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Sample records for oestrogen receptors cell

  1. Oestrogen inhibits human colonic motility by a non-genomic cell membrane receptor-dependent mechanism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Classical effects of oestrogen involve activation of target genes after binding nuclear receptors. Oestrogenic effects too rapid for DNA transcription (non-genomic) are known to occur. The effect of oestrogen on colonic motility is unknown despite the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in pregnant and premenopausal women. METHODS: Histologically normal colon was obtained from proximal resection margins of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended in organ baths under 1 g of tension. After equilibration, they were exposed to 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8) or bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8). Fulvestrant, an oestrogen receptor antagonist, was added to some baths (n = 8). Other strips were exposed to calphostin C or cycloheximide. Carbachol was added in increasing concentrations and contractile activity was recorded isometrically. RESULTS: Oestrogen inhibited colonic contractility (mean difference 19.7 per cent; n = 8, P < 0.001). In keeping with non-genomic, rapid-onset steroid action, the effect was apparent within minutes and reversible. It was observed with both 17beta-oestradiol and BSA-conjugated oestrogen, and was not altered by cycloheximide. Effects were inhibited by fulvestrant, suggesting receptor mediation. CONCLUSION: Oestrogen decreases contractility in human colonic smooth muscle by a non-genomic mechanism involving cell membrane coupling.

  2. Iodine-125-labelled tamoxifen is differentially cytoxic to cells containing oestrogen receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomer, W.D.; McLaughlin, W.H.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Tamoxifen, a non-steroidal anti-oestrogen competes with 17 - oestradiol for oestrogen receptor protein and is translocated to the nucleus. Carrier-free 125 I-TAM was tested for cytotoxicity in oestrogen receptor rich (human breast cancer MCF-7) and poor (V-79 Chinese hamster) cells. 125 I-TAM was differentially cytotoxic to MCF-7 cells. The D 37 values for MCF-7 and V-79 cells were 0.5 and 1.5 pCi/cell respectively. No radiotoxicity was observed with Na 125 I at doses equal to 125 I-TAM; iodide was effectively excluded from both cell lines and remained in the extracellular space. Also, nonradioactive 127 I-TAM and TAM were both non-toxic when tested at levels comparable to 125 I-TAM. It is suggested that the marked cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells results from close approximation of 125 I with the genetic apparatus as a result of direct charging of specific nuclear receptors and/or translocation of 125 I-TAM receptor complexes from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, and that the minimal toxicity in V-79 cells reflects transmitted cytoplasmic radiation effects, limited direct nuclear charging and/or limited nuclear translocation resulting from the relative paucity of oestrogen in the cells. (U.K.)

  3. Oestrogen receptor alpha in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Audrey F; Ewart, Marie-Ann; Mair, Kirsty; Nilsen, Margaret; Dempsie, Yvonne; Loughlin, Lynn; Maclean, Margaret R

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) occurs more frequently in women with mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) and dysfunctional BMPR2 signalling underpinning heritable PAH. We have previously shown that serotonin can uncover a pulmonary hypertensive phenotype in BMPR2(+/-) mice and that oestrogen can increase serotinergic signalling in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs). Hence, here we wished to characterize the expression of oestrogen receptors (ERs) in male and female human pulmonary arteries and have examined the influence of oestrogen and serotonin on BMPR2 and ERα expression. By immunohistochemistry, we showed that ERα, ERβ, and G-protein-coupled receptors are expressed in human pulmonary arteries localizing mainly to the smooth muscle layer which also expresses the serotonin transporter (SERT). Protein expression of ERα protein was higher in female PAH patient hPASMCs compared with male and serotonin also increased the expression of ERα. 17β-estradiol induced proliferation of hPASMCs via ERα activation and this engaged mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt signalling. Female mice over-expressing SERT (SERT(+) mice) develop PH and the ERα antagonist MPP attenuated the development of PH in normoxic and hypoxic female SERT(+) mice. The therapeutic effects of MPP were accompanied by increased expression of BMPR2 in mouse lung. ERα is highly expressed in female hPASMCs from PAH patients and mediates oestrogen-induced proliferation of hPASMCs via mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt signalling. Serotonin can increase ERα expression in hPASMCs and antagonism of ERα reverses serotonin-dependent PH in the mouse and increases BMPR2 expression. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Immunolocalisation of oestrogen receptor beta in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A H; Al-Azzawi, F

    2000-02-01

    Oestrogens exert their actions via specific nuclear protein receptors that are members of the steroid/thyroid receptor superfamily of transcription factors. Recently, a second oestrogen receptor (ERbeta) has been cloned, and using reverse transcription-PCR and immunohistochemistry it has been shown to have a wide tissue distribution in the rat that is distinct from the classical oestrogen receptor, ERalpha. Using commercial polyclonal antisera against peptides specific to human ERbeta, we have determined the sites of ERbeta expression in archival and formalin-fixed human tissue and compared its expression with that of ERalpha. ERbeta was localised to the cell nuclei of a wide range of normal adult human tissues including ovary, Fallopian tube, uterus, lung, kidney, brain, heart, prostate and testis. In the ovary, ERbeta was present in multiple cell types including granulosa cells in small, medium and large follicles, theca and corpora lutea, whereas ERalpha was weakly expressed in the nuclei of granulosa cells, but not in the theca nor in the copora lutea. In the endometrium, both ERalpha and ERbeta were observed in luminal epithelial cells and in the nuclei of stromal cells but, significantly, ERbeta was weak or absent from endometrial glandular epithelia. Epithelial cells in most male tissues including the prostate, the urothelium and muscle layers of the bladder, and Sertoli cells in the testis, were also immunopositive for ERbeta. Significant ERbeta immunoreactivity was detected in most areas of the brain, with the exception of the hippocampus - a tissue that stained positively for ERalpha. In conclusion, the almost ubiquitous immunohistochemical localisation of ERbeta indicates that ERbeta may play a major role in the mediation of oestrogen action. The differential expression of ERalpha and ERbeta in some of these tissues suggests a more complex control mechanism in oestrogenic potential than originally envisioned.

  5. Oestrogen receptor beta over expression in males with non-small cell lung cancer is associated with better survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Birgit Guldhammer; Sode, Birgitte M Fischer; Pappot, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adenocarcinoma of the lung is more frequent in females than in males and the association with smoking is less pronounced than for the other histological subtypes of lung cancer. Oestrogen induction of cell proliferation has been found in breast adenocarcinomas, and since oestrogen...... the results to gender and survival. METHODS: Paraffin embedded, histological material was collected from 104 patients (71 men and 33 women), operated in the period 1989-1992 for NSCLC (56 squamous cell carcinomas, 40 adenocarcinomas and 8 large cell carcinomas). ERalpha, ERbeta and progesterone were...... and progesterone expression for the prognosis. RESULTS: ERbeta positivity was demonstrated in 69% (72 of 104) of the tumours. There was no statistically significant correlation between ERbeta positivity and age, gender, stage, or histology. After adjusting for gender, age, stage at diagnosis and histology...

  6. Of Oestrogens and Sperm: A Review of the Roles of Oestrogens and Oestrogen Receptors in Male Reproduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostálová, Pavla; Žatecká, Eva; Dvořáková-Hortová, Kateřina

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 5 (2017), č. článku 904. E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-05547S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : oestrogens * oestrogen receptors * testes * sperm Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Reproductive biology (medical aspects to be 3) Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2016

  7. Oestrogen receptor evaluation in Pomeranian dogs with hair cycle arrest (alopecia X) on melatonin supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Linda A; Donnell, Robert L; Kania, Stephen A

    2006-08-01

    The role of oestrogen receptors in dogs with hair cycle arrest (alopecia X) was investigated by immunohistochemistry. The purpose of this study was to determine if hair regrowth in dogs with hair cycle arrest treated with melatonin was associated with a decrease in follicular oestrogen receptors. Fifteen Pomeranians (excluding intact females) with hair cycle arrest were enrolled. Two biopsies were obtained from alopecic areas of the trunk before and after 3 months on melatonin. Haematoxylin and eosin-stained tissues were examined and oestrogen receptor-alpha was demonstrated immunohistochemically. Common histopathological findings included hyperkeratosis, follicular keratosis, excessive tricholemmal keratinization (flame follicles), thin epidermis, few small anagen bulbs, epidermal pigmentation and melanin aggregates within follicular keratin. Melanin aggregates within basal cells and hair were an occasional finding. After 3 months, 40% (six) dogs had mild to moderate hair regrowth. Biopsies from six dogs showed histological evidence of an increase in anagen hairs and eight dogs had a decrease in epidermal pigmentation. Moderate to marked staining intensity of oestrogen receptor-alpha was noted in all sebaceous gland basal cells, all small hair bulbs and follicular epithelium of telogen hairs. There was no oestrogen receptor-alpha staining of nuclei within the epidermis, apocrine glands or dermal fibroblasts. Large anagen hair bulbs had minimal to no oestrogen receptor staining. Hair regrowth was not associated with a change in oestrogen receptor-alpha staining.

  8. Localization of oestrogen hormone receptors in the reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primers sequence used were the forward and reverse β oestrogen primer which was designed to detect the expression of the gene encoding oestrogen receptor in the reproductive tract of the giant African Land Snail (Archachatina marginata) were: Forward: 5'-GCT TCG AGC TCA GCC TG-3' Reverse: 5'-AGG ATC ATG ...

  9. Oestrogen receptors in tumors of breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, J; Kay, G; Da Fonseca, M [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Department of Nuclear Medicine; Lange, M [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Surgery; De Moor, N G [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Department of Radiation Therapy; Savage, N [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Department of Physiological Chemistry

    1978-04-15

    Oestrogen receptors were measured in the cytoplasmic fraction of tumors from patients with breast cancer. Receptors were detected in 48% of patients, and 52% showed no receptors. A follow-up study of a small group of patients on hormone therapy is reported.

  10. Evaluation of transcriptional activity of the oestrogen receptor with sodium iodide symporter as an imaging reporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul

    2006-10-01

    Oestrogen receptors are ligand-dependent transcription factors whose activity is modulated either by oestrogens or by an alternative signalling pathway. Oestrogen receptors interact via a specific DNA-binding domain, the oestrogen responsive element (ERE), in the promoter region of sensitive genes. This binding leads to an initiation of gene expression and hormonal effects. To determine the transcriptional activity of the oestrogen receptor, we developed a molecular imaging system using sodium iodide symporter (NIS) as a reporter gene. The NIS reporter gene was placed under the control of an artificial ERE derived from pERE-TA-SEAP and named as pERE-NIS. pERE-NIS was transferred to MCF-7, human breast cancer cells, which highly expressed oestrogen receptor-alpha with lipofectamine. Stably expressing cells were generated by selection with G418 for 14 days. After treatment of 17beta-oestradiol and tamoxifen with serial doses, the (125)I uptake was measured for the determination of NIS expression. The inhibition of NIS activity was performed with 50 micromol x l(-1) potassium perchlorate. The MCF7/pERE-NIS treated with 17beta-oestradiol accumulated (125)I up to 70-80% higher than did non-treated cells. NIS expression was increased according to increasing doses of 17beta-oestradiol. MCF7/pERE-NIS treated with tamoxifen also accumulated (125)I up to 50% higher than did non-treated cells. Potassium perchlorate completely inhibited (125)I uptake. When MDA-MB231 cells, the oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells, were transfected with pERE-NIS, (125)I uptake of MDA-MB-231/pERE-NIS did not increase. This pERE-NIS reporter system is sufficiently sensitive for monitoring transcriptional activity of the oestrogen receptor. Therefore, cis-enhancer reporter systems with ERE will be applicable to the development of a novel selective oestrogen receptor modulator with low toxicity and high efficacy.

  11. Breast cancer oestrogen independence mediated by BCAR1 or BCAR3 genes is transmitted through mechanisms distinct from the oestrogen receptor signalling pathway or the epidermal growth factor receptor signalling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorssers, Lambert CJ; Agthoven, Ton van; Brinkman, Arend; Veldscholte, Jos; Smid, Marcel; Dechering, Koen J

    2005-01-01

    Tamoxifen is effective for endocrine treatment of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancers but ultimately fails due to the development of resistance. A functional screen in human breast cancer cells identified two BCAR genes causing oestrogen-independent proliferation. The BCAR1 and BCAR3 genes both encode components of intracellular signal transduction, but their direct effect on breast cancer cell proliferation is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the growth control mediated by these BCAR genes by gene expression profiling. We have measured the expression changes induced by overexpression of the BCAR1 or BCAR3 gene in ZR-75-1 cells and have made direct comparisons with the expression changes after cell stimulation with oestrogen or epidermal growth factor (EGF). A comparison with published gene expression data of cell models and breast tumours is made. Relatively few changes in gene expression were detected in the BCAR-transfected cells, in comparison with the extensive and distinct differences in gene expression induced by oestrogen or EGF. Both BCAR1 and BCAR3 regulate discrete sets of genes in these ZR-75-1-derived cells, indicating that the proliferation signalling proceeds along distinct pathways. Oestrogen-regulated genes in our cell model showed general concordance with reported data of cell models and gene expression association with oestrogen receptor status of breast tumours. The direct comparison of the expression profiles of BCAR transfectants and oestrogen or EGF-stimulated cells strongly suggests that anti-oestrogen-resistant cell proliferation is not caused by alternative activation of the oestrogen receptor or by the epidermal growth factor receptor signalling pathway

  12. Hepatic effects of tartrazine (E 102) after systemic exposure are independent of oestrogen receptor interactions in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Stephanie K.; Probert, Philip M.E.; Lakey, Anne F.; Axon, Andrew R.; Leitch, Alistair C.; Williams, Faith M.; Jowsey, Paul A.; Blain, Peter G.; Kass, George E.N.; Wright, Matthew C.

    2017-01-01

    Tartrazine is a food colour that activates the transcriptional function of the human oestrogen receptor alpha in an in vitro cell model. Since oestrogens are cholestatic, we hypothesised tartrazine will cause periportal injury to the liver in vivo. To test this hypothesis, tartrazine was initially administered systemically to mice resulting in a periportal recruitment of inflammatory cells, increased serum alkaline phosphatase activity and mild periportal fibrosis. To determine whether an oes...

  13. Immunohistochemical assessment of oestrogen and progesterone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabau, D A; Thorpe, S M; Knoop, A

    2000-01-01

    Two different methods to determine steroid receptors were analysed with respect to their ability to estimate prognosis in primary breast cancer patients. The immunohistochemical assay (IHA) was compared with the dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) method of receptor determination. A random sample of 28...... distinction between benign and malignant tissue is possible using the IHAmethod. Thus, IHAresults appear to be more clinically relevant....

  14. Hepatic effects of tartrazine (E 102) after systemic exposure are independent of oestrogen receptor interactions in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stephanie K; Probert, Philip M E; Lakey, Anne F; Axon, Andrew R; Leitch, Alistair C; Williams, Faith M; Jowsey, Paul A; Blain, Peter G; Kass, George E N; Wright, Matthew C

    2017-05-05

    Tartrazine is a food colour that activates the transcriptional function of the human oestrogen receptor alpha in an in vitro cell model. Since oestrogens are cholestatic, we hypothesised tartrazine will cause periportal injury to the liver in vivo. To test this hypothesis, tartrazine was initially administered systemically to mice resulting in a periportal recruitment of inflammatory cells, increased serum alkaline phosphatase activity and mild periportal fibrosis. To determine whether an oestrogenic effect may be a key event in this response, tartrazine, sulphonated metabolites and a food additive contaminant were screened for their ability to interact with murine oestrogen receptors. In all cases, there were no interactions as agonists or antagonists and further, no oestrogenicity was observed with tartrazine in an in vivo uterine growth assay. To examine the relevance of the hepatic effects of tartrazine to its use as a food additive, tartrazine was orally administered to transgenic NF-κB-Luc mice. Pre- and concurrent oral treatment with alcohol was incorporated given its potential to promote gut permeability and hepatic inflammation. Tartrazine alone induced NF- κB activities in the colon and liver but there was no periportal recruitment of inflammatory cells or fibrosis. Tartrazine, its sulphonated metabolites and the contaminant inhibited sulphotransferase activities in murine hepatic S9 extracts. Given the role of sulfotransferases in bile acid excretion, the initiating event giving rise to periportal inflammation and subsequent hepatic pathology through systemic tartrazine exposure is therefore potentially associated an inhibition of bile acid sulphation and excretion and not on oestrogen receptor-mediated transcriptional function. However, these effects were restricted to systemic exposures to tartrazine and did not occur to any significant effect after oral exposure. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of Aromatase Expression in the Adult Male and Female Mouse Brain. I. Coexistence with Oestrogen Receptors α and β, and Androgen Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanić, Davor; Dubois, Sydney; Chua, Hui Kheng; Tonge, Bruce; Rinehart, Nicole; Horne, Malcolm K.; Boon, Wah Chin

    2014-01-01

    Aromatase catalyses the last step of oestrogen synthesis. There is growing evidence that local oestrogens influence many brain regions to modulate brain development and behaviour. We examined, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of aromatase in the adult male and female mouse brain, using mice in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) is transcribed following the physiological activation of the Cyp19A1 gene. EGFP-immunoreactive processes were distributed in many brain regions, including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, olfactory tubercle, medial amygdaloid nucleus and medial preoptic area, with the densest distributions of EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. Differences between male and female mice were apparent, with the density of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres being lower in some brain regions of female mice, including the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus, lateral septum, medial amygdala and hypothalamus co-expressed oestrogen receptor (ER) α and β, or the androgen receptor (AR), although single-labelled EGFP-positive cells were also identified. Additionally, single-labelled ERα−, ERβ- or AR-positive cell bodies often appeared to be surrounded by EGFP-immunoreactive nerve fibres/terminals. The widespread distribution of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres suggests that aromatase signalling is common in the mouse brain, and that locally synthesised brain oestrogens could mediate biological effects by activating pre- and post-synaptic oestrogen α and β receptors, and androgen receptors. The higher number of EGFP-positive cells in male mice may indicate that the autocrine and paracrine effects of oestrogens are more prominent in males than females. PMID:24646567

  16. The role of oestrogen receptor {alpha} in human thyroid cancer: contributions from coregulatory proteins and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, and molecular studies suggest a role for oestrogen in thyroid cancer. How oestrogen mediates its effects and the consequence of it on clinical outcome has not been fully elucidated. The participation of coregulatory proteins in modulating oestrogen receptor (ER) function and input of crosstalk with the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 was investigated. Oestrogen induced cell proliferation in the follicular thyroid cancer (FTC)-133 cells, but not in the anaplastic 8305C cell line. Knockdown of the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1 inhibited FTC-133 basal, but not oestrogen induced, cell proliferation. Oestrogen also increased protein expression of SRC-1 and the ER target gene cyclin D1 in the FTC-133 cell line. ERalpha, ERbeta, the coregulatory proteins SRC-1 and nuclear corepressor (NCoR), and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 were localised by immunohistochemistry and immnofluorescence in paraffin-embedded tissue from thyroid tumour patients (n=111). ERalpha was colocalised with both SRC-1 and NCoR to the nuclei of the tumour epithelial cells. Expression of ERalpha and NCoR was found predominantly in non-anaplastic tumours and was significantly associated with well-differentiated tumours and reduced incidence of disease recurrence. In non-anaplastic tumours, HER2 was significantly associated with SRC-1, and these proteins were associated with poorly differentiated tumours, capsular invasion and disease recurrence. Totally, 87% of anaplastic tumours were positive for SRC-1. Kaplan-Meier estimates of disease-free survival indicated that in thyroid cancer, SRC-1 strongly correlates with reduced disease-free survival (P<0.001), whereas NCoR predicted increased survival (P<0.001). These data suggest opposing roles for the coregulators SRC-1 and NCoR in thyroid tumour progression.

  17. Tartrazine and sunset yellow are xenoestrogens in a new screening assay to identify modulators of human oestrogen receptor transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axon, Andrew; May, Felicity E.B.; Gaughan, Luke E.; Williams, Faith M.; Blain, Peter G.; Wright, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a cholestatic liver disease of unknown cause that occurs most frequently in post-menopausal women. Since the female sex hormone oestrogen can be cholestatic, we hypothesised that PBC may be triggered in part by chronic exposure to xenoestrogens (which may be more active on a background of low endogenous oestrogen levels seen in post-menopausal women). A reporter gene construct employing a synthetic oestrogen response element predicted to specifically interact with oestrogen receptors (ER) was constructed. Co-transfection of this reporter into an ER null cell line with a variety of nuclear receptor expression constructs indicated that the reporter gene was trans-activated by ERα and ERβ, but not by the androgen, thyroid, progesterone, glucocorticoid or vitamin D receptors. Chemicals linked to PBC were then screened for xenoestrogen activity in the human ERα-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Using this assay, the coal-derived food and cosmetic colourings – sunset yellow and tartrazine – were identified as novel human ERα activators, activating the human ER with an EC 50% concentration of 220 and 160 nM, respectively.

  18. Tartrazine and sunset yellow are xenoestrogens in a new screening assay to identify modulators of human oestrogen receptor transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axon, Andrew; May, Felicity E B; Gaughan, Luke E; Williams, Faith M; Blain, Peter G; Wright, Matthew C

    2012-08-16

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a cholestatic liver disease of unknown cause that occurs most frequently in post-menopausal women. Since the female sex hormone oestrogen can be cholestatic, we hypothesised that PBC may be triggered in part by chronic exposure to xenoestrogens (which may be more active on a background of low endogenous oestrogen levels seen in post-menopausal women). A reporter gene construct employing a synthetic oestrogen response element predicted to specifically interact with oestrogen receptors (ER) was constructed. Co-transfection of this reporter into an ER null cell line with a variety of nuclear receptor expression constructs indicated that the reporter gene was trans-activated by ERα and ERβ, but not by the androgen, thyroid, progesterone, glucocorticoid or vitamin D receptors. Chemicals linked to PBC were then screened for xenoestrogen activity in the human ERα-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Using this assay, the coal-derived food and cosmetic colourings--sunset yellow and tartrazine--were identified as novel human ERα activators, activating the human ER with an EC(50%) concentration of 220 and 160 nM, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of oestrogens and their receptors on cardiometabolic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Santos, Roberta S; Criollo, Alfredo; Nelson, Michael D; Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of mortality in developed countries. The incidence of CVD is sexually dimorphic, and research has focused on the contribution of sex steroids to the development and progression of the cardiometabolic syndrome, which is defined as a clustering of interrelated risk factors that promote the development of atherosclerosis (which can lead to CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Data are inconclusive as to how sex steroids and their respective receptors increase or suppress the risk of developing the cardiometabolic syndrome and thus CVD. In this Review, we discuss the potential role, or roles, of sex hormones in cardiometabolic health by first focusing on the influence of oestrogens and their receptors on the risk of developing cardiometabolic syndrome and CVD. We also highlight what is known about testosterone and its potential role in protecting against the development of the cardiometabolic syndrome and CVD. Given the inconclusive nature of the data regarding the direct effects of each sex hormone, we advocate and highlight the importance of studying the relative levels and the ratio of sex hormones to each other, as well as the use of cross sex hormone therapy and its effect on cardiometabolic health.

  20. Phyto-oestrogens and breast cancer chemoprevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limer, Jane L; Speirs, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenol compounds of plant origin that exhibit a structural similarity to the mammalian steroid hormone 17β-oestradiol. In Asian nations the staple consumption of phyto-oestrogen-rich foodstuffs correlates with a reduced incidence of breast cancer. Human dietary intervention trials have noted a direct relationship between phyto-oestrogen ingestion and a favourable hormonal profile associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, these studies failed to ascertain the precise effect of dietary phyto-oestrogens on the proliferation of mammary tissue. Epidemiological and rodent studies crucially suggest that breast cancer chemoprevention by dietary phyto-oestrogen compounds is dependent on ingestion before puberty, when the mammary gland is relatively immature. Phyto-oestrogen supplements are commercially marketed for use by postmenopausal women as natural and safe alternatives to hormone replacement therapy. Of current concern is the effect of phyto-oestrogen compounds on the growth of pre-existing breast tumours. Data are contradictory, with cell culture studies reporting both the oestrogenic stimulation of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines and the antagonism of tamoxifen activity at physiological phyto-oestrogen concentrations. Conversely, phyto-oestrogen ingestion by rodents is associated with the development of less aggressive breast tumours with reduced metastatic potential. Despite the present ambiguity, current data do suggest a potential benefit from use of phyto-oestrogens in breast cancer chemoprevention and therapy. These aspects are discussed

  1. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci...

  2. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); G.A. Mendoza-Fandino (Gustavo A.); S. Nord (Silje); J. Lilyquist (Janna); C. Olswold (Curtis); B. Hallberg (Boubou); S. Agata (Simona); H. Ahsan (Habibul); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C.B. Ambrosone (Christine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); V. Arndt (Volker); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Barile (Monica); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. Beckmann (Lars); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); J. Benítez (Javier); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); S.S. Buys (Saundra S.); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M.A. Caligo (Maria); F. Canzian (Federico); T.A. Carpenter (Adrian); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S.J. Chanock (Stephen J.); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); K. Czene (Kamila); M.B. Daly (Mary B.); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Devilee (Peter); O. Díez (Orland); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); M. Dumont (Martine); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); A.B. Ekici (Arif); H. Eliassen (Heather); S.D. Ellis (Steve); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Försti (Asta); F. Fostira (Florentia); W.D. Foulkes (William); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); M. Gabrielson (Marike); M. Gammon (Marilie); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); J. Garber (Judy); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.A. Gayther (Simon); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); G.G. Giles (Graham); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); A. González-Neira (Anna); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); J. Gronwald (Jacek); P. Guénel (Pascal); M.J. Gunter (Marc J.); L. Haeberle (Lothar); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Healey (Sue); T. Heikkinen (Tuomas); B.E. Henderson (Brian); J. Herzog (Josef); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); R.N. Hoover (Robert); J.L. Hopper (John); K. Humphreys (Keith); D. Hunter (David); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny N.); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. James (Margaret); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); U.B. Jensen; E.M. John (Esther); M. Jones (Michael); M. Kabisch (Maria); S. Kar (Siddhartha); B.Y. Karlan (Beth Y.); S. Khan (Sofia); K.T. Khaw; M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); J.A. Knight (Julia); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A. Kwong (Ava); Y. Laitman (Yael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Lazaro (Conxi); E. Lee (Eunjung); L. Le Marchand (Loic); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A. Lindblom (Annika); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); J. Liu (Jianjun); J. Long (Jirong); J. Lubinski (Jan); P.L. Mai (Phuong); E. Makalic (Enes); K.E. Malone (Kathleen E.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); S. Margolin (Sara); F. Marme (Federick); J.W.M. Martens (John); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Meindl (Alfons); A. Miller (Austin); R.L. Milne (Roger); P. Miron (Penelope); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); R. Nussbaum (Robert); K. Offit (Kenneth); E. Olah; O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); J.E. Olson (Janet); A. Osorio (Ana); S.K. Park (Sue K.); P.H.M. Peeters; B. Peissel (Bernard); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Peto (Julian); C. Phelan (Catherine); R. Pilarski (Robert); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); N. Rahman (Nazneen); J. Rantala (Johanna); C. Rappaport (Christine); G. Rennert (Gad); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M. Robson (Mark); I. Romieu (Isabelle); A. Rudolph (Anja); E.J.T. Rutgers (Emiel); M.-J. Sanchez (Maria-Jose); R. Santella (Regina); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); D.F. Schmidt (Daniel); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); R.J. Scott (Rodney); L. Senter (Leigha); P. Sharma (Priyanka); J. Simard (Jacques); C.F. Singer (Christian); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); P. Soucy (Penny); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Steinemann (Doris); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (Marie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); C. Szabo (Csilla); R. Tamimi (Rulla); W. Tapper (William); P.J. Teixeira; S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); D. Thompson (Deborah); L. Tihomirova (Laima); A.E. Toland (Amanda); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); T. Truong (Thérèse); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); A. Teulé (A.); R. Tumino (Rosario); N. Tung (Nadine); C. Turnbull (Clare); G. Ursin (Giski); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); E. Weiderpass (Elisabete); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); A.S. Whittemore (Alice S.); H. Wildiers (Hans); R. Winqvist (Robert); X.R. Yang (Xiaohong R.); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); S. Yao (Song); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); W. Zheng (Wei); P. Hall (Per); P. Kraft (Peter); C. Vachon (Celine); S. Slager (Susan); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); A.A.N. Monteiro (Alvaro A. N.); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCommon variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10-8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative

  3. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci,

  4. Prediction of in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor activity using hierarchical clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, hierarchical clustering classification models were developed to predict in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor (ER) activity. Classification models were developed for binding, agonist, and antagonist in vitro ER activity and for mouse in vivo uterotrophic ER bindi...

  5. Oestrogen, an evolutionary conserved regulator of T cell differentiation and immune tolerance in jawed vertebrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiola, Matthieu; Knigge, Thomas; Duflot, Aurélie; Pinto, Patricia I S; Farcy, Emilie; Monsinjon, Tiphaine

    2018-07-01

    In teleosts, as in mammals, the immune system is tightly regulated by sexual steroid hormones, such as oestrogens. We investigated the effects of 17β-oestradiol on the expression of several genes related to T cell development and resulting T cell subpopulations in sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, for a primary lymphoid organ, the thymus, and two secondary lymphoid organs, the head-kidney and the spleen. In parallel, the oxidative burst capacity was assessed in leucocytes of the secondary lymphoid organs. Apoptosis- and proliferation-related genes, indicative of B and T cell clonal selection and lymphoid progenitor activity, were not affected by elevated oestrogen-levels. Sex-related oestrogen-responsiveness in T cell and antigen-presenting cell markers was observed, the expression of which was differentially induced by oestrogen-exposure in the three lymphoid organs. Remarkably, in the spleen, oestrogen increased regulatory T cell-related gene expression was associated with a decrease in oxidative burst capacity. To the best of our knowledge, this study indicates for the first time that physiological levels of oestrogen are likely to promote immune tolerance by modulating thymic function (i.e., T cell development and output) and peripheral T cells in teleosts, similar to previously reported oestrogenic effects in mammals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Colocalization of corticotropin-releasing hormone and oestrogen receptor-alpha in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus in mood disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, Ai-Min; Hestiantoro, Andon; van Someren, Eus J. W.; Swaab, Dick F.; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2005-01-01

    Oestrogens may modulate the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The present study was to investigate whether the activity of the HPA axis in mood disorders might be directly modulated by oestrogens via oestrogen receptors (ORs) in the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)

  7. Zinc presence in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and its correlation with oestrogen receptor status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquharson, M J [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L8 (Canada); Al-Ebraheem, A [Department of Radiography, City Community and Health Sciences, City University, London, EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Geraki, K [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Leek, R; Jubb, A; Harris, A L [Cancer Research UK, Oxford Cancer Centre, Molecular Oncology Laboratories, University of Oxford, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, 0X3 9DS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: farquhm@mcmaster.ca

    2009-07-07

    Zinc is known to play an important role in many cellular processes, and the levels of zinc are controlled by specific transporters from the ZIP (SLC39A) influx transporter group and the ZnT (SLC30A) efflux transporter group. The distribution of zinc was measured in 59 samples of invasive ductal carcinoma of breast using synchrotron radiation micro probe x-ray fluorescence facilities. The samples were formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue micro arrays (TMAs) enabling a high throughput of samples and allowing us to correlate the distribution of trace metals with tumour cell distribution and, for the first time, important biological variables. The samples were divided into two classes, 34 oestrogen receptor positive (ER+ve) and 25 oestrogen receptor negative (ER-ve) based on quantitative immunohistochemistry assessment. The overall levels of zinc (i.e. in tumour and surrounding tissue) in the ER+ve samples were on average 60% higher than those in the ER-ve samples. The zinc levels were higher in the ER+ve tumour areas compared to the ER-ve tumour areas with the mean levels in the ER+ve samples being approximately 80% higher than the mean ER-ve levels. However, the non-tumour tissue regions of the samples contained on average the same levels of zinc in both types of breast cancers. The relative levels of zinc in tumour areas of the tissue were compared with levels in areas of non-tumour surrounding tissue. There was a significant increase in zinc in the tumour regions of the ER+ve samples compared to the surrounding regions (P < 0.001) and a non-significant increase in the ER-ve samples. When comparing the increase in zinc in the tumour regions expressed as a percentage of the surrounding non-tumour tissue zinc level in the same sample, a significant difference between the ER+ve and ER-ve samples was found (P < 0.01)

  8. Zinc presence in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and its correlation with oestrogen receptor status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farquharson, M J; Al-Ebraheem, A; Geraki, K; Leek, R; Jubb, A; Harris, A L

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is known to play an important role in many cellular processes, and the levels of zinc are controlled by specific transporters from the ZIP (SLC39A) influx transporter group and the ZnT (SLC30A) efflux transporter group. The distribution of zinc was measured in 59 samples of invasive ductal carcinoma of breast using synchrotron radiation micro probe x-ray fluorescence facilities. The samples were formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue micro arrays (TMAs) enabling a high throughput of samples and allowing us to correlate the distribution of trace metals with tumour cell distribution and, for the first time, important biological variables. The samples were divided into two classes, 34 oestrogen receptor positive (ER+ve) and 25 oestrogen receptor negative (ER-ve) based on quantitative immunohistochemistry assessment. The overall levels of zinc (i.e. in tumour and surrounding tissue) in the ER+ve samples were on average 60% higher than those in the ER-ve samples. The zinc levels were higher in the ER+ve tumour areas compared to the ER-ve tumour areas with the mean levels in the ER+ve samples being approximately 80% higher than the mean ER-ve levels. However, the non-tumour tissue regions of the samples contained on average the same levels of zinc in both types of breast cancers. The relative levels of zinc in tumour areas of the tissue were compared with levels in areas of non-tumour surrounding tissue. There was a significant increase in zinc in the tumour regions of the ER+ve samples compared to the surrounding regions (P < 0.001) and a non-significant increase in the ER-ve samples. When comparing the increase in zinc in the tumour regions expressed as a percentage of the surrounding non-tumour tissue zinc level in the same sample, a significant difference between the ER+ve and ER-ve samples was found (P < 0.01).

  9. Tumour nuclear oestrogen receptor beta 1 correlates inversely with parathyroid tumour weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Pernow, Ylva; Norenstedt, Sophie; Dinets, Andrii; Larsson, Catharina; Hartman, Johan; Höög, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrinopathy, frequently caused by a parathyroid adenoma, rarely by a parathyroid carcinoma that lacks effective oncological treatment. As the majority of cases are present in postmenopausal women, oestrogen signalling has been implicated in the tumourigenesis. Oestrogen receptor beta 1 (ERB1) and ERB2 have been recently identified in parathyroid adenomas, the former inducing genes coupled to tumour apoptosis. We applied immunohistochemistry and slide digitalisation to quantify nuclear ERB1 and ERB2 in 172 parathyroid adenomas, atypical adenomas and carcinomas, and ten normal parathyroid glands. All the normal parathyroid glands expressed ERB1 and ERB2. The majority of tumours expressed ERB1 (70.6%) at varying intensities, and ERB2 (96.5%) at strong intensities. Parathyroid carcinomas expressed ERB1 in three out of six cases and ERB2 in five out of six cases. The intensity of tumour nuclear ERB1 staining significantly correlated inversely with tumour weight (P=0.011), and patients whose tumours were classified as ERB1-negative had significantly greater tumour weight as well as higher serum calcium (P=0.002) and parathyroid hormone levels (P=0.003). Additionally, tumour nuclear ERB1 was not expressed differentially with respect to sex or age of the patient. Levels of tumour nuclear ERB2 did not correlate with clinical characteristics. In conclusion, decreased ERB1 immunoreactivity is associated with increased tumour weight in parathyroid adenomas. Given the previously reported correlation with tumour-suppressive signalling, selective oestrogen receptor modulation (SERMs) may play a role in the treatment of parathyroid carcinomas. Future studies of SERMs and oestrogen treatment in PHPT should consider tumour weight as a potential factor in pharmacological responsiveness. © 2015 The authors.

  10. Enzyme immunoassay of oestrogen receptors in needle biopsies from human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, U; Andersen, J; Poulsen, H S

    1991-01-01

    For quantitative assessments of sex hormone receptors in liver tissue, ligand binding assays are inconvenient, as they require large biopsies (0.5-1.0 g). The present study shows that it is possible to measure oestrogen receptors (ER) quantitatively in needle biopsy specimens as small as 10 mg...... by modifications of a commercial enzyme immunoassay employing monoclonal antibodies. Sucrose gradient centrifugation and the dextran charcoal method served as reference methods. A consecutive series of needle biopsies from patients suspected of liver disease were investigated. The biopsies (n = 37) had a median...

  11. The oestrogen receptor alpha-regulated lncRNA NEAT1 is a critical modulator of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakravarty, Dimple; Sboner, Andrea; Nair, Sujit S; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Li, Ruohan; Hennig, Sven; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Pauwels, Jonathan; Park, Kyung; Kossai, Myriam; MacDonald, Theresa Y; Fontugne, Jacqueline; Erho, Nicholas; Vergara, Ismael A; Ghadessi, Mercedeh; Davicioni, Elai; Jenkins, Robert B; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Chen, Zhengming; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Hirose, Tetsuro; Bander, Neil H; Beltran, Himisha; Fox, Archa H; Elemento, Olivier; Rubin, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in establishing an oncogenic cascade that drives prostate cancer progression. Some prostate cancers escape androgen dependence and are often associated with an aggressive phenotype. The oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is expressed in prostate cancers,

  12. Partial and weak oestrogenicity of the red wine constituent resveratrol: consideration of its superagonist activity in MCF-7 cells and its suggested cardiovascular protective effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, J; Tinwell, H; Pennie, W; Brooks, A N; Lefevre, P A; Beresford, N; Sumpter, J P

    1999-01-01

    It was recently reported that the red wine phytoestrogen resveratrol (RES) acts as a superagonist to oestrogen-responsive MCF-7 cells. This activity of RES was speculated to be relevant to the 'French paradox' in which moderate red wine consumption is reported to yield cardiovascular health benefits to humans. We report here that RES binds to oestrogen receptors (ER) isolated from rat uterus with an affinity approximately 5 orders of magnitude lower than does either the reference synthetic oestrogen diethylstilboestrol (DES) or oestradiol (E2). In comparison with E2 or DES, RES is only a weak and partial agonist in a yeast hER-alpha transcription assay and in cos-1 cell assays employing transient transfections of ER-alpha or ER-beta associated with two different ER-response elements. Resveratrol was also concluded to be inactive in immature rat uterotrophic assays conducted using three daily administrations of 0.03-120 mgkg(-1)/day(-1) RES (administered by either oral gavage or subcutaneous injection). These data weaken the suggestion that the oestrogenicity of RES may account for the reported cardiovascular protective effects of red wine consumption, and they raise questions regarding the extent to which oestrogenicity data derived for a chemical using MCF-7 cells (or any other single in vitro assay) can be used to predict the hormonal effects likely to occur in animals or humans.

  13. Oestrogen receptor α gene haplotype and postmenopausal breast cancer risk: a case control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedrén, Sara; Stiger, Fredrik; Persson, Ingemar; Baron, John; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Lovmar, Lovisa; Humphreys, Keith; Magnusson, Cecilia; Melhus, Håkan; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Kindmark, Andreas; Landegren, Ulf; Fermér, Maria Lagerström

    2004-01-01

    Oestrogen receptor α, which mediates the effect of oestrogen in target tissues, is genetically polymorphic. Because breast cancer development is dependent on oestrogenic influence, we have investigated whether polymorphisms in the oestrogen receptor α gene (ESR1) are associated with breast cancer risk. We genotyped breast cancer cases and age-matched population controls for one microsatellite marker and four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ESR1. The numbers of genotyped cases and controls for each marker were as follows: TA n , 1514 cases and 1514 controls; c.454-397C → T, 1557 cases and 1512 controls; c.454-351A → G, 1556 cases and 1512 controls; c.729C → T, 1562 cases and 1513 controls; c.975C → G, 1562 cases and 1513 controls. Using logistic regression models, we calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Haplotype effects were estimated in an exploratory analysis, using expectation-maximisation algorithms for case-control study data. There were no compelling associations between single polymorphic loci and breast cancer risk. In haplotype analyses, a common haplotype of the c.454-351A → G or c.454-397C → T and c.975C → G SNPs appeared to be associated with an increased risk for ductal breast cancer: one copy of the c.454-351A → G and c.975C → G haplotype entailed an OR of 1.19 (95% CI 1.06–1.33) and two copies with an OR of 1.42 (95% CI 1.15–1.77), compared with no copies, under a model of multiplicative penetrance. The association with the c.454-397C → T and c.975C → G haplotypes was similar. Our data indicated that these haplotypes were more influential in women with a high body mass index. Adjustment for multiple comparisons rendered the associations statistically non-significant. We found suggestions of an association between common haplotypes in ESR1 and the risk for ductal breast cancer that is stronger in heavy women

  14. Biodistribution and dosimetry of iodine-123-labelled Z-MIVE: an oestrogen receptor radioligand for breast cancer imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijks, L. J.; Busemann Sokole, E.; Stabin, M. G.; de Bruin, K.; Janssen, A. G.; van Royen, E. A.

    1998-01-01

    This study reports on the distribution and radiation dosimetry of iodine-123-labelled cis-11beta-methoxy-17alpha-iodovinyloestradiol (Z-[123I]MIVE), a promising radioligand for imaging of oestrogen receptors (ERs) in human breast cancer. Whole-body scans were performed up to 24 h after intravenous

  15. Oestrogen and progesterone receptor assays in breast tumours. The Prince Henry's Hospital experience, 1983-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, P T; Myles, K M; Funder, J W

    1993-08-16

    To present and analyse the results of eight years of experience (1983-1990) in breast tumour receptor analysis. All female primary breast tumour samples received (4683) were analysed for seasonal variation, patient age, relative risk index, oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status, ER and PR status as a function of age, ER and PR levels as a function of age, and ER and PR levels as a function of month of analysis. The assays were done at the Medical Research Centre, Prince Henry's Hospital, Melbourne, as a non-profit service to surgeons, oncologists and pathologists. The numbers of samples referred for assay increased progressively each year, from 473 in 1983 to 1097 in 1990, but the receptor status (ER +/-, PR +/-) appeared not to vary from year to year. ER+PR+ tumours were the most common in all age groups, steadily increasing from between 50% and 60% in premenopausal women to 70% or more in those aged over 80. In postmenopausal women, levels of ER in ER+ tumours were three times those in premenopausal women; PR levels in PR+ tumours, however, were bimodal, with higher levels in the age groups 35-49 and 70-89 years than in women aged 50-69 years. No significant seasonal variation was seen, and the overall patterns of receptor status are similar to those seen in Northern hemisphere studies.

  16. Cell life and death in the anterior pituitary gland: role of oestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seilicovich, A

    2010-07-01

    Apoptotic processes play an important role in the maintenance of cell numbers in the anterior pituitary gland during physiological endocrine events. In this review, we summarise the regulation of apoptosis of anterior pituitary cells, particularly lactotrophs, somatotrophs and gonadotrophs, and analyse the possible mechanisms involved in oestrogen-induced apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells. Oestrogens exert apoptotic actions in several cell types and act as modulators of pituitary cell renewal, sensitising cells to both mitogenic and apoptotic signals. Local synthesis of growth factors and cytokines induced by oestradiol as well as changes in phenotypic features that enhance the responsiveness of anterior pituitary cells to pro-apoptotic factors may account for cyclical apoptotic activity in anterior pituitary cells during the oestrous cycle. Considering that tissue homeostasis results from a balance between cell proliferation and death and that mechanisms involved in apoptosis are tightly regulated, defects in cell death processes could have a considerable physiopathological impact.

  17. Role of Oestrogen α Receptors in Sociosexual Behaviour in Female Rats Housed in a Seminatural Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeren, E M S; Antonio-Cabrera, E; Spiteri, T; Musatov, S; Ogawa, S; Pfaff, D W; Ågmo, A

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the role of oestrogen receptor (ER)α in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN), the preoptic area (POA), the medial amygdala (MePD) and the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST) in sociosexual behaviour in female rats. This was conducted in two sets of experiments, with the VMN and POA investigated in the first set, and the MePD and BNST in the second set. The VMN and POA received intense projections from the MePD and BNST. We used a short hairpin RNA encoded within an adeno-associated viral vector directed against the gene for ERα to reduce the number of ERα in the VMN or POA (first set of experiments) or in the BNST or MePD (second set of experiments) in female rats. The rats were housed in groups of four ovariectomised females and three males in a seminatural environment for 8 days. Compared with traditional test set-ups, the seminatural environment provides an arena in which the rats can express their full behavioural repertoire, which allowed us to investigate multiple aspects of social and sexual behaviour in groups of rats. Behavioural observation was performed after oestrogen and progesterone injections. A reduction of ERα expression in the VMN or POA diminished the display of paracopulatory behaviours and lordosis responses compared to controls, whereas the lordosis quotient remained unaffected. This suggests that ERα in the VMN and POA play an important role in intrinsic sexual motivation. The reduction in ERα did not affect the social behaviour of the females, although the males sniffed and pursued the females with reduced ERα less than the controls. This suggests that the ERα in the VMN and POA is involved in the regulation of sexual attractiveness of females. The ERα in the MePD and BNST, on the other hand, plays no role in sociosexual behaviour. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  18. The oestrogen receptor alpha-regulated lncRNA NEAT1 is a critical modulator of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Dimple; Sboner, Andrea; Nair, Sujit S.; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Li, Ruohan; Hennig, Sven; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Pauwels, Jonathan; Park, Kyung; Kossai, Myriam; MacDonald, Theresa Y.; Fontugne, Jacqueline; Erho, Nicholas; Vergara, Ismael A.; Ghadessi, Mercedeh; Davicioni, Elai; Jenkins, Robert B.; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Chen, Zhengming; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Hirose, Tetsuro; Bander, Neil H.; Beltran, Himisha; Fox, Archa H.; Elemento, Olivier; Rubin, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in establishing an oncogenic cascade that drives prostate cancer progression. Some prostate cancers escape androgen dependence and are often associated with an aggressive phenotype. The oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is expressed in prostate cancers, independent of AR status. However, the role of ERα remains elusive. Using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and RNA-sequencing data, we identified an ERα-specific non-coding transcriptome signature. Among putatively ERα-regulated intergenic long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), we identified nuclear enriched abundant transcript 1 (NEAT1) as the most significantly overexpressed lncRNA in prostate cancer. Analysis of two large clinical cohorts also revealed that NEAT1 expression is associated with prostate cancer progression. Prostate cancer cells expressing high levels of NEAT1 were recalcitrant to androgen or AR antagonists. Finally, we provide evidence that NEAT1 drives oncogenic growth by altering the epigenetic landscape of target gene promoters to favour transcription. PMID:25415230

  19. Oestrogen receptors in breast tumours: associations with age, menopausal status and epidemiological and clinical features in 735 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, J M; Godolphin, W

    1980-11-01

    Comparisons between oestrogen-receptor (RE)-positive or negative patients were made on a continuous series of 735 patients with primary breast tumours seen at the major treatment centre in British Columbia between 1975 and 1978. RE positivity was commoner in older patients, and was not associated with menopausal status independently of age. The concentration of receptor protein also increased with increasing age, but was not affected by menopausal status. Neither RE status nor quantity was associated with any of the epidemiological risk factors studied, which included parity, age at first birth, weight, family history and exposure to oestrogenic drugs and oral contraceptives. Patients with RE- tumours were more likely to present with symptoms other than a breast lump, pain or nipple inversion, and had less-differentiated tumours; they did not differ from RE+ patients in terms of stage, size of tumour, or interval from first symptom. These findings are discussed in terms of the biological origin and determinants of oestrogen receptors.

  20. Targeting tumour re-wiring by triple blockade of mTORC1, epidermal growth factor, and oestrogen receptor signalling pathways in endocrine-resistant breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Ricardo; Pancholi, Sunil; Rani, Aradhana; Schuster, Eugene; Guest, Stephanie K; Nikitorowicz-Buniak, Joanna; Simigdala, Nikiana; Thornhill, Allan; Avogadri-Connors, Francesca; Cutler, Richard E; Lalani, Alshad S; Dowsett, Mitch; Johnston, Stephen R; Martin, Lesley-Ann

    2018-06-08

    Endocrine therapies are the mainstay of treatment for oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive (ER + ) breast cancer (BC). However, resistance remains problematic largely due to enhanced cross-talk between ER and growth factor pathways, circumventing the need for steroid hormones. Previously, we reported the anti-proliferative effect of everolimus (RAD001-mTORC1 inhibitor) with endocrine therapy in resistance models; however, potential routes of escape from treatment via ERBB2/3 signalling were observed. We hypothesised that combined targeting of three cellular nodes (ER, ERBB, and mTORC1) may provide enhanced long-term clinical utility. A panel of ER + BC cell lines adapted to long-term oestrogen deprivation (LTED) and expressing ESR1 wt or ESR1 Y537S , modelling acquired resistance to an aromatase-inhibitor (AI), were treated in vitro with a combination of RAD001 and neratinib (pan-ERBB inhibitor) in the presence or absence of oestradiol (E2), tamoxifen (4-OHT), or fulvestrant (ICI182780). End points included proliferation, cell signalling, cell cycle, and effect on ER-mediated transactivation. An in-vivo model of AI resistance was treated with monotherapies and combinations to assess the efficacy in delaying tumour progression. RNA-seq analysis was performed to identify changes in global gene expression as a result of the indicated therapies. Here, we show RAD001 and neratinib (pan-ERBB inhibitor) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in proliferation, irrespective of the ESR1 mutation status. The combination of either agent with endocrine therapy further reduced proliferation but the maximum effect was observed with a triple combination of RAD001, neratinib, and endocrine therapy. In the absence of oestrogen, RAD001 caused a reduction in ER-mediated transcription in the majority of the cell lines, which associated with a decrease in recruitment of ER to an oestrogen-response element on the TFF1 promoter. Contrastingly, neratinib increased both ER

  1. Oestrogen receptor beta isoform expression in sporadic colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis and progressive stages of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevanato Filho, Paulo Roberto; Aguiar Júnior, Samuel; Begnami, Maria Dirlei

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the sex hormones, oestrogen may play a role in colorectal cancer, particularly in conjunction with oestrogen receptor-β (ERβ). The expression of ERβ isoform variants and their correlations with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) syndrome and sporadic colorectal carcinomas...... was identified in sporadic polyps and in sporadic colorectal cancer as well as in polyps from FAP syndrome patients compared with normal tissues (p expression in polyps (p ..., no differences were observed when sporadic colorectal carcinomas were compared to normal mucosa tissues. These findings suggest an association of the ERβ isoform variants in individuals affected by germline mutations of the APC gene. Progressively decreased expression of ERβ was found in polyps at early stages...

  2. Oestrogen receptors, nodes and stage as predictors of post-recurrence survival in 457 breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, L L; Godolphin, W; Spinelli, J J

    1987-12-01

    The relationship to survival after first recurrence of oestrogen receptor (ER), nodal status and TNM stage at diagnosis, and treatment for advanced disease was studied in 457 females whose primary breast cancer was diagnosed in 1975 to 1981. Receptor concentration was the most important predictor of post-recurrence survival, with some additional information conveyed by nodal status. ER predicted survival after recurrence independently of nodal status, clinical stage or mode of therapy. Response to endocrine therapy is only a facet of the generally favourable prognosis of ER positive patients, rather than the sole explanation.

  3. Rapid effects of phytoestrogens on human colonic smooth muscle are mediated by oestrogen receptor beta.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have correlated consumption of dietary phytoestrogens with beneficial effects on colon, breast and prostate cancers. Genomic and non-genomic mechanisms are responsible for anti-carcinogenic effects but, until now, the effect on human colon was assumed to be passive and remote. No direct effect on human colonic smooth muscle has previously been described. Institutional research board approval was granted. Histologically normal colon was obtained from the proximal resection margin of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended under 1g of tension in organ baths containing oxygenated Krebs solution at 37 degrees C. After an equilibration period, tissues were exposed to diarylpropionitrile (DPN) (ER beta agonist) and 1,3,5-tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-propyl-1H-pyrazole (PPT) (ER alpha agonist) or to the synthetic phytoestrogen compounds genistein (n=8), daidzein (n=8), fisetin (n=8) and quercetin (n=8) in the presence or absence of fulvestrant (oestrogen receptor antagonist). Mechanism of action was investigated by inhibition of downstream pathways. The cholinergic agonist carbachol was used to induce contractile activity. Tension was recorded isometrically. Phytoestrogens inhibit carbachol-induced colonic contractility. In keeping with a non-genomic, rapid onset direct action, the effect was within minutes, reversible and similar to previously described actions of 17 beta oestradiol. No effect was seen in the presence of fulvestrant indicating receptor modulation. While the DPN exerted inhibitory effects, PPT did not. The effect appears to be reliant on a p38\\/mitogen activated protein kinase mediated induction of nitric oxide production in colonic smooth muscle. The present data set provides the first description of a direct effect of genistein, daidzein, fisetin and quercetin on human colonic smooth muscle. The presence of ER in colonic smooth muscle has been functionally proven and the beta

  4. Oestrogen receptor beta isoform expression in sporadic colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis and progressive stages of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanato Filho, Paulo Roberto; Aguiar Júnior, Samuel; Begnami, Maria Dirlei; Kuasne, Hellen; Spencer, Ranyell Matheus; Nakagawa, Wilson Toshihiko; Bezerra, Tiago Santoro; Kupper, Bruna Catin; Takahashi, Renata Maymi; Barros Filho, Mateus; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Lopes, Ademar

    2017-11-13

    Among the sex hormones, oestrogen may play a role in colorectal cancer, particularly in conjunction with oestrogen receptor-β (ERβ). The expression of ERβ isoform variants and their correlations with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) syndrome and sporadic colorectal carcinomas are poorly described. This study aimed to investigate the expression levels of the ERβ1, ERβ2, ERβ4 and ERβ5 isoform variants using quantitative RT-PCR (921 analyses) in FAP, normal mucosa, adenomatous polyps and sporadic colorectal carcinomas. Decreased expression of ERβ isoforms was identified in sporadic polyps and in sporadic colorectal cancer as well as in polyps from FAP syndrome patients compared with normal tissues (p colorectal carcinomas were compared to normal mucosa tissues. These findings suggest an association of the ERβ isoform variants in individuals affected by germline mutations of the APC gene. Progressively decreased expression of ERβ was found in polyps at early stages of low-grade dysplasia, followed by T1-T2 and T3-T4 tumours (p colorectal cancer, the loss of expression was an independent predictor of recurrence, and ERβ1 and ERβ5 expression levels were associated with better disease-free survival (p = 0.002). These findings may provide a better understanding of oestrogens and their potential preventive and therapeutic effects on sporadic colorectal cancer and cancers associated with FAP syndrome.

  5. Differential expression of oestrogen receptor isoforms and androgen receptor in the normal vulva and vagina compared with vulval lichen sclerosus and chronic vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A H; Guzail, M; Al-Azzawi, F

    2008-02-01

    Although the expression of the oestrogen receptor (ER) alpha isoform and androgen receptor (AR) has been examined in vulval lichen sclerosus (VLS), the distribution pattern of ERalpha, ERbeta and AR has not been described in chronic atrophic vaginitis nor correlated with markers of proliferation (Ki-67) in either of these diseased tissues. To measure the levels and distribution of ERalpha, ERbeta and AR immunoreactivity in relation to Ki-67 in normal and diseased vulva and vagina. The expression of ERalpha, ERbeta and AR in relation to the proliferation marker Ki-67 in VLS, squamous hyperplasia of the vulva and chronic atrophic vaginitis was determined by immunohistomorphometric analysis and compared with that in normal vulva and vagina. VLS showed similar ERalpha and ERbeta expression in the 'epidermal' and 'dermal' tissue layers to that of normal vulvae, whereas AR expression appeared to be absent in most cases. ERbeta and Ki-67 expression was correlated with ERalpha expression but only in the 'fibrovascular' layer of the vulva. ERalpha expression was absent from the 'fibromuscular' layer of diseased vulvae, while ERbeta expression was absent in normal tissues but was highly expressed in diseased vulvae. ERalpha expression was significantly correlated with AR expression in the fibrovascular layer of the vagina and inversely correlated with Ki-67 staining in the parabasal cells of the epidermis in patients with chronic atrophic vaginitis. These data suggest that ER expression and levels may be implicated in the aetiopathology of VLS and chronic atrophic vaginitis.

  6. Novel G Protein-Coupled Oestrogen Receptor GPR30 Shows Changes in mRNA Expression in the Rat Brain over the Oestrous Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. Spary

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oestrogen influences autonomic function via actions at classical nuclear oestrogen receptors α and β in the brain, and recent evidence suggests the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 may also function as a cytoplasmic oestrogen receptor. We investigated the expression of GPR30 in female rat brains throughout the oestrous cycle and after ovariectomy to determine whether GPR30 expression in central autonomic nuclei is correlated with circulating oestrogen levels. In the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, ventrolateral medulla (VLM and periaqueductal gray (PAG GPR30 mRNA, quantified by real-time PCR, was increased in proestrus and oestrus. In ovariectomised (OVX rats, expression in NTS and VLM appeared increased compared to metoestrus, but in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and PAG lower mRNA levels were seen in OVX. GPR30-like immunoreactivity (GPR30-LI colocalised with Golgi in neurones in many brain areas associated with autonomic pathways, and analysis of numbers of immunoreactive neurones showed differences consistent with the PCR data. GPR30-LI was found in a variety of transmitter phenotypes, including cholinergic, serotonergic, catecholaminergic and nitrergic neurones in different neuronal groups. These observations support the view that GPR30 could act as a rapid transducer responding to oestrogen levels and thus modulate the activity of central autonomic pathways.

  7. Inverse antagonist activities of parabens on human oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ): In vitro and in silico studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Sun, Libei; Hu, Ying; Jiao, Jian; Hu, Jianying

    2013-01-01

    Parabens are p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters that have been used extensively as preservatives in foods, cosmetics, drugs and toiletries. These intact esters are commonly detected in human breast cancer tissues and other human samples, thus arousing concern about the involvement of parabens in human breast cancer. In this study, an in vitro nuclear receptor coactivator recruiting assay was developed and used to evaluate the binding activities of parabens, salicylates and benzoates via antagonist competitive binding on the human oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ), which is known as both a diagnostic biomarker and a treatment target of breast cancer. The results showed that all of the test parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl- and benzylparaben) possessed clear inverse antagonist activities on ERRγ, with a lowest observed effect level (LOEL) of 10 −7 M and the 50% relative effective concentrations (REC50) varying from 3.09 × 10 −7 to 5.88 × 10 −7 M, whereas the salicylates possessed much lower activities and the benzoates showed no obvious activity. In silico molecular docking analyses showed that parabens fitted well into the active site of ERRγ, with hydrogen bonds forming between the p-hydroxyl group of parabens and the Glu275/Arg316 of ERRγ. As the paraben levels reported in breast cancer tissues are commonly higher than the LOELs observed in this study, parabens may play some role via ERRγ in the carcinogenesis of human breast cancer. In addition, parabens may have significant effects on breast cancer patients who are taking tamoxifen, as ERRγ is regarded as a treatment target for tamoxifen. - Highlights: • An oestrogen-related receptor γ coactivator recruiting assay was developed. • Strong binding activities of parabens with oestrogen-related receptor γ were found. • The paraben levels reported in breast cancer tissues were higher than their LOELs. • Parabens may play some role via ERRγ in the carcinogenesis of human breast cancer.

