoustic communication across the water-air interface, generation of ambient noise, and detection of underwater explosions.

  18. Numerical research on the mechanism of contaminant release through the porous sediment-overlying water interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑淑君; 曹洋; 郭加宏

    2014-01-01

    After the pollutant discharged into the river or lake has been reduced, the release of the contaminant from the sediment to the overlying water may cause the river and lake be contaminated again. On the condition that the overlying water flow does not lead to sediment suspension, numerical researches are carried out for the mechanism of contaminant release through the sediment-overlying water interface. The overlying water flow is calculated as turbulence. The sediment is regarded as isotropic homogeneous porous medium, therefore the seepage field in the porous sediment layer is obtained by solving Darcy’s equations. Coupled two dimensional steady flows of the overlying water and the pore water in the sediment are calculated. Based on the flow fields obtained, the unsteady contaminant solute transportation process in the pore water in the sediment and the overlying water is numerically simulated, as the shapes of the sediment-overlying water interface are flat or periodic triangular respectively. Numerical results show that the exchange of the pore water and the overlying water is an important factor which decides the release flux of the contaminant from the sediment to the overlying water. The pressure distribution produced by the overlying water flow along the sediment-overlying water interface, as it is not flat, may induce the seepage of the pore water in the sediment and through the sediment-overlying water interface, which may increase the release flux of the contaminant from the sediment to the overlying water.

  19. Water corrosion of spent nuclear fuel: radiolysis driven dissolution at the UO2/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springell, Ross; Rennie, Sophie; Costelle, Leila; Darnbrough, James; Stitt, Camilla; Cocklin, Elizabeth; Lucas, Chris; Burrows, Robert; Sims, Howard; Wermeille, Didier; Rawle, Jonathan; Nicklin, Chris; Nuttall, William; Scott, Thomas; Lander, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    X-ray diffraction has been used to probe the radiolytic corrosion of uranium dioxide. Single crystal thin films of UO(2) were exposed to an intense X-ray beam at a synchrotron source in the presence of water, in order to simultaneously provide radiation fields required to split the water into highly oxidising radiolytic products, and to probe the crystal structure and composition of the UO(2) layer, and the morphology of the UO(2)/water interface. By modeling the electron density, surface roughness and layer thickness, we have been able to reproduce the observed reflectivity and diffraction profiles and detect changes in oxide composition and rate of dissolution at the Ångström level, over a timescale of several minutes. A finite element calculation of the highly oxidising hydrogen peroxide product suggests that a more complex surface interaction than simple reaction with H(2)O(2) is responsible for an enhancement in the corrosion rate directly at the interface of water and UO(2), and this may impact on models of long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel.

  20. Novel preparation method for sustained-release PLGA microspheres using water-in-oil-in-hydrophilic-oil-in-water emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong X

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoyun Hong,1,2,* Liangming Wei,3,* Liuqing Ma,2 Yinghui Chen,4 Zhenguo Liu,1 Weien Yuan2,* 1Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai JiaoTong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai JiaoTong University, 3Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication Technology, Ministry of Education, Research Institute of Micro/Nanometer Science and Technology, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 4Department of Neurology, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: An increasing number of drugs are needing improved formulations to optimize patient compliance because of their short half-lives in blood. Sustained-release formulations of drugs are often required for long-term efficacy, and microspheres are among the most popular ones. When drugs are encapsulated into microsphere formulations, different methods of preparation need to be used according to specific clinical requirements and the differing physicochemical characteristics of individual drugs. In this work, we developed a novel method for sustained-release drug delivery using a water-in-oil-in-hydrophilic oil-in-water (w/o/oh/w emulsion to encapsulate a drug into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA microspheres. Different effects were achieved by varying the proportions and concentrations of hydrophilic oil and PLGA. Scanning electron and optical microscopic images showed the surfaces of the microspheres to be smooth and that their morphology was spherical. Microspheres prepared using the w/o/oh/w emulsion were able to load protein efficiently and had sustained-release properties. These results indicate that the above-mentioned method might be useful for developing sustained-release microsphere formulations in the future. Keywords: protein, microspheres, water-in-oil-in-hydrophilic oil-in-water

  1. Interfacial tension in oil-water-surfactant systems: on the role of intra-molecular forces on interfacial tension values using DPD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguillard, E; Pannacci, N; Creton, B; Rousseau, B

    2013-04-14

    We have computed interfacial tension in oil-water-surfactant model systems using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. Oil and water molecules are modelled as single DPD beads, whereas surfactant molecules are composed of head and tail beads linked together by a harmonic potential to form a chain molecule. We have investigated the influence of the harmonic potential parameters, namely, the force constant K and the equilibrium distance r0, on the interfacial tension values. For both parameters, the range investigated has been chosen in agreement with typical values in the literature. Surprisingly, we observe a large effect on interfacial tension values, especially at large surfactant concentration. We demonstrate that, due to a subtle balance between intra-molecular and inter-molecular interactions, the local structure of surfactants at the oil-water interface is modified, the interfacial tension is changed and the interface stability is affected.

  2. Water drop impact onto oil covered solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ningli; Chen, Huanchen; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2016-11-01

    Droplet impact onto an oily surface can be encountered routinely in industrial applications; e.g., in spray cooling. It is not clear from literature what impact an oil film may have on the impact process. In this work, water drop impact onto both hydrophobic (glass) and hydrophilic (OTS) substrates which were covered by oil films (silicone) of different thickness (5um-50um) and viscosity (5cst-100cst) were performed. The effects of drop impact velocity, film thickness, and viscosity of the oil film and wettability of the substrate were studied. Our results show that when the film viscosity and impact velocity is low, the water drop deformed into the usual disk shape after impact, and rebounded from the surface. Such rebound phenomena disappears, when the viscosity of oil becomes very large. With the increase of the impact velocity, crown and splashing appears in the spreading phase. The crown and splashing behavior appears more easily with the increase of film thickness and decrease of its viscosity. It was also found that the substrate wettability can only affect the impact process in cases which drop has a large Webber number (We = 594), and the film's viscosity and thickness are small. This work was support by National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Project Number is 51506084.

  3. Recovery of oil from oil-in-water emulsion using biopolymers by adsorptive method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elanchezhiyan, S Sd; Sivasurian, N; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, it is aimed to identify, a low cost sorbent for the recovery of oil from oil-in-water emulsion using biopolymers such as chitin and chitosan. Chitin has the greater adsorption capacity than chitosan due to its hydrophobic nature. The characterizations of chitin and chitosan were done using FTIR, SEM, EDAX, XRD, TGA and DSC techniques. Under batch equilibrium mode, a systematic study was performed to optimize the various equilibrium parameters viz., contact time, pH, dosage, initial concentration of oil, and temperature. The adsorption process reached equilibrium at 40 min of contact time and the percentage removal of oil was found to be higher (90%) in the acidic medium. The Freundlich and Langmuir models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were calculated. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were calculated to find out the nature of the sorption mechanism. The kinetic studies were investigated with reaction-based and diffusion-based models. The suitable mechanism for the removal of oil has been established.

  4. Novel Methodology for the Highly-Efficient Separation of Oil and Water (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-16

    Fabric Pure PEGDA Pure PEGDA 10% POSS 20% POSS 10% POSS 20% POSS Water Rapeseed oil Water Rapeseed oil PEGDA surface reconfiguration leads to...Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) March 2014- April 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Novel Methodology for the Highly-Efficient Separation of Oil and...distrib tion unlimited. Novel Methodology for the Highly- Efficient Separation of Oil and Water Joseph Mabry, Anish Tuteja, Andrew Guenthner, Josiah Reams

  5. Femtosecond laser ablated durable superhydrophobic PTFE sheet for oil/water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentao; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Yong, Jiale; Fang, Yao; Huo, Jinglan

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond laser microfabrication has been attracting increasing interest of researchers in recent years, and been applied on interface science to control the wettability of solid surfaces. Herein, we fabricate a kind of rough microstructures on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sheet by femtosecond laser. The femtosecond laser ablated surfaces show durable superhydrophobicity and ultralow water adhesion even after storing in a harsh environment for a long time, including strong acid, strong alkali, and high temperature. A penetrating microholes array was further generated on the rough superhydrophobic PTFE sheet by a subsequent mechanical drilling process. The as-prepared material was successfully applied in the field of oil/water separation due to the inverse superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity.

  6. Clear well physical water treatment technology for the oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troncoso y Troncoso, Joao Ricardo [Weatherford Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rzeznik, Lawrence; Parker, Wiley L. [Weatherford International, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Deposits of various types are common problems associated with oil and gas production. Deposits of scale, paraffin can block tubing, cause pumps to stick and clog valves and chokes. The expense and widespread occurrence of deposition problems have resulted in the development of a variety of treatment options which have been marginally successful at best. This paper discusses a new and novel approach for controlling scale, paraffin using an electronic physical water treating device and results that have been achieved. This physical water treatment technology has been applied to oil and gas production wells which incorporate all forms of product lift. Units are now also being installed in several South American locations. This paper will discuss the results obtained from the use of these physical water treatment devices and discuss the criteria which are used to ascertain whether a particular well site's problems can be eased by use of these devices. These criteria will be discussed for both land based and offshore oil wells. (author)

  7. A new nano-engineered hierarchical membrane for concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from oil-in-water nanoemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Detao; Liu, Zhaoyang; Bai, Hongwei; Sun, Darren Delai; Song, Xiaoxiao

    2016-04-01

    Surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsions pose a severe threat to both the environment and human health. Recent development of membrane filtration technology has enabled efficient oil removal from oil/water nanoemulsion, however, the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil remains unsolved because the existing filtration membranes still suffer from low surfactant removal rate and serious surfactant-induced fouling issue. In this study, to realize the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from nanoemulsion, a novel hierarchically-structured membrane is designed with a nanostructured selective layer on top of a microstructured support layer. The physical and chemical properties of the overall membrane, including wettability, surface roughness, electric charge, thickness and structures, are delicately tailored through a nano-engineered fabrication process, that is, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet assisted phase inversion coupled with surface functionalization. Compared with the membrane fabricated by conventional phase inversion, this novel membrane has four times higher water flux, significantly higher rejections of both oil (~99.9%) and surfactant (as high as 93.5%), and two thirds lower fouling ratio when treating surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsion. Due to its excellent performances and facile fabrication process, this nano-engineered membrane is expected to have wide practical applications in the oil/water separation fields of environmental protection and water purification.

  8. Mineral-coated polymer membranes with superhydrophilicity and underwater superoleophobicity for effective oil/water separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng-Cheng; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2013-09-27

    Oil-polluted water is a worldwide problem due to the increasing industrial oily wastewater and the frequent oil spill accidents. Here, we report a novel kind of superhydrophilic hybrid membranes for effective oil/water separation. They were prepared by depositing CaCO3-based mineral coating on PAA-grafted polypropylene microfiltration membranes. The rigid mineral-coating traps abundant water in aqueous environment and forms a robust hydrated layer on the membrane pore surface, thus endowing the membranes with underwater superoleophobicity. Under the drive of either gravity or external pressure, the hybrid membranes separate a range of oil/water mixtures effectively with high water flux (>2000 L m(-2) h(-1)), perfect oil/water separation efficiency (>99%), high oil breakthrough pressure (>140 kPa) and low oil fouling. The oil/water mixtures include not only free mixtures but also oil-in-water emulsions. Therefore, the mineral-coated membrane enables an efficient and energy-saving separation for various oil/water mixtures, showing attractive potential for practical oil/water separation.

  9. Selective retardation of perfume oil evaporation from oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by either surfactant or nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Holt, Benjamin L; Beaussoubre, Pascal; Wong, Kenneth

    2010-12-07

    We have used dynamic headspace analysis to investigate the evaporation rates of perfume oils from stirred oil-in-water emulsions into a flowing gas stream. We compare the behavior of an oil of low water solubility (limonene) and one of high water solubility (benzyl acetate). It is shown how the evaporation of an oil of low water solubility is selectively retarded and how the retardation effect depends on the oil volume fraction in the emulsion. We compare how the evaporation retardation depends on the nature of the adsorbed film stabilizing the emulsion. Surfactant films are less effective than adsorbed films of nanoparticles, and the retardation can be further enhanced by compression of the adsorbed nanoparticle films by preshrinking the emulsion drops.

  10. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chempath, Shaji [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pratt, Lawrence R [TULANE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  11. Effect of ionic surfactants on the phase behavior and structure of sucrose ester/water/oil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Carlos; Acharya, Durga P; Hinata, Shigeki; Ishitobi, Masahiko; Kunieda, Hironobu

    2003-06-15

    The phase behavior and structure of sucrose ester/water/oil systems in the presence of long-chain cosurfactant (monolaurin) and small amounts of ionic surfactants was investigated by phase study and small angle X-ray scattering. In a water/sucrose ester/monolaurin/decane system at 27 degrees C, instead of a three-phase microemulsion, lamellar liquid crystals are formed in the dilute region. Unlike other systems in the presence of alcohol as cosurfactant, the HLB composition does not change with dilution, since monolaurin adsorbs almost completely in the interface. The addition of small amounts of ionic surfactant, regardless of the counterion, increases the solubilization of water in W/O microemulsions. The solubilization on oil in O/W microemulsions is not much affected, but structuring is induced and a viscous isotropic phase is formed. At high ionic surfactant concentrations, the single-phase microemulsion disappears and liquid crystals are favored.

  12. Challenges of Membrane Filtration for Produced Water Treatment in Offshore Oil & Gas Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Kasper Lund; Hansen, Leif; Mai, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tremendous amount of produced water are discharged into the sea from offshore oil & gas installations. Along with every barrel of oil three barrels of water are produced and this is only worsen as the fields mature. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is employed to increase production, as a part of EOR...

  13. Alkyl bicarbamates supramolecular organogelators with effective selective gelation and high oil recovery from oil/water mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongzhen; Wu, Songquan; Yan, Xingru; Ma, Tao; Shao, Lu; Liu, Yuyan; Guo, Zhanhu

    2017-01-01

    A series of alkyl bicarbamates supramolecular organogelators were synthesized with different structures and lengths of alkyl chains. The driving forces for the self-assembly of small molecules, including the intermolecular H bonding, π-π stacking and van der Waals interactions, played an important role in the formation of different 3D network structures, i.e., fibers, ribbons, sheets, and prisms. And a probable formation process of the gel networks was proposed. Furthermore, the phase-selective gelling performances were investigated for oil removal from aqueous solution. Interestingly, the gelling properties were found to be affected by the length and structure of alkyl chains, while some gelators with intermediate alkyl chain lengths could effectively gel all the tested oils from water surface within 15 min, such as Russian crude oil, diesel, gasoline, soybean oil, peanut oil, olive oil, cyclohexane, hexane and ethyl acetate. Advantageously, fast gelation, high rate of oil removal (>95%) and excellent oil retention rate (close to 100%) were realized in the recovery of oil spills from water surface. This kind of supramolecular gelators demonstrates good potential applications in the delivery or removal of organic pollution from oil/water mixtures.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of radon accumulation in water and oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pafong, Elvira; Drossel, Barbara [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas that can enter the human body from air or from ground water. Radon can accumulate to levels that considerably rise the risk of lung cancer while it is also known as a a treatment of various ailments, most notably rheumatoid arthritis. The accumulation of radon differs between tissues, with particularly high concentrations in fatty cells. In order to understand the mechanisms responsible for the different solubility of radon in water and fat, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radon gas at ambient conditions in contact with a bulk material consisting either of water or oil. We evaluate the diffusion coefficient of radon in both media as well as the equilibrium concentration. The crucial point here is to understand the hydrophobic interaction between water and radon as compared to the dispersive interaction between radon and oil. Therefore, we artificially vary the water charges (i.e., the hydrophobicity) as well as the parameters of the van-der-Waals interaction.

  15. Water in soybean oil microemulsions as medium for electrochemical measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendonça Carla R. B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Microemulsions of water in soybean oil (w/o ME were prepared with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS as surfactant and amyl or isoamyl alcohol, as co-surfactants. Microemulsions containing 40.0% oil, 43.2% alcohol, 10.8% SDS and 6.0% water in weight, in the ratio 1:4 [SDS]:[alcohol] showed the highest thermodynamic stability. The aqueous droplet size and its diffusion coefficient Dw/o in the ME were determined through dynamic light scattering (DLS. Voltammetric measurements in the ME at a Pt disk ultramicroelectrode (ume evidenced the oxidation of both water and ferrocene (Fc, and the reduction of oleic acid. The Dw/o values calculated from the limiting current being lower than the ones obtained from DLS indicate that water oxidation probably requires diffusion towards the electrode of both the droplets and the water molecules from inside the droplets. The results show that electroanalytical determinations can be carried out in w/o ME.

