WorldWideScience

Sample records for nutritional deficiencies chronic

  1. Nutrition treatment of deficiency and malnutrition in chronic pancreatitis: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2010-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis results in exocrine and endocrine dysfunction, affecting normal digestion and absorption of nutrients. In individuals with chronic pancreatitis, nutrition status may be further affected by poor dietary intake, often related to alcoholism. However, some deficiencies may be overlooked, potentially leading to nutrition-related problems with bone health and fatigue. The aim of this article is to describe the deficiencies that occur and to propose an evidence-based algorithm for the nutrition assessment and treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  2. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  3. Syndromes associated with nutritional deficiency and excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Melinda; Yan, Albert C

    2010-01-01

    Normal functioning of the human body requires a balance between nutritional intake and metabolism, and imbalances manifest as nutritional deficiencies or excess. Nutritional deficiency states are associated with social factors (war, poverty, famine, and food fads), medical illnesses with malabsorption (such as Crohn disease, cystic fibrosis, and after bariatric surgery), psychiatric illnesses (eating disorders, autism, alcoholism), and medications. Nutritional excess states result from inadvertent or intentional excessive intake. Cutaneous manifestations of nutritional imbalance can herald other systemic manifestations. This contribution discusses nutritional deficiency and excess syndromes with cutaneous manifestations of particular interest to clinical dermatologists. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Zinc: physiology, deficiency, and parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Callum

    2015-06-01

    The essential trace element zinc (Zn) has a large number of physiologic roles, in particular being required for growth and functioning of the immune system. Adaptive mechanisms enable the body to maintain normal total body Zn status over a wide range of intakes, but deficiency can occur because of reduced absorption or increased gastrointestinal losses. Deficiency impairs physiologic processes, leading to clinical consequences that include failure to thrive, skin rash, and impaired wound healing. Mild deficiency that is not clinically overt may still cause nonspecific consequences, such as susceptibility to infection and poor growth. The plasma Zn concentration has poor sensitivity and specificity as a test of deficiency. Consequently, diagnosis of deficiency requires a combination of clinical assessment and biochemical tests. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) are susceptible to Zn deficiency and its consequences. Nutrition support teams should have a strategy for assessing Zn status and optimizing this by appropriate supplementation. Nutrition guidelines recommend generous Zn provision from the start of PN. This review covers the physiology of Zn, the consequences of its deficiency, and the assessment of its status, before discussing its role in PN. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. Nutritional Deficiency in Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Sciatti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Although evidence-based treatments have substantially improved outcomes, prognosis remains poor with high costs for health care systems. In patients with HF, poor dietary behaviors are associated with unsatisfactory quality of life and adverse outcome. The HF guidelines have not recommended a specific nutritional strategy. Despite the role of micronutrient deficiency, it has been extensively studied, and data about the efficacy of supplementation therapy in HF are not supported by large randomized trials and there is limited evidence regarding the outcomes. The aim of the present review is to analyze the state-of-the-art of nutritional deficiencies in HF, focusing on the physiological role and the prognostic impact of micronutrient supplementation.

  6. Iodine deficiency and nutrition in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manousou, Sofia; Dahl, Lisbeth; Heinsbaek Thuesen, Betina

    2017-01-01

    Iodine nutrition is a result of geological conditions, iodine fortification and monitoring strategies within a country together with the dietary habits of the population. This review summarizes the basis for the current iodine situation in the Scandinavian countries in order to identify gaps...... strategies have been used in Scandinavia to improve iodine nutrition. The major source of iodine is iodized salt in Sweden and from milk and dairy products in Norway. In Denmark, drinking water, milk, dairy products and iodized salt used in commercial production of bread are the important sources of iodine....... The current iodine status in Scandinavia is not optimal and action is ongoing to increase iodination in Denmark, where there is mild iodine deficiency in the general population. Data from all three countries indicate insufficient iodine nutrition during pregnancy and there is a need for data from children...