  8. Exposure to 17β-Oestradiol Induces Oxidative Stress in the Non-Oestrogen Receptor Invertebrate Species Eisenia fetida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbynek Heger

    Full Text Available The environmental impacts of various substances on all levels of organisms are under investigation. Among these substances, endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs present a threat, although the environmental significance of these compounds remains largely unknown. To shed some light on this field, we assessed the effects of 17β-oestradiol on the growth, reproduction and formation of free radicals in Eisenia fetida.Although the observed effects on growth and survival were relatively weak, a strong impact on reproduction was observed (50.70% inhibition in 100 μg/kg of E2. We further demonstrated that the exposure of the earthworm Eisenia fetida to a contaminant of emerging concern, 17β-oestradiol (E2, significantly affected the molecules involved in antioxidant defence. Exposure to E2 results in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the stimulation of antioxidant systems (metallothionein and reduced oxidized glutathione ratio but not phytochelatins at both the mRNA and translated protein levels. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-imaging revealed the subcuticular bioaccumulation of oestradiol-3,4-quinone, altering the levels of local antioxidants in a time-dependent manner.The present study illustrates that although most invertebrates do not possess oestrogen receptors, these organisms can be affected by oestrogen hormones, likely reflecting free diffusion into the cellular microenvironment with subsequent degradation to molecules that undergo redox cycling, producing ROS, thereby increasing environmental contamination that also perilously affects keystone animals, forming lower trophic levels.

  9. Circulating sex hormones and gene expression of subcutaneous adipose tissue oestrogen and alpha-adrenergic receptors in HIV-lipodystrophy: implications for fat distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Pedersen, Steen B; Svenstrup, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    of alpha2A-adrenergic-receptor correlated positively with expression of oestrogen-receptor-alpha. CONCLUSIONS: The results fit the hypothesis that sex hormones play a role in altered fat distribution and insulin sensitivity of male patients with HIV-lipodystrophy. The effect of oestradiol...... patients, correlated positively with both plasma oestradiol and testosterone (n = 31). Glycerol concentration during clamp (a marker of lipolysis) correlated inversely with expression of alpha2A-adrenergic-receptor, ratio of subcutaneous to total abdominal fat mass, and limb fat, respectively. Expression...

  10. Mammographic density changes following discontinuation of tamoxifen in premenopausal women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Hwa; Cho, Nariya; Kim, Young-Seon; Yi, Ann

    2018-04-06

    To evaluate the changes in mammographic density after tamoxifen discontinuation in premenopausal women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancers and the underlying factors METHODS: A total of 213 consecutive premenopausal women with breast cancer who received tamoxifen treatment after curative surgery and underwent three mammograms (baseline, after tamoxifen treatment, after tamoxifen discontinuation) were included. Changes in mammographic density after tamoxifen discontinuation were assessed qualitatively (decrease, no change, or increase) by two readers and measured quantitatively by semi-automated software. The association between % density change and clinicopathological factors was evaluated using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. After tamoxifen discontinuation, a mammographic density increase was observed in 31.9% (68/213, reader 1) to 22.1% (47/213, reader 2) by qualitative assessment, with a mean density increase of 1.8% by quantitative assessment compared to density before tamoxifen discontinuation. In multivariate analysis, younger age (≤ 39 years) and greater % density decline after tamoxifen treatment (≥ 17.0%) were independent factors associated with density change after tamoxifen discontinuation (p density change with a mean density increase of 1.8%, which was associated with younger age and greater density change after tamoxifen treatment. • Increased mammographic density after tamoxifen discontinuation can occur in premenopausal women. • Mean density increase after tamoxifen discontinuation was 1.8%. • Density increase is associated with age and density decrease after tamoxifen.

  11. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda S; Foo, Jia N; Rafiq, Sajjad; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Dite, Gillian S; Hopper, John L; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Blomqvist, Carl; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Smeets, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nord, Silje; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje; Kriege, Mieke; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans; Li, Yi; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans U; Rüdiger, Thomas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Teo, Soo Hwang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Har Yip, Cheng; Fuang Ho, Gwo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Maishman, Tom; Tapper, William J; Dunning, Alison; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Eccles, Diana M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2014-06-17

    Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49-2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10(-9)). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities.

  12. Assessment of the oestrogenic activity of the contraceptive progestin levonorgestrel and its non-phenolic metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán, R; Pérez-Palacios, G; Reyes, M; Damián-Matsumura, P; García, G A; Grillasca, I; Lemus, A E

    2001-09-14

    Levonorgestrel (13beta-ethyl-17alpha-ethynyl-17beta-hydroxy-4-gonen-3-one), a potent contraceptive progestin stimulates growth and proliferation of cultured breast cancer cells through a receptor-mediated mechanism, even though levonorgestrel does not bind to the oestrogen receptor (ER). To assess whether the oestrogen-like effects induced by this synthetic progestin are exerted via its metabolic conversion products, we studied the binding affinity of three A-ring levonorgestrel derivatives to the ER and their capability to transactivate an oestrogen-dependent yeast system co-transfected with the human ER gene and oestrogen responsive elements fused to a beta-galactosidase reporter vector. The results demonstrated that the 3beta,5alpha reduced levonorgestrel derivative and to a lesser extent its 3alpha isomer interact with the oestrogen receptor, with a significantly lower relative binding affinity (2.4% and 0.4%, respectively) than that of oestradiol (100%), while levonorgestrel does not. Both levonorgestrel metabolites were able to activate, in a dose-dependent manner, the beta-galactosidase reporter gene in the yeast expression system, an effect that was precluded by a steroidal antioestrogen. The oestrogenic potency of levonorgestrel metabolites was significantly lower (750-fold) than that of oestradiol. Furthermore, high doses of 3beta,5alpha levonorgestrel (2.5 mg/day/6 days) induced an increase of oestrogen-dependent progestin receptor in the anterior pituitary of castrated rats. The overall data offer a plausible explanation for the weak oestrogenic effects induced by high, non-pharmacological doses of levonorgestrel.

  13. Oestrogen influences on mitochondrial gene expression and respiratory chain activity in cortical and mesencephalic astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, G W; Beyer, C; Arnold, S

    2008-07-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism plays an essential role in the central nervous system (CNS). Abnormalities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain often accompany neurodegenerative diseases. This makes mitochondria a perfect target for strategies of cellular protection against toxic compounds and pathological conditions. Steroid hormones, such as oestrogen, are well-known to fulfil a protective role in the brain during ischaemic and degenerative processes. Because astrocytes function as the major energy supplier in the CNS, we have analysed oestrogen effects on the mitochondrial respiratory chain of this cell type. In our studies, we applied semi- and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene expression and polarographic measurements of the respiratory chain activity of mitochondria. We observed that structural and functional properties were regulated dependent on the oestrogen exposure time and the brain region, but independent of the nuclear oestrogen receptors. We could demonstrate that long-term oestrogen exposure increases the subunit gene expression of respiratory chain complexes and the mitochondrial DNA content, thereby indicating an up-regulation of the amount of mitochondria per cell together with an increase of mitochondrial energy production. This could represent an important indirect mechanism by which long-term oestrogen exposure protects neurones from cell death under neurotoxic conditions. On the other hand, we observed short-term effects of oestrogen on the activity of mitochondrial, proton-pumping respiratory chain complexes. In astrocytes from the cortex, respiratory chain activity was decreased, whereas it was increased in astrocytes from the mesencephalon. An increased production of reactive oxygen species would be the consequence of an increased respiratory chain activity in mesencephalic astrocytes. This could explain the different efficiencies of oestrogen-mediated short-term protection in distinct brain

  14. Immunocharacteristics of oestrogen and androgen target cells in the anterior pituitary gland of the chick as embryo demonstrated by a combined method of autoradiography and immunohistochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasc, J.-M.; Sar, M.; Stumpf, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of oestrogen and androgen target cells in the anterior pituitary gland of the chick embryo on days 10, 12 and 15 of incubation was studied 1 h after the injection of tritium-labelled steroid hormone using the thaw-mount autoradiographic technique. Oestradiol target cells were localized in the caudal zone that corresponds to the so-called 'caudal lobe', while androgen target cells were found throughout the rostral and caudal lobes of the anterior gland. With a combined autoradiography and immunohistochemistry technique, most of the oestrogen target cells showed immunoreactivity to turkey LH antiserum but not to adrenocorticotrophin (1-24) and β-thyrotrophin antisera. In contrast, androgen target cells did not show positive immunoreactivity to the three antisera used. The results suggested a direct and early involvement of oestrogens but not of androgens in the feedback regulation of pituitary gonadotrophin secretion in the chick embryo. (U.K.)

  15. Molecular cloning, characterisation, and tissue distribution of oestrogen receptor alpha in eelpout (Zoarces viviparus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Thomas K; Skjødt, Karsten; Anglade, Isabelle

    2003-01-01

    that ERalpha mRNA was highly expressed in distinct regions of the preoptic area and the mediobasal hypothalamus. We have provided evidence that the receptor is auto-regulated by 17beta-oestradiol (E(2)) not only in liver but also in the testis, indicating an important role for E(2) during spermatogenesis...

  16. Immunolocalization of androgen and oestrogen receptors in the ventral lobe of rat (Rattus norvegicus) prostate after long-term treatment with ethanol and nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fávaro, W J; Cagnon, V H A

    2008-12-01

    Nicotine and alcohol adversely affect prostate gland function. In this work, immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the immunoreactivity and distribution of androgen and alpha, beta-oestrogen receptors following chronic treatment with alcohol, nicotine or a combination of both substances, as well as to relate these results to the development of possible prostatic pathologies. Forty male rats were divided into four groups: the Control group received tap water; the Alcoholic group received diluted 10% Gay Lussac ethanol; the Nicotine group received a 0.125 mg/100 g body weight dose of nicotine injected subcutaneously on a daily basis (Sigma Chemical Company, St. Louis, MO, USA); the Nicotine-Alcohol group received simultaneous alcohol and nicotine treatment. After 90 days of treatment, samples of the ventral lobe of the prostate were collected and processed for immunohistochemistry, light microscopy and the quantification of serum hormonal concentrations. The results showed significantly decreased serum testosterone levels and increased serum oestrogen levels in the animals from the nicotine-alcohol, the alcoholic and the nicotine groups, as well as their hormonal receptor levels. Then, it was concluded that ethanol and nicotine compromised the prostatic hormonal balance, which is a crucial factor to maintain the morphological and physiological features of this organ.

  17. Prolactin release, oestrogens and proliferation of prolactin-secreting cells in the anterior pituitary gland of adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, R L; Machiavelli, G A; Romano, M I; Burdman, J A

    1986-03-01

    Relationships among the release of prolactin, the effect of oestrogens and the proliferation of prolactin-secreting cells were studied under several experimental conditions. Administration of sulpiride or oestradiol released prolactin and stimulated cell proliferation in the anterior pituitary gland of adult male rats. Clomiphene completely abolished the rise in cell proliferation, but did not interfere with the sulpiride-induced release of prolactin. Treatment with oestradiol plus sulpiride significantly increased serum prolactin concentrations and the mitotic index compared with the sum of the stimulation produced by both drugs separately. Bromocriptine abolished the stimulatory effect of oestradiol on the serum prolactin concentration and on cell proliferation. In oestradiol- and/or sulpiride-treated rats, 80% of the cells in mitoses were lactotrophs. The remaining 20% did not stain with antisera against any of the pituitary hormones. The number of prolactin-secreting cells in the anterior pituitary gland significantly increased after the administration of oestradiol or sulpiride. The results demonstrate that treatment with sulpiride and/or oestradiol increases the proliferation and the number of lactotrophs in the anterior pituitary gland of the rat.

  18. Genome-wide association studies in women of African ancestry identified 3q26.21 as a novel susceptibility locus for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Dezheng; Feng, Ye; Haddad, Stephen; Zheng, Yonglan; Yao, Song; Han, Yoo-Jeong; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Adebamowo, Clement; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Falusi, Adeyinka G; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Deming, Sandra L; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Bensen, Jeannette T; Simon, Michael S; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Leske, M Cristina; Ambs, Stefan; Chen, Lin S; Qian, Frank; Gamazon, Eric R; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Cox, Nancy J; Chanock, Stephen J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Olshan, Andrew F; Ambrosone, Christine B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Palmer, Julie R; Haiman, Christopher A

    2016-11-01

    Multiple breast cancer loci have been identified in previous genome-wide association studies, but they were mainly conducted in populations of European ancestry. Women of African ancestry are more likely to have young-onset and oestrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancer for reasons that are unknown and understudied. To identify genetic risk factors for breast cancer in women of African descent, we conducted a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies of breast cancer; one study consists of 1,657 cases and 2,029 controls genotyped with Illumina’s HumanOmni2.5 BeadChip and the other study included 3,016 cases and 2,745 controls genotyped using Illumina Human1M-Duo BeadChip. The top 18,376 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from the meta-analysis were replicated in the third study that consists of 1,984 African Americans cases and 2,939 controls. We found that SNP rs13074711, 26.5 Kb upstream of TNFSF10 at 3q26.21, was significantly associated with risk of oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer (odds ratio [OR]=1.29, 95% CI: 1.18-1.40; P = 1.8 × 10 − 8). Functional annotations suggest that the TNFSF10 gene may be involved in breast cancer aetiology, but further functional experiments are needed. In addition, we confirmed SNP rs10069690 was the best indicator for ER-negative breast cancer at 5p15.33 (OR = 1.30; P = 2.4 × 10 − 10) and identified rs12998806 as the best indicator for ER-positive breast cancer at 2q35 (OR = 1.34; P = 2.2 × 10 − 8) for women of African ancestry. These findings demonstrated additional susceptibility alleles for breast cancer can be revealed in diverse populations and have important public health implications in building race/ethnicity-specific risk prediction model for breast cancer.

  19. Divergent oestrogen receptor-specific breast cancer trends in Ireland (2004-2013): Amassing data from independent Western populations provide etiologic clues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullooly, Maeve; Murphy, Jeanne; Gierach, Gretchen L; Walsh, Paul M; Deady, Sandra; Barron, Thomas I; Sherman, Mark E; Rosenberg, Philip S; Anderson, William F

    2017-11-01

    The aetiology and clinical behaviour of breast cancers vary by oestrogen receptor (ER) expression, HER2 expression and over time. Data from the United States and Denmark show rising incidence rates for ER+ and falling incidence rates for ER- breast cancers. Given that Ireland is a somewhat similar Western population but with distinctive risk exposures (especially for lactation), we analysed breast cancer trends by ER status; and for the first time, by the joint expression of ER±/HER2±. We assessed invasive breast cancers (n = 24,845; 2004-2013) within the population-based National Cancer Registry of Ireland. The population at risk was obtained from the Irish Central Statistics Office (n = 10,401,986). After accounting for missing ER and HER2 data, we assessed receptor-specific secular trends in age-standardised incidence rates (ASRs) with the estimated annual percentage change (EAPC) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Age-period-cohort models were also fitted to further characterise trends accounting for age, calendar-period and birth-cohort interactions. ASRs increased for ER+ (EAPC: 2.2% per year [95% CI: 0.97, 3.45%/year]) and decreased for ER- cancers (EAPC: -3.43% per year [95% CI: -5.05, -1.78%/year]), as well as for specific age groups at diagnosis (rates among independent Western populations likely reflects calendar-period and/or risk factor changes with differential effects for ER+ and ER- breast cancers. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Assessing oestrogenic effects of brominated flame retardants Hexabromocyclododecane and Tetrabromobisphenol A on MCF-7 cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dorosh, Andriy; Děd, Lukáš; Elzeinová, Fatima; Pěknicová, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 56, - (2010), s. 35-39 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06011; GA MŠk(CZ) 2B06151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : endocrine disruptors * BRF - brominated flame retardant * MCF-7 cells * TFF1 - trefoil factor Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 0.729, year: 2010

  1. Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Oestrogen Receptor-Positive/Progesterone Receptor-Negative/Her2-Negative Breast Cancer According to a Novel Definition of Negative Progesterone Receptor Status: A Large Population-Based Study from China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-qi Li

    Full Text Available A lack of progesterone receptor (PgR expression in oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+ tumours is associated with worse survival. PgR status is usually defined as positive or negative using 1% positive nuclei as a cut-off point. In this study, we aimed to assess the clinicopathologic characteristics of ER+/PgR-/HER2- tumours by comparing them with ER+/PgR+/HER2- tumours using a PgR cut-off point of 20% as a divisive criterion.We analysed 1,522 patients with primary breast cancer who had undergone surgery at the Cancer Center of Fudan University between 2012 and 2014. Age, grade, tumour size, lymph node status and lymphovascular invasion were assessed. Multinomial logistic regression, linear regression and chi-square test models were applied to assess associations between ER, PR and clinical features.ER+/PgR-/HER2- tumours showed poorer clinicopathologic characteristics relative to ER+/PgR+/HER2- tumours using a PgR threshold of 20% instead of 1%. The clinicopathologic characteristics did not differ between tumours with purely negative PgR expression and tumours with a PgR percentage ranging from 1% to 19%. The prognostic significance of PR expression appeared more pronounced in patients under a high Ki-67 status than those under a low Ki-67 status.Based on these findings, we propose the use of a novel threshold of 20% to define PgR status. Nevertheless, the impact of this new criterion on patient management and clinical treatment requires additional study.

  2. Association of oestrogen receptor beta 2 (ERβ2/ERβcx) with outcome of adjuvant endocrine treatment for primary breast cancer – a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinayagam, Raman; Sibson, D Ross; Holcombe, Christopher; Aachi, Vijay; Davies, Michael PA

    2007-01-01

    Oestrogen receptor beta (ERβ) modulates ERα activity; wild type ERβ (ERβ1) and its splice variants may therefore impact on hormone responsiveness of breast cancer. ERβ2/ERβcx acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of ERα and expression of ERβ2 mRNA has been proposed as a candidate marker for outcome in primary breast cancer following adjuvant endocrine therapy. We therefore now assess ERβ2 protein by immunostaining and mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR in relation to treatment outcome. ERβ2-specific immunostaining was quantified in 141 primary breast cancer cases receiving adjuvant endocrine therapy, but no neoadjuvant therapy or adjuvant chemotherapy. The expression of mRNA for ERβ2/ERβcx was measured in 100 cases by quantitative RT-PCR. Statistical analysis of breast cancer relapse and breast cancer survival was performed using Kaplan Meier log-rank tests and Cox's univariate and multivariate survival analysis. High ERβ2 immunostaining (Allred score >5) and high ERβ2 mRNA levels were independently associated with significantly better outcome across the whole cohort, including both ERα positive and negative cases (Log-Rank P < 0.05). However, only ERβ2 mRNA levels were significantly associated with better outcome in the ERα + subgroup (Log-Rank P = 0.01) and this was independent of grade, size, nodal status and progesterone receptor status (Cox hazard ratio 0.31 P = 0.02 for relapse; 0.17 P = 0.01 for survival). High ERβ2 mRNA was also associated with better outcome in node negative cases (Log Rank P < 0.001). ERβ2 protein levels were greater in ERα positive cases (T-test P = 0.00001), possibly explaining the association with better outcome. Levels of ERβ2 protein did not correlate ERβ2 mRNA levels, but 34% of cases had both high mRNA and protein and had a significantly better outcome (Log-Rank relapse P < 0.005). High ERβ2 protein levels were associated with ERα expression. Although most cases with high ERβ2 mRNA had strong ERβ2

  3. Cytotoxic effects of the synthetic oestrogens and androgens on Balb/c 3T3 and HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minta Maria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to test and compare the cytotoxic potential of two synthetic oestrogens: diethylstilboestrol (DES and ethinyloestradiol (EE2 and two androgens: testosterone propionate (TP and trenbolone (TREN on two cell lines. The fibroblast cell line Balb/c 3T3 and the hepatoma cell line HepG2 were selected. To get more insight into the mode of toxic action, four methods were used, which evaluated different biochemical endpoints: mitochondrial activity (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl- 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction assay, lysosomal activity (neutral red uptake assay, total protein content, and lactate dehydrogenase release. Cytotoxicity was assessed after 24, 48, and 72 h exposure to eight concentrations ranging from 0.78 to 100 μg/mL. Concentration- and time- dependent effects were observed. Depending on the line and assay used, half maximal effective concentration after 72 h (EC50-72h values ranged as follows: DES 1-13.7 μg/mL (Balb/c 3T3 and 3.7-5.2 μg/mL (HepG2; EE2 2.1-14.3 μg/mL (Balb/c 3T3 and 1.8-7.8 μg/mL (HepG2; TP-14.9-17.5 μg/mL (Balb/c 3T3, and 63.9- 100 μg/mL (HepG2; and TREN 11.3-31.4 μg/mL (Balb/c 3T3 and 12.5-59.4 μg/mL (HepG2. The results revealed that oestrogens were more toxic than androgens and the most affected endpoint was mitochondrial activity. In contrast to oestrogens, for which EC50-72h values were similar in both lines and by all assays used, Balb/c 3T3 cells were more sensitive than HepG2 cells to TP.

  4. The effects of oestrogens on linear bone growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of linear bone growth in children and adolescents comprises a complex interaction of hormones and growth factors. Growth hormone (GH) is considered to be the key hormone regulator of linear growth in childhood. The pubertal increase in growth velocity associated with GH has traditionally...... been attributed to testicular androgen secretion in boys, and to oestrogens or adrenal androgen secretion in girls. Research data indicating that oestrogen may be the principal hormone stimulating the pubertal growth spurt in boys as well as girls is reviewed. Such an action is mediated by oestrogen...... female growth spurt despite lack of androgen action. Oestrogens may also influence linear bone growth indirectly via modulation of the GH-insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis. Thus, ER blockade diminishes endogenous GH secretion, androgen receptor (AR) blockade increases GH secretion in peripubertal...

  5. Differences in the rate of oestrogen-induced apoptosis in breast cancer by oestradiol and the triphenylethylene bisphenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiorah, I E; Jordan, V C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Triphenylethylene (TPE)-like compounds were the first agents to be used in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Although structurally related to the anti-oestrogen, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, TPEs possess oestrogenic properties in fully oestrogenized breast cancer cells but do not induce apoptosis with short-term treatment in long-term oestrogen-deprived breast cancer cells. This study determined the differential effects of bisphenol, a TPE, on growth and apoptosis based on the modulation of the shape of the ligand–oestrogen receptor complex. Experimental Approach Apoptotic flow cytometric studies were used to evaluate apoptosis over time. Proliferation of the breast cancer cells was assessed using DNA quantification and cell cycle analysis. Real-time PCR was performed to quantify mRNA levels of apoptotic genes. Regulation of cell cycle and apoptotic genes was determined using PCR-based arrays. Key Results Bisphenol induced an up-regulation of cell cycle genes similar to those induced by 17β oestradiol (E2). Unlike the changes induced by E2 that occur after 24 h, the apoptosis evoked by bisphenol occurred after 4 days, with quantifiable apoptotic changes noted at 6 days. A prolonged up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory stress response genes was observed with subsequent activation of apoptosis-related genes in the second week of treatment with bisphenol. Conclusions and Implications The bisphenol: ERα complex induces delayed biological effects on the growth and apoptosis of breast cancer cells. Both the shape of the complex and the duration of treatment control the initiation of apoptosis. PMID:24819221

  6. Phyto-oestrogens and their metabolites in milk produced on two pastures with different botanical compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S. A.; Purup, S.; Hansen-Møller, J.

    2014-01-01

    . The objective of this study was to assess the effects of grazing a recently established pasture containing red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and an older pasture containing a variety of sown and unsown plant species on milk concentrations of phyto-oestrogens. Sixteen Norwegian Red dairy cows [mean (standard......Phyto-oestrogens are a group of secondary plant metabolites that may bind to oestrogen receptors and exert oestrogenic or anti-oestrogenic effects in humans and can protect against cancer diseases. When ingested by dairy cows, phyto-oestrogens can be metabolised and transferred to the milk...... deviation); body weight 599 (45.1). kg, stage of lactation 73 (15.0) d in milk, milk yield 29.9 (2.90) kg/d at the start of the experiment] were divided into two groups and grazed either a short-term pasture (SP) or a long-term pasture (LP). The SP was representative of organically managed leys in Norway...

  7. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 testing in invasive breast cancer: should histological grade, type and oestrogen receptor status influence the decision to repeat testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakha, Emad A; Pigera, Marian; Shin, Sandra J; D'Alfonso, Timothy; Ellis, Ian O; Lee, Andrew H S

    2016-07-01

    The recent American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guidelines for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing in breast cancer recommend repeat testing based on tumour grade, tumour type, and hormone receptor status. The aim of this study was to test the value of these criteria. HER2 status was concordant in the core biopsies and excision specimens in 392 of 400 invasive carcinomas. The major reasons for discordance were amplification around the cut-off for positivity and tumour heterogeneity. Of 116 grade 3 carcinomas that were HER2-negative in the core biopsy, four were HER2-positive in the excision specimen. Three of these four either showed borderline negative amplification in the core biopsy or were heterogeneous. None of the 55 grade 1 carcinomas were HER2-positive. Review of repeat testing of HER2 in routine practice suggested that it may also be of value for multifocal tumours and if recommended by the person assessing the in-situ hybridization. Mandatory repeat HER2 testing of grade 3 HER2-negative carcinomas is not appropriate. This is particularly true if repeat testing is performed after borderline negative amplification in the core biopsy or in HER2-negative heterogeneous carcinomas. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Oestrogens in saliva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothschild, R.S.; Levine, L.S.; Hattingh, J.

    1981-01-01

    Matched plasma and saliva samples were obtained from a non-pregnant and pregnant group (last trimester) of female caucasians. Using a sensitive radioimmunoassay, 17β-oestradiol was measured, and the gingival index system of Loe (1967) was used to assess the gingival condition of each patient. The results showed that 17β-oestradiol could be measured in saliva but that the levels were extremely low and a very sensitive immunoassay was necessary. In the pregnant group, saliva represented 3 per cent of the plasma level. This was not the case in the non-pregnant group, probably because of the constantly changing free: bound plasma ratio. The results are discussed in relation to the fact that oestrogens are known to bind to the oral epithelium [af

  9. Development of a transient expression assay for detecting environmental oestrogens in zebrafish and medaka embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Okhyun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oestrogenic contaminants are widespread in the aquatic environment and have been shown to induce adverse effects in both wildlife (most notably in fish and humans, raising international concern. Available detecting and testing systems are limited in their capacity to elucidate oestrogen signalling pathways and physiological impacts. Here we developed a transient expression assay to investigate the effects of oestrogenic chemicals in fish early life stages and to identify target organs for oestrogenic effects. To enhance the response sensitivity to oestrogen, we adopted the use of multiple tandem oestrogen responsive elements (EREc38 in a Tol2 transposon mediated Gal4ff-UAS system. The plasmid constructed (pTol2_ERE-TATA-Gal4ff, contains three copies of oestrogen response elements (3ERE that on exposure to oestrogen induces expression of Gal4ff which this in turn binds Gal4-responsive Upstream Activated Sequence (UAS elements, driving the expression of a second reporter gene, EGFP (Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein. Results The response of our construct to oestrogen exposure in zebrafish embryos was examined using a transient expression assay. The two plasmids were injected into 1–2 cell staged zebrafish embryos, and the embryos were exposed to various oestrogens including the natural steroid oestrogen 17ß-oestradiol (E2, the synthetic oestrogen 17α- ethinyloestradiol (EE2, and the relatively weak environmental oestrogen nonylphenol (NP, and GFP expression was examined in the subsequent embryos using fluorescent microscopy. There was no GFP expression detected in unexposed embryos, but specific and mosaic expression of GFP was detected in the liver, heart, somite muscle and some other tissue cells for exposures to steroid oestrogen treatments (EE2; 10 ng/L, E2; 100 ng/L, after 72 h exposures. For the NP exposures, GFP expression was observed at 10 μg NP/L after 72 h (100 μg NP/L was toxic to the fish. We

  10. The cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib in combination with letrozole versus letrozole alone as first-line treatment of oestrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative, advanced breast cancer (PALOMA-1/TRIO-18): a randomised phase 2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Richard S; Crown, John P; Lang, Istvan; Boer, Katalin; Bondarenko, Igor M; Kulyk, Sergey O; Ettl, Johannes; Patel, Ravindranath; Pinter, Tamas; Schmidt, Marcus; Shparyk, Yaroslav; Thummala, Anu R; Voytko, Nataliya L; Fowst, Camilla; Huang, Xin; Kim, Sindy T; Randolph, Sophia; Slamon, Dennis J

    2015-01-01

    Palbociclib (PD-0332991) is an oral, small-molecule inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 with preclinical evidence of growth-inhibitory activity in oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells and synergy with anti-oestrogens. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of palbociclib in combination with letrozole as first-line treatment of patients with advanced, oestrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. In this open-label, randomised phase 2 study, postmenopausal women with advanced oestrogen receptor-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer who had not received any systemic treatment for their advanced disease were eligible to participate. Patients were enrolled in two separate cohorts that accrued sequentially: in cohort 1, patients were enrolled on the basis of their oestrogen receptor-positive and HER2-negative biomarker status alone, whereas in cohort 2 they were also required to have cancers with amplification of cyclin D1 (CCND1), loss of p16 (INK4A or CDKN2A), or both. In both cohorts, patients were randomly assigned 1:1 via an interactive web-based randomisation system, stratified by disease site and disease-free interval, to receive continuous oral letrozole 2.5 mg daily or continuous oral letrozole 2.5 mg daily plus oral palbociclib 125 mg, given once daily for 3 weeks followed by 1 week off over 28-day cycles. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed progression-free survival in the intention-to-treat population. Accrual to cohort 2 was stopped after an unplanned interim analysis of cohort 1 and the statistical analysis plan for the primary endpoint was amended to a combined analysis of cohorts 1 and 2 (instead of cohort 2 alone). The study is ongoing but closed to accrual; these are the results of the final analysis of progression-free survival. The study is registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00721409. Between Dec 22, 2009, and May 12, 2012, we randomly assigned 165 patients, 84 to palbociclib

  11. The therapeutic effects of docosahexaenoic acid on oestrogen/androgen-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chao; Luo, Fei; Zhou, Ying; Du, Xiaoling; Shi, Jiandang; Zhao, Xiaoling; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Yan; Hong, Wei; Zhang, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the major disorders of the urinary system in elderly men. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the main component of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) and has nerve protective, anti-inflammatory and tumour-growth inhibitory effects. Here, the therapeutic potential of DHA in treating BPH was investigated. Seal oil effectively prevented the development of prostatic hyperplasia induced by oestradiol/testosterone in a rat model by suppressing the increase of the prostatic index (PI), reducing the thickness of the peri-glandular smooth muscle layer, inhibiting the proliferation of both prostate epithelial and stromal cells, and downregulating the expression of androgen receptor (AR) and oestrogen receptor α (ERα). An in vitro study showed that DHA inhibited the growth of the human prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1 and the epithelial cell line RWPE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In both cell lines, the DHA arrested the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. In addition, DHA also reduced the expression of ERα and AR in the WPMY-1 and RWPE-1 cells. These results indicate that DHA inhibits the multiplication of prostate stromal and epithelial cells through a mechanism that may involve cell cycle arrest and the downregulation of ERα and AR expression. - Highlights: • Seal oil prevents oestradiol/testosterone (E2/T)-induced BPH in castrated rats. • Seal oil downregulates the expression of oestrogen receptor α(ERα) and androgen receptor (AR) in rat BPH tissues. • DHA inhibits the growth of human prostate stromal and epithelial cells in vitro. • DHA arrests human prostate stromal and epithelial cells in the G2/M phase and downregulates the expression of cyclin B1. • DHA inhibits the expression of ERα and AR in human prostate stromal and epithelial cells.

  12. The therapeutic effects of docosahexaenoic acid on oestrogen/androgen-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Bioactive Materials Key Lab of Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Luo, Fei [Department of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin Institute of Urology, Tianjin 300211 (China); Zhou, Ying; Du, Xiaoling; Shi, Jiandang; Zhao, Xiaoling [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Bioactive Materials Key Lab of Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Xu, Yong [Department of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin Institute of Urology, Tianjin 300211 (China); Zhu, Yan [Tianjin State Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin 300193 (China); Hong, Wei, E-mail: hongwei@tijmu.edu.cn [Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhang, Ju, E-mail: zhangju@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Bioactive Materials Key Lab of Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the major disorders of the urinary system in elderly men. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the main component of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) and has nerve protective, anti-inflammatory and tumour-growth inhibitory effects. Here, the therapeutic potential of DHA in treating BPH was investigated. Seal oil effectively prevented the development of prostatic hyperplasia induced by oestradiol/testosterone in a rat model by suppressing the increase of the prostatic index (PI), reducing the thickness of the peri-glandular smooth muscle layer, inhibiting the proliferation of both prostate epithelial and stromal cells, and downregulating the expression of androgen receptor (AR) and oestrogen receptor α (ERα). An in vitro study showed that DHA inhibited the growth of the human prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1 and the epithelial cell line RWPE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In both cell lines, the DHA arrested the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. In addition, DHA also reduced the expression of ERα and AR in the WPMY-1 and RWPE-1 cells. These results indicate that DHA inhibits the multiplication of prostate stromal and epithelial cells through a mechanism that may involve cell cycle arrest and the downregulation of ERα and AR expression. - Highlights: • Seal oil prevents oestradiol/testosterone (E2/T)-induced BPH in castrated rats. • Seal oil downregulates the expression of oestrogen receptor α(ERα) and androgen receptor (AR) in rat BPH tissues. • DHA inhibits the growth of human prostate stromal and epithelial cells in vitro. • DHA arrests human prostate stromal and epithelial cells in the G2/M phase and downregulates the expression of cyclin B1. • DHA inhibits the expression of ERα and AR in human prostate stromal and epithelial cells.

  13. The effects of oestrogens on linear bone growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A

    2001-01-01

    receptors (ER-alpha and ER-beta) in the human growth plate, and polymorphisms in the ER gene may influence adult height in healthy subjects. Prepubertal oestradiol concentrations are significantly higher in girls than in boys, explaining sex-related differences in pubertal onset. Men with a disruptive......Regulation of linear bone growth in children and adolescents comprises a complex interaction of hormones and growth factors. Growth hormone (GH) is considered to be the key hormone regulator of linear growth in childhood. The pubertal increase in growth velocity associated with GH has traditionally...... been attributed to testicular androgen secretion in boys, and to oestrogens or adrenal androgen secretion in girls. Research data indicating that oestrogen may be the principal hormone stimulating the pubertal growth spurt in boys as well as girls is reviewed. Such an action is mediated by oestrogen...

  14. A Rare Case of Oestrogen Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeault, Emilie; Bujold, Janie; Doucet, Marie-Eve

    Oestrogen dermatitis is a rare disorder characterised by cyclical eruptions in association with a woman's menstrual cycle. A 43-year-old woman with an 8-year history of cyclical inguinal dermatitis, with a negative patch test, was tested with intradermal progesterone and oestrogen. Intradermal testing was positive for oestrogen only. In a female patient with cyclical dermatitis, it is important to consider oestrogen or progesterone dermatitis in the differential diagnosis.

  15. Prognostic and predictive value of the 21-gene recurrence score assay in postmenopausal women with node-positive, oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer on chemotherapy: a retrospective analysis of a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albain, Kathy S; Barlow, William E; Shak, Steven; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Livingston, Robert B; Yeh, I-Tien; Ravdin, Peter; Bugarini, Roberto; Baehner, Frederick L; Davidson, Nancy E; Sledge, George W; Winer, Eric P; Hudis, Clifford; Ingle, James N; Perez, Edith A; Pritchard, Kathleen I; Shepherd, Lois; Gralow, Julie R; Yoshizawa, Carl; Allred, D Craig; Osborne, C Kent; Hayes, Daniel F

    2010-01-01

    The 21-gene recurrence score assay is prognostic for women with node-negative, oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer treated with tamoxifen. A low recurrence score predicts little benefit of chemotherapy. For node-positive breast cancer, we investigated whether the recurrence score was prognostic in women treated with tamoxifen alone and whether it identified those who might not benefit from anthracycline-based chemotherapy, despite higher risks of recurrence. The phase 3 trial SWOG-8814 for postmenopausal women with node-positive, oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer showed that chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and fluorouracil (CAF) before tamoxifen (CAF-T) added survival benefit to treatment with tamoxifen alone. Optional tumour banking yielded specimens for determination of recurrence score by RT-PCR. In this retrospective analysis, we assessed the effect of recurrence score on disease-free survival by treatment group (tamoxifen vs CAF-T) using Cox regression, adjusting for number of positive nodes. There were 367 specimens (40% of the 927 patients in the tamoxifen and CAF-T groups) with sufficient RNA for analysis (tamoxifen, n=148; CAF-T, n=219). The recurrence score was prognostic in the tamoxifen-alone group (p=0.006; hazard ratio [HR] 2.64, 95% CI 1.33-5.27, for a 50-point difference in recurrence score). There was no benefit of CAF in patients with a low recurrence score (score or =31; log-rank p=0.033; HR 0.59, 0.35-1.01), after adjustment for number of positive nodes. The recurrence score by treatment interaction was significant in the first 5 years (p=0.029), with no additional prediction beyond 5 years (p=0.58), although the cumulative benefit remained at 10 years. Results were similar for overall survival and breast-cancer-specific survival. The recurrence score is prognostic for tamoxifen-treated patients with positive nodes and predicts significant benefit of CAF in tumours with a high recurrence score. A low recurrence

  16. In vitro evaluation of oestrogenic/androgenic activity of the serum organochlorine pesticide mixtures previously described in a breast cancer case–control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivero, Javier; Luzardo, Octavio P.; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A.; Machín, Rubén P.; Pestano, José; Zumbado, Manuel; Boada, Luis D.; Camacho, María; Valerón, Pilar F.

    2015-01-01

    Some organochlorine pesticides (OCs) have been individually linked to breast cancer (BC) because they exert oestrogenic effects on mammary cells. However, humans are environmentally exposed to more or less complex mixtures of these organochlorines, and the biological effects of these mixtures must be elucidated. In this work we evaluated the in vitro effects exerted on human BC cells by the OC mixtures that were most frequently detected in two groups of women who participated in a BC case–control study developed in Spain: healthy women and women diagnosed with BC. The cytotoxicity, oestrogenicity, and androgenicity of the most prevalent OC mixtures found in healthy women (H-mixture) and in BC patients (BC-mixture) were tested at concentrations that resembled those found in the serum of the evaluated women. Our results showed that both OC mixtures presented a similar oestrogenic activity and effect on cell viability, but BC-mixture showed an additional anti-androgenic effect. These results indicate that although the proliferative effect exerted by these mixtures on human breast cells seems to depend mainly on their oestrogenic action, the BC-mixture might additionally induce cell proliferation due to its anti-androgenic activity, therefore increasing the carcinogenic potential of this mixture. The findings of this study demonstrate that subtle variations in the composition of a mixture may induce relevant changes in its biological action. - Highlights: • E-screen and A-screen of two mixtures of organochlorine pesticides (OCP) • Assay concentrations based on a previous breast cancer case–control study • Only non-cytotoxic concentrations assayed • Both OCP mixtures induce proliferation mediated by oestrogen receptor. • OCP mixture of breast cancer patients exhibits additional androgenic activity.

  17. In vitro evaluation of oestrogenic/androgenic activity of the serum organochlorine pesticide mixtures previously described in a breast cancer case–control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivero, Javier; Luzardo, Octavio P., E-mail: octavio.perez@ulpgc.es; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A.; Machín, Rubén P.; Pestano, José; Zumbado, Manuel; Boada, Luis D.; Camacho, María; Valerón, Pilar F.

    2015-12-15

    Some organochlorine pesticides (OCs) have been individually linked to breast cancer (BC) because they exert oestrogenic effects on mammary cells. However, humans are environmentally exposed to more or less complex mixtures of these organochlorines, and the biological effects of these mixtures must be elucidated. In this work we evaluated the in vitro effects exerted on human BC cells by the OC mixtures that were most frequently detected in two groups of women who participated in a BC case–control study developed in Spain: healthy women and women diagnosed with BC. The cytotoxicity, oestrogenicity, and androgenicity of the most prevalent OC mixtures found in healthy women (H-mixture) and in BC patients (BC-mixture) were tested at concentrations that resembled those found in the serum of the evaluated women. Our results showed that both OC mixtures presented a similar oestrogenic activity and effect on cell viability, but BC-mixture showed an additional anti-androgenic effect. These results indicate that although the proliferative effect exerted by these mixtures on human breast cells seems to depend mainly on their oestrogenic action, the BC-mixture might additionally induce cell proliferation due to its anti-androgenic activity, therefore increasing the carcinogenic potential of this mixture. The findings of this study demonstrate that subtle variations in the composition of a mixture may induce relevant changes in its biological action. - Highlights: • E-screen and A-screen of two mixtures of organochlorine pesticides (OCP) • Assay concentrations based on a previous breast cancer case–control study • Only non-cytotoxic concentrations assayed • Both OCP mixtures induce proliferation mediated by oestrogen receptor. • OCP mixture of breast cancer patients exhibits additional androgenic activity.

  18. Differential effects of oestrogenic hormones on cell proliferation in the colonic crypt epithelium and in colonic carcinomata of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1982-01-01

    A number of hormones, including some steroids, have previously been shown to influence the rate of cell division in the colonic crypt epithelium and in colonic tumours. In this report the effect of oophorectomy and of treatment with ovarian hormones on cell proliferation in these tissues is compared. Colonic tumours cell proliferation was retarded following oophorectomy and this retardation was reversed by the administration of oestradiol, but not by the administration of progesterone. Oophorectomy did not retard cell proliferation in the colonic crypts. The possible significance of these findings in relation to age-dependent variations in the sex ratio for human bowel cancer is discussed.

  19. The Paradox of Oestradiol-Induced Breast Cancer Cell Growth and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, Philipp Y; Lewis-Wambi, Joan S; Jordan, V Craig

    2009-05-01

    High dose oestrogen therapy was used as a treatment for postmenopausal patients with breast cancer from the 1950s until the introduction of the safer antioestrogen, tamoxifen in the 1970s. The anti-tumour mechanism of high dose oestrogen therapy remained unknown. There was no enthusiasm to study these signal transduction pathways as oestrogen therapy has almost completely been eliminated from the treatment paradigm. Current use of tamoxifen and the aromatase inhibitors seek to create oestrogen deprivation that prevents the growth of oestrogen stimulated oestrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer cells. However, acquired resistance to antihormonal therapy does occur, but it is through investigation of laboratory models that a vulnerability of the cancer cell has been discovered and is being investigated to provide new opportunities in therapy with the potential for discovering new cancer-specific apoptotic drugs. Laboratory models of resistance to raloxifene and tamoxifen, the selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors demonstrate an evolution of drug resistance so that after many years of oestrogen deprivation, the ER positive cancer cell reconfigures the survival signal transduction pathways so oestrogen now becomes an apoptotic trigger rather than a survival signal. Current efforts are evaluating the mechanisms of oestrogen-induced apoptosis and how this new biology of oestrogen action can be amplified and enhanced, thereby increasing the value of this therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of breast cancer. Several synergistic approaches to therapeutic enhancement are being advanced which involve drug combinations to impair survival signaling with the use of specific agents and to impair bcl-2 that protects the cancer cell from apoptosis. We highlight the historical understanding of oestrogen's role in cell survival and death and specifically illustrate the progress that has been made in the last five years to understand the

  20. N-Butanol and Aqueous Fractions of Red Maca Methanolic Extract Exerts Opposite Effects on Androgen and Oestrogens Receptors (Alpha and Beta in Rats with Testosterone-Induced Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH affects, worldwide, 50% of 60-year-old men. The Peruvian plant red maca (Lepidium meyenii inhibits BPH in rodents. This study aimed to determine the effects of methanolic red maca extract and its n-butanol and aqueous fractions on expression of androgen and oestrogen receptors in rats with testosterone enanthate-induced BPH. Thirty-six rats in six groups were studied. Control group received 2 mL of vehicle orally and 0.1 mL of propylene glycol intramuscularly. The second group received vehicle orally and testosterone enanthate (TE (25 mg/0.1 mL intramuscularly in days 1 and 7. The other four groups were BPH-induced with TE and received, during 21 days, 3.78 mg/mL of finasteride, 18.3 mg/mL methanol extract of red maca, 2 mg/mL of n-butanol fraction, or 16.3 mg/mL of aqueous fraction from red maca. Treatments with red maca extract and its n-butanol but not aqueous fraction reduced prostate weight similar to finasteride. All maca treated groups restored the expression of ERβ, but only the aqueous fraction increased androgen receptors and ERα. In conclusion, butanol fraction of red maca reduced prostate size in BPH by restoring expression of ERβ without affecting androgen receptors and ERα. This effect was not observed with aqueous fraction of methanolic extract of red maca.

  1. N-Butanol and Aqueous Fractions of Red Maca Methanolic Extract Exerts Opposite Effects on Androgen and Oestrogens Receptors (Alpha and Beta) in Rats with Testosterone-Induced Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fano, Diego; Vásquez-Velásquez, Cinthya; Gonzales-Castañeda, Cynthia; Guajardo-Correa, Emanuel; Orihuela, Pedro A; Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2017-01-01

    Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) affects, worldwide, 50% of 60-year-old men. The Peruvian plant red maca (Lepidium meyenii) inhibits BPH in rodents. This study aimed to determine the effects of methanolic red maca extract and its n-butanol and aqueous fractions on expression of androgen and oestrogen receptors in rats with testosterone enanthate-induced BPH. Thirty-six rats in six groups were studied. Control group received 2 mL of vehicle orally and 0.1 mL of propylene glycol intramuscularly. The second group received vehicle orally and testosterone enanthate (TE) (25 mg/0.1 mL) intramuscularly in days 1 and 7. The other four groups were BPH-induced with TE and received, during 21 days, 3.78 mg/mL of finasteride, 18.3 mg/mL methanol extract of red maca, 2 mg/mL of n-butanol fraction, or 16.3 mg/mL of aqueous fraction from red maca. Treatments with red maca extract and its n-butanol but not aqueous fraction reduced prostate weight similar to finasteride. All maca treated groups restored the expression of ER β , but only the aqueous fraction increased androgen receptors and ER α . In conclusion, butanol fraction of red maca reduced prostate size in BPH by restoring expression of ER β without affecting androgen receptors and ER α . This effect was not observed with aqueous fraction of methanolic extract of red maca.

  2. N-Butanol and Aqueous Fractions of Red Maca Methanolic Extract Exerts Opposite Effects on Androgen and Oestrogens Receptors (Alpha and Beta) in Rats with Testosterone-Induced Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Velásquez, Cinthya

    2017-01-01

    Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) affects, worldwide, 50% of 60-year-old men. The Peruvian plant red maca (Lepidium meyenii) inhibits BPH in rodents. This study aimed to determine the effects of methanolic red maca extract and its n-butanol and aqueous fractions on expression of androgen and oestrogen receptors in rats with testosterone enanthate-induced BPH. Thirty-six rats in six groups were studied. Control group received 2 mL of vehicle orally and 0.1 mL of propylene glycol intramuscularly. The second group received vehicle orally and testosterone enanthate (TE) (25 mg/0.1 mL) intramuscularly in days 1 and 7. The other four groups were BPH-induced with TE and received, during 21 days, 3.78 mg/mL of finasteride, 18.3 mg/mL methanol extract of red maca, 2 mg/mL of n-butanol fraction, or 16.3 mg/mL of aqueous fraction from red maca. Treatments with red maca extract and its n-butanol but not aqueous fraction reduced prostate weight similar to finasteride. All maca treated groups restored the expression of ERβ, but only the aqueous fraction increased androgen receptors and ERα. In conclusion, butanol fraction of red maca reduced prostate size in BPH by restoring expression of ERβ without affecting androgen receptors and ERα. This effect was not observed with aqueous fraction of methanolic extract of red maca. PMID:29375645

  3. Orchidectomy and oestrogen therapy revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P

    1998-01-01

    with gynaecomastia, loss of sexual function and unacceptable cardiovascular toxicity. Low dose oestrogens in combination with antiandrogens or antithrombotic agents may be better tolerated treatments. The route of administration is a crucial factor in the genesis of cardiovascular toxicity and parenterally...

  4. Oestrogen directly inhibits the cardiovascular L-type Ca2+ channel Cav1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, Nina D.; Koschak, Alexandra; MacLeod, Kenneth T.

    2007-01-01

    Oestrogen can modify the contractile function of vascular smooth muscle and cardiomyocytes. The negative inotropic actions of oestrogen on the heart and coronary vasculature appear to be mediated by L-type Ca 2+ channel (Ca v 1.2) inhibition, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We tested the hypothesis that oestrogen directly inhibits the cardiovascular L-type Ca 2+ current, I CaL . The effect of oestrogen on I CaL was measured in Ca v 1.2-transfected HEK-293 cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The current revealed typical activation and inactivation profiles of nifedipine- and cadmium-sensitive I CaL . Oestrogen (50 μM) rapidly reduced I CaL by 50% and shifted voltage-dependent activation and availability to more negative potentials. Furthermore, oestrogen blocked the Ca 2+ channel in a rate-dependent way, exhibiting higher efficiency of block at higher stimulation frequencies. Our data suggest that oestrogen inhibits I CaL through direct interaction of the steroid with the channel protein

  5. Correlation between tumour characteristics, SUV measurements, metabolic tumour volume, TLG and textural features assessed with {sup 18}F-FDG PET in a large cohort of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemarignier, Charles; Groheux, David [Saint-Louis Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); University Sorbonne Paris Cite, INSERM/CNRS UMR944/7212, Paris (France); Martineau, Antoine; Vercellino, Laetitia; Merlet, Pascal [Saint-Louis Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Teixeira, Luis; Espie, Marc [Saint-Louis Hospital, Breast Diseases Unit, Paris (France); University Sorbonne Paris Cite, INSERM/CNRS UMR944/7212, Paris (France)

    2017-07-15

    The study was designed to evaluate 1) the relationship between PET image textural features (TFs) and SUVs, metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and tumour characteristics in a large prospective and homogenous cohort of oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer (BC) patients, and 2) the capability of those parameters to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). 171 consecutive patients with large or locally advanced ER+ BC without distant metastases underwent an {sup 18}F-FDG PET examination before NAC. The primary tumour was delineated with an adaptive threshold segmentation method. Parameters of volume, intensity and texture (entropy, homogeneity, contrast and energy) were measured and compared with tumour characteristics determined on pre-treatment breast biopsy (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). The correlation between PET-derived parameters was determined using Spearman's coefficient. The relationship between PET features and pathological findings was determined using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Spearman's coefficients between SUV{sub max} and TFs were 0.43, 0.24, -0.43 and -0.15 respectively for entropy, homogeneity, energy and contrast; they were higher between MTV and TFs: 0.99, 0.86, -0.99 and -0.87. All TFs showed a significant association with the histological type (IDC vs. ILC; 0.02 < P < 0.03) but didn't with immunohistochemical characteristics. SUV{sub max} and TLG predicted the pathological response (P = 0.0021 and P = 0.02 respectively); TFs didn't (P: 0.27, 0.19, 0.94, 0.19 respectively for entropy, homogeneity, energy and contrast). The correlation of TFs was poor with SUV parameters and high with MTV. TFs showed a significant association with the histological type. Finally, while SUV{sub max} and TLG were able to predict response to NAC, TFs failed. (orig.)

  6. Correlation between tumour characteristics, SUV measurements, metabolic tumour volume, TLG and textural features assessed with 18F-FDG PET in a large cohort of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemarignier, Charles; Martineau, Antoine; Teixeira, Luis; Vercellino, Laetitia; Espié, Marc; Merlet, Pascal; Groheux, David

    2017-07-01

    The study was designed to evaluate 1) the relationship between PET image textural features (TFs) and SUVs, metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and tumour characteristics in a large prospective and homogenous cohort of oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer (BC) patients, and 2) the capability of those parameters to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). 171 consecutive patients with large or locally advanced ER+ BC without distant metastases underwent an 18 F-FDG PET examination before NAC. The primary tumour was delineated with an adaptive threshold segmentation method. Parameters of volume, intensity and texture (entropy, homogeneity, contrast and energy) were measured and compared with tumour characteristics determined on pre-treatment breast biopsy (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). The correlation between PET-derived parameters was determined using Spearman's coefficient. The relationship between PET features and pathological findings was determined using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Spearman's coefficients between SUV max and TFs were 0.43, 0.24, -0.43 and -0.15 respectively for entropy, homogeneity, energy and contrast; they were higher between MTV and TFs: 0.99, 0.86, -0.99 and -0.87. All TFs showed a significant association with the histological type (IDC vs. ILC; 0.02 < P < 0.03) but didn't with immunohistochemical characteristics. SUV max and TLG predicted the pathological response (P = 0.0021 and P = 0.02 respectively); TFs didn't (P: 0.27, 0.19, 0.94, 0.19 respectively for entropy, homogeneity, energy and contrast). The correlation of TFs was poor with SUV parameters and high with MTV. TFs showed a significant association with the histological type. Finally, while SUV max and TLG were able to predict response to NAC, TFs failed.

  7. Is quantitative oestrogen receptor expression useful in the evaluation of the clinical prognosis? Analysis of a homogeneous series of 797 patients with prospective determination of the ER status using simultaneous EIA and IHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazouni, Chafika; Bonnier, Pascal; Goubar, Aïcha; Romain, Sylvie; Martin, Pierre-Marie

    2010-10-01

    Oestrogen receptor (ER) determination in breast cancer (BC) is a major yardstick for the prognosis and for response to hormonal therapy (HT). As several techniques have been proposed for ER quantification, the purpose of our study was to assess whether the qualitative or quantitative analysis of ER expression might influence the prognosis and response to treatment. We analysed overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in 797 primary BC cases with ER determination by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The clinical impact according to qualitative or quantitative analysis of ER expression was assessed. Response to HT was evaluated according to quantitative EIA-determined ER expression levels. According to the qualitative analysis of ER expression, patients with EIA-determined and IHC-determined ER-positive tumours had significantly longer OS and DFS (p<0.001). The analysis stratified on quartiles of ER levels showed significantly different outcomes according to EIA- and IHC-determined subgroups. In the group of patients who received adjuvant treatment, 5-year OS was significantly different between the groups, with a clear benefit for the highest EIA-determined ER quartiles (p<0.001). Comparatively, in terms of 5-year DFS, a clear separation was noted between groups for adjuvant treatment (p<0.001). The group with moderate ER+ values was clearly distinct from the ER-negative population. Quantitative ER expression helped to better distinguish the beneficial or detrimental effect of HT within quartiles of ER-expressing tumours. Based on the STEPP analysis which showed a trend towards an ER effect on DFS as a function of HT assignment, we confirm the benefit of HT in patients with a very high EIA-determined ER level and a detrimental impact on negative and weakly positive groups. Quantitative ER expression in BC helps to better discriminate heterogeneity in clinical outcome and response to HT. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  8. Circulating sex hormones and gene expression of subcutaneous adipose tissue oestrogen and alpha-adrenergic receptors in HIV-lipodystrophy: implications for fat distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Pedersen, Steen B; Svenstrup, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    in lipodystrophic patients compared to nonlipodystrophic patients, whereas luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin were similar and normal in both study groups. Ratio of subcutaneous to total abdominal fat mass, limb fat, and insulin sensitivity, which were all decreased in lipodystrophic...... patients, correlated positively with both plasma oestradiol and testosterone (n = 31). Glycerol concentration during clamp (a marker of lipolysis) correlated inversely with expression of alpha2A-adrenergic-receptor, ratio of subcutaneous to total abdominal fat mass, and limb fat, respectively. Expression......OBJECTIVE: Circulating oestradiol and testosterone, which have been shown to increase in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), may influence fat distribution and insulin sensitivity. Oestradiol increases subcutaneous adipose...

  9. Oestradiol reduces Liver Receptor Homolog-1 mRNA transcript stability in breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, Kyren A.; Zhao, Zhe; Knower, Kevin C.; To, Sarah Q.; Chand, Ashwini L.; Clyne, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •LRH-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates tumor proliferation. •In breast cancer, high mRNA expression is associated with ER+ status. •In ER−ve cells, despite very low mRNA, we found abundant LRH-1 protein. •Our data show distinctly different LRH-1 protein isoforms in ER− and ER+ breast cancer cells. •This is due to differences in LRH-1 mRNA and protein stability rates. -- Abstract: The expression of orphan nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1) is elevated in breast cancer and promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. LRH-1 expression is regulated by oestrogen (E 2 ), with LRH-1 mRNA transcript levels higher in oestrogen receptor α (ERα) positive (ER+) breast cancer cells compared to ER− cells. However, the presence of LRH-1 protein in ER− cells suggests discordance between mRNA transcript levels and protein expression. To understand this, we investigated the impact of mRNA and protein stability in determining LRH-1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. LRH-1 transcript levels were significantly higher in ER+ versus ER− breast cancer cells lines; however LRH-1 protein was expressed at similar levels. We found LRH-1 mRNA and protein was more stable in ER− compared to ER+ cell lines. The tumor-specific LRH-1 variant isoform, LRH-1v4, which is highly responsive to E 2 , showed increased mRNA stability in ER− versus ER+ cells. In addition, in MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines, LRH-1 total mRNA stability was reduced with E 2 treatment, this effect mediated by ERα. Our data demonstrates that in ER− cells, increased mRNA and protein stability contribute to the abundant protein expression levels. Expression and immunolocalisation of LRH-1 in ER− cells as well as ER− tumors suggests a possible role in the development of ER− tumors. The modulation of LRH-1 bioactivity may therefore be beneficial as a treatment option in both ER− and ER+ breast cancer

  10. Oestradiol reduces Liver Receptor Homolog-1 mRNA transcript stability in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, Kyren A. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Environmental and Biotechnology Centre, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Zhao, Zhe; Knower, Kevin C. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); To, Sarah Q. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Chand, Ashwini L. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Clyne, Colin D., E-mail: Colin.clyne@princehenrys.org [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •LRH-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates tumor proliferation. •In breast cancer, high mRNA expression is associated with ER+ status. •In ER−ve cells, despite very low mRNA, we found abundant LRH-1 protein. •Our data show distinctly different LRH-1 protein isoforms in ER− and ER+ breast cancer cells. •This is due to differences in LRH-1 mRNA and protein stability rates. -- Abstract: The expression of orphan nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1) is elevated in breast cancer and promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. LRH-1 expression is regulated by oestrogen (E{sub 2}), with LRH-1 mRNA transcript levels higher in oestrogen receptor α (ERα) positive (ER+) breast cancer cells compared to ER− cells. However, the presence of LRH-1 protein in ER− cells suggests discordance between mRNA transcript levels and protein expression. To understand this, we investigated the impact of mRNA and protein stability in determining LRH-1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. LRH-1 transcript levels were significantly higher in ER+ versus ER− breast cancer cells lines; however LRH-1 protein was expressed at similar levels. We found LRH-1 mRNA and protein was more stable in ER− compared to ER+ cell lines. The tumor-specific LRH-1 variant isoform, LRH-1v4, which is highly responsive to E{sub 2}, showed increased mRNA stability in ER− versus ER+ cells. In addition, in MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines, LRH-1 total mRNA stability was reduced with E{sub 2} treatment, this effect mediated by ERα. Our data demonstrates that in ER− cells, increased mRNA and protein stability contribute to the abundant protein expression levels. Expression and immunolocalisation of LRH-1 in ER− cells as well as ER− tumors suggests a possible role in the development of ER− tumors. The modulation of LRH-1 bioactivity may therefore be beneficial as a treatment option in both ER− and ER+ breast cancer.

  11. Indomethacin inhibits the effects of oestrogen in the anterior pituitary gland of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosental, D G; Machiavelli, G A; Cherñavsky, A C; Speziale, N S; Burdman, J A

    1989-06-01

    Two inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis, indomethacin and aspirin, blocked the increase of oestrogen-binding sites in the nuclear subcellular fraction, an increase which occurs after the administration of oestradiol. Consequently the biological effects of oestrogens in the anterior pituitary gland of the rat (prolactin synthesis, concentration of progesterone-binding sites and cell proliferation) are diminished. The anterior pituitary gland synthesized prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), PGE2 and PGD2 from arachidonic acid. This synthesis was blocked when indomethacin was added to the culture media. Oestrogen increased the concentration of PGE2: an increase that was partially prevented by indomethacin. Prostaglandins may have an important role on the effects of oestrogen in the anterior pituitary gland of the rat.