  16. Feasibility evaluation of downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Langhus, B. G.; Belieu, S.

    1999-01-31

    The largest volume waste stream associated with oil and gas production is produced water. A survey conducted by the American Petroleum Institute estimated that 20.9 billion barrels of produced water were disposed of in 1985 (Wakim 1987). Of this total, 91% was disposed of through disposal wells or was injected for enhanced oil recovery projects. Treatment and disposal of produced water represents a significant cost for operators. A relatively new technology, downhole oil/water separators (DOWS), has been developed to reduce the cost of handling produced water. DOWS separate oil and gas from produced water at the bottom of the well and reinject some of the produced water into another formation or another horizon within the same formation, while the oil and gas are pumped to the surface. Since much of the produced water is not pumped to the surface, treated, and pumped from the surface back into a deep formation, the cost of handling produced water is greatly reduced. When DOWS are used, additional oil may be recovered as well. In cases where surface processing or disposal capacity is a limiting factor for further production within a field, the use of DOWS to dispose of some of the produced water can allow additional production within that field. Simultaneous injection using DOWS minimizes the opportunity for contamination of underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) through leaks in tubing and casing during the injection process. This report uses the acronym 'DOWS' although the technology may also be referred to as DHOWS or as dual injection and lifting systems (DIALS). Simultaneous injection using DOWS has the potential to profoundly influence the domestic oil industry. The technology has been shown to work in limited oil field applications in the United States and Canada. Several technical papers describing DOWS have been presented at oil and gas industry conferences, but for the most part, the information on the DOWS technology has not been widely

  17. The value of offshore field experiments in oil spill technology development for Norwegian waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faksness, Liv-Guri; Brandvik, Per Johan; Daling, Per S; Singsaas, Ivar; Sørstrøm, Stein Erik

    2016-10-15

    The blowout on the Ekofisk field in the North Sea in 1977 initiated R&D efforts in Norway focusing on improving oil spill contingency in general and more specifically on weathering processes and modeling drift and spreading of oil spills. Since 1978, approximately 40 experimental oil spills have been performed under controlled conditions in open and ice covered waters in Norway. The importance of these experimental oil spills for understanding oil spill behavior, development of oil spill and response models, and response technologies are discussed here. The large progress within oil spill R&D in Norway since the Ekofisk blowout has been possible through a combination of laboratory testing, basin studies, and experimental oil spills. However, it is the authors' recommendation that experimental oil spills still play an important role as a final validation for the extensive R&D presently going on in Norway, e.g. deep-water releases of oil and gas.

  18. Supercritical water oxidation of oil-based drill cuttings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Zeliang; Yin, Fengjun; Wang, Guangwei; Chen, Hongzhen; He, Chunlan; Xu, Yuanjian

    2017-03-09

    Oil-based drill cuttings (OBDC) are a typical hazardous solid waste that arises from drilling operations in oil and gas fields. The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of OBDC was comprehensively investigated in a batch reactor under the conditions of various oxygen coefficients (OC, 1.5-3.5), temperatures (T, 400-500°C) and reaction times (t, 0.5-10min). Preheating experiments indicated that most of the organic compounds in the initial OBDC sample were distributed within gaseous, oil, aqueous and solid phases, with no more than 9.8% of organic compounds converted into inorganic carbon. All tested variables, i.e., OC, T and t, positively affect the transformation of carbon compounds from the oil and solid phases to the aqueous phase and, ultimately, to CO2. Carbon monoxide is the primary stable intermediate. The total organic carbon (TOC) removal efficiency can reach up to 89.2% within 10min at 500°C. Analysis of the reaction pathways suggests both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions exist in the reactor. The homogeneous reaction is a typical SCWO reaction that is governed by a free radical mechanism, and the heterogeneous reaction is dominated by mass transfer. The information obtained in this study is useful for further investigation and development of hydrothermal treatment procedures for OBDC.

  19. Determination of water in NIST reference material for mineral oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren; Nordmark

    2000-07-15

    The accuracy of the reference concentrations of moisture in electrical insulating oil RM 8506 and lubricating oil RM 8507 (both of mineral type) and specified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as containing 39.7 and 76.8 ppm (w/w) water, respectively, has recently been the subject of debate in this journal. To shed some further light on this controversy, we report in this correspondence results for these oils obtained by two additional methods, one based on specially designed reagents for diaphragm-free Karl Fischer (KF) coulometry and the other based on the concept of stripping at elevated temperature/continuous KF coulometry. A positive interference effect was shown to take place for RM 8506 when the direct coulometric method was used. If the results are corrected for this, the values including six different procedures varied in the range 13.5-15.6 ppm (w/w). For RM 8507, all values were between 42.5 and 47.2 ppm (w/w), which means that the values recommended by NIST for both reference oils using volumetric titration are about twice as high as those obtained with the other techniques. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is presented.

  20. Superoleophillic electrospun polystrene/exofoliated graphite fibre for selective removal of crude oil from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayande, S. Oluwagbemiga; Dare, Enock O.; Olorundare, F. O. Grace; Nkosi, D.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Mamba, B. B.

    2016-04-01

    During oil spills, the aquatic environment is greatly endangered because oil floats on water making the penetration of sunlight difficult therefore primary productivity is compromised, birds and aquatic organisms are totally eliminated within a short period. It is therefore essential to remove the oil from the water bodies after the spillage. This work reports on the fabrication of oil loving electrospun polystyrene-exofoliated graphite fibre with hydrophobic and oleophillic surface properties. The fibre was applied for the selective adsorption of crude oil from simulated crude oil spillage on water. The maximum oil adsorption capacity of the EPS/EG was 1.15 kg/g in 20 min while the lowest oil adsorption capacity was 0.81 kg/g in 10 min. Cheap oil adsorbent was developed with superoleophillic and superhydrophobic properties.

  1. Toxicity of water-soluble fractions of biodiesel fuels derived from castor oil, palm oil, and waste cooking oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Maria Bernadete Neiva Lemos; de Araújo, Milena Maria Sampaio; Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; da Cruz, Andrea Cristina Santos; Pereira, Solange Andrade; do Nascimento, Núbia Costa

    2011-04-01

    Concerns over the sustained availability of fossil fuels and their impact on global warming and pollution have led to the search for fuels from renewable sources to address worldwide rising energy demands. Biodiesel is emerging as one of the possible solutions for the transport sector. It shows comparable engine performance to that of conventional diesel fuel, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, the toxicity of products and effluents from the biodiesel industry has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Brazil has a very high potential as a biodiesel producer, in view of its climatic conditions and vast areas for cropland, with consequent environmental risks because of possible accidental biodiesel spillages into water bodies and runoff to coastal areas. This research determined the toxicity to two marine organisms of the water-soluble fractions (WSF) of three different biodiesel fuels obtained by methanol transesterification of castor oil (CO), palm oil (PO), and waste cooking oil (WCO). Microalgae and sea urchins were used as the test organisms, respectively, for culture-growth-inhibition and early-life-stage-toxicity tests. The toxicity levels of the analyzed biodiesel WSF showed the highest toxicity for the CO, followed by WCO and the PO. Methanol was the most prominent contaminant; concentrations increased over time in WSF samples stored up to 120 d. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  2. Determination of optimal parameters of purification water surface from oil and oil products by sorbent on the basis of worn automobile tires

    OpenAIRE

    YUSUBOV FAXRADDIN VALI; SHIXALIYEV КARAM SEYFI; ABDULLAYEVA МAYA YADIGAR

    2016-01-01

    The article describes an identification of optimal parameters for surface water purification from oil and oil products by sorbent based on worn automotive tires. In thus Optimal parameters for water surface purification from oil and oil products by sorbent have been found out on the basis of constructed regression model of the process.

  3. Low-field NMR determinations of the properties of heavy oils and water-in-oil emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaTorraca, G A; Dunn, K J; Webber, P R; Carlson, R M

    1998-01-01

    Low-field (magnetic resonance (NMR) well-logging measurements are beginning to be used to obtain estimates of oil viscosity in situ. To build an interpretive capability, we made laboratory T1 and T2 relaxation measurements on a suite of high-density, high-viscosity crude oils. These measurements were also used to estimate oil viscosity and water fraction from T1 and T2 measurements on stable, water-in-oil emulsions. High-density, high-viscosity oils have components that relax faster than can be measured by nuclear magnetic resonance logging tools. This requires corrections to T2 logging measurements for accurate estimates of oil saturation and porosity.

  4. Immiscible displacement of oil by water in a microchannel: Asymmetric flow behavior and nonlinear stability analysis of core-annular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Hooman; Abbasi, Alireza; Das, Kausik S.; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    The immiscible displacement of oil by water in a circular microchannel was investigated. A fused silica microchannel with an inner diameter of 250 μm and a length of 7 cm was initially filled with a viscous silicone oil. Only water then was injected into the channel. We describe our flow observations based on the two-dimensional images captured in the middle of the channel. The water finger displaced the oil and left an oil film on the channel wall. While the oil was being displaced at the core, the flow resistance decreased, which resulted in increases in water flow rate and inertia. Eventually, the water finger reached the channel exit and formed a core-annular flow pattern. The wavelength of the waves formed at the oil-water interface also increased with the increase in inertia. The initially symmetric interfacial waves became asymmetric with time. Also, the water core shifted from the center of the channel and left a thinner oil film on one side of the microchannel. Under all flow rates tested in this study, as long as the water was continuously injected, the water core was stable and no breakup into droplets was observed. We also discuss the flow stability based on nonlinear and linear stability analyses performed on the core-annular flow. Compared to the linear analysis, which ignores the inertia effects, the nonlinear analysis, which includes the inertia effects, predicts longer interfacial wavelengths by a factor of (1)/(1-(ao)/(2)(Wew+Weo(ao2)/(1-ao2))) where Wew and Weo are the Weber numbers of the water and the oil phases, respectively, and ao is the unperturbed water core radius made dimensionless by the channel radius.

  5. Immiscible displacement of oil by water in a microchannel: asymmetric flow behavior and nonlinear stability analysis of core-annular flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Hooman; Abbasi, Alireza; Das, Kausik S; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    The immiscible displacement of oil by water in a circular microchannel was investigated. A fused silica microchannel with an inner diameter of 250 μm and a length of 7 cm was initially filled with a viscous silicone oil. Only water then was injected into the channel. We describe our flow observations based on the two-dimensional images captured in the middle of the channel. The water finger displaced the oil and left an oil film on the channel wall. While the oil was being displaced at the core, the flow resistance decreased, which resulted in increases in water flow rate and inertia. Eventually, the water finger reached the channel exit and formed a core-annular flow pattern. The wavelength of the waves formed at the oil-water interface also increased with the increase in inertia. The initially symmetric interfacial waves became asymmetric with time. Also, the water core shifted from the center of the channel and left a thinner oil film on one side of the microchannel. Under all flow rates tested in this study, as long as the water was continuously injected, the water core was stable and no breakup into droplets was observed. We also discuss the flow stability based on nonlinear and linear stability analyses performed on the core-annular flow. Compared to the linear analysis, which ignores the inertia effects, the nonlinear analysis, which includes the inertia effects, predicts longer interfacial wavelengths by a factor of 1/sqrt[1-a(o)/2(We(w) + We(o)a(o)(2)/1-a(o)(2))] where We(w) and We(o) are the Weber numbers of the water and the oil phases, respectively, and a(o) is the unperturbed water core radius made dimensionless by the channel radius.

  6. Versatile fabrication of magnetic carbon fiber aerogel applied for bidirectional oil-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Zhu, Xiaotao; Ge, Bo; Men, Xuehu; Li, Peilong; Zhang, Zhaozhu

    2015-09-01

    Fabricating functional materials that can solve environmental problems resulting from oil or organic solvent pollution is highly desired. However, expensive materials or complicated procedures and unidirectional oil-water separation hamper their applications. Herein, a magnetic superhydrophobic carbon fiber aerogel with high absorption capacity was developed by one-step pyrolysis of Fe(NO3)3-coated cotton in an argon atmosphere. The obtained aerogel can selectively collect oils from oil-polluted region by a magnet bar owing to its magnetic properties and achieves fast oil-water separation for its superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. Furthermore, the aerogel performs recyclable oil absorption capacity even after ten cycles of oil-water separation and bears organic solvent immersion. Importantly, the obtained aerogel turns to superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic after thermal treatment, allowing it as a promising and efficient material for bidirectional oil-water separation and organic contaminants removal.

  7. Oil slicks on water surface: Breakup, coalescence, and droplet formation under breaking waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissanka, Indrajith D; Yapa, Poojitha D

    2017-01-15

    The ability to calculate the oil droplet size distribution (DSD) and its dynamic behavior in the water column is important in oil spill modeling. Breaking waves disperse oil from a surface slick into the water column as droplets of varying sizes. Oil droplets undergo further breakup and coalescence in the water column due to the turbulence. Available models simulate oil DSD based on empirical/equilibrium equations. However, the oil DSD evolution due to subsequent droplet breakup and coalescence in the water column can be best represented by a dynamic population model. This paper develops a phenomenological model to calculate the oil DSD in wave breaking conditions and ocean turbulence and is based on droplet breakup and coalescence. Its results are compared with data from laboratory experiments that include different oil types, different weathering times, and different breaking wave heights. The model comparisons showed a good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Surface Tension of Ab Initio Liquid Water at the Water-Air Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Nagata, Yuki; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    We report calculations of the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the simulation cell size dependence of the surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which show that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is required for the small system used in the AIMD simulation. The AIMD simulations reveal that the double-{\\xi} basis set overestimates the experimentally measured surface tension due to the Pulay stress, while the triple and quadruple-{\\xi} basis sets give similar results. We further demonstrate that the van der Waals corrections critically affect the surface tension. AIMD simulations without the van der Waals correction substantially underestimate the surface tension, while van der Waals correction with the Grimme's D2 technique results in the value for the surface tension that is too high. T...

  9. Stability of β-carotene in protein-stabilized oil-in-water delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornacchia, Leonardo; Roos, Yrjo H

    2011-07-13

    Inclusion of liposoluble bioactive compounds in fortified foods represents a complex challenge due to the labile nature of such compounds and the instability of oil-in-water emulsion-based delivery systems. In the present study, dispersions prepared with 10% (w/w) sunflower oil (SO) or hydrogenated palm kernel oil (HPKO) containing 0.05% (w/w) β-carotene were stabilized by various concentrations of whey protein isolate (WPI) or sodium caseinate (NaCas) (0.1 to 2.0% w/w) in 30% (w/w) sucrose aqueous solutions. Physicochemical characterization of emulsions was done considering the particle size, the particle surface protein coverage, and the physical state of continuous and dispersed phases. Physical stability of the systems and their protection properties on β-carotene were compared. The lipid carrier type and interfacial structure were investigated as the two key factors which regulate the stability of labile lipophilic bioactive molecules in food model systems. Our results showed high β-carotene stability when O/W systems were stable (protein concentration ≥0.8% w/w.) A (partially) solid lipid carrier (HPKO) enhanced protection compared to the liquid carrier (SO) as the bioactive molecules were entrapped in isolated domains within the solid lattice and kept apart from reactive species in the surroundings. NaCas provided a better barrier than WPI due to the different amino acid composition and interface structure which significantly reduced β-carotene degradation rate.

  10. Water quantity and quality at the urban-rural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Sun; B. Graeme Lockaby

    2012-01-01

    Population growth and urban development dramatically alter natural watershed ecosystem structure and functions and stress water resources. We review studies on the impacts of urbanization on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes underlying stream water quantity and water quality issues, as well as water supply challenges in an urban environment. We conclude that...

  11. Transport-limited water splitting at ion-selective interfaces during concentration polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer Peder; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytical model of salt- and water-ion transport across an ion-selective interface based on an assumption of local equilibrium of the water-dissociation reaction. The model yields current-voltage characteristics and curves of water-ion current versus salt-ion current, which are in ...

  12. GEOPHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION, REDOX ZONATION, AND CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION AT A GROUNDWATER/SURFACE WATER INTERFACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three transects along a groundwater/surface water interface were characterized for spatial distributions of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons and geochemical conditions to evaluate the natural bioremediation potential of this environmental system. Partly on the basis of ground p...

  13. Water-oil drainage dynamics in oil-wet random microfluidic porous media analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wei; Neeves, Keith; Yin, Xiaolong

    2012-01-01

    Displacement experiments carried out in microfluidic porous media analogs show that reduced surface tension leads to a more stable displacement, opposite to the process in Hele-Shaw cells where surface tension stabilizes the displacement of a more viscous fluid by a less viscous fluid. In addition, geometry of porous media is observed to play an important role. Three random microfluidic porous media analogs were made to study water-oil drainage dynamics, featuring a pattern of randomly connected channels with a uniform width, a pattern with Gaussian channel width distribution, and a pattern with large isolated pores. The microfluidic chips fabricated using Polydimenthylsiloxane with glass covers have the internal surface treated by Trichlorosilane to achieve a uniform oil-wet condition. The aqueous phase displaces the oil phase, with a viscosity ratio of about 1:40 and a density ratio of 1:0.85. Videos 1-3 show water flooding processes. It is observed that both channel size distribution (Video 2) and heteroge...