  7. Clinical Aspects of Trace Elements: Zinc in Human Nutrition – Zinc Deficiency and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Pluhator

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Available evidence suggests that trace elements, such as zinc, once thought to have no nutritional relevance, are possibly deficient in large sections of the human population. Conditioned deficiencies have been reported to result from malabsorption syndromes, acrodermatitis enteropathica, alcoholism, gastrointestinal disease, thermal injury, chronic diseases (eg, diabetes, sickle cell anemia, and in total parenteral nutrition therapy. Awareness that patients with these problems are at risk has led health professionals to focus increasingly on the importance of zinc therapy in the prevention and treatment of deficiency. More recently zinc toxicity and its role in human nutrition and well-being have come under investigation. Reports have focused on the role of zinc toxicity in causes of copper deficiency, changes in the immune system and alterations in blood lipids. As the numerous challenges presented by the study of zinc in human nutrition are met, more appropriate recommendations for dietary and therapeutic zinc intake are being made.

  8. Nutritional deficiency in general practice: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, van C.A.M.; Laar, van de F.A.; Weel, van C.; Staveren, van W.A.; Binsbergen, van J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Nutritional deficiency is an independent risk factor for mortality. Despite its clinical relevance, the prevalence in a primary care setting is poorly documented. We performed a systematic review of reported prevalence and clinical assessment of nutritional deficiency in general practice.

  9. Severe Hypothyroidism From Iodine Deficiency Associated With Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golekoh, Marjorie C; Cole, Conrad R; Jones, Nana-Hawa Yayah

    2016-11-01

    Parenteral nutrition is crucial for supply of nutrients in children who cannot tolerate a full enteral diet. In the United States, it is not standard of care to give iodine to children dependent on parenteral nutrition, hence iodine is not routinely included in the micronutrient package. Herein, we present a case of a boy with hypothyroidism secondary to iodine deficiency after prolonged exclusive use of parenteral nutrition. Our case highlights the importance of screening for iodine deficiency and administering timely iodine supplementation in these at-risk children to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  10. Iron deficiency and overload in relation to nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg MQI; Jansen EHJM; LEO

    2000-01-01

    Nutritional iron intake in the Netherlands has been reviewed with respect to both iron deficiency and iron overload. In general, iron intake and iron status in the Netherlands are adequate and therefore no change in nutrition policy is required. The following aspects and developments, however, need

  11. Growth failure and nutrition considerations in chronic childhood wasting diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Ursula G; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Coss-Bu, Jorge A

    2015-04-01

    Growth failure is a common problem in many children with chronic diseases. This article is an overview of the most common causes of growth failure/growth retardation that affect children with a number of chronic diseases. We also briefly review the nutrition considerations and treatment goals. Growth failure is multifactorial in children with chronic conditions, including patients with cystic fibrosis, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, human immunodeficiency virus, inflammatory bowel disease, short bowel syndrome, and muscular dystrophies. Important contributory factors to growth failure include increased energy needs, increased energy loss, malabsorption, decreased energy intake, anorexia, pain, vomiting, intestinal obstruction, and inflammatory cytokines. Various metabolic and pathologic abnormalities that are characteristic of chronic diseases further lead to significant malnutrition and growth failure. In addition to treating disease-specific abnormalities, treatment should address the energy and protein deficits, including vitamin and mineral supplements to correct deficiencies, correct metabolic and endocrinologic abnormalities, and include long-term monitoring of weight and growth. Individualized, age-appropriate nutrition intervention will minimize the malnutrition and growth failure seen in children with chronic diseases. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. Prevalence of nutritional deficiency in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Gomes Nunes Piva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of nutritional deficiency among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study using data obtained from the Brazilian Case Registry Database and from the medical records of patients diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (15-59 years of age residing in one of the municipalities that make up the 16th Regional Health District of the state of Bahia. We calculated the incidence, lethality, and mortality rates, as well as the prevalence of nutritional deficiency, as evaluated by body mass index. Demographic, social, clinical, and epidemiological data were collected. RESULTS: Of the 72 confirmed cases of tuberculosis, 59 (81.9% were in males, and 21 (29.2% of the patients were in the 40-49 year age bracket. The majority (85.3% described themselves as Mulatto or Black; 55.2% reported using alcohol; and approximately 90% were treated as outpatients. In the district and age bracket studied, the incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis was 30.6/100,000 population. Among the 72 patients, data regarding nutritional status was available for 34. Of those, 50% and 25%, respectively, presented nutritional deficiency at the beginning and at the end of treatment. No statistically significant differences were found between normal-weight and malnourished patients regarding the characteristics studied. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of nutritional deficiency was high among our sample of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. This underscores the importance of nutritional follow-up for the assessment of tuberculosis treatment in the decision-making process regarding therapeutic interventions.