  12. Expression of GABAergic receptors in mouse taste receptor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Starostik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple excitatory neurotransmitters have been identified in the mammalian taste transduction, with few studies focused on inhibitory neurotransmitters. Since the synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is expressed in a subset of mouse taste cells, we hypothesized that other components of the GABA signaling pathway are likely expressed in this system. GABA signaling is initiated by the activation of either ionotropic receptors (GABA(A and GABA(C or metabotropic receptors (GABA(B while it is terminated by the re-uptake of GABA through transporters (GATs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analysis, we investigated the expression of different GABA signaling molecules in the mouse taste system. Taste receptor cells (TRCs in the circumvallate papillae express multiple subunits of the GABA(A and GABA(B receptors as well as multiple GATs. Immunocytochemical analyses examined the distribution of the GABA machinery in the circumvallate papillae. Both GABA(A-and GABA(B- immunoreactivity were detected in the peripheral taste receptor cells. We also used transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP in either the Type II taste cells, which can respond to bitter, sweet or umami taste stimuli, or in the Type III GAD67 expressing taste cells. Thus, we were able to identify that GABAergic receptors are expressed in some Type II and Type III taste cells. Mouse GAT4 labeling was concentrated in the cells surrounding the taste buds with a few positively labeled TRCs at the margins of the taste buds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of GABAergic receptors localized on Type II and Type III taste cells suggests that GABA is likely modulating evoked taste responses in the mouse taste bud.

  13. Lipoprotein receptors in cultured bovine endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struempfer, A.E.M.

    1983-07-01

    In this study, receptors that may be involved in the uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and low density lipoproteins which have been modified by acetylation (AcLDL), were characterized. Aortic epithelial cells were used and a cell culture system which closely resembled the in vivo monolayer was established. Endothelial cell and lipoprotein interactions were examined by incubating the cells with 125 l-labelled lipoproteins under various conditions. The receptor affinity of bovine aortic endothelial cells was higher for AcLDL than that for LDL. Competition studies demonstrated that there were two distinct receptors for LDL and AcLDL on the endothelial cells. AcLDL did not compete with LDL for the LDL receptor, and conversely LDL did not compete with AcLDL for the AcLDL receptor. The receptor activities for LDL and AcLDL were examined as a function of culture age. Whereas the LDL receptor could be regulated, the AcLDL receptor was not as susceptible to regulation. Upon exposing endothelial cells for 72 h to either LDL or AcLDL, it was found that the total amount of cellular cholesterol increased by about 50%. However, the increase of total cholesterol was largely in the form of free cholesterol. This is in contrast to macrophages, where the increase in total cholesterol upon exposure to AcLDL is largely in the form cholesteryl esters

  14. In vivo relative quantitative proteomics reveals HMGB1 as a downstream mediator of oestrogen-stimulated keratinocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung U; Noh, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ju Hee; Lee, Won Jai; Yoo, Jong Shin; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Hyeran; Jung, Inhee; Jin, Shan; Lee, Kwang Hoon

    2015-06-01

    It is known that oestrogen influences skin wound healing by modulating the inflammatory response, cytokine expression and extracellular matrix deposition; accelerating re-epithelialization; and stimulating angiogenesis. To identify novel proteins associated with effects of oestrogen on keratinocyte, stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based mass spectrometry was performed. Using SILAC, quantification of 1085 proteins was achieved. Among these proteins, 60 proteins were upregulated and 32 proteins were downregulated. Among significantly upregulated proteins, high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) has been further evaluated for its role in the effect of oestrogen on keratinocytes. HMGB1 expression was strongly induced in oestrogen-treated keratinocytes in dose- and time-dependent manner. Further, HMGB1 was able to significantly accelerate the rate of HaCaT cell migration. To determine whether HMGB1 is involved in E2-induced HaCaT cell migration, cells were transfected with HMGB1 siRNA. Knockdown of HMGB1 blocked oestrogen-induced keratinocyte migration. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate that HMGB1 is a novel downstream mediator of oestrogen-stimulated keratinocyte migration. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cyproterone acetate in the treatment of oestrogen hypersensitivity vulvovaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Yvonne; Bradford, Jennifer; Fischer, Gayle

    2018-02-01

    Oestrogen hypersensitivity vulvovaginitis is a rare chronic cyclical vulvovaginitis responsive to oestrogen suppression or antagonism. We present a case series of 16 patients with refractory cyclical vulvovaginitis, all of whom responded to oestrogen suppression with cyproterone acetate. © 2017 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  16. Partial characterization of a novel oestrogen-induced protein in the rat adenohypophysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabiell, X; Zugaza, J L; Pombo, C M; Bokser, L; Mulet, N; Casanueva, F F

    1993-06-01

    In order to detect putative markers of prolactin-secreting pituitary tumours, adult rats were subjected to long-term oestrogenization with oestradiol benzoate (OE2) on a monthly basis. At 6 months, anterior pituitaries were dissected and incubated either as tissue fragments or as dispersed cells with a [35S]methionine mix for labelling. Proteins released into the incubation medium and from tissue extracts were further analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Oestrogen induced the appearance in the incubation medium of a protein (OE2 band) with an M(r) of 38,000 under reducing conditions, and high specific activity. Surprisingly, such a protein was not detected in tissue extracts. The OE2 band was detectable by 7 days after the first dose of oestrogen, and remained throughout 1 year of treatment. The tumour cell line GH3 showed a similar OE2 band which was further enhanced by oestrogens. The protein was observed similarly in both female and male pituitary donors, either intact or gonadectomized, and also in rats of different strains, suggesting that its appearance was independent of the strain of rat and gonadal status. Furthermore, the OE2 band was specific for pituitary cells and not produced by other oestrogenized tissues. No alteration in the rate of generation or the electrophoretic pattern of the OE2 band was observed when pituitary cells from oestrogenized rats were metabolically labelled while being incubated with tunicamycin. Furthermore, a system for glycan detection, adsorption to Concanavalin A or incubation with endoglycosidase F also failed to show a clear amount of glycosylation of the oestrogen-induced protein. Both immunoprecipitation experiments and time-limited proteolysis with V8 protease ruled out the possibility that the OE2 band could be structurally related to either GH or prolactin. In conclusion, oestrogens induce the generation of a new monocatenary protein with an apparent M(r) of 38

  17. Mouse bioassay to assess oestrogenic and anti-oestrogenic compounds: Hydroxytamoxifen, Diethylstilbestrol and Genistein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Köhlerová, Eva; Škarda, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 5 (2004), s. 209-217 ISSN 0931-184X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/02/0406; GA AV ČR IBS5045302; GA AV ČR KSK5020115 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : bioassay * anti-oestrogens * oestrogenicity Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 0.471, year: 2004

  18. Oestrogen supplementation in gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    2005-02-06

    Feb 6, 2005 ... intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) — a prospective randomised study. ARTICLE. Objective. To investigate the impact of oestrogen supplementation from the early luteal to the late proliferative phase on biochemical and ongoing pregnancy rates in gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT). Methods. Ninety-five ...

  19. Oestrogen, testosterone, cytotoxin and cholinesterase inhibitor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oestrogen, testosterone, cytotoxin and cholinesterase inhibitor removal during reclamation of sewage to drinking water. ... Risks associated with sewage effluent and reclaimed sewage should be closely monitored; therefore water at the Gammams Sewage Treatment Plant (GSTP) inlet and outlet, as well as reclaimed water ...

  20. A new day dawns: women without oestrogen or is a balance best?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, V Craig

    2002-01-01

    Building on the 30-year success story with tamoxifen, the question now is whether one agent can be used for treatment and prevention or should new medicines be targeted to specific applications? The early results with anastrozole suggest it could replace tamoxifen for treatment and should be tested as a preventive. Unfortunately, long-term testing of aromatase inhibitors will be required to avoid concerns about osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease and coronary heart disease. Most importantly, the knowledge gained with tamoxifen has resulted in a new generation of selective oestrogen receptor modulators that can be used to prevent osteoporosis, breast cancer and uterine cancer. It is now clear that strategies utilising aromatase inhibitors and selective oestrogen receptor modulators will provide much needed options for individualised treatments

  1. Transitional cell carcinoma express vitamin D receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Recently, vitamin D analogues have shown antineoplastic effect in several diseases. Vitamin D analogues exert its effect by interacting with the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Studies of VDR in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) have not been reported. The purpose of the present study was therefore.......05). Similarly, also tumor grade appeared to be related to the number of cells expressing the receptor. Normal urothlium also expressed VDR but only with low intensity. Our study shows that TCC cells possess the VDR receptor which may make them capable to respond to stimulation with vitamin D, but functional...... studies of vitamin D's effect on TCC cells in vitro are necessary before the efficacy of treatment with vitamin D analogues in TCC can be evaluated in patients....

  2. NMDA Receptors in Glial Cells: Pending Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzamba, David; Honsa, Pavel; Anderova, Miroslava

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type are involved in many cognitive processes, including behavior, learning and synaptic plasticity. For a long time NMDA receptors were thought to be the privileged domain of neurons; however, discoveries of the last 25 years have demonstrated their active role in glial cells as well. Despite the large number of studies in the field, there are many unresolved questions connected with NMDA receptors in glia that are still a matter of debate. The main objective of this review is to shed light on these controversies by summarizing results from all relevant works concerning astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and polydendrocytes (also known as NG2 glial cells) in experimental animals, further extended by studies performed on human glia. The results are divided according to the study approach to enable a better comparison of how findings obtained at the mRNA level correspond with protein expression or functionality. Furthermore, special attention is focused on the NMDA receptor subunits present in the particular glial cell types, which give them special characteristics different from those of neurons - for example, the absence of Mg(2+) block and decreased Ca(2+) permeability. Since glial cells are implicated in important physiological and pathophysiological roles in the central nervous system (CNS), the last part of this review provides an overview of glial NMDA receptors with respect to ischemic brain injury.

  3. Changing T cell specificity by retroviral T cell receptor display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, H. W.; van den Boom, M. D.; Spits, H.; Hooijberg, E.; Schumacher, T. N.

    2000-01-01

    The diversity of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is limited, because of the processes of positive and negative T cell selection. To obtain T cells with specificities beyond the immune system's capacity, we have developed a strategy for retroviral TCR display. In this approach, a library of T

  4. Dopamine receptor repertoire of human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunz Lars

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High levels of dopamine (DA were described in human ovary and recently evidence for DA receptors in granulosa and luteal cells has been provided, as well. However, neither the full repertoire of ovarian receptors for DA, nor their specific role, is established. Human granulosa cells (GCs derived from women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF are an adequate model for endocrine cells of the follicle and the corpus luteum and were therefore employed in an attempt to decipher their DA receptor repertoire and functionality. Methods Cells were obtained from patients undergoing IVF and examined using cDNA-array, RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. In addition, calcium measurements (with FLUO-4 were employed. Expression of two DA receptors was also examined by in-situ hybridization in rat ovary. Effects of DA on cell viability and cell volume were studied by using an ATP assay and an electronic cell counter system. Results We found members of the two DA receptor families (D1- and D2 -like associated with different signaling pathways in human GCs, namely D1 (as expected and D5 (both are Gs coupled and linked to cAMP increase and D2, D4 (Gi/Gq coupled and linked to IP3/DAG. D3 was not found. The presence of the trophic hormone hCG (10 IU/ml in the culture medium for several days did not alter mRNA (semiquantitative RT-PCR or protein levels (immunocytochemistry/Western blotting of D1,2,4,5 DA receptors. Expression of prototype receptors for the two families, D1 and D2, was furthermore shown in rat granulosa and luteal cells by in situ hybridization. Among the DA receptors found in human GCs, D2 expression was marked both at mRNA and protein levels and it was therefore further studied. Results of additional RT-PCR and Western blots showed two splice variants (D2L, D2S. Irrespective of these variants, D2 proved to be functional, as DA raised intracellular calcium levels. This calcium mobilizing effect of DA was observed

  5. Oestrogen, headache and oral contraceptives | Utian | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The possible relationship between headache and the oral contraceptive is considered. In the present study, no association has been demonstrat~d between oestrogen withdrawal (as produced by oophorectomy, or cessation of exogenous oestrogen replacement therapy in oophorectomised females) or by exogenous ...

  6. Cloning the interleukin 1 receptor from human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, J.E.; Acres, R.B.; Grubin, C.E.; McMahan, C.J.; Wignall, J.M.; March, C.J.; Dower, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    cDNA clones of the interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor expressed in a human T-cell clone have been isolated by using a murine IL-1 receptor cDNA as a probe. The human and mouse receptors show a high degree of sequence conservation. Both are integral membrane proteins possessing a single membrane-spanning segment. Similar to the mouse receptor, the human IL-1 receptor contains a large cytoplasmic region and an extracellular, IL-1 binding portion composed of three immunoglobulin-like domains. When transfected into COS cells, the human IL-1 receptor cDNA clone leads to expression of two different affinity classes of receptors, with K a values indistinguishable from those determined for IL-1 receptors in the original T-cell clone. An IL-1 receptor expressed in human dermal fibroblasts has also been cloned and sequenced and found to be identical to the IL-1 receptor expressed in T cells

  7. Oestrogen, ocular function and low-level vision: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Claire V; Walker, James A; Davidson, Colin

    2014-11-01

    Over the past 10 years, a literature has emerged concerning the sex steroid hormone oestrogen and its role in human vision. Herein, we review evidence that oestrogen (oestradiol) levels may significantly affect ocular function and low-level vision, particularly in older females. In doing so, we have examined a number of vision-related disorders including dry eye, cataract, increased intraocular pressure, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In each case, we have found oestrogen, or lack thereof, to have a role. We have also included discussion of how oestrogen-related pharmacological treatments for menopause and breast cancer can impact the pathology of the eye and a number of psychophysical aspects of vision. Finally, we have reviewed oestrogen's pharmacology and suggest potential mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects, with particular emphasis on anti-apoptotic and vascular effects. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  8. Compounds from Cynomorium songaricum with Estrogenic and Androgenic Activities Suppress the Oestrogen/Androgen-Induced BPH Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueni; Tao, Rui; Yang, Jing; Miao, Lin; Wang, Yu; Munyangaju, Jose Edouard; Wichai, Nuttapong; Wang, Hong; Zhu, Yan; Liu, Erwei; Chang, Yanxu; Gao, Xiumei

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the phytoestrogenic and phytoandrogenic activities of compounds isolated from CS and uncover the role of CS in prevention of oestrogen/androgen-induced BPH. Cells were treated with CS compounds, and immunofluorescence assay was performed to detect the nuclear translocation of ER α or AR in MCF-7 or LNCaP cells; luciferase reporter assay was performed to detect ERs or AR transcriptional activity in HeLa or AD293 cells; MTT assay was performed to detect the cell proliferation of MCF-7 or LNCaP cells. Oestrogen/androgen-induced BPH model was established in rat and the anti-BPH, anti-estrogenic, and anti-androgenic activities of CS in vivo were further investigated. The nuclear translocation of ER α was stimulated by nine CS compounds, three of which also stimulated AR translocation. The transcriptional activities of ER α and ER β were induced by five compounds, within which only ECG induced AR transcriptional activity as well. Besides, ECG stimulated the proliferation of both MCF-7 cells and LNCaP cells. CS extract suppressed oestrogen/androgen-induced BPH progress in vivo by downregulation of E2 and T level in serum and alteration of the expressions of ER α , ER β , and AR in the prostate. Our data demonstrates that compounds from CS exhibit phytoestrogenic and phytoandrogenic activities, which may contribute to inhibiting the oestrogen/androgen-induced BPH development.

  9. Expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman S. Cheung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are prototypical ligand gated ion channels typically found in muscular and neuronal tissues. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, however, have also recently been identified on other cell types, including stem cells. Activation of these receptors by the binding of agonists like choline, acetylcholine, or nicotine has been implicated in many cellular changes. In regards to stem cell function, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation leads to changes in stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation potential. In this review we summarize the expression and function of known nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different classes of stem cells including: pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, periodontal ligament derived stem cells, and neural progenitor cells and discuss the potential downstream effects of receptor activation on stem cell function.

  10. Isolated oestrogen deficiency in male 30-year-old: persistent growth plates with severe osteopenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.; Roberts, J.; Howman-Giles, R.; Cowell, C.; Jeremy, R.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: A 31-year-old male presented with right rib pain and generalised skeletal symptoms. He has a past history of multiple fractures following trauma. No history of childhood fractures. Asthma (No steroids). A product of a consanguineous marriage, he has one child aged 7. Examination showed 178.6cm male with normal sexual characteristics. No abnormality detected apart from tenderness over right ribs. Bone scan showed active growth plates and right and left rib fractures. X-rays demonstrated a bone age of 15 1/2 - 16 yrs and a compression fracture of L2. His bone mineral density is severely reduced. Metabolic investigations revealed Testosterone 27.4 nmol (N 11-35), oestradiol < 70 pmol/L, ultrasensitive assay 14 and 17 pmol/L (consistent with 8-year-old male), LH N, FSH N, 46 XY Karyotype. Alkaline phosphatase. 148 (N<120), Normal glucose tolerance test. This patient illustrates a very rare condition of oestrogen deficiency in a male, probably due to aromatase deficiency. This enzyme converts testosterone to oestradiol. It illustrates the role of oestrogen in fusing growth plates and maintaining bone mass in males with otherwise normal androgen levels. A similar clinical picture can result from an oestrogen receptor abnormality. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  11. Recruitment of activation receptors at inhibitory NK cell immune synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Schleinitz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell activation receptors accumulate by an actin-dependent process at cytotoxic immune synapses where they provide synergistic signals that trigger NK cell effector functions. In contrast, NK cell inhibitory receptors, including members of the MHC class I-specific killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR family, accumulate at inhibitory immune synapses, block actin dynamics, and prevent actin-dependent phosphorylation of activation receptors. Therefore, one would predict inhibition of actin-dependent accumulation of activation receptors when inhibitory receptors are engaged. By confocal imaging of primary human NK cells in contact with target cells expressing physiological ligands of NK cell receptors, we show here that this prediction is incorrect. Target cells included a human cell line and transfected Drosophila insect cells that expressed ligands of NK cell activation receptors in combination with an MHC class I ligand of inhibitory KIR. The two NK cell activation receptors CD2 and 2B4 accumulated and co-localized with KIR at inhibitory immune synapses. In fact, KIR promoted CD2 and 2B4 clustering, as CD2 and 2B4 accumulated more efficiently at inhibitory synapses. In contrast, accumulation of KIR and of activation receptors at inhibitory synapses correlated with reduced density of the integrin LFA-1. These results imply that inhibitory KIR does not prevent CD2 and 2B4 signaling by blocking their accumulation at NK cell immune synapses, but by blocking their ability to signal within inhibitory synapses.

  12. Synthesis of DNA in oestrogen-induced pituitary tumurs in rats: effect of bromocriptine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbermann, L E; Machiavelli, G A; De Nicola, A F; Weissenberg, L S; Burdman, J A

    1980-11-01

    Bromocriptine increased the concentration of prolactin in oestrogen-induced tumours of the rat pituitary gland. Prolactinaemia was significantly reduced and at the same time there was a considerable decrease in the weight of the tumour, in the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into DNA and in the activity of DNA polymerase alpha. The results suggested that the intracellular content of prolactin controls cell proliferation in this experimental tumour. A hypothalamic disorder is proposed as the primary cause of these tumours.

  13. CSF-1 Receptor Signaling in Myeloid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, E. Richard; Chitu, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    The CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) is activated by the homodimeric growth factors colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and interleukin-34 (IL-34). It plays important roles in development and in innate immunity by regulating the development of most tissue macrophages and osteoclasts, of Langerhans cells of the skin, of Paneth cells of the small intestine, and of brain microglia. It also regulates the differentiation of neural progenitor cells and controls functions of oocytes and trophoblastic cells in the female reproductive tract. Owing to this broad tissue expression pattern, it plays a central role in neoplastic, inflammatory, and neurological diseases. In this review we summarize the evolution, structure, and regulation of expression of the CSF-1R gene. We review, the structures of CSF-1, IL-34, and the CSF-1R and the mechanism of ligand binding to and activation of the receptor. We further describe the pathways regulating macrophage survival, proliferation, differentiation, and chemotaxis downstream from the CSF-1R. PMID:24890514

  14. Assessment and management of bone health in women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer receiving endocrine therapy: Position statement of the Endocrine Society of Australia, the Australian and New Zealand Bone & Mineral Society, the Australasian Menopause Society and the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Mathis; Ramchand, Sabashini; Milat, Frances; Vincent, Amanda; Lim, Elgene; Kotowicz, Mark A; Hicks, Jill; Teede, Helena

    2018-05-09

    To formulate clinical consensus recommendations on bone health assessment and management of women with oestrogen receptor-positive early breast cancer receiving endocrine therapy. Representatives appointed by relevant Australian Medical Societies used a systematic approach for adaptation of guidelines (ADAPTE) to derive an evidence-informed position statement addressing five key questions. Women receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitors and the subset of premenopausal woman on tamoxifen have accelerated bone loss and increased fracture risk. Both bisphosphonates and denosumab prevent bone loss, additionally denosumab has proven anti-fracture benefit. Women considering endocrine therapy need fracture risk assessment, including clinical risk factors, biochemistry and bone mineral density (BMD) measurement, with monitoring based on risk factors. Weight-bearing exercise, vitamin D and calcium sufficiency is recommended routinely. Antiresorptive treatment should be considered in women with prevalent or incident clinical or morphometric fractures, a T-score (or Z-scores in women <50 years) of <-2.0 at any site, or if annual bone loss is ≥5%, considering baseline BMD and other fracture risk factors. Duration of antiresorptive treatment can be individualised based on absolute fracture risk. Relative to their skeletal benefits, risks of adverse events with antiresorptive treatments are low. Skeletal health should be considered in the decision-making process regarding choice and duration of endocrine therapy. Before and during endocrine therapy, skeletal health should be assessed regularly, optimised by nonpharmacological intervention and where indicated antiresorptive treatment, in an individualised, multidisciplinary approach. Clinical trials are needed to better delineate long-term fracture risks of adjuvant endocrine therapy, and to determine the efficacy of interventions designed to minimise these risks. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This

  15. Kupffer cell complement receptor clearance function and host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loegering, D J

    1986-01-01

    Kupffer cells are well known to be important for normal host defense function. The development of methods to evaluate the in vivo function of specific receptors on Kupffer cells has made it possible to assess the role of these receptors in host defense. The rationale for studying complement receptors is based on the proposed important role of these receptors in host defense and on the observation that the hereditary deficiency of a complement receptor is associated with recurrent severe bacterial infections. The studies reviewed here demonstrate that forms of injury that are associated with depressed host defense including thermal injury, hemorrhagic shock, trauma, and surgery also cause a decrease in complement receptor clearance function. This decrease in Kupffer cell receptor clearance function was shown not to be the result of depressed hepatic blood flow or depletion of complement components. Complement receptor function was also depressed following the phagocytosis of particulates that are known to depress Kupffer cell host defense function. Endotoxemia and bacteremia also were associated with a depression of complement receptor function. Complement receptor function was experimentally depressed in uninjured animals by the phagocytosis of IgG-coated erythrocytes. There was a close association between the depression of complement receptor clearance function and increased susceptibility to the lethal effects of endotoxin and bacterial infection. These studies support the hypotheses that complement receptors on Kupffer cells are important for normal host defense and that depression of the function of these receptors impairs host defense.

  16. Expression of Plant Receptor Kinases in Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Hidefumi; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2017-01-01

    Although more than 600 single-transmembrane receptor kinase genes have been found in the Arabidopsis genome, only a few of them have known physiological functions, and even fewer plant receptor kinases have known specific ligands. Ligand-binding analysis must be operated using the functionally expressed receptor form. However, the relative abundance of native receptor kinase molecules in the plasma membrane is often quite low. Here, we present a method for stable and functional expression of plant receptor kinases in tobacco BY-2 cells that allows preparation of microsomal fractions containing the receptor. This procedure provides a sufficient amount of receptor proteins while maintaining its ligand-binding activities.

  17. Andrographolide regulates epidermal growth factor receptor and transferrin receptor trafficking in epidermoid carcinoma (A-431) cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y; Chiow, KH; Huang, D; Wong, SH

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Andrographolide is the active component of Andrographis paniculata, a plant used in both Indian and Chinese traditional medicine, and it has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis in different cancer cell lines. However, not much is known about how it may affect the key receptors implicated in cancer. Knowledge of how andrographolide affects receptor trafficking will allow us to better understand new mechanisms by which andrographolide may cause death in cancer cells. Experimental approach: We utilized the well-characterized epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transferrin receptor (TfR) expressed in epidermoid carcinoma (A-431) cells as a model to study the effect of andrographolide on receptor trafficking. Receptor distribution, the total number of receptors and surface receptors were analysed by immunofluorescence, Western blot as well as flow-cytometry respectively. Key results: Andrographolide treatment inhibited cell growth, down-regulated EGFRs on the cell surface and affected the degradation of EGFRs and TfRs. The EGFR was internalized into the cell at an increased rate, and accumulated in a compartment that co-localizes with the lysosomal-associated membrane protein in the late endosomes. Conclusion and implications: This study sheds light on how andrographolide may affect receptor trafficking by inhibiting receptor movement from the late endosomes to lysosomes. The down-regulation of EGFR from the cell surface also indicates a new mechanism by which andrographolide may induce cancer cell death. PMID:20233216

  18. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying the rapid vascular effects of steroids: sorting out the receptors and the pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Ross D; Gros, Robert

    2011-07-01

    Aldosterone, oestrogens and other vasoactive steroids are important physiological and pathophysiological regulators of cardiovascular and metabolic function. The traditional view of the cardiovascular actions of these vasoactive steroids has focused on their roles as regulators of transcription via activation of their 'classical' receptors [mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and oestrogen receptors (ER)]. However, based on a series of observations going back more than half a century, scientists have speculated that a range of steroids, including oestrogen and aldosterone, might have effects on regulation of smooth muscle contractility, cell growth and differentiation that are too rapid to be accounted for by transcriptional regulation. Recent studies performed in our laboratories (and those of others) have begun to elucidate the mechanism of rapid steroid-mediated cardiometabolic regulation. GPR30, now designated as GPER-1 (http://www.iuphar-db.org/DATABASE/FamilyIntroductionForward?familyId=22), a newly characterized 'orphan receptor', has been implicated in mediating the rapid effects of estradiol and most recently those of aldosterone. Studies to date have taught us that to understand the rapid vascular mechanisms of steroids, one must (i) know which vascular 'compartment' the steroid is acting; (ii) know which receptor the steroid hormone is activating; and (iii) not assume the receptor specificity of a steroid receptor ligand based solely on its selectivity for its traditional 'transcriptional' steroid receptor. Our newfound appreciation of the rapid effects of steroids such as aldosterone and oestrogens opens up a new vista for advancing our understanding of the biology and pathobiology of vascular regulation. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Modulating Estrogen Receptor-related Receptor-α Activity Inhibits Cell Proliferation*

    OpenAIRE

    Bianco, Stéphanie; Lanvin, Olivia; Tribollet, Violaine; Macari, Claire; North, Sophie; Vanacker, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    High expression of the estrogen receptor-related receptor (ERR)-α in human tumors is correlated to a poor prognosis, suggesting an involvement of the receptor in cell proliferation. In this study, we show that a synthetic compound (XCT790) that modulates the activity of ERRα reduces the proliferation of various cell lines and blocks the G1/S transition of the cell cycle in an ERR...

  20. Hormone-receptor expression and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieh, Weiva; Köbel, Martin; Longacre, Teri A

    2013-01-01

    Few biomarkers of ovarian cancer prognosis have been established, partly because subtype-specific associations might be obscured in studies combining all histopathological subtypes. We examined whether tumour expression of the progesterone receptor (PR) and oestrogen receptor (ER) was associated ...

  1. Tropomyosin Receptor Kinase A Expression on Merkel Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehkamp, Ulrike; Stern, Sophie; Krüger, Sandra; Hauschild, Axel; Röcken, Christoph; Egberts, Friederike

    2017-11-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a malignant neuroendocrine skin tumor frequently associated with the Merkel cell polyomavirus. Immune checkpoint therapy showed remarkable results, although not all patients are responsive to this therapy. Anti-tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA)-targeted treatment has shown promising results in several tumor entities. To determine TrkA expression in MCC as a rationale for potential targeted therapy. This case series study investigated the MCC specimens of 55 patients treated at the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany, from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2015. Thirty-nine of the 55 samples were suitable for further histopathologic examination. Expression of TrkA was explored by immunohistochemical analysis. Diagnosis of MCC was confirmed by staining positive for cytokeratin 20 (CK20) and synaptophysin. Expression of TrkA on the tumor cells. Specimens of 39 patients (21 women and 18 men; mean [SD] age, 75.0 [7.8] years) underwent immunohistochemical investigation. Thirty-eight of 38 specimens expressed CK20 and synaptophysin on the MCC tumor cells (100% expression). Merkel cell polyomavirus was detected in 32 of 38 specimens (84%). Tropomyosin receptor kinase A was found in all 36 evaluable specimens on the tumor cells; 34 (94%) showed a weak and 2 (6%) showed a strong cytoplasmic expression. In addition, strongly positive perinuclear dots were observed in 30 of 36 specimens (83%). Tropomyosin receptor kinase A was expressed on MCC tumor cells in 100% of evaluable specimens. This result may lead to the exploration of new targeted treatment options in MCC, especially for patients who do not respond to anti-programmed cell death protein 1 treatment.

  2. A novel method to generate T-cell receptor-deficient chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Takahiro; Wong, Desmond; Png, Yi Tian; Campana, Dario

    2018-03-13

    Practical methods are needed to increase the applicability and efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies. Using donor-derived CAR-T cells is attractive, but expression of endogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) carries the risk for graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). To remove surface TCRαβ, we combined an antibody-derived single-chain variable fragment specific for CD3ε with 21 different amino acid sequences predicted to retain it intracellularly. After transduction in T cells, several of these protein expression blockers (PEBLs) colocalized intracellularly with CD3ε, blocking surface CD3 and TCRαβ expression. In 25 experiments, median TCRαβ expression in T lymphocytes was reduced from 95.7% to 25.0%; CD3/TCRαβ cell depletion yielded virtually pure TCRαβ-negative T cells. Anti-CD3ε PEBLs abrogated TCRαβ-mediated signaling, without affecting immunophenotype or proliferation. In anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells, expression of an anti-CD19-41BB-CD3ζ CAR induced cytokine secretion, long-term proliferation, and CD19 + leukemia cell killing, at rates meeting or exceeding those of CAR-T cells with normal CD3/TCRαβ expression. In immunodeficient mice, anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells had markedly reduced GVHD potential; when transduced with anti-CD19 CAR, these T cells killed engrafted leukemic cells. PEBL blockade of surface CD3/TCRαβ expression is an effective tool to prepare allogeneic CAR-T cells. Combined PEBL and CAR expression can be achieved in a single-step procedure, is easily adaptable to current cell manufacturing protocols, and can be used to target other T-cell molecules to further enhance CAR-T-cell therapies. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Genetic engineering with T cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Morgan, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    In the past two decades, human gene transfer research has been translated from a laboratory technology to clinical evaluation. The success of adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to treat the patients with metastatic melanoma has led to new strategies to redirect normal T cells to recognize tumor antigens by genetic engineering with tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes. This new strategy can generate large numbers of defined antigen-specific cells for therapeutic application. Much progress has been made to TCR gene transfer systems by optimizing gene expression and gene transfer protocols. Vector and protein modifications have enabled excellent expression of introduced TCR chains in human lymphocytes with reduced mis-pairing between the introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Initial clinical studies have demonstrated that TCR gene-engineered T cells could mediate tumor regression in vivo. In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects of TCR gene-engineered T cells as a therapeutic strategy for treating patients with melanoma and other cancers. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  5. Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors and forebrain cholinergic system: receptor expression in identified cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas-Cazorla, Raúl; Vilaró, M Teresa

    2015-11-01

    Activation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors has pro-cognitive effects on memory performance. The proposed underlying neurochemical mechanism is the enhancement of acetylcholine release in frontal cortex and hippocampus elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. Although 5-HT4 receptors are present in brain areas related to cognition, e.g., hippocampus and cortex, the cellular localization of the receptors that might modulate acetylcholine release is unknown at present. We have analyzed, using dual label in situ hybridization, the cellular localization of 5-HT4 receptor mRNA in identified neuronal populations of the rat basal forebrain, which is the source of the cholinergic innervation to cortex and hippocampus. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was visualized with isotopically labeled oligonucleotide probes, whereas cholinergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and parvalbumin-synthesizing neurons were identified with digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probes. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was not detected in the basal forebrain cholinergic cell population. In contrast, basal forebrain GABAergic, parvalbumin synthesizing, and glutamatergic cells contained 5-HT4 receptor mRNA. Hippocampal and cortical glutamatergic neurons also express this receptor. These results indicate that 5-HT4 receptors are not synthesized by cholinergic cells, and thus would be absent from cholinergic terminals. In contrast, several non-cholinergic cell populations within the basal forebrain and its target hippocampal and cortical areas express these receptors and are thus likely to mediate the enhancement of acetylcholine release elicited by 5-HT4 agonists.

  6. Role of laminin receptor in tumor cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Taraboletti, G; Sobel, M E

    1987-01-01

    Polyclonal antisera were made against biochemically purified laminin receptor protein as well as against synthetic peptides deduced from a complementary DNA clone corresponding to the COOH-terminal end of the laminin receptor (U.M. Wewer et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 83: 7137-7141, 1986......). These antisera were used to study the potential role of laminin receptor in laminin-mediated attachment and haptotactic migration of human A2058 melanoma cells. The anti-laminin receptor antisera reacted with the surface of suspended, nonpermeabilized melanoma and carcinoma cells. The anti-laminin receptor...... antisera blocked the surface interaction of A2058 cells with endogenous laminin, resulting in the inhibition of laminin-mediated cell attachment. The A2058 melanoma cells migrated toward a gradient of solid phase laminin or fibronectin (haptotaxis). Anti-laminin antiserum abolished haptotaxis on laminin...

  7. The relationship between oestrogen and muscle strength: a current perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Jayne Elliott-Sale

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between muscle strength and oestrogen is ambiguous and is still largely unresolved. The evidence for and against an effect of oestradiol on determinants of muscle function is equivocal and often contradictory. The bulk of the research in this area was performed during the eighties and nineties, using models of reproductive functioning such as; the menstrual cycle, the menopause and hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptives and in vitro fertilisation treatment, to alter the female hormonal milieu. In the last decade, approximately 15 papers have demonstrated a relationship, both positive and negative, between the concentration of oestrogen and skeletal muscle strength. Conversely, around 20 articles have not shown any influence of oestrogen on a number of strength measures. The majority of these studies were performed using post-menopausal and eumenorrheic females. Most current studies use hormonal assays to confirm oestrogen status, however no recent studies have reported the bioavailable concentration of oestradiol. Similarly, no research in the last 10 years has used in vitro fertilisation treatment or pregnancy as acute and chronic models of supra-physiological changes in sex hormone concentration. Future work should focus on performing meta-analyses on each of the key components of muscle strength in an attempt to elucidate a causal relationship. In addition, models of reproductive functioning that cause the greatest magnitude of change to oestrogen concentration should be used, while controlling as many confounding factors as possible.

  8. T cell receptor-engineered T cells to treat solid tumors: T cell processing toward optimal T cell fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Lamers (Cor); S. van Steenbergen-Langeveld (Sabine); M. van Brakel (Mandy); C.M. Groot-van Ruijven (Corrien); P.M.M.L. van Elzakker (Pascal); B.A. van Krimpen (Brigitte); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractTherapy with autologous T cells that have been gene-engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) provides a feasible and broadly applicable treatment for cancer patients. In a clinical study in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with CAR T

  9. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20...... receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed...... whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays...

  10. Gonadal cell surface receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Bhat, M.; Cama, H.R.

    1979-01-01

    A specific membrane receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein has been demonstrated in testicular cells. Prealbumin-2 did not show any specific binding to the membrane. The affinity of retinol-binding protein for receptor drastically decreases upon delivery of retinol and the retinol-binding protein does not enter the cell. The mechanism of delivery of retinol to the target cell by plasma retinol-binding protein has been investigated. The process involves two steps; direct binding of retinol-binding protein to the receptor and uptake of retinol by the target cell with a concomitant drastic reduction in the affinity of the retinol-binding protein to the receptor. Probably the second step of the process needs a cytosolic factor, possibly the cellular retinol-binding protein or an enzyme. The binding of retinol-binding protein to the receptor is saturable and reversible. The interaction shows a Ksub(d) value of 2.1x10 -10 . The specific binding of a retinol-binding protein with great affinity has been employed in the development of a method for radioassay of the receptor. The receptor level of the gonadal cell has been found to vary with the stage of differentiation. The receptor concentrations in 11-week-old birds and adult birds are comparable. Testosterone treatment of 11-week-old birds produced a substantial increase in the receptor concentration over control, while the protein content increased marginally, indicating that, probably, synthesis of the receptor is specifcally induced by testosterone during spermatogenesis, and the concentration of receptor is relatively higher before the formation of the acrosome. (Auth.)

  11. Internalisation of gonadotrophin-receptor complex in ovarian luteal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, P.M.; Conti, M.; Harwood, J.P.; Dufau, M.L.; Catt, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    Following evidence that certain protein hormones can enter target cells the present investigation was undertaken which shows that gonadotrophin-induced receptor loss may occur by a process of internalisation of the hormone-receptor complex following the initial interaction of gonadotrophin with the cell surface. Localisation studies were carried out in 33-d old female rats previously treated with pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) to induce ovarian luteinisation. Animals were injected with 125 I-hCG to label the ovarian receptors for luteinising hormone in vivo. Microscope autoradiographs demonstrating distribution of 125 I-hCG in ovaries at various times following injection are shown. The combined results from the autoradiographs and from solubilisation experiments were used to determine the location and nature of the hCG-receptor complex following occupancy and loss of receptors from the plasma membrane of luteinised ovarian cells. (U.K.)

  12. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viguerie, N.; Tahiri-Jouti, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Clerc, P.; Logsdon, C.; Svoboda, M.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A.

    1988-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of 125 I-[Tyr 11 ]Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 ± 20 fmol/10 6 cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking 125 I-[Tyr 11 ]somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein N i to inhibit adenylate cyclase

  13. Screening of selected pesticides for oestrogen receptor activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Breinholt, Vibeke; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    , including. chlorpyrifos, diuron, iprodion, linuron, pentachlorphenol, prochloraz, propioconazol, propyzamine, quintozen, tetrachorvinphos and tetradifon. Some pesticides resulted in a negligible proliferation response, which was nor statistically significant under the present experimental conditions...

  14. Clinical significance of oestrogen and progesterone receptors in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    specimens obtained from uterine fibroids and normal myometrium during surgeries performed on ... The steroid dependence of the growth and symptomatology of uterine fibroids may be related ..... irregular menstrual blood loss (menorrhagia) with consequent ... including prolonged or heavy menstrual bleeding, pressure.

  15. Polymorphisms in Genes of Relevance for Oestrogen and Oxytocin Pathways and Risk of Barrett's Oesophagus and Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma: A Pooled Analysis from the BEACON Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Lagergren

    Full Text Available The strong male predominance in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC and Barrett's oesophagus (BO continues to puzzle. Hormonal influence, e.g. oestrogen or oxytocin, might contribute.This genetic-epidemiological study pooled 14 studies from three continents, Australia, Europe, and North America. Polymorphisms in 3 key genes coding for the oestrogen pathway (receptor alpha (ESR1, receptor beta (ESR2, and aromatase (CYP19A1, and 3 key genes of the oxytocin pathway (the oxytocin receptor (OXTR, oxytocin protein (OXT, and cyclic ADP ribose hydrolase glycoprotein (CD38, were analysed using a gene-based approach, versatile gene-based test association study (VEGAS.Among 1508 OAC patients, 2383 BO patients, and 2170 controls, genetic variants within ESR1 were associated with BO in males (p = 0.0058 and an increased risk of OAC and BO combined in males (p = 0.0023. Genetic variants within OXTR were associated with an increased risk of BO in both sexes combined (p = 0.0035 and in males (p = 0.0012. We followed up these suggestive findings in a further smaller data set, but found no replication. There were no significant associations between the other 4 genes studied and risk of OAC, BO, separately on in combination, in males and females combined or in males only.Genetic variants in the oestrogen receptor alpha and the oxytocin receptor may be associated with an increased risk of BO or OAC, but replication in other large samples are needed.

  16. Polymorphisms in Genes of Relevance for Oestrogen and Oxytocin Pathways and Risk of Barrett's Oesophagus and Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma: A Pooled Analysis from the BEACON Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagergren, Katarina; Ek, Weronica E; Levine, David; Chow, Wong-Ho; Bernstein, Leslie; Casson, Alan G; Risch, Harvey A; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Bird, Nigel C; Reid, Brian J; Corley, Douglas A; Hardie, Laura J; Wu, Anna H; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Pharoah, Paul; Caldas, Carlos; Romero, Yvonne; Vaughan, Thomas L; MacGregor, Stuart; Whiteman, David; Westberg, Lars; Nyren, Olof; Lagergren, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    The strong male predominance in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) and Barrett's oesophagus (BO) continues to puzzle. Hormonal influence, e.g. oestrogen or oxytocin, might contribute. This genetic-epidemiological study pooled 14 studies from three continents, Australia, Europe, and North America. Polymorphisms in 3 key genes coding for the oestrogen pathway (receptor alpha (ESR1), receptor beta (ESR2), and aromatase (CYP19A1)), and 3 key genes of the oxytocin pathway (the oxytocin receptor (OXTR), oxytocin protein (OXT), and cyclic ADP ribose hydrolase glycoprotein (CD38)), were analysed using a gene-based approach, versatile gene-based test association study (VEGAS). Among 1508 OAC patients, 2383 BO patients, and 2170 controls, genetic variants within ESR1 were associated with BO in males (p = 0.0058) and an increased risk of OAC and BO combined in males (p = 0.0023). Genetic variants within OXTR were associated with an increased risk of BO in both sexes combined (p = 0.0035) and in males (p = 0.0012). We followed up these suggestive findings in a further smaller data set, but found no replication. There were no significant associations between the other 4 genes studied and risk of OAC, BO, separately on in combination, in males and females combined or in males only. Genetic variants in the oestrogen receptor alpha and the oxytocin receptor may be associated with an increased risk of BO or OAC, but replication in other large samples are needed.

  17. The Role of the Sweet Taste Receptor in Enteroendocrine Cells and Pancreatic β-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itaru Kojima

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The sweet taste receptor is expressed in taste cells located in taste buds of the tongue. This receptor senses sweet substances in the oral cavity, activates taste cells, and transmits the taste signals to adjacent neurons. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein-coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. Recent studies have shown that this receptor is also expressed in the extragustatory system, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreatic β-cells, and glucose-responsive neurons in the brain. In the intestine, the sweet taste receptor regulates secretion of incretin hormones and glucose uptake from the lumen. In β-cells, activation of the sweet taste receptor leads to stimulation of insulin secretion. Collectively, the sweet taste receptor plays an important role in recognition and metabolism of energy sources in the body.

  18. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheng Newick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias. This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment.

  19. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The presence of AT2 receptors in mitochondria and their role in NO generation and cell aging were recently demonstrated in various human and mouse non-tumour cells. We investigated the intracellular distribution of AT2 receptors including their presence in mitochondria and the role in the induction...... agonist, Compound 21 (C21) penetrates the cell membrane of quiescent SK-UT-1 cells, activates intracellular AT2 receptors and induces rapid cell death; approximately 70% of cells died within 24 h. The cells, which escaped from the cell death, displayed activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, i...

  20. Perspectives on the Trypanosoma cruzi–host cell receptor interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalta, Fernando; Scharfstein, Julio; Ashton, Anthony W.; Tyler, Kevin M.; Guan, Fangxia; Mukherjee, Shankar; Lima, Maria F.; Alvarez, Sandra; Weiss, Louis M.; Huang, Huan; Machado, Fabiana S.

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The critical initial event is the interaction of the trypomastigote form of the parasite with host receptors. This review highlights recent observations concerning these interactions. Some of the key receptors considered are those for thromboxane, bradykinin, and for the nerve growth factor TrKA. Other important receptors such as galectin-3, thrombospondin, and laminin are also discussed. Investigation into the molecular biology and cell biology of host receptors for T. cruzi may provide novel therapeutic targets. PMID:19283409

  1. Prospects and limitations of T cell receptor gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Annelies; Schotte, Remko; Coccoris, Miriam; de Witte, Moniek A.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells is an attractive means to provide cancer patients with immune cells of a desired specificity and the efficacy of such adoptive transfers has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. Because the T cell receptor is the single specificity-determining

  2. Effects of phyto-oestrogens on veal calf prostate histology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    In veal calf production plant-based proteins are frequently included in milk replacer fed to the animals. Since soy products, which are mostly used, are known for their high levels of phyto-oestrogens, the effects of these feeds on the veal calf prostate were examined. Goal was to determine whether

  3. Detection and Quantification of Oestrogenic Endocrine Disruptors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to detect the presence and quantify the total oestrogens (estriol (E1), estradiol (E2), and estrone (E3)) in Lake Victoria water with a view of assessing their contribution to the health status of fish. A total of 27 water samples; three from each of the nine sampling sites were collected in Mwanza gulf in ...

  4. Cholesterol, coronary heart disease and oestrogens | Utian | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Present concepts of the interrelationship between oestrogens, endogenous and exogenous, and the development of atheromatosis and coronalY heart disease in the human female are reviewed. Aspects of research conducted by me at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, are incorporated in the discussion. The current ...

  5. Oestrogens and Osteoporosis | Utian | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interrelationship between oestrogens, endogenous and exogenous, their effects on plasma calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase metabolism, and the pathogenesis of osteoporosis are reviewed. Aspects of research conducted by me at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town are incorporated in the discussion.

  6. Modulating Estrogen Receptor-related Receptor-α Activity Inhibits Cell Proliferation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Stéphanie; Lanvin, Olivia; Tribollet, Violaine; Macari, Claire; North, Sophie; Vanacker, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    High expression of the estrogen receptor-related receptor (ERR)-α in human tumors is correlated to a poor prognosis, suggesting an involvement of the receptor in cell proliferation. In this study, we show that a synthetic compound (XCT790) that modulates the activity of ERRα reduces the proliferation of various cell lines and blocks the G1/S transition of the cell cycle in an ERRα-dependent manner. XCT790 induces, in a p53-independent manner, the expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21waf/cip1 at the protein, mRNA, and promoter level, leading to an accumulation of hypophosphorylated Rb. Finally, XCT790 reduces cell tumorigenicity in Nude mice. PMID:19546226

  7. Local oestrogen for vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, J; Lethaby, A; Kennedy, R

    2006-10-18

    Vaginal atrophy is a frequent complaint of postmenopausal women; symptoms include vaginal dryness, itching, discomfort and painful intercourse. Systemic treatment for these symptoms in the form of oral hormone replacement therapy is not always necessary. An alternative choice is oestrogenic preparations administered vaginally (in the form of creams, pessaries, tablets and the oestradiol-releasing ring). The objective of this review was to compare the effectiveness, safety and acceptability of oestrogenic preparations for women who suffer from vaginal atrophy. We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Register of trials (searched January 2006), The Cochrane Library (2006,Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2006), EMBASE (1980 to January 2006), Current Contents (1993 to January 2006, Biological Abstracts (1969 to 2006), Social Sciences Index (1980 to January 2006), PsycINFO (1972 to February 2006), CINAHL (1982 to January 2006) and reference list of articles. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. The inclusion criteria were randomised comparisons of oestrogenic preparations administered intravaginally in postmenopausal women for the treatment of symptoms resulting from vaginal atrophy or vaginitis. Thirty-seven trials were identified: of these 18 were excluded. Included trials were assessed for quality and two reviewer authors extracted data independently. The ratios for dichotomous outcomes and means for continuous outcomes were calculated. The outcomes analysed were categorised under the headings of: efficacy, safety and acceptability. Nineteen trials with 4162 women were included in this review. The overall quality of the studies was good, although not all trials measured the same outcomes. All trials measured efficacy, with various outcome measures. When comparing the efficacy of different oestrogenic preparations (in the form of creams, pessaries, tablets and the oestradiol-releasing vaginal ring) in relieving the

  8. Estrogen receptor α and aryl hydrocarbon receptor cross-talk in a transfected hepatoma cell line (HepG2 exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Göttel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prototype dioxin congener 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD is known to exert anti-estrogenic effects via activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR by interfering with the regulation of oestrogen homeostasis and the estrogen receptor α (ERα signalling pathway. The AhR/ER cross-talk is considered to play a crucial role in TCDD- and E2-dependent mechanisms of carcinogenesis, though the concerted mechanism of action in the liver is not yet elucidated. The present study investigated TCDD's impact on the transcriptional cross-talk between AhR and ERα and its modulation by 17β-estradiol (E2 in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2, which is AhR-responsive but ERα-negative. Transient transfection assays with co-transfection of hERα and supplementation of receptor antagonists showed anti-estrogenic action of TCDD via down-regulation of E2-induced ERα signaling. In contrast, enhancement of AhR signaling dependent on ERα was observed providing evidence for increased cytochrome P450 (CYP induction to promote E2 metabolism. However, relative mRNA levels of major E2-metabolizing CYP1A1 and 1B1 and the main E2-detoxifying catechol-O-methyltransferase were not affected by the co-treatments. This study provides new evidence of a TCDD-activated AhR-mediated molecular AhR/ERα cross-talk mechanism at transcriptional level via indirect inhibition of ERα and enhanced transcriptional activity of AhR in HepG2 cells.

  9. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 4 Receptor in the Endothelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Profirovic, Jasmina; Vardya, Irina; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana

    2006-01-01

    39 5-HYDROXYTRYPTAMINE 4 RECEPTOR IN THE ENDOTHELIAL CELLS. J. Profirovic, I. Vardya, T. Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) is an important neurotransmitter that regulates multiple events in the ce......39 5-HYDROXYTRYPTAMINE 4 RECEPTOR IN THE ENDOTHELIAL CELLS. J. Profirovic, I. Vardya, T. Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) is an important neurotransmitter that regulates multiple events...... gap formation in HUVECs. We are currently investigating the mechanism underlying 5-HT4 receptor-induced actin cytoskeleton changes in the endothelial cells. These data suggest that by activating 5-HT4 receptor, serotonin could be involved in regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics in the endothelial...

  10. Correlated receptor transport processes buffer single-cell heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Kallenberger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cells typically vary in their response to extracellular ligands. Receptor transport processes modulate ligand-receptor induced signal transduction and impact the variability in cellular responses. Here, we quantitatively characterized cellular variability in erythropoietin receptor (EpoR trafficking at the single-cell level based on live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling. Using ensembles of single-cell mathematical models reduced parameter uncertainties and showed that rapid EpoR turnover, transport of internalized EpoR back to the plasma membrane, and degradation of Epo-EpoR complexes were essential for receptor trafficking. EpoR trafficking dynamics in adherent H838 lung cancer cells closely resembled the dynamics previously characterized by mathematical modeling in suspension cells, indicating that dynamic properties of the EpoR system are widely conserved. Receptor transport processes differed by one order of magnitude between individual cells. However, the concentration of activated Epo-EpoR complexes was less variable due to the correlated kinetics of opposing transport processes acting as a buffering system.

  11. Dynamics of Corticosteroid Receptors: Lessons from Live Cell Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Mayumi

    2011-01-01

    Adrenal corticosteroids (cortisol in humans or corticosterone in rodents) exert numerous effects on the central nervous system that regulates the stress response, mood, learning and memory, and various neuroendocrine functions. Corticosterone (CORT) actions in the brain are mediated via two receptor systems: the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). It has been shown that GR and MR are highly colocalized in the hippocampus. These receptors are mainly distributed in the cytoplasm without hormones and translocated into the nucleus after treatment with hormones to act as transcriptional factors. Thus the subcellular dynamics of both receptors are one of the most important issues. Given the differential action of MR and GR in the central nervous system, it is of great consequence to clarify how these receptors are trafficked between cytoplasm and nucleus and their interactions are regulated by hormones and/or other molecules to exert their transcriptional activity. In this review, we focus on the nucleocytoplasmic and subnuclear trafficking of GR and MR in neural cells and non-neural cells analyzed by using molecular imaging techniques with green fluorescent protein (GFP) including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and discuss various factors affecting the dynamics of these receptors. Furthermore, we discuss the future directions of in vivo molecular imaging of corticosteroid receptors at the whole brain level

  12. Cell-surface acceleration of urokinase-catalyzed receptor cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer-Hansen, G; Ploug, M; Behrendt, N

    1997-01-01

    by a prior incubation of the cells with uPA inactivated by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, demonstrating a requirement for specific receptor binding of the active uPA to obtain the high-efficiency cleavage of cell-bound uPAR. Furthermore, amino-terminal sequence analysis revealed that uPAR(2+3), purified from U...

  13. The role of purinergic receptors in stem cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Kaebisch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge modern society has to face is the increasing need for tissue regeneration due to degenerative diseases or tumors, but also accidents or warlike conflicts. There is great hope that stem cell-based therapies might improve current treatments of cardiovascular diseases, osteochondral defects or nerve injury due to the unique properties of stem cells such as their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Since embryonic stem cells raise severe ethical concerns and are prone to teratoma formation, adult stem cells are still in the focus of research. Emphasis is placed on cellular signaling within these cells and in between them for a better understanding of the complex processes regulating stem cell fate. One of the oldest signaling systems is based on nucleotides as ligands for purinergic receptors playing an important role in a huge variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, migration and differentiation. Besides their natural ligands, several artificial agonists and antagonists have been identified for P1 and P2 receptors and are already used as drugs. This review outlines purinergic receptor expression and signaling in stem cells metabolism. We will briefly describe current findings in embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as in cancer-, hematopoietic-, and neural crest-derived stem cells. The major focus will be placed on recent findings of purinergic signaling in mesenchymal stem cells addressed in in vitro and in vivo studies, since stem cell fate might be manipulated by this system guiding differentiation towards the desired lineage in the future.

  14. Activation-induced proteolysis of cytoplasmic domain of zeta in T cell receptors and Fc receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, J L; Anderson, P

    1994-12-01

    The CD3-T cell receptor (TCR) complex on T cells and the Fc gamma receptor type III (Fc gamma RIII)-zeta-gamma complex on natural killer cells are functionally analogous activation receptors that associate with a family of disulfide-linked dimers composed of the related subunits zeta and gamma. Immunochemical analysis of receptor complexes separated on two-dimensional diagonal gels allowed the identification of a previously uncharacterized zeta-p14 heterodimer. zeta-p14 is a component of both CD3-TCR and Fc gamma RIII-zeta-gamma. Peptide mapping analysis shows that p14 is structurally related to zeta, suggesting that it is either: (i) derived from zeta proteolytically or (ii) the product of an alternatively spliced mRNA. The observation that COS cells transformed with a cDNA encoding zeta express zeta-p14 supports the former possibility. The expression of CD3-TCR complexes including zeta-p14 increases following activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or concanavalin A, suggesting that proteolysis of zeta may contribute to receptor modulation or desensitization.

  15. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, J.R.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 4 0 C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 37 0 C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation

  16. Investigations on the insulin receptor of isolated fat cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, W.

    1980-01-01

    Fat cells, isolated from the epididymal adipose tissue of rats, were incubed with iodine 125 insulin after previous incubation with various antagonists. By varying the antagonist concentration, it was possible to determine the effect these substances have on the insulin receptor, i.e. the insulin similarity. By varying the preincubation time, toxicity of the test substances could be detected, which pretended repression effects; and by finally verying the incubation time the effects on the receptor via the membrane could be distinguished from direct receptor bindings of the antagonist. (orig./MG) [de

  17. DNA polymerases in the rat pituitary gland. Effect of oestrogens and sulpiride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, G A; Kalbermann, L E; Machiavelli, G; Szijan, I; Burdman, J A

    1980-06-01

    Changes in the activity of DNA polymerase and [3H]thymidine incorporation into the DNA of the anterior pituitary gland were studied in oestrogenized male and pregnant rats. The activities of DNA polymerases alpha and beta, extracted in Tris--HCl or in sodium phosphate buffer were characterized according to their optimum pH and sensitivity to N-ethyl-maleimide. In the Tris-soluble fraction DNA polymerase activity is almost exclusively alpha, while in the phosphate soluble fraction it is a mixture of alpha and beta. The administration of oestrogens to male rats increases [3H]thymidine incorporation and enhances the activity of DNA polymerases in the Tris-soluble fraction, while the activity of the phosphate-soluble enzyme does not change. Sulpiride administration results in a further increment of [3H]thymidine incorporation and of DNA polymerase activity in the Tris-soluble fraction. In pregnant rats sulpiride also produces an increment of DNA polymerase activity only in the Tris-soluble fraction. Thus, the activity of the Tris-soluble fraction from APG behaves as DNA polymerase alpha. This activity changes in parallel with [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA which is an indication of cell proliferation in the gland. This is discussed with respect to a negative feedback mechanism between intracellular prolactin concentration and DNA synthesis in the APG.

  18. NMDA Receptors in Glial Cells: Pending Questions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Džamba, Dávid; Honsa, Pavel; Anděrová, Miroslava

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2013), s. 250-262 ISSN 1570-159X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/08/1381; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 604212 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : astrocytes * ischemia * NMDA receptors Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.347, year: 2013

  19. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Elutriated lymphocytes for manufacturing chimeric antigen receptor T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stroncek, David F.; Lee, Daniel W.; Ren, Jiaqiang; Sabatino, Marianna; Highfill, Steven; Khuu, Hanh; Shah, Nirali N.; Kaplan, Rosandra N.; Fry, Terry J.; Mackall, Crystal L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells manufactured from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) concentrates for the treatment of hematologic malignancies have been promising, but CAR T cell yields have been variable. This variability is due in part to the contamination of the PBMC concentrates with monocytes and granulocytes. Methods Counter-flow elutriation allows for the closed system separation of lymphocytes from monocytes and granulocytes. We ...

  1. Oestrogen: an overlooked mediator in the neuropsychopharmacology of treatment response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Charlotte; Tilbrook, Alan; Kulkarni, Jayashri

    2011-05-01

    Major depression (MD) and anorexia nervosa (AN) often present comorbidly and both share some affective symptoms, despite obvious phenotypic differences. In the illness phase, pathophysiological evidence indicates similar abnormalities in both clinical groups including dysfunction in the serotonin (5-HT) system (of which some abnormalities persist following recovery) and between 60% and 80% of patients in both groups present with significant hyperactivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. First-line approach to treatment for MD involves modulation of the 5-HT system using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). For AN, treatment with SSRIs has been shown to be considerably less effective compared to MD. Both illnesses show marked dysregulation in the HPA axis. A consequence of SSRI treatment is a reduction and/or normalization of indices of the HPA axis [i.e. cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)], which is consistent with recovery levels in both clinical groups. Oestrogen (in high doses) has been shown to exert antidepressant effects and positively impact on MD symptoms as a treatment in its own right, or in combination with antidepressants, in women of menopausal age. It is proposed that a combination of SSRIs and oestrogen therapy may facilitate physiological normalization in MD in women of non-menopausal age and in AN. Preliminary evidence suggests oestrogen treatment alone is of some benefit to patients and it is proposed that a combination of SSRI and oestrogen will precipitate and potentially accelerate symptomatic remission. Should this approach be successful, it offers the capacity for improvement over traditional antidepressant use in women diagnosed with MD and a novel strategy for the treatment of AN, a serious clinical illness associated with the highest mortality of any psychiatric condition.