  14. An Experimental Study of Oil / Water Flow in Horizontal Pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elseth, Geir

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the behaviour of the simultaneous flow of oil and water in horizontal pipes. In this connection, two test facilities are used. Both facilities have horizontal test sections with inner pipe diameters equal to 2 inches. The largest facility, called the model oil facility, has reservoirs of 1 m{sub 3} of each medium enabling flow rates as high as 30 m{sub 3}/h, which corresponds to mixture velocities as high as 3.35 m/s. The flow rates of oil and water can be varied individually producing different flow patterns according to variations in mixture velocity and input water cut. Two main classes of flows are seen, stratified and dispersed. In this facility, the main focus has been on stratified flows. Pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured for a large number of flow conditions. Among the instruments used are differential pressure transmitters and a traversing gamma densitometer, respectively. The flow patterns that appear are classified in flow pattern maps as functions of either mixture velocity and water cut or superficial velocities. From these experiments a smaller number of stratified flows are selected for studies of velocity and turbulence. A laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) is applied for these measurements in a transparent part of the test section. To be able to produce accurate measurements a partial refractive index matching procedure is used. The other facility, called the matched refractive index facility, has a 0.2 m{sub 3} reservoir enabling mainly dispersed flows. Mixture velocities range from 0.75 m/s to 3 m/s. The fluids in this facility are carefully selected to match the refractive index of the transparent part of the test section. A full refractive index matching procedure is carried out producing excellent optical conditions for velocity and turbulence studies by LDA. In addition, pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured. (author)

  15. Thermally-nucleated self-assembly of water and alcohol into stable structures at hydrophobic interfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Giofrè, Daniele; José Segura, Juan; Stellacci, Francesco; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    At the interface with solids, the mobility of liquid molecules tends to be reduced compared with bulk, often resulting in increased local order due to interactions with the surface of the solid. At room temperature, liquids such as water and methanol can form solvation structures, but the molecules remain highly mobile, thus preventing the formation of long-lived supramolecular assemblies. Here we show that mixtures of water with methanol can form a novel type of interfaces with hydrophobic s...

  16. Investigating New Innovations to Detect Small Salt-Water Fraction Component in Mineral Oil and Small Oil Fraction Component in Salt-Water Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R.R. Mucunguzi-Rugwebe

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to present the key findings on the effects of small salt-water fraction component, β expressed in volume % per L on rotation are presented in the temperature range of 19.0 to 24.0ºC. It was found that rotations in oils with low boiling point known as light oils like Final diesel No. 2 were greater than the rotations which occurred in oils with high boiling point called heavy oils such as Esso diesel. Small oil fraction components, γs expressed in mL/L of salt water down to 10 ppm were detected. The greatest impact on rotation of these oils was found in light oils like Fina No. 2 diesel. At 40 ppm which is the oil content level below which the environment authority considers process water to be free from oil environmental hazards, the observed rotation angles were 23.2º for Esso, 36.7º for Nors Hydro AS, and 71.8º in Fina No. 2 diesel. It was observed that light oils molecules have drastic effect on optical properties of the mixture in which they exist. It was found that for all oils, oil fractions greater than 100 ppm, caused the medium to be optically dense. This technology has shown a very high potential of being used as an environmental monitor to detect oil fractions down to 10 ppm and the technique can use laser beam to control re-injected process water with oil fractions between 100-2000 ppm.

  17. An effective method to predict oil recovery in high water cut stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志斌; 刘浩翰

    2015-01-01

    The water flooding characteristic curve method based on the traditional regression equation between the oil and water phase permeability ratio and the water saturation is inappropriate to predict the oil recovery in the high water cut stage. Hence, a new water flooding characteristic curve equation adapted to the high water cut stage is proposed to predict the oil recovery. The water drive phase permeability experiments show that the curve of the oil and water phase permeability ratio vs. the water saturation, in the semi-logarithmic coordinates, has a significantly lower bend after entering the high water cut stage, so the water flooding characteristic curve method based on the traditional regression equation between the oil and water phase permeability ratio and the water saturation is inappropriate to predict the oil recovery in the high water cut stage; therefore, a new water flooding characteristic curve equation based on a better relationship betweenln(kro/krw)andwS is urgently desirable to be established to effectively and reliably predict the oil recovery of a water drive reservoir adapted to a high water cut stage. In this paper, by carrying out the water drive phase permeability experiments, a new mathematical model between the oil and water phase permeability ratio and the water saturation is established,with the regression analysis method and an integration of the established model, the water flooding characteristic curve equation adapted to a high water cut stage is obtained. Using the new water flooding characteristic curve to predict the oil recovery of the GD3-block of the SL oilfield and the J09-block of the DG oilfield in China, results with high predicted accuracy are obtained.

  18. Characteristics of remaining oil viscosity in water-and polymer-flooding reservoirs in Daqing Oilfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of 21 crude oil samples shows a good correlation between high molecular-weight hydrocarbon components (C 40+) and viscosity.Forty-four remaining oil samples extracted from oil sands of oilfield development coring wells were analyzed by high-temperature gas chromatography (HTGC),for the relative abundance of C 21-,C 21-C 40 and C 40+ hydrocarbons.The relationship between viscosity of crude oil and C 40+ (%) hydrocarbons abundance is used to expect the viscosity of remaining oil.The mobility characteristics of remaining oil,the properties of remaining oil,and the next displacement methods in reservoirs either water-flooded or polymer-flooded are studied with rock permeability,oil saturation of coring wells,etc.The experimental results show that the hydrocarbons composition,viscosity,and mobility of remaining oil from both polymer-flooding and water-flooding reservoirs are heterogeneous,especially the former.Relative abundance of C 21- and C 21-C 40 hydrocarbons in polymer-flooding reservoirs is lower than that of water-flooding,but with more abundance of C 40+ hydrocarbons.It is then suggested that polymer flooding must have driven more C 40- hydrocarbons out of reservoir,which resulted in relatively enriched C 40+,more viscous oils,and poorer mobility.Remaining oil in water-flooding reservoirs is dominated by moderate viscosity oil with some low viscosity oil,while polymer-flooding mainly contained moderate viscosity oil with some high viscosity oil.In each oilfield and reservoir,displacement methods of remaining oil,viscosity,and concentration by polymer-solution can be adjusted by current viscosity of remaining oil and mobility ratio in a favorable range.A new basis and methods are suggested for the further development and enhanced oil recovery of remaining oil.

  19. Oil and Water Don't Mix: The Gulf Coast Oil Disaster as a Preschool Social Studies Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    On April 20, 2010, an offshore oil-drilling platform exploded, spilling millions of gallons of oil into the gulf. From Louisiana to the Gulf Coast of Florida the effects are being felt by fisherman, shrimpers, dive charters, and other hardworking folks who depend on the water for their livelihood. But there is another population in these coastal…

  20. Oil and Water Don't Mix: The Gulf Coast Oil Disaster as a Preschool Social Studies Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    On April 20, 2010, an offshore oil-drilling platform exploded, spilling millions of gallons of oil into the gulf. From Louisiana to the Gulf Coast of Florida the effects are being felt by fisherman, shrimpers, dive charters, and other hardworking folks who depend on the water for their livelihood. But there is another population in these coastal…

  1. Effect of Addition of Cosurfactant on the Phase Behaviour of Oil-in-water Aminosilicone Oil Microemulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Hong LUO; Xiao Li ZHAN; Peng Yong YU

    2004-01-01

    Stable and transparent aminosilicone oil microemulsion of the average particle size below 0.05 micron was prepared. The interaction of the aminosilicone oil, water, complex surfactants and cosurfactant was studied by part pseudoternary phase diagram. The effect of cosurfactants (such as alcohol) and the mechanism of its effect on the phase behaviour of the pseudoternary system were investigated.

  2. Antioxidant Activity of Potato Peel Extracts in a Fish-RapeseedOil Mixture and in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    oil mixture and oil-in-water emulsions. Multiple antioxidant activity of the potato peel extracts was evident from in-vitro systems as they showed strong reducing power, radical scavenging ability, ferrous ion chelating activity and prevented oxidation in a liposome model system. The Sava variety...

  3. Slow dynamics of phospholipid monolayers at the air/water interface

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Siyoung Q

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface serve as model systems for various biological interfaces, e.g. lung surfactant layers and outer leaflets of cell membranes. Although the dynamical (viscoelastic) properties of these interfaces may play a key role in stability, dynamics and function, the relatively weak rheological properties of most such monolayers have rendered their study difficult or impossible. A novel technique to measure the dynamical properties of fluid-fluid interfaces have developed accordingly. We microfabricate micron-scale ferromagnetic disks, place them on fluid-fluid interfaces, and use external electromagnets to exert torques upon them. By measuring the rotation that results from a known external torque, we compute the rotational drag, from which we deduce the rheological properties of the interface. Notably, our apparatus enable direct interfacial visualization while the probes are torqued. In this fluid dynamics video, we directly visualize dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine(DPPC...

  4. Lipid oxidation in fish oil enriched oil-in-water emulsions and cream cheese with pre-emulsified fish oil is affected differently by the emulsifier used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Andersen, Ulf

    will include results from studies on lipid oxidation in simple oil-in-water emulsions prepared with milk proteins alone or combinations of milk proteins and phospholipids. In addition, a study on fish oil enriched cream cheese will be presented. In this study, the cream cheese was enriched with either neat...... fish oil or a fish oil-in-water delivery emulsion prepared with whey protein isolate, sodium caseinate or a commercially available emulsifier that consisted of ~20% milk phospholipids and ~50% milk proteins. Results showed that simple emulsions prepared with a combination of milk proteins...... acids to foods invariably increases the risk of lipid oxidation. A possible strategy to avoid lipid oxidation and the consecutive development of unpleasant off-flavours is to protect the oil in a delivery emulsion in which the oil droplets are shielded from its possible pro-oxidative surroundings...

  5. Photoelectrochemical water splitting: optimizing interfaces and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis several photoelectrochemical water splitting devices based on semiconductor materials were investigated. The aim was the design, characterization, and fabrication of solar-to-fuel devices which can absorb solar light and split water to produce hydrogen.

  6. Locomotion and phenotypic transformation of the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi at the water-air interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Terence M; King, Conrad A

    2003-01-01

    The protozoon Naegleria gruberi is able to carry out amoeboid locomotion at the water-air interface in a manner indistinguishable from that exhibited on solid substrata with the production of focal contacts and associated filopodia. The speed of locomotion at this interface can be modulated by changes in electrolyte concentrations; these speed changes are identical to those observed at a water-glass interface. The nature of the water-air interface is discussed leading to the hypothesis that surface tension alone could provide suitable properties for the adhesion and translocation of amoebae at this interface without necessitating specific, absorbed molecules. The temporary swimming flagellate stage of Naegleria is able to dock at the interface, make stable adhesions to it, and revert to the amoeboid phenotype. Conversely, amoebae resident at the water-air interface can transform to swimming flagellates and escape into the bulk liquid phase. We report the presence of Naegleria amoebae in the surface microlayers of natural ponds; thus, in freshwater bodies there may be active shuttling of Naegleria amoebae from the benthos to the surface microlayers by means of the non-feeding, swimming flagellate phenotype. The public health implication of this behaviour in the case of the pathogenic relative, Naegleria fowleri, is discussed.

  7. Temperature dependence of local solubility of hydrophobic molecules in the liquid-vapor interface of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kiharu; Sumi, Tomonari; Koga, Kenichiro

    2014-11-14

    One important aspect of the hydrophobic effect is that solubility of small, nonpolar molecules in liquid water decreases with increasing temperature. We investigate here how the characteristic temperature dependence in liquid water persists or changes in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interface. From the molecular dynamics simulation and the test-particle insertion method, the local solubility Σ of methane in the liquid-vapor interface of water as well as Σ of nonpolar solutes in the interface of simple liquids are calculated as a function of the distance z from the interface. We then examine the temperature dependence of Σ under two conditions: variation of Σ at fixed position z and that at fixed local solvent density around the solute molecule. It is found that the temperature dependence of Σ at fixed z depends on the position z and the system, whereas Σ at fixed local density decreases with increasing temperature for all the model solutions at any fixed density between vapor and liquid phases. The monotonic decrease of Σ under the fixed-density condition in the liquid-vapor interface is in accord with what we know for the solubility of nonpolar molecules in bulk liquid water under the fixed-volume condition but it is much robust since the solvent density to be fixed can be anything between the coexisting vapor and liquid phases. A unique feature found in the water interface is that there is a minimum in the local solubility profile Σ(z) on the liquid side of the interface. We find that with decreasing temperature the minimum of Σ grows and at the same time the first peak in the oscillatory density profile of water develops. It is likely that the minimum of Σ is due to the layering structure of the free interface of water.

  8. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR by Miscible CO2 and Water Flooding of Asphaltenic and Non-Asphaltenic Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin A. Chukwudeme

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available An EOR study has been performed applying miscible CO2 flooding and compared with that for water flooding. Three different oils are used, reference oil (n-decane, model oil (n-C10, SA, toluene and 0.35 wt % asphaltene and crude oil (10 wt % asphaltene obtained from the Middle East. Stearic acid (SA is added representing a natural surfactant in oil. For the non-asphaltenic oil, miscible CO2 flooding is shown to be more favourable than that by water. However, it is interesting to see that for first years after the start of the injection (< 3 years it is shown that there is almost no difference between the recovered oils by water and CO2, after which (> 3 years oil recovery by gas injection showed a significant increase. This may be due to the enhanced performance at the increased reservoir pressure during the first period. Maximum oil recovery is shown by miscible CO2 flooding of asphaltenic oil at combined temperatures and pressures of 50 °C/90 bar and 70 °C/120 bar (no significant difference between the two cases, about 1% compared to 80 °C/140 bar. This may support the positive influence of the high combined temperatures and pressures for the miscible CO2 flooding; however beyond a certain limit the oil recovery declined due to increased asphaltene deposition. Another interesting finding in this work is that for single phase oil, an almost linear relationship is observed between the pressure drop and the asphaltene deposition regardless of the flowing fluid pressure.

  9. A numerical model for water and heat transport in freezing soils with nonequilibrium ice-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhenyang; Tian, Fuqiang; Wu, Jingwei; Huang, Jiesheng; Hu, Hongchang; Darnault, Christophe J. G.

    2016-09-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model of heat and water transport in freezing soils is developed by assuming that ice-water interfaces are not necessarily in equilibrium. The Clapeyron equation, which is derived from a static ice-water interface using the thermal equilibrium theory, cannot be readily applied to a dynamic system, such as freezing soils. Therefore, we handled the redistribution of liquid water with the Richard's equation. In this application, the sink term is replaced by the freezing rate of pore water, which is proportional to the extent of supercooling and available water content for freezing by a coefficient, β. Three short-term laboratory column simulations show reasonable agreement with observations, with standard error of simulation on water content ranging between 0.007 and 0.011 cm3 cm-3, showing improved accuracy over other models that assume equilibrium ice-water interfaces. Simulation results suggest that when the freezing front is fixed at a specific depth, deviation of the ice-water interface from equilibrium, at this location, will increase with time. However, this deviation tends to weaken when the freezing front slowly penetrates to a greater depth, accompanied with thinner soils of significant deviation. The coefficient, β, plays an important role in the simulation of heat and water transport. A smaller β results in a larger deviation in the ice-water interface from equilibrium, and backward estimation of the freezing front. It also leads to an underestimation of water content in soils that were previously frozen by a rapid freezing rate, and an overestimation of water content in the rest of the soils.

  10. The [BMI][Tf2N] ionic liquid/water binary system: a molecular dynamics study of phase separation and of the liquid-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieffert, N; Wipff, G

    2006-07-01

    We report molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the aqueous interface of the hydrophobic [BMI][Tf2N] ionic liquid (IL), composed of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cations (BMI+) and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anions (Tf2N-). The questions of water/IL phase separation and properties of the neat interface are addressed, comparing different liquid models (TIP3P vs TIP5P water and +1.0/-1.0 vs +0.9/-0.9 charged IL ions), the Ewald vs the reaction field treatments of the long range electrostatics, and different starting conditions. With the different models, the "randomly" mixed liquids separate much more slowly (in 20 to 40 ns) than classical water-oil mixtures do (typically, in less than 1 ns), finally leading to distinct nanoscopic phases separated by an interface, as in simulations which started with a preformed interface, but the IL phase is more humid. The final state of water in the IL thus depends on the protocol and relates to IL heterogeneities and viscosity. Water mainly fluctuates in hydrophilic basins (rich in O(Tf2N) and aromatic CH(BMI) groups), separated by more hydrophobic domains (rich in CF3(Tf2N) and alkyl(BMI) groups), in the form of monomers and dimers in the weakly humid IL phase, and as higher aggregates when the IL phase is more humid. There is more water in the IL than IL in water, to different extents, depending on the model. The interface is sharper and narrower (approximately 10 A) than with the less hydrophobic [BMI][PF6] IL and is overall neutral, with isotropically oriented molecules, as in the bulk phases. The results allow us to better understand the analogies and differences of aqueous interfaces with hydrophobic (but hygroscopic) ILs, compared to classical organic liquids.