  13. Dietary pattern and nutritional deficiencies among urban adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrigen Kr. Deka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adolescents are considered to be a nutritionally vulnerable segment of the population. There is a greater need to look into the nutritional status of adolescents but unfortunately, precise estimates of their dietary intake, dietary practices as well as nutritional deficiencies have been the least explored area. The general objective for conducting this study was to assess the dietary pattern and nutritional deficiencies among adolescents. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among adolescents in schools and colleges in the urban areas of Jhansi district in Uttar Pradesh. The study sample consisted of 400 school children in the age group of 10-19 years. Food consumption of the subjects was assessed using a 3-day food intake recall method. Results: Mean age of the adolescents was 14.16 years. More than half of the children studied had malnutrition (53.5%. Mean intake of calorie, protein, fat, iron, and vitamins A and C were lower than the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs. The habitual dietary pattern indicated poor consumption of milk, liver, and leafy vegetables. In comparison to boys (31.5%, more girls (46% were underweight. On seeing the association, nutritional status of these adolescents within the normal limits were found to be significantly higher in those from nuclear families (P < 0.001, those with better educated parents (P < 0.000, and those from families of higher socioeconomic status (P < 0.000. Conclusion: Overall, among the participants, there were both macro- and micronutrients deficiencies. Therefore, there is a need to encourage people to adopt small family norms, and a need for the sensitization of both adolescents and their parents through health and nutrition education (HNE to improve the health and nutritional status of the adolescents.

  14. Myeloid Neoplasms in the Guise of Nutritional Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Veda

    2012-01-01

    The classic BCR-ABL-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) which include polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are among the most frequent hematologic neoplasms. Because of their relatively smooth clinical course, it is likely that many of these MPNs actually go undetected. Considering the high prevalence of iron, folic-acid, and vitamin B12 deficiencies in developing countries, their coexistence with MPN can be expected frequently. In such situations where both disorders coexist, MPN is often overlooked. This causes considerable diagnostic delay. In this paper, two cases of PMF and one case of PV where the diagnosis of MPN was delayed for about 3 years are discussed. Presence of concomitant vitamin B12, folate, and iron deficiencies perhaps camouflaged the underlying MPN. Bearing in mind the possibility of MPN, even in the setting of apparent nutritional deficiency and performing a bone marrow evaluation, is the crucial step in unveiling the hidden MPN. PMID:23227377

  15. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Iron Deficiency in Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Yi L; Rashtak, Shahrooz; Kelly, Darlene G; Murray, Joseph A

    2016-08-01

    Iron is not routinely added to parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations in the United States because of the risk of anaphylaxis and concerns about incompatibilities. Studies have shown that iron dextran in non-lipid-containing PN solutions is safe. Data are limited on iron status, prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and efficacy of intravenous iron infusion in long-term home PN (HPN). We aimed to determine the incidence of IDA and to examine the effectiveness of parenteral iron replacement in patients receiving HPN. Medical records of patients receiving HPN at the Mayo Clinic from 1977 to 2010 were reviewed. Diagnoses, time to IDA development, and hemoglobin, ferritin, and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) values were extracted. Response of iron indices to intravenous iron replacement was investigated. Of 185 patients (122 women), 60 (32.4%) were iron deficient. Five patients were iron deficient, and 18 had unknown iron status before HPN. Of 93 patients who had sufficient iron storage, 37 had IDA development after a mean of 27.2 months (range, 2-149 months) of therapy. Iron was replaced by adding maintenance iron dextran to PN or by therapeutic iron infusion. Patients with both replacement methods had significant improvement in iron status. With intravenous iron replacement, mean ferritin increased from 10.9 to 107.6 mcg/L (P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  17. Nutritional support of children with chronic liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect that chronic liver disease has on a child's nutritional status and ... even children with less severe liver disease require nutritional .... Reduced muscle bulk .... pain and fractures, palpation of the spine and assessment of pubertal stage.