  2. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  3. Entry of Francisella tularensis into Murine B Cells: The Role of B Cell Receptors and Complement Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Plzakova

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is an intracellular pathogen that dominantly infects and proliferates inside phagocytic cells but can be seen also in non-phagocytic cells, including B cells. Although protective immunity is known to be almost exclusively associated with the type 1 pathway of cellular immunity, a significant role of B cells in immune responses already has been demonstrated. Whether their role is associated with antibody-dependent or antibody-independent B cell functions is not yet fully understood. The character of early events during B cell-pathogen interaction may determine the type of B cell response regulating the induction of adaptive immunity. We used fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to identify the basic requirements for the entry of F. tularensis into B cells within in vivo and in vitro infection models. Here, we present data showing that Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strain LVS significantly infects individual subsets of murine peritoneal B cells early after infection. Depending on a given B cell subset, uptake of Francisella into B cells is mediated by B cell receptors (BCRs with or without complement receptor CR1/2. However, F. tularensis strain FSC200 ΔiglC and ΔftdsbA deletion mutants are defective in the ability to enter B cells. Once internalized into B cells, F. tularensis LVS intracellular trafficking occurs along the endosomal pathway, albeit without significant multiplication. The results strongly suggest that BCRs alone within the B-1a subset can ensure the internalization process while the BCRs on B-1b and B-2 cells need co-signaling from the co receptor containing CR1/2 to initiate F. tularensis engulfment. In this case, fluidity of the surface cell membrane is a prerequisite for the bacteria's internalization. The results substantially underline the functional heterogeneity of B cell subsets in relation to F. tularensis.

  4. Thyrotropin modulates receptor-mediated processing of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in cultured thyroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Y.L.; Burman, K.D.; Lahiri, S.; Abdelrahim, M.M.; D'Avis, J.C.; Wartofsky, L.

    1991-01-01

    In a prior study of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding to cultured thyroid cells, we reported that at 4 C, more than 95% of bound ANP is recovered on cell membranes, with negligible ANP internalization observed. Since ANP binding was inhibited by TSH, we have further studied TSH effects on postbinding ANP processing to determine whether this phenomenon reflects enhanced endocytosis of the ANP-receptor complex. An ANP chase study was initiated by binding [125I] ANP to thyroid cells at 4 C for 2 h, followed by incubation at 37 C. ANP processing was then traced by following 125I activity at various time intervals in three fractions: cell surface membranes, incubation medium, and inside the cells. Radioactivity released into medium represented processed ANP rather than ANP dissociated from surface membranes, since prebound [125I]ANP could not be competitively dissociated by a high concentration of ANP (1 mumol/L) at 37 C. Chase study results showed that prebound ANP quickly disappeared from cell membranes down to 34% by 30 min. Internalized ANP peaked at 10 min, with 21% of initial prebound ANP found inside the cells. At the same time, radioactivity recovered in incubation medium sharply increased between 10-30 min from 8% to 52%. Preincubation of cells with chloroquine (which blocks degradation of the ANP-receptor complex by inhibiting lysosomal hydrolase) caused a 146% increase in internalized [125I]ANP by 30 min (39% compared to 15% control), while medium radioactivity decreased from 52% to 16%, suggesting that processing of the receptor complex is mediated via lysosomal enzymes. In chase studies employing cells pretreated with chloroquine, TSH stimulated the internalization rate of ANP-receptor complex. By 30 min, TSH significantly reduced the membrane-bound ANP, and the decrease was inversely correlated to the increase in internalized radioactivity

  5. Secretin receptor involvement in prion-infected cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Nishizawa, Keiko; Oguma, Ayumi; Nishimura, Yuki; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Teruya, Kenta; Nishijima, Ichiko; Doh-ura, Katsumi

    2015-07-08

    The cellular mechanisms behind prion biosynthesis and metabolism remain unclear. Here we show that secretin signaling via the secretin receptor regulates abnormal prion protein formation in prion-infected cells. Animal studies demonstrate that secretin receptor deficiency slightly, but significantly, prolongs incubation time in female but not male mice. This gender-specificity is consistent with our finding that prion-infected cells are derived from females. Therefore, our results provide initial insights into the reasons why age of disease onset in certain prion diseases is reported to occur slightly earlier in females than males. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamics of Receptor-Mediated Nanoparticle Internalization into Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles offer a promising medical tool for targeted drug delivery, for example to treat inflamed endothelial cells during the development of atherosclerosis. To inform the design of such therapeutic strategies, we develop a computational model of nanoparticle internalization into endothelial cells, where internalization is driven by receptor-ligand binding and limited by the deformation of the cell membrane and cytoplasm. We specifically consider the case of nanoparticles targeted against ICAM-1 receptors, of relevance for treating atherosclerosis. The model computes the kinetics of the internalization process, the dynamics of binding, and the distribution of stresses exerted between the nanoparticle and the cell membrane. The model predicts the existence of an optimal nanoparticle size for fastest internalization, consistent with experimental observations, as well as the role of bond characteristics, local cell mechanical properties, and external forces in the nanoparticle internalization process. PMID:25901833

  7. Sexual function in prostatic cancer patients treated with radiotherapy, orchiectomy or oestrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, B.; Damber, J.E.; Littbrand, B.; Sjoegren, K.; Tomic, R. (Umeaa Univ. (Sweden))

    1984-02-01

    Sexual function in prostatic carcinoma patients was studied in 12 patients from each of three treatment groups: radiotherapy, orchiectomy and oestrogen treatment. Significant deterioration occurred in all groups. Although erectile potency was preserved in 9 of 12 patients treated with radiotherapy, 7 of these had a marked reduction in the frequency of sexual activity. Men subjected to orchiectomy or oestrogen treatment were seldom capable of having intercourse or of experiencing orgasm. However, oestrogen-treated men continued sexual activity with their partner more often than orchiectomised subjects. Patients receiving oestrogen treatment scored significantly higher for mental depression than those in the other two treatment groups.

  8. Sexual function in prostatic cancer patients treated with radiotherapy, orchiectomy or oestrogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, B.; Damber, J.-E.; Littbrand, B.; Sjoegren, K.; Tomic, R.

    1984-01-01

    Sexual function in prostatic carcinoma patients was studied in 12 patients from each of three treatment groups: radiotherapy, orchiectomy and oestrogen treatment. Significant deterioration occurred in all groups. Although erectile potency was preserved in 9 of 12 patients treated with radiotherapy, 7 of these had a marked reduction in the frequency of sexual activity. Men subjected to orchiectomy or oestrogen treatment were seldom capable of having intercourse or of experiencing orgasm. However, oestrogen-treated men continued sexual activity with their partner more often than orchiectomised subjects. Patients receiving oestrogen treatment scored significantly higher for mental depression than those in the other two treatment groups. (author)

  9. Study of the effects of radiation on prevention of gynaecomastia due to oestrogen therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterfall, N B; Glaser, M G [Charing Cross Group of Hospitals, London (UK)

    1979-09-01

    A study of the effects of irradiation in prevention of gynaecomastia due to oestrogen therapy for carcinoma is reported. Twenty patients were treated with oestrogens without radiotherapy, of these 17 developed gynaecomastia. Twenty-seven patients were treated with radiotherapy prior to oestrogens, of these only 3 developed gynaecomastia. Previous studies have shown similar results but have used larger doses of irradiation and recommended a delay of 1 month between radiotherapy and treatment. In this study a low dose of radiation was used and oestrogens were started immediately after radiotherapy.

  10. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors and their Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajik N.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Natural killer (NK cells are a subset of lymphocytes comprising around 10% of total lymphocytes in peripheral blood. Due to their role in the innate response, NK cells provide a ‘first line of defense’ against infectious agents and cancer and are also thought to play a role in autoimmunity. The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR are regulatory surface molecules, found on NK cells and on a subset of T lymphocytes. The genes for KIR are present on chromosome 19 in the leukocyte receptor complex and show a major difference for both the type and number of KIR genes present among different ethnic groups. They have been divided into two groups of 2D or 3D, depending on the number of external immunoglobulin domains. The presence of a long cytoplasmic tail with two immune tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIM allows the transduction of inhibitory signals and characterizes the inhibitory KIRs (2DL and 3DL, whereas the presence of short cytoplasmic tails corresponds to the activating KIR receptors (2DS and 3DS.These polymorphic receptors interact with specific motifs on human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules, modulate NK cytolytic activity. Some KIRs are known to interact with HLA-C molecules of target cells, HLA-Bw4 molecules and HLA-A3/11. For some KIRs the corresponding ligands are still unknown.

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of oestrogen and progesterone receptors during experimental acute and chronic murine Schistosomiasis mansoni Expressão imunohistoquímica de receptores para estrogênio e progesterona nas fases aguda e crônica da esquistossomose mansônica experimental em camundongos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia Ahmed Habib

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The responsibility of Schistosoma mansoni in female infertility is still controversial. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of acute and chronic schistosomiasis mansoni infection on the endometrium using immunohistochemical analysis of uterine hormone receptor expression. METHODS: Twenty-four nonpregnant swiss albino mice were divided into three groups: control, noninfected; acute; and chronic Schistosoma mansoni infection. Histological sections of uterine specimens were examined by light microscope with an image analyzing system to detect structural histological, estrogen receptor (ER and progesterone receptor (PR expression in the endometrium. RESULTS: No secretory phase was detected in the endometrium in acute and chronic Schistosoma infection. Hormone receptor expression (ER and PR showed statistically significant differences among the groups (pINTRODUÇÃO: A responsabilidade do Schistosoma mansoni em esterilidade feminina é ainda controversa. Este estudo é conduzido para avaliar o efeito da esquistossomose mansoni aguda e crônica no endométrio usando análise de imuno-histoquímíca da expressão de receptor hormonal uterina. MÉTODOS: Vinte e quatro camundongos fêmeas albinas suíças não grávidas foram divididas em 3 grupos (controle não-infectado, grupos agudos e crônicos infeccionados com Schistosoma mansoni. As seções histológicas de espécimes uterinos foram examinadas por microscópio leve com imagem, analisando sistema para detectar no endométrio expressões histológicas estruturais, receptor de estrogênio (ER e receptor de progesterona (PR. RESULTADOS: Nenhuma fase secretora foi detectada no endométrio com infecção aguda e crônica de Schistosoma. A expressão hormonal de receptor (ER e PR mostrou diferenças estatisticamente significantes entre grupos diferentes (p<0,05 com baixa significativa hormonal de ER com infecção crônica (comparado com controle proliferativo, controle secret

  12. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor and Vitamin D Receptor Signaling Pathways in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Kitagishi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are members of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors, which respond to specific ligands such as polyunsaturated fatty acids by altering gene expression. Three subtypes of this receptor have been discovered, each evolving to achieve different biological functions. Like other nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of PPARs is affected not only by ligand-stimulation, but also by cross-talk with other molecules. For example, both PPARs and the RXRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that coordinately regulate gene expression. In addition, PPARs and vitamin D receptor (VDR signaling pathways regulate a multitude of genes that are of importance for cellular functions including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. Interaction of the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways has been shown at the level of molecular cross-regulation of their transcription factor. A variety of ligands influencing the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways have been shown to reveal chemopreventive potential by mediating tumor suppressive activities in human cancers. Use of these compounds may represent a potential novel strategy to prevent cancers. This review summarizes the roles of the PPARs and the VDR in pathogenesis and progression of cancer.

  13. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor and Vitamin D Receptor Signaling Pathways in Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Satoru, E-mail: smatsuda@cc.nara-wu.ac.jp; Kitagishi, Yasuko [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Nara Women’s University, Kita-Uoya Nishimachi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan)

    2013-10-21

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors, which respond to specific ligands such as polyunsaturated fatty acids by altering gene expression. Three subtypes of this receptor have been discovered, each evolving to achieve different biological functions. Like other nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of PPARs is affected not only by ligand-stimulation, but also by cross-talk with other molecules. For example, both PPARs and the RXRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that coordinately regulate gene expression. In addition, PPARs and vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling pathways regulate a multitude of genes that are of importance for cellular functions including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. Interaction of the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways has been shown at the level of molecular cross-regulation of their transcription factor. A variety of ligands influencing the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways have been shown to reveal chemopreventive potential by mediating tumor suppressive activities in human cancers. Use of these compounds may represent a potential novel strategy to prevent cancers. This review summarizes the roles of the PPARs and the VDR in pathogenesis and progression of cancer.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor and Vitamin D Receptor Signaling Pathways in Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Satoru; Kitagishi, Yasuko

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors, which respond to specific ligands such as polyunsaturated fatty acids by altering gene expression. Three subtypes of this receptor have been discovered, each evolving to achieve different biological functions. Like other nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of PPARs is affected not only by ligand-stimulation, but also by cross-talk with other molecules. For example, both PPARs and the RXRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that coordinately regulate gene expression. In addition, PPARs and vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling pathways regulate a multitude of genes that are of importance for cellular functions including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. Interaction of the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways has been shown at the level of molecular cross-regulation of their transcription factor. A variety of ligands influencing the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways have been shown to reveal chemopreventive potential by mediating tumor suppressive activities in human cancers. Use of these compounds may represent a potential novel strategy to prevent cancers. This review summarizes the roles of the PPARs and the VDR in pathogenesis and progression of cancer

  15. Oestrogene mimetic isoflavones’ pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Dragomirescu,

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Genisteine is the most abundant and the most studied estrogen-mimetic izoflavone. It's chemical formula is 4',5,7 – trihidroxyisoflavone. It has also estrogen-modulated properties by its binding ability to the beta type estrogen receptor. Genisteine presents the following farmacodinamic effects: antiaterogen effect, prevention of estrogen-dependent cancers, especially breast cancer, prevention of skin aging body, osteoprogen effect, prevention of osteoporosis at the menopauses women. Despite all these real benefits, there are also many adverse effects, registered both in humans and animals. Thus, the sheep feeding with some Fabaceae species, containing estrogen-mimetic isoflavones were stopped their reproductive function(isoflavones acted as an oral contraceptive. In humans, phytoestroges influence is still under evaluation, being suspected effects such as cerebral involution - via abusive apoptosis - or disturbance in hormonal status, in male children. All these are added to already known allergies, caused by soy proteins.

  16. Immunoprofiling of human uterine mast cells identifies three phenotypes and expression of ERβ and glucocorticoid receptor [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca De Leo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human mast cells (MCs are long-lived tissue-resident immune cells characterised by granules containing the proteases chymase and/or tryptase. Their phenotype is modulated by their tissue microenvironment. The human uterus has an outer muscular layer (the myometrium surrounding the endometrium, both of which play an important role in supporting a pregnancy. The endometrium is a sex steroid target tissue consisting of epithelial cells (luminal, glandular surrounded by a multicellular stroma, with the latter containing an extensive vascular compartment as well as fluctuating populations of immune cells that play an important role in regulating tissue function. The role of MCs in the human uterus is poorly understood with little known about their regulation or the impact of steroids on their differentiation status. The current study had two aims: 1 To investigate the spatial and temporal location of uterine MCs and determine their phenotype; 2 To determine whether MCs express receptors for steroids implicated in uterine function, including oestrogen (ERα, ERβ, progesterone (PR and glucocorticoids (GR. Methods: Tissue samples from women (n=46 were used for RNA extraction or fixed for immunohistochemistry. Results: Messenger RNAs encoded by TPSAB1 (tryptase and CMA1 (chymase were detected in endometrial tissue homogenates. Immunohistochemistry revealed the relative abundance of tryptase MCs was myometrium>basal endometrium>functional endometrium. We show for the first time that uterine MCs are predominantly of the classical MC subtypes: (positive, +; negative, - tryptase+/chymase- and tryptase+/chymase+, but a third subtype was also identified (tryptase-/chymase+. Tryptase+ MCs were of an ERβ+/ERα-/PR-/GR+ phenotype mirroring other uterine immune cell populations, including natural killer cells. Conclusions: Endometrial tissue resident immune MCs have three protease-specific phenotypes. Expression of both ERβ and GR in MCs mirrors

  17. T cell clones which share T cell receptor epitopes differ in phenotype, function and specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yssel, H.; Blanchard, D.; Boylston, A.; de Vries, J. E.; Spits, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, we described a monoclonal antibody (3D6) that reacts with the T cell receptor (Ti) of the T leukemic cell line HPB-ALL and that cross-reacts with 2-10% of the T cells of normal healthy individuals. In this study we report the establishment of T cell clones that are 3D6+ but that differ in

  18. 77 FR 3482 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Exclusive License: Development of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen Receptors Into Therapeutics for.... 61/473,409 entitled ``Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III chimeric antigen receptors... EGFRvIII chimeric antigen (CARs) and methods of using these engineered T cells to treat and/or prevent...

  19. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1992-01-01

    of EGF receptor mRNA in all 10 cell lines that were found to be EGF receptor-positive and in one cell line that was found to be EGF receptor-negative in the radioreceptor assay and affinity labeling. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence that a large proportion of a broad panel of small cell......Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression was evaluated in a panel of 21 small cell lung cancer cell lines with radioreceptor assay, affinity labeling, and Northern blotting. We found high-affinity receptors to be expressed in 10 cell lines. Scatchard analysis of the binding data...... demonstrated that the cells bound between 3 and 52 fmol/mg protein with a KD ranging from 0.5 x 10(-10) to 2.7 x 10(-10) M. EGF binding to the receptor was confirmed by affinity-labeling EGF to the EGF receptor. The cross-linked complex had a M(r) of 170,000-180,000. Northern blotting showed the expression...

  20. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy.

  1. Nonimmune cells equipped with T-cell-receptor-like signaling for cancer cell ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Ryosuke; Scheller, Leo; Fussenegger, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The ability to engineer custom cell-contact-sensing output devices into human nonimmune cells would be useful for extending the applicability of cell-based cancer therapies and for avoiding risks associated with engineered immune cells. Here we have developed a new class of synthetic T-cell receptor-like signal-transduction device that functions efficiently in human nonimmune cells and triggers release of output molecules specifically upon sensing contact with a target cell. This device employs an interleukin signaling cascade, whose OFF/ON switching is controlled by biophysical segregation of a transmembrane signal-inhibitory protein from the sensor cell-target cell interface. We further show that designer nonimmune cells equipped with this device driving expression of a membrane-penetrator/prodrug-activating enzyme construct could specifically kill target cells in the presence of the prodrug, indicating its potential usefulness for target-cell-specific, cell-based enzyme-prodrug cancer therapy. Our study also contributes to the advancement of synthetic biology by extending available design principles to transmit extracellular information to cells.

  2. Regulation of HIV receptor expression in cervical epithelial cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) caused by the Gram-negative bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are associated with an increased risk of HIV acquisition in South African women. HIV infection involves binding of the virus to CD4+ receptors on host cells and subsequent binding to ...

  3. Short-term oestrogen replacement therapy improves insulin resistance, lipids and fibrinolysis in postmenopausal women with NIDDM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussaard, H.E.; Gevers Leuven, J.A.; Frölich, M.; Kluft, C.; Krans, H.M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Oestrogen replacement therapy is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. Patients with non-insulin- dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have an increased cardiovascular risk. However, oestrogen replacement therapy is only reluctantly prescribed for

  4. Plant cell wall signalling and receptor-like kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sebastian

    2017-02-15

    Communication between the extracellular matrix and the cell interior is essential for all organisms as intrinsic and extrinsic cues have to be integrated to co-ordinate development, growth, and behaviour. This applies in particular to plants, the growth and shape of which is governed by deposition and remodelling of the cell wall, a rigid, yet dynamic, extracellular network. It is thus generally assumed that cell wall surveillance pathways exist to monitor the state of the wall and, if needed, elicit compensatory responses such as altered expression of cell wall remodelling and biosynthesis genes. Here, I highlight recent advances in the field of cell wall signalling in plants, with emphasis on the role of plasma membrane receptor-like kinase complexes. In addition, possible roles for cell wall-mediated signalling beyond the maintenance of cell wall integrity are discussed. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Rapid internalization of the insulin receptor in rat hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backer, J.M.; White, M.F.; Kahn, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have studied the internalization of the insulin receptor (IR) in rat hepatoma cells (Fao). The cells were surface-iodinated at 4 0 C, stimulated with insulin at 37 0 C, and then cooled rapidly, trypsinized at 4 0 C and solubilized. The IR was immunoprecipitated with a specific antibody, and internalization of the IR was assessed by the appearance of trypsin-resistant bands on SDS-PAGE. Insulin induced the internalization of surface receptors with a t 1/2 of 9-10 mins; cells not exposed to insulin internalized less than 20% of the IR during 1 h at 37 0 C. Further experiments demonstrated that the accumulation of trypsin-resistant IR paralleled a loss of receptor from the cell surface. Insulin-stimulated cells were chilled and iodinated at 4 0 C, followed by solubilization, immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE; alternatively, insulin-stimulated cells were chilled, surface-bound ligand removed by washing the cells at pH 4.2, and specific [ 125 I]insulin binding measured at 4 0 C. Both techniques confirmed the disappearance of IR from the cell surface at rates comparable to the insulin-stimulated internalization described above. The total amount of phosphotyrosine-containing IR, as assessed by immunoprecipitation with an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, remained constant during this time interval, suggesting that active kinase is translocated into the cell. In summary, the authors data indicate that insulin binding increases the rate of IR internalization of Fao cells. This relocation may facilitate the interaction of the activated tyrosine kinase in the IR with intracellular substrates, thus transmitting the insulin signal to metabolic pathways

  6. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of trichosanthin in choriocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, W.Y.; Huang Hai; Tam, S.-C.

    2003-01-01

    Trichosanthin (TCS) is a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP). It is generally believed that its many biological activities act through inhibition of ribosomes resulting in a decrease in protein synthesis. It has been hypothesized that the rate of entry of TCS into cells to reach ribosomes is an important factor in determining its biological activity. To prove this hypothesis, we have mapped out and compared the intracellular routing of TCS in two cell lines, namely the choriocarcinoma JAR cell line, which is known to be highly sensitive to the toxic effects of TCS, and the hepatoma H35 cell line, to which TCS shows minimal toxicity. Results from laser scanning confocal microscopy indicated that fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled TCS quickly accumulated inside JAR cells within 4 h of incubation while only a low level of fluorescent signals was detected in H35 cells during the same period of time. When TCS was conjugated with gold particles (Au) and its intracellular locations were traced with a transmission electron microscope, it was found that most of TCS were bound to coated pits on the JAR cell surface and were rapidly internalized within an hour. By 4 h, TCS reached almost every cytoplasmic region including ribosomes, and the JAR cell began to degenerate. In H35 cells, however, the binding of TCS to coated pits was not observed, but instead, a small amount of TCS was found to penetrate the cell non-specifically by direct diffusion across the cell membrane. Our observations suggest that most of TCS enter JAR cells via a specific receptor mediated pathway, which allows a swift transport of TCS across the membrane and a rapid accumulation of intracellular TCS, while in H35 cells, TCS takes a slow and non-specific route. The receptor-mediated uptake together with the specific intracellular routing of TCS may partly account for the differential vulnerability of the choriocarcinoma cell line towards the toxicity of TCS

  7. New insights into how trafficking regulates T cell receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqiong Lou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThere is emerging evidence that exocytosis plays an important role in regulating T cell receptor (TCR signaling. The trafficking molecules involved in lytic granule (LG secretion in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL have been well studied due to the immune disorder known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohisiocytosis (FHLH. However, the knowledge of trafficking machineries regulating the exocytosis of receptors and signaling molecules remains quite limited. In this review, we summarize the reported trafficking molecules involved in the transport of the TCR and downstream signaling molecules to the cell surface. By combining this information with the known knowledge of LG exocytosis and general exocytic trafficking machinery, we attempt to draw a more complete picture of how the TCR signaling network and exocytic trafficking matrix are interconnected to facilitate T cell activation. This also highlights how membrane compartmentalization facilitates the spatiotemporal organization of cellular responses that are essential for immune functions.

  8. Receptor control in mesenchymal stem cell engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Matthew J.; García, Andrés J.; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2018-03-01

    Materials science offers a powerful tool to control mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) growth and differentiation into functional phenotypes. A complex interplay between the extracellular matrix and growth factors guides MSC phenotypes in vivo. In this Review, we discuss materials-based bioengineering approaches to direct MSC fate in vitro and in vivo, mimicking cell-matrix-growth factor crosstalk. We first scrutinize MSC-matrix interactions and how the properties of a material can be tailored to support MSC growth and differentiation in vitro, with an emphasis on MSC self-renewal mechanisms. We then highlight important growth factor signalling pathways and investigate various materials-based strategies for growth factor presentation and delivery. Integrin-growth factor crosstalk in the context of MSC engineering is introduced, and bioinspired material designs with the potential to control the MSC niche phenotype are considered. Finally, we summarize important milestones on the road to MSC engineering for regenerative medicine.

  9. Phyto-oestrogen levels in foods : The design and construction of the VENUS database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiely, M.; Faughnan, M.; Wähälä, K.; Brants, H.; Mulligan, A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the Vegetal Estrogens in Nutrition and the Skeleton (VENUS) project was to evaluate existing data on dietary exposure to compounds with oestrogenic and anti-oestrogenic effects present in plant foods as constituents or contaminants, and to identify and disseminate in vitro and in

  10. Effect of forage on the content of phyto-oestrogens in bovine milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Hansen-Møller, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Phyto-oestrogens are believed to have a range of beneficial effects on predominant Western diseases. A few studies on phyto-oestrogens in milk exist and show that the composition can be affected by feeding. Therefore, the aim was to study how feeding of lucerne and grass/clover silages (GCSs) aff...

  11. Glucose transporters are expressed in taste receptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merigo, Flavia; Benati, Donatella; Cristofoletti, Mirko; Osculati, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    In the intestine, changes of sugar concentration generated in the lumen during digestion induce adaptive responses of glucose transporters in the epithelium. A close matching between the intestinal expression of glucose transporters and the composition and amount of the diet has been provided by several experiments. Functional evidence has demonstrated that the regulation of glucose transporters into enterocytes is induced by the sensing of sugar of the enteroendocrine cells through activation of sweet taste receptors (T1R2 and T1R3) and their associated elements of G-protein-linked signaling pathways (e.g. α-gustducin, phospholipase C β type 2 and transient receptor potential channel M5), which are signaling molecules also involved in the perception of sweet substances in the taste receptor cells (TRCs) of the tongue. Considering this phenotypical similarity between the intestinal cells and TRCs, we evaluated whether the TRCs themselves possess proteins of the glucose transport mechanism. Therefore, we investigated the expression of the typical intestinal glucose transporters (i.e. GLUT2, GLUT5 and SGLT1) in rat circumvallate papillae, using immunohistochemistry, double-labeling immunofluorescence, immunoelectron microscopy and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The results showed that GLUT2, GLUT5 and SGLT1 are expressed in TRCs; their immunoreactivity was also observed in cells that displayed staining for α-gustducin and T1R3 receptor. The immunoelectron microscopic results confirmed that GLUT2, GLUT5 and SGLT1 were predominantly expressed in cells with ultrastructural characteristics of chemoreceptor cells. The presence of glucose transporters in TRCs adds a further link between chemosensory information and cellular responses to sweet stimuli that may have important roles in glucose homeostasis, contributing to a better understanding of the pathways implicated in glucose metabolism. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011

  12. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves' patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves' disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs

  13. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves` patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves` disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs.

  14. DMPD: Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7744810 Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. Ben-Ba...ow Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. PubmedID 7744810 Title Signals and receptors involved in recr...uitment of inflammatory cells. Authors Ben-Baruch A, Mic

  15. TAM receptors in apoptotic cell clearance, autoimmunity, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh-Quynh; Tsou, Wen-I; Kotenko, Sergei; Birge, Raymond B

    2013-08-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases, Tyro-3, Axl and Mer, collectively designated as TAM, are involved in the clearance of apoptotic cells. TAM ligands, Gas6 and Protein S, bind to the surfaces of apoptotic cells, and at the same time, interact directly with TAM expressed on phagocytes, impacting the engulfment and clearance of apoptotic cells and debris. The well-tuned and balanced actions of TAM may affect a variety of human pathologies including autoimmunity, retinal degeneration, and cancer. This article emphasizes some of the emerging findings and mechanistic insights into TAM functions that are clinically relevant and possibly therapeutically targeted.

  16. Glucocorticoid receptor beta increases migration of human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, Lucien; Nwaneri, Assumpta C; Grabnar, Maria; Demeter, Jonathan; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-05-10

    Bladder cancer is observed worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Recent investigations on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling point to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. Here we show an inverse effect on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform signaling that may lead to bladder cancer. We found similar GRα expression levels in the transitional uroepithelial cancer cell lines T24 and UMUC-3. However, the T24 cells showed a significant (p bladder cancer cells. Therefore, GRβ may have a significant role in bladder cancer, and possibly serve as a therapeutic target for the disease.

  17. A Comprehensive Nuclear Receptor Network for Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Kittler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In breast cancer, nuclear receptors (NRs play a prominent role in governing gene expression, have prognostic utility, and are therapeutic targets. We built a regulatory map for 24 NRs, six chromatin state markers, and 14 breast-cancer-associated transcription factors (TFs that are expressed in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The resulting network reveals a highly interconnected regulatory matrix where extensive crosstalk occurs among NRs and other breast -cancer-associated TFs. We show that large numbers of factors are coordinately bound to highly occupied target regions throughout the genome, and these regions are associated with active chromatin state and hormone-responsive gene expression. This network also provides a framework for stratifying and predicting patient outcomes, and we use it to show that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta binds to a set of genes also regulated by the retinoic acid receptors and whose expression is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer.

  18. P2X7 receptor activation induces cell death and microparticle release in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinescu, P.; Wang, B.; Kovacevic, K.; Jalilian, I.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Wiley, J.S.; Sluyter, R.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular ATP induces cation fluxes in and impairs the growth of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells in a manner characteristic of the purinergic P2X7 receptor, however the presence of P2X7 in these cells is unknown. This study investigated whether MEL cells express functional P2X7. RT-PCR,

  19. The Role of Estrogen Related Receptor in Modulating Estrogen Receptor Mediated Transcription in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    tumors correlates with an unfavorable prognosis (Ariazi 2002; Lu 2001; Suzuki 2004; Vanacker 1999). The transcriptional activity of ERRa is not inhibited...SA. 101:6570-5. Needham, M ., S. Raines, J. McPheat, C. Stacey, J. Ellston, S. Hoare, and M . Parker. 2000. Differential interaction of steroid hormone...R. Graves, M . Wright, and B.M. Spiegelman. 1998. A cold- inducible coactivator of nuclear receptors linked to adaptive thermogenesis. Cell. 92:829- 39

  20. Endothelium in brain: Receptors, mitogenesis, and biosynthesis in glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCumber, M.W.; Ross, C.A.; Snyder, S.H.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have explored the cellular loci of endothelin (ET) actions and formation in the brain, using cerebellar mutant mice was well as primary and continuous cell cultures. A glial role is favored by several observations: (1) mutant mice lacking neuronal Purkinje cells display normal ET receptor binding and enhanced stimulation by ET of inositolphospholipid turnover; (ii) in weaver mice lacking neuronal granule cells, ET stimulation of inositolphospholipid turnover is not significantly diminished; (iii) C 6 glioma cells and primary cultures of cerebellar astroglia exhibit substantial ET receptor binding and ET-induced stimulation of inositolphospholipid turnover; (iv) ET promotes mitogenesis of C 6 glioma cells and primary cerebellar astroglia; and (v) primary cultures of cerebellar astroglia contain ET mRNA. ET also appears to have a neuronal role, since it stimulates inositolphospholipid turnover in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells, and ET binding declines in granule cell-deficient mice. Thus, ET can be produced by glia and act upon both glia and neurons in a paracrine fashion

  1. Insulin receptor internalization defect in an insulin-resistant mouse melanoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androlewicz, M.J.; Straus, D.S.; Brandenburg, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrated that the PG19 mouse melanoma cell line does not exhibit a biological response to insulin, whereas melanoma x mouse embryo fibroblast hybrids do respond to insulin. To investigate the molecular basis of the insulin resistance of the PG19 melanoma cells, insulin receptors from the insulin-resistant melanoma cells and insulin-sensitive fibroblast x melanoma hybrid cells were analyzed by the technique of photoaffinity labeling using the photoprobe 125 I-NAPA-DP-insulin. Photolabeled insulin receptors from the two cell types have identical molecular weights as determined by SDS gel electrophoresis under reducing and nonreducing conditions, indicating that the receptors on the two cell lines are structurally similar. Insulin receptor internalization studies revealed that the hybrid cells internalize receptors to a high degree at 37 degree C, whereas the melanoma cells internalize receptors to a very low degree or not at all. The correlation between ability to internalize insulin receptors and sensitivity to insulin action in this system suggests that uptake of the insulin-receptor complex may be required for insulin action in these cells. Insulin receptors from the two cell lines autophosphorylate in a similar insulin-dependent manner both in vitro and in intact cells, indicating that insulin receptors on the melanoma and hybrid cells have functional tyrosine protein kinase activity. Therefore, the block in insulin action in the PG19 melanoma cells appears to reside at a step beyond insulin-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation

  2. Fc-receptors and surface immunoglobulins in cells of the hairy cell leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieber, E P; Linke, R P; Riethmueller, G [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Experimentelle Chirurgie und Immunologie; Heyden, H.W. von; Waller, H D [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Innere Medizin 2

    1976-01-01

    Using /sup 125/I-labelled aggregated IgG in a quantitative assay a strong expression of Fc-receptors was found on the leukemic cells of a patient with hairy cell leukemia. The Fc-receptor activity on these cells was much higher than that on monocytes and B-lymphocytes from normal blood. Surface immunoglobulins were detected by radioautography using radioactively labelled (Fab')/sub 2/-fragments of monospecific antibodies directed against immunoglobulin heavy chains. Prior to radioautography the cells were stained for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase. It is found that all cells containing this enzyme bore delta-chains on their surface. On more than 90% of these cells a simultaneous expression of ..mu..-chains was detected. ..gamma..-chains could only be demonstrated on cells which were negative for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase; part of these cells, however, were hairy cells by morphological criteria.

  3. Fc-receptors and surface immunoglobulins in cells of the hairy cell leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieber, E.P.; Linke, R.P.; Riethmueller, G.; Heyden, H.W. von; Waller, H.D.

    1976-01-01

    Using 125 I-labelled aggregated IgG in a quantitative assay a strong expression of Fc-receptors was found on the leukemic cells of a patient with hairy cell leukemia. The Fc-receptor activity on these cells was much higher than that on monocytes and B-lymphocytes from normal blood. Surface immunoglobulins were detected by radioautography using radioactively labelled (Fab') 2 -fragments of monospecific antibodies directed against immunoglobulin heavy chains. Prior to radioautography the cells were stained for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase. It is found that all cells containing this enzyme bore delta-chains on their surface. On more than 90% of these cells a simultaneous expression of μ-chains was detected. γ-chains could only be demonstrated on cells which were negative for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase; part of these cells, however, were hairy cells by morphological criteria. (orig.) [de

  4. [Functional properties of taste bud cells. Mechanisms of afferent neurotransmission in Type II taste receptor cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, R A

    2013-01-01

    Taste Bud cells are heterogeneous in their morphology and functionality. These cells are responsible for sensing a wide variety of substances and for associating detected compounds with a different taste: bitter, sweet, salty, sour and umami. Today we know that each of the five basic tastes corresponds to distinct cell populations organized into three basic morpho-functional cell types. In addition, some receptor cells of the taste bud demonstrate glia-related functions. In this article we expand on some properties of these three morphological receptor cell types. Main focus is devoted to the Type II cells and unusual mechanism for afferent neurotransmission in these cells. Taste cells of the Type II consist of three populations detecting bitter, sweet and umami tastes, and, thus, evoke a serious scientific interest.

  5. Renal cells activate the platelet receptor CLEC-2 through podoplanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Charita M.; Pearce, Andrew C.; Watson, Aleksandra A.; Mistry, Anita R.; Pollitt, Alice Y.; Fenton-May, Angharad E.; Johnson, Louise A.; Jackson, David G.; Watson, Steve P.; O'Callaghan, Chris A.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that the C-type lectin-like receptor, CLEC-2, is expressed on platelets and that it mediates powerful platelet aggregation by the snake venom toxin, rhodocytin. In addition, we have provided indirect evidence for an endogenous ligand for CLEC-2 in renal cells expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This putative ligand facilitates transmission of HIV through its incorporation into the viral envelope and binding to CLEC-2 on platelets. The aim of this study was to identify the ligand on these cells which binds to CLEC-2 on platelets. Recombinant CLEC-2 exhibits specific binding to 293T cells in which the HIV can be grown. Further, 293T cells activate both platelets and CLEC-2-transfected DT-40 B cells. The transmembrane protein podoplanin was identified on 293T cells and demonstrated to mediate both binding of 293T cells to CLEC-2 and 293T cell activation of CLEC-2-transfected DT-40 B cells. Podoplanin is expressed on renal cells (podocytes). Further, a direct interaction between CLEC-2 and podoplanin was confirmed using surface plasmon resonance and was shown to be independent of glycosylation of CLEC-2. The interaction has an affinity of 24.5 ± 3.7μM. The present study identifies podoplanin as a ligand for CLEC-2 on renal cells. PMID:18215137

  6. Reproductive effects from oestrogen activity in polluted water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumpter, J.P. [Brunel Univ., Uxbridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biology and Biochemistry

    1998-12-31

    A new area of ecotoxicology, now usually called endocrine disruption, has arisen in the last few years. However, despite the present topicality of this issue, some of the best documented examples of endocrine disruption were reported a decade or more ago (see, for example, Fry, 1995). The issue is concerned with the effects of chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones on the physiology of exposed wildlife and humans. As many of these xenohormones minic steroid hormones, especially oestrogens and androgens, most of the reported effects have involved effects on the reproductive system of exposed organisms. Many of these reported effects on wildlife have concerned aquatic, rather than terrestrial, organisms (even the well-documented effects on birds are primarily concerned with water birds, which feed predominantly on fish); the reproductive abnormalities seen in alligators living in some lakes in Florida and the oestrogenic effects on fish reported in British rivers (this example is discussed in detail below) provide good examples of the type of effects observed in aquatic organisms. This predominance of effects on aquatic organisms could reflect an unconscious bias of the interests of research scientists (are there more wildlife biologists interested in aquatic, rather than terrestrial, animals?), but is perhaps more likely a consequence of the fact that the aquatic environmemnt is the ultimate `sink` for the international or unintentional disposal of much waste. (orig.)

  7. Selective receptor expression restricts Nipah virus infection of endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diederich Sandra

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nipah virus (NiV is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus that causes severe diseases in animals and humans. Endothelial cell (EC infection is an established hallmark of NiV infection in vivo. Despite systemic virus spread via the vascular system, EC in brain and lung are preferentially infected whereas EC in other organs are less affected. As in vivo, we found differences in the infection of EC in cell culture. Only brain-derived primary or immortalized EC were found to be permissive to NiV infection. Using a replication-independent fusion assay, we could show that the lack of infection in non-brain EC was due to a lack of receptor expression. The NiV entry receptors ephrinB2 (EB2 or ephrinB3 were only expressed in brain endothelia. The finding that EB2 expression in previously non-permissive aortic EC rendered the cells permissive to infection then demonstrated that EB2 is not only necessary but also sufficient to allow the establishment of a productive NiV infection. This strongly suggests that limitations in receptor expression restrict virus entry in certain EC subsets in vivo, and are thus responsible for the differences in EC tropism observed in human and animal NiV infections.

  8. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell (Car T Cell Therapy In Hematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Ataca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well demonstrated that immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and cause less off-target toxicities. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR modified T cells. On July 1, 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthrough therapy’ designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the beneficiaries of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical-clinical studies, effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  9. Inactivation of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Nørgaard, P; Abrahamsen, N

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) exerts a growth inhibitory effect on many cell types through binding to two types of receptors, the type I and II receptors. Resistance to TGF-beta due to lack of type II receptor (RII) has been described in some cancer types including small cell lung...

  10. Gastrin receptor characterization: affinity cross-linking of the gastrin receptor on canine gastric parietal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, M.; Park, J.; Yamada, T.

    1987-01-01

    The authors applied affinity cross-linking methods to label the gastrin receptor on isolated canine gastric parietal cells in order to elucidate the nature of its chemical structure. 125 I-labeled Leu 15 -gastrin and 125 I-labeled gastrin/sub 2-17/ bound to intact parietal cells and their membranes with equal affinity, and half-maximal inhibition of binding was obtained at an incubation concentration of 3.2 x 10 -10 M unlabeled gastrin. 125 I-gastrin/sub 2-17/ was cross-linked to plasma membranes or intact parietal cells by incubation in disuccinimidyl suberate. The membrane pellets were solubilized with or without dithiothreitol and applied to electrophoresis on 7.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Autoradiograms revealed a band of labeling at M/sub r/ 76,000 and labeling of this band was inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion by addition of unlabeled gastrin to the incubation mixture. Dithiothreitol in concentrations as high as 100 mM did not later the electrophoretic mobility of the labeled band. After taking into account the molecular weight of 125 I-gastrin/sub 2-17/, the results suggest that the gastrin receptor on parietal cells is a single protein of M/sub r/ 74,000 without disulfide-linked subunits

  11. Involvement of Activating NK Cell Receptors and Their Modulation in Pathogen Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are endowed with cell-structure-sensing receptors providing inhibitory protection from self-destruction (inhibitory NK receptors, iNKRs, including killer inhibitory receptors and other molecules and rapid triggering potential leading to functional cell activation by Toll-like receptors (TLRs, cytokine receptors, and activating NK cell receptors including natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs, i.e., NKp46, NKp46, and NKp44. NCR and NKG2D recognize ligands on infected cells which may be endogenous or may directly bind to some structures derived from invading pathogens. In this paper, we address the known direct or indirect interactions between activating receptors and pathogens and their expression during chronic HIV and HCV infections.

  12. The impact of low-magnitude high-frequency vibration on fracture healing is profoundly influenced by the oestrogen status in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Wehrle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture healing is impaired in aged and osteoporotic individuals. Because adequate mechanical stimuli are able to increase bone formation, one therapeutical approach to treat poorly healing fractures could be the application of whole-body vibration, including low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV. We investigated the effects of LMHFV on fracture healing in aged osteoporotic mice. Female C57BL/6NCrl mice (n=96 were either ovariectomised (OVX or sham operated (non-OVX at age 41 weeks. When aged to 49 weeks, all mice received a femur osteotomy that was stabilised using an external fixator. The mice received whole-body vibrations (20 minutes/day with 0.3 g peak-to-peak acceleration and a frequency of 45 Hz. After 10 and 21 days, the osteotomised femurs and intact bones (contra-lateral femurs, lumbar spine were evaluated using bending-testing, micro-computed tomography (μCT, histology and gene expression analyses. LMHFV disturbed fracture healing in aged non-OVX mice, with significantly reduced flexural rigidity (−81% and bone formation (−80% in the callus. Gene expression analyses demonstrated increased oestrogen receptor β (ERβ, encoded by Esr2 and Sost expression in the callus of the vibrated animals, but decreased β-catenin, suggesting that ERβ might mediate these negative effects through inhibition of osteoanabolic Wnt/β-catenin signalling. In contrast, in OVX mice, LMHFV significantly improved callus properties, with increased flexural rigidity (+1398% and bone formation (+637%, which could be abolished by subcutaneous oestrogen application (0.025 mg oestrogen administered in a 90-day-release pellet. On a molecular level, we found an upregulation of ERα in the callus of the vibrated OVX mice, whereas ERβ was unaffected, indicating that ERα might mediate the osteoanabolic response. Our results indicate a major role for oestrogen in the mechanostimulation of fracture healing and imply that LMHFV might only be safe and

  13. Steroid hormones as regulators of the proliferative activity of normal and neoplastic intestinal epithelial cells (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1988-01-01

    Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors are present in normal epithelial cells of both the small and large intestine and there have also been contentious reports of androgen, oestrogen and progesterone receptors in the epithelium of the normal large intestine. The majority of reports suggest that stimulation of the intestinal glucocorticoid receptors results in increased proliferation of epithelial cells in the small bowel, as does stimulation of androgen receptors and possibly mineralocorticoid receptors. The proliferative response of the normal intestine to oestrogens is difficult to evaluate and that to progestigens appears not to have been reported. Epidemiological studies reveal a higher incidence of bowel cancer in premenopausal women than in men of the same age and yet there is a lower incidence of these tumors in women of higher parity. These findings have been atributted to a variety of non-epithelial gender characteristic such as differences in bile metabolism, colonic bacterial and fecal transit times. In experimental animals, androgens have also been shown to influence carcinogenesis and this could well be attributed to changes in food intake etc. However, many studies have now revealed steroid hormone receptors on colorectal tumor cells and thus a direct effect of the steroid hormones on the epithelium during and after malignant transformation must now be considered.

  14. Immune receptors involved in Streptococcus suis recognition by dendritic cells.

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    Marie-Pier Lecours

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is an important swine pathogen and an emerging zoonotic agent of septicemia and meningitis. Knowledge on host immune responses towards S. suis, and strategies used by this pathogen for subversion of these responses is scarce. The objective of this study was to identify the immune receptors involved in S. suis recognition by dendritic cells (DCs. Production of cytokines and expression of co-stimulatory molecules by DCs were shown to strongly rely on MyD88-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting that DCs recognize S. suis and become activated mostly through Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling. Supporting this fact, TLR2(-/- DCs were severely impaired in the release of several cytokines and the surface expression of CD86 and MHC-II. The release of IL-12p70 and CXC10, and the expression of CD40 were found to depend on signaling by both TLR2 and TLR9. The release of IL-23 and CXCL1 were partially dependent on NOD2. Finally, despite the fact that MyD88 signaling was crucial for DC activation and maturation, MyD88-dependent pathways were not implicated in S. suis internalization by DCs. This first study on receptors involved in DC activation by S. suis suggests a major involvement of MyD88 signaling pathways, mainly (but not exclusively through TLR2. A multimodal recognition involving a combination of different receptors seems essential for DC effective response to S. suis.

  15. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng [Department of Gastroenterology, The Tenth People’s Hospital of Shanghai, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yyang@houstonmethodist.org [Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers.

  16. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers

  17. Stimulation of cell proliferation by histamine H2 receptors in dimethylhdrazine-induced adenocarcinomata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1978-03-01

    Cell proliferation in dimethylhydrazine-induced colonic carcinomata was stimulated by histamine and by the histamine H2 receptor agonist dimaprit and inhibited by the histamine H2 receptor antagonists Metiamide and Cimetidine but not by the histamine H1 receptor antagonist Mepyramine. In contrast histamine had no effect on colonic crypt cell proliferation in normal or dimethylhydrazine-treated rats.

  18. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H...

  19. T-cell receptor gamma delta bearing cells in normal human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J. D.; Teunissen, M. B.; Cairo, I.; Krieg, S. R.; Kapsenberg, M. L.; Das, P. K.; Borst, J.

    1990-01-01

    T-cell antigen receptors (TCR) are divided into common alpha beta and less common gamma delta types. In the murine skin, TCR gamma delta+ cells have been reported to form the great majority of epidermal T lymphocytes. We have examined the relative contribution of TCR alpha beta+ and TCR gamma delta+

  20. Prevalence and practice of oestrogen use among the male gym participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turki Fahad Alharthi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Oestrogen is the primary female sex hormone and has important functions in both female and male physiology. Recently oestrogen abuse among male gym participants had raised as it is considered to enhance gym performance and breast size. Aims This study assesses the prevalence of oestrogen use among male gym patrons in Saudi Arabia, their practice related to oestrogen abuse, and the profiles of users. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from February 2017 to May 2017 and included 4,860 male gym patrons. The participants were given a questionnaire with a total of 19 questions regarding socioeconomic information, knowledge and practices related to oestrogen, and lifestyle habits. Results The participants had a mean age of 28.6+6.2 years, 6.1 per cent of them abused oestrogen, and the most common forms used were ethinylestradiol (0.03mg and drospirenone (3mg. Furthermore, 80.7 per cent of the users used it before exercise only. Breast enlargement was the main reason for oestrogen use, and local drug stores were the main source. Compared to non-users, oestrogen users were older (P=0.322, reported lower incomes (P=0.395, were more likely to be active smokers (P=0.597, and had a longer duration of gym participation (P < 0.001. Conclusion The results indicate that 6.1 per cent of the surveyed male participants abused a combination of oestrogen and progesterone for breast enlargement, which was significantly more likely among males who had longer durations of gym participation.

  1. Towards the generation of B-cell receptor retrogenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Freitag

    Full Text Available Transgenic expression of B- and T-cell receptors (BCRs and TCRs, respectively has been a standard tool to study lymphocyte development and function in vivo. The generation of transgenic mice is time-consuming and, therefore, a faster method to study the biology of defined lymphocyte receptors in vivo would be highly welcome. Using 2A peptide-linked multicistronic retroviral vectors to transduce stem cells, TCRs can be expressed rapidly in mice of any background. We aimed at adopting this retrogenic technology to the in vivo expression of BCRs. Using a well characterised BCR specific for hen egg lysozyme (HEL, we achieved surface expression of the retrogenically encoded BCR in a Rag-deficient pro B-cell line in vitro. In vivo, retrogenic BCRs were detectable only intracellularly but not on the surface of B cells from wild type or Rag2-deficient mice. This data, together with the fact that no BCR retrogenic mouse model has been published in the 7 years since the method was originally published for TCRs, strongly suggests that achieving BCR-expression in vivo with retrogenic technology is highly challenging if not impossible.

  2. Palindromic nucleotide analysis in human T cell receptor rearrangements.

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    Santosh K Srivastava

    Full Text Available Diversity of T cell receptor (TCR genes is primarily generated by nucleotide insertions upon rearrangement from their germ line-encoded V, D and J segments. Nucleotide insertions at V-D and D-J junctions are random, but some small subsets of these insertions are exceptional, in that one to three base pairs inversely repeat the sequence of the germline DNA. These short complementary palindromic sequences are called P nucleotides. We apply the ImmunoSeq deep-sequencing assay to the third complementarity determining region (CDR3 of the β chain of T cell receptors, and use the resulting data to study P nucleotides in the repertoire of naïve and memory CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells. We estimate P nucleotide distributions in a cross section of healthy adults and different T cell subtypes. We show that P nucleotide frequency in all T cell subtypes ranges from 1% to 2%, and that the distribution is highly biased with respect to the coding end of the gene segment. Classification of observed palindromic sequences into P nucleotides using a maximum conditional probability model shows that single base P nucleotides are very rare in VDJ recombination; P nucleotides are primarily two bases long. To explore the role of P nucleotides in thymic selection, we compare P nucleotides in productive and non-productive sequences of CD8(+ naïve T cells. The naïve CD8(+ T cell clones with P nucleotides are more highly expanded.

  3. Identification of Receptor Ligands and Receptor Subtypes Using Antagonists in a Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Cell Biosensor Separation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Harvey A.; Orwar, Owe; Scheller, Richard H.; Zare, Richard N.

    1995-08-01

    A capillary electrophoresis system with single-cell biosensors as a detector has been used to separate and identify ligands in complex biological samples. The power of this procedure was significantly increased by introducing antagonists that inhibited the cellular response from selected ligand-receptor interactions. The single-cell biosensor was based on the ligand-receptor binding and G-protein-mediated signal transduction pathways in PC12 and NG108-15 cell lines. Receptor activation was measured as increases in cytosolic free calcium ion concentration by using fluorescence microscopy with the intracellular calcium ion indicator fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, a mixture of bradykinin (BK) and acetylcholine (ACh) was fractionated and the components were identified by inhibiting the cellular response with icatibant (HOE 140), a selective antagonist to the BK B_2 receptor subtype (B_2BK), and atropine, an antagonist to muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes. Structurally related forms of BK were also identified based on inhibiting B_2BK receptors. Applications of this technique include identification of endogenous BK in a lysate of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2) and screening for bioactivity of BK degradation products in human blood plasma. The data demonstrate that the use of antagonists with a single-cell biosensor separation system aids identification of separated components and receptor subtypes.

  4. Recruitment of SHP-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase and signalling by a chimeric T-cell receptor-killer inhibitory receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M D; Geisler, C

    2000-01-01

    Receptors expressing the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) in their cytoplasmic tail play an important role in the negative regulation of natural killer and B-cell activation. A subpopulation of T cells expresses the ITIM containing killer cell inhibitory receptor (KIR), which...... recognize MHC class I molecules. Following coligation of KIR with an activating receptor, the tyrosine in the ITIM is phosphorylated and the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 is recruited to the ITIM via its SH2 domains. It is still not clear how SHP-1 affects T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling...... regarding total protein tyrosine phosphorylation, TCR down-regulation, mobilization of intracellular free calcium, or induction of the activation markers CD69 and CD25....

  5. Interaction of KSHV with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanan Valiya Veettil

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus entry is a complex process characterized by a sequence of events. Since the discovery of KSHV in 1994, tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of KSHV entry into its in vitro target cells. KSHV entry is a complex multistep process involving viral envelope glycoproteins and several cell surface molecules that is utilized by KSHV for its attachment and entry. KSHV has a broad cell tropism and the attachment and receptor engagement on target cells have an important role in determining the cell type-specific mode of entry. KSHV utilizes heparan sulfate, integrins and EphrinA2 molecules as receptors which results in the activation of host cell pre-existing signal pathways that facilitate the subsequent cascade of events resulting in the rapid entry of virus particles, trafficking towards the nucleus followed by viral and host gene expression. KSHV enters human fibroblast cells by dynamin dependant clathrin mediated endocytosis and by dynamin independent macropinocytosis in dermal endothelial cells. Once internalized into endosomes, fusion of the viral envelope with the endosomal membranes in an acidification dependent manner results in the release of capsids which subsequently reaches the nuclear pore vicinity leading to the delivery of viral DNA into the nucleus. In this review, we discuss the principal mechanisms that enable KSHV to interact with the host cell surface receptors as well as the mechanisms that are required to modulate cell signaling machinery for a successful entry.

  6. Phosphorylation site dynamics of early T-cell receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chylek, Lily A; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Dengjel, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    In adaptive immune responses, T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling impacts multiple cellular processes and results in T-cell differentiation, proliferation, and cytokine production. Although individual protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation events have been studied extensively, we lack...... that diverse dynamic patterns emerge within seconds. We detected phosphorylation dynamics as early as 5 s and observed widespread regulation of key TCR signaling proteins by 30 s. Development of a computational model pointed to the presence of novel regulatory mechanisms controlling phosphorylation of sites...... a systems-level understanding of how these components cooperate to control signaling dynamics, especially during the crucial first seconds of stimulation. Here, we used quantitative proteomics to characterize reshaping of the T-cell phosphoproteome in response to TCR/CD28 co-stimulation, and found...

  7. Methods for quantifying T cell receptor binding affinities and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Gloor, Brian E.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Baker, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide antigens bound and presented by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Recognition of a peptide/MHC complex is required for initiation and propagation of a cellular immune response, as well as the development and maintenance of the T cell repertoire. Here we discuss methods to quantify the affinities and thermodynamics of interactions between soluble ectodomains of TCRs and their peptide/MHC ligands, focusing on titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence anisotropy. As TCRs typically bind ligand with weak-to-moderate affinities, we focus the discussion on means to enhance the accuracy and precision of low affinity measurements. In addition to further elucidating the biology of the T cell mediated immune response, more reliable low affinity measurements will aid with more probing studies with mutants or altered peptides that can help illuminate the physical underpinnings of how TCRs achieve their remarkable recognition properties. PMID:21609868

  8. Involvement of the Soluble Urokinase Receptor in Chondrosarcoma Cell Mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Bifulco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of urokinase receptor (uPAR in tissue and serum of patients with chondrosarcoma correlate with poor prognosis. First, we analyzed the uPAR levels in tissues and plasma of five patients affected by chondrosarcoma. Interestingly, very high levels of uPAR and its soluble forms (SuPAR were found on tumor cell surfaces and plasma, respectively, of two patients with lung metastases. Therefore, to investigate the role of SuPAR in chondrosaromas, we generated a primary cell culture from a chondrosarcoma tissue overexpressing uPAR on cell surfaces. We found that chondrosarcoma-like primary culture cells release a large amount of SuPAR in the medium. In vitro, SuPAR elicits chondrosarcoma cell migration likely through its uPAR88-92 sequence, since the DII88-183 or DIIDIIR88-284 uPAR domains retain motogen effect whereas DI1-87 or DIII184-284 domains, both lacking the uPAR88-92 sequence, are ineffective. Chondrosarcoma cells cross matrigel in response to SuPAR, and their invasion capability is abrogated by RERF peptide which inhibits uPAR88-92 signalling. These findings assign a role to uPAR in mobilizing chondrosarcoma cells and suggest that RERF peptide may be regarded as a prototype to generate new therapeutics for the chondrosarcoma treatment.

  9. Activation of postnatal neural stem cells requires nuclear receptor TLX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wenze; Zou, Yuhua; Shen, Chengcheng; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2011-09-28

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) continually produce new neurons in postnatal brains. However, the majority of these cells stay in a nondividing, inactive state. The molecular mechanism that is required for these cells to enter proliferation still remains largely unknown. Here, we show that nuclear receptor TLX (NR2E1) controls the activation status of postnatal NSCs in mice. Lineage tracing indicates that TLX-expressing cells give rise to both activated and inactive postnatal NSCs. Surprisingly, loss of TLX function does not result in spontaneous glial differentiation, but rather leads to a precipitous age-dependent increase of inactive cells with marker expression and radial morphology for NSCs. These inactive cells are mispositioned throughout the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus during development and can proliferate again after reintroduction of ectopic TLX. RNA-seq analysis of sorted NSCs revealed a TLX-dependent global expression signature, which includes the p53 signaling pathway. TLX regulates p21 expression in a p53-dependent manner, and acute removal of p53 can rescue the proliferation defect of TLX-null NSCs in culture. Together, these findings suggest that TLX acts as an essential regulator that ensures the proliferative ability of postnatal NSCs by controlling their activation through genetic interaction with p53 and other signaling pathways.

  10. Role of nuclear receptors in breast cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alessio; Papi; Marina; Orlandi

    2016-01-01

    The recapitulation of primary tumour heterogenity and the existence of a minor sub-population of cancer cells,capable of initiating tumour growth in xenografts on serial passages, led to the hypothesis that cancer stem cells(CSCs) exist. CSCs are present in many tumours, among which is breast cancer. Breast CSCs(BCSCs) are likely to sustain the growth of the primary tumour mass, as wellas to be responsible for disease relapse and metastatic spreading. Consequently, BCSCs represent the most significant target for new drugs in breast cancer therapy. Both the hypoxic condition in BCSCs biology and proinflammatory cytokine network has gained increasing importance in the recent past. Breast stromal cells are crucial components of the tumours milieu and are a major source of inflammatory mediators. Recently, the antiinflammatory role of some nuclear receptors ligands has emerged in several diseases, including breast cancer. Therefore, the use of nuclear receptors ligands may be a valid strategy to inhibit BCSCs viability and consequently breast cancer growth and disease relapse.