  11. CHEMICAL DEMULSIFICATION OF MODEL WATER-IN-OIL EMULSIONS WITH LOW WATER CONTENT BY MEANS OF IONIC LIQUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Balsamo

    Full Text Available Abstract The demulsification of model water-in-oil (w/o emulsions containing 1% wt. water by [Omim][PF6] and Aliquat® 336 ionic liquids (IL as demulsifiers was investigated in batch mode at different temperatures (30, 45 and 60 °C and demulsifier concentrations (2.5×10‒3, 1.2×10‒2 and 2.9×10‒2 mol L‒1. The model oil is a mixture n-heptane/toluene (70/30% wt. with 1% wt. of Span® 83 as a surfactant. Experimental results showed that the main differences in demulsification dynamics between systems containing IL and blank (i.e., in the absence of demulsifier are detected at 30 °C and for short demulsification times (t≤4 h. In particular, the demulsification efficiency is 8, 21 and 74% for the blank sample, [Omim][PF6] and Aliquat® 336 tested under the more concentrated IL condition, respectively. The superior demulsification performances of Aliquat® 336 with respect to [Omim][PF6] were related to the greater molecular weight and more hydrophobic character of its cation, likely able to induce a faster desorption of the surfactant at the w/o interface and consequently promoting water droplet coalescence. Moreover, the kinetic demulsification data were successfully interpreted by an empirical pseudo-first order model. In general, the obtained outcomes encourage future research efforts in the use of ionic liquids for the removal of low water fractions from w/o emulsions.

  12. Coagulation-flocculation pretreatment of oil sands process affected water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourrezaei, P.; El-Din, M.G. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2008-07-01

    This presentation addressed the issue of water use in the oil sands industry and efforts to use this limited resource more efficiently. Three wastewater treatment schemes for oil sands tailings ponds were proposed, notably primary, secondary and tertiary treatment. Primary treatment involves the removal of suspended solids using physical-chemical treatments. Secondary treatment involves the removal of dissolved solids and organics using chemical oxidation, ultrafiltration or nanofiltration. Tertiary treatment involves removal of residual organics/solids using biological activated carbon filtration, sand filtration or reverse osmosis. The composition of oil sands process water (OSPW) was also discussed with reference to suspended solids, salts, hydrocarbons, other dissolved organics (such as naphthenic acids and phenols), ammonia, inorganic compounds and trace elements. The conventional coagulation/flocculation process is essential in industrial wastewater treatment. It is cost effective, easy to operate and energy efficient. The process is used because small suspended and colloidal particles and dissolved constituents cannot be removed quickly by sedimentation. A chemical method must be used. Coagulation/flocculation brings small suspended and colloidal particles into contact so that they collide, stick and grow to a size that settles readily. Alum is the predominant and least expensive water treatment coagulant used for the coagulation/flocculation process. It provides positively charged ions to neutralize the negative charge of colloidal particles resulting in aggregation. It creates big settling flocs that enmesh colloids as it settles. The factors affecting the process include pH, chemical type, chemical concentration, rapid mixing intensity, slow mixing intensity and time. tabs., figs.

  13. Molecular conformation of linear alkane molecules: From gas phase to bulk water through the interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murina, Ezequiel L.; Fernández-Prini, Roberto; Pastorino, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    We studied the behavior of long chain alkanes (LCAs) as they were transferred from gas to bulk water, through the liquid-vapor interface. These systems were studied using umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulation and we have calculated properties like free energy profiles, molecular orientation, and radius of gyration of the LCA molecules. The results show changes in conformation of the solutes along the path. LCAs adopt pronounced molecular orientations and the larger ones extend appreciably when partially immersed in the interface. In bulk water, their conformations up to dodecane are mainly extended. However, larger alkanes like eicosane present a more stable collapsed conformation as they approach bulk water. We have characterized the more probable configurations in all interface and bulk regions. The results obtained are of interest for the study of biomatter processes requiring the transfer of hydrophobic matter, especially chain-like molecules like LCAs, from gas to bulk aqueous systems through the interface.

  14. Solvent-Induced Proton Hopping at a Water-Oxide Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocci, Gabriele; Michaelides, Angelos

    2014-02-01

    Despite widespread interest, a detailed understanding of the dynamics of proton transfer at interfaces is lacking. Here, we use ab initio molecular dynamics to unravel the connection between interfacial water structure and proton transfer for the widely studied and experimentally well-characterized water-ZnO(101̅0) interface. We find that upon going from a single layer of adsorbed water to a liquid multilayer, changes in the structure are accompanied by a dramatic increase in the proton-transfer rate at the surface. We show how hydrogen bonding and rather specific hydrogen-bond fluctuations at the interface are responsible for the change in the structure and proton-transfer dynamics. The implications of this for the chemical reactivity and for the modeling of complex wet oxide interfaces in general are also discussed.

  15. Sulfate reducing bacteria and their activities in oil sands process-affected water biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong; Yu, Tong, E-mail: tong.yu@ualberta.ca; Liu, Yang, E-mail: yang.liu@ualberta.ca

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm reactors were constructed to grow stratified multispecies biofilm in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) supplemented with growth medium. The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within the biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated. The community structure and potential activity of SRB in the biofilm were investigated with H{sub 2}S microsensor measurements, dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the stratified biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. The study expands current knowledge of biofilm treatment of OSPW and the function of anaerobic SRB in OSPW biofilm, and thus provides information for future bioreactor development in the reclamation of OSPW. - Graphical abstract: The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within Oil Sands Process-affected Water (OSPW) biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated by Liu and coworkers. Combined microsensor and molecular biology techniques were utilized in this study. Their results demonstrated that multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. - Highlights: • Biofilm in oil sands wastewater was developed on engineered biocarriers. • Bacterial community and in situ activity of SRB were studied in the

  16. Essentials of water systems design in the oil, gas, and chemical processing industries

    CERN Document Server

    Bahadori, Alireza; Boyd, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Essentials of Water Systems Design in the Oil, Gas and Chemical Processing Industries provides valuable insight for decision makers by outlining key technical considerations and requirements of four critical systems in industrial processing plants—water treatment systems, raw water and plant water systems, cooling water distribution and return systems, and fire water distribution and storage facilities. The authors identify the key technical issues and minimum requirements related to the process design and selection of various water supply systems used in the oil, gas, and chemical processing industries. This book is an ideal, multidisciplinary work for mechanical engineers, environmental scientists, and oil and gas process engineers.

  17. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung; Naomi Davidson; Ajeet Kumar Reddy; Mingzhen Wei

    2003-04-01

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information, (2) a web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries, (3) a fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water, and (4) a corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project has been focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collection of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 4000 entries for southeast New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the

  18. Contaminants, water quality, and wildlife mortality on oil production sites in western South Dakota. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, C.J.; Ruelle, R.

    1993-04-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate oil pits and other hazards at oil production sites to (1) document the magnitude of wildlife mortality due to exposure to oil and other chemicals, (2) determine the physical and toxic effects of oil pit contents on wildlife, and (3) identify methods to prevent sublethal and lethal impacts to wildlife. Pits at oil production sites in Fall River and Harding Counties of western South Dakota were surveyed for wildlife carcasses by searching the shorelines and raking underwater around the pit edges in April, July, and October 1992. In July, composite water and sediment samples were collected from 26 pits, and analyzed for oil and grease. Bioassays were conducted with two life stages of Hyalella azteca and Daphnia magna to determine pit water toxicity. Seed germination tests were conducted using radish seeds exposed to pit water. Oil and poor water quality appeared to be the primary causes of pit liquid toxicity.

  19. Mineral-Coated Polymer Membranes with Superhydrophilicity and Underwater Superoleophobicity for Effective Oil/Water Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Peng-Cheng Chen; Zhi-Kang Xu

    2013-01-01

    Oil-polluted water is a worldwide problem due to the increasing industrial oily wastewater and the frequent oil spill accidents. Here, we report a novel kind of superhydrophilic hybrid membranes for effective oil/water separation. They were prepared by depositing CaCO3-based mineral coating on PAA-grafted polypropylene microfiltration membranes. The rigid mineral-coating traps abundant water in aqueous environment and forms a robust hydrated layer on the membrane pore surface, thus endowing t...

  20. Detecting oil sands process-affected waters in the Alberta oil sands region using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Richard J; Burnison, B Kent; Frank, Richard A; Solomon, Keith R; Van Der Kraak, Glen

    2009-06-01

    Large volumes of oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW) are produced during the extraction of bitumen from oil sand. There are approximately 10(9) m(3) of OSPW currently being stored in settling basins on oil sands mining sites in Northern Alberta. Developers plan to create artificial lakes with OSPW and it is expected that this water may eventually enter the environment. This study was conducted in order to determine if synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) could detect OSPW contamination in water systems. Water samples collected from ponds containing OSPW and selected sites in the Alberta oil sands region were evaluated using SFS with an offset value of 18 nm. OSPW ponds consistently displayed a minor peak at 282.5 nm and a broad major peak ranging between 320 and 340 nm. Water from reference sites within the oil sands region had little fluorescence at 282.5 nm but greater fluorescence beyond 345 nm. Naphthenic acids are the major toxic component of OSPW. Both a commercial naphthenic acid and a naphthenic acid extract prepared from OSPW had similar fluorescent spectra with peaks at 280 nm and 320 nm and minor shoulders at approximately 303 and 331 nm. The presence of aromatic acids closely associated with the naphthenic acids may be responsible for unique fluorescence at 320-340 nm. SFS is proposed to be a simple and fast method to monitor the release of OSPW into ground and surface waters in the oil sands region.

  1. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

    2003-09-24

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed

  2. Natural oil slicks fuel surface water microbial activities in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziervogel, Kai; D'souza, Nigel; Sweet, Julia; Yan, Beizhan; Passow, Uta

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a series of roller tank incubations with surface seawater from the Green Canyon oil reservoir, northern Gulf of Mexico, amended with either a natural oil slick (GCS-oil) or pristine oil. The goal was to test whether bacterial activities of natural surface water communities facilitate the formation of oil-rich marine snow (oil snow). Although oil snow did not form during any of our experiments, we found specific bacterial metabolic responses to the addition of GCS-oil that profoundly affected carbon cycling within our 4-days incubations. Peptidase and β-glucosidase activities indicative of bacterial enzymatic hydrolysis of peptides and carbohydrates, respectively, were suppressed upon the addition of GCS-oil relative to the non-oil treatment, suggesting that ascending oil and gas initially inhibits bacterial metabolism in surface water. Biodegradation of physically dispersed GCS-oil components, indicated by the degradation of lower molecular weight n-alkanes as well as the rapid transformation of particulate oil-carbon (C: N >40) into the DOC pool, led to the production of carbohydrate- and peptide-rich degradation byproducts and bacterial metabolites such as transparent exopolymer particles (TEP). TEP formation was highest at day 4 in the presence of GCS-oil; in contrast, TEP levels in the non-oil treatment already peaked at day 2. Cell-specific enzymatic activities closely followed TEP concentrations in the presence and absence of GCS-oil. These results demonstrate that the formation of oil slicks and activities of oil-degrading bacteria result in a temporal offset of microbial cycling of organic matter, affecting food web interactions and carbon cycling in surface waters over cold seeps. PMID:24847314

  3. Natural oil slicks fuel surface water microbial activities in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eZiervogel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a series of roller tank incubations with surface seawater from the Green Canyon oil reservoir, northern Gulf of Mexico, amended with either a natural oil slick (GCS-oil or pristine oil. The goal was to test whether bacterial activities of natural surface water communities facilitate the formation of oil-rich marine snow (oil snow. Although oil snow did not form during any of our experiments, we found specific bacterial metabolic responses to the addition of GCS-oil that profoundly affected carbon cycling within our 4-days incubations. Peptidase and -glucosidase activities indicative of bacterial enzymatic hydrolysis of peptides and carbohydrates, respectively, were suppressed upon the addition of GCS-oil relative to the non-oil treatment, suggesting that ascending oil and gas initially inhibits bacterial metabolism in surface water. Biodegradation of physically dispersed GCS-oil components indicated by the degradation of lower molecular weight n-alkanes as well as the rapid transformation of particulate oil-carbon (C: N >40 into the DOC pool, led to the production of carbohydrate- and peptide-rich degradation byproducts and bacterial metabolites such as transparent exopolymer particles (TEP. TEP formation was highest at day 4 in the presence of GCS-oil; in contrast, TEP levels in the non-oil treatment already peaked at day 2. Cell-specific enzymatic activities closely followed TEP concentrations in the presence and absence of GCS-oil. These results demonstrate that the formation of oil slicks and activities of oil-degrading bacteria result in a temporal offset of microbial cycling of organic matter, affecting food web interactions and carbon cycling in surface waters over cold seeps.

  4. Factors governing partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Eveline; Walstra, Pieter; Dewettinck, Koen

    2010-01-15

    The consequences of the instability mechanism partial coalescence in oil-in-water food emulsions show a discrepancy. On the one hand, it needs to be avoided in order to achieve an extended shelf life in food products like sauces, creams and several milk products. On the other hand, during the manufacturing of products like ice cream, butter and whipped toppings partial coalescence is required to achieve the desired product properties. It contributes to the structure formation, the physicochemical properties (stability, firmness,...) and the sensory perception, like fattiness and creaminess of the final food products. This review critically summarises the findings of partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions in order to provide insight in how to enhance and retard it. Next to the pioneering work, a large set of experimental results of more recent work is discussed. First, the general mechanism of partial coalescence is considered and a distinction is made between partial and 'true' coalescence. The main differences are: the required solid particles in the dispersed oil phase, the formation of irregular clusters and the increased aggregation rate. Second, the kinetics of partial coalescence is discussed. In more detail, potential parameters affecting the rate of partial coalescence are considered by means of the encounter frequency and capture efficiency of the fat globules. The flow conditions, the fat volume fraction and the physicochemical properties of continuous aqueous phase affect both the encounter frequency and capture efficiency while the actual temperature, temperature history and the composition and formulation of the emulsion mainly affect the capture efficiency.

  5. A MODEL FOR PREDICTING PHASE INVERSION IN OIL-WATER TWO-PHASE PIPE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Jing; LI Qing-ping; YAO Hai-yuan; YU Da

    2006-01-01

    Experiments of phase inversion characteristics for horizontal oil-water two-phase flow in a stainless steel pipe loop (25.7 mm inner diameter,52 m long) are conducted. A new viewpoint is brought forward about the process of phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow. Using the relations between the total free energies of the pre-inversion and post-inversion dispersions, a model for predicting phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow has been developed that considers the characteristics of pipe flow. This model is compared against other models with relevant data of phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow. Results indicate that this model is better than other models in terms of calculation precision and applicability. The model is useful for guiding the design for optimal performance and safety in the operation of oil-water two-phase pipe flow in oil fields.

  6. Preparation of superhydrophobic/oleophilic copper mesh for oil-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huaijie; Gu, Wenhan; Fu, Jingyuan; Liu, Ying; Chen, Shougang

    2017-08-01

    A superhydrophobic and oleophilic copper mesh film with micro/nano hierarchical structures was prepared through facile electrodeposition and immersion processes. Contact angles of water and oil on the modified mesh were 152.4° and 12.6°, respectively. The modified mesh showed high oil-water separation efficiency (were above 90%) and rate with high oil flux of 4507 Lm-2 h-1. Results show that oil can pass through the coated mesh easily, whereas water was held on the modified mesh, which demonstrated that the coated films matched well with the requirements for effective separation of oil-water mixtures. Therefore, the coated mesh is a promising and effective membrane for separating oil-water mixtures.

  7. Stability of Concentrated Olive Oil-in-water Emulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Hsiao-Wei; MISRAN Mi-sni

    2008-01-01

    The stability of olive oil-in-water(o/w)emulsion stabilized with sucrose fatty acid ester(SFAE)was evaluated through an accelerated ageing test.The stability of the emulsion in this study was examined by the appearance of any phase separation in the emulsion,mean droplet size and rbeological properties over one month.The effect of accelerated ageing at 45 μ on the emulsion rheological properties was investigated using an amplitude sweep test,a frequency sweep test and a viscometry test.The rheological properties of the emulsion were examined at the one day,one week and one month of storage time.Among the series of emulsions prepared,the emulsion with 2 :8 of water to oil ratio(by weight)is the most stable one,which did not show any of phase separation.The amplitude sweep result shows that there was no significant change of the critical strain of the emulsion throughout one month of storage time.The dynamic properties as well as the steady flow behavior of the emulsion also show no significant changes for over one month of storage time.The mean droplet size of the emulsion remained stable around 2.5 μn within the period of investigation.