  18. The Importance of Assessing Nutritional Status to Ensure Optimal Recovery during the Chronic Phase of Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Monica C

    2018-01-01

    Despite evidence that many of the consequences of stroke that hinder recovery (i.e., obesity, muscle atrophy, and functional declines) have nutritionally modifiable behavior components, little attention has been focused on the significance of nutrition beyond the acute phase of stroke. This literature review summarizes the evidence for and against the influence of nutrition on optimal recovery and rehabilitation in chronic (>6 months) stroke. The literature, which is mainly limited to cross-sectional studies, suggests that a suboptimal nutritional status, including an excess caloric intake, reduced protein intake, and micronutrient deficiencies, particularly the B-vitamins, vitamin D, and omega 3 fatty acids, may have deleterious effects on metabolic, physical, and psychological functioning in chronic stroke survivors. Careful evaluation of dietary intake, especially among those with eating disabilities and preexisting malnutrition, may aid in the identification of individuals at increased nutritional risk through which early intervention may benefit recovery and rehabilitation and prevent further complications after stroke.

  19. Inflammation and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Juan; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and nutritional imbalance are important comorbid conditions that correlate with poor clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nutritional disorders such as cachexia/protein energy wasting, obesity and growth retardation negatively impact the quality of life and disease progression in children with CKD. Inadequate nutrition has been associated with growth disturbances in children with CKD. On the other hand, over-nutrition and obesity are associated...

  20. Iron deficiency in chronic heart failure : An international pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klip, IJsbrand T.; Comin-Colet, Josep; Voors, Adriaan A.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Enjuanes, Cristina; Banasiak, Waldemar; Lok, Dirk J.; Rosentryt, Piotr; Torrens, Ainhoa; Polonski, Lech; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Meer, Peter; Jankowska, Ewa A.

    Background Iron deficiency (ID) is an emerging problem in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and can be a potential therapeutic target. However, not much is known about the prevalence, predictors, and prognosis of ID in patients with chronic HF. Methods In an international pooled cohort

  1. Nutritional Deficiencies and Sarcopenia in Heart Failure: A Therapeutic Opportunity to Reduce Hospitalization and Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Peter A; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Kazem; Hegazi, Refaat M

    2016-01-01

    There is an expanding prevalence pool of heart failure (HF) due to the increasing prevalence of survivors of myocardial infarction, diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and obesity. There is increasing interest in the role of nutrition in all forms of HF, given observations concerning micro- and macronutrient deficiencies, loss of lean body mass or sarcopenia, and their relationships with hospitalization and death. This review examines the relationships among loss of lean body mass, macro- and micronutrient intake, and the natural history of HF, particularly in the elderly, in whom the risks for all-cause rehospitalization, infection, falls, and mortality are increased. These risks are potentially modifiable through strategies that improve nutrition in this vulnerable population.

  2. Evaluation of Nutritional Status and Hydration in Patients on Chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nutrition and hydration of the dialysis patients have major influences on the outcomes of chronic hemodialysis. Purpose: To characterize the states of nutrition and hydration in patients on chronic hemodialysis at Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH) and to evaluate the usefulness of measurements by ...