  11. Inosine Released from Dying or Dead Cells Stimulates Cell Proliferation via Adenosine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionMany antitumor therapies induce apoptotic cell death in order to cause tumor regression. Paradoxically, apoptotic cells are also known to promote wound healing, cell proliferation, and tumor cell repopulation in multicellular organisms. We aimed to characterize the nature of the regenerative signals concentrated in the micromilieu of dead and dying cells.MethodsCultures of viable melanoma B16F10 cells, mouse fibroblasts, and primary human fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS in the presence of dead and dying cells, their supernatants (SNs, or purified agonists and antagonists were used to evaluate the stimulation of proliferation. Viable cell quantification was performed by either flow cytometry of harvested cells or by crystal violet staining of adherent cells. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of cell SNs were deployed to identify the nature of growth-promoting factors. Coimplantation of living cells in the presence of SNs collected from dead and dying cells and specific agonists was used to evaluate tumor growth in vivo.ResultsThe stimulation of proliferation of few surviving cells by bystander dead cells was confirmed for melanoma cells, mouse fibroblasts, and primary FLS. We found that small soluble molecules present in the protein-free fraction of SNs of dead and dying cells were responsible for the promotion of proliferation. The nucleoside inosine released by dead and dying cells acting via adenosine receptors was identified as putative inducer of proliferation of surviving tumor cells after irradiation and heat treatment.ConclusionInosine released by dead and dying cells mediates tumor cell proliferation via purinergic receptors. Therapeutic strategies surmounting this pathway may help to reduce the rate of recurrence after radio- and chemotherapy.

  12. VDJtools: Unifying Post-analysis of T Cell Receptor Repertoires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Shugay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing number of immune repertoire sequencing studies, the field still lacks software for analysis and comprehension of this high-dimensional data. Here we report VDJtools, a complementary software suite that solves a wide range of T cell receptor (TCR repertoires post-analysis tasks, provides a detailed tabular output and publication-ready graphics, and is built on top of a flexible API. Using TCR datasets for a large cohort of unrelated healthy donors, twins, and multiple sclerosis patients we demonstrate that VDJtools greatly facilitates the analysis and leads to sound biological conclusions. VDJtools software and documentation are available at https://github.com/mikessh/vdjtools.

  13. Histamine type I (H1) receptor radioligand binding studies on normal T cell subsets, B cells, and monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, W.; Doyle, K.; Rocklin, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A single, specific binding site for [ 3 H]pyrilamine on normal human T helper, T suppressor, B cells, and monocytes was documented. The binding of the radioligand to its receptor is reversible with cold H 1 antagonist, saturates at 40 to 60 nM, and binding equilibrium is achieved in 2 to 4 min. Using a computer program (Ligand), the authors calculated the dissociation constants, binding capacities, and numbers of receptors per cell for each of the different cell types. Monocytes were found to have the highest affinity for [ 3 H]pyrilamine, followed by T helper cells, B cells and T suppressor cells (K/sub D/ = 44.6 +/- 49.4 nM). T suppressor cells were found to express the higher number of H 1 receptors per cell followed by B cells, T helper cells, and monocytes. The binding affinity for [ 3 H]pyrilamine increased over a 48-hr period, whereas the number of receptors per T cell was essentially unchanged. In contrast, T cells stimulated with Con A or PHA were shown to have a greater than fourfold increase in the number of receptors per cell, whereas the binding affinity for [ 3 H]pyrilamine decreased over the 48-hr period. Although the function of H 1 receptors on T cells, B cells, and monocytes has not been completely defined, this receptor has the potential of playing an important role in the modulating the immune response

  14. S1P receptor signalling and RGS proteins; expression and function in vascular smooth muscle cells and transfected CHO cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks-Balk, Mariëlle C.; van Loenen, Pieter B.; Hajji, Najat; Michel, Martin C.; Peters, Stephan L. M.; Alewijnse, Astrid E.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signalling via G protein-coupled receptors is important for the regulation of cell function and differentiation. Specific Regulators of G protein Signalling (RGS) proteins modulate the function of these receptors in many cell types including vascular smooth muscle cells

  15. Xeno-oestrogenic activity in serum as marker of occupational pesticide exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Nielsen, Flemming; Nielsen, Jesper Bo

    2007-01-01

    -oestrogenic activity in serum was statistically significant for women who had been at work within the last week, while no association was observed for women who had not been at work during the most recent week. Conclusions: The study illustrates the usefulness of this biomarker for qualitative assessment...... with oestrogen-like properties in an occupational setting. Methods: Serum samples were obtained from two separate cohorts representing non-pregnant and pregnant female greenhouse workers in Denmark. Serum samples from 270 non-pregnant women and 173 pregnant women were analysed for xeno-oestrogenic activity......, medium or high based on information collected by detailed interviews of the women and the employers. Results: In both cohorts, an exposure-associated increase in the xeno-oestrogenic activity in serum was demonstrated. Among the pregnant women, the association between pesticide exposure and xeno...

  16. The Androgen Receptor Bridges Stem Cell-Associated Signaling Nodes in Prostate Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair H. Davies

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic potential of stem cells relies on dissecting the complex signaling networks that are thought to regulate their pluripotency and self-renewal. Until recently, attention has focused almost exclusively on a small set of “core” transcription factors for maintaining the stem cell state. It is now clear that stem cell regulatory networks are far more complex. In this review, we examine the role of the androgen receptor (AR in coordinating interactions between signaling nodes that govern the balance of cell fate decisions in prostate stem cells.

  17. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  18. Sexual dimorphism and oestrogen regulation of KCNE3 expression modulates the functional properties of KCNQ1 K channels.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alzamora, Rodrigo

    2012-02-01

    The KCNQ1 potassium channel associates with various KCNE ancillary subunits that drastically affect channel gating and pharmacology. Co-assembly with KCNE3 produces a current with nearly instantaneous activation, some time-dependent activation at very positive potentials, a linear current-voltage relationship and a 10-fold higher sensitivity to chromanol 293B. KCNQ1:KCNE3 channels are expressed in colonic crypts and mediate basolateral K(+) recycling required for Cl(-) secretion. We have previously reported the female-specific anti-secretory effects of oestrogen via KCNQ1:KCNE3 channel inhibition in colonic crypts. This study was designed to determine whether sex and oestrogen regulate the expression and function of KCNQ1 and KCNE3 in rat distal colon. Colonic crypts were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats and used for whole-cell patch-clamp and to extract total RNA and protein. Sheets of epithelium were used for short-circuit current recordings. KCNE1 and KCNE3 mRNA and protein abundance were significantly higher in male than female crypts. No expression of KCNE2 was found and no difference was observed in KCNQ1 expression between male and female (at oestrus) colonic crypts. Male crypts showed a 2.2-fold higher level of association of KCNQ1 and KCNE3 compared to female cells. In female colonic crypts, KCNQ1 and KCNE3 protein expression fluctuated throughout the oestrous cycle and 17beta-oestradiol (E2 10 nM) produced a rapid (<15 min) dissociation of KCNQ1 and KCNE3 in female crypts only. Whole-cell K(+) currents showed a linear current-voltage relationship in male crypts, while K(+) currents in colonic crypts isolated from females displayed voltage-dependent outward rectification. Currents in isolated male crypts and epithelial sheets were 10-fold more sensitive to specific KCNQ1 inhibitors, such as chromanol 293B and HMR-1556, than in female. The effect of E2 on K(+) currents mediated by KCNQ1 with or without different beta-subunits was assayed from current

  19. The biology of NK cells and their receptors affects clinical outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Bree; Felices, Martin; Cichocki, Frank; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were first identified for their capacity to reject bone marrow allografts in lethally irradiated mice without prior sensitization. Subsequently, human NK cells were detected and defined by their non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity toward transformed or virally infected target cells. Karre et al. later proposed 'the missing self hypothesis' to explain the mechanism by which self-tolerant cells could kill targets that had lost self MHC class I. Subsequently, the receptors that recognize MHC class I to mediate tolerance in the host were identified on NK cells. These class I-recognizing receptors contribute to the acquisition of function by a dynamic process known as NK cell education or licensing. In the past, NK cells were assumed to be short lived, but more recently NK cells have been shown to mediate immunologic memory to secondary exposures to cytomegalovirus infection. Because of their ability to lyse tumors with aberrant MHC class I expression and to produce cytokines and chemokines upon activation, NK cells may be primed by many stimuli, including viruses and inflammation, to contribute to a graft-versus-tumor effect. In addition, interactions with other immune cells support the therapeutic potential of NK cells to eradicate tumor and to enhance outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Surface receptor Toso controls B cell-mediated regulation of T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinbo; Duong, Vu Huy Hoang; Westphal, Katrin; Westphal, Andreas; Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Grassl, Guntram A; Brand, Korbinian; Chan, Andrew C; Föger, Niko; Lee, Kyeong-Hee

    2018-05-01

    The immune system is tightly controlled by regulatory processes that allow for the elimination of invading pathogens, while limiting immunopathological damage to the host. In the present study, we found that conditional deletion of the cell surface receptor Toso on B cells unexpectedly resulted in impaired proinflammatory T cell responses, which led to impaired immune protection in an acute viral infection model and was associated with reduced immunopathological tissue damage in a chronic inflammatory context. Toso exhibited its B cell-inherent immunoregulatory function by negatively controlling the pool of IL-10-competent B1 and B2 B cells, which were characterized by a high degree of self-reactivity and were shown to mediate immunosuppressive activity on inflammatory T cell responses in vivo. Our results indicate that Toso is involved in the differentiation/maintenance of regulatory B cells by fine-tuning B cell receptor activation thresholds. Furthermore, we showed that during influenza A-induced pulmonary inflammation, the application of Toso-specific antibodies selectively induced IL-10-competent B cells at the site of inflammation and resulted in decreased proinflammatory cytokine production by lung T cells. These findings suggest that Toso may serve as a novel therapeutic target to dampen pathogenic T cell responses via the modulation of IL-10-competent regulatory B cells.

  1. Confinement of activating receptors at the plasma membrane controls natural killer cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guia, Sophie; Jaeger, Baptiste N; Piatek, Stefan; Mailfert, Sébastien; Trombik, Tomasz; Fenis, Aurore; Chevrier, Nicolas; Walzer, Thierry; Kerdiles, Yann M; Marguet, Didier; Vivier, Eric; Ugolini, Sophie

    2011-04-05

    Natural killer (NK) cell tolerance to self is partly ensured by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-specific inhibitory receptors on NK cells, which dampen their reactivity when engaged. However, NK cells that do not detect self MHC class I are not autoreactive. We used dynamic fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to show that MHC class I-independent NK cell tolerance in mice was associated with the presence of hyporesponsive NK cells in which both activating and inhibitory receptors were confined in an actin meshwork at the plasma membrane. In contrast, the recognition of self MHC class I by inhibitory receptors "educated" NK cells to become fully reactive, and activating NK cell receptors became dynamically compartmentalized in membrane nanodomains. We propose that the confinement of activating receptors at the plasma membrane is pivotal to ensuring the self-tolerance of NK cells.

  2. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heizmann, Beate; Sellars, MacLean; Macias-Garcia, Alejandra; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation.

  3. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heizmann, Beate [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Sellars, MacLean [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Macias-Garcia, Alejandra [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Institute for Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chan, Susan, E-mail: scpk@igbmc.fr [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Kastner, Philippe, E-mail: scpk@igbmc.fr [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Faculté de Médecine, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2016-02-12

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation.

  4. Rat hepatic β2-adrenergic receptor: structural similarities to the rat fat cell β1-adrenergic receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graziano, M.P.

    1984-01-01

    The mammalian β 2 -adrenergic receptor from rat liver has been purified by sequential cycles of affinity chromatography followed by steric-exclusion high performance liquid chromatography. Electrophoresis of highly purified receptor preparations on polyacrylamide gels in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate under reducing conditions reveals a single peptide M/sub r/ = 67,000, as judged by silver staining. Purified β 2 -adrenergic receptor migrates on steric-exclusion high performance liquid chromatography in two peaks, with M/sub r/ = 140,000 and 67,000. Specific binding of the high affinity, β-adrenergic receptor antagonists (-)[ 3 H]dihydroalprenolol and (-)[ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol to purified rat liver β-adrenergic receptor preparations displays stereoselectivity for (-)isomers of agonists and a rank order of potencies for agonists characteristics of a β 2 -adrenergic receptor. Radioiodinated, β 1 -adrenergic receptors from rat fat cells and β 2 -adrenergic receptors from rat liver purified in the presence of protease inhibitors comigrate in electrophoretic separations on polyacrylamide gels in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate as 67,000-M/sub r/ peptides. Autoradiograms of two dimensional partial proteolytic digests of the purified, radioiodinated rat liver β 2 -adrenergic receptor, generated with α-chymotrypsin, S. aureus V8 protease and elastase reveal a pattern of peptide fragments essentially identical to those generated by partial proteolytic digests of the purified, radioiodinated β 1 -adrenergic receptor from rat fat cells, by these same proteases. These data indicate that a high degree of homology exists between these two pharmacologically distinct mammalian β-adrenergic receptor proteins

  5. The Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR56/ADGRG1 Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human NK Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin-Wen Chang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells possess potent cytotoxic mechanisms that need to be tightly controlled. Here, we explored the regulation and function of GPR56/ADGRG1, an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor implicated in developmental processes and expressed distinctively in mature NK cells. Expression of GPR56 was triggered by Hobit (a homolog of Blimp-1 in T cells and declined upon cell activation. Through studying NK cells from polymicrogyria patients with disease-causing mutations in ADGRG1, encoding GPR56, and NK-92 cells ectopically expressing the receptor, we found that GPR56 negatively regulates immediate effector functions, including production of inflammatory cytokines and cytolytic proteins, degranulation, and target cell killing. GPR56 pursues this activity by associating with the tetraspanin CD81. We conclude that GPR56 inhibits natural cytotoxicity of human NK cells.

  6. Reaction and Aggregation Dynamics of Cell Surface Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michelle Dong

    This dissertation is composed of both theoretical and experimental studies of cell surface receptor reaction and aggregation. Project I studies the reaction rate enhancement due to surface diffusion of a bulk dissolved ligand with its membrane embedded target, using numerical calculations. The results show that the reaction rate enhancement is determined by ligand surface adsorption and desorption kinetic rates, surface and bulk diffusion coefficients, and geometry. In particular, we demonstrate that the ligand surface adsorption and desorption kinetic rates, rather than their ratio (the equilibrium constant), are important in rate enhancement. The second and third projects are studies of acetylcholine receptor clusters on cultured rat myotubes using fluorescence techniques after labeling the receptors with tetramethylrhodamine -alpha-bungarotoxin. The second project studies when and where the clusters form by making time-lapse movies. The movies are made from overlay of the pseudocolored total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) images of the cluster, and the schlieren images of the cell cultures. These movies are the first movies made using TIRF, and they clearly show the cluster formation from the myoblast fusion, the first appearance of clusters, and the eventual disappearance of clusters. The third project studies the fine structural features of individual clusters observed under TIRF. The features were characterized with six parameters by developing a novel fluorescence technique: spatial fluorescence autocorrelation. These parameters were then used to study the feature variations with age, and with treatments of drugs (oligomycin and carbachol). The results show little variation with age. However, drug treatment induced significant changes in some parameters. These changes were different for oligomycin and carbachol, which indicates that the two drugs may eliminate clusters through different mechanisms.

  7. Desensitization of parathyroid hormone receptors on cultured bone cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pun, K.K.; Ho, P.W.; Nissenson, R.A.; Arnaud, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    Administration of excessive amounts of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in the treatment of osteoporosis can reverse the beneficial effects of a low-dose, intermittent regime. To investigate the direct actions and the possible cellular mechanisms of PTH in inducing desensitization of PTH receptors, we studied the effects of desensitization on rat osteoblastic UMR-106 cells. When the osteoblasts were preincubated with bPTH-(1-34), complete refractoriness to a subsequent challenge with the hormone developed within 1 h and at hormone concentrations as low as 5 nM. When osteoblasts thus desensitized were incubated in hormone-free medium, recovery of the cAMP responses began within 2 h and reached maximum after 16 h. Cycloheximide did not affect the process of desensitization. [Nle8,Nle18,Tyr34]bPTH-(3-34)amide significantly impaired the desensitization process by PTH-(1-34) but did not have stimulatory effect on cAMP responses. No significant heterologous desensitization was obvious after preincubation with isoprenaline (50 microM), prostaglandin E1 (50 microM), or prostaglandin E2 (50 microM) for 2 h. Binding experiments with [125I]PLP-(1-36)amide after desensitization revealed that there was an approximate twofold decrease in receptor affinities as analyzed by Scatchard analysis, showing that the decrease in affinity was prominent in the process of desensitization. When the cells were treated with monensin during desensitization, PTH challenge after desensitization produced significantly lower cyclic AMP responses. Recovery after desensitization occurred over a period of 16 h. Inclusion of monensin, but not cycloheximide, impaired the recovery. The results show that homologous desensitization of rat osteoblasts to PTH is brought about by the occupancy of receptors by PTH-(1-34) but not by cAMP generation itself

  8. Deep vein thrombosis and the oestrogen content in oral contraceptives. An epidemiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, A

    1985-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have pointed to a correlation between the oestrogen content of oral contraceptives and the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The correlation has been strongest in studies which partially consisted of adverse drug reaction reports to the Swedish Adverse Drug Reaction Advisory Committee (SADRAC). The present study analyzes the epidemiological basis of the adverse drug reaction reports on DVT in women on oral contraceptives to SADRAC. It verifies the reported correlation between the oestrogen content of the pills and the risk of DVT but it also demonstrates that this correlation probably was secondary to differences in the diagnostic standard of DVT, to differences in reporting policies to SADRAC and to an age difference between women on low-oestrogen-pills and those on high-oestrogen pills and is thus due to bias. It is concluded that adverse drug reaction reporting on oral contraceptives has been very unreliable, for which reason it cannot support any epidemiological conclusion concerning the relative thrombogenicity of high-oestrogen pills compared with that of low-oestrogen pills.

  9. Role of CD3 gamma in T cell receptor assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Neisig, A; Hou, X

    1996-01-01

    . In contrast, treatment of T cells with tunicamycin suggested that N-linked glycosylation of CD3 delta is required for TCR assembly. Site-directed mutagenesis of the acidic amino acid in the TM domain of CD3 gamma demonstrated that this residue is involved in TCR assembly probably by binding to Ti beta......The T cell receptor (TCR) consists of the Ti alpha beta heterodimer and the associated CD3 gamma delta epsilon and zeta 2 chains. The structural relationships between the subunits of the TCR complex are still not fully known. In this study we examined the role of the extracellular (EC...... predicted in the EC domain of CD3 gamma. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that these sites play a crucial role in TCR assembly probably by binding to CD3 epsilon. Mutagenesis of N-linked glycosylation sites showed that glycosylation of CD3 gamma is not required for TCR assembly and expression...

  10. Human Diversity in a Cell Surface Receptor that Inhibits Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anu; Leite, Mara; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Altura, Melissa A; Ogahara, Cassandra; Weiss, Eli; Fu, Wenqing; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; O'Keeffe, Michael; Terhorst, Cox; Akey, Joshua M; Miller, Samuel I

    2016-07-25

    Mutations in genes encoding autophagy proteins have been associated with human autoimmune diseases, suggesting that diversity in autophagy responses could be associated with disease susceptibility or severity. A cellular genome-wide association study (GWAS) screen was performed to explore normal human diversity in responses to rapamycin, a microbial product that induces autophagy. Cells from several human populations demonstrated variability in expression of a cell surface receptor, CD244 (SlamF4, 2B4), that correlated with changes in rapamycin-induced autophagy. High expression of CD244 and receptor activation with its endogenous ligand CD48 inhibited starvation- and rapamycin-induced autophagy by promoting association of CD244 with the autophagy complex proteins Vps34 and Beclin-1. The association of CD244 with this complex reduced Vps34 lipid kinase activity. Lack of CD244 is associated with auto-antibody production in mice, and lower expression of human CD244 has previously been implicated in severity of human rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, indicating that increased autophagy as a result of low levels of CD244 may alter disease outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of Innate Lymphoid Cells by Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiyang; Bostick, John W.; Zhou, Liang

    2018-01-01

    With striking similarity to their adaptive T helper cell counterparts, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) represent an emerging family of cell types that express signature transcription factors, including T-bet+ Eomes+ natural killer cells, T-bet+ Eomes− group 1 ILCs, GATA3+ group 2 ILCs, RORγt+ group 3 ILCs, and newly identified Id3+ regulatory ILC. ILCs are abundantly present in barrier tissues of the host (e.g., the lung, gut, and skin) at the interface of host–environment interactions. Active research has been conducted to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the development and function of ILCs. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor, best known to mediate the effects of xenobiotic environmental toxins and endogenous microbial and dietary metabolites. Here, we review recent progresses regarding Ahr function in ILCs. We focus on the Ahr-mediated cross talk between ILCs and other immune/non-immune cells in host tissues especially in the gut. We discuss the molecular mechanisms of the action of Ahr expression and activity in regulation of ILCs in immunity and inflammation, and the interaction between Ahr and other pathways/transcription factors in ILC development and function with their implication in disease. PMID:29354125

  12. Regulation of Innate Lymphoid Cells by Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyang Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With striking similarity to their adaptive T helper cell counterparts, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs represent an emerging family of cell types that express signature transcription factors, including T-bet+ Eomes+ natural killer cells, T-bet+ Eomes− group 1 ILCs, GATA3+ group 2 ILCs, RORγt+ group 3 ILCs, and newly identified Id3+ regulatory ILC. ILCs are abundantly present in barrier tissues of the host (e.g., the lung, gut, and skin at the interface of host–environment interactions. Active research has been conducted to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the development and function of ILCs. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr is a ligand-dependent transcription factor, best known to mediate the effects of xenobiotic environmental toxins and endogenous microbial and dietary metabolites. Here, we review recent progresses regarding Ahr function in ILCs. We focus on the Ahr-mediated cross talk between ILCs and other immune/non-immune cells in host tissues especially in the gut. We discuss the molecular mechanisms of the action of Ahr expression and activity in regulation of ILCs in immunity and inflammation, and the interaction between Ahr and other pathways/transcription factors in ILC development and function with their implication in disease.

  13. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT

  14. Insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in cultured rat hepatocytes: regulation by cell density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.D.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) receptors in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes were characterized and their regulation by cell density examined. In hepatocytes cultured at 5 X 10(5) cells per 3.8 cm2 plate [ 125 I]IGF-II bound to specific, high affinity receptors (Ka = 4.4 +/- 0.5 X 10(9) l/mol). Less than 1% cross-reactivity by IGF-I and no cross-reactivity by insulin were observed. IGF-II binding increased when cells were permeabilized with 0.01% digitonin, suggesting the presence of an intracellular receptor pool. Determined by Scatchard analysis and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after affinity labeling, the higher binding was due solely to an increase in binding sites present on 220 kDa type II IGF receptors. In hepatocytes cultured at low densities, the number of cell surface receptors increased markedly, from 10-20,000 receptors per cell at a culture density of 6 X 10(5) cells/well to 70-80,000 receptors per cell at 0.38 X 10(5) cells/well. The increase was not due simply to the exposure of receptors from the intracellular pool, as a density-related increase in receptors was also seen in cells permeabilized with digitonin. There was no evidence that IGF binding proteins, either secreted by hepatocytes or present in fetal calf serum, had any effect on the measurement of receptor concentration or affinity. We conclude that rat hepatocytes in primary culture contain specific IGF-II receptors and that both cell surface and intracellular receptors are regulated by cell density

  15. Cell-specific cre recombinase expression allows selective ablation of glutamate receptors from mouse horizontal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Ströh

    Full Text Available In the mouse retina, horizontal cells form an electrically coupled network and provide feedback signals to photoreceptors and feedforward signals to bipolar cells. Thereby, horizontal cells contribute to gain control at the first visual synapse and to the antagonistic organization of bipolar and ganglion cell receptive fields. However, the nature of horizontal cell output remains a matter of debate, just as the exact contribution of horizontal cells to center-surround antagonism. To facilitate studying horizontal cell function, we developed a knockin mouse line which allows ablating genes exclusively in horizontal cells. This knockin line expresses a Cre recombinase under the promoter of connexin57 (Cx57, a gap junction protein only expressed in horizontal cells. Consistently, in Cx57+/Cre mice, Cre recombinase is expressed in almost all horizontal cells (>99% and no other retinal neurons. To test Cre activity, we crossbred Cx57+/Cre mice with a mouse line in which exon 11 of the coding sequence for the ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluA4 was flanked by two loxP sites (GluA4fl/fl. In GluA4fl/fl:Cx57+/Cre mice, GluA4 immunoreactivity was significantly reduced (∼ 50% in the outer retina where horizontal cells receive photoreceptor inputs, confirming the functionality of the Cre/loxP system. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from isolated horizontal cell somata showed a reduction of glutamate-induced inward currents by ∼ 75%, suggesting that the GluA4 subunit plays a major role in mediating photoreceptor inputs. The persistent current in GluA4-deficient cells is mostly driven by AMPA and to a very small extent by kainate receptors as revealed by application of the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI52466 and concanavalin A, a potentiator of kainate receptor-mediated currents. In summary, the Cx57+/Cre mouse line provides a versatile tool for studying horizontal cell function. GluA4fl/fl:Cx57+/Cre mice, in which horizontal cells receive less

  16. Cell-Specific Cre Recombinase Expression Allows Selective Ablation of Glutamate Receptors from Mouse Horizontal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Schultz, Konrad; Cimiotti, Kerstin; Weiler, Reto; Willecke, Klaus; Dedek, Karin

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse retina, horizontal cells form an electrically coupled network and provide feedback signals to photoreceptors and feedforward signals to bipolar cells. Thereby, horizontal cells contribute to gain control at the first visual synapse and to the antagonistic organization of bipolar and ganglion cell receptive fields. However, the nature of horizontal cell output remains a matter of debate, just as the exact contribution of horizontal cells to center-surround antagonism. To facilitate studying horizontal cell function, we developed a knockin mouse line which allows ablating genes exclusively in horizontal cells. This knockin line expresses a Cre recombinase under the promoter of connexin57 (Cx57), a gap junction protein only expressed in horizontal cells. Consistently, in Cx57+/Cre mice, Cre recombinase is expressed in almost all horizontal cells (>99%) and no other retinal neurons. To test Cre activity, we crossbred Cx57+/Cre mice with a mouse line in which exon 11 of the coding sequence for the ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluA4 was flanked by two loxP sites (GluA4fl/fl). In GluA4fl/fl:Cx57+/Cre mice, GluA4 immunoreactivity was significantly reduced (∼50%) in the outer retina where horizontal cells receive photoreceptor inputs, confirming the functionality of the Cre/loxP system. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from isolated horizontal cell somata showed a reduction of glutamate-induced inward currents by ∼75%, suggesting that the GluA4 subunit plays a major role in mediating photoreceptor inputs. The persistent current in GluA4-deficient cells is mostly driven by AMPA and to a very small extent by kainate receptors as revealed by application of the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI52466 and concanavalin A, a potentiator of kainate receptor-mediated currents. In summary, the Cx57+/Cre mouse line provides a versatile tool for studying horizontal cell function. GluA4fl/fl:Cx57+/Cre mice, in which horizontal cells receive less excitatory input

  17. A chimeric antigen receptor for TRAIL-receptor 1 induces apoptosis in various types of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Hamana, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Hidetoshi; Jin, Aishun; Lin, Zhezhu; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2014-10-31

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its associated receptors (TRAIL-R/TR) are attractive targets for cancer therapy because TRAIL induces apoptosis in tumor cells through TR while having little cytotoxicity on normal cells. Therefore, many agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for TR have been produced, and these induce apoptosis in multiple tumor cell types. However, some TR-expressing tumor cells are resistant to TR-specific mAb-induced apoptosis. In this study, we constructed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) of a TRAIL-receptor 1 (TR1)-specific single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody (TR1-scFv-CAR) and expressed it on a Jurkat T cell line, the KHYG-1 NK cell line, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). We found that the TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing Jurkat cells killed target cells via TR1-mediated apoptosis, whereas TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing KHYG-1 cells and PBLs killed target cells not only via TR1-mediated apoptosis but also via CAR signal-induced cytolysis, resulting in cytotoxicity on a broader range if target cells than with TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing Jurkat cells. The results suggest that TR1-scFv-CAR could be a new candidate for cancer gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of estrogen receptors alpha and beta in uterine leiomyoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Francisco; Frías, Ignacio; Báez, Delia; García, Candelaria; López, Francisco J; Fraser, James D; Rodríguez, Yurena; Reyes, Ricardo; Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Bello, Aixa R

    2006-12-01

    Cellular and subcellular localization of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) in uterine leiomyomas. Retrospective study. University of La Laguna (ULL) and Canary University Hospital (HUC). Premenopausal and postmenopausal women with uterine leiomyomas. Hysterectomy and myomectomy. Estrogen receptor alpha was only present in smooth muscle cells with variation in the subcellular location in different leiomyomas. Estrogen receptor beta was widely distributed in smooth muscle, endothelial, and connective tissue cells with nuclear location in all cases studied; variations were only found in the muscle cells for this receptor. Estrogens operate in leiomyoma smooth muscle cells through different receptors, alpha and beta. However they only act through the ERbeta in endothelial and connective cells.

  19. Role of the T cell receptor ligand affinity in T cell activation by bacterial superantigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Geisler, C; Buus, S

    2001-01-01

    Similar to native peptide/MHC ligands, bacterial superantigens have been found to bind with low affinity to the T cell receptor (TCR). It has been hypothesized that low ligand affinity is required to allow optimal TCR signaling. To test this, we generated variants of Staphylococcus enterotoxin C3...... (SEC3) with up to a 150-fold increase in TCR affinity. By stimulating T cells with SEC3 molecules immobilized onto plastic surfaces, we demonstrate that increasing the affinity of the SEC3/TCR interaction caused a proportional increase in the ability of SEC3 to activate T cells. Thus, the potency...... correlation between ligand affinity and ligand potency indicating that it is the density of receptor-ligand complexes in the T cell contact area that determines TCR signaling strength....

  20. On the evocability of a positive oestrogen feedback action on LH secretion in transsexual men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörner, G; Rohde, W; Seidel, K; Haas, W; Schott, G S

    1976-03-01

    In transsexual men with homosexual behaviour and intact testicular function, as well as in homosexual men with normal gender identity, following a negative oestrogen feedback effect a delayed positive oestrogen feedback action on LH secretion was evoked. By contrast, in transsexual men with hypo- or asexuality and intact testes or hypergonadotrophic hypo- or agonadism, as well as in heterosexual men with normal gender identity, a negative oestrogen feedback effect was not followed by a positive feedback action on LH release. In transsexual women with homosexual behaviour and oligo- and/or hypomenorrhoea, only a weak or at best moderate positive oestrogen feedback action on LH release was evocable, similarly as in castrated and oestrogen-primed heterosexual men. By contrast, in a transsexual woman with bisexual behaviour and eumenorrhoea, a strong positive oestrogen feedback action on LH secretion was evocable, as well as in heterosexual women with normal gender identity.

  1. Functional importance of GLP-1 receptor species and expression levels in cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Hastrup, Sven; Underwood, Christina Rye; Wulff, Birgitte Schjellerup; Fleckner, Jan

    2012-04-10

    Of the mammalian species, only the GLP-1 receptors of rat and human origin have been described and characterized. Here, we report the cloning of the homologous GLP-1 receptors from mouse, rabbit, pig, cynomolgus monkey and chimp. The GLP-1 receptor is highly conserved across species, thus underlining the physiological importance of the peptide hormone and its receptor across a wide range of mammals. We expressed the receptors by stable transfection of BHK cells, both in cell lines with high expression levels of the cloned receptors, as well as in cell lines with lower expression levels, more comparable to endogenous expression of these receptors. High expression levels of cloned GLP-1 receptors markedly increased the potency of GLP-1 and other high affinity ligands, whereas the K(d) values were not affected. For a low affinity ligand like the ago-allosteric modulator Compound 2, expression levels of the human GLP-1 receptor were important for maximal efficacy as well as potency. The two natural metabolites of GLP-1, GLP-1(9-37) and GLP-1(9-36)amide were agonists when tested on a cell line with high expression of the recombinant human GLP-1 receptor, whereas they behaved as (low potent) antagonists on a cell line that expressed the receptor endogenously, as well as cells expressing a moderate level of the recombinant human GLP-1 receptor. The amide form was a more potent agonist than the free acid from. In conclusion, receptor expression level is an important parametre for selecting cell lines with cloned GLP-1 receptors for functional characterization of physiological and pharmaceutical ligands. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. T-cell receptor transfer into human T cells with ecotropic retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koste, L; Beissert, T; Hoff, H; Pretsch, L; Türeci, Ö; Sahin, U

    2014-05-01

    Adoptive T-cell transfer for cancer immunotherapy requires genetic modification of T cells with recombinant T-cell receptors (TCRs). Amphotropic retroviral vectors (RVs) used for TCR transduction for this purpose are considered safe in principle. Despite this, TCR-coding and packaging vectors could theoretically recombine to produce replication competent vectors (RCVs), and transduced T-cell preparations must be proven free of RCV. To eliminate the need for RCV testing, we transduced human T cells with ecotropic RVs so potential RCV would be non-infectious for human cells. We show that transfection of synthetic messenger RNA encoding murine cationic amino-acid transporter 1 (mCAT-1), the receptor for murine retroviruses, enables efficient transient ecotropic transduction of human T cells. mCAT-1-dependent transduction was more efficient than amphotropic transduction performed in parallel, and preferentially targeted naive T cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that ecotropic TCR transduction results in antigen-specific restimulation of primary human T cells. Thus, ecotropic RVs represent a versatile, safe and potent tool to prepare T cells for the adoptive transfer.

  3. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng, E-mail: oxyccc@163.com

    2015-12-04

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  4. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  5. Nuclear Receptor TLX Regulates Cell Cycle Progression in Neural Stem Cells of the Developing Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wenwu; Sun, Guoqiang; Yang, Su; Qu, Qiuhao; Nakashima, Kinichi; Shi, Yanhong

    2007-01-01

    TLX is an orphan nuclear receptor that is expressed exclusively in vertebrate forebrains. Although TLX is known to be expressed in embryonic brains, the mechanism by which it influences neural development remains largely unknown. We show here that TLX is expressed specifically in periventricular neural stem cells in embryonic brains. Significant thinning of neocortex was observed in embryonic d 14.5 TLX-null brains with reduced nestin labeling and decreased cell proliferation in the germinal ...

  6. Regulated internalization of NMDA receptors drives PKD1-mediated suppression of the activity of residual cell-surface NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiao-Qian; Qiao, Haifa; Groveman, Bradley R; Feng, Shuang; Pflueger, Melissa; Xin, Wen-Kuan; Ali, Mohammad K; Lin, Shuang-Xiu; Xu, Jindong; Duclot, Florian; Kabbaj, Mohamed; Wang, Wei; Ding, Xin-Sheng; Santiago-Sim, Teresa; Jiang, Xing-Hong; Salter, Michael W; Yu, Xian-Min

    2015-11-19

    Constitutive and regulated internalization of cell surface proteins has been extensively investigated. The regulated internalization has been characterized as a principal mechanism for removing cell-surface receptors from the plasma membrane, and signaling to downstream targets of receptors. However, so far it is still not known whether the functional properties of remaining (non-internalized) receptor/channels may be regulated by internalization of the same class of receptor/channels. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a principal subtype of glutamate-gated ion channel and plays key roles in neuronal plasticity and memory functions. NMDARs are well-known to undergo two types of regulated internalization - homologous and heterologous, which can be induced by high NMDA/glycine and DHPG, respectively. In the present work, we investigated effects of regulated NMDAR internalization on the activity of residual cell-surface NMDARs and neuronal functions. In electrophysiological experiments we discovered that the regulated internalization of NMDARs not only reduced the number of cell surface NMDARs but also caused an inhibition of the activity of remaining (non-internalized) surface NMDARs. In biochemical experiments we identified that this functional inhibition of remaining surface NMDARs was mediated by increased serine phosphorylation of surface NMDARs, resulting from the activation of protein kinase D1 (PKD1). Knockdown of PKD1 did not affect NMDAR internalization but prevented the phosphorylation and inhibition of remaining surface NMDARs and NMDAR-mediated synaptic functions. These data demonstrate a novel concept that regulated internalization of cell surface NMDARs not only reduces the number of NMDARs on the cell surface but also causes an inhibition of the activity of remaining surface NMDARs through intracellular signaling pathway(s). Furthermore, modulating the activity of remaining surface receptors may be an effective approach for treating receptor

  7. B cell antigen receptor signaling and internalization are mutually exclusive events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hou

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Engagement of the B cell antigen receptor initiates two concurrent processes, signaling and receptor internalization. While both are required for normal humoral immune responses, the relationship between these two processes is unknown. Herein, we demonstrate that following receptor ligation, a small subpopulation of B cell antigen receptors are inductively phosphorylated and selectively retained at the cell surface where they can serve as scaffolds for the assembly of signaling molecules. In contrast, the larger population of non-phosphorylated receptors is rapidly endocytosed. Each receptor can undergo only one of two mutually exclusive fates because the tyrosine-based motifs that mediate signaling when phosphorylated mediate internalization when not phosphorylated. Mathematical modeling indicates that the observed competition between receptor phosphorylation and internalization enhances signaling responses to low avidity ligands.

  8. Memory control by the B cell antigen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Niklas; Wienands, Jürgen

    2018-05-01

    The generation of memory B cells (MBCs) that have undergone immunoglobulin class switching from IgM, which dominates primary antibody responses, to other immunoglobulin isoforms is a hallmark of immune memory. Hence, humoral immunological memory is characterized by the presence of serum immunoglobulins of IgG subtypes known as the γ-globulin fraction of blood plasma proteins. These antibodies reflect the antigen experience of B lymphocytes and their repeated triggering. In fact, efficient protection against a previously encountered pathogen is critically linked to the production of pathogen-specific IgG molecules even in those cases where the primary immune response required cellular immunity, for example, T cell-mediated clearance of intracellular pathogens such as viruses. Besides IgG, also IgA and IgE can provide humoral immunity depending on the microbe's nature and infection route. The molecular mechanisms underlying the preponderance of switched immunoglobulin isotypes during memory antibody responses are a matter of active and controversial debate. Here, we summarize the phenotypic characteristics of distinct MBC subpopulations and discuss the decisive roles of different B cell antigen receptor isotypes for the functional traits of class-switched B cell populations. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Targeting Gallium to Cancer Cells through the Folate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerissa Viola-Villegas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of gallium(III compounds as anti-cancer agents for both treatment and diagnosis is a rapidly developing field of research. Problems remain in exploring the full potential of gallium(III as a safe and successful therapeutic agent or as an imaging agent. One of the major issues is that gallium(III compounds have little tropism for cancer cells. We have combined the targeting properties of folic acid (FA with long chain liquid polymer poly(ethylene glycol (PEG 'spacers’. This FA-PEG unit has been coupled to the gallium coordination complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-N, N′, N′, N′′-tetraacetic acid (DOTA through amide linkages for delivery into target cells overexpressing the folate receptor (FR. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were conducted against a multi-drug resistant ovarian cell line (A2780/AD that overexpresses the FR and contrasted against a FR free Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell line. Results are rationalized taking into account stability studies conducted in RPMI 1640 media and HEPES buffer at pH 7.4.

  10. The vitamin D receptor and T cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eKongsbak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The vitamin D receptor (VDR is a nuclear, ligand-dependent transcription factor that in complex with hormonally active vitamin D, 1,25(OH2D3, regulates the expression of more than 900 genes involved in a wide array of physiological functions. The impact of 1,25(OH2D3-VDR signaling on immune function has been the focus of many recent studies as a link between 1,25(OH2D3 and sus-ceptibility to various infections and to development of a variety of inflammatory diseases has been suggested. It is also becoming increasingly clear that microbes slow down immune reactivity by dysregulating the VDR ultimately to increase their chance of survival. Immune modulatory therapies that enhance VDR expression and activity are therefore considered in the clinic today to a greater extent. As T cells are of great importance for both protective immunity and development of inflammatory diseases a variety of studies have been engaged investigating the impact of VDR ex-pression in T cells and found that VDR expression and activity plays an important role in both T cell development, differentiation and effector function. In this review we will analyze current know-ledge of VDR regulation and function in T cells and discuss its importance for immune activity.

  11. Targeting Gallium to Cancer Cells through the Folate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerissa Viola-Villegas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of gallium(III compounds as anti-cancer agents for both treatment and diagnosis is a rapidly developing field of research. Problems remain in exploring the full potential of gallium(III as a safe and successful therapeutic agent or as an imaging agent. One of the major issues is that gallium(III compounds have little tropism for cancer cells. We have combined the targeting properties of folic acid (FA with long chain liquid polymer poly(ethylene glycol (PEG ‘spacers’. This FA-PEG unit has been coupled to the gallium coordination complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-N,N′,N′′,N′′′-tetraacetic acid (DOTA through amide linkages for delivery into target cells overexpressing the folate receptor (FR. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were conducted against a multi-drug resistant ovarian cell line (A2780/AD that overexpresses the FR and contrasted against a FR free Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell line. Results are rationalized taking into account stability studies conducted in RPMI 1640 media and HEPES buffer at pH 7.4.

  12. Seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor repertoire of gastric ghrelin cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, Maja S; Park, Won-Mee; Sakata, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating secretion of the orexigenic-glucoregulatory hormone ghrelin remain unclear. Based on qPCR analysis of FACS-purified gastric ghrelin cells, highly expressed and enriched 7TM receptors were comprehensively identified and functionally characterized using in vitro......, ex vivo and in vivo methods. Five Gαs-coupled receptors efficiently stimulated ghrelin secretion: as expected the β1-adrenergic, the GIP and the secretin receptors but surprisingly also the composite receptor for the sensory neuropeptide CGRP and the melanocortin 4 receptor. A number of Gαi....../o-coupled receptors inhibited ghrelin secretion including somatostatin receptors SSTR1, SSTR2 and SSTR3 and unexpectedly the highly enriched lactate receptor, GPR81. Three other metabolite receptors known to be both Gαi/o- and Gαq/11-coupled all inhibited ghrelin secretion through a pertussis toxin-sensitive Gαi...

  13. The Determinations of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptor in Breast Cancer Cell by Radioimmunoassay Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chi Yeul

    1981-01-01

    The estrogen and progesterone receptors which are bound to the cytoplasmic protein of cancer cells were measured in 20 patients with the early breast cancer by means of radioimmunoassay using charcoal. 1) The patients with estrogen receptor positive were 13 (65%) of 20 cases and with progestrone receptor positive were 7 cases (35%) in the early breast cancer. 2) Coexistence of estrogen and progesterone receptor positive was noted in 7 cases (35%). The cases of estrogen receptor positive and progesterone receptor negative were 6 cases (33.3%), while there were no cases of estrogen receptor negative with progesterone receptor positive. 3) Coincidence of estrogen and progesterone negative was noticed in 7 cases (35%). Conclusively it is considered that the measurement of estrogen and progesterone receptors has relevance as predictive value, in the response to hormonal manipulations and chemotherapy for breast cancer patients.

  14. Sleeping Beauty Transposition of Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Like Orphan Receptor-1 (ROR1 into Diverse Memory T-Cell Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew C Deniger

    Full Text Available T cells modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs targeting CD19 demonstrated clinical activity against some B-cell malignancies. However, this is often accompanied by a loss of normal CD19+ B cells and humoral immunity. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-1 (ROR1 is expressed on sub-populations of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors, but not by healthy B cells or normal post-partum tissues. Thus, adoptive transfer of T cells specific for ROR1 has potential to eliminate tumor cells and spare healthy tissues. To test this hypothesis, we developed CARs targeting ROR1 in order to generate T cells specific for malignant cells. Two Sleeping Beauty transposons were constructed with 2nd generation ROR1-specific CARs signaling through CD3ζ and either CD28 (designated ROR1RCD28 or CD137 (designated ROR1RCD137 and were introduced into T cells. We selected for T cells expressing CAR through co-culture with γ-irradiated activating and propagating cells (AaPC, which co-expressed ROR1 and co-stimulatory molecules. Numeric expansion over one month of co-culture on AaPC in presence of soluble interleukin (IL-2 and IL-21 occurred and resulted in a diverse memory phenotype of CAR+ T cells as measured by non-enzymatic digital array (NanoString and multi-panel flow cytometry. Such T cells produced interferon-γ and had specific cytotoxic activity against ROR1+ tumors. Moreover, such cells could eliminate ROR1+ tumor xenografts, especially T cells expressing ROR1RCD137. Clinical trials will investigate the ability of ROR1-specific CAR+ T cells to specifically eliminate tumor cells while maintaining normal B-cell repertoire.

  15. Basal cell adhesion molecule/lutheran protein. The receptor critical for sickle cell adhesion to laminin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, M; Zen, Q; Cottman, M; Leonard, N; Jefferson, S; Daymont, C; Truskey, G; Telen, M J

    1998-01-01

    Sickle red cells bind significant amounts of soluble laminin, whereas normal red cells do not. Solid phase assays demonstrate that B-CAM/LU binds laminin on intact sickle red cells and that red cell B-CAM/LU binds immobilized laminin, whereas another putative laminin binding protein, CD44, does not. Ligand blots also identify B-CAM/LU as the only erythrocyte membrane protein(s) that binds laminin. Finally, transfection of murine erythroleukemia cells with human B-CAM cDNA induces binding of both soluble and immobilized laminin. Thus, B-CAM/LU appears to be the major laminin-binding protein of sickle red cells. Previously reported overexpression of B-CAM/LU by epithelial cancer cells suggests that this protein may also serve as a laminin receptor in malignant tumors. PMID:9616226

  16. Comparison of steroid receptors from the androgen responsive DDT1 cell line and the nonresponsive HVP cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J S; Kohler, P O

    1978-01-01

    Two hamster cell lines have been isolated from androgen target tissue. The DDT1 cells derived from ductus deferens tissue exhibit a growth response to androgens, while the HVP cells derived from ventral prostate are androgen unresponsive. Both cell lines contain androgen receptors, that are similar when compared by kinetic methods, sedimentation velocity, chromatographic procedures or nuclear translocation ability. The forms of the high salt extracted nuclear receptors are indistinguishable chromatographically. Therefore, we postulate that the lesion preventing androgen induced growth in the HVP cell line is subseqent to nuclear translocation of the steroid receptor complex.

  17. Atypical nuclear localization of VIP receptors in glioma cell lines and patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbarin, Alice; Séité, Paule [Equipe Récepteurs, Régulations et Cellules Tumorales, Université de Poitiers, PBS bât 36, 1 rue Georges Bonnet, TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France); Godet, Julie [Laboratoire d’anatomie et de cytologie pathologiques, CHU de Poitiers, 2 rue de la Milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc [Equipe Récepteurs, Régulations et Cellules Tumorales, Université de Poitiers, PBS bât 36, 1 rue Georges Bonnet, TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France); Chadéneau, Corinne, E-mail: corinne.chadeneau@univ-poitiers.fr [Equipe Récepteurs, Régulations et Cellules Tumorales, Université de Poitiers, PBS bât 36, 1 rue Georges Bonnet, TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • The VIP receptor VPAC1 contains a putative NLS signal. • VPAC1 is predominantly nuclear in GBM cell lines but not VPAC2. • Non-nuclear VPAC1/2 protein expression is correlated with glioma grade. • Nuclear VPAC1 is observed in 50% of stage IV glioma (GBM). - Abstract: An increasing number of G protein-coupled receptors, like receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are found in cell nucleus. As VIP receptors are involved in the regulation of glioma cell proliferation and migration, we investigated the expression and the nuclear localization of the VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 in this cancer. First, by applying Western blot and immunofluorescence detection in three human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, we observed a strong nuclear staining for the VPAC1 receptor and a weak nuclear VPAC2 receptor staining. Second, immunohistochemical staining of VPAC1 and VPAC2 on tissue microarrays (TMA) showed that the two receptors were expressed in normal brain and glioma tissues. Expression in the non-nuclear compartment of the two receptors significantly increased with the grade of the tumors. Analysis of nuclear staining revealed a significant increase of VPAC1 staining with glioma grade, with up to 50% of GBM displaying strong VPAC1 nuclear staining, whereas nuclear VPAC2 staining remained marginal. The increase in VPAC receptor expression with glioma grades and the enhanced nuclear localization of the VPAC1 receptors in GBM might be of importance for glioma progression.

  18. Oestrogenic activity of a textile industrial wastewater treatment plant effluent evaluated by the E-screen test and MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiliro, Tiziana, E-mail: tiziana.schiliro@unito.it [Department of Public Health and Microbiology, University of Torino, Via Santena 5bis, 10126 Torino (Italy); Porfido, Arianna [Department of Public Health and Microbiology, University of Torino, Via Santena 5bis, 10126 Torino (Italy); Spina, Federica; Varese, Giovanna Cristina [Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Torino, Viale Mattioli 25, 10125 Torino (Italy); Gilli, Giorgio [Department of Public Health and Microbiology, University of Torino, Via Santena 5bis, 10126 Torino (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    This study quantified the biological oestrogenic activity in the effluent of a textile industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWWTP) in northwestern Italy. Samples of the IWWTP effluent were collected monthly, both before and after tertiary treatment (ozonation). After solid phase extraction, all samples were subjected to two in vitro tests of total estrogenic activity, the human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 BUS) proliferation assay, or E-screen test, and the luciferase-transfected human breast cancer cell line (MELN) gene-reporter assay, to measure the 17{beta}-oestradiol equivalent quantity (EEQ). In the E-screen test, the mean EEQ values were 2.35 {+-} 1.68 ng/L pre-ozonation and 0.72 {+-} 0.58 ng/L post-ozonation; in the MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay, the mean EEQ values were 4.18 {+-} 3.54 ng/L pre-ozonation and 2.53 {+-} 2.48 ng/L post-ozonation. These results suggest that the post-ozonation IWWTP effluent had a lower oestrogenic activity (simple paired t-tests, p < 0.05). The average reduction of estrogenic activity of IWWTP effluent after ozonation was 67 {+-} 26% and 52 {+-} 27% as measured by E-screen test and MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay, respectively. There was a positive and significant correlation between the two tests (Rho S = 0.650, p = 0.022). This study indicates that the environmental risk is low because oestrogenic substances are deposited into the river via IWWTP at concentrations lower than those at which chronic exposure has been reported to affect the endocrine system of living organisms. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two in vitro tests are suited for oestrogenic activity assessment in textile WWTP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a significant correlation between the results of the two in vitro tests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oestrogenic activity of the effluent is reduced by ozonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The input of estrogenic substances into the river via textile WWTP is low.

  19. Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells express a functional Ca+ -sensing receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berra Romani, Roberto; Raqeeb, Abdul; Laforenza, Umberto; Scaffino, Manuela Federica; Moccia, Francesco; Avelino-Cruz, Josè Everardo; Oldani, Amanda; Coltrini, Daniela; Milesi, Veronica; Taglietti, Vanni; Tanzi, Franco

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism whereby extracellular Ca(2+) exerts the endothelium-dependent control of vascular tone is still unclear. In this study, we assessed whether cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC) express a functional extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) using a variety of techniques. CaSR mRNA was detected using RT-PCR, and CaSR protein was identified by immunocytochemical analysis. In order to assess the functionality of the receptor, CMEC were loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorochrome, Fura-2/AM. A number of CaSR agonists, such as spermine, Gd(3+), La(3+) and neomycin, elicited a heterogeneous intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which was abolished by disruption of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) signaling and by depletion of intracellular stores with cyclopiazonic acid. The inhibition of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger upon substitution of extracellular Na(+) unmasked the Ca(2+) signal triggered by an increase in extracellular Ca(2+) levels. Finally, aromatic amino acids, which function as allosteric activators of CaSR, potentiated the Ca(2+) response to the CaSR agonist La(3+). These data provide evidence that CMEC express CaSR, which is able to respond to physiological agonists by mobilizing Ca(2+) from intracellular InsP(3)-sensitive stores. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors in tethered cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Karen L.; Meyer, Bruno H.; Hovius, Ruud

    2003-01-01

    for the surface immobilization of membrane proteins was developed using the prototypic seven transmembrane neurokinin-1 receptor. The receptor was expressed as a biotinylated protein in mammalian cells. Membranes from cell homogenates were selectively immobilized on glass surfaces covered with streptavidin. TIRF...... measurements showed that a fluorescent agonist binds to the receptor on the sensor surface with similar affinity as to the receptor in live cells. This approach offers the possibility to investigate minute amounts of membrane protein in an active form and in its native environment without purification....

  1. Characterization of human endothelial cell urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor protein and messenger RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnathan, E S; Kuo, A; Karikó, K

    1990-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture (HUVEC) express receptors for urokinase-type plasminogen activators (u-PA). The immunochemical nature of this receptor and its relationship to u-PA receptors expressed by other cell types is unknown. Cross-linking active site-blocked u-PA to HUVEC...... an endothelial cell cDNA library using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and oligonucleotide primers corresponding to the DNA sequence of the receptor cloned from transformed human fibroblasts (Roldan et al, EMBO J 9:467, 1990). The size of the cDNA (approximately 1,054 base pairs, bp) and the presence...

  2. NOD1 cooperates with TLR2 to enhance T cell receptor-mediated activation in CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blandine C Mercier

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, like Toll-like receptors (TLR and NOD-like receptors (NLR, are involved in the detection of microbial infections and tissue damage by cells of the innate immune system. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that TLR2 can additionally function as a costimulatory receptor on CD8 T cells. Here, we establish that the intracytosolic receptor NOD1 is expressed and functional in CD8 T cells. We show that C12-iEDAP, a synthetic ligand for NOD1, has a direct impact on both murine and human CD8 T cells, increasing proliferation and effector functions of cells activated via their T cell receptor (TCR. This effect is dependent on the adaptor molecule RIP2 and is associated with an increased activation of the NF-κB, JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NOD1 stimulation can cooperate with TLR2 engagement on CD8 T cells to enhance TCR-mediated activation. Altogether our results indicate that NOD1 might function as an alternative costimulatory receptor in CD8 T cells. Our study provides new insights into the function of NLR in T cells and extends to NOD1 the recent concept that PRR stimulation can directly control T cell functions.

  3. Tracking Cell Surface GABAB Receptors Using an α-Bungarotoxin Tag*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Megan E.; Li, Xinyan; Smart, Trevor G.

    2008-01-01

    GABAB receptors mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system and are important for synaptic plasticity as well as being implicated in disease. Located at pre- and postsynaptic sites, GABAB receptors will influence cell excitability, but their effectiveness in doing so will be dependent, in part, on their trafficking to, and stability on, the cell surface membrane. To examine the dynamic behavior of GABAB receptors in GIRK cells and neurons, we have devised a method that is based on tagging the receptor with the binding site components for the neurotoxin, α-bungarotoxin. By using the α-bungarotoxin binding site-tagged GABAB R1a subunit (R1aBBS), co-expressed with the R2 subunit, we can track receptor mobility using the small reporter, α-bungarotoxin-conjugated rhodamine. In this way, the rates of internalization and membrane insertion for these receptors could be measured with fixed and live cells. The results indicate that GABAB receptors rapidly turnover in the cell membrane, with the rate of internalization affected by the state of receptor activation. The bungarotoxin-based method of receptor-tagging seems ideally suited to follow the dynamic regulation of other G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:18812318

  4. Tracking cell surface GABAB receptors using an alpha-bungarotoxin tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Megan E; Li, Xinyan; Smart, Trevor G

    2008-12-12

    GABA(B) receptors mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system and are important for synaptic plasticity as well as being implicated in disease. Located at pre- and postsynaptic sites, GABA(B) receptors will influence cell excitability, but their effectiveness in doing so will be dependent, in part, on their trafficking to, and stability on, the cell surface membrane. To examine the dynamic behavior of GABA(B) receptors in GIRK cells and neurons, we have devised a method that is based on tagging the receptor with the binding site components for the neurotoxin, alpha-bungarotoxin. By using the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site-tagged GABA(B) R1a subunit (R1a(BBS)), co-expressed with the R2 subunit, we can track receptor mobility using the small reporter, alpha-bungarotoxin-conjugated rhodamine. In this way, the rates of internalization and membrane insertion for these receptors could be measured with fixed and live cells. The results indicate that GABA(B) receptors rapidly turnover in the cell membrane, with the rate of internalization affected by the state of receptor activation. The bungarotoxin-based method of receptor-tagging seems ideally suited to follow the dynamic regulation of other G-protein-coupled receptors.

  5. Ketoprofen and antinociception in hypo-oestrogenic Wistar rats fed on a high sucrose diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Morales, Osmar Antonio; Espinosa-Juárez, Josué Vidal; García-Martínez, Betzabeth Anali; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-05

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ketoprofen are the most commonly used analgesics for the treatment of pain. However, no studies have evaluated the analgesic response to ketoprofen in conditions of obesity. The aim of this study was to analyse the time course of nociceptive pain in Wistar rats with and without hypo-oestrogenism on a high sucrose diet and to compare the antinociceptive response using ketoprofen. Hypo-oestrogenic and naïve rats received a hyper caloric diet (30% sucrose) or water ad libitum for 17 weeks, the thermal nociception ("plantar test" method) and body weight were tested during this period. A biphasic response was observed: thermal latency decreased in the 4th week (hyperalgesia), while from 12th to 17th week, thermal latency increased (hypoalgesia) in hypo-oestrogenic rats fed with high sucrose diet compared with the hypo-oestrogenic control group. At 4th and 17th weeks, different doses of ketoprofen (1.8-100mg/kg p.o.), were evaluated in all groups. The administration of ketoprofen at 4th and 17th weeks showed dose-dependent effects in the all groups; however, a greater pharmacological efficacy was observed in the 4th week in the hypo-oestrogenic animals that received sucrose. Nevertheless, in all the groups significantly diminish the antinociceptive effects in the 17th week. Our data showed that nociception was altered in the hypo-oestrogenic animals that were fed sucrose (hyperalgesia and hypoalgesia). Ketoprofen showed a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect at both time points. However, hypo-oestrogenism plus high-sucrose diet modifies the antinociceptive effect of ketoprofen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Muscarinic receptors in separate populations of noradrenaline- and adrenaline-containing chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelena, P.; Moro, M.A.; Castillo, C.J.; Garcia, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    We have performed binding experiments of (a)[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate to partially purified membranes from noradrenaline- and adrenaline-containing chromaffin cells and (b) [3H]N-methyl-quinuclidinyl benzilate to acutely isolated, or 48-h cultured, chromaffin cells subpopulations. Using this approach, we obtained enough evidence to conclude (1st) that muscarinic receptors are present in both noradrenaline- and adrenaline containing cells; (2nd) that noradrenaline cells contain in fact 2-3 fold higher density of those receptors; and (3rd) that those receptors undergo plastic changes upon chronic culturing of the cells

  7. Molecular characterization of the di-leucine-based internalization motif of the T cell receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Hou, X; Wegener, A M

    1996-01-01

    Several cell surface receptors including the T cell receptor (TCR) are phosphorylated and down-regulated following activation of protein kinases. We have recently shown that both phosphorylation of Ser-126 and the presence of the di-leucine sequence Leu-131 and Leu-132 in CD3 gamma are required f...... are important. 2) Recognition of phosphorylated CD3 gamma by molecules involved in receptor internalization. In this process Ser(P)-126, Asp-127, Leu-131, and Leu-132 are important....

  8. B cell receptor inhibition as a target for CLL therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyakumar, Deepa; O'Brien, Susan

    2016-03-01

    Inhibitors of the B cell receptor (BCR) represent an attractive therapeutic option for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Recently approved inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (ibrutinib) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (idelalisib), are promising agents because they are generally well tolerated and highly effective. These agents may be particularly important in the treatment of older patients who are less able to tolerate the myelosuppression (and infections) associated with chemoimmunotherapy. As a class of medications, BCR inhibitors have some unique side effects including redistribution lymphocytosis. Ibrutinib has specific toxicities including increased risk for bleeding and atrial fibrillation. Idelalisib also has some unique toxicities consisting of transaminitis, diarrhea and pneumonitis. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating these agents in combination with antibodies, chemotherapy and other small molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The vitamin d receptor and T cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Martin; Levring, Trine B; Geisler, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a nuclear, ligand-dependent transcription factor that in complex with hormonally active vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, regulates the expression of more than 900 genes involved in a wide array of physiological functions. The impact of 1,25(OH)2D3-VDR signaling on immune...... function has been the focus of many recent studies as a link between 1,25(OH)2D3 and susceptibility to various infections and to development of a variety of inflammatory diseases has been suggested. It is also becoming increasingly clear that microbes slow down immune reactivity by dysregulating the VDR...... ultimately to increase their chance of survival. Immune modulatory therapies that enhance VDR expression and activity are therefore considered in the clinic today to a greater extent. As T cells are of great importance for both protective immunity and development of inflammatory diseases a variety of studies...