  8. Separation mechanisms and fluid flow in oil/water separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celius, H.K.; Knudsen, B. [IKU Petroleumsforskning A/S, Trondheim (Norway); Hafskjold, B.; Hansen, E.W. [Selskapet for Industriell og Teknisk Forskning, Trondheim (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes work aimed at physical and numerical modeling of separation rates of oil/water systems in order to establish better tools for design and operation of offshore operators. This work aims to integrate the chemical and physical phenomena behind coalescence and settling with those of fluid flow in the system, in order to develop tools for design and operational analysis of separation equipment. The work includes the development of a high pressure, bench-scale test rig to perform separation tests on live oil and water samples, and a rationale in the form of a computer code that can be used to interpret the test results and transform them to a form siutable for operational purposes. This involves a formulation of a mathematical description of the chemical and physical mechanisms behind the emulsification and separation process, and to establish a link to the hydrdynamic properties of the separator vessel. The Emucol computer program is used in the analysis. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Recent Trends in Water Use and Production for California Oil Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedeman, Kate; Yeh, Sonia; Scanlon, Bridget R; Teter, Jacob; Mishra, Gouri Shankar

    2016-07-19

    Recent droughts and concerns about water use for petroleum extraction renew the need to inventory water use for oil production. We quantified water volumes used and produced by conventional oil production and hydraulic fracturing (HF) in California. Despite a 25% decrease in conventional oil production from 1999 to 2012, total water use increased by 30% though much of that increase was derived from reuse of produced water. Produced water volumes increased by 50%, with increasing amounts disposed in unlined evaporation ponds or released to surface water. Overall freshwater use (constituting 1.2% of the state's nonagricultural water consumption) increased by 46% during this period due to increased freshwater-intensive tertiary oil production. HF has been practiced in California for more than 30 years, accounting for 1% of total oil production in 2012 from mostly directional and vertical wells. Water use intensity for HF wells in California averaged at 3.5 vol water/vol oil production in 2012 and 2.4 vol/vol in 2013, higher than the range from literature estimates and net water use intensity of conventional production (1.2 vol/vol in 2012). Increasing water use and disposal for oil production have important implications for water management and have potentially adverse health, environmental, and ecological impacts.

  10. The Geopolitics of Water and Oil in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Throughout history, few nations have been as successful in leveraging their geographic location as Turkey. As the center of two of the most powerful civilizations of all time, the Byzantine and Ottoman Empires, Turkey was the bridge between East and West, a bustling center of trade and a strategic economic and political nexus between regions of the world. In addition to its geographic power, Turkey has historically possessed substantial water resources. Unlike many water parched areas of the Middle East, Turkey's water capacity has allowed it to grow large populations and build elaborate cities. In the modern era, Turkey once again has an opportunity to regain its historical role, as the state where today's geopolitics of energy coincides with Turkey's traditional geopolitics of water. Turkey's central location, this time not between East and West, but between producers and consumers of energy, gives it a central, geopolitical role in world affairs, both in oil and gas. Moreover, Turkey's water resources can be utilized to reinforce Turkey's strategic energy role in the region, by building a strategy of cooperation with water-poor countries from the Levant to the Arabian Peninsula. Throughout history, water and energy have been among the most fundamental resources of civilization, at the very base of Maslow's hierarchy of needs essential to fostering human growth and development for thousands of years. It is seldom appreciated how linked water and energy truly are. Producing, transferring, and supplying energy requires a significant amount of water, just as the extraction, purification, and even desalination of water requires a significant amount of energy. As both energy and water grow scarcer throughout the future, nations such as Turkey can gain considerable influence as a result of their geographic locations and natural endowments. Turkey can benefit from pipeline diplomacy, taking advantage of its geographical location to

  11. From water-in-oil to oil-in-water emulsions to optimize the production of fatty acids using ionic liquids in micellar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luísa D F; Coutinho, João A P; Ventura, Sónia P M

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalysis is nowadays considered as one of the most important tools in green chemistry. The elimination of multiple steps involved in some of the most complex chemical synthesis, reducing the amounts of wastes and hazards, thus increasing the reaction yields and decreasing the intrinsic costs, are the major advantages of biocatalysis. This work aims at improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of olive oil to produce valuable fatty acids through emulsion systems formed by long alkyl chain ionic liquids (ILs). The optimization of the emulsion and the best conditions to maximize the production of fatty acids were investigated. The stability of the emulsion was characterized considering the effect of several parameters, namely, the IL and its concentration and different water/olive oil volumetric ratios. ILs from the imidazolium and phosphonium families were evaluated. The results suggest that the ILs effect on the hydrolysis performance varies with the water concentration and the emulsion system formed, that is, water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsion. Although at low water concentrations, the presence of ILs does not present any advantages for the hydrolysis reaction, at high water contents (in oil-in-water emulsions), the imidazolium-based IL acts as an enhancer of the lipase catalytic capacity, super-activating 1.8 times the enzyme, and consequently promoting the complete hydrolysis of the olive oil for the highest water contents [85% (v/v)].

  12. A new model for the biodegradation kinetics of oil droplets: application to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilcáez, Javier; Li, Li; Hubbard, Susan S

    2013-10-20

    Oil biodegradation by native bacteria is one of the most important natural processes that can attenuate the environmental impacts of marine oil spills. Existing models for oil biodegradation kinetics are mostly for dissolved oil. This work developed a new mathematical model for the biodegradation of oil droplets and applied the model to estimate the time scale for oil biodegradation under conditions relevant to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. In the model, oil is composed of droplets of various sizes following the gamma function distribution. Each oil droplet shrinks during the microbe-mediated degradation at the oil-water interface. Using our developed model, we find that the degradation of oil droplets typically goes through two stages. The first stage is characterized by microbial activity unlimited by oil-water interface with higher biodegradation rates than that of the dissolved oil. The second stage is governed by the availability of the oil-water interface, which results in much slower rates than that of soluble oil. As a result, compared to that of the dissolved oil, the degradation of oil droplets typically starts faster and then quickly slows down, ultimately reaching a smaller percentage of degraded oil in longer time. The availability of the water-oil interface plays a key role in determining the rates and extent of degradation. We find that several parameters control biodegradation rates, including size distribution of oil droplets, initial microbial concentrations, initial oil concentration and composition. Under conditions relevant to the Deepwater Horizon spill, we find that the size distribution of oil droplets (mean and coefficient of variance) is the most important parameter because it determines the availability of the oil-water interface. Smaller oil droplets with larger variance leads to faster and larger extent of degradation. The developed model will be useful for evaluating transport and fate of spilled oil, different

  13. Synthesis and applications of vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon water repellent agents on cotton fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tao; Zheng, Junzhi; Sun, Gang

    2012-06-05

    Vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon water repellent agents were prepared by chemical modifications of different vegetable oils - soybean and linseed oils through several reactions, including saponification, acidification, acylation of vegetable oil and trans-esterification with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropanol. The resulted fluorocarbon agents were then copolymerized with styrene. The structures of the vegetable oil based agents were characterized by FT-IR and NMR. By evaluating water contact angle and time of water disappearance on cotton fabrics, as well as whiteness and breaking strength of cotton fabrics that were treated by these agents, optimum fabric finishing conditions were explored. The cotton fabrics finished with the vegetable oil-based fluorocarbon agents showed excellent water repellency, while other properties of the cotton fabrics declined to certain level. The linseed oil-based tetrafluoropropanol water repellent agent displayed the highest water repellency among all modified oils. All the treated fabrics exhibited good durability of water repellency. The linseed oil-based tetrafluoropropanol water repellent agent demonstrated the best durability among all repellent agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasonic method for measuring water holdup of low velocity and high-water-cut oil-water two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, An; Han, Yun-Feng; Ren, Ying-Yu; Zhai, Lu-Sheng; in, Ning-De

    2016-03-01

    Oil reservoirs with low permeability and porosity that are in the middle and late exploitation periods in China's onshore oil fields are mostly in the high-water-cut production stage. This stage is associated with severely non-uniform local-velocity flow profiles and dispersed-phase concentration (of oil droplets) in oil-water two-phase flow, which makes it difficult to measure water holdup in oil wells. In this study, we use an ultrasonic method based on a transmission-type sensor in oil-water two-phase flow to measure water holdup in low-velocity and high water-cut conditions. First, we optimize the excitation frequency of the ultrasonic sensor by calculating the sensitivity of the ultrasonic field using the finite element method for multiphysics coupling. Then we calculate the change trend of sound pressure level attenuation ratio with the increase in oil holdup to verify the feasibility of the employed diameter for the ultrasonic sensor. Based on the results, we then investigate the effects of oil-droplet diameter and distribution on the ultrasonic field. To further understand the measurement characteristics of the ultrasonic sensor, we perform a flow loop test on vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow and measure the responses of the optimized ultrasonic sensor. The results show that the ultrasonic sensor yields poor resolution for a dispersed oil slug in water flow (D OS/W flow), but the resolution is favorable for dispersed oil in water flow (D O/W flow) and very fine dispersed oil in water flow (VFD O/W flow). This research demonstrates the potential application of a pulsed-transmission ultrasonic method for measuring the fraction of individual components in oil-water two-phase flow with a low mixture velocity and high water cut.

  15. Effects of crossflow velocity and transmembrane pressure on microfiltration of oil-in-water emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Darvishzadeh, Tohid

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the issue of oil removal from water using hydrophilic porous membranes. The effective separation of oil-in-water dispersions involves high flux of water through the membrane and, at the same time, high rejection rate of the oil phase. The effects of transmembrane pressure and crossflow velocity on rejection of oil droplets and thin oil films by pores of different cross-section are investigated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation. We found that in the absence of crossflow, the critical transmembrane pressure, which is required for the oil droplet entry into a circular pore of a given surface hydrophilicity, agrees well with analytical predictions based on the Young-Laplace equation. With increasing crossflow velocity, the shape of the oil droplet is strongly deformed near the pore entrance and the critical pressure of permeation increases. We determined numerically the phase diagram for the droplet rejection, permeation, and breakup depending of the transmembrane pressure and...

  16. Measurements of monolayer hydrodynamics at an air/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Michael James

    2002-09-01

    Growing interest in monomolecular films is driven in part by their numerous applications, which include coating technologies, chemical and bio-sensors, and optoelectronic devices. In the present research, a study involving several different experiments has focused on an improved understanding and quantification of the physics of monolayer-influenced flows. Measurements were made with laser-based nonintrusive techniques, including boundary-fitted digital particle image velocimetry (BFDPIV) to obtain interfacial velocity and shear data, and reflected second-harmonic generation (SHG) to directly measure surfactant concentration at the interface. A simple geometry consisting of uniform bulk flow and a planar surface-piercing barrier which resulted in the phenomenon commonly referred to as a Reynolds ridge was used to study the elasticity of a monolayer. A novel technique was developed in which velocity and surfactant concentration measurements are made simultaneously with a single laser beam which is scanned along the interface. Additionally, a theoretical model balancing surface elasticity and bulk shear at the interface was developed to predict the concentration profile for any insoluble monolayer. The predicted concentration profiles were found to be in agreement with experimental results. Additionally, global predictions from the model for four different insoluble surfactant systems also showed agreement with experimental measurements. In order to study the interfacial dilatational viscosity (kappa s) of a monolayer, for which there are no consistently measured values in the literature, a cavity flow was utilized in which the floor oscillates in the direction parallel to itself. Initially, a baseline study was performed to establish the range of parameters for which the flow is essentially two-dimensional (2D). Three flow regimes were found in the parameter space considered: an essentially 2D time-periodic flow, a time-periodic three-dimensional (3D) flow with a

  17. Estimating pH at the Air/Water Interface with a Confocal Fluorescence Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiya; Imanishi, Yasushi; Harata, Akira

    2015-01-01

    One way to determine the pH at the air/water interface with a confocal fluorescence microscope has been proposed. The relation between the pH at the air/water interface and that in a bulk solution has been formulated in connection with the adsorption equilibrium and the dissociation equilibrium of the dye adsorbed. Rhodamine B (RhB) is used as a surface-active fluorescent pH probe. The corrected fluorescence spectrum of RhB molecules at the air/water interface with the surface density of 1.0 nmol m(-2) level shows pH-dependent shifts representing an acid-base equilibrium. Two ways to determine the unknown acid-base equilibrium constant of RhB molecules at the air/water interface have been discussed. With surface-tension measurements, the adsorption properties, maximum surface density, and adsorption equilibrium constants were estimated for both cationic and zwitterionic forms of RhB molecules at the air/water interface.

  18. Cyclo-hexa-peptides at the water/cyclohexane interface: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Min; Fan, Jian Fen; Liu, Dong Yan; Song, Xue Zeng; Liu, Jian; Zhou, Wei Qun; Xiao, He Ming

    2013-02-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations have been performed to study the behaviors of ten kinds of cyclo-hexa-peptides (CHPs) composed of amino acids with the diverse hydrophilic/hydrophobic side chains at the water/cyclohexane interface. All the CHPs take the "horse-saddle" conformations at the interface and the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of the side chains influences the backbones' structural deformations. The orientations and distributions of the CHPs at the interface and the differences of interaction energies (ΔΔE) between the CHPs and the two liquid phases have been determined. RDF analysis shows that the H-bonds were formed between the O(C) atoms of the CHPs' backbones and H(w) atoms of water molecules. N atoms of the CHPs' backbones formed the H-bonds or van der Waals interactions with the water solvent. It was found that there is a parallel relationship between ΔΔE and the lateral diffusion coefficients (D ( xy )) of the CHPs at the interface. The movements of water molecules close to the interface are confined to some extent, indicating that the dynamics of the CHPs and interfacial water molecules are strongly coupled.

  19. Nanolayering around and thermal resistivity of the water-hexagonal boron nitride interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akıner, Tolga; Mason, Jeremy K.; Ertürk, Hakan

    2017-07-01

    The water-hexagonal boron nitride interface was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Since the properties of the interface change significantly with the interatomic potential, a new method for calibrating the solid-liquid interatomic potential is proposed based on the experimental energy of the interface. The result is markedly different from that given by Lorentz-Berthelot mixing for the Lennard-Jones parameters commonly used in the literature. Specifically, the extent of nanolayering and interfacial thermal resistivity is measured for several interatomic potentials, and the one calibrated by the proposed method gives the least thermal resistivity.

  20. Study of the fluid dynamic and the efficiency of displacement in oil-water systems; Estudo da fluidodinamica e da eficiencia de deslocamento em sistemas agua-oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorese, Eliana K.; Quadri, Marintho B.; Machado, Ricardo A.F.; Nogueira, Andre L.; Lopes, Toni J. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica e de Alimentos; Baptista, Renan M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    Several operations and procedures in the oil industry are related to immiscible displacement of a fluid by another one. Some examples can be listed: the natural and artificial oil elevation from wells, the pumping of high viscosity oils through pipelines using water injection and secondary oil recovery. The performance of the last one is a direct consequence of the interfacial phenomena inherent to oil/water systems. As occur in oil leakages from submarine pipelines, the phase inversion phenomenon can also be considered in this context. Therefore, it is of major importance to realize experimental analysis of the oil/water interface stability and the facts that leads to the fingering phenomenon appearance. This phenomenon is represented into the other one like one or more fingers. The mathematical model used to describe the immiscible displacement of another one is initially developed to Hele-Shaw cells. Experimental observations with a Hele-Shaw cell enable the evaluation of the proposed model and its capability to adequately describe the viscous fingering phenomenon related to physical (density, viscosity and interfacial tension) and geometric properties of the system. (author)

  1. Characterisation of liquid-liquid interfaces related to offshore produced water treatment - interfacial activity of model Components

    OpenAIRE

    Olhaye, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Produced water is one of the biggest environmental challenges in gas and crude oil production, and the stability of oil in water emulsions makes separation during treatments difficult.The objective of this work is to find out how interfacial active compounds contribute to the stability of oil/water emulsions. A model naphthenic acid dissolved in model oil was used together with a synthetic aqueous brine of different pH values in order to mimic produced water conditions. The experiment was con...