  3. Nutrition intervention strategies to combat zinc deficiency in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, R S; Ferguson, E L

    1998-06-01

    . In the future, dietary modification/diversification, although long term, may be the preferred strategy because it is more sustainable, economically feasible, culturally acceptable, and equitable, and can be used to alleviate several micronutrient deficiencies simultaneously, without danger of inducing antagonistic micronutrient interactions. Appropriate dietary strategies include consumption of zinc-dense foods and those known to enhance zinc absorption, reducing the phytic acid content of plant based staples via enzymic hydrolysis induced by germination/fermentation or nonenzymic hydrolysis by soaking or thermal processing. All the strategies outlined above should be integrated with ongoing national food, nutrition and health education programmes, to enhance their effectiveness and sustainability, and implemented using nutrition education and social marketing techniques. Ultimately the success of any approach for combating zinc deficiency depends on strong advocacy, top level commitment, a stable infrastructure, long term financial support and the capacity to control quality and monitor and enforce compliance at the national or regional level. To be cost effective, costs for these strategies must be shared by industry, government, donors and consumers.

  4. Nutrition deficiency increases the risk of stomach cancer mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Li Qing

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study is to determine whether exposure to malnutrition during early life is associated with increased risk of stomach cancer in later life. Methods The design protocol included analyzing the trend of gastric cancer mortality and nutrition and evaluating the association between nutrient deficiency in early life and the risk of gastric cancer by hierarchical age–period–birth cohort (APC analysis using general log-linear Poisson models and to compare the difference between birth cohorts who were exposed to the 1959–1961 Chinese famine and those who were not exposed to the famine. Data on stomach cancer mortality from 1970 to 2009 and the dietary patterns from 1955 to 1985 which included the 1959–1961 Chinese famine period in the Zhaoyuan County population were obtained. The nutrition information was collected 15 years prior to the mortality data as based on the latest reference of disease incubation. Results APC analysis revealed that severe nutrition deficiency during early life may increase the risk of stomach cancer. Compared with the 1960–1964 birth cohort, the risk for stomach cancer in all birth cohorts from 1900 to 1959 significantly increased; compared with the 1970–1974 cohort, the risk for stomach cancer in the 1975–1979 cohort significantly increased, whereas the others had a steadily decreased risk; compared with 85–89 age group in the 2005–2009 death survey, the ORs decreased with younger age and reached significant levels for the 50–54 age group after adjusting the confounding factors. The 1930 to 1964 group (exposed to famine had a higher mortality rate than the 1965 to 1999 group (not exposed to famine. For males, the relative risk (RR was 2.39 and the 95% confidence interval (CI was 1.51 to 3.77. For females, RR was 1.64 and 95% CI was 1.02 to 2.62. Conclusion The results of the present study suggested that prolonged malnutrition during early life may increase the risk of

  5. Nutrition Therapy in Elderly with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minidian Fasitasari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition is an important health element for elderly people and influence aging process. Malnutrition prevalence is increasing in this population. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is one of the chronic diseases in elderly that is related to malnutrition. The association between malnutrition and pulmonary disease (including COPD has been known for a long time. Malnutrition has negative impacts on pulmonary structure, elasticity, and function, strength and endurance of respiratory muscles, pulmonary immunity defense mechanism, and breath control. Inversely, pulmonary disease (including COPD will increase energy need and may reduce dietary intake. Nutrition intervention in COPD patient is intended for regulating anorexia, improving pulmonary function, and controlling weight loss. Nutrient requirements will be calculated according to the results of nutrition assessment. This article will discuss about nutrition therapy in elderly with COPD. It describes respiratory system in aging, association COPD and nutrition, and nutrition assessment, as well as nutrition intervention in elderly people with COPD.