  10. Enzalutamide inhibits androgen receptor-positive bladder cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ide, Hiroki; Kashiwagi, Eiji; El-Shishtawy, Kareem A; Li, Yi; Reis, Leonardo O; Zheng, Yichun; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Emerging preclinical evidence suggests that androgen-mediated androgen receptor (AR) signals promote bladder cancer progression. However, little is known about the efficacy of an AR signaling inhibitor, enzalutamide, in the growth of bladder cancer cells. In this study, we compared the effects of enzalutamide and 2 other classic antiandrogens, flutamide and bicalutamide, on androgen-induced bladder cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion as well as tumor growth in vivo. Thiazolyl blue cell viability assay, flow cytometry, scratch wound-healing assay, transwell invasion assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and reporter gene assay were performed in AR-positive (e.g., UMUC3, TCCSUP, and 647V-AR) and AR-negative (e.g., UMUC3-AR-short hairpin RNA [shRNA], TCCSUP-AR-shRNA, 647V) bladder cancer lines treated with dihydrotestosterone and each AR antagonist. We also used a mouse xenograft model for bladder cancer. Dihydrotestosterone increased bladder cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion indicating that endogenous or exogenous AR was functional. Enzalutamide, hydroxyflutamide, and bicalutamide showed similar inhibitory effects, without significant agonist activity, on androgen-mediated cell viability/apoptosis, cell migration, and cell invasion in AR-positive lines. No significant effects of dihydrotestosterone as well as AR antagonists on the growth of AR-negative cells were seen. Correspondingly, in UMUC3 cells, these AR antagonists down-regulated androgen-induced expression of AR, matrix metalloproteinase-2, and interleukin-6. Androgen-enhanced AR-mediated transcriptional activity was also blocked by each AR antagonist exhibiting insignificant agonist activity. In UMUC3 xenograft-bearing mice, oral gavage treatment with each antiandrogen retarded tumor growth, and only enzalutamide demonstrated a statistically significant suppression compared with mock treatment. Our current data support recent observations indicating the involvement of

  11. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...

  12. Toll-like receptor 3 signalling up-regulates expression of the HIV co-receptor G-protein coupled receptor 15 on human CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Kiene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many HIV-2 and SIV isolates, as well as some HIV-1 strains, can use the orphan 7-transmembrane receptor GPR15 as co-receptor for efficient entry into host cells. GPR15 is expressed on central memory and effector memory CD4(+ T cells in healthy individuals and a subset of these cells is susceptible to HIV-1 and SIV infection. However, it has not been determined whether GPR15 expression is altered in the context of HIV-1 infection. RESULTS: Here, we show that GPR15 expression in CD4(+ T cells is markedly up-regulated in some HIV-1 infected individuals compared to the rest of the infected patients and to healthy controls. Infection of the PM1 T cell line with primary HIV-1 isolates was found to up-regulate GPR15 expression on the infected cells, indicating that viral components can induce GPR15 expression. Up-regulation of GPR15 expression on CD4(+ T cells was induced by activation of Toll-like receptor 3 signalling via TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF and was more prominent on gut-homing compared to lymph node-homing CD4(+ T cells. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that infection-induced up-regulation of GPR15 expression could increase susceptibility of CD4(+ T cells to HIV infection and target cell availability in the gut in some infected individuals.

  13. Crammed signaling motifs in the T-cell receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto, Aldo; Abia, David; Alarcón, Balbino

    2014-09-01

    Although the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) is long known to contain multiple signaling subunits (CD3γ, CD3δ, CD3ɛ and CD3ζ), their role in signal transduction is still not well understood. The presence of at least one immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) in each CD3 subunit has led to the idea that the multiplication of such elements essentially serves to amplify signals. However, the evolutionary conservation of non-ITAM sequences suggests that each CD3 subunit is likely to have specific non-redundant roles at some stage of development or in mature T cell function. The CD3ɛ subunit is paradigmatic because in a relatively short cytoplasmic sequence (∼55 amino acids) it contains several docking sites for proteins involved in intracellular trafficking and signaling, proteins whose relevance in T cell activation is slowly starting to be revealed. In this review we will summarize our current knowledge on the signaling effectors that bind directly to the TCR and we will propose a hierarchy in their response to TCR triggering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Glyphosate induces human breast cancer cells growth via estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprakaisang, Siriporn; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Suriyo, Tawit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2013-09-01

    Glyphosate is an active ingredient of the most widely used herbicide and it is believed to be less toxic than other pesticides. However, several recent studies showed its potential adverse health effects to humans as it may be an endocrine disruptor. This study focuses on the effects of pure glyphosate on estrogen receptors (ERs) mediated transcriptional activity and their expressions. Glyphosate exerted proliferative effects only in human hormone-dependent breast cancer, T47D cells, but not in hormone-independent breast cancer, MDA-MB231 cells, at 10⁻¹² to 10⁻⁶M in estrogen withdrawal condition. The proliferative concentrations of glyphosate that induced the activation of estrogen response element (ERE) transcription activity were 5-13 fold of control in T47D-KBluc cells and this activation was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist, ICI 182780, indicating that the estrogenic activity of glyphosate was mediated via ERs. Furthermore, glyphosate also altered both ERα and β expression. These results indicated that low and environmentally relevant concentrations of glyphosate possessed estrogenic activity. Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used for soybean cultivation, and our results also found that there was an additive estrogenic effect between glyphosate and genistein, a phytoestrogen in soybeans. However, these additive effects of glyphosate contamination in soybeans need further animal study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of dopamine D2 receptors in a novel cell line (SUP1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivins, K.J.; Luedtke, R.R.; Artymyshyn, R.P.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    A prolactin-secreting cell line, SUP1, has been established from rat pituitary tumor 7315a. In radioligand binding experiments, the D2 receptor antagonist (S)-(-)-3- 125 I iodo-2-hydroxy-6-methoxy-N-[(1-ethyl-2- pyrrolidinyl)methyl]benzamide ( 125 I IBZM) labeled a single class of sites in homogenates of SUP1 cells (Kd = 0.6 nM; Bmax = 45 fmol/mg of protein). The sites displayed a pharmacological profile consistent with that of D2 receptors. Inhibition of the binding of 125 I IBZM by dopamine was sensitive to GTP, suggesting that D2 receptors in SUP1 cells are coupled to guanine nucleotide-binding protein(s). In the presence of isobutylmethylxanthine, dopamine decreased the level of cAMP accumulation in SUP1 cells. Dopamine also inhibited prolactin secretion from SUP1 cells. Both the inhibition of cAMP accumulation and the inhibition of prolactin secretion were blocked by D2 receptor antagonists, suggesting that these effects of dopamine were mediated by an interaction with D2 receptors. The regulation of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells by D2 receptor agonists was investigated. Exposure of SUP1 cells to dopamine or to the D2 receptor agonist N-propylnorapomorphine led to increased expression of D2 receptors, with no change in the affinity of the receptors for 125 I IBZM. An increase in the density of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells was evident within 7 hr of exposure to dopamine. Spiroperidol, a D2 receptor antagonist, blocked the effect of dopamine on receptor density. These results suggest that exposure of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells to agonists leads to an up-regulation of D2 receptors. Dopamine retained the ability to inhibit cAMP accumulation in SUP1 cells exposed to dopamine for 24 hr, suggesting that D2 receptors in SUP1 cells are not desensitized by prolonged exposure to agonist

  16. IMPROVED TUMOR CELL KILLING BY TRAIL REQUIRES SELECTIVE AND HIGH AFFINITY RECEPTOR ACTIVATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szegezdi, Eva; van der Sloot, Almer M.; Alessandro, Natoni; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Cool, Robbert H.; Munoz, Ines G.; Montoya, Guillermo; Quax, Wim J.; Luis Serrano, Steven de Jong; Samali, Afshin; Wallach, D; Kovalenko, A; Feldman, M

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis can be activated by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in a wide range of tumor cells, but not in non-transformed cells. TRAIL interaction with receptors DR4 or DR5 induces apoptosis, whereas DcR1, DcR2 and osteoprotegerin are decoy receptors for TRAIL. TRAIL

  17. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Protease-activated receptor 2 modulates proliferation and invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eryani, Kamal; Cheng, Jun; Abé, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Babkair, Hamzah; Essa, Ahmed; Saku, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Based on our previous finding that protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) regulates hemophagocytosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells, which induces their heme oxygenase 1-dependent keratinization, we have formulated a hypothesis that PAR-2 functions in wider activities of SCC cells. To confirm this hypothesis, we investigated immunohistochemical profiles of PAR-2 in oral SCC tissues and its functional roles in cell proliferation and invasion in SCC cells in culture. The PAR-2 expression modes were determined in 48 surgical tissue specimens of oral SCC. Using oral SCC-derived cell systems, we determined both gene and protein expression levels of PAR-2. SCC cell proliferation and invasive properties were also examined in conditions in which PAR-2 was activated by the synthetic peptide SLIGRL. PAR-2 was immunolocalized in oral SCC and carcinoma in situ cells, especially in those on the periphery of carcinoma cell foci (100% of cases), but not in normal oral epithelia. Its expression at both gene and protein levels was confirmed in 3 oral SCC cell lines including ZK-1. Activation of PAR-2 induced ZK-1 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. PAR-2-activated ZK-1 cells invaded faster than nonactivated ones. The expression of PAR-2 is specific to oral malignancies, and PAR-2 regulates the growth and invasion of oral SCC cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol enhances MCF-7 cell proliferation via cannabinoid receptor-independent signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Shuso; Yamaori, Satoshi; Motoya, Erina; Matsunaga, Tamihide; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuhito

    2008-01-01

    We recently reported that Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9 -THC) has the ability to stimulate the proliferation of human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells. However, the mechanism of action remains to be clarified. The present study focused on the relationship between receptor expression and the effects of Δ 9 -THC on cell proliferation. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that there was no detectable expression of CB receptors in MCF-7 cells. In accordance with this, no effects of cannabinoid 1/2 (CB1/2) receptor antagonists and pertussis toxin on cell proliferation were observed. Although MCF-7 cell proliferation is suggested to be suppressed by Δ 9 -THC in the presence of CB receptors, it was revealed that Δ 9 -THC could exert upregulation of living cells in the absence of the receptors. Interestingly, Δ 9 -THC upregulated human epithelial growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression, which is known to be a predictive factor of human breast cancer and is able to stimulate cancer cells as well as MCF-7 cells. Actinomycin D-treatment interfered with the upregulation of HER2 and cell proliferation by cannabinoid. Taken together, these studies suggest that, in the absence of CB receptors, Δ 9 -THC can stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by modulating, at least in part, HER2 transcription

  20. EVIR: chimeric receptors that enhance dendritic cell cross-dressing with tumor antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Hansen, Sarah K; De Palma, Michele

    2018-03-01

    We describe a lentivirus-encoded chimeric receptor, termed extracellular vesicle (EV)-internalizing receptor (EVIR), which enables the selective uptake of cancer-cell-derived EVs by dendritic cells (DCs). The EVIR enhances DC presentation of EV-associated tumor antigens to CD8 + T cells primarily through MHCI recycling and cross-dressing. EVIRs should facilitate exploring the mechanisms and implications of horizontal transfer of tumor antigens to antigen-presenting cells.

  1. Targeting Multiple Tumors Using T-Cells Engineered to Express a Natural Cytotoxicity Receptor 2-Based Chimeric Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl Eisenberg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in cancer treatment are demonstrating the increasing and powerful potential of immunotherapeutic strategies. In this regard, the adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T-lymphocytes approaches can lead to tumor regression in cancer patients. More recently, the use of T-cells genetically engineered to express cancer-specific receptors such as the anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR continues to show promise for the treatment of hematological malignancies. Still, there is a crucial need to develop efficient CAR-T cell approaches for the treatment of solid tumors. It has been shown that other lymphocytes such as natural killer (NK cells can demonstrate potent antitumor function—nonetheless, their use in immunotherapy is rather limited due to difficulties in expanding these cells to therapeutically relevant numbers and to suppression by endogenous inhibitory mechanisms. Cancer recognition by NK cells is partly mediated by molecules termed natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs. In the present study, we hypothesize that it is possible to endow T-cells with an NK recognition pattern, providing them with a mean to recognize tumor cells, in a non-MHC restricted way. To test this, we genetically modified human T-cells with different chimeric receptors based on the human NCR2 molecule and then assessed their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that expression in primary lymphocytes of an NCR2-derived CAR, termed s4428z, confers T-cells with the ability to specifically recognize heterogeneous tumors and to mediate tumor cytotoxicity in a mouse model. This study demonstrates the benefit of combining tumor recognition capability of NK cells with T cell effectiveness to improve cancer immunotherapy.

  2. EGF-induced stimualtion of EGF-receptor synthesis in human cytotrophoblasts and A431 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePalo, L.; Basu, A.; Das, M.

    1987-01-01

    EGF-receptor is a transmembrane glycoprotein whose intracellular degradation is known to be enhanced by EGF. The authors tested whether the receptor is replenished during this process by an enhanced rate of synthesis. Human A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells, and primary cultures of human placental cytotrophoblasts were used in these studies. Cells were labeled with 35 S-methionine, and EGF-receptor biosynthesis was quantitated by immunoprecipitation using a monoclonal anti-EGF-receptor antibody. EGF stimulated receptor biosynthesis at concentrations of 0.1-1 nM. The effect was seen within 2 h of EGF addition. The maximal stimulatory effect was modest in A431 (∼ 2-fold), but marked in the cytotrophoblasts (>5-fold). At EGF concentrations higher than 3 nM, the stimulatory effect was abolished. In contrast, the effect of EGF on receptor degradation is negligible at low subnanomolar concentrations, and is pronounced only at saturating concentrations. These results show that occupation of the cell surface EGF-receptor by its ligand can lead to production of more receptor protein, thus counterbalancing the negative effect on receptor degradation. At low subnanomolar (mitogenic) concentrations of EGF the stimulator effect on receptor synthesis is likely to predominate over the effect on receptor degradation

  3. T Cell Phenotype and T Cell Receptor Repertoire in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Patas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available While a link between inflammation and the development of neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD is supported by a growing body of evidence, little is known about the contribution of aberrant adaptive immunity in this context. Here, we conducted in-depth characterization of T cell phenotype and T cell receptor (TCR repertoire in MDD. For this cross-sectional case–control study, we recruited antidepressant-free patients with MDD without any somatic or psychiatric comorbidities (n = 20, who were individually matched for sex, age, body mass index, and smoking status to a non-depressed control subject (n = 20. T cell phenotype and repertoire were interrogated using a combination of flow cytometry, gene expression analysis, and next generation sequencing. T cells from MDD patients showed significantly lower surface expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6, which are known to be central to T cell differentiation and trafficking. In addition, we observed a shift within the CD4+ T cell compartment characterized by a higher frequency of CD4+CD25highCD127low/− cells and higher FOXP3 mRNA expression in purified CD4+ T cells obtained from patients with MDD. Finally, flow cytometry-based TCR Vβ repertoire analysis indicated a less diverse CD4+ T cell repertoire in MDD, which was corroborated by next generation sequencing of the TCR β chain CDR3 region. Overall, these results suggest that T cell phenotype and TCR utilization are skewed on several levels in patients with MDD. Our study identifies putative cellular and molecular signatures of dysregulated adaptive immunity and reinforces the notion that T cells are a pathophysiologically relevant cell population in this disorder.

  4. Cell surface estrogen receptor alpha is upregulated during subchronic metabolic stress and inhibits neuronal cell degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Barbati

    Full Text Available In addition to the classical nuclear estrogen receptor, the expression of non-nuclear estrogen receptors localized to the cell surface membrane (mER has recently been demonstrated. Estrogen and its receptors have been implicated in the development or progression of numerous neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, the pathogenesis of these diseases has been associated with disturbances of two key cellular programs: apoptosis and autophagy. An excess of apoptosis or a defect in autophagy has been implicated in neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of ER in determining neuronal cell fate and the possible implication of these receptors in regulating either apoptosis or autophagy. The human neuronal cell line SH-SY5Y and mouse neuronal cells in primary culture were thus exposed to chronic minimal peroxide treatment (CMP, a form of subcytotoxic minimal chronic stress previously that mimics multiple aspects of long-term cell stress and represents a limited molecular proxy for neurodegenerative processes. We actually found that either E2 or E2-bovine serum albumin construct (E2BSA, i.e. a non-permeant form of E2 was capable of modulating intracellular cell signals and regulating cell survival and death. In particular, under CMP, the up-regulation of mERα, but not mERβ, was associated with functional signals (ERK phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation compatible with autophagic cytoprotection triggering and leading to cell survival. The mERα trafficking appeared to be independent of the microfilament system cytoskeletal network but was seemingly associated with microtubular apparatus network, i.e., to MAP2 molecular chaperone. Importantly, antioxidant treatments, administration of siRNA to ERα, or the presence of antagonist of ERα hindered these events. These results support that the surface expression of mERα plays a pivotal role in determining cell fate, and that ligand-induced activation of mER signalling exerts a

  5. Plant cell surface receptor-mediated signaling - a common theme amid diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunxia; Zhou, Jinggeng; Shan, Libo; Meng, Xiangzong

    2018-01-29

    Sessile plants employ a diverse array of plasma membrane-bound receptors to perceive endogenous and exogenous signals for regulation of plant growth, development and immunity. These cell surface receptors include receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and receptor-like proteins (RLPs) that harbor different extracellular domains for perception of distinct ligands. Several RLK and RLP signaling pathways converge at the somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs), which function as shared co-receptors. A repertoire of receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases (RLCKs) associate with the receptor complexes to relay intracellular signaling. Downstream of the receptor complexes, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are among the key signaling modules at which the signals converge, and these cascades regulate diverse cellular and physiological responses through phosphorylation of different downstream substrates. In this Review, we summarize the emerging common theme that underlies cell surface receptor-mediated signaling pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana : the dynamic association of RLKs and RLPs with specific co-receptors and RLCKs for signal transduction. We further discuss how signaling specificities are maintained through modules at which signals converge, with a focus on SERK-mediated receptor signaling. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Role of T cell receptor affinity in the efficacy and specificity of adoptive T cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Stone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, there has been considerable progress in the treatment of cancer using gene modified adoptive T cell therapies. Two approaches have been used, one involving the introduction of a conventional alpha-beta T cell receptor (TCR against a pepMHC cancer antigen, and the second involving introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR consisting of a single-chain antibody as an Fv fragment (scFv linked to transmembrane and signaling domains. In this review, we focus on one aspect of TCR-mediated adoptive T cell therapies, the impact of the affinity of the alpha-beta TCR for the pepMHC cancer antigen on both efficacy and specificity. We discuss the advantages of higher affinity TCRs in mediating potent activity of CD4 T cells. This is balanced with the potential disadvantage of higher affinity TCRs in mediating greater self-reactivity against a wider range of structurally similar antigenic peptides, especially in synergy with the CD8 co-receptor. Both TCR affinity and target selection will influence potential safety issues. We suggest pre-clinical strategies that might be used to examine each TCR for possible on-target and off-target side effects due to self-reactivities, and to adjust TCR affinities accordingly.

  7. Compartmentalization of B-cell antigen receptor functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankester, A. C.; van Lier, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), like the PDGF-receptor, translate information from the extracellular environment into cytoplasmic signals that regulate a spectrum of cellular functions. RTK molecules consist of ligand binding extracellular domains, cytoplasmic kinase domains and tyrosine

  8. The Expression Profiles of Lysophospholipid Receptors (LPLRs in Different Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Lee

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA are two bioactive lysophospholipids (LPLs, stored primarily in platelets and released during platelet activation. Both LPLs are capable of regulating endothelial cell functions. The physiological functions of S1P and LPA are mediated by interacting with eight different G-protein coupled receptors: S1P1 through 5 and LPA1 through 3, which activate three different heterotrimeric GTP proteins-including Gi、Gq and G(12/13. The expression of LPL receptors in endothelial cells would affect the responses of S1P and LPA to these cells. There is no previous report discussing the expression profiles of LPL receptors in different endothelial cells from various species. In this study, we aim to investigate the expression profiles of S1P and LPA receptors in different endothelial cells isolated from human, rat, mouse and bovine origin. We used RT-PCR to determine LPLs receptors expression profiles in different endothelial cells. Our results indicated that endothelial cells from various species express different LPL receptors. Endothelial cells isolated from the same source of different species also had different LPLs receptors expression profiles. Therefore, different endothelial cells should respond to LPLs in different manners.

  9. G Protein-Coupled Receptor 87 (GPR87 Promotes Cell Proliferation in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor 87 (GPR87 is a newly deorphanized member of the cell surface molecule G protein-coupled receptor family. GPR signaling was shown to play a role in promotion of cell growth and survival, metastasis, and drug resistance. The overexpression of GPR87 has also been reported in many malignant tumors including bladder cancer. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of silencing GPR87 expression with a replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector expressing short hairpin RNA targeting GPR87 (Ad-shGPR87 and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms in bladder cancer cells. Six GPR87-expressing human bladder cancer cells, HT1197, HT1376, J82, RT112, TCCSUP and UMUC3, were used. Infection with Ad-shGPR87 effectively downregulated the GPR87 expression, and significantly reduced the percentage of viable cells in 4 of 6 cell lines as detected by an MTT assay. Significant inhibition on cell proliferation with Ad-shGPR87 was observed in the wild-type p53 bladder cancer cell lines (HT1197, RT112, TCCSUP and UMUC3, but not in the mutant p53 cells (HT1376 and J82. As represented by a wild-type p53 RT112 cell, Ad-shGPR87 infection significantly enhanced p53 and p21 expression and caused caspase-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, the treatment with Ad-shGPR87 exerted a significant antitumor effect against the GPR87-expressing RT112 xenografts. GPR87 appeared to be a promising target for gene therapy, and Ad-shGPR87 had strong antitumor effects, specifically anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects, against GPR87-expressing human bladder cancer cells.

  10. Serotonin receptors influencing cell proliferation in the jejunal crypt epithelium and in colonic adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1986-01-01

    Serotonin has previously been shown to stimulate cell proliferation in the jejunal crypt epithelium and in colonic tumours. The original classification of serotonin receptors into D and M groups was not conductive to the understanding of these observations. The more recent classification of serotonin receptors into 5HT1 and 5HT2 groups is considered in this report. On the balance of evidence it appears that similar receptors mediate the response to serotonin in the two tissues under consideration and that these receptors resemble those of the 5HT1 group. Such receptors are usually positively linked to adenylate cyclase.

  11. Migration and chemokine receptor pattern of colitis-preventing DX5+NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Matthias; Werner, Jens M; Farkas, Stefan; Schlitt, Hans J; Geissler, Edward K

    2011-11-01

    DX5(+)NKT cells are a subpopulation of NKT cells expressing both T cell receptor and NK cell markers that show an immune-regulating function. Transferred DX5(+)NKT cells from immune competent Balb/c mice can prevent or reduce induced colitis in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Here, we investigated the in vivo migration of DX5(+)NKT cells and their corresponding chemokine receptor patterns. DX5(+)NKT cells were isolated from spleens of Balb/c mice and transferred into Balb/c SCID mice. After 2 and 8 days, in vivo migration was examined using in vivo microscopy. In addition, the chemokine receptor pattern was analyzed with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and the migration assay was performed. Our results show that labeled DX5(+)NKT cells were primarily detectable in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen after transfer. After 8 days, DX5(+)NKT cells were observed in the colonic tissues, especially the appendix. FACS analysis of chemokine receptors in DX5(+)NKT cells revealed expression of CCR3, CCR6, CCR9, CXCR3, CXCR4, and CXCR6, but no CCR5, CXCR5, or the lymphoid homing receptor CCR7. Stimulation upregulated especially CCR7 expression, and chemokine receptor patterns were different between splenic and liver DX5(+)NKT cells. These data indicate that colitis-preventing DX5(+)NKT cells need to traffic through lymphoid organs to execute their immunological function at the site of inflammation. Furthermore, DX5(+)NKT cells express a specific chemokine receptor pattern with an upregulation of the lymphoid homing receptor CCR7 after activation.

  12. Prostate stromal cells express the progesterone receptor to control cancer cell mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Lee, Jennifer Suehyun; Xie, Ning; Li, Estelle; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Fazli, Ladan; Cox, Michael; Plymate, Stephen; Gleave, Martin; Dong, Xuesen

    2014-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between epithelium and stroma play vital roles for prostate cancer development and progression. Enhanced secretions of cytokines and growth factors by cancer associated fibroblasts in prostate tumors create a favorable microenvironment for cancer cells to grow and metastasize. Our previous work showed that the progesterone receptor (PR) was expressed specifically in prostate stromal fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. However, the expression levels of PR and its impact to tumor microenvironment in prostate tumors are poorly understood. Immunohistochemistry assays are applied to human prostate tissue biopsies. Cell migration, invasion and proliferation assays are performed using human prostate cells. Real-time PCR and ELISA are applied to measure gene expression at molecular levels. Immunohistochemistry assays showed that PR protein levels were decreased in cancer associated stroma when compared with paired normal prostate stroma. Using in vitro prostate stromal cell models, we showed that conditioned media collected from PR positive stromal cells inhibited prostate cancer cell migration and invasion, but had minor suppressive impacts on cancer cell proliferation. PR suppressed the secretion of stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) by stromal cells independent to PR ligands. Blocking PR expression by siRNA or supplementation of exogenous SDF-1 or IL-6 to conditioned media from PR positive stromal cells counteracted the inhibitory effects of PR to cancer cell migration and invasion. Decreased expression of the PR in cancer associated stroma may contribute to the elevated SDF-1 and IL-6 levels in prostate tumors and enhance prostate tumor progression.

  13. Ethanol potentiates the genotoxicity of the food-derived mammary carcinogen PhIP in human estrogen receptor-positive mammary cells: mechanistic support for lifestyle factors (cooked red meat and ethanol) associated with mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Durr-E-Shahwar; David, Rhiannon M; Gooderham, Nigel J

    2018-04-01

    Consumption of cooked/processed meat and ethanol are lifestyle risk factors in the aetiology of breast cancer. Cooking meat generates heterocyclic amines such as 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). Epidemiology, mechanistic and animal studies indicate that PhIP is a mammary carcinogen that could be causally linked to breast cancer incidence; PhIP is DNA damaging, mutagenic and oestrogenic. PhIP toxicity involves cytochrome P450 (CYP1 family)-mediated metabolic activation to DNA-damaging species, and transcriptional responses through Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and estrogen-receptor-α (ER-α). Ethanol consumption is a modifiable lifestyle factor strongly associated with breast cancer risk. Ethanol toxicity involves alcohol dehydrogenase metabolism to reactive acetaldehyde, and is also a substrate for CYP2E1, which when uncoupled generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage. Here, using human mammary cells that differ in estrogen-receptor status, we explore genotoxicity of PhIP and ethanol and mechanisms behind this toxicity. Treatment with PhIP (10 -7 -10 -4 M) significantly induced genotoxicity (micronuclei formation) preferentially in ER-α positive human mammary cell lines (MCF-7, ER-α+) compared to MDA-MB-231 (ER-α-) cells. PhIP-induced CYP1A2 in both cell lines but CYP1B1 was selectively induced in ER-α(+) cells. ER-α inhibition in MCF-7 cells attenuated PhIP-mediated micronuclei formation and CYP1B1 induction. PhIP-induced CYP2E1 and ROS via ER-α-STAT-3 pathway, but only in ER-α (+) MCF-7 cells. Importantly, simultaneous treatments of physiological concentrations ethanol (10 -3 -10 -1 M) with PhIP (10 -7 -10 -4 M) increased oxidative stress and genotoxicity in MCF-7 cells, compared to the individual chemicals. Collectively, these data offer a mechanistic basis for the increased risk of breast cancer associated with dietary cooked meat and ethanol lifestyle choices.

  14. EPO-independent functional EPO receptor in breast cancer enhances estrogen receptor activity and promotes cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbothe, Susann; Larsson, Anna-Maria; Vaapil, Marica; Wigerup, Caroline; Sun, Jianmin; Jögi, Annika; Neumann, Drorit; Rönnstrand, Lars; Påhlman, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • New anti-human EPOR antibody confirms full-length EPOR expression in breast cancer cells. • Proliferation of breast cancer cells is not affected by rhEPO treatment in vitro. • EPOR knockdown impairs proliferation of ERa positive breast cancer cells. • EPOR knockdown reduces AKT phosphorylation and ERa activity. - Abstract: The main function of Erythropoietin (EPO) and its receptor (EPOR) is the stimulation of erythropoiesis. Recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) is therefore used to treat anemia in cancer patients. However, clinical trials have indicated that rhEPO treatment might promote tumor progression and has a negative effect on patient survival. In addition, EPOR expression has been detected in several cancer forms. Using a newly produced anti-EPOR antibody that reliably detects the full-length isoform of the EPOR we show that breast cancer tissue and cells express the EPOR protein. rhEPO stimulation of cultured EPOR expressing breast cancer cells did not result in increased proliferation, overt activation of EPOR (receptor phosphorylation) or a consistent activation of canonical EPOR signaling pathway mediators such as JAK2, STAT3, STAT5, or AKT. However, EPOR knockdown experiments suggested functional EPO receptors in estrogen receptor positive (ERα + ) breast cancer cells, as reduced EPOR expression resulted in decreased proliferation. This effect on proliferation was not seen in ERα negative cells. EPOR knockdown decreased ERα activity further supports a mechanism by which EPOR affects proliferation via ERα-mediated mechanisms. We show that EPOR protein is expressed in breast cancer cells, where it appears to promote proliferation by an EPO-independent mechanism in ERα expressing breast cancer cells

  15. EPO-independent functional EPO receptor in breast cancer enhances estrogen receptor activity and promotes cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinbothe, Susann; Larsson, Anna-Maria; Vaapil, Marica; Wigerup, Caroline [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Translational Cancer Research, Medicon Village, Lund University, SE-223 81 Lund (Sweden); CREATE Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Sun, Jianmin [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Translational Cancer Research, Medicon Village, Lund University, SE-223 81 Lund (Sweden); Jögi, Annika [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Translational Cancer Research, Medicon Village, Lund University, SE-223 81 Lund (Sweden); CREATE Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Neumann, Drorit [Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Rönnstrand, Lars [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Translational Cancer Research, Medicon Village, Lund University, SE-223 81 Lund (Sweden); Påhlman, Sven, E-mail: sven.pahlman@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Translational Cancer Research, Medicon Village, Lund University, SE-223 81 Lund (Sweden); CREATE Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • New anti-human EPOR antibody confirms full-length EPOR expression in breast cancer cells. • Proliferation of breast cancer cells is not affected by rhEPO treatment in vitro. • EPOR knockdown impairs proliferation of ERa positive breast cancer cells. • EPOR knockdown reduces AKT phosphorylation and ERa activity. - Abstract: The main function of Erythropoietin (EPO) and its receptor (EPOR) is the stimulation of erythropoiesis. Recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) is therefore used to treat anemia in cancer patients. However, clinical trials have indicated that rhEPO treatment might promote tumor progression and has a negative effect on patient survival. In addition, EPOR expression has been detected in several cancer forms. Using a newly produced anti-EPOR antibody that reliably detects the full-length isoform of the EPOR we show that breast cancer tissue and cells express the EPOR protein. rhEPO stimulation of cultured EPOR expressing breast cancer cells did not result in increased proliferation, overt activation of EPOR (receptor phosphorylation) or a consistent activation of canonical EPOR signaling pathway mediators such as JAK2, STAT3, STAT5, or AKT. However, EPOR knockdown experiments suggested functional EPO receptors in estrogen receptor positive (ERα{sup +}) breast cancer cells, as reduced EPOR expression resulted in decreased proliferation. This effect on proliferation was not seen in ERα negative cells. EPOR knockdown decreased ERα activity further supports a mechanism by which EPOR affects proliferation via ERα-mediated mechanisms. We show that EPOR protein is expressed in breast cancer cells, where it appears to promote proliferation by an EPO-independent mechanism in ERα expressing breast cancer cells.

  16. Potential cellular receptors involved in hepatitis C virus entry into cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muellhaupt Beat

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects hepatocytes and leads to permanent, severe liver damage. Since the genomic sequence of HCV was determined, progress has been made towards understanding the functions of the HCV-encoded proteins and identifying the cellular receptor(s responsible for adsorption and penetration of the virus particle into the target cells. Several cellular receptors for HCV have been proposed, all of which are associated with lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. This article reviews the cellular receptors for HCV and suggests a general model for HCV entry into cells, in which lipoproteins play a crucial role.

  17. Synthetic Receptors Induce Anti Angiogenic and Stress Signaling on Human First Trimester Cytotrophoblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed F. Pantho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The cytotrophoblast (CTB cells of the human placenta have membrane receptors that bind certain cardiotonic steroids (CTS found in blood plasma. One of these, marinobufagenin, is a key factor in the etiology of preeclampsia. Herein, we used synthetic receptors (SR to study their effectiveness on the angiogenic profile of human first trimester CTB cells. The humanextravillous CTB cells (Sw.71 used in this study were derived from first trimester chorionic villus tissue. Culture media of CTB cells treated with ≥1 nM SR level revealed sFlt-1 (Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 was significantly increased while VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly decreased in the culture media (* p < 0.05 for each The AT2 receptor (Angiotensin II receptor type 2 expression was significantly upregulated in ≥1 nM SR-treated CTB cells as compared to basal; however, the AT1 (Angiotensin II receptor, type 1 and VEGFR-1 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 receptor expression was significantly downregulated (* p < 0.05 for each. Our results show that the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects of SR on CTB cells are similar to the effects of CTS. The observed anti angiogenic activity of SR on CTB cells demonstrates that the functionalized-urea/thiourea molecules may be useful as potent inhibitors to prevent CTS-induced impairment of CTB cells.

  18. Cannabinoid-induced cell death in endometrial cancer cells: involvement of TRPV1 receptors in apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, B M; Correia-da-Silva, G; Teixeira, N A

    2018-05-01

    Among a variety of phytocannabinoids, Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the most promising therapeutic compounds. Besides the well-known palliative effects in cancer patients, cannabinoids have been shown to inhibit in vitro growth of tumor cells. Likewise, the major endocannabinoids (eCBs), anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), induce tumor cell death. The purpose of the present study was to characterize cannabinoid elements and evaluate the effect of cannabinoids in endometrial cancer cell viability. The presence of cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), and endocannabinoid-metabolizing enzymes were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot. We also examined the effects and the underlying mechanisms induced by eCBs and phytocannabinoids in endometrial cancer cell viability. Besides TRPV1, both EC cell lines express all the constituents of the endocannabinoid system. We observed that at concentrations higher than 5 μM, eCBs and CBD induced a significant reduction in cell viability in both Ishikawa and Hec50co cells, whereas THC did not cause any effect. In Ishikawa cells, contrary to Hec50co, treatment with AEA and CBD resulted in an increase in the levels of activated caspase -3/-7, in cleaved PARP, and in reactive oxygen species generation, confirming that the reduction in cell viability observed in the MTT assay was caused by the activation of the apoptotic pathway. Finally, these effects were dependent on TRPV1 activation and intracellular calcium levels. These data indicate that cannabinoids modulate endometrial cancer cell death. Selective targeting of TPRV1 by AEA, CBD, or other stable analogues may be an attractive research area for the treatment of estrogen-dependent endometrial carcinoma. Our data further support the evaluation of CBD and CBD-rich extracts for the potential treatment of endometrial cancer, particularly, that has become non-responsive to common therapies.

  19. Dopamine D2 receptor expression in the corticotroph cells of the human normal pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivonello, Rosario; Waaijers, Marlijn; Kros, Johan M; Pivonello, Claudia; de Angelis, Cristina; Cozzolino, Alessia; Colao, Annamaria; Lamberts, Steven W J; Hofland, Leo J

    2017-08-01

    The dopamine D 2 receptor is the main dopamine receptor expressed in the human normal pituitary gland. The aim of the current study was to evaluate dopamine D 2 receptor expression in the corticotroph cell populations of the anterior lobe and pars intermedia, as well as posterior lobe of the human normal pituitary gland by immunohistochemistry. Human normal pituitary gland samples obtained from routine autopsies were used for the study. In all cases, histology together with immunostaining for adrenocorticotropic hormone, melanocyte-stimulating hormone, prolactin, and neurofilaments were performed and compared to the immunostaining for D 2 receptor. D 2 receptor was heterogeneously expressed in the majority of the cell populations of the anterior and posterior lobe as well as in the area localized between the anterior and posterior lobe, and arbitrary defined as "intermediate zone". This zone, characterized by the presence of nerve fibers included the residual pars intermedia represented by the colloid-filled cysts lined by the remnant melanotroph cells strongly expressing D 2 receptors, and clusters of corticotroph cells, belonging to the anterior lobe but localized within the cysts and adjacent to the posterior lobe, variably expressing D 2 receptors. D 2 dopamine receptor is expressed in the majority of the cell populations of the human normal pituitary gland, and particularly, in the different corticotroph cell populations localized in the anterior lobe and the intermediate zone of the pituitary gland.

  20. TGFβ activated kinase 1 (TAK1 at the crossroad of B cell receptor and Toll-like receptor 9 signaling pathways in human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Szili

    Full Text Available B cell development and activation are regulated by combined signals mediated by the B cell receptor (BCR, receptors for the B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF-R and the innate receptor, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9. However, the underlying mechanisms by which these signals cooperate in human B cells remain unclear. Our aim was to elucidate the key signaling molecules at the crossroads of BCR, BAFF-R and TLR9 mediated pathways and to follow the functional consequences of costimulation.Therefore we stimulated purified human B cells by combinations of anti-Ig, B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF and the TLR9 agonist, CpG oligodeoxynucleotide. Phosphorylation status of various signaling molecules, B cell proliferation, cytokine secretion, plasma blast generation and the frequency of IgG producing cells were investigated. We have found that BCR induced signals cooperate with BAFF-R- and TLR9-mediated signals at different levels of cell activation. BCR and BAFF- as well as TLR9 and BAFF-mediated signals cooperate at NFκB activation, while BCR and TLR9 synergistically costimulate mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs, ERK, JNK and p38. We show here for the first time that the MAP3K7 (TGF beta activated kinase, TAK1 is responsible for the synergistic costimulation of B cells by BCR and TLR9, resulting in an enhanced cell proliferation, plasma blast generation, cytokine and antibody production. Specific inhibitor of TAK1 as well as knocking down TAK1 by siRNA abrogates the synergistic signals. We conclude that TAK1 is a key regulator of receptor crosstalk between BCR and TLR9, thus plays a critical role in B cell development and activation.

  1. DNA binding properties of dioxin receptors in wild-type and mutant mouse hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuthill, S.; Poellinger, L.

    1988-01-01

    The current model of action of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) entails stimulation of target gene transcription via the formation of dioxin-receptor complexes and subsequent accumulation of the complexes within the cell nucleus. Here, the authors have analyzed the DNA binding properties of the dioxin receptor in wild-type mouse hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells and a class of nonresponsive mutant cells which fail to accumulate dioxin-receptor complexes within the nucleus in vivo. In vitro, both the wild-type and mutant [ 3 H]dioxin-receptor complexes exhibited low affinity for DNA-cellulose (5-8% and around 4% retention, respectively) in the absence of prior biochemical manipulations. However, following chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, the wild-type but not the mutant dioxin receptor was transformed to a species with an increased affinity for DNA (40-50% retention on DNA-cellulose). The gross molecular structure of the mutant, non DNA binding dioxin receptor did not appear to be altered as compared to that of the wild-type receptor. These results imply that the primary deficiency in the mutant dioxin receptor form may reside at the DNA binding level and that, in analogy to steroid hormone receptors, DNA binding of the receptor may be an essential step in the regulation of target gene transcription by dioxin

  2. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors through the replicative life span of IMR-90 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpace, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor number and receptor affinity for isoproterenol were assessed at various in vitro ages of the human diploid fibroblast cell line IMR-90. From population doubling level (PDL) 33 to 44, there was a positive correlation between beta-adrenergic receptor density and PDL. Beta-adrenergic receptors, assessed by Scatchard analysis of [ 125 I]-iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) binding, increased from 15 fmol/mg protein at PDL 33 to 36 fmol/mg protein at PDL 44. In contrast, from PDL 44 to 59, there was a negative correlation between beta-adrenergic receptor density and PDL. Receptor density declined to 12 fmol/mg protein at PDL 59. When the density of beta-adrenergic receptors was expressed as receptor per cell, the findings were similar. Receptor agonist affinity for isoproterenol was determined from Hill plots of [ 125 I]-ICYP competition with isoproterenol. There was no change in the dissociation constant for isoproterenol with in vitro age. In humans, serum norepinephrine concentrations increase with age. This increase in serum norepinephrine may be partially responsible for the decreased beta-adrenergic receptor-agonist affinity observed with age in human lymphocytes and rat heart and lung. The present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the decreases in receptor agonist affinity in rat and man with age are secondary to increases in catecholamine concentrations

  3. Analysis of 125I-[Tyr3] octreotide receptors of NCI-H466 cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Junjie; Fan Wo; Xu Yujie; Zhang Youjiu; Zhu Ran

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the affinity of small cell lung carcinoma to [Tyr 3 ] octreotide (TOC). Methods: Taking 125 I-[Tyr 3 ] octreotide (labeled by chloramine-T method), as the ligand, small cell lung carcinoma NCI-H466 cell line was inspected for the receptor-binding points and affinity constant. Results: The radio-chemical purity of 125 I-TOC purified through sephadex G-10 was higher than 95%. Receptor analysis study showed that the expression of somatostatin receptors on NCI-H446 cells was numerous (Bmax = 1.17 x 10 5 /cell) with strong affinity to 125 I-TOC (Kd = 0.56 nM). Conclusion: Labeled TOC could be used for small cell lung carcinoma receptor imaging and radio-pharmaceutical therapy

  4. Characterization of cell-surface receptors for monoclonal-nonspecific suppressor factor (MNSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Ogawa, H.; Tsunematsu, T.

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal-nonspecific suppressor factor (MNSF) is a lymphokine derived from murine T cell hybridoma. The target tissues are both LPS-stimulated B cells and Con A-stimulated T cells. Since the action of MNSF may be mediated by its binding to specific cell surface receptors, we characterized the mode of this binding. The purified MNSF was labeled with 125 I, using the Bolton-Hunter reagent. The labeled MNSF bound specifically to a single class of receptor (300 receptors per cell) on mitogen-stimulated murine B cells or T cells with an affinity of 16 pM at 24 degrees C, in the presence of sodium azide. Competitive experiments showed that MNSF bound to the specific receptor and that the binding was not shared with IL2, IFN-gamma, and TNF. Various cell types were surveyed for the capacity to specifically bind 125 I-MNSF. 125 I-MNSF bound to MOPC-31C (a murine plasmacytoma line) and to EL4 (a murine T lymphoma line). The presence of specific binding correlates with the capacity of the cells to respond to MNSF. These data support the view that like other polypeptide hormones, the action of MNSF is mediated by specific cell surface membrane receptor protein. Identification of these receptors will provide insight into the apparently diverse activities of MNSF

  5. Cell surface receptors for signal transduction and ligand transport: a design principles study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Shankaran

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Receptors constitute the interface of cells to their external environment. These molecules bind specific ligands involved in multiple processes, such as signal transduction and nutrient transport. Although a variety of cell surface receptors undergo endocytosis, the systems-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor trafficking dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model of receptor-ligand binding and internalization to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. A given signaling or transport receptor system represents a particular implementation of this module with a specific set of kinetic parameters. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptor systems can be characterized as being: i avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracellular ligand capture efficiency, ii consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to enhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than merely serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulation.

  6. Nuclear receptor TLX regulates cell cycle progression in neural stem cells of the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenwu; Sun, Guoqiang; Yang, Su; Qu, Qiuhao; Nakashima, Kinichi; Shi, Yanhong

    2008-01-01

    TLX is an orphan nuclear receptor that is expressed exclusively in vertebrate forebrains. Although TLX is known to be expressed in embryonic brains, the mechanism by which it influences neural development remains largely unknown. We show here that TLX is expressed specifically in periventricular neural stem cells in embryonic brains. Significant thinning of neocortex was observed in embryonic d 14.5 TLX-null brains with reduced nestin labeling and decreased cell proliferation in the germinal zone. Cell cycle analysis revealed both prolonged cell cycles and increased cell cycle exit in TLX-null embryonic brains. Increased expression of a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and decreased expression of cyclin D1 provide a molecular basis for the deficiency of cell cycle progression in embryonic brains of TLX-null mice. Furthermore, transient knockdown of TLX by in utero electroporation led to precocious cell cycle exit and differentiation of neural stem cells followed by outward migration. Together these results indicate that TLX plays an important role in neural development by regulating cell cycle progression and exit of neural stem cells in the developing brain.

  7. Increasing cell-device adherence using cultured insect cells for receptor-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terutsuki, Daigo; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Okamoto, Yuki; Tixier-Mita, Agnès; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi; Mita, Yoshio; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2018-03-01

    Field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors have a wide range of applications, and a bio-FET odorant sensor, based on insect (Sf21) cells expressing insect odorant receptors (ORs) with sensitivity and selectivity, has emerged. To fully realize the practical application of bio-FET odorant sensors, knowledge of the cell-device interface for efficient signal transfer, and a reliable and low-cost measurement system using the commercial complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) foundry process, will be indispensable. However, the interfaces between Sf21 cells and sensor devices are largely unknown, and electrode materials used in the commercial CMOS foundry process are generally limited to aluminium, which is reportedly toxic to cells. In this study, we investigated Sf21 cell-device interfaces by developing cross-sectional specimens. Calcium imaging of Sf21 cells expressing insect ORs was used to verify the functions of Sf21 cells as odorant sensor elements on the electrode materials. We found that the cell-device interface was approximately 10 nm wide on average, suggesting that the adhesion mechanism of Sf21 cells may differ from that of other cells. These results will help to construct accurate signal detection from expressed insect ORs using FETs.

  8. Lack of oestrogenic effects of food preservatives (parabens) in uterotrophic assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossaini, A.; Larsen, Jens-Jørgen; Larsen, John Christian

    2000-01-01

    The oestrogenic activity of the parabens, methyl-, ethyl- and propyl p-hydroxybenzoate, widely used as antimicrobials in food, and butyl p-hydroxybenzoate, which is used in cosmetic products, and their shared main metabolite p-hydroxybenzoic acid was investigated in a mouse uterotrophic assay......, Immature B6D2F1 mice were treated with oral or subcutaneous doses of the test compounds for three consecutive days, p-Hydroxgybenzoic acid and butyl p-hydroxybenzoate were also tested by the subcutaneous route in a rat uterotrophic assay. A significant increase in the uterus weight at day 4 was considered...... an oestrogenic effect. In the mouse assay, none of the compounds tested produced any oestrogenic response at dose levels up to 100 mg/kg body weight per day, for ethyl p-hydroxybenzoate even at a dose level of 1000 mg/kg body weight per day. In immature Wistar rats, subcutaneous administration of butyl p...

  9. Erythrina mulungu alkaloids are potent inhibitors of neuronal nicotinic receptor currents in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Setti-Perdigão

    Full Text Available Crude extracts and three isolated alkaloids from Erythrina mulungu plants have shown anxiolytic effects in different animal models. We investigated whether these alkaloids could affect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and if they are selective for different central nervous system (CNS subtypes. Screening experiments were performed using a single concentration of the alkaloid co-applied with acetylcholine in whole cell patch-clamp recordings in three different cell models: (i PC12 cells natively expressing α3* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors; (ii cultured hippocampal neurons natively expressing α7* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors; and (iii HEK 293 cells heterologoulsy expressing α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. For all three receptors, the percent inhibition of acetylcholine-activated currents by (+-11á-hydroxyerysotrine was the lowest, whereas (+-erythravine and (+-11á-hydroxyerythravine inhibited the currents to a greater extent. For the latter two substances, we obtained concentration-response curves with a pre-application protocol for the α7* and α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The IC50 obtained with (+-erythravine and (+-11á-hydroxyerythravine were 6 µM and 5 µM for the α7* receptors, and 13 nM and 4 nM for the α4β2 receptors, respectively. Our data suggest that these Erythrina alkaloids may exert their behavioral effects through inhibition of CNS nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, particularly the α4β2 subtype.

  10. DMPD: Toll-like receptors: paving the path to T cell-driven autoimmunity? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17888644 Toll-like receptors: paving the path to T cell-driven autoimmunity? Marsla... Toll-like receptors: paving the path to T cell-driven autoimmunity? PubmedID 17888644 Title Toll-like recep...tors: paving the path to T cell-driven autoimmunity? Authors Marsland BJ, Kopf M.

  11. Sensitivity of C6 Glioma Cells Carrying the Human Poliovirus Receptor to Oncolytic Polioviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovtseva, A O; Lipatova, A V; Grinenko, N F; Baklaushev, V P; Chumakov, P M; Chekhonin, V P

    2016-10-01

    A humanized line of rat C6 glioma cells expressing human poliovirus receptor was obtained and tested for the sensitivity to oncolytic effects of vaccine strains of type 1, 2, and 3 polioviruses. Presentation of the poliovirus receptor on the surface of C6 glioma cells was shown to be a necessary condition for the interaction of cells with polioviruses, but insufficient for complete poliovirus oncolysis.

  12. Optimization of cAMP fluorescence dataset from ACTOne cannabinoid receptor 1 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaela S. Presley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ACTOne cannabinoid receptor 1 functional system is comprised of transfected HEK cells with the parental cyclic nucleotide gated channel (CNG co-transfected with cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1. The ACTOne CB1 cell line was evaluated for cAMP driven fluorescence by optimizing experimental conditions for sensitivity to forskolin and CP 55,940, reading time point, reliability of cell passage number, and pertussis inactivation of Gi/o.

  13. Effect of propofol on androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kenichiro; Hirotsu, Akiko; Daijo, Hiroki; Matsuyama, Tomonori; Terada, Naoki; Tanaka, Tomoharu

    2017-08-15

    Androgen receptor is a nuclear receptor and transcription factor activated by androgenic hormones. Androgen receptor activity plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of prostate cancer. Although accumulating evidence suggests that general anesthetics, including opioids, affect cancer cell growth and impact patient prognosis, the effect of those drugs on androgen receptor in prostate cancer is not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the general anesthetic propofol on androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer cells. An androgen-dependent human prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP) was stimulated with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and exposed to propofol. The induction of androgen receptor target genes was investigated using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and androgen receptor protein levels and localization patterns were analyzed using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. The effect of propofol on the proliferation of LNCaP cells was analyzed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Propofol significantly inhibited DHT-induced expression of androgen receptor target genes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays indicated that propofol suppressed nuclear levels of androgen receptor proteins. Exposure to propofol for 24h suppressed the proliferation of LNCaP cells, whereas 4h of exposure did not exert significant effects. Together, our results indicate that propofol suppresses nuclear androgen receptor protein levels, and inhibits androgen receptor transcriptional activity and proliferation in LNCaP cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In vivo oestrogenic modulation of Egr1 and Pitx1 gene expression in female rat pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska, Alina; Herman, Andrzej P; Wolińska-Witort, Ewa; Kochman, Kazimierz; Zwierzchowski, Lech

    2014-12-01

    EGR1 and PITX1 are transcription factors required for gonadotroph cell Lhb promoter activation. To determine changes in Egr1 and Pitx1 mRNA levels in central and peripheral pituitary stimulations, an in vivo model based on i.c.v. pulsatile (1 pulse/0.5 h over 2 h) GnRH agonist (1.5 nM buserelin) or antagonist (2 nM antide) microinjections was used. The microinjections were given to ovariectomised and 17β-oestradiol (E2) (3×20 μg), ERA (ESR1) agonist propyl pyrazole triol (PPT) (3×0.5 mg), ERB (ESR2) agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) (3×0.5 mg) s.c. pre-treated rats 30 min after last pulse anterior pituitaries were excised. Relative mRNA expression was determined by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Results revealed a gene-specific response for GnRH and/or oestrogenic stimulations in vivo. Buserelin pulses enhanced Egr1 expression by 66% in ovariectomised rats, whereas the oestradiol-supplemented+i.c.v. NaCl-microinjected group showed a 50% increase in Egr1 mRNA expression. The oestrogenic signal was transmitted via ERA (ESR1) and ERB (ESR2) activation as administration of PPT and DPN resulted in 97 and 62%, respectively, elevation in Egr1 mRNA expression. A synergistic action of GnRH agonist and 17β-oestradiol (E2) stimulation of the Egr1 gene transcription in vivo were found. GnRHR activity did not affect Pitx1 mRNA expression; regardless of NaCl, buserelin or antide i.c.v. pulses, s.c. oestrogenic supplementation (with E2, PPT or DPN) consistently decreased (by -46, -48 and -41% respectively) the Pitx1 mRNA in the anterior pituitary gland. Orchestrated Egr1 and Pitx1 activities depending on specific central and peripheral regulatory inputs could be responsible for physiologically variable Lhb gene promoter activation in vivo. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. Naturally occurring glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) receptors in human intestinal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Anette; Hastrup, Sven; Andersen, Marie; Thim, Lars

    2006-02-17

    Although clinical trials with GLP-2 receptor agonists are currently ongoing, the mechanisms behind GLP-2-induced intestinal epithelial growth remain to be understood. To approach the GLP-2 mechanism of action this study aimed to identify intestinal cell lines endogenously expressing the GLP-2 receptor. Here we report the first identification of a cell line endogenously expressing functional GLP-2 receptors. The human intestinal epithelial cell line, FHC, expressed GLP-2 receptor encoding mRNA (RT-PCR) and GLP-2 receptor protein (Western blot). In cultured FHC cells, GLP-2 induced concentration dependent cAMP accumulation (pEC(50)=9.7+/-0.04 (mean+/-S.E.M., n=4)). In addition, a naturally occurring human intestinal fibroblast cell line, 18Co, endogenously expressing GLP-2 receptor encoding mRNA (RT-PCR) and protein (Western blot) was identified. No receptor functionality (binding or G-protein signalling) could be demonstrated in 18Co cells. The identified gut-relevant cell lines provide tools for future clarification of the mechanisms underlying GLP-2-induced epithelial growth.

  16. Progesterone receptor expression during prostate cancer progression suggests a role of this receptor in stromal cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Yang, Ou; Fazli, Ladan; Rennie, Paul S; Gleave, Martin E; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-07-01

    The progesterone receptor, like the androgen receptor, belongs to the steroid receptor superfamily. Our previous studies have reported that the PR is expressed specifically in prostate stroma. PR inhibits proliferation of, and regulates cytokine secretion by stromal cells. However, PR protein expression in cancer-associated stroma during prostate cancer progression has not been profiled. Since the phenotypes of prostate stromal cells change dynamically as tumors progress, whether the PR plays a role in regulating stromal cell differentiation needs to be investigated. Immunohistochemistry assays measured PR protein levels on human prostate tissue microarrays containing 367 tissue cores from benign prostate, prostate tumors with different Gleason scores, tumors under various durations of castration therapy, and tumors at the castration-resistant stage. Immunoblotting assays determined whether PR regulated the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), vimentin, and fibroblast specific protein (FSP) in human prostate stromal cells. PR protein levels decreased in cancer-associated stroma when compared with that in benign prostate stroma. This reduction in PR expression was not correlated with Gleason scores. PR protein levels were elevated by castration therapy, but reduced to pre-castration levels when tumors progressed to the castration-resistant stage. Enhanced PR expression in human prostate stromal cells increased α-SMA, but decreased vimentin and FSP protein levels ligand-independently. These results suggest that PR plays an active role in regulating stromal cell phenotypes during prostate cancer progression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Dual effects of muscarinic M2 acetylcholine receptors on the synthesis of cyclic AMP in CHO cells: dependence on time, receptor density and receptor agonists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michal, Pavel; Lysíková, Michaela; Tuček, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 6 (2001), s. 1217-1228 ISSN 0007-1188 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0214; GA AV ČR IAA7011910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cyclic AMP * muscarinic receptors * CHO cells Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.502, year: 2001

  18. Distinct angiotensin II receptor in primary cultures of glial cells from rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raizada, M.K.; Phillips, M.I.; Crews, F.T.; Sumners, C.

    1987-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang-II) has profound effects on the brain. Receptors for Ang-II have been demonstrated on neurons, but no relationship between glial cells and Agn-II has been established. Glial cells (from the hypothalamus and brain stem of 1-day-old rat brains) in primary culture have been used to demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors. Binding of 125 I-Ang-II to glial cultures was rapid, reversible, saturable, and specific for Ang-II. The rank order of potency of 125 I-Ang-II binding was determined. Scatchard analysis revealed a homogeneous population of high-affinity binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 110 fmol/mg of protein. Light-microscopic autoradiography of 125 I-Ang-II binding supported the kinetic data, documenting specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells. Ang-II stimulated a dose-dependent hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositols in glial cells, an effect mediated by Ang-II receptors. However, Ang-II failed to influence [ 3 H] norepinephrine uptake, and catecholamines failed to regulate Ang-II receptors, effects that occur in neurons. These observations demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells in primary cultures derived from normotensive rat brain. The receptors are kinetically similar to, but functionally distinct from, the neuronal Ang-II receptors

  19. Human neural progenitors express functional lysophospholipid receptors that regulate cell growth and morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callihan Phillip

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysophospholipids regulate the morphology and growth of neurons, neural cell lines, and neural progenitors. A stable human neural progenitor cell line is not currently available in which to study the role of lysophospholipids in human neural development. We recently established a stable, adherent human embryonic stem cell-derived neuroepithelial (hES-NEP cell line which recapitulates morphological and phenotypic features of neural progenitor cells isolated from fetal tissue. The goal of this study was to determine if hES-NEP cells express functional lysophospholipid receptors, and if activation of these receptors mediates cellular responses critical for neural development. Results Our results demonstrate that Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA and Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptors are functionally expressed in hES-NEP cells and are coupled to multiple cellular signaling pathways. We have shown that transcript levels for S1P1 receptor increased significantly in the transition from embryonic stem cell to hES-NEP. hES-NEP cells express LPA and S1P receptors coupled to Gi/o G-proteins that inhibit adenylyl cyclase and to Gq-like phospholipase C activity. LPA and S1P also induce p44/42 ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation in these cells and stimulate cell proliferation via Gi/o coupled receptors in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR- and ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, LPA and S1P stimulate transient cell rounding and aggregation that is independent of EGFR and ERK, but dependent on the Rho effector p160 ROCK. Conclusion Thus, lysophospholipids regulate neural progenitor growth and morphology through distinct mechanisms. These findings establish human ES cell-derived NEP cells as a model system for studying the role of lysophospholipids in neural progenitors.