  2. Production of high quality water for oil sands application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaudette-Hodsman, C.; Macleod, B. [Pall Corp., Mississauga, ON (Canada); Venkatadri, R. [Pall Corp., East Hills, NY (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This paper described a pressurized microfiltration membrane system installed at an oil sands extraction site in Alberta. The system was designed to complement a reverse osmosis (RO) system installed at the site to produce the high quality feed water required by the system's boilers. Groundwater in the region exhibited moderate total suspended solids and high alkalinity and hardness levels, and the RO system required feed water with a silt density index of 3 or less. The conventional pretreatment system used at the site was slowing down production due to the severe fouling of the RO membranes. The new microfiltration system contained an automated PVDF hollow fiber microfiltration membrane system contained in a trailer. Suspended particles and bacteria were captured within the filter, and permeate was sent to the RO unit. Within 6 hours of being installed, the unit was producing water with SDI values in the range of 1.0 to 2.5. It was concluded that the microfiltration system performed reliably regardless of wide variations in feed water quality and flow rates. 3 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  3. Adsorption and solvation of ethanol at the water liquid-vapor interface: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1997-01-01

    The free energy profiles of methanol and ethanol at the water liquid-vapor interface at 310K were calculated using molecular dynamics computer simulations. Both alcohols exhibit a pronounced free energy minimum at the interface and, therefore, have positive adsorption at this interface. The surface excess was computed from the Gibbs adsorption isotherm and was found to be in good agreement with experimental results. Neither compound exhibits a free energy barrier between the bulk and the surface adsorbed state. Scattering calculations of ethanol molecules from a gas phase thermal distribution indicate that the mass accommodation coefficient is 0.98, and the molecules become thermalized within 10 ps of striking the interface. It was determined that the formation of the solvation structure around the ethanol molecule at the interface is not the rate-determining step in its uptake into water droplets. The motion of an ethanol molecule in a water lamella was followed for 30 ns. The time evolution of the probability distribution of finding an ethanol molecule that was initially located at the interface is very well described by the diffusion equation on the free energy surface.

  4. Adsorption and solvation of ethanol at the water liquid-vapor interface: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1997-01-01

    The free energy profiles of methanol and ethanol at the water liquid-vapor interface at 310K were calculated using molecular dynamics computer simulations. Both alcohols exhibit a pronounced free energy minimum at the interface and, therefore, have positive adsorption at this interface. The surface excess was computed from the Gibbs adsorption isotherm and was found to be in good agreement with experimental results. Neither compound exhibits a free energy barrier between the bulk and the surface adsorbed state. Scattering calculations of ethanol molecules from a gas phase thermal distribution indicate that the mass accommodation coefficient is 0.98, and the molecules become thermalized within 10 ps of striking the interface. It was determined that the formation of the solvation structure around the ethanol molecule at the interface is not the rate-determining step in its uptake into water droplets. The motion of an ethanol molecule in a water lamella was followed for 30 ns. The time evolution of the probability distribution of finding an ethanol molecule that was initially located at the interface is very well described by the diffusion equation on the free energy surface.

  5. Discovery of Water Structural Transitions near Interfaces of Polarizable Solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry

    2015-03-01

    The standard harmonic approximation describing polarization around the solute is expected to break down with increasing solute polarizability. The focus of this study is to investigate the structure of water around dipolar-polarizable solutes by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in the non-harmonic regime. We observe a structural transition in the water hydration shell and its condensation, which are driven by increasing the solute polarizability. There is also a crossover in the orientational structure near the point of breakdown of the harmonic approximation. At lower polarizabilities, waters in the hydration shell point their hydrogens toward the solute. The dipoles flip their orientations at the transition to the non-harmonic regime. Both the hydration shell compressibility and the electric field susceptibility display maxima in the transition region. Using the water electric field at the center of the polarizable solute as the order parameter, a Landau-type model is formulated. Its predictions are in reasonable agreement with MC simulations performed for hard sphere and Lennard Jones polarizable solutes in a TIP3P water model. The observed structural transition suggests a general crossover phenomenon driven by the stabilization energy required to polarize the solute. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (CHE-1213288). CPU time was provided by the National Science Foundation through XSEDE resources (TG-MCB080116N).

  6. Insights into hydrogen bonding via ice interfaces and isolated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Bisson, Patrick; Vu, Tuan Hoang

    2014-11-01

    Water in a confined environment has a combination of fewer available configurations and restricted mobility. Both affect the spectroscopic signature. In this work, the spectroscopic signature of water in confined environments is discussed in the context of competing models for condensed water: (1) as a system of intramolecular coupled molecules or (2) as a network with intermolecular dipole-dipole coupled O-H stretches. Two distinct environments are used: the confined asymmetric environment at the ice surface and the near-isolated environment of water in an infrared transparent matrix. Both the spectroscopy and the environment are described followed by a perspective discussion of implications for the two competing models. Despite being a small molecule, water is relatively complex; perhaps not surprisingly the results support a model that blends inter- and intramolecular coupling. The frequency, and therefore the hydrogen-bond strength, appears to be a function of donor-acceptor interaction and of longer-range dipole-dipole alignment in the hydrogen-bonded network. The O-H dipole direction depends on the local environment and reflects intramolecular O-H stretch coupling.

  7. Transport-limited water splitting at ion-selective interfaces during concentration polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Christoffer Peder; Bruus, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    We present an analytical model of salt- and water-ion transport across an ion-selective interface based on an assumption of local equilibrium of the water-dissociation reaction. The model yields current-voltage characteristics and curves of water-ion current versus salt-ion current, which are in qualitative agreement with experimental results published in the literature. The analytical results are furthermore in agreement with direct numerical simulations. As part of the analysis, we find app...

  8. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-03-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work, a polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and a fluorosurfactant are spray deposited separately to create a durable, superoleophobic coating. Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) polyelectrolyte was complexed with a fluorosurfactant layer (FL), which provides oil repellency while being hydrophilic. This oleophobic/superhydrophilic behavior was enhanced through the use of roughening with SiO2 particles resulting in a superoleophobic coating with hexadecane contact angles exceeding 155° and tilt angles of less than 4°. The coating is also superhydrophilic, which is desirable for oil-water separation applications. The durability of these coatings was examined through the use of micro- and macrowear experiments. These coatings currently display characteristics of transparency. Fabrication of these coatings via the layer-by-layer technique results in superoleophobic surfaces displaying improved durability compared to existing work where either the durability or the oil-repellency is compromised.

  9. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work, a polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and a fluorosurfactant are spray deposited separately to create a durable, superoleophobic coating. Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) polyelectrolyte was complexed with a fluorosurfactant layer (FL), which provides oil repellency while being hydrophilic. This oleophobic/superhydrophilic behavior was enhanced through the use of roughening with SiO2 particles resulting in a superoleophobic coating with hexadecane contact angles exceeding 155° and tilt angles of less than 4°. The coating is also superhydrophilic, which is desirable for oil-water separation applications. The durability of these coatings was examined through the use of micro- and macrowear experiments. These coatings currently display characteristics of transparency. Fabrication of these coatings via the layer-by-layer technique results in superoleophobic surfaces displaying improved durability compared to existing work where either the durability or the oil-repellency is compromised. PMID:25731716

  10. Interactions of fines with base fractions of oil and its implication in smart water flooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    Migration of fines, and formation of oil emulsion have been independently observed during smart water flooding both have been suggested to play a vital role in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). But, the exact role of fines and the reason of emulsion formation are not well studied for carbonate reservo...... reservoirs. This study shows that addition of water and crude oil on calcite fines leads to formation of soluble oil emulsions in the water phase. Formation of these emulsions and its implication in EOR has been experimentally analyzed.......Migration of fines, and formation of oil emulsion have been independently observed during smart water flooding both have been suggested to play a vital role in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). But, the exact role of fines and the reason of emulsion formation are not well studied for carbonate...

  11. Chemical mass transport between fluid fine tailings and the overlying water cover of an oil sands end pit lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dompierre, Kathryn A.; Barbour, S. Lee; North, Rebecca L.; Carey, Sean K.; Lindsay, Matthew B. J.

    2017-06-01

    Fluid fine tailings (FFT) are a principal by-product of the bitumen extraction process at oil sands mines. Base Mine Lake (BML)—the first full-scale demonstration oil sands end pit lake (EPL)—contains approximately 1.9 × 108 m3 of FFT stored under a water cover within a decommissioned mine pit. Chemical mass transfer from the FFT to the water cover can occur via two key processes: (1) advection-dispersion driven by tailings settlement; and (2) FFT disturbance due to fluid movement in the water cover. Dissolved chloride (Cl) was used to evaluate the water cover mass balance and to track mass transport within the underlying FFT based on field sampling and numerical modeling. Results indicated that FFT was the dominant Cl source to the water cover and that the FFT is exhibiting a transient advection-dispersion mass transport regime with intermittent disturbance near the FFT-water interface. The advective pore water flux was estimated by the mass balance to be 0.002 m3 m-2 d-1, which represents 0.73 m of FFT settlement per year. However, the FFT pore water Cl concentrations and corresponding mass transport simulations indicated that advection rates and disturbance depths vary between sample locations. The disturbance depth was estimated to vary with location between 0.75 and 0.95 m. This investigation provides valuable insight for assessing the geochemical evolution of the water cover and performance of EPLs as an oil sands reclamation strategy.

  12. First-principles quantum mechanical investigations: Catalytic reactions of furfural on Pd(111) and at the water/Pd(111) interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenhua

    Bio-oils have drawn more and more attention from scientists as a promising new clean, cheap energy source. One of the most interesting relevant issues is the effect of catalysts on the catalytic reactions that are used for producing bio-oils. Furfural, as a very important intermediate during these reactions, has attracted significant studies. However, the effect of catalysts, including particularly the liquid/solid interface formed by a metal catalyst and liquid water, in the catalytic reactions involving furfural still remains elusive. In this research, we performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles density-functional theory calculations to investigate the atomic-scale mechanisms of catalytic hydrogenation of furfural on the palladium surface and at the liquid/state interface formed by the palladium surface and liquid water. We studied all the possible mechanisms that lead to formation of furfuryl alcohol (FOL), formation of tetrahydrofurfural (THFAL), and formation of tetrahydrofurfurfuryl alcohol (THFOL). We found that liquid water plays a significant role in the hydrogenation reactions. During the reaction in the presence of water and the palladium catalyst, in particular, water directly participates in the hydrogenation of the aldehyde group of furfural and facilitates the formation of FOL by reducing the activation energy. Our calculations show that water provides hydrogen for the hydrogenation of the aldehyde group, and at the same time, a pre-existing hydrogen atom, which is resulted from dissociation of molecular hydrogen (experimentally, molecular hydrogen is always supplied for hydrogenation) on the palladium surface, is bonded to water, making the water molecule intact in structure. In the absence of water, on the other hand, formation of FOL and THFAL on the palladium surface involves almost the same energy barriers, suggesting a comparable selectivity. Overall, as water reduces the activation energy for the formation of FOL

  13. Interactions of fines with base fractions of oil and its implication in smart water flooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    Migration of fines, and formation of oil emulsion have been independently observed during smart water flooding both have been suggested to play a vital role in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). But, the exact role of fines and the reason of emulsion formation are not well studied for carbonate...... reservoirs. This study shows that addition of water and crude oil on calcite fines leads to formation of soluble oil emulsions in the water phase. Formation of these emulsions and its implication in EOR has been experimentally analyzed....

  14. Experimentally probing the libration of interfacial water: the rotational potential of water is stiffer at the air/water interface than in bulk liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yujin; Kampfrath, Tobias; Campen, R Kramer

    2016-07-21

    Most properties of liquid water are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. Because forming an aqueous interface requires termination of this network, one might expect the molecular level properties of interfacial water to markedly differ from water in bulk. Intriguingly, much prior experimental and theoretical work has found that, from the perspective of their time-averaged structure and picosecond structural dynamics, hydrogen-bonded OH groups at an air/water interface behave the same as hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk liquid water. Here we report the first experimental observation of interfacial water's libration (i.e. frustrated rotation) using the laser-based technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. We find this mode has a frequency of 834 cm(-1), ≈165 cm(-1) higher than in bulk liquid water at the same temperature and similar to bulk ice. Because libration frequency is proportional to the stiffness of water's rotational potential, this increase suggests that one effect of terminating bulk water's hydrogen bonding network at the air/water interface is retarding rotation of water around intact hydrogen bonds. Because in bulk liquid water the libration plays a key role in stabilizing reaction intermediates and dissipating excess vibrational energy, we expect the ability to probe this mode in interfacial water to open new perspectives on the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions at aqueous interfaces.

  15. Oil-in-water emulsification using confined impinging jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Shad W; Norton, Ian T

    2012-07-01

    A confined impinging jet mixing device has been used to investigate the continuous sunflower oil/water emulsification process under turbulent flow conditions with oil contents between 5% (v/v) and 10% (v/v). Various emulsifiers (Tween20, Span80, Whey Protein, Lecithin and Sodium Dodecylsulphate) varying in molecular weights have been studied. Mean droplet sizes varied with the emulsifiers used and smallest droplets were obtained under fully turbulent flow regime, i.e. at the highest jet flow rate and highest jet Reynolds Number conditions. Sodium Dodecylsulfate (SDS) produced droplets in the range of 3.8 μm while 6 μm droplets were obtained with Whey Protein. Similar droplet sizes were obtained under fully turbulent flow conditions (610 mL/min; Reynolds Number=13,000) for oil content varying between 5% (v/v) and 10% (v/v). To investigate the smallest droplet size possible in the device, the emulsion was passed through the geometry multiple times. Multi-pass emulsification resulted in reduction in droplet size indicating that longer residence in the flow field under high shear condition allowed for breakage of droplets as well as the time for the emulsifier to stabilize the newly formed droplets, decreasing the impact of coalescence. This was confirmed by timescale analysis of the involved process steps for the droplet data obtained via experiments. Dependence of mean droplet size on the o/w interfacial tension and peak energy dissipation was also investigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and characterization of ultra lightweight, highly selective, filter media for oil-water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghernejad, Lida

    Emulsions formed by oil-water mixtures can cause serious issues at different stages of crude oil production, produced water remediation, and oil spills. Efficient, cost-effective processes for separation of oil--water emulsions or dispersions are critical and highly desirable. Filters are among the most common means employed to separate oil-water emulsions into their corresponding components. To conduct single step gravity-based or centrifugal separation of oil--water mixtures into their pure phase, it is essential that the filter be hydrophilic and oleophobic both in air and water. The filter medium should also have high surface porosity, which affects the rate of permeation of one phase. It should be stable at operating temperatures and pressures and be resistant to degradation by chemicals in the feed stream. Favorable oil rejection characteristics, resistance to fouling by organic and inorganic foulants and low cost of production are also important. The goal of this project is to develop ultra-lightweight filters that are durable, highly porous and able to selectively separate oil-water mixtures, from non-woven cellulose based materials by electrospinning. Since electrospinning is a cost-effective, scalable method that can be used to fabricate filters with very thin nanoscale fibers and nano-dimension pores, and cellulose is a very cheap and abundant ingredient, these filters may be considered as novel tools for efficient, cost-effective separation of oil-water emulsions in industry. Currently there is a growing demand for highly porous selective filters for oil-water mixtures in the petroleum industry. These filters are beneficial to both manufacturers and consumers. This research focuses on the development and characterization of the new filter material and evaluation of its suitability for oil-water separation in the field.

  17. Scaling oxygen microprofiles at the sediment interface of deep stratified waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwefel, Robert; Hondzo, Miki; Wüest, Alfred; Bouffard, Damien

    2017-02-01

    Dissolved oxygen microprofiles at the sediment-water interface of Lake Geneva were measured concurrently with velocities 0.25 to 2 m above the sediment. The measurements and scaling analyses indicate dissolved oxygen fluctuations and turbulent fluxes in exceedance of molecular diffusion in the proximity of the sediment-water interface. The measurements allowed the parameterization of the turbulent diffusion as a function of the dimensionless height above the sediment and the turbulence above the sediment-water interface. Turbulent diffusion depended strongly on the friction velocity and differed from formulations reported in the literature that are based on concepts of turbulent and developed wall-bounded flows. The dissolved oxygen microprofiles and proposed parameterization of turbulent diffusion enable a foundation for the similarity scaling of oxygen microprofiles in proximity to the sediment. The proposed scaling allows the estimation of diffusive boundary layer thickness, oxygen flux, and oxygen microprofile distribution in the near-sediment boundary layer.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Structure and Functions of Water-Membrane Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A large number of essential cellular processes occur at the interfaces between water and membranes. The selectivity and dynamics of these processes are largely determined by the structural and electrical properties of the water-membrane interface. We investigate these properties by the molecular dynamics method. Over the time scales of the simulations, the membrane undergoes fluctuations described by the capillary wave model. These fluctuations produce occasional thinning defects in the membrane which provide effective pathways for passive transport of ions and small molecules across the membrane. Ions moving through the membrane markedly disrupt its structure and allow for significant water penetration into the membrane interior. Selectivity of transport, with respect to ionic charge, is determined by the interfacial electrostatic potential. Many small molecules. of potential significance in catalysis, bioenergetics and pharmacology, are shown to bind to the interface. The energetics and dynamics of this process will be discussed.

  19. Formation of a water-xylene interface in a microchannel without sidewalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masashi

    2009-10-01

    Channels in a microfluidic device were rapidly created using an office inkjet printer. The process was easy enough for common end users to carry it out by themselves. A water-xylene interface was formed by combining two parallel channels that were filled with water and xylene, respectively. Such an interface can be important in analytical and synthetic uses because various chemical processes, such as reaction, extraction, and separation, can be performed through the interface. The water-filled channel was 0.5-1.3 mm wide, and the xylene-filled one was 1.3 mm wide. Both channels were 0.09 mm deep and 20 mm long. The continuous flow of these fluids was successfully carried out using a syringe pump at a volume flow rate of 1 microL/min for 5 min.

  20. Observation of the Turbulent Burst near A Sheared Air—Water Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShuangfengWANG; ZhennanNIU; 等

    1999-01-01

    The turbulent burst under a sheared air-water interface was experimentally investigated using hydrogen bubble visualization technique.The surface shear was imposed by an airflow over the water flow which was kept free from surface waves.Results show that the wind shear has the main influence on the bursting events.At relatively high shear rates,the flow near the interface is dominated primarily by intermittent bursting events.The general features of bursting processes are described in some detail.The observed bursting events show qualitative similarities with those occurring in near-wall turbulence.However,a few distinctive phenomena were also observed,including the existence of vertical vortices and thickening process of the boundary layer,which appear to be associated with the characteristics of air-water interface.

  1. Polystyrene-Polylactide Bottlebrush Block Copolymer at the Air/Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Byun, Myunghwan; Rzayev, Javid; Lin, Zhiqun

    2010-03-01

    Hydrophobic ultrahigh molecular weight bottlebrush block copolymer and linear block copolymer of polystyrene-polylactide (PS-PLA) were shown to be capable of forming Langmuir monolayers and exhibiting unique assembly behaviors at the air/water interface, which cannot be addressed by the classic theory of Langmuir monolayer of amphiphilic copolymers. New models were proposed to illustrate these intriguing surface behaviors. The self-assembled structure of Langmuir monolayer of bottlebrush block copolymer was determined by a combination of AFM measurement, thermal annealing, and enzymatic degradation experiment. To the best of our knowledge, this is among few studies on hydrophobic block copolymers at the air/water interface. As such, it not only complements the well-known models of self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers at the air/water interface but also expands the use of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique to hydrophobic block copolymers.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Structure and Functions of Water-Membrane Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A large number of essential cellular processes occur at the interfaces between water and membranes. The selectivity and dynamics of these processes are largely determined by the structural and electrical properties of the water-membrane interface. We investigate these properties by the molecular dynamics method. Over the time scales of the simulations, the membrane undergoes fluctuations described by the capillary wave model. These fluctuations produce occasional thinning defects in the membrane which provide effective pathways for passive transport of ions and small molecules across the membrane. Ions moving through the membrane markedly disrupt its structure and allow for significant water penetration into the membrane interior. Selectivity of transport, with respect to ionic charge, is determined by the interfacial electrostatic potential. Many small molecules. of potential significance in catalysis, bioenergetics and pharmacology, are shown to bind to the interface. The energetics and dynamics of this process will be discussed.

  3. Atomic scale structures of interfaces between kaolinite edges and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Lu, X.; Wang, R.; Meijer, E.J.; Zhou, H.; He, H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the atomic scale structures of kaolinite edge surfaces in contact with water. The commonly occurring edge surfaces are investigated (i.e. (0 1 0) and (1 1 0)) by using first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) technique. For (1 1 0)-type edge surface, there are two different

  4. Bacterial diversity and composition of an alkaline uranium mine tailings-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nurul H; Bondici, Viorica F; Medihala, Prabhakara G; Lawrence, John R; Wolfaardt, Gideon M; Warner, Jeff; Korber, Darren R

    2013-10-01

    The microbial diversity and biogeochemical potential associated with a northern Saskatchewan uranium mine water-tailings interface was examined using culture-dependent and -independent techniques. Morphologically-distinct colonies from uranium mine water-tailings and a reference lake (MC) obtained using selective and non-selective media were selected for 16S rRNA gene sequencing and identification, revealing that culturable organisms from the uranium tailings interface were dominated by Firmicutes and Betaproteobacteria; whereas, MC organisms mainly consisted of Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria. Ion Torrent (IT) 16S rRNA metagenomic analysis carried out on extracted DNA from tailings and MC interfaces demonstrated the dominance of Firmicutes in both of the systems. Overall, the tailings-water interface environment harbored a distinct bacterial community relative to the MC, reflective of the ambient conditions (i.e., total dissolved solids, pH, salinity, conductivity, heavy metals) dominating the uranium tailings system. Significant correlations among the physicochemical data and the major bacterial groups present in the tailings and MC were also observed. Presence of sulfate reducing bacteria demonstrated by culture-dependent analyses and the dominance of Desulfosporosinus spp. indicated by Ion Torrent analyses within the tailings-water interface suggests the existence of anaerobic microenvironments along with the potential for reductive metabolic processes.

  5. Water percolation through the root-soil interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benard, Pascal; Kroener, Eva; Vontobel, Peter; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Plant roots exude a significant fraction of the carbon assimilated via photosynthesis into the soil. The mucilaginous fraction of root exudates affects the hydraulic properties of the soil near the roots, the so called rhizosphere, in a remarkable and dynamic way. After drying, mucilage becomes hydrophobic and limits the rewetting of the rhizosphere. Here, we aim to find a quantitative relation between rhizosphere rewetting, particle size, soil matric potential and mucilage concentration. We used a pore-network model in which mucilage was randomly distributed in a cubic lattice. The general idea was that the mucilage concentration per solid soil surface increases the contact angle between the liquid and solid phases consequently limiting the rewetting of pores covered with dry mucilage. We used the Young-Laplace equation to calculate the mucilage concentration at which pores are not wettable for varying particle sizes and matric potentials. Then, we simulated the percolation of water across a cubic lattice. Our simulations predicted that above a critical mucilage concentration water could not flow through the porous medium. The critical mucilage concentration decreased with increasing particle size and decreasing matric potential. The model was compared with experiments of capillary rise in soils of different particle size and mucilage concentration. The experiments confirmed the percolation behaviour of the rhizosphere rewetting. Mucilage turned hydrophobic at concentrations above 0.1 mg/cm2. The critical mucilage concentration at matric potential of -2.5 hPa was ca. 1% [g/g] for fine sand and 0.1 % [g/g] for coarse sand. Our conceptual model is a first step towards a better understanding of the water dynamics in the rhizosphere during rewetting and it can be used to predict in what soil textures rhizosphere water repellency becomes a critical issue for root water uptake.

  6. Origin of proton affinity to membrane/water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichselbaum, Ewald; Österbauer, Maria; Knyazev, Denis G; Batishchev, Oleg V; Akimov, Sergey A; Hai Nguyen, Trung; Zhang, Chao; Knör, Günther; Agmon, Noam; Carloni, Paolo; Pohl, Peter

    2017-07-03

    Proton diffusion along biological membranes is vitally important for cellular energetics. Here we extended previous time-resolved fluorescence measurements to study the time and temperature dependence of surface proton transport. We determined the Gibbs activation energy barrier ΔG (‡)r that opposes proton surface-to-bulk release from Arrhenius plots of (i) protons' surface diffusion constant and (ii) the rate coefficient for proton surface-to-bulk release. The large size of ΔG (‡)r disproves that quasi-equilibrium exists in our experiments between protons in the near-membrane layers and in the aqueous bulk. Instead, non-equilibrium kinetics describes the proton travel between the site of its photo-release and its arrival at a distant membrane patch at different temperatures. ΔG (‡)r contains only a minor enthalpic contribution that roughly corresponds to the breakage of a single hydrogen bond. Thus, our experiments reveal an entropic trap that ensures channeling of highly mobile protons along the membrane interface in the absence of potent acceptors.

  7. 16 CFR Appendix D3 to Part 305 - Water Heaters-Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Water Heaters-Oil D3 Appendix D3 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Water Heaters—Oil Range Information CAPACITY FIRST HOUR RATING Range of Estimated...

  8. The Silica-Water Interface from the Analysis of Molecular Dynamic Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Lardhi, Sheikha F.

    2013-05-01

    Surface chemistry is an emerging field that can give detailed insight about the elec- tronic properties and the interaction of complex material surfaces with their neigh- bors. This is for both solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces. Among the latter class, the silica-water interface plays a major role in nature. Silica is among the most abundant materials on earth, as well in advanced technological applications such as catalysis and nanotechnology. This immediately indicates the relevance of a detailed understanding of the silica-water interface. In this study, we investigate the details of this interaction at microscopic level by analyzing trajectories obtained with ab initio molecular dynamic simulations. The system we consider consists of bulk liquid water confined between two β-cristobalite silica surfaces. The molecular dynamics were generated with the CP2K, an ab initio molecular dynamic simulation tool. The simulations are 25 picoseconds long, and the CP2K program was run on 64 cores on a supercomputer cluster. During the simulations the program integrates Newton’s equations of motion for the system and generates the trajectory for analysis. For analysis, we focused on the following properties that characterize the silica water interface. We calculated the density profile of the water layers from the silica surface, and we also calculated the radial distribution function (RDF) of the hydrogen bond at the silanols on the silica surface. The main focus of this thesis is to write the programs for calculating the atom density profile and the RDF from the generated MD trajectories. The atomic probability density profile shows that water is strongly adsorbed on the (001) cristobalite surface, while the RDF indicates differently ad- sorbed water molecules in the first adsorption layer. As final remark, the protocol and the tools developed in this thesis can be applied to the study of basically any crystal-water interface.

  9. Sticky water surfaces: Helix-coil transitions suppressed in a cell-penetrating peptide at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schach, Denise; Globisch, Christoph; Roeters, Steven J.; Woutersen, Sander; Fuchs, Adrian; Weiss, Clemens K.; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Landfester, Katharina; Bonn, Mischa; Peter, Christine; Weidner, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    GALA is a 30 amino acid synthetic peptide consisting of a Glu-Ala-Leu-Ala repeat and is known to undergo a reversible structural transition from a disordered to an α-helical structure when changing the pH from basic to acidic values. In its helical state GALA can insert into and disintegrate lipid membranes. This effect has generated much interest in GALA as a candidate for pH triggered, targeted drug delivery. GALA also serves as a well-defined model system to understand cell penetration mechanisms and protein folding triggered by external stimuli. Structural transitions of GALA in solution have been studied extensively. However, cell penetration is an interfacial effect and potential biomedical applications of GALA would involve a variety of surfaces, e.g., nanoparticles, lipid membranes, tubing, and liquid-gas interfaces. Despite the apparent importance of interfaces in the functioning of GALA, the effect of surfaces on the reversible folding of GALA has not yet been studied. Here, we use sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) to probe the structural response of GALA at the air-water interface and IR spectroscopy to follow GALA folding in bulk solution. We combine the SFG data with molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a molecular-level picture of the interaction of GALA with the air-water interface. Surprisingly, while the fully reversible structural transition was observed in solution, at the water-air interface, a large fraction of the GALA population remained helical at high pH. This "stickiness" of the air-water interface can be explained by the stabilizing interactions of hydrophobic leucine and alanine side chains with the water surface.

  10. New Method of Online Measurement of Oil and Suspended Material Concentration In Flowing Waste Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hongwei; Xu, Guobing; Xu, Xinqiang; Zhou, Fangde

    2007-06-01

    At present, the most of the measurements of oil and suspended material concentration in waste water measuring are not online surveys. A new method of online measurement of oil and suspended material concentration in flowing waste water is presented. The room experiments and field tests showed that it is suitable to waste water treatment on line. After sampling, It needed to measure immediately the concentration in first time. Then let sample to be in still in 10 - 20 seconds. After that the bulk concentration was measured in second time. Because of the suspended solids having heavy density, they would be dropped from waster water. During ultrasonic operation, emulsify the oil in waster water, the oil and suspended solid would be depart. After that the third time measurement was done. In thus way the concentrations of oil and suspended solids can be measured. At present there are two on-site equipments operating in the Changqing oilfield, and the results are pretty well.

  11. Oil-in-water Pickering emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles from the water-insoluble protein zein

    OpenAIRE

    de Folter, J.W.J.; van Ruijven, M.W.M.; Velikov, K.

    2012-01-01

    Few fully natural and biocompatible materials are available for the effective particle-stabilization of emulsions since strict requirements, such as insolubility in both fluid phases and intermediate wettability, need to be met. In this paper, we demonstrate the first use of water-insoluble proteins, employing the corn protein zein as a representative of this family, as effective particle-stabilizers of oil-in-water emulsions of natural oils and water. For this purpose, we synthesized zein co...

  12. Dynamic protein adsorption at the polyurethane copolymer/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaseen, M; Lu, J R [Biological Physics Group, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Salacinski, H J; Seifalian, A M [Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Centre, Royal Free and University College Medical School, UCL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.lu@manchester.ac.uk

    2008-09-01

    Polyurethanes (PU) and their polymeric derivatives are widely used in the manufacturing of medical devices. It is important to understand how protein adsorbs onto PU materials as this molecular process directly implicates surface biocompatibility. In this work, we compared protein adsorption at the PU film surfaces with that from the hydrophilic silicon oxide. Two PU polymers were used, a commercial polyurethane (PUA) and a novel poly(carbonate-urea)urethane matrix containing silsesquioxanes (PU4). AFM imaging revealed micro-domain segregation on both PU surfaces, but the incorporation of pendent silsesquioxanes made the PU4 surface much rougher, with the outer surface comprised of soft upper PU segments and lower PU-silsesquioxane hard segments. It appeared that fibrinogen was preferable to adsorb onto the upper soft PU segments. The spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements at the PU film/solution interface showed that human serum albumin (HSA) adsorption was little affected by surface chemistry whilst fibrinogen adsorption was much greater on the two PU surfaces indicating a strong surface effect. Further studies revealed that HSA adsorption was reversible on hydrophilic SiO{sub 2} against changes in pH from 5 to 7, but irreversible on the two PU surfaces. In contrast, fibrinogen adsorption against the same pH cycling was found to be irreversible on all three surfaces. The different extent of irreversibility was clearly indicative of different interfacial interactions. Sequential protein adsorption revealed that the PU4 surface shared similar physiochemical properties to the SiO{sub 2} surface, demonstrating the success in incorporating the siloxane pendant nanocages. The knowledge of protein surface structure and behaviour may lead to the development of effective means to control surface biocompatibility.

  13. Quantitative calculation of GOR of complex oil-gas-water systems with logging data: A case study of the Yingdong Oil/Gas Field in the Qaidam Basin

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In the Yingdong Oil/Gas Field of the Qaidam Basin, multiple suites of oil-gas-water systems overlie each other vertically, making it difficult to accurately identify oil layers from gas layers and calculate gas-oil ratio (GOR). Therefore, formation testing and production data, together with conventional logging, NMR and mud logging data were integrated to quantitatively calculate GOR. To tell oil layers from gas layers, conventional logging makes use of the excavation effect of compensated ne...

  14. Hole localization, water dissociation mechanisms, and band alignment at aqueous-titania interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, John L.

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising method for generating clean energy, but materials that can efficiently act as photocatalysts are scarce. This is in part due to the fact that exposure to water can strongly alter semiconductor surfaces and therefore photocatalyst performance. Many materials are not stable in aqueous environments; in other cases, local changes in structure may occur, affecting energy-level alignment. Even in the simplest case, dynamic fluctuations modify the organization of interface water. Accounting for such effects requires knowledge of the dominant local structural motifs and also accurate semiconductor band-edge positions, making quantitative prediction of energy-level alignments computationally challenging. Here we employ a combined theoretical approach to study the structure, energy alignment, and hole localization at aqueous-titania interfaces. We calculate the explicit aqueous-semiconductor interface using ab initio molecular dynamics, which provides the fluctuating atomic structure, the extent of water dissociation, and the resulting electrostatic potential. For both anatase and rutile TiO2 we observe spontaneous water dissociation and re-association events that occur via distinct mechanisms. We also find a higher-density water layer occurring on anatase. In both cases, we find that the second monolayer of water plays a crucial role in controlling the extent of water dissociation. Using hybrid functional calculations, we then investigate the propensity for dissociated waters to stabilize photo-excited carriers, and compare the results of rutile and anatase aqueous interfaces. Finally, we use the GW approach from many-body perturbation theory to obtain the position of semiconductor band edges relative to the occupied 1b1 level and thus the redox levels of water, and examine how local structural modifications affect these offsets. This work was performed in collaboration with N. Kharche, M. Z. Ertem, J. T. Muckerman, and M. S

  15. Determination of alpha dose rate profile at the HLW nuclear glass/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougnaud, S., E-mail: sarah.mougnaud@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Tribet, M.; Rolland, S. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Renault, J.-P. [CEA Saclay, NIMBE UMR 3685 CEA/CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jégou, C. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The nuclear glass/water interface is studied. • The way the energy of alpha particles is deposited is modeled using MCNPX code. • A model giving dose rate profiles at the interface using intrinsic data is proposed. • Bulk dose rate is a majoring estimation in alteration layer and in surrounding water. • Dose rate is high in small cracks; in larger ones irradiated volume is negligible. - Abstract: Alpha irradiation and radiolysis can affect the alteration behavior of High Level Waste (HLW) nuclear glasses. In this study, the way the energy of alpha particles, emitted by a typical HLW glass, is deposited in water at the glass/water interface is investigated, with the aim of better characterizing the dose deposition at the glass/water interface during water-induced leaching mechanisms. A simplified chemical composition was considered for the nuclear glass under study, wherein the dose rate is about 140 Gy/h. The MCNPX calculation code was used to calculate alpha dose rate and alpha particle flux profiles at the glass/water interface in different systems: a single glass grain in water, a glass powder in water and a water-filled ideal crack in a glass package. Dose rate decreases within glass and in water as distance to the center of the grain increases. A general model has been proposed to fit a dose rate profile in water and in glass from values for dose rate in glass bulk, alpha range in water and linear energy transfer considerations. The glass powder simulation showed that there was systematic overlapping of radiation fields for neighboring glass grains, but the water dose rate always remained lower than the bulk value. Finally, for typical ideal cracks in a glass matrix, an overlapping of irradiation fields was observed while the crack aperture was lower than twice the alpha range in water. This led to significant values for the alpha dose rate within the crack volume, as long as the aperture remained lower than 60 μm.