  20. Expression of inhibitory receptors on intratumoral T cells modulates the activity of a T cell-bispecific antibody targeting folate receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Jens; Thommen, Daniela S.; Herzig, Petra; Bacac, Marina; Klein, Christian; Roller, Andreas; Belousov, Anton; Levitsky, Victor; Savic, Spasenija; Moersig, Wolfgang; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A.; Umana, Pablo; Pisa, Pavel; von Bergwelt-Baildon, M.; Lardinois, Didier; Müller, Philipp; Karanikas, Vaios; Zippelius, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT T-cell bispecific antibodies (TCBs) are a novel therapeutic tool designed to selectively recruit T-cells to tumor cells and simultaneously activate them. However, it is currently unknown whether the dysfunctional state of T-cells, embedded into the tumor microenvironment, imprints on the therapeutic activity of TCBs. We performed a comprehensive analysis of activation and effector functions of tumor-infiltrating T-cells (TILs) in different tumor types, upon stimulation by a TCB targeting folate receptor 1 and CD3 (FolR1-TCB). We observed a considerable heterogeneity in T-cell activation, cytokine production and tumor cell killing upon exposure to FolR1-TCB among different FolR1-expressing tumors. Of note, tumors presenting with a high frequency of PD-1hi TILs displayed significantly impaired tumor cell killing and T-cell function. Further characterization of additional T-cell inhibitory receptors revealed that PD-1hi TILs defined a T-cell subset with particularly high levels of multiple inhibitory receptors compared with PD-1int and PD-1neg T-cells. PD-1 blockade could restore cytokine secretion but not cytotoxicity of TILs in a subset of patients with scarce PD-1hi expressing cells; in contrast, patients with abundance of PD-1hi expressing T-cells did not benefit from PD-1 blockade. Our data highlight that FolR1-TCB is a promising novel immunotherapeutic treatment option which is capable of activating intratumoral T-cells in different carcinomas. However, its therapeutic efficacy may be substantially hampered by a pre-existing dysfunctional state of T-cells, reflected by abundance of intratumoral PD-1hi T-cells. These findings present a rationale for combinatorial approaches of TCBs with other therapeutic strategies targeting T-cell dysfunction. PMID:27057429

  1. Presence of estrogen receptors in human myeloid monocytic cells (THP-1 cell line).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, M; Villaggio, B; Bisso, A; Sulli, A; Coviello, D; Dayer, J M

    2001-01-01

    To test THP-1 cells for the presence of estrogen receptors (ER) since studies have demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, the influence of estrogens on cells involved in immune response (i.e. macrophages), and since it has been demonstrated that human myeloid monocytic THP-1 cells acquire phenotypic and functional macrophage-like features after incubation with several cytokines or pharmacological agents. Stimulation of THP-1 cells with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) to prompt their differentiation into macrophage-like cells and evaluation of the possible induction of ER. The expression of ER was analyzed by immunocytochemical assay, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. After stimulation by PMA, the human myeloid monocytic THP-1 cells showed the presence of ER, together with markers of monocytic cell differentiation such as CD68, CD54 and HLA-DR. Estrogen effects may be exerted directly through ER on monocytes/macrophages. PMA-treated THP-1 cells may constitute a useful in vitro model to determine the effects of estrogens on macrophage-like cells and their implications in the inflammatory and immune processes.

  2. Dopamine receptors modulate cytotoxicity of natural killer cells via cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA, a neurotransmitter in the nervous system, has been shown to modulate immune function. We have previously reported that five subtypes of DA receptors, including D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R and D5R, are expressed in T lymphocytes and they are involved in regulation of T cells. However, roles of these DA receptor subtypes and their coupled signal-transduction pathway in modulation of natural killer (NK cells still remain to be clarified. The spleen of mice was harvested and NK cells were isolated and purified by negative selection using magnetic activated cell sorting. After NK cells were incubated with various drugs for 4 h, flow cytometry measured cytotoxicity of NK cells against YAC-1 lymphoma cells. NK cells expressed the five subtypes of DA receptors at mRNA and protein levels. Activation of D1-like receptors (including D1R and D5R with agonist SKF38393 enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity, but activation of D2-like receptors (including D2R, D3R and D4R with agonist quinpirole attenuated NK cells. Simultaneously, SKF38393 elevated D1R and D5R expression, cAMP content, and phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding (CREB level in NK cells, while quinpirole reduced D3R and D4R expression, cAMP content, and phosphorylated CREB level in NK cells. These effects of SKF38393 were blocked by SCH23390, an antagonist of D1-like receptors, and quinpirole effects were abolished by haloperidol, an antagonist of D2-like receptors. In support these results, H89, an inhibitor of phosphokinase A (PKA, prevented the SKF38393-dependent enhancement of NK cells and forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC, counteracted the quinpirole-dependent suppression of NK cells. These findings show that DA receptor subtypes are involved in modulation of NK cells and suggest that D1-like receptors facilitate NK cells by stimulating D1R/D5R-cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway and D2-like receptors suppress NK cells by inhibiting D3R/D4R-cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway. The

  3. Redirecting T cells to eradicate B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: bispecific T-cell engagers and chimeric antigen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoss, I; Bargou, R C; Nagorsen, D; Friberg, G R; Baeuerle, P A; Forman, S J

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances in antibody technology to harness T cells for cancer immunotherapy, particularly in the difficult-to-treat setting of relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (r/r ALL), have led to innovative methods for directing cytotoxic T cells to specific surface antigens on cancer cells. One approach involves administration of soluble bispecific (or dual-affinity) antibody-based constructs that temporarily bridge T cells and cancer cells. Another approach infuses ex vivo-engineered T cells that express a surface plasma membrane-inserted antibody construct called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Both bispecific antibodies and CARs circumvent natural target cell recognition by creating a physical connection between cytotoxic T cells and target cancer cells to activate a cytolysis signaling pathway; this connection allows essentially all cytotoxic T cells in a patient to be engaged because typical tumor cell resistance mechanisms (such as T-cell receptor specificity, antigen processing and presentation, and major histocompatibility complex context) are bypassed. Both the bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) antibody construct blinatumomab and CD19-CARs are immunotherapies that have yielded encouraging remission rates in CD19-positive r/r ALL, suggesting that they might serve as definitive treatments or bridging therapies to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. With the introduction of these immunotherapies, new challenges arise related to unique toxicities and distinctive pathways of resistance. An increasing body of knowledge is being accumulated on how to predict, prevent, and manage such toxicities, which will help to better stratify patient risk and tailor treatments to minimize severe adverse events. A deeper understanding of the precise mechanisms of action and immune resistance, interaction with other novel agents in potential combinations, and optimization in the manufacturing process will help to advance immunotherapy outcomes in the r

  4. The impact of low-magnitude high-frequency vibration on fracture healing is profoundly influenced by the oestrogen status in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrle, Esther; Liedert, Astrid; Heilmann, Aline; Wehner, Tim; Bindl, Ronny; Fischer, Lena; Haffner-Luntzer, Melanie; Jakob, Franz; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Fracture healing is impaired in aged and osteoporotic individuals. Because adequate mechanical stimuli are able to increase bone formation, one therapeutical approach to treat poorly healing fractures could be the application of whole-body vibration, including low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV). We investigated the effects of LMHFV on fracture healing in aged osteoporotic mice. Female C57BL/6NCrl mice (n=96) were either ovariectomised (OVX) or sham operated (non-OVX) at age 41 weeks. When aged to 49 weeks, all mice received a femur osteotomy that was stabilised using an external fixator. The mice received whole-body vibrations (20 minutes/day) with 0.3 G: peak-to-peak acceleration and a frequency of 45 Hz. After 10 and 21 days, the osteotomised femurs and intact bones (contra-lateral femurs, lumbar spine) were evaluated using bending-testing, micro-computed tomography (μCT), histology and gene expression analyses. LMHFV disturbed fracture healing in aged non-OVX mice, with significantly reduced flexural rigidity (-81%) and bone formation (-80%) in the callus. Gene expression analyses demonstrated increased oestrogen receptor β (ERβ, encoded by Esr2) and Sost expression in the callus of the vibrated animals, but decreased β-catenin, suggesting that ERβ might mediate these negative effects through inhibition of osteoanabolic Wnt/β-catenin signalling. In contrast, in OVX mice, LMHFV significantly improved callus properties, with increased flexural rigidity (+1398%) and bone formation (+637%), which could be abolished by subcutaneous oestrogen application (0.025 mg oestrogen administered in a 90-day-release pellet). On a molecular level, we found an upregulation of ERα in the callus of the vibrated OVX mice, whereas ERβ was unaffected, indicating that ERα might mediate the osteoanabolic response. Our results indicate a major role for oestrogen in the mechanostimulation of fracture healing and imply that LMHFV might only be safe and effective in

  5. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells for acute lymphoid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupp, Stephan A; Kalos, Michael; Barrett, David; Aplenc, Richard; Porter, David L; Rheingold, Susan R; Teachey, David T; Chew, Anne; Hauck, Bernd; Wright, J Fraser; Milone, Michael C; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H

    2013-04-18

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells with specificity for CD19 have shown promise in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It remains to be established whether chimeric antigen receptor T cells have clinical activity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Two children with relapsed and refractory pre-B-cell ALL received infusions of T cells transduced with anti-CD19 antibody and a T-cell signaling molecule (CTL019 chimeric antigen receptor T cells), at a dose of 1.4×10(6) to 1.2×10(7) CTL019 cells per kilogram of body weight. In both patients, CTL019 T cells expanded to a level that was more than 1000 times as high as the initial engraftment level, and the cells were identified in bone marrow. In addition, the chimeric antigen receptor T cells were observed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), where they persisted at high levels for at least 6 months. Eight grade 3 or 4 adverse events were noted. The cytokine-release syndrome and B-cell aplasia developed in both patients. In one child, the cytokine-release syndrome was severe; cytokine blockade with etanercept and tocilizumab was effective in reversing the syndrome and did not prevent expansion of chimeric antigen receptor T cells or reduce antileukemic efficacy. Complete remission was observed in both patients and is ongoing in one patient at 11 months after treatment. The other patient had a relapse, with blast cells that no longer expressed CD19, approximately 2 months after treatment. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells are capable of killing even aggressive, treatment-refractory acute leukemia cells in vivo. The emergence of tumor cells that no longer express the target indicates a need to target other molecules in addition to CD19 in some patients with ALL.

  6. Cell specific effects of PCB 126 on aryl hydrocarbone receptors in follicular cells of porcine ovaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, A.; Augustowska, K.; Gregoraszczuk, E. [Lab. of Physiology and Toxicology of Reproduction, Dept. of Animal Physiology, Inst. of Zoology, Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyles (PCBs) like other endocrine disrupters could interfere with natural hormones by binding to their receptors and thus mimicking the cellular response to them. They are known to possess either estrogenic or antiestrogenic properties. In our previous papers we demonstrated that PCBs are able to disrupt ovarian steroidogenesis. We found that the coplanar PCB 126 caused the decrease in estradiol secretion in whole cultured pig ovarian follicles. PCB 126 congener is structurally related to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Since TCDD effects are known to be mediated by aryl hydrocarbone receptors (AhRs), we decided to determine if PCB 126 affects signal transduction pathway activated by these receptors. It has been reported that the functional AhR is present in ovary including oocytes, granulosa and theca cells of rat, mouse, rhesus monkey and human ovary. Moreover, the expression of AhR in the rat ovary appeared to be estrous cycle-dependent, thus suggesting that AhR expression may be regulated by fluctuating hormone levels. This study was designed to investigate the effects of the non-ortho-substituted 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) on the AhR activation, localization and protein level in pig ovarian follicle cells.

  7. Cell-Type-Specific Regulation of the Retinoic Acid Receptor Mediated by the Orphan Nuclear Receptor TLX†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mime; Yu, Ruth T.; Yasuda, Kunio; Umesono, Kazuhiko

    2000-01-01

    Malformations in the eye can be caused by either an excess or deficiency of retinoids. An early target gene of the retinoid metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), is that encoding one of its own receptors, the retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ). To better understand the mechanisms underlying this autologous regulation, we characterized the chick RARβ2 promoter. The region surrounding the transcription start site of the avian RARβ2 promoter is over 90% conserved with the corresponding region in mammals and confers strong RA-dependent transactivation in primary cultured embryonic retina cells. This response is selective for RAR but not retinoid X receptor-specific agonists, demonstrating a principal role for RAR(s) in retina cells. Retina cells exhibit a far higher sensitivity to RA than do fibroblasts or osteoblasts, a property we found likely due to expression of the orphan nuclear receptor TLX. Ectopic expression of TLX in fibroblasts resulted in increased sensitivity to RA induction, an effect that is conserved between chick and mammals. We have identified a cis element, the silencing element relieved by TLX (SET), within the RARβ2 promoter region which confers TLX- and RA-dependent transactivation. These results indicate an important role for TLX in autologous regulation of the RARβ gene in the eye. PMID:11073974

  8. Cell-type-specific regulation of the retinoic acid receptor mediated by the orphan nuclear receptor TLX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M; Yu, R T; Yasuda, K; Umesono, K

    2000-12-01

    Malformations in the eye can be caused by either an excess or deficiency of retinoids. An early target gene of the retinoid metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), is that encoding one of its own receptors, the retinoic acid receptor beta (RARbeta). To better understand the mechanisms underlying this autologous regulation, we characterized the chick RARbeta2 promoter. The region surrounding the transcription start site of the avian RARbeta2 promoter is over 90% conserved with the corresponding region in mammals and confers strong RA-dependent transactivation in primary cultured embryonic retina cells. This response is selective for RAR but not retinoid X receptor-specific agonists, demonstrating a principal role for RAR(s) in retina cells. Retina cells exhibit a far higher sensitivity to RA than do fibroblasts or osteoblasts, a property we found likely due to expression of the orphan nuclear receptor TLX. Ectopic expression of TLX in fibroblasts resulted in increased sensitivity to RA induction, an effect that is conserved between chick and mammals. We have identified a cis element, the silencing element relieved by TLX (SET), within the RARbeta2 promoter region which confers TLX- and RA-dependent transactivation. These results indicate an important role for TLX in autologous regulation of the RARbeta gene in the eye.

  9. Characterization of cholecystokinin receptors on guinea pig gastric chief cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matozaki, T.; Sakamoto, C.; Nagao, M.; Nishisaki, H.; Konda, Y.; Nakano, O.; Matsuda, K.; Wada, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kasuga, M.

    1991-01-01

    The binding of cholecystokinin (CCK) to its receptors on guinea pig gastric chief cell membranes were characterized by the use of 125 I-CCK-octapeptide (CCK8). At 30 degrees C optimal binding was obtained at acidic pH in the presence of Mg2+, while Na+ reduced the binding. In contrast to reports on pancreatic and brain CCK receptors, scatchard analysis of CCK binding to chief cell membranes revealed two classes of binding sites. Whereas, in the presence of a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog, GTP gamma S, only a low affinity site of CCK binding was observed. Chief cell receptors recognized CCK analogs, with an order of potency of: CCK8 greater than gastrin-I greater than CCK4. Although all CCK receptor antagonists tested (dibutyryl cyclic GMP, L-364718 and CR1409) inhibited labeled CCK binding to chief cell membranes, the relative potencies of these antagonists in terms of inhibiting labeled CCK binding were different from those observed in either pancreatic membranes or brain membranes. The results indicate, therefore, that on gastric chief cell membranes there exist specific CCK receptors, which are coupled to G protein. Furthermore, chief cell CCK receptors may be distinct from pancreatic or brain type CCK receptors

  10. A Novel System of Polymorphic and Diverse NK Cell Receptors in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Cornelia; Neff, Jennifer; Roos, Christian; Eberle, Manfred; Aujard, Fabienne; Münch, Claudia; Schempp, Werner; Carrington, Mary; Shiina, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Knaust, Florian; Coggill, Penny; Sehra, Harminder; Beck, Stephan; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Reinhardt, Richard; Walter, Lutz

    2009-01-01

    There are two main classes of natural killer (NK) cell receptors in mammals, the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and the structurally unrelated killer cell lectin-like receptors (KLR). While KIR represent the most diverse group of NK receptors in all primates studied to date, including humans, apes, and Old and New World monkeys, KLR represent the functional equivalent in rodents. Here, we report a first digression from this rule in lemurs, where the KLR (CD94/NKG2) rather than KIR constitute the most diverse group of NK cell receptors. We demonstrate that natural selection contributed to such diversification in lemurs and particularly targeted KLR residues interacting with the peptide presented by MHC class I ligands. We further show that lemurs lack a strict ortholog or functional equivalent of MHC-E, the ligands of non-polymorphic KLR in “higher” primates. Our data support the existence of a hitherto unknown system of polymorphic and diverse NK cell receptors in primates and of combinatorial diversity as a novel mechanism to increase NK cell receptor repertoire. PMID:19834558

  11. Expression of growth factor receptors and targeting of EGFR in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ling; Hausmann, Martin; Dietmaier, Wolfgang; Kellermeier, Silvia; Pesch, Theresa; Stieber-Gunckel, Manuela; Lippert, Elisabeth; Klebl, Frank; Rogler, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a malignant neoplasm of the bile ducts or the gallbladder. Targeting of growth factor receptors showed therapeutic potential in palliative settings for many solid tumors. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of seven growth factor receptors in CC cell lines and to assess the effect of blocking the EGFR receptor in vitro. Expression of EGFR (epithelial growth factor receptor), HGFR (hepatocyte growth factor receptor) IGF1R (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor), IGF2R (insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor) and VEGFR1-3 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3) were examined in four human CC cell lines (EGI-1, HuH28, OZ and TFK-1). The effect of the anti-EGFR-antibody cetuximab on cell growth and apoptosis was studied and cell lines were examined for KRAS mutations. EGFR, HGFR and IGFR1 were present in all four cell lines tested. IGFR2 expression was confirmed in EGI-1 and TFK-1. No growth-inhibitory effect was found in EGI-1 cells after incubation with cetuximab. Cetuximab dose-dependently inhibited growth in TFK-1. Increased apoptosis was only seen in TFK-1 cells at the highest cetuximab dose tested (1 mg/ml), with no dose-response-relationship at lower concentrations. In EGI-1 a heterozygous KRAS mutation was found in codon 12 (c.35G>A; p.G12D). HuH28, OZ and TFK-1 lacked KRAS mutation. CC cell lines express a pattern of different growth receptors in vitro. Growth factor inhibitor treatment could be affected from the KRAS genotype in CC. The expression of EGFR itself does not allow prognoses on growth inhibition by cetuximab

  12. Expression of growth factor receptors and targeting of EGFR in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellermeier Silvia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CC is a malignant neoplasm of the bile ducts or the gallbladder. Targeting of growth factor receptors showed therapeutic potential in palliative settings for many solid tumors. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of seven growth factor receptors in CC cell lines and to assess the effect of blocking the EGFR receptor in vitro. Methods Expression of EGFR (epithelial growth factor receptor, HGFR (hepatocyte growth factor receptor IGF1R (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, IGF2R (insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor and VEGFR1-3 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3 were examined in four human CC cell lines (EGI-1, HuH28, OZ and TFK-1. The effect of the anti-EGFR-antibody cetuximab on cell growth and apoptosis was studied and cell lines were examined for KRAS mutations. Results EGFR, HGFR and IGFR1 were present in all four cell lines tested. IGFR2 expression was confirmed in EGI-1 and TFK-1. No growth-inhibitory effect was found in EGI-1 cells after incubation with cetuximab. Cetuximab dose-dependently inhibited growth in TFK-1. Increased apoptosis was only seen in TFK-1 cells at the highest cetuximab dose tested (1 mg/ml, with no dose-response-relationship at lower concentrations. In EGI-1 a heterozygous KRAS mutation was found in codon 12 (c.35G>A; p.G12D. HuH28, OZ and TFK-1 lacked KRAS mutation. Conclusion CC cell lines express a pattern of different growth receptors in vitro. Growth factor inhibitor treatment could be affected from the KRAS genotype in CC. The expression of EGFR itself does not allow prognoses on growth inhibition by cetuximab.

  13. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Christine Field

    Full Text Available Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies.

  14. Molecular and functional profiling of histamine receptor-mediated calcium ion signals in different cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisenberg, Annika; Kaschuba, Dagmar; Balfanz, Sabine; Jordan, Nadine; Baumann, Arnd

    2015-10-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play a pivotal role in cellular physiology. Often Ca(2+)-dependent processes are studied in commonly available cell lines. To induce Ca(2+) signals on demand, cells may need to be equipped with additional proteins. A prominent group of membrane proteins evoking Ca(2+) signals are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). These proteins register external signals such as photons, odorants, and neurotransmitters and convey ligand recognition into cellular responses, one of which is Ca(2+) signaling. To avoid receptor cross-talk or cross-activation with introduced proteins, the repertoire of cell-endogenous receptors must be known. Here we examined the presence of histamine receptors in six cell lines frequently used as hosts to study cellular signaling processes. In a concentration-dependent manner, histamine caused a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) in HeLa, HEK 293, and COS-1 cells. The concentration for half-maximal activation (EC50) was in the low micromolar range. In individual cells, transient Ca(2+) signals and Ca(2+) oscillations were uncovered. The results show that (i) HeLa, HEK 293, and COS-1 cells express sufficient amounts of endogenous receptors to study cellular Ca(2+) signaling processes directly and (ii) these cell lines are suitable for calibrating Ca(2+) biosensors in situ based on histamine receptor evoked responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Delineation of the GPRC6A Receptor Signaling Pathways Using a Mammalian Cell Line Stably Expressing the Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Engesgaard; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie

    2013-01-01

    receptor has been suggested to couple to multiple G protein classes albeit via indirect methods. Thus, the exact ligand preferences and signaling pathways are yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we generated a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line that stably expresses mouse GPRC6A. In an effort...... and divalent cations, and for the first time, we conclusively show that these responses are mediated through the Gq pathway. We were not able to confirm previously published data demonstrating Gi- and Gs-mediated signaling; neither could we detect agonistic activity of testosterone and osteocalcin. Generation...... of the stable CHO cell line with robust receptor responsiveness and optimization of the highly sensitive homogeneous time resolved fluorescence technology allow fast assessment of Gq activation without previous manipulations like cotransfection of mutated G proteins. This cell-based assay system for GPRC6A...

  16. The liver X receptor agonist T0901317 acts as androgen receptor antagonist in human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuu, Chih-pin; Chen, Rou-Yu; Hiipakka, Richard A.; Kokontis, John M.; Warner, Karen V.; Xiang, Jialing; Liao, Shutsung

    2007-01-01

    T0901317 is a potent non-steroidal synthetic liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. T0901317 blocked androgenic stimulation of the proliferation of androgen-dependent LNCaP 104-S cells and androgenic suppression of the proliferation of androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, inhibited the transcriptional activation of an androgen-dependent reporter gene by androgen, and suppressed gene and protein expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA), a target gene of androgen receptor (AR) without affecting gene and protein expression of AR. T0901317 also inhibited binding of a radiolabeled androgen to AR, but inhibition was much weaker compared to the effect of the antiandrogens, bicalutamide and hydroxyflutamide. The LXR agonist T0901317, therefore, acts as an antiandrogen in human prostate cancer cells

  17. Eph receptor interclass cooperation is required for the regulation of cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurek, Aleksandra; Genander, Maria; Kundu, Parag; Catchpole, Timothy; He, Xiao; Strååt, Klas; Sabelström, Hanna; Xu, Nan-Jie; Pettersson, Sven; Henkemeyer, Mark; Frisén, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Cancer often arises by the constitutive activation of mitogenic pathways by mutations in stem cells. Eph receptors are unusual in that although they regulate the proliferation of stem/progenitor cells in many adult organs, they typically fail to transform cells. Multiple ephrins and Eph receptors are often co-expressed and are thought to be redundant, but we here describe an unexpected dichotomy with two homologous ligands, ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2, regulating specifically migration or proliferation in the intestinal stem cell niche. We demonstrate that the combined activity of two different coexpressed Eph receptors of the A and B class assembled into common signaling clusters in response to ephrin-B2 is required for mitogenic signaling. The requirement of two different Eph receptors to convey mitogenic signals identifies a new type of cooperation within this receptor family and helps explain why constitutive activation of a single receptor fails to transform cells. - Highlights: • We demonstrate that ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 have largely non-overlapping functions in the intestinal stem cell niche. • Ephrin-B1 regulates cell positioning and ephrin-B2 regulates cell proliferation in the intestinal stem cell niche. • EphA4/B2 receptor cooperation in response to ephrin-B2 binding is obligatory to convey mitogenic signals in the intestine. • EphA4 facilitates EphB2 phosphorylation in response to ephrin-B2 in SW480 adenocarcinoma cells. • Ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 induce phosphorylation and degradation of the EphB2 receptor with different kinetics.

  18. Eph receptor interclass cooperation is required for the regulation of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurek, Aleksandra; Genander, Maria [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Kundu, Parag [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Catchpole, Timothy [Department of Developmental Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 (United States); He, Xiao; Strååt, Klas; Sabelström, Hanna [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Xu, Nan-Jie [Department of Developmental Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 (United States); Pettersson, Sven [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); The National Cancer Centre, Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Henkemeyer, Mark [Department of Developmental Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 (United States); Frisén, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.frisen@ki.se [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-10-15

    Cancer often arises by the constitutive activation of mitogenic pathways by mutations in stem cells. Eph receptors are unusual in that although they regulate the proliferation of stem/progenitor cells in many adult organs, they typically fail to transform cells. Multiple ephrins and Eph receptors are often co-expressed and are thought to be redundant, but we here describe an unexpected dichotomy with two homologous ligands, ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2, regulating specifically migration or proliferation in the intestinal stem cell niche. We demonstrate that the combined activity of two different coexpressed Eph receptors of the A and B class assembled into common signaling clusters in response to ephrin-B2 is required for mitogenic signaling. The requirement of two different Eph receptors to convey mitogenic signals identifies a new type of cooperation within this receptor family and helps explain why constitutive activation of a single receptor fails to transform cells. - Highlights: • We demonstrate that ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 have largely non-overlapping functions in the intestinal stem cell niche. • Ephrin-B1 regulates cell positioning and ephrin-B2 regulates cell proliferation in the intestinal stem cell niche. • EphA4/B2 receptor cooperation in response to ephrin-B2 binding is obligatory to convey mitogenic signals in the intestine. • EphA4 facilitates EphB2 phosphorylation in response to ephrin-B2 in SW480 adenocarcinoma cells. • Ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 induce phosphorylation and degradation of the EphB2 receptor with different kinetics.

  19. Protease-activated receptor 2 agonist increases cell proliferation and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    XIE, LIQUN; DUAN, ZEXING; LIU, CAIJU; ZHENG, YANMIN; ZHOU, JING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the expression of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) in the human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990, and to evaluate its effect on cell proliferation and invasion. The expression of PAR-2 protein and mRNA in SW1990 cells was determined by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. MTT and cell invasion and migration assays, as well as semi-quantitative PCR and zymography analysis, were additionally performed. PAR-2 mRNA was significantly upregulated in the cells treated with trypsin or the PAR-2 activating peptide Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Lys-Val (SLIGKV) (P0.05). Trypsin and SLIGKV significantly promoted SW1990 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, trypsin and SLIGKV significantly increased the mRNA expression (P<0.01) and gelatinolytic activity (P<0.01) of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. In conclusion, PAR-2 is expressed in SW1990 cells. PAR-2 activation may promote the invasion and migration of human pancreatic cancer cells by increasing MMP-2 expression. PMID:25452809

  20. Bovine cumulus-granulosa cells contain biologically active retinoid receptors that can respond to retinoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malayer Jerry

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retinoids, a class of compounds that include retinol and its metabolite, retinoic acid, are absolutely essential for ovarian steroid production, oocyte maturation, and early embryogenesis. Previous studies have detected high concentrations of retinol in bovine large follicles. Further, administration of retinol in vivo and supplementation of retinoic acid during in vitro maturation results in enhanced embryonic development. In the present study, we hypothesized that retinoids administered either in vivo previously or in vitro can exert receptor-mediated effects in cumulus-granulosa cells. Total RNA extracted from in vitro cultured cumulus-granulosa cells was subjected to reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and mRNA expression for retinol binding protein (RBP, retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha, retinoic acid receptor beta (RARbeta, retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARgamma, retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha, retinoid X receptor beta (RXRbeta, retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (RALDH-2, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma. Transcripts were detected for RBP, RARalpha, RARgamma, RXRalpha, RXRbeta, RALDH-2, and PPARgamma. Expression of RARbeta was not detected in cumulus-granulosa cells. Using western blotting, immunoreactive RARalpha, and RXRbeta protein was also detected in bovine cumulus-granulosa cells. The biological activity of these endogenous retinoid receptors was tested using a transient reporter assay using the pAAV-MCS-betaRARE-Luc vector. Addition of 0.5 and 1 micro molar all-trans retinoic acid significantly (P trans retinol stimulated a mild increase in reporter activity, however, the increase was not statistically significant. Based on these results we conclude that cumulus cells contain endogenously active retinoid receptors and may also be competent to synthesize retinoic acid using the precursor, retinol. These results also indirectly provide evidence that retinoids

  1. Two panels of steroid receptor luciferase reporter cell lines for compound profiling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, David; Paguio, A.; Bartůněk, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 2 (2011), s. 248-266 ISSN 1386-2073 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : nuclear hormone receptor * steroid receptor * cell-based luciferase reporter assay Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.785, year: 2011

  2. Activation of toll-like receptors and dendritic cells by a broad range of bacterial molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boele, L.C.L.; Bajramovic, J.J.; Vries, A.M.M.B.C. de; Voskamp-Visser, I.A.I.; Kaman, W.E.; Kleij, D. van der

    2009-01-01

    Activation of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by pathogens leads to activation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC), which orchestrate the development of the adaptive immune response. To create an overview of the effects of a broad range of pathogenic bacteria,

  3. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPRS Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human and Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunin, A.; Sisirak, V.; Ghosh, H.S.; Grajkowska, L.T.; Hou, Z.E.; Miron, M.; Yang, C.; Ceribelli, M.; Uetani, N.; Chaperot, L.; Plumas, J.; Hendriks, W.J.; Tremblay, M.L.; Hacker, H.; Staudt, L.M.; Green, P.H.; Bhagat, G.; Reizis, B.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are primary producers of type I interferon (IFN) in response to viruses. The IFN-producing capacity of pDCs is regulated by specific inhibitory receptors, yet none of the known receptors are conserved in evolution. We report that within the human immune system,

  4. Characterization of germ cell-specific expression of the orphan nuclear receptor, germ cell nuclear factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, D; Niederberger, C; Slaughter, G R; Cooney, A J

    1997-10-01

    Nuclear receptors, such as those for androgens, estrogens, and progesterones, control many reproductive processes. Proteins with structures similar to these receptors, but for which ligands have not yet been identified, have been termed orphan nuclear receptors. One of these orphans, germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF), has been shown to be germ cell specific in the adult and, therefore, may also participate in the regulation of reproductive functions. In this paper, we examine more closely the expression patterns of GCNF in germ cells to begin to define spatio-temporal domains of its activity. In situ hybridization showed that GCNF messenger RNA (mRNA) is lacking in the testis of hypogonadal mutant mice, which lack developed spermatids, but is present in the wild-type testis. Thus, GCNF is, indeed, germ cell specific in the adult male. Quantitation of the specific in situ hybridization signal in wild-type testis reveals that GCNF mRNA is most abundant in stage VII round spermatids. Similarly, Northern analysis and specific in situ hybridization show that GCNF expression first occurs in testis of 20-day-old mice, when round spermatids first emerge. Therefore, in the male, GCNF expression occurs postmeiotically and may participate in the morphological changes of the maturing spermatids. In contrast, female expression of GCNF is shown in growing oocytes that have not completed the first meiotic division. Thus, GCNF in the female is expressed before the completion of meiosis. Finally, the nature of the two different mRNAs that hybridize to the GCNF complementary DNA was studied. Although both messages contain the DNA binding domain, only the larger message is recognized by a probe from the extreme 3' untranslated region. In situ hybridization with these differential probes demonstrates that both messages are present in growing oocytes. In addition, the coding region and portions of the 3' untranslated region of the GCNF complementary DNA are conserved in the rat.

  5. Novel primary thymic defect with T lymphocytes expressing gamma delta T cell receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Pallesen, G; Platz, P

    1989-01-01

    Flow cytometric analysis of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a six year old girl with a primary cellular immune deficiency showed a normal fraction of CD3 positive T cells. Most (70%) of the CD3 positive cells, however, expressed the gamma delta and not the alpha beta T cell receptor....... Immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that most of the gamma delta T cell receptors existed as disulphide-linked heterodimers. Proliferative responses to mitogens were severely reduced, but specific antibody responses after vaccination could be detected...... deficiency associated with a high proportion of T cells expressing the gamma delta T cell receptor has been described in nude mice, and it is suggested that the immune deficiency of this patient may represent a human analogue....

  6. Building tolerance by dismantling synapses: inhibitory receptor signaling in natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huse, Morgan; Catherine Milanoski, S; Abeyweera, Thushara P

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface receptors bearing immunotyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) maintain natural killer (NK) cell tolerance to normal host tissues. These receptors are difficult to analyze mechanistically because they block activating responses in a rapid and comprehensive manner. The advent of high-resolution single cell imaging techniques has enabled investigators to explore the cell biological basis of the inhibitory response. Recent studies using these approaches indicate that ITIM-containing receptors function at least in part by structurally undermining the immunological synapse between the NK cell and its target. In this review, we discuss these new advances and how they might relate to what is known about the biochemistry of inhibitory signaling in NK cells and other cell types. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Effects of phyto-oestrogen quercetin on productive performance, hormones, reproductive organs and apoptotic genes in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J X; Chaudhry, M T; Yao, J Y; Wang, S N; Zhou, B; Wang, M; Han, C Y; You, Y; Li, Y

    2018-04-01

    Quercetin, a polyphenolic flavonoid with diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory and antiviral, inhibits lipid peroxidation, prevents oxidative injury and cell death. The purpose of the research was to investigate the effect of quercetin on productive performance, reproductive organs, hormones and apoptotic genes in laying hens between 37 and 45 weeks of age, because of the structure and oestrogenic activities similar to 17β-oestradiol. The trial was conducted using 240 Hessian laying hens (37 weeks old), housed in wire cages with two hens in each cage. These hens were randomly allotted to four treatments with six replicates, 10 hens in each replicate and fed with diets containing quercetin as 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 g/kg feed for 8 weeks. The results showed that dietary quercetin significantly increased (p feed-egg ratio was decreased (p  .05) on average egg weight and average daily feed intake. Compared with control, secretion of hormones, oestradiol (E 2 ) , progesterone (P4), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), insulin-like growth factors-1 (IGF-1) and growth hormone (GH), was found to be significantly higher (p  .05) by quercetin, whereas magnum index, isthmus index, magnum length, isthmus length and follicle numbers were significantly increased (p < .05) with quercetin supplementation. Additionally, expression of apoptotic genes was significantly (p < .05) up-regulated or down-regulated by quercetin. These results indicated that quercetin improved productive performance, and its mechanism may be due to the oestrogen-like activities of quercetin. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Utilization of the Tango beta-arrestin recruitment technology for cell-based EDG receptor assay development and interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetter, Justin A; Revankar, Chetana; Hanson, Bonnie J

    2009-10-01

    Cellular assay development for the endothelial differentiation gene (EDG) family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and related lysophospholipid (LP) receptors is complicated by endogenous receptor expression and divergent receptor signaling. Endogenously expressed LP receptors exist in most tissue culture cell lines. These LP receptors, along with other endogenously expressed GPCRs, contribute to off-target signaling that can complicate interpretation of second-messenger-based cellular assay results. These receptors also activate a diverse and divergent set of cellular signaling pathways, necessitating the use of a variety of assay formats with mismatched procedures and functional readouts. This complicates examination and comparison of these receptors across the entire family. The Tango technology uses the conserved beta-arrestin-dependent receptor deactivation process to allow interrogation of the EDG and related receptors with a single functional assay. This method also isolates the target receptor signal, allowing the use of tissue culture cell lines regardless of their endogenous receptor expression. The authors describe the use of this technique to build cell-based receptor-specific assays for all 8 members of the EDG receptor family as well as the related LPA receptors GPR23, GPR92, and GPR87. In addition, they demonstrate the value of this technology for identification and investigation of functionally selective receptor compounds as demonstrated by the immunosuppressive compound FtY720-P and its action at the EDG(1) and EDG(3) receptors.

  9. Expression and function of β-adrenergic receptors in human hematopoietic cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeki, T.; Andersson, L.C.; Kontula, K.K.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the expression and functional characteristics of β-adrenoceptors in a panel of 10 phenotypically different human hematopoietic cell lines. A binding assay with [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol as the ligand revealed that cell lines of myelomonocytic or histiocytic derivation (HL-60, ML-2, RC-2A, U-937) expressed high numbers of β-adrenoceptors. An intermediate density of receptors was found in a non-T, non-B cell leukemia line (Nall-1), whereas T-cell (JM, CCRF-CEM), B-cell (Raji) or erythroleukemic cell lines (K-562, HEL) displayed minimala or undetectable binding of the radioligand. Isoprenaline-stimulated cAMP production by the cells correlated to their extent of β-adrenoceptor expression. Southern blot hybridization analysis of genomic DNA from the cell lines with a 32 P-labelled β 2 -adrenoceptor cDNA probe revealed no evidence for major rearrangement or amplification of the receptor gene. Incubation with isoprenaline in vitro suppressed the proliferation of the receptor-rich RC-2A cells but did not affect the growth rate of the receptor-deficient K-562 cells. Treatment with propranolol slightly enhanced the proliferation of the RC-2A cells but did not markedly alter the growth rate of two other cell lines, regardless of their β-adrenoceptor status. These findings indicate a regulatory influence by the sympathoadrenergic system on selected cells of the myelomonocytic lineage. (au)

  10. Role of ErbB receptors in cancer cell migration and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline eAppert-Collin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Growth factors mediate their diverse biologic responses (regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival by binding to and activating cell-surface receptors with intrinsic protein kinase activity named Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs. About 60 RTKs have been identified and can be classified into more than 16 different receptor families. Their activity is normally tightly controlled and regulated. Overexpression of RTK proteins or functional alterations caused by mutations in the corresponding genes or abnormal stimulation by autocrine growth factor loops contribute to constitutive RTK signaling, resulting in alterations in the physiological activities of cells. The ErbB receptor family of RTKs comprises four distinct receptors: the EGFR (also known as ErbB1/HER1, ErbB2 (neu, HER2, ErbB3 (HER3 and ErbB4 (HER4. ErbB family members are often overexpressed, amplified, or mutated in many forms of cancer, making them important therapeutic targets. EGFR has been found to be amplified in gliomas and non-small-cell lung carcinoma while ErbB2 amplifications are seen in breast, ovarian, bladder, non-small-cell lung carcinoma, as well as several other tumor types. Several data have shown that ErbB receptor family and its downstream pathway regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, and tumor invasion by modulating extracellular matrix components. Recent findings indicate that extracellular matrix components such as matrikines bind specifically to EGF receptor and promote cell invasion. In this review, we will present an in-depth overview of the structure, mechanisms, cell signaling, and functions of ErbB family receptors in cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, we will describe in a last part the new strategies developed in anti-cancer therapy to inhibit ErbB family receptor activation.

  11. Characterization of the epidermal growth factor receptor associated with cytoskeletons of A431 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, L.M.; Gittinger, C.K.; Landreth, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-R) have been shown to be associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton of A431 cells, where they retained both a functional ligand-binding domain and tyrosine kinase activity. In the present study we have characterized the tyrosine kinase and ligand binding activities of this cytoskeletally associated EGF-R. The tyrosine kinase activity of the cytoskeletally associated EGF-R was stimulated by EGF treatment of intact cells as evidenced by increased autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of the exogenous substrate angiotensin II (AII). The kinetic behavior of the EGF-R associated with cytoskeletons of EGF-treated cells was similar to that of purified receptors. The stimulation of the receptor kinase activity required EGF treatment of intact cells prior to Triton extraction. If cytoskeletons were prepared from untreated cells and then incubated with EGF, there was no stimulation of the detergent-insoluble receptor kinase activity, indicating that the immobilized receptor was unable to undergo EGF-stimulated activation. Comparison of peptide maps from soluble and cytoskeletally associated EGF-R revealed qualitatively similar patterns; however, they are distinguished by a prominent 46 kD band in digests of the cytoskeletal EGF-R. Saturable binding of 125I-EGF to A431 cytoskeletons prepared from adherent and suspended cells demonstrated the presence of specific receptors on the cytoskeleton. High-affinity EGF-R were preferentially retained upon detergent extraction of adherent cells, whereas both low- and high-affinity receptors were solubilized from the cytoskeletons of suspended cells. Suspension of cells resulted in the solubilization of an additional 15% of the EGF-R to that solubilized in adherent cells, indicating that EGF-R can reversibly associate with the structural elements of the cell

  12. Increased cell division but not thymic dysfunction rapidly affects the T-cell receptor excision circle content of the naive T cell population in HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, Mette D.; Borleffs, J.C.C.; Otto, S.A.; Cohen Stuart, J.W.T. (James Willem Theodoor); Verschuren, M.C.M. (Martie); Boucher, C.A.B.; Coutinho, R.A.; Lange, Joep M.A.; Rinke de Wit, T.F. (Tobias); Tsegaye, A. (Aster); Dongen, J.J.M. (Jaques) van; Hamann, D. (Dörte); Boer, R.J. de; Miedema, F.

    2000-01-01

    Recent thymic emigrants can be identified by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) formed during T-cell receptor rearrangement. Decreasing numbers of TRECs have been observed with aging and in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected individuals, suggesting for thymic impairment. Here,

  13. Prostate stromal cells express the progesterone receptor to control cancer cell mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yu

    Full Text Available Reciprocal interactions between epithelium and stroma play vital roles for prostate cancer development and progression. Enhanced secretions of cytokines and growth factors by cancer associated fibroblasts in prostate tumors create a favorable microenvironment for cancer cells to grow and metastasize. Our previous work showed that the progesterone receptor (PR was expressed specifically in prostate stromal fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. However, the expression levels of PR and its impact to tumor microenvironment in prostate tumors are poorly understood.Immunohistochemistry assays are applied to human prostate tissue biopsies. Cell migration, invasion and proliferation assays are performed using human prostate cells. Real-time PCR and ELISA are applied to measure gene expression at molecular levels.Immunohistochemistry assays showed that PR protein levels were decreased in cancer associated stroma when compared with paired normal prostate stroma. Using in vitro prostate stromal cell models, we showed that conditioned media collected from PR positive stromal cells inhibited prostate cancer cell migration and invasion, but had minor suppressive impacts on cancer cell proliferation. PR suppressed the secretion of stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and interlukin-6 (IL-6 by stromal cells independent to PR ligands. Blocking PR expression by siRNA or supplementation of exogenous SDF-1 or IL-6 to conditioned media from PR positive stromal cells counteracted the inhibitory effects of PR to cancer cell migration and invasion.Decreased expression of the PR in cancer associated stroma may contribute to the elevated SDF-1 and IL-6 levels in prostate tumors and enhance prostate tumor progression.

  14. Impact of cell type and epitope tagging on heterologous expression of G protein-coupled receptor: a systematic study on angiotensin type II receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Jiang

    Full Text Available Despite heterologous expression of epitope-tagged GPCR is widely adopted for functional characterization, there is lacking of systematic analysis of the impact of expression host and epitope tag on GPCR expression. Angiotensin type II (AT2 receptor displays agonist-dependent and -independent activities, coupling to a spectrum of signaling molecules. However, consensus has not been reached on the subcellular distributions, signaling cascades and receptor-mediated actions. To examine the contributions of host cell and epitope tag on receptor expression and activity, epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were transiently or stably expressed in HEK293, CHO-K1 and PC12 cells. The epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were detected both on the cell membrane and in the perinuclear region. In transiently transfected HEK293 cells, Myc-AT2 existed predominantly as monomer. Additionally, a ladder of ubiquitinated AT2 receptor proteins was detected. By contrast, stably expressed epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants existed as both monomer and high molecular weight complexes, and the latter was enriched in cell surface. Glycosylation promoted cell surface expression of Myc-AT2 but had no effect on AT2-GFP in HEK293 cells. In cells that stably expressed Myc-AT2, serum starvation induced apoptosis in CHO-K1 cells but not in HEK293 or PC12 cells. Instead, HEK293 and PC12 cells stably expressing Myc-AT2 exhibited partial cell cycle arrest with cells accumulating at G1 and S phases, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that expression levels, subcellular distributions and ligand-independent constitutive activities of AT2 receptor were cell type-dependent while posttranslational processing of nascent AT2 receptor protein was modulated by epitope tag and mode of expression.

  15. The P2X7 Receptor Supports Both Life and Death in Fibrogenic Pancreatic Stellate Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haanes, Kristian; Schwab, Albrecht; Novak, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    The pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) have complex roles in pancreas, including tissue repair and fibrosis. PSCs surround ATP releasing exocrine cells, but little is known about purinergic receptors and their function in PSCs. Our aim was to resolve whether PSCs express the multifunctional P2X7...... versions of the receptor. In culture, the proliferation rate of the KO PSCs was significantly lower. Inclusion of apyrase reduced the proliferation rate in both WT and KO PSCs, indicating importance of endogenous ATP. Exogenous ATP had a two-sided effect. Proliferation of both WT and KO cells...... inhibitor az10606120. The P2X7 receptor-pore inhibitor A438079 partially prevented cell death induced by millimolar ATP concentrations. This study shows that ATP and P2X7 receptors are important regulators of PSC proliferation and death, and therefore might be potential targets for treatments of pancreatic...

  16. Ligands, cell-based models, and readouts required for Toll-like receptor action.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dellacasagrande, Jerome

    2012-02-01

    This chapter details the tools that are available to study Toll-like receptor (TLR) biology in vitro. This includes ligands, host cells, and readouts. The use of modified TLRs to circumvent some technical problems is also discussed.

  17. Expression of Ricinus communis receptors on epithelial cells in oral carcinomas and oral wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabelsteen, E; Mackenzie, I C

    1978-12-01

    The histological distribution of receptors for Ricinus communis Fraction 1 (RCA1) in oral carcinomas and in oral epithelial cells during wound healing has been studied by use of fluorescein-tagged RCA1. Biopsies from 15 human oral carcinomas and adjacent normal mucosa showed RCA1 receptors at the cell membranes in the basal and spinous layer of the normal epithelium, whereas receptors could not be demonstrated in invading islands of the tumors. In healing oral wounds from eight humans and three monkeys, RCA1 receptors were demonstrated both in normal epithelium adjacent to the wounds and in the epithelial outgrowth from the wound margin. Titrations, however, showed that the epithelial outgrowth reacted more weakly than did the normal adjacent epithelium. These results support previous in vitro studies showing changes in carbohydrate composition of moving normal cells and of malignant cells, a finding that may be of interest in relation to formation of metastases.

  18. Deficiency of leptin receptor in myeloid cells disrupts hypothalamic metabolic circuits and causes body weight increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqing Gao

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Myeloid cell leptin receptor deficient mice partially replicate the db/db phenotype. Leptin signaling in hypothalamic microglia is important for microglial function and a correct formation of the hypothalamic neuronal circuit regulating metabolism.

  19. Intraclonal Cell Expansion and Selection Driven by B Cell Receptor in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Monica; Cutrona, Giovanna; Reverberi, Daniele; Fabris, Sonia; Neri, Antonino; Fabbi, Marina; Quintana, Giovanni; Quarta, Giovanni; Ghiotto, Fabio; Fais, Franco; Ferrarini, Manlio

    2011-01-01

    The mutational status of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region (IGHV) genes utilized by chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) clones defines two disease subgroups. Patients with unmutated IGHV have a more aggressive disease and a worse outcome than patients with cells having somatic IGHV gene mutations. Moreover, up to 30% of the unmutated CLL clones exhibit very similar or identical B cell receptors (BcR), often encoded by the same IG genes. These “stereotyped” BcRs have been classified into defined subsets. The presence of an IGHV gene somatic mutation and the utilization of a skewed gene repertoire compared with normal B cells together with the expression of stereotyped receptors by unmutated CLL clones may indicate stimulation/selection by antigenic epitopes. This antigenic stimulation may occur prior to or during neoplastic transformation, but it is unknown whether this stimulation/selection continues after leukemogenesis has ceased. In this study, we focused on seven CLL cases with stereotyped BcR Subset #8 found among a cohort of 700 patients; in six, the cells expressed IgG and utilized IGHV4-39 and IGKV1-39/IGKV1D-39 genes, as reported for Subset #8 BcR. One case exhibited special features, including expression of IgM or IgG by different subclones consequent to an isotype switch, allelic inclusion at the IGH locus in the IgM-expressing cells and a particular pattern of cytogenetic lesions. Collectively, the data indicate a process of antigenic stimulation/selection of the fully transformed CLL cells leading to the expansion of the Subset #8 IgG-bearing subclone. PMID:21541442

  20. Truncation of CXCL12 by CD26 reduces its CXC chemokine receptor 4- and atypical chemokine receptor 3-dependent activity on endothelial cells and lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssens, Rik; Mortier, Anneleen; Boff, Daiane

    2017-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 or stromal cell-derived factor 1/SDF-1 attracts hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature leukocytes through the G protein-coupled CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). In addition, it interacts with atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3 or CXCR7) and glycosaminoglycans. CXCL12 ac...

  1. Endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand induces the migration of human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Seishi; Muramatsu, Mayumi; Gokoh, Maiko; Oka, Saori; Waku, Keizo; Sugiura, Takayuki

    2005-02-01

    2-Arachidonoylglycerol is an endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). Evidence is gradually accumulating which shows that 2-arachidonoylglycerol plays important physiological roles in several mammalian tissues and cells, yet the details remain ambiguous. In this study, we first examined the effects of 2-arachidonoylglycerol on the motility of human natural killer cells. We found that 2-arachidonoylglycerol induces the migration of KHYG-1 cells (a natural killer leukemia cell line) and human peripheral blood natural killer cells. The migration of natural killer cells induced by 2-arachidonoylglycerol was abolished by treating the cells with SR144528, a CB2 receptor antagonist, suggesting that the CB2 receptor is involved in the 2-arachidonoylglycerol-induced migration. In contrast to 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand, did not induce the migration. Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, a major psychoactive constituent of marijuana, also failed to induce the migration; instead, the addition of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol together with 2-arachidonoylglycerol abolished the migration induced by 2-arachidonoylglycerol. It is conceivable that the endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptor, that is, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, affects natural killer cell functions such as migration, thereby contributing to the host-defense mechanism against infectious viruses and tumor cells.

  2. Limited impact on glucose homeostasis of leptin receptor deletion from insulin- or proglucagon-expressing cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Soedling

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions/interpretation: The use here of a highly selective Cre recombinase indicates that leptin signalling plays a relatively minor, age- and sex-dependent role in the control of β cell function in the mouse. No in vivo role for leptin receptors on α cells, nor in other proglucagon-expressing cells, was detected in this study.

  3. Can Selective MHC Downregulation Explain the Specificity and Genetic Diversity of NK Cell Receptors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Kesmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express inhibiting receptors (iNKRs), which specifically bind MHC-I molecules on the surface of healthy cells. When the expression of MHC-I on the cell surface decreases, which might occur during certain viral infections and cancer, iNKRs lose inhibiting signals and the

  4. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells form nonclassical and potent immune synapses driving rapid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, A J; Cross, R S; Watson, K A; Liao, Y; Shi, W; Prince, H M; Beavis, P A; Trapani, J A; Kershaw, M H; Ritchie, D S; Darcy, P K; Neeson, P J; Jenkins, M R

    2018-02-27

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells are effective serial killers with a faster off-rate from dying tumor cells than CAR-T cells binding target cells through their T cell receptor (TCR). Here we explored the functional consequences of CAR-mediated signaling using a dual-specific CAR-T cell, where the same cell was triggered via TCR (tcrCTL) or CAR (carCTL). The carCTL immune synapse lacked distinct LFA-1 adhesion rings and was less reliant on LFA to form stable conjugates with target cells. carCTL receptors associated with the synapse were found to be disrupted and formed a convoluted multifocal pattern of Lck microclusters. Both proximal and distal receptor signaling pathways were induced more rapidly and subsequently decreased more rapidly in carCTL than in tcrCTL. The functional consequence of this rapid signaling in carCTL cells included faster lytic granule recruitment to the immune synapse, correlating with faster detachment of the CTL from the target cell. This study provides a mechanism for how CAR-T cells can debulk large tumor burden quickly and may contribute to further refinement of CAR design for enhancing the quality of signaling and programming of the T cell. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  5. MicroRNA-133a suppresses multiple oncogenic membrane receptors and cell invasion in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Kai Wang

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs cause high mortality worldwide, and the cancer progression can be activated by several genetic events causing receptor dysregulation, including mutation or amplification. MicroRNAs are a group of small non-coding RNA molecules that function in gene silencing and have emerged as the fine-tuning regulators during cancer progression. MiR-133a is known as a key regulator in skeletal and cardiac myogenesis, and it acts as a tumor suppressor in various cancers. This study demonstrates that miR-133a expression negatively correlates with cell invasiveness in both transformed normal bronchial epithelial cells and lung cancer cell lines. The oncogenic receptors in lung cancer cells, including insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R, TGF-beta receptor type-1 (TGFBR1, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, are direct targets of miR-133a. MiR-133a can inhibit cell invasiveness and cell growth through suppressing the expressions of IGF-1R, TGFBR1 and EGFR, which then influences the downstream signaling in lung cancer cell lines. The cell invasive ability is suppressed in IGF-1R- and TGFBR1-repressed cells and this phenomenon is mediated through AKT signaling in highly invasive cell lines. In addition, by using the in vivo animal model, we find that ectopically-expressing miR-133a dramatically suppresses the metastatic ability of lung cancer cells. Accordingly, patients with NSCLCs who have higher expression levels of miR-133a have longer survival rates compared with those who have lower miR-133a expression levels. In summary, we identified the tumor suppressor role of miR-133a in lung cancer outcome prognosis, and we demonstrated that it targets several membrane receptors, which generally produce an activating signaling network during the progression of lung cancer.

  6. Pattern of faecal 20-oxopregnane and oestrogen concentrations during pregnancy in wild plains zebra mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, Hlengisizwe; Duncan, Patrick; Grange, Sophie; Cameron, Elissa Z; Barnier, Florian; Ganswindt, Andre

    2011-07-01

    Regulative endocrine mechanisms influence the reproductive behaviour and success of mammals, but they have been studied predominantly in domestic and captive animals. The study aims at describing the pattern of faecal 20-oxopregnane and oestrogen concentrations during pregnancy in wild plains zebra Equus quagga chapmani. Data were collected during wet and dry seasons 2007-2009. Enzyme Immunoassays were used to determine 20-oxopregnane and oestrogen concentrations in faecal samples (n=74) collected from individual mares (n=32) whose dates of foaling were known through long-term monitoring. Hormonal profiles were described with a General Additive Model (GAM: Hormone ∼ Days to Foaling). Faecal 20-oxopregnanes have a complex cycle during pregnancy (GAM, n=70, R(2)=0.616, p200 ng/g DW) of faecal 20-oxopregnanes associated with high (>160 ng/g DW) faecal oestrogen levels indicate mid-pregnancy in c.90% of cases (16/17). High faecal 20-oxopregnanes (>200 ng/g DW) and low faecal oestrogen levels (<160 ng/g DW) indicate late pregnancy, again in c.90% of cases. Two faecal samples would allow the stage of pregnancy to be determined with confidence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Circumventing the natural, frequent oestrogen waves of the female cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) using oral progestin (Altrenogest).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosier, Adrienne E; Comizzoli, Pierre; Koester, Diana C; Wildt, David E

    2017-08-01

    Cheetah are induced ovulators, experiencing short, variable oestrogen waves year-round. Exogenous gonadotrophin administration induces ovulation, but success is variable and often improves if ovaries are quiescent. After affirming the presence of short-term oestrogenic waves, we examined the effect of the timing of administration of exogenous equine and human chorionic gonadotrophins (eCG-hCG) within the oestrogen concentration pattern on subsequent follicle development and oocyte and corpus luteum quality. We also investigated ovarian suppression using an oral progestin (Altrenogest, 7 days) and assessed whether Altrenogest moderated adrenal activity by reducing glucocorticoid metabolites. All cheetahs exhibited short (every ~7-10 days), sporadic, year-round increases in faecal oestradiol punctuated by unpredictable periods (4-10 weeks) of baseline oestradiol (anoestrous). Gonadotrophin (eCG-hCG) efficacy was not affected by oestradiol 'wave' pattern if administered ≥3 days after an oestrogen peak. Such cheetahs produced normative faecal progestagen patterns and higher numbers (P<0.06) of mature oocytes than females given gonadotrophins ≤2 days after an oestradiol peak. Altrenogest supplementation expanded the interval between oestradiol peaks to 12.9 days compared with 7.3 days without progestin pretreatment. Altrenogest-fed females excreted less (P<0.05) glucocorticoid metabolites than non-supplemented counterparts. Results show that Altrenogest is effective for suppressing follicular activity, may contribute to reduced glucocorticoid production and may result in more effective ovulation induction via gonadotrophin therapy.

  8. Phyto-oestrogen excretion and rate of bone loss in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Morton, M.S.; Brüggemann-Rotgans, I.E.M.; Beresteijn, E.C.H. van

    1998-01-01

    Objective: The hypothesis was tested that the rate of postmenopausal bone loss is inversely associated with long-term urinary excretion of phyto-oestrogens, as a marker of habitual dietary intake. Design: Secondary analysis of a 10-year follow-up study (1979-1989) among postmenopausal women in the

  9. Investigating the role of natural phyto-oestrogens on bone health in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valtueña, S.; Cashman, K.; Robins, S.P.; Cassidy, A.; Kardinaal, A.; Branca, F.

    2003-01-01

    Research on the bone effects of natural phyto-oestrogens after menopause is at a relatively early stage. Published studies are few, difficult to compare and often inconclusive, due in part to design weaknesses. Currently, many questions remain to be answered including to what extent a safe daily

  10. Oestrogenic activity in drinking waters from a rural area in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-02-27

    Feb 27, 2007 ... rivers. Thus human exposure to environmental contaminants in drinking water is potentially high. Two rural ... and anogenital distance have been identified as new biological ... more sensitive ER-Calux assay confirmed the oestrogenic activ- ... on the nutritional status and dietary intake of children to deter-.

  11. Subtype-dependent postnatal development of taste receptor cells in mouse fungiform taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Iwamoto, Masafumi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2012-06-01

    Taste buds contain two types of taste receptor cells, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type 3-immunoreactive cells (type II cells) and synaptosomal-associating protein-25-immunoreactive cells (type III cells). We investigated their postnatal development in mouse fungiform taste buds immunohistochemically and electrophysiologically. The cell density, i.e. the number of cells per taste bud divided by the maximal area of the horizontal cross-section of the taste bud, of type II cells increased by postnatal day (PD)49, where as that of type III cells was unchanged throughout the postnatal observation period and was equal to that of the adult cells at PD1. The immunoreactivity of taste bud cell subtypes was the same as that of their respective subtypes in adult mice throughout the postnatal observation period. Almost all type II cells were immunoreactive to gustducin at PD1, and then the ratio of gustducin-immunoreactive type II cells to all type II cells decreased to a saturation level, ∼60% of all type II cells, by PD15. Type II and III cells generated voltage-gated currents similar to their respective adult cells even at PD3. These results show that infant taste receptor cells are as excitable as those of adults and propagate in a subtype-dependent manner. The relationship between the ratio of each taste receptor cell subtype to all cells and taste nerve responses are discussed. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. α-Tocopherol modulates the low density lipoprotein receptor of human HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bottema Cynthia DK

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the effects of vitamin E (α-tocopherol on the low density lipoprotein (LDL receptor, a cell surface protein which plays an important role in controlling blood cholesterol. Human HepG2 hepatoma cells were incubated for 24 hours with increasing amounts of α, δ, or γ-tocopherol. The LDL receptor binding activity, protein and mRNA, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase mRNA, cell cholesterol and cell lathosterol were measured. The effect of α-tocopherol was biphasic. Up to a concentration of 50 μM, α-tocopherol progressively increased LDL receptor binding activity, protein and mRNA to maximum levels 2, 4 and 6-fold higher than control, respectively. The HMG-CoA reductase mRNA and the cell lathosterol concentration, indices of cholesterol synthesis, were also increased by 40% over control by treatment with 50 μM α-tocopherol. The cell cholesterol concentration was decreased by 20% compared to control at 50 μM α-tocopherol. However, at α-tocopherol concentrations higher than 50 μM, the LDL receptor binding activity, protein and mRNA, the HMG-CoA reductase mRNA and the cell lathosterol and cholesterol concentrations all returned to control levels. The biphasic effect on the LDL receptor was specific for α-tocopherol in that δ and γ-tocopherol suppressed LDL receptor binding activity, protein and mRNA at all concentrations tested despite the cells incorporating similar amounts of the three homologues. In conclusion, α-tocopherol, exhibits a specific, concentration-dependent and biphasic "up then down" effect on the LDL receptor of HepG2 cells which appears to be at the level of gene transcription. Cholesterol synthesis appears to be similarly affected and the cell cholesterol concentration may mediate these effects.