  16. Molecular dynamics study of water molecule diffusion in oil-paper insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Rui-Jin; Zhu, Meng-Zhao; Yang, Li-Jun; Zhou, Xin; Gong, Chun-Yan

    2011-03-01

    Moisture is an important factor that influences the safe operation of transformers. In this study, molecular dynamics was employed to investigate the diffusion behavior of water molecules in the oil-paper insulation materials of transformers. Two oil-cellulose models were built. In the first model, water molecules were initially distributed in oil, and in the second model, water molecules were distributed in cellulose. The non-bonding energies of interaction between water molecules and oil, and between water molecules and cellulose, were calculated by the Dreiding force field. The interaction energy was found to play a dominant role in influencing the equilibrium distribution of water molecules. The radial direction functions of water molecules toward oil and cellulose indicate that the hydrogen bonds between water molecules and cellulose are sufficiently strong to withstand the operating temperature of the transformer. Mean-square displacement analysis of water molecules diffusion suggests that water molecules initially distributed in oil showed anisotropic diffusion; they tended to diffuse toward cellulose. Water molecules initially distributed in cellulose diffused isotropically. This study provides a theoretical contribution for improvements in online monitoring of water in transformers, and for subsequent research on new insulation materials.

  17. A Review of Laboratory-Scale Research on Upgrading Heavy Oil in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the growing demand for energy and the depletion of conventional crude oil, heavy oil in huge reserve has attracted extensive attention. However, heavy oil cannot be directly refined by existing processes unless they are upgraded due to its complex composition and high concentration of heteroatoms (N, S, Ni, V, etc.. Of the variety of techniques for heavy oil upgrading, supercritical water (SCW is gaining popularity because of its excellent ability to convert heavy oil into valued, clean light oil by the suppression of coke formation and the removal of heteroatoms. Based on the current status of this research around the world, heavy oil upgrading in SCW is summarized from three aspects: Transformation of hydrocarbons, suppression of coke, and removal of heteroatoms. In this work, the challenge and future development of the orientation of upgrading heavy oil in SCW are pointed out.

  18. Influence of biosurfactant on the diesel oil remediation in soil-water system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-ying; ZHENG Xi-lai; LI Bing

    2006-01-01

    There were six high diesel oil degrading bacteria strains isolated from the oil contaminated soil that collected from Linzi City. The strain Y1 was able to produce biosurfactant rhamnolipid when cultivated on diesel oil as carbon source. The critical micelle concentrations (CMC) of rhamnolipid in water and in the soil were measured respectively according to the correlation between the surface tension of the medium and the added rhamnolipid concentration. The results showed that the CMC of rhamnolipid in water was 65 mg/L, and was 185 mg/L in soil. The tests on diesel oil biodegradation were conducted with the addition of different concentrations of rharnnolipid in water and in soil respectively. When 0.01% rhamnolipid was added to water, the diesel oil degradation was enhanced. On the contrary, when the same concentration of rhamnolipid was added to the soil, the degradation of diesel oil was inhibited. The results suggested that the rhamnolipid could enhance the diesel oil biodegradation, indicating that the concentration of rhamnolipid was higher than the corresponding CMC in the medium. Kinetics parameters for the diesel oil biodegradation parameters such as biodegradation constant (λ), coefficient of correlation (r) and half life (t1/2) in both tests were numerically analyzed in this paper, indicating that the moderate concentration of rhamnolipid in the medium could not only enhance the extent of diesel oil biodegradation but also shorten the time for oil remediation.

  19. Influence of biosurfactant on the diesel oil remediation in soil-water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Ying; Zheng, Xi-Lai; Li, Bing

    2006-01-01

    There were six high diesel oil degrading bacteria strains isolated from the oil contaminated soil that collected from Linzi City. The strain Y1 was able to produce biosurfactant rhamnolipid when cultivated on diesel oil as carbon source. The critical micelle concentrations (CMC) of rhamnolipid in water and in the soil were measured respectively according to the correlation between the surface tension of the medium and the added rhamnolipid concentration. The results showed that the CMC of rhamnolipid in water was 65 mg/L, and was 185 mg/L in soil. The tests on diesel oil biodegradation were conducted with the addition of different concentrations of rhamnolipid in water and in soil respectively. When 0.01% rhamnolipid was added to water, the diesel oil degradation was enhanced. On the contrary, when the same concentration of rhamnolipid was added to the soil, the degradation of diesel oil was inhibited. The results suggested that the rhamnolipid could enhance the diesel oil biodegradation, indicating that the concentration of rhamnolipid was higher than the corresponding CMC in the medium. Kinetics parameters for the diesel oil biodegradation parameters such as biodegradation constant (lambda), coefficient of correlation (r) and half life (t1/2) in both tests were numerically analyzed in this paper, indicating that the moderate concentration of rhamnolipid in the medium could not only enhance the extent of diesel oil biodegradation but also shorten the time for oil remediation.

  20. Understanding the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface from molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Zhipei; Ren, Tao; Wu, Pan; Shen, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xinping

    2014-11-25

    Understanding the behavior of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is crucial for many applications, such as lubricants, paints, cosmetics, and fire-fighting foams. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the microscopic properties of non-ionic fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface. Several properties, including the distribution of head groups, the distribution probability of the tilt angle between hydrophobic tails with respect to the xy plane, and the order parameter of surfactants, were computed to probe the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface. The effects of the monomer structure on interfacial phenomena of non-ionic surfactants were investigated as well. It is observed that the structure of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is more ordered than that of hydrocarbons, which is dominated by the van der Waals interaction between surfactants and water molecules. However, replacing one or two CF2 with one or two CH2 group does not significantly influence the interfacial structure, suggesting that hydrocarbons may be promising alternatives to perfluorinated surfactants.

  1. Hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akella, Sathish; Singh, Dhiraj; Singh, Ravi; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when placed at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface due to Marangoni forces. This steady camphor influx from tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the camphor outflux due to evaporation. When spontaneous fluctuations in evaporation break the axial symmetry of Marangoni force acting radially outwards, the camphor tablet is propelled like a boat along the water surface. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at air-water interfaces. We observe three different modes of motion, namely continuous, harmonic and periodic, due to the volatile nature of camphor. We explain these modes in terms of ratio of two time-scales: the time-scale over which viscous forces are dominant over the Marangoni forces (τη) and the time-scale over which Marangoni forces are dominant over the viscous forces (τσ). The continuous, harmonic and periodic motions are observed when τη /τσ ~ 1 , τη /τσ >= 1 and τη /τσ >> 1 respectively. Experimentally, the ratio of the time scales is varied by changing the interfacial tension of the air-water interface using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  2. Determination of alpha dose rate profile at the HLW nuclear glass/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougnaud, S.; Tribet, M.; Rolland, S.; Renault, J.-P.; Jégou, C.

    2015-07-01

    Alpha irradiation and radiolysis can affect the alteration behavior of High Level Waste (HLW) nuclear glasses. In this study, the way the energy of alpha particles, emitted by a typical HLW glass, is deposited in water at the glass/water interface is investigated, with the aim of better characterizing the dose deposition at the glass/water interface during water-induced leaching mechanisms. A simplified chemical composition was considered for the nuclear glass under study, wherein the dose rate is about 140 Gy/h. The MCNPX calculation code was used to calculate alpha dose rate and alpha particle flux profiles at the glass/water interface in different systems: a single glass grain in water, a glass powder in water and a water-filled ideal crack in a glass package. Dose rate decreases within glass and in water as distance to the center of the grain increases. A general model has been proposed to fit a dose rate profile in water and in glass from values for dose rate in glass bulk, alpha range in water and linear energy transfer considerations. The glass powder simulation showed that there was systematic overlapping of radiation fields for neighboring glass grains, but the water dose rate always remained lower than the bulk value. Finally, for typical ideal cracks in a glass matrix, an overlapping of irradiation fields was observed while the crack aperture was lower than twice the alpha range in water. This led to significant values for the alpha dose rate within the crack volume, as long as the aperture remained lower than 60 μm.

  3. EFFECT OF WATER CONTENT, TEMPERATURE AND AVERAGE DROPLET SIZE ON THE SETTLING VELOCITY OF WATER-IN-OIL EMULSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWater-in-oil (W/O emulsions are complex mixtures generally found in crude oil production in reservoirs and processing equipment. Sedimentation studies of water-oil emulsions enable the analysis of the fluid dynamic behavior concerning separation of this system composed of two immiscible liquids. Gravitational settling was evaluated in this article for a model emulsion system consisting of water and a Brazilian crude oil diluted in a clear mineral oil as organic phase. The effects of water content and temperature were considered in the study of sedimentation velocity of water-oil emulsions. Water contents between 10% and 50 % and temperatures of 25, 40 and 60 ºC were evaluated, and a Richardson-Zaki type correlation was obtained to calculate settling velocities as a function of the process variables investigated. Water contents and average droplet sizes were monitored at different levels in the settling equipment, thus enabling identification of the effect of these variables on the phenomena of sedimentation and coalescence of the emulsions studied. The results showed that the emulsion stability during sedimentation was governed by the emulsion water content, which yielded high settling velocities at low water contents, even when very small droplets were present. A quantitative analysis of the combined effects of drop size and droplet concentration supports the conclusion that a stronger effect is produced by the higher concentration of particles, compared with the relatively smaller effect of increasing the size of the droplets.

  4. Identification of salivary proteins at oil–water interfaces stabilized by lysozyme and ß-lactoglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, E.; Vitorino, R.M.P.; Schipper, R.G.; Amado, F.M.L.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    In this research, we investigated the interaction occurring between oil-in-water emulsion droplets, stabilized by different emulsifiers, i.e. lysozyme and ß-lactoglobulin (ß-lg), and salivary proteins (SPs) with a molecular mass (Mr) above about 10 kDa. Different techniques, i.e. infrared

  5. Scattering of water from the glycerol liquid-vacuum interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, I.; Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Nathanson, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations of the scattering of D2O from the glycerol surface at different collision energies are reported. The results for the trapping probabilities and energy transfer are in good agreement with experiments. The calculations demonstrate that the strong attractive forces between these two strongly hydrogen bonding molecules have only a minor effect on the initial collision dynamics. The trapping probability is influenced to a significant extent by the repulsive hard sphere-like initial encounter with the corrugated surface and, only at a later stage, by the efficiency of energy flow in the multiple interactions between the water and the surface molecules.

  6. Measurement of the interface tension of smectic membranes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harth, Kirsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    2013-05-21

    A simple method is proposed to measure the interfacial tension of a smectic liquid crystal (LC) in freely suspended film geometry in aqueous environment. The method is based upon the evaluation of the deformation of smectic bubbles by the buoyancy of a trapped air volume. The advantages over classical suspended smectic droplet experiments in water are the considerably shorter equilibration times, and most important, the much larger density differences between the fluids. The latter allow a much more accurate force determination. Bulk elastic force contributions can be practically neglected in the thin smectic films. Values for a smectic C mixture of two disubstituted phenylpyrimidines are reported.

  7. Seismic Interface Waves in Coastal Waters: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-15

    water. In 1976 McLeroy and his co-workers [1861 again performed a very extensive real-world experiment in the Gulf of Mexico . Using a receiving array of...York, Academic Press, 1967. 4. SOMMERFELD, A. Uber die Ausbreitung der Wellen in der drahtlosen Telegraphie. Annalen der Physik, 28, 1909. 665-736. 5...Rayleigh waves on the confines of two solid elastic media. Doklady Akademii Nauk, SSSR, 33, 1947: 15-17. 30. KOPPE, H. Uber Rayleigh-Wellen an der

  8. Hydrated goethite (alpha-FeOOH) (100) interface structure: Ordered water and surface functional groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, S.K.; Waychunas, G.A.; Trainor, T.P.; Eng, P.J.

    2009-12-15

    Goethite({alpha}-FeOOH), an abundant and highly reactive iron oxyhydroxide mineral, has been the subject of numerous stud-ies of environmental interface reactivity. However, such studies have been hampered by the lack of experimental constraints on aqueous interface structure, and especially of the surface water molecular arrangements. Structural information of this type is crucial because reactivity is dictated by the nature of the surface functional groups and the structure or distribution of water and electrolyte at the solid-solution interface. In this study we have investigated the goethite(100) surface using surface diffraction techniques, and have determined the relaxed surface structure, the surface functional groups, and the three dimensional nature of two distinct sorbed water layers. The crystal truncation rod (CTR) results show that the interface structure consists of a double hydroxyl, double water terminated interface with significant atom relaxations. Further, the double hydroxyl terminated surface dominates with an 89% contribution having a chiral subdomain structure on the(100) cleavage faces. The proposed interface stoichiometry is ((H{sub 2}O)-(H{sub 2}O)-OH{sub 2}-OH-Fe-O-O-Fe-R) with two types of terminal hydroxyls; a bidentate (B-type) hydroxo group and a monodentate (A-type) aquo group. Using the bond-valence approach the protonation states of the terminal hydroxyls are predicted to be OH type (bidentate hydroxyl with oxygen coupled to two Fe{sup 3+} ions) and OH{sub 2} type (monodentate hydroxyl with oxygen tied to only one Fe{sup 3+}). A double layer three dimensional ordered water structure at the interface was determined from refinement of fits to the experimental data. Application of bond-valence constraints to the terminal hydroxyls with appropriate rotation of the water dipole moments allowed a plausible dipole orientation model as predicted. The structural results are discussed in terms of protonation and H-bonding at the interface

  9. Toxicity of Water Accommodated Fractions of Estonian Shale Fuel Oils to Aquatic Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinova, Irina; Kanarbik, Liina; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Kahru, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Estonia is the worldwide leading producer of the fuel oils from the oil shale. We evaluated the ecotoxicity of water accommodated fraction (WAF) of two Estonian shale fuel oils ("VKG D" and "VKG sweet") to aquatic species belonging to different trophic levels (marine bacteria, freshwater crustaceans and aquatic plants). Artificial fresh water and natural lake water were used to prepare WAFs. "VKG sweet" (lower density) proved more toxic to aquatic species than "VKG D" (higher density). Our data indicate that though shale oils were very toxic to crustaceans, the short-term exposure of Daphnia magna to sub-lethal concentrations of shale fuel oils WAFs may increase the reproductive potential of survived organisms. The weak correlation between measured chemical parameters (C10-C40 hydrocarbons and sum of 16 PAHs) and WAF's toxicity to studied species indicates that such integrated chemical parameters are not very informative for prediction of shale fuel oils ecotoxicity.

  10. Characterization of napthenic acids in oil sands process-affected waters using fluorescence technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.; Alostaz, M.; Ulrich, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Process-affected water from oil sands production plants presents a major environmental challenge to oil sands operators due to its toxicity to different organisms as well as its corrosiveness in refinery units. This abstract investigated the use of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices to detect and characterize changes in naphthenic acid in oil sands process-affected waters. Samples from oil sands production plants and storage ponds were tested. The study showed that oil sands naphthenic acids show characteristic fluorescence signatures when excited by ultraviolet light in the range of 260 to 350 mm. The signal was a unique attribute of the naphthenic acid molecule. Changes in the fluorescence signature can be used to determine chemical changes such as degradation or aging. It was concluded that the technology can be used as a non-invasive continuous water quality monitoring tool to increase process control in oil sands processing plants.

  11. Experimental study of flow patterns and pressure drops of heavy oil-water-gas vertical flow

    Institute of Sci