  13. Intrinsic nitric oxide regulates the taste response of the sugar receptor cell in the blowfly, Phormia regina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoshihiro; Mashiko, Masashi; Ozaki, Mamiko; Amakawa, Taisaku; Nakamura, Tadashi

    2004-01-01

    The taste organ in insects is a hair-shaped taste sensory unit having four functionally differentiated contact chemoreceptor cells. In the blowfly, Phormia regina, cGMP has been suggested to be a second messenger for the sugar receptor cell. Generally, cGMP is produced by membranous or soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), which can be activated by nitric oxide (NO). In the present paper, we electrophysiologically showed that an NO scavenger, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl (PTIO), an NO donor, 1-hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene (NOC 7) or an NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) specifically affected the response in the sugar receptor cell, but not in other receptor cells. PTIO, when introduced into the receptor cells in a sensillum aided by sodium deoxycholate (DOC, pH 7.2), depressed the response of sugar receptor cells to sucrose but did not affect those of the salt or water receptor cells. NOC 7, given extracellularly, latently induced the response of sugar receptor cells; and L-NAME, when introduced into the receptor cells, depressed the response of sugar receptor cells. The results clearly suggest that NO, which may be produced by intrinsic NOS in sugar receptor cells, participates in the transduction cascade of these cells in blowfly.

  14. DMPD: Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17142025 Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. Watt...) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. PubmedID... 17142025 Title Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic ce

  15. Dopamine receptors on adrenal chromaffin cells modulate calcium uptake and catecholamine release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigornia, L; Suozzo, M; Ryan, K A; Napp, D; Schneider, A S

    1988-10-01

    The presence of dopamine-containing cells in sympathetic ganglia, i.e., small, intensely fluorescent cells, has been known for some time. However, the role of dopamine as a peripheral neurotransmitter and its mechanism of action are not well understood. Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of D2 dopamine receptors on the surface of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells using radioligand binding methods and dopamine receptor inhibition of catecholamine release from perfused adrenal glands. In the present study, we provide evidence confirming a role of dopamine receptors as inhibitory modulators of adrenal catecholamine release from bovine chromaffin cell cultures and further show that the mechanism of modulation involves inhibition of stimulated calcium uptake. Apomorphine gave a dose-dependent inhibition (IC50 = 1 microM) of 45Ca2+ uptake stimulated by either nicotine (10 microM) or membrane depolarization with an elevated K+ level (60 mM). This inhibition was reversed by a series of specific (including stereospecific) dopamine receptor antagonists: haloperidol, spiperone, sulpiride, and (+)-butaclamol, but not (-)-butaclamol. In addition, the calcium channel agonist Bay K 8644 was used to stimulate uptake of 45Ca2+ into chromaffin cells, and this uptake was also inhibited by the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine. The combined results suggest that dopamine receptors on adrenal chromaffin cells alter Ca2+ channel conductance, which, in turn, modulates catecholamine release.

  16. Association of nerve growth factor receptors with the triton X-100 cytoskeleton of PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vale, R.D.; Ignatius, M.J.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    Triton X-100 solubilizes membranes of PC12 cells and leaves behind a nucleus and an array of cytoskeletal filaments. Nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors are associated with this Triton X-100-insoluble residue. Two classes of NGF receptors are found on PC12 cells which display rapid and slow dissociating kinetics. Although rapidly dissociating binding is predominant (greater than 75%) in intact cells, the majority of binding to the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton is slowly dissociating (greater than 75%). Rapidly dissociating NGF binding on intact cells can be converted to a slowly dissociating form by the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). This lectin also increases the number of receptors which associate with the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton by more than 10-fold. 125 I-NGF bound to receptors can be visualized by light microscopy autoradiography in Triton X-100-insoluble residues of cell bodies, as well as growth cones and neurites. The WGA-induced association with the cytoskeleton, however, is not specific for the NGF receptor. Concentrations of WGA which change the Triton X-100 solubility of membrane glycoproteins are similar to those required to alter the kinetic state of the NGF receptor. Both events may be related to the crossbridging of cell surface proteins induced by this multivalent lectin

  17. Alpha7 nicotinic receptor mediated protection against ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; King, M A; Grimes, J; Smith, N; de Fiebre, C M; Meyer, E M

    1999-01-16

    Ethanol caused a concentration-dependent loss of PC12 cells over a 24 h interval, accompanied by an increase in intracellular calcium. The specific alpha7 nicotinic receptor partial agonist DMXB attenuated both of these ethanol-induced actions at a concentration (3 microM) found previously to protect against apoptotic and necrotic cell loss. The alpha7 nicotinic receptor antagonist methylylaconitine blocked the neuroprotective action of DMXB when applied with but not 30 min after the agonist. These results indicate that activation of alpha7 nicotinic receptors may be therapeutically useful in preventing ethanol-neurotoxicity. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Oxygen Modulates Human Decidual Natural Killer Cell Surface Receptor Expression and Interactions with Trophoblasts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Alison E.; Goulwara, Sonu S.; Whitley, Guy S.; Cartwright, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Decidual natural killer (dNK) cells have been shown to both promote and inhibit trophoblast behavior important for decidual remodeling in pregnancy and have a distinct phenotype compared to peripheral blood NK cells. We investigated whether different levels of oxygen tension, mimicking the physiological conditions of the decidua in early pregnancy, altered cell surface receptor expression and activity of dNK cells and their interactions with trophoblast. dNK cells were isolated from terminated first-trimester pregnancies and cultured in oxygen tensions of 3%, 10%, and 21% for 24 h. Cell surface receptor expression was examined by flow cytometry, and the effects of secreted factors in conditioned medium (CM) on the trophoblast cell line SGHPL-4 were assessed in vitro. SGHPL-4 cells treated with dNK cell CM incubated in oxygen tensions of 10% were significantly more invasive (P cells treated with dNK cell CM incubated in oxygen tensions of 3% or 21%. After 24 h, a lower percentage of dNK cells expressed CD56 at 21% oxygen (P cells expressed NKG2D at 10% oxygen (P oxygen tensions, with large patient variation. This study demonstrates dNK cell phenotype and secreted factors are modulated by oxygen tension, which induces changes in trophoblast invasion and endovascular-like differentiation. Alterations in dNK cell surface receptor expression and secreted factors at different oxygen tensions may represent regulation of function within the decidua during the first trimester of pregnancy. PMID:25232021

  19. Normalization of TAM post-receptor signaling reveals a cell invasive signature for Axl tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani, Stanley G; Kumar, Sushil; Davra, Viralkumar; Chang, Yun-Juan; Kasikara, Canan; Geng, Ke; Tsou, Wen-I; Wang, Shenyan; Hoque, Mainul; Boháč, Andrej; Lewis-Antes, Anita; De Lorenzo, Mariana S; Kotenko, Sergei V; Birge, Raymond B

    2016-09-06

    Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk (TAMs) are a family of three conserved receptor tyrosine kinases that have pleiotropic roles in innate immunity and homeostasis and when overexpressed in cancer cells can drive tumorigenesis. In the present study, we engineered EGFR/TAM chimeric receptors (EGFR/Tyro3, EGFR/Axl, and EGF/Mertk) with the goals to interrogate post-receptor functions of TAMs, and query whether TAMs have unique or overlapping post-receptor activation profiles. Stable expression of EGFR/TAMs in EGFR-deficient CHO cells afforded robust EGF inducible TAM receptor phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling. Using a series of unbiased screening approaches, that include kinome-view analysis, phosphor-arrays, RNAseq/GSEA analysis, as well as cell biological and in vivo readouts, we provide evidence that each TAM has unique post-receptor signaling platforms and identify an intrinsic role for Axl that impinges on cell motility and invasion compared to Tyro3 and Mertk. These studies demonstrate that TAM show unique post-receptor signatures that impinge on distinct gene expression profiles and tumorigenic outcomes.

  20. Kokumi Substances, Enhancers of Basic Tastes, Induce Responses in Calcium-Sensing Receptor Expressing Taste Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Yasuda, Reiko; Kuroda, Motonaka; Eto, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we reported that calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a receptor for kokumi substances, which enhance the intensities of salty, sweet and umami tastes. Furthermore, we found that several γ-glutamyl peptides, which are CaSR agonists, are kokumi substances. In this study, we elucidated the receptor cells for kokumi substances, and their physiological properties. For this purpose, we used Calcium Green-1 loaded mouse taste cells in lingual tissue slices and confocal microscopy. Kokumi substances, applied focally around taste pores, induced an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a subset of taste cells. These responses were inhibited by pretreatment with the CaSR inhibitor, NPS2143. However, the kokumi substance-induced responses did not require extracellular Ca2+. CaSR-expressing taste cells are a different subset of cells from the T1R3-expressing umami or sweet taste receptor cells. These observations indicate that CaSR-expressing taste cells are the primary detectors of kokumi substances, and that they are an independent population from the influenced basic taste receptor cells, at least in the case of sweet and umami. PMID:22511946

  1. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye; Hong, Darong; Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer

  2. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Darong [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Science, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Ho, E-mail: jonghokim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  3. Nuclear receptor 4a3 (nr4a3 regulates murine mast cell responses and granule content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Garcia-Faroldi

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptor 4a3 (Nr4a3 is a transcription factor implicated in various settings such as vascular biology and inflammation. We have recently shown that mast cells dramatically upregulate Nuclear receptor 4a3 upon activation, and here we investigated the functional impact of Nuclear receptor 4a3 on mast cell responses. We show that Nuclear receptor 4a3 is involved in the regulation of cytokine/chemokine secretion in mast cells following activation via the high affinity IgE receptor. Moreover, Nuclear receptor 4a3 negatively affects the transcript and protein levels of mast cell tryptase as well as the mast cell's responsiveness to allergen. Together, these findings identify Nuclear receptor 4a3 as a novel regulator of mast cell function.

  4. Proneurotrophin-3 promotes cell cycle withdrawal of developing cerebellar granule cell progenitors via the p75 neurotrophin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Juan Pablo; Abercrombie, Elizabeth; Friedman, Wilma J

    2016-07-19

    Cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCP) proliferate extensively in the external granule layer (EGL) of the developing cerebellum prior to differentiating and migrating. Mechanisms that regulate the appropriate timing of cell cycle withdrawal of these neuronal progenitors during brain development are not well defined. The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) is highly expressed in the proliferating GCPs, but is downregulated once the cells leave the cell cycle. This receptor has primarily been characterized as a death receptor for its ability to induce neuronal apoptosis following injury. Here we demonstrate a novel function for p75(NTR) in regulating proper cell cycle exit of neuronal progenitors in the developing rat and mouse EGL, which is stimulated by proNT3. In the absence of p75(NTR), GCPs continue to proliferate beyond their normal period, resulting in a larger cerebellum that persists into adulthood, with consequent motor deficits.

  5. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells for the Treatment of B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Tomuleasa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell technology has seen a rapid development over the last decade mostly due to the potential that these cells may have in treating malignant diseases. It is a generally accepted principle that very few therapeutic compounds deliver a clinical response without treatment-related toxicity, and studies have shown that CAR T-cells are not an exception to this rule. While large multinational drug companies are currently investigating the potential role of CAR T-cells in hematological oncology, the potential of such cellular therapies are being recognized worldwide as they are expected to expand in the patient to support the establishment of the immune memory, provide a continuous surveillance to prevent and/or treat a relapse, and keep the targeted malignant cell subpopulation in check. In this article, we present the possible advantages of using CAR T-cells in treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia, presenting the technology and the current knowledge in their preclinical and early clinical trial use. Thus, this article first presents the main present-day knowledge on the standard of care for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Afterward, current knowledge is presented about the use of CAR T-cells in cancer immunotherapy, describing their design, the molecular constructs, and the preclinical data on murine models to properly explain the background for their clinical use. Last, but certainly not least, this article presents the use of CAR T-cells for the immunotherapy of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, describing both their potential clinical advantages and the possible side effects.

  6. Cell-autonomous intracellular androgen receptor signaling drives the growth of human prostate cancer initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Griend, Donald J; D'Antonio, Jason; Gurel, Bora; Antony, Lizamma; Demarzo, Angelo M; Isaacs, John T

    2010-01-01

    The lethality of prostate cancer is due to the continuous growth of cancer initiating cells (CICs) which are often stimulated by androgen receptor (AR) signaling. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for such AR-mediated growth stimulation are not fully understood. Such mechanisms may involve cancer cell-dependent induction of tumor stromal cells to produce paracrine growth factors or could involve cancer cell autonomous autocrine and/or intracellular AR signaling pathways. We utilized clinical samples, animal models and a series of AR-positive human prostate cancer cell lines to evaluate AR-mediated growth stimulation of prostate CICs. The present studies document that stromal AR expression is not required for prostate cancer growth, since tumor stroma surrounding AR-positive human prostate cancer metastases (N = 127) are characteristically AR-negative. This lack of a requirement for AR expression in tumor stromal cells is also documented by the fact that human AR-positive prostate cancer cells grow equally well when xenografted in wild-type versus AR-null nude mice. AR-dependent growth stimulation was documented to involve secretion, extracellular binding, and signaling by autocrine growth factors. Orthotopic xenograft animal studies documented that the cellautonomous autocrine growth factors which stimulate prostate CIC growth are not the andromedins secreted by normal prostate stromal cells. Such cell autonomous and extracellular autocrine signaling is necessary but not sufficient for the optimal growth of prostate CICs based upon the response to anti-androgen plus/or minus preconditioned media. AR-induced growth stimulation of human prostate CICs requires AR-dependent intracellular pathways. The identification of such AR-dependent intracellular pathways offers new leads for the development of effective therapies for prostate cancer. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Comparative study of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of human and rat cortical glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demushkin, V.P.; Burbaeva, G.S.; Dzhaliashvili, T.A.; Plyashkevich, Y.G.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was a comparative studyof muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human and rat glial cells. ( 3 H)Quinuclidinyl-benzylate (( 3 H)-QB), atropine, platiphylline, decamethonium, carbamylcholine, tubocurarine, and nicotine were used. The glial cell fraction was obtained from the cerebral cortex of rats weighing 130-140 g and from the frontal pole of the postmortem brain from men aged 60-70 years. The use of the method of radioimmune binding of ( 3 H)-QB with human and rat glial cell membranes demonstrated the presence of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in the glial cells

  8. Signal transduction of Helicobacter pylori during interaction with host cell protein receptors of epithelial and immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachathundikandi, Suneesh Kumar; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Backert, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections can induce pathologies ranging from chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration to gastric cancer. Bacterial isolates harbor numerous well-known adhesins, vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, protease HtrA, urease, peptidoglycan, and type IV secretion systems (T4SS). It appears that H. pylori targets more than 40 known host protein receptors on epithelial or immune cells. A series of T4SS components such as CagL, CagI, CagY, and CagA can bind to the integrin α5β1 receptor. Other targeted membrane-based receptors include the integrins αvβ3, αvβ5, and β2 (CD18), RPTP-α/β, GP130, E-cadherin, fibronectin, laminin, CD46, CD74, ICAM1/LFA1, T-cell receptor, Toll-like receptors, and receptor tyrosine kinases EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and c-Met. In addition, H. pylori is able to activate the intracellular receptors NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3 with important roles in innate immunity. Here we review the interplay of various bacterial factors with host protein receptors. The contribution of these interactions to signal transduction and pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:24280762

  9. Serum levels of oestrogen and some biochemical parameters in relation to reproductive activities and level of production in fowl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El - Abiad, N.M.F.

    1982-01-01

    This work was carried out at the poultry experiment station department of animal production, faculty of agriculture zagazig university, benha branch. radioimmunological and biochemical assays were performed in the laboratories of radioimmunology and biochemistry unit of atomic energy establishment . It was intended to study: 1. The effect of oestrogen level along the time of egg formation on some parameters in blood serum related to metabolic efficiency. 2. The variations in oestrogen level and blood serum parameters due to clutch size of hens. 3.Changes in oestrogen levels and some blood constituents along the time of egg formation

  10. Sonic hedgehog-expressing basal cells are general post-mitotic precursors of functional taste receptor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hirohito; Scott, Jennifer K.; Harada, Shuitsu; Barlow, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Taste buds contain ~60 elongate cells and several basal cells. Elongate cells comprise three functional taste cell types: I - glial cells, II - bitter/sweet/umami receptor cells, and III - sour detectors. Although taste cells are continuously renewed, lineage relationships among cell types are ill-defined. Basal cells have been proposed as taste bud stem cells, a subset of which express Sonic hedgehog (Shh). However, Shh+ basal cells turnover rapidly suggesting that Shh+ cells are precursors of some or all taste cell types. Results To fate map Shh-expressing cells, mice carrying ShhCreERT2 and a high (CAG-CAT-EGFP) or low (R26RLacZ) efficiency reporter allele were given tamoxifen to activate Cre in Shh+ cells. Using R26RLacZ, lineage-labeled cells occur singly within buds, supporting a post-mitotic state for Shh+ cells. Using either reporter, we show that Shh+ cells differentiate into all three taste cell types, in proportions reflecting cell type ratios in taste buds (I > II > III). Conclusions Shh+ cells are not stem cells, but are post-mitotic, immediate precursors of taste cells. Shh+ cells differentiate into each of the three taste cell types, and the choice of a specific taste cell fate is regulated to maintain the proper ratio within buds. PMID:24590958

  11. Subcellular localization of estradiol receptor in MCF7 cells studied with nanogold-labelled antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, M M; Qualmann, B; Thole, H H; Sierralta, W D

    1998-01-01

    Ultrastructural localization studies of estradiol receptor in hormone-deprived and hormone-stimulated MCF7 cells were done using F(ab') fragments of three different antibodies (#402, 13H2, HT277) covalently linked to nanogold. These ultra-small, non-charged immunoreagents, combined with a size-enlargement by silver enhancement, localized estradiol receptor in both nuclear and cytoplasmic areas of non-stimulated target cells; stimulation with the steroid induced a predominantly nuclear labelling. In the cytoplasm of resting cells, tagging was often observed at or in the proximity of stress fibers. In the nucleus a large proportion of receptor was found inside the nucleolus, specially with the reagent derived from antibody 13H2. We postulate that different accessibilities of receptor epitopes account for the different labelling densities observed at cytoskeletal elements and the nucleoli.

  12. Quantitative Microscopic Analysis of Plasma Membrane Receptor Dynamics in Living Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Russinova, Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    Plasma membrane-localized receptors are essential for cellular communication and signal transduction. In Arabidopsis thaliana, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) is one of the receptors that is activated by binding to its ligand, the brassinosteroid (BR) hormone, at the cell surface to regulate diverse plant developmental processes. The availability of BRI1 in the plasma membrane is related to its signaling output and is known to be controlled by the dynamic endomembrane trafficking. Advances in fluorescence labeling and confocal microscopy techniques enabled us to gain a better understanding of plasma membrane receptor dynamics in living cells. Here we describe different quantitative microscopy methods to monitor the relative steady-state levels of the BRI1 protein in the plasma membrane of root epidermal cells and its relative exocytosis and recycling rates. The methods can be applied also to analyze similar dynamics of other plasma membrane-localized receptors.

  13. Identifying plant cell-surface receptors: combining 'classical' techniques with novel methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebler, Susanne; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Cell-cell communication during development and reproduction in plants depends largely on a few phytohormones and many diverse classes of polymorphic secreted peptides. The peptide ligands are bound at the cell surface of target cells by their membranous interaction partners representing, in most cases, either receptor-like kinases or ion channels. Although knowledge of both the extracellular ligand and its corresponding receptor(s) is necessary to describe the downstream signalling pathway(s), to date only a few ligand-receptor pairs have been identified. Several methods, such as affinity purification and yeast two-hybrid screens, have been used very successfully to elucidate interactions between soluble proteins, but most of these methods cannot be applied to membranous proteins. Experimental obstacles such as low concentration and poor solubility of membrane receptors, as well as instable transient interactions, often hamper the use of these 'classical' approaches. However, over the last few years, a lot of progress has been made to overcome these problems by combining classical techniques with new methodologies. In the present article, we review the most promising recent methods in identifying cell-surface receptor interactions, with an emphasis on success stories outside the field of plant research.

  14. Overexpression of functional TrkA receptors after internalisation in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund-Michel, Véronique; Frossard, Nelly

    2008-10-01

    Trafficking of the TrkA receptor after stimulation by NGF is of emerging importance in structural cells in the context of airway inflammatory diseases. We have recently reported the expression of functional TrkA receptors in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC). We have here studied the TrkA trafficking mechanisms in these cells. TrkA disappearance from the cell membrane was induced within 5 min of NGF (3pM) stimulation. Co-immunoprecipitation of clathrin-TrkA was revealed, and TrkA internalisation inhibited either by clathrin inhibitors or by siRNA inducing downregulation of endogenous clathrin. TrkA internalised receptors were totally degraded in lysosomes, with no recycling phenomenon. Newly synthesized TrkA receptors were thereafter re-expressed at the cell membrane within 10 h. TrkA re-synthesis was inhibited by blockade of clathrin-dependent internalisation, but not of TrkA receptors lysosomal degradation. Finally, we observed that NGF multiple stimulations progressively increased TrkA expression in HASMC, which was associated with an increase in NGF/TrkA-dependent proliferation. In conclusion, we show here the occurrence of clathrin-dependent TrkA internalisation and lysosomal degradation in the airway smooth muscle, followed by upregulated re-synthesis of functional TrkA receptors and increased proliferative effect in the human airway smooth muscle. This may have pathophysiological consequences in airway inflammatory diseases.

  15. Efficient cell-free production of olfactory receptors: detergent optimization, structure, and ligand binding analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Liselotte; Graveland-Bikker, Johanna; Steuerwald, Dirk; Vanberghem, Mélanie; Herlihy, Kara; Zhang, Shuguang

    2008-10-14

    High-level production of membrane proteins, particularly of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in heterologous cell systems encounters a number of difficulties from their inherent hydrophobicity in their transmembrane domains, which frequently cause protein aggregation and cytotoxicity and thus reduce the protein yield. Recent advances in cell-free protein synthesis circumvent those problems to produce membrane proteins with a yield sometimes exceeding the cell-based approach. Here, we report cell-free production of a human olfactory receptor 17-4 (hOR17-4) using the wheat germ extract. Using the simple method, we also successful produced two additional olfactory receptors. To obtain soluble olfactory receptors and to increase yield, we directly added different detergents in varying concentrations to the cell-free reaction. To identify a purification buffer system that maintained the receptor in a nonaggregated form, we developed a method that uses small-volume size-exclusion column chromatography combined with rapid and sensitive dot-blot detection. Different buffer components including salt concentration, various detergents and detergent concentration, and reducing agent and its concentrations were evaluated for their ability to maintain the cell-free produced protein stable and nonaggregated. The purified olfactory receptor displays a typical a alpha-helical CD spectrum. Surface plasmon resonance measurements were used to show binding of a known ligand undecanal to hOR17-4. Our approach to produce a high yield of purified olfactory receptor is a milestone toward obtaining a large quantity of olfactory receptors for designing bionic sensors. Furthermore, this simple approach may be broadly useful not only for other classes of GPCRs but also for other membrane proteins.

  16. A sensitive electrochemiluminescence cytosensor for quantitative evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor expressed on cell surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yanjuan; Zhang, Shaolian; Wen, Qingqing; Huang, Hongxing; Yang, Peihui, E-mail: typh@jnu.edu.cn

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • EGF-cytosensor was used for evaluating EGFR expression level on cell surfaces. • CdSQDs and EGF were coated on magnetic beads (MBs) for ECL-probe. • Good sensitivity was achieved due to the signal amplification of ECL-probe. - Abstract: A sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) strategy for evaluating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression level on cell surfaces was designed by integrating the specific recognition of EGFR expressed on MCF-7 cell surfaces with an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-funtionalized CdS quantum dots (CdSQDs)-capped magnetic bead (MB) probe. The high sensitivity of ECL probe of EGF-funtionalized CdSQD-capped-MB was used for competitive recognition with EGFR expressed on cell surfaces with recombinant EGFR protein. The changes of ECL intensity depended on both the cell number and the expression level of EGFR receptor on cell surfaces. A wide linear response to cells ranging from 80 to 4 × 10{sup 6} cells mL{sup −1} with a detection limit of 40 cells mL{sup −1} was obtained. The EGF-cytosensor was used to evaluate EGFR expression levels on MCF-7 cells, and the average number of EGFR receptor on single MCF-7 cells was 1.35 × 10{sup 5} with the relative standard deviation of 4.3%. This strategy was further used for in-situ and real-time evaluating EGFR receptor expressed on cell surfaces in response to drugs stimulation at different concentration and incubation time. The proposed method provided potential applications in the detection of receptors on cancer cells and anticancer drugs screening.

  17. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Roybal, Kole T; Puchner, Elias M; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A

    2015-10-16

    There is growing interest in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, these engineered T cells can exhibit excessive activity that is difficult to control and can cause severe toxicity. We designed "ON-switch" CARs that enable small-molecule control over T cell therapeutic functions while still retaining antigen specificity. In these split receptors, antigen-binding and intracellular signaling components assemble only in the presence of a heterodimerizing small molecule. This titratable pharmacologic regulation could allow physicians to precisely control the timing, location, and dosage of T cell activity, thereby mitigating toxicity. This work illustrates the potential of combining cellular engineering with orthogonal chemical tools to yield safer therapeutic cells that tightly integrate cell-autonomous recognition and user control. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Roybal, Kole T.; Puchner, Elias M.; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing promise in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, excessive activity and poor control over such engineered T cells can cause severe toxicities. We present the design of “ON-switch” CARs that enable small molecule-control over T cell therapeutic functions, while still retaining antigen specificity. In these split receptors, antigen binding and intracellular signaling components only assemble in the presence of a heterodimerizing small molecule. This titratable pharmacologic regulation could allow physicians to precisely control the timing, location, and dosage of T cell activity, thereby mitigating toxicity. This work illustrates the potential of combining cellular engineering with orthogonal chemical tools to yield safer therapeutic cells that tightly integrate both cell autonomous recognition and user control. PMID:26405231

  19. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guescini, M.; Leo, G.; Genedani, S.; Carone, C.; Pederzoli, F.; Ciruela, F.; Guidolin, D.; Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K.; Agnati, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A 2A and D 2 receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D 2 R-CFP or A 2A R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D 2 R-CFP and A 2A R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A 2A R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A 2A receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A 2A Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A 2A receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  20. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guescini, M. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino (Italy); Leo, G.; Genedani, S. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); Carone, C. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); IRCCS San Camillo Lido, Venezia (Italy); Pederzoli, F. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ciruela, F. [Departament Patologia i Terapeutica Experimental, Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Guidolin, D. [Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology, University of Padua (Italy); Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino (Italy); Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K. [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Agnati, L.F., E-mail: luigiagnati@tin.it [IRCCS San Camillo Lido, Venezia (Italy)

    2012-03-10

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A{sub 2A} and D{sub 2} receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D{sub 2}R-CFP or A{sub 2A}R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D{sub 2}R-CFP and A{sub 2A}R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A{sub 2A}R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A{sub 2A}Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A{sub 2A} receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  2. Slow receptor dissociation kinetics differentiate macitentan from other endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Gatfield

    Full Text Available Two endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs, bosentan and ambrisentan, are currently approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, a devastating disease involving an activated endothelin system and aberrant contraction and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC. The novel ERA macitentan has recently concluded testing in a Phase III morbidity/mortality clinical trial in PAH patients. Since the association and dissociation rates of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists can influence their pharmacological activity in vivo, we used human PASMC to characterize inhibitory potency and receptor inhibition kinetics of macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan using calcium release and inositol-1-phosphate (IP(1 assays. In calcium release assays macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan were highly potent ERAs with K(b values of 0.14 nM, 0.12 nM and 1.1 nM, respectively. Macitentan, but not ambrisentan and bosentan, displayed slow apparent receptor association kinetics as evidenced by increased antagonistic potency upon prolongation of antagonist pre-incubation times. In compound washout experiments, macitentan displayed a significantly lower receptor dissociation rate and longer receptor occupancy half-life (ROt(1/2 compared to bosentan and ambrisentan (ROt(1/2:17 minutes versus 70 seconds and 40 seconds, respectively. Because of its lower dissociation rate macitentan behaved as an insurmountable antagonist in calcium release and IP(1 assays, and unlike bosentan and ambrisentan it blocked endothelin receptor activation across a wide range of endothelin-1 (ET-1 concentrations. However, prolongation of the ET-1 stimulation time beyond ROt(1/2 rendered macitentan a surmountable antagonist, revealing its competitive binding mode. Bosentan and ambrisentan behaved as surmountable antagonists irrespective of the assay duration and they lacked inhibitory activity at high ET-1 concentrations. Thus, macitentan is a competitive

  3. Testosterone increases renal anti-aging klotho gene expression via the androgen receptor-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Che; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lin, Shih-Hua; Ka, Shuk-Man; Chen, Ann; Shih, Meng-Fu; Hsu, Yu-Juei

    2014-12-01

    Gender is known to be associated with longevity and oestrogen administration induced longevity-associated gene expression is one of the potential mechanisms underlying the benefits of oestrogen on lifespan, whereas the role of testosterone in the regulation of longevity-associated gene expressions remains largely unclear. The klotho gene, predominantly expressed in the kidney, has recently been discovered to be an aging suppressor gene. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory effects of testosterone on renal klotho gene expression in vivo and in vitro. In testosterone-administered mouse kidney and NRK-52E cells, increased klotho expression was accompanied by the up-regulation of the nuclear androgen receptor (AR). Overexpression of AR enhanced the expression of klotho mRNA and protein. Conversely, testosterone-induced klotho expression was attenuated in the presence of flutamide, an AR antagonist. A reporter assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated that AR directly binds to the klotho promoter via androgen response elements (AREs) which reconfirmed its importance for AR binding via the element mutation. In summary, our study demonstrates that testosterone up-regulates anti-aging klotho together with AR expression in the kidney in vivo and in vitro by recruiting AR on to the AREs of the klotho promoter.

  4. The putative imidazoline receptor agonist, harmane, promotes intracellular calcium mobilisation in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Paul E; Hills, Claire E; Rogers, Gareth J; Garland, Patrick; Farley, Sophia R; Morgan, Noel G

    2004-10-06

    beta-Carbolines (including harmane and pinoline) stimulate insulin secretion by a mechanism that may involve interaction with imidazoline I(3)-receptors but which also appears to be mediated by actions that are additional to imidazoline receptor agonism. Using the MIN6 beta-cell line, we now show that both the imidazoline I(3)-receptor agonist, efaroxan, and the beta-carboline, harmane, directly elevate cytosolic Ca(2+) and increase insulin secretion but that these responses display different characteristics. In the case of efaroxan, the increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) was readily reversible, whereas, with harmane, the effect persisted beyond removal of the agonist and resulted in the development of a repetitive train of Ca(2+)-oscillations whose frequency, but not amplitude, was concentration-dependent. Initiation of the Ca(2+)-oscillations by harmane was independent of extracellular calcium but was sensitive to both dantrolene and high levels (20 mM) of caffeine, suggesting the involvement of ryanodine receptor-gated Ca(2+)-release. The expression of ryanodine receptor-1 and ryanodine receptor-2 mRNA in MIN6 cells was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and, since low concentrations of caffeine (1 mM) or thimerosal (10 microM) stimulated increases in [Ca(2+)](i), we conclude that ryanodine receptors are functional in these cells. Furthermore, the increase in insulin secretion induced by harmane was attenuated by dantrolene, consistent with the involvement of ryanodine receptors in mediating this response. By contrast, the smaller insulin secretory response to efaroxan was unaffected by dantrolene. Harmane-evoked changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) were maintained by nifedipine-sensitive Ca(2+)-influx, suggesting the involvement of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channels. Taken together, these data imply that harmane may interact with ryanodine receptors to generate sustained Ca(2+)-oscillations in pancreatic beta-cells and that this effect

  5. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. ► Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. ► Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers – this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre-treatment with anti-MMP1 antibody. This study contributes to understanding

  6. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  7. Clarifying CB2 Receptor-Dependent and Independent Effects of THC on Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sarafian, Theodore; Montes, Cindy; Harui, Airi; Beedanagari, Sudheer R.; Kiertscher, Sylvia; Stripecke, Renata; Hossepian, Derik; Kitchen, Christina; Kern, Rita; Belperio, John; Roth, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Marijuana smoking is associated with a number of abnormal findings in the lungs of habitual smokers. Previous studies revealed that Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) caused mitochondrial injury in primary lung epithelial cells and in the cell line, A549 (Sarafian et al., 2003; Sarafian et al., 2005). The role of cannabinoid receptors in this injury was unclear, as was the potential impact on cell function. In order to investigate these questions, A549 cells were engineered to over-express the typ...

  8. Regulation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, receptors by [3H]-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in cultured cells (T-47D): evidence for receptor upregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, T.A.; Horst, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The authors examined the effect of 1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 on receptor concentration in cultured cells (T-47D). Two days prior to experiment, cells were fed with RPMI 1640 + 10% serum and 24-32 hours prior to experiment the media was replaced with RPMI 1640 + 25 mM Hepes + 1% serum. [ 3 H]-1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 +/- 100-fold molar excess cold hormone was used to treat the cells. Occupied receptors were measured in freshly prepared cytosols. Total receptors were measured following a 16-hour incubation of cytosols in the presence of 0.6 nM [ 3 H]-1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 +/- 100-fold molar excess of cold hormone at 4 0 C. Treatment of cell cultures for 16-18 hours with 0.5-1.0 nM [ 3 H]-1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 resulted in a 30-40% receptor occupancy by the hormone and a 2- to 3-fold increase in total cell receptor as compared to vehicle-treated controls. Time course studies showed a rapid increase in total receptors up to 16 hours post-treatment in the face of declining receptor occupancy. Actinomycin D blocked the [ 3 H]-1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 -dependent rise in cell receptor. The physiological significance of this receptor upregulation is not known nor is it known whether upregulation results from synthesis of new receptors and/or is the result of the activation of preformed receptors by a inducible activator protein

  9. MR1-restricted MAIT cells display ligand discrimination and pathogen selectivity through distinct T cell receptor usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gold, Marielle C.; McLaren, James E.; Reistetter, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) that detects microbial metabolites presented by the nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-like molecule MR1. The highly conserved nature of MR1 in conjunction with biased MAIT TCRα chain usa...

  10. Mesenchymal stromal cells engage complement and complement receptor bearing innate effector cells to modulate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Moll

    Full Text Available Infusion of human third-party mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs appears to be a promising therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD. To date, little is known about how MSCs interact with the body's innate immune system after clinical infusion. This study shows, that exposure of MSCs to blood type ABO-matched human blood activates the complement system, which triggers complement-mediated lymphoid and myeloid effector cell activation in blood. We found deposition of complement component C3-derived fragments iC3b and C3dg on MSCs and fluid-phase generation of the chemotactic anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. MSCs bound low amounts of immunoglobulins and lacked expression of complement regulatory proteins MCP (CD46 and DAF (CD55, but were protected from complement lysis via expression of protectin (CD59. Cell-surface-opsonization and anaphylatoxin-formation triggered complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18-mediated effector cell activation in blood. The complement-activating properties of individual MSCs were furthermore correlated with their potency to inhibit PBMC-proliferation in vitro, and both effector cell activation and the immunosuppressive effect could be blocked either by using complement inhibitor Compstatin or by depletion of CD14/CD11b-high myeloid effector cells from mixed lymphocyte reactions. Our study demonstrates for the first time a major role of the complement system in governing the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs and elucidates how complement activation mediates the interaction with other immune cells.

  11. Estrogen receptor α and aryl hydrocarbon receptor independent growth inhibitory effects of aminoflavone in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, Ashley M; Wu, Jiacai; Ersland, Karen; Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) as a potential therapeutic target for several human diseases, including estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positive breast cancer. Aminoflavone (AF), an activator of AhR signaling, is currently undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of solid tumors. Of particular interest is the potential treatment of triple negative breast cancers (TNBC), which are typically more aggressive and characterized by poorer outcomes. Here, we examined AF’s effects on two TNBC cell lines and the role of AhR signaling in AF sensitivity in these model cell lines. AF sensitivity in MDA-MB-468 and Cal51 was examined using cell counting assays to determine growth inhibition (GI 50 ) values. Luciferase assays and qPCR of AhR target genes cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1B1 were used to confirm AF-mediated AhR signaling. The requirement of endogenous levels of AhR and AhR signaling for AF sensitivity was examined in MDA-MB-468 and Cal51 cells stably harboring inducible shRNA for AhR. The mechanism of AF-mediated growth inhibition was explored using flow cytometry for markers of DNA damage and apoptosis, cell cycle analysis, and β-galactosidase staining for senescence. Luciferase data was analyzed using Student’s T test. Three-parameter nonlinear regression was performed for cell counting assays. Here, we report that ERα-negative TNBC cell lines MDA-MB-468 and Cal51 are sensitive to AF. Further, we presented evidence suggesting that neither endogenous AhR expression levels nor downstream induction of AhR target genes CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 is required for AF-mediated growth inhibition in these cells. Between these two ERα negative cell lines, we showed that the mechanism of AF action differs slightly. Low dose AF mediated DNA damage, S-phase arrest and apoptosis in MDA-MB-468 cells, while it resulted in DNA damage, S-phase arrest and cellular senescence in Cal51 cells. Overall, this work provides evidence against the

  12. Human rotavirus specific T cells: quantification by ELISPOT and expression of homing receptors on CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Olga Lucia; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Gonzalez, Rosabel; Perez-Schael, Irene; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.; Angel, Juana

    2003-01-01

    Using an intracellular cytokine assay, we recently showed that the frequencies of rotavirus (RV)-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells secreting INFγ, circulating in RV infected and healthy adults, are very low compared to the frequencies of circulating cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactive T cells in comparable individuals. In children with acute RV infection, these T cells were barely or not detectable. In the present study, an ELISPOT assay enabled detection of circulating RV-specific INFγ-secreting cells in children with RV diarrhea but not in children with non-RV diarrhea without evidence of a previous RV infection. Using microbead-enriched CD4 + and CD8 + T cell subsets, IFNγ-secreting RV-specific CD8 + but not CD4 + T cells were detected in recently infected children. Using the same approach, both CD4 + and CD8 + RV-specific T cells were detected in healthy adults. Furthermore, stimulation of purified subsets of PBMC that express lymphocyte homing receptors demonstrated that RV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells from adult volunteers preferentially express the intestinal homing receptor α4β7, but not the peripheral lymph node homing receptor L-selectin. In contrast, CMV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells preferentially express L-selectin but not α4β7. These results suggest that the expression of homing receptors on virus-specific T cells depends on the organ where these cells were originally stimulated and that their capacity to secrete INFγ is independent of the expression of these homing receptors

  13. In vitro invasion of small-cell lung cancer cell lines correlates with expression of epidermal growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, L; Rude Voldborg, B; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    receptor (EGFR) in a panel of 21 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines. We have previously reported that ten of these cell lines expressed EGFR protein detected by radioreceptor and affinity labelling assays. In 11 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines, EGFR mRNA was detected by Northern blot...... analysis. In vitro invasion in a Boyden chamber assay was found in all EGFR-positive cell lines, whereas no invasion was detected in the EGFR-negative cell lines. Quantification of the in vitro invasion in 12 selected SCLC cell lines demonstrated that, in the EGFR-positive cell lines, between 5% and 16......-PCR). However, in vitro invasive SCLC cell lines could not be distinguished from non-invasive cell lines based on the expression pattern of these molecules. In six SCLC cell lines, in vitro invasion was also determined in the presence of the EGFR-neutralizing monoclonal antibody mAb528. The addition...

  14. Neurotransmitter receptors as signaling platforms in anterior pituitary cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 463, C (2018), s. 49-64 ISSN 0303-7207 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12695S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : pituitary * ligand-gated receptor channels * G protein -coupled receptors * neurotransmitters * action potentials * calcium signaling * hormone secretion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 3.754, year: 2016

  15. CD56 Is a Pathogen Recognition Receptor on Human Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Sabrina; Weiss, Esther; Schmitt, Anna-Lena; Schlegel, Jan; Burgert, Anne; Terpitz, Ulrich; Sauer, Markus; Moretta, Lorenzo; Sivori, Simona; Leonhardt, Ines; Kurzai, Oliver; Einsele, Hermann; Loeffler, Juergen

    2017-07-21

    Aspergillus (A.) fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal mold inducing invasive aspergillosis (IA) in immunocompromised patients. Although antifungal activity of human natural killer (NK) cells was shown in previous studies, the underlying cellular mechanisms and pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) are still unknown. Using flow cytometry we were able to show that the fluorescence positivity of the surface receptor CD56 significantly decreased upon fungal contact. To visualize the interaction site of NK cells and A. fumigatus we used SEM, CLSM and dSTORM techniques, which clearly demonstrated that NK cells directly interact with A. fumigatus via CD56 and that CD56 is re-organized and accumulated at this interaction site time-dependently. The inhibition of the cytoskeleton showed that the receptor re-organization was an active process dependent on actin re-arrangements. Furthermore, we could show that CD56 plays a role in the fungus mediated NK cell activation, since blocking of CD56 surface receptor reduced fungal mediated NK cell activation and reduced cytokine secretion. These results confirmed the direct interaction of NK cells and A. fumigatus, leading to the conclusion that CD56 is a pathogen recognition receptor. These findings give new insights into the functional role of CD56 in the pathogen recognition during the innate immune response.

  16. Phorbol ester induced phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor in intact MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knabbe, C.; Lippman, M.E.; Greene, G.L.; Dickson, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies with a variety of cellular receptors have shown that phorbol ester induced phosphorylation modulates ligand binding and function. In this study the authors present direct evidence that the estrogen receptor in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells is a phosphoprotein whose phosphorylation state can be enhanced specifically by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). Cells were cultured to 6h in the presence of [ 32 P]-orthophosphate. Whole cell extracts were immunoprecipitated with a monoclonal antibody (D58) against the estrogen receptor and subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis. Autoradiography showed a specific band in the region of 60-62 kDa which was significantly increased in preparations from PMA treated cells. Phospho-amino acid analysis demonstrated specific phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues. Cholera toxin or forskolin did not change the phosphorylation state of this protein. In a parallel binding analysis PMA led to a rapid decrease of estrogen binding sites. The estrogen induction of both progesterone receptors and growth in semisolid medium was blocked by PMA, whereas the estrogen induction of the 8kDa protein corresponding to the ps2 gene product and of the 52 kDa protein was not affected. In conclusion, phorbol esters can induce phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor. This process may be associated with the inactivation of certain receptor functions

  17. Histamine receptors in human detrusor smooth muscle cells: physiological properties and immunohistochemical representation of subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Jochen; Weimann, Annett; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Dawood, Waled; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Dorschner, Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    The potent inflammatory mediator histamine is released from activated mast cells in interstitial cystitis (IC). Here, we report on the histamine receptor subtypes involved in the intracellular calcium response of cultured smooth muscle cells (cSMC). Fura-2 was used to monitor the calcium response in cSMC, cultured from human detrusor biopsies. The distribution of histamine receptor subtypes was addressed by immunocytochemistry in situ and in vitro. Histamine stimulated a maximum of 92% of the cells (n=335), being more effective than carbachol (70%, n=920). HTMT (H1R-agonist), dimaprit (H2R) and MTH (H3R) lead to significant lower numbers of reacting cells (60, 48 and 54%). Histamine receptor immunoreactivity (H1R, H2R, H3R, H4R) was found in situ and in vitro. Histamine-induced calcium increase is mediated by distinct histamine receptors. Thus, pre-therapeutic evaluation of histamine receptor expression in IC patients may help to optimize therapy by using a patient-specific cocktail of subtype-specific histamine receptor antagonists.

  18. In silico characterization of functional SNP within the oestrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MAHA REBAÕ

    found that one SNP in 5 UTR may potentially change protein expression level, nine SNPs were found to affect miRNA binding site and 28 SNPs might affect ..... Riancho et al. 2010), breast cancer (Tapper et al. 2008; Ding et al. .... in postmenopausal women: associations with common estrogen receptor alpha polymorphic ...

  19. p75 neurotrophin receptor is involved in proliferation of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscatelli, Ilana; Pierantozzi, Enrico; Camaioni, Antonella; Siracusa, Gregorio [Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, Section of Histology and Embryology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Campagnolo, Luisa, E-mail: campagno@med.uniroma2.it [Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, Section of Histology and Embryology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2009-11-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors are known to play a role in the proliferation and survival of many different cell types of neuronal and non-neuronal lineages. In addition, there is much evidence in the literature showing that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}), alone or in association with members of the family of Trk receptors, is expressed in a wide variety of stem cells, although its role in such cells has not been completely elucidated. In the present work we have investigated the expression of p75{sup NTR} and Trks in totipotent and pluripotent cells, the mouse pre-implantation embryo and embryonic stem and germ cells (ES and EG cells). p75{sup NTR} and TrkA can be first detected in the blastocyst from which ES cell lines are derived. Mouse ES cells retain p75{sup NTR}/TrkA expression. Nerve growth factor is the only neurotrophin able to stimulate ES cell growth in culture, without affecting the expression of stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase, Oct4 and Nanog. Such proliferation effect was blocked by antagonizing either p75{sup NTR} or TrkA. Interestingly, immunoreactivity to anti-p75{sup NTR} antibodies is lost upon ES cell differentiation. The expression pattern of neurotrophin receptors in murine ES cells differs from human ES cells, that only express TrkB and C, and do not respond to NGF. In this paper we also show that, while primordial germ cells (PGC) do not express p75{sup NTR}, when they are made to revert to an ES-like phenotype, becoming EG cells, expression of p75{sup NTR} is turned on.

  20. p75 neurotrophin receptor is involved in proliferation of undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscatelli, Ilana; Pierantozzi, Enrico; Camaioni, Antonella; Siracusa, Gregorio; Campagnolo, Luisa

    2009-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors are known to play a role in the proliferation and survival of many different cell types of neuronal and non-neuronal lineages. In addition, there is much evidence in the literature showing that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75 NTR ), alone or in association with members of the family of Trk receptors, is expressed in a wide variety of stem cells, although its role in such cells has not been completely elucidated. In the present work we have investigated the expression of p75 NTR and Trks in totipotent and pluripotent cells, the mouse pre-implantation embryo and embryonic stem and germ cells (ES and EG cells). p75 NTR and TrkA can be first detected in the blastocyst from which ES cell lines are derived. Mouse ES cells retain p75 NTR /TrkA expression. Nerve growth factor is the only neurotrophin able to stimulate ES cell growth in culture, without affecting the expression of stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase, Oct4 and Nanog. Such proliferation effect was blocked by antagonizing either p75 NTR or TrkA. Interestingly, immunoreactivity to anti-p75 NTR antibodies is lost upon ES cell differentiation. The expression pattern of neurotrophin receptors in murine ES cells differs from human ES cells, that only express TrkB and C, and do not respond to NGF. In this paper we also show that, while primordial germ cells (PGC) do not express p75 NTR , when they are made to revert to an ES-like phenotype, becoming EG cells, expression of p75 NTR is turned on.

  1. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells using specific muscarinic receptor antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeskey, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    In cerebellar granule cell cultures, two muscarinic receptor mediated responses were observed: inhibition of adenylate cyclase (M-AC) and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis (M-PI). These responses were antagonized by three purported specific muscarinic antagonists: pirenzipine and (-)QNX (specific for M-PI) and methoctramine (specific for M-AC). However, the specificity for the three antagonists in blocking these responses is not comparable to the specificity observed in binding studies on these cells or to that quoted in the literature. Two peaks of molecular sizes were found in these cells corresponding to the two molecular sizes of muscarinic receptive proteins reported in the literature. Muscarinic receptive proteins were alkylated with 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard followed by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Pirenzipine and (-)QNX were able to block alkylation of the high molecular size peak, which corresponds to the receptive protein m 3 reported in the literature. Methoctramine was able to block alkylation of a portion of the lower molecular size peak, possibly corresponding to the m 2 and/or m 4 receptive proteins reported in the literature. Studies attempting to show the presence of receptor reserve for either of the two biochemical responses present in these cells by alkylation of the receptive protein with nonradiolabeled propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM) were confounded by specificity of this agent for the lower molecular weight peak of muscarinic receptive protein. Thus the muscarinic receptive proteins coupled to M-AC were alkylated preferentially over the ones coupled to M-PI

  2. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors potentiate receptor tyrosine kinase therapies in bladder cancer cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourn J

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Bourn,1,2 Maria Cekanova1,2 1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; 2UT-ORNL Graduate School of Genome Science and Technology, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA Purpose: Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKIs are used as targeted therapies for patients diagnosed with cancer with highly expressed receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, including the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR and c-Kit receptor. Resistance to targeted therapies is partially due to the activation of alternative pro-survival signaling pathways, including cyclooxygenase (COX-2. In this study, we validated the effects of two RTKIs, axitinib and AB1010, in combination with COX inhibitors on the V-akt murine thymoma oncogene homolog 1 (Akt and COX-2 signaling pathways in bladder cancer cells.Methods: The expression of several RTKs and their downstream signaling targets was analyzed by Western blot (WB analysis in human and canine bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC cell lines. The effects of RTKIs and COX inhibitors in bladder TCC cells were assessed by MTS for cell viability, by Caspase-3/7 and Annexin V assay for apoptosis, by WB analysis for detection of COX-2 and Akt signaling pathways, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 levels.Results: All tested TCC cells expressed the c-Kit and PDGFRα receptors, except human 5637 cells that had low RTKs expression. In addition, all tested cells expressed COX-1, COX-2, Akt, extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2, and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhance of activated B cells proteins, except human UM-UC-3 cells, where no COX-2 expression was detected by WB analysis. Both RTKIs inhibited cell viability and increased apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in tested bladder TCC cells, which positively correlated with their expression levels of the PDGFRα and c

  3. Neomycin is a platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) antagonist that allows discrimination of PDGF alpha- and beta-receptor signals in cells expressing both receptor types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassbotn, F S; Ostman, A; Siegbahn, A; Holmsen, H; Heldin, C H

    1992-08-05

    The aminoglycoside neomycin has recently been found to affect certain platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) responses in C3H/10T1/2 C18 fibroblasts. Using porcine aortic endothelial cells transfected with PDGF alpha- or beta-receptors, we explored the possibility that neomycin interferes with the interaction between the different PDGF isoforms and their receptors. We found that neomycin (5 mM) inhibited the binding of 125I-PDGF-BB to the alpha-receptor with only partial effect on the binding of 125I-PDGF-AA; in contrast, the binding of 125I-PDGF-BB to the beta-receptor was not affected by the aminoglycoside. Scatchard analyses showed that neomycin (5 mM) decreased the number of binding sites for PDGF-BB on alpha-receptor-expressing cells by 87%. Together with cross-competition studies with 125I-labeled PDGF homodimers, the effect of neomycin indicates that PDGF-AA and PDGF-BB bind to both common and unique structures on the PDGF alpha-receptor. Neomycin specifically inhibited the autophosphorylation of the alpha-receptor by PDGF-BB, with less effect on the phosphorylation induced by PDGF-AA and no effect on the phosphorylation of the beta-receptor by PDGF-BB. Thus, neomycin is a PDGF isoform- and receptor-specific antagonist that provides a possibility to compare the signal transduction pathways of alpha- and beta-receptors in cells expressing both receptor types. This approach was used to show that activation of PDGF beta-receptors by PDGF-BB mediated a chemotactic response in human fibroblasts, whereas activation of alpha-receptors by the same ligand inhibited chemotaxis.

  4. Expression and autoregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor mRNA in small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Spang-Thomsen, M; Poulsen, H S

    1996-01-01

    In small-cell lung cancer cell lines resistance to growth inhibition by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, was previously shown to correlate with lack of TGF-beta receptor I (RI) and II (RII) proteins. To further investigate the role of these receptors, the expression of mRNA for RI, RII...... and beta-glycan (RIII) was examined. The results showed that loss of RII mRNA correlated with TGF-beta 1 resistance. In contrast, RI-and beta-glycan mRNA was expressed by all cell lines, including those lacking expression of these proteins. According to Southern blot analysis, the loss of type II m......RNA was not due to gross structural changes in the gene. The effect of TGF-beta 1 on expression of TGF-beta receptor mRNA (receptor autoregulation) was examined by quantitative Northern blotting in four cell lines with different expression of TGF-beta receptor proteins. In two cell lines expressing all three TGF...

  5. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miwa, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism

  6. Targeting CB2-GPR55 Receptor Heteromers Modulates Cancer Cell Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Andradas, Clara; Medrano, Mireia; Caffarel, María M.; Pérez-Gómez, Eduardo; Blasco-Benito, Sandra; Gómez-Cañas, María; Pazos, M. Ruth; Irving, Andrew J.; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I.; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Guzmán, Manuel; McCormick, Peter J.; Sánchez, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptors CB2 (CB2R) and GPR55 are overexpressed in cancer cells and human tumors. Because a modulation of GPR55 activity by cannabinoids has been suggested, we analyzed whether this receptor participates in cannabinoid effects on cancer cells. Here we show that CB2R and GPR55 form heteromers in cancer cells, that these structures possess unique signaling properties, and that modulation of these heteromers can modify the antitumoral activity of cannabinoids in vivo. These findings unveil the existence of previously unknown signaling platforms that help explain the complex behavior of cannabinoids and may constitute new targets for therapeutic intervention in oncology. PMID:24942731

  7. The P2X7 receptor regulates cell survival, migration and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannuzzo, Andrea; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Novak, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    of the ATP receptors, the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) could be an important player in PDAC behaviour. METHODS: We determined the expression (real time PCR and Western blot) and localization (immunofluorescence) of P2X7R in human PDAC cell lines (AsPC-1, BxPC-3, Capan-1, MiaPaCa-2, Panc-1) and a "normal" human...

  8. Expression of the α2-macroglobulin receptor on human neoplastic fibroblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grofova, M.; Matoska, J.; Bies, J.; Bizik, J.; Vaheri, A.

    1995-01-01

    The α 2 -macroglobulin membrane-associated receptor ( α 2 MR) has been previously detected on hepatocytes, fibroblast, macrophages, syncytiotrophoblasts and recently on human malignant blood cells of myelomonocytic leukemia. In cells growing in vitro from human germ cell tumors α 2 MR mRNA was detected by Northern blotting. Endocytosis of α 2 MR from culture medium was detected in these cells by indirect immunofluorescence. In cell extracts α 2 MR and its degradation products were detected by immunoblotting. The cells expressing α 2 MR and internalizing α 2 MR were identified as fibroblast both by their morphology and expression of vimentin intermediate filaments. The role and function of α 2 MR receptor in the analyzed neoplastic cells of teratomatous origin is discussed. (author)

  9. Exploiting natural killer group 2D receptors for CAR T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, Benjamin; Cook, W James; Murad, Joana; Graber, David J; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Lonez, Caroline; Gilham, David E; Sentman, Charles L; Agaugue, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are genetically engineered proteins that combine an extracellular antigen-specific recognition domain with one or several intracellular T-cell signaling domains. When expressed in T cells, these CARs specifically trigger T-cell activation upon antigen recognition. While the clinical proof of principle of CAR T-cell therapy has been established in hematological cancers, CAR T cells are only at the early stages of being explored to tackle solid cancers. This special report discusses the concept of exploiting natural killer cell receptors as an approach that could broaden the specificity of CAR T cells and potentially enhance the efficacy of this therapy against solid tumors. New data demonstrating feasibility of this approach in humans and supporting the ongoing clinical trial are also presented.

  10. Putative thyroid hormone receptors in red blood cells of some reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C C; Chiu, K W

    1987-06-01

    Putative triiodothyronine (T3) receptors have been detected in the nuclei of red blood cells (RBC) in a number of reptile species. The binding characteristics of T3 receptors in vitro were dissociation constant (Kd) 9.1 to 28.58, 36.8 and 40, and 11.12 and 11.36 pM, and binding capacity (Bmax) 0.12 to 0.37, 0.17 and 0.24, and 0.19 and 0.28 fmol per million cells in the rat snake (Ptyas korros), soft-shelled turtle (Trionyx sinensis), and tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), respectively. These data were obtained in all species using in vitro incubation of whole cell according to current receptor studies on living cells. With modified technique in subsequent experiments, these values of the binding characteristics were seemingly low. The discrepancy was ascribed to the assessment of "free" fraction of hormone which would be used in subsequent calculation.

  11. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications. PMID:27519944

  12. Expression of the growth hormone receptor gene in insulin producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Annette; Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) plays a dual role in glucose homeostasis. On the one hand, it exerts an insulin antagonistic effect on the peripheral tissue, on the other hand, it stimulates insulin biosynthesis and beta-cell proliferation. The expression of GH-receptors on the rat insulinoma cell line RIN-5...

  13. Toll-like receptors in the pathogenesis of human B cell malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isaza-Correa, Johana M.; Liang, Zheng; van den Berg, Anke; Diepstra, Arjan; Visser, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important players in B-cell activation, maturation and memory and may be involved in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas. Accumulating studies show differential expression in this heterogeneous group of cancers. Stimulation with TLR specific ligands, or agonists of

  14. T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute, Surgery Branch, Tumor Immunology Section, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize T Cells Attacking Cancer: T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen

  15. Effects of estradiol and progestogens on human breast cells: Regulation of sex steroid receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Ping Chen

    2013-09-01

    Conclusions: The combination of E2 and various progestogens resulted in diverging effects on ERs and PRs expressions, which induced different effects on MCF-7 cell growth. Compared with P4, aberrant hormone and biological activity of synthetic progestin, by way of altered receptor expression, may be an important factor in affecting breast cell growth.

  16. Cell-cell adhesion mediated by binding of membrane-anchored transforming growth factor α to epidermal growth factor receptors promotes cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anklesaria, P.; Greenberger, J.S.; Teixido, J.; Laiho, M.; Massague, J.; Pierce, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    The precursor for transforming growth factor α, pro-TGF-α, is a cell surface glycoprotein that can establish contact with epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors on adjacent cells. To examine whether the pro-TGF-α/EGF receptor pair can simultaneously mediate cell adhesion and promote cell proliferation, the authors have expressed pro-TGF-α in a bone marrow stromal cell line labeled with [ 35 S] cysteine. Expression of pro-TGF-α allows these cells to support long-term attachment of an EGF/interleukin-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line that expresses EGF receptors but is unable to adhere to normal stroma. This interaction is inhibited by soluble EGF receptor ligands. Further, the hematopoietic progenitor cells replicate their DNA while they are attached to the stromal cell layer and become foci of sustained cell proliferation. Thus, pro-TGF-α and the EGF receptor can function as mediators of intercellular adhesion and this interaction may promote a mitogenic response. They propose the term juxtacrine to designate this form of stimulation between adjacent cells

  17. The effects of black cohosh on the regulation of estrogen receptor (ERα) and progesterone receptor (PR) in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyd, Monica; Lloyd, Victoria; Hallman, Kelly; Aleck, Katie; Mladenovik, Viktoria; McKee, Christina; Morse, Mia; Bedgood, Tyler; Dinda, Sumi

    2018-01-01

    The North American plant Cimicifuga racemosa , also known as black cohosh (BC), is a herb that recently has gained attent