  6. Diagnosis of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrainwala, Jehan; Berns, Jeffrey S

    2016-03-01

    Anemia is a common and clinically important consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is most commonly a result of decreased erythropoietin production by the kidneys and/or iron deficiency. Deciding on the appropriate treatment for anemia associated with CKD with iron replacement and erythropoietic-stimulating agents requires an ability to accurately diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. However, the diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia in CKD patients is complicated by the relatively poor predictive ability of easily obtained routine serum iron indices (eg, ferritin and transferrin saturation) and more invasive gold standard measures of iron deficiency (eg, bone marrow iron stores) or erythropoietic response to supplemental iron. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic utility of currently used serum iron indices and emerging alternative markers of iron stores. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Deficiency and sources of nutrition among an Indian tribal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudipta

    2014-09-01

    This paper is an attempt to explore the relationship between protein consumption and BMI for the adult Santhals, a tribal community of West Bengal, India. For this purpose, a cross sectional sample of 1262 adult Santhals were mea- sured. A high incidence (46.9%) of chronic energy deficiency (CED) is observed. A low production of protein rich food items such as pulses, poultry and fishing within their own economy reveal that the barter system fails to provide enough protein rich food items for the community. Along with this, low income earning opportunities lead to a low consumption of protein rich food and hence a high incidence of undernutrition. The occupational pattern reveals that the Santhals who derive livelihood by the means of hard physical activities are more prone to develop CED. The study suggests that the overdependence on forests and their own economy for consumption needs may not be helping this community in attaining a better health status.

  8. Nutrient deficiencies associated with nutrition-focused physical findings of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radler, Diane Rigassio; Lister, Tracy

    2013-12-01

    Conducting nutrition-focused physical examinations and reporting the findings from the perspective of nutrition status strengthen the practitioner's assessments, interventions, and monitoring. The nutrition-focused physical examination of the oral cavity is particularly useful to identify nutrient deficiencies early and with accuracy as the tissues in the oral mucosa have a turnover rate of nutrition care. The purpose of this article is to discuss the methods of conducting a nutrition-focused oral screening examination and compile and document the evidence regarding the effects of micronutrient deficiencies on the oral mucosa. The information is formatted into a table that can be used as a tool when conducting an oral screening by identifying possible deficiencies based on the observations and other relevant findings. The tool will also guide the practitioner in confirming the physical findings, suggesting interventions to treat the deficiency and how to monitor the outcomes.

  9. Iron deficiency in chronic systolic heart failure(indic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic systolic heart failure (HF is characterized by the left ventricular dysfunction, exercise intolerance and is associated with neurohormonal activation that affects several organs such as kidney and skeletal muscle. Anemia is common in HF and may worsen symptoms. Iron deficiency (ID is also common in HF patients with or without anemia. Iron is the key cofactor in oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle and the Krebs cycle. There is a paucity of data regarding iron metabolism in chronic systolic HF in India. Methods: IroN Deficiency In CHF study (INDIC is an observational study that investigated forty chronic heart failure patients for the presence of ID. Serum ferritin (micrograms per liter, serum iron (micrograms per liter, total iron binding capacity (micrograms per liter, transferring (milligrams per deciliter, and transferrin saturation were measured to assess iron status. Results: There were 67.5% (27/40 patients who had ID with a mean serum ferritin level of 76.4 μg/L. Of the 27 iron deficient patients, 22 (55% had an absolute ID, and 5 had a functional ID. Eight out of 27 of the iron deficient patients were anemic (20% of the total cohort, 30% of the iron deficient patients. Anemia was seen in 6 other patients, which was possibly anemia of chronic disease. There was a trend for more advanced New York Heart Association (NYHA class (NYHA III and NYHA IV patients with ID (37.4% vs. 30.77%, P = 0.697. Conclusion: In our study, ID was very common, affecting more than half of the patients with systolic HF. Absolute ID was the most common cause of ID and patients with ID had a tendency to have advanced NYHA class. Our study also demonstrated that ID can occur in the absence of anemia (iron depletion.

  10. Vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Haye H; Comin-Colet, Josep; Klip, Ijsbrand T; Enjuanes, Cristina; Grote Beverborg, Niels; Voors, Adriaan A; Banasiak, Waldemar; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Bruguera, Jordi; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A; van der Meer, Peter

    2015-02-01

    To determine the prevalence, clinical correlates and the effects on outcome of vitamin B12 and folic acid levels in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). We studied an international pooled cohort comprising 610 patients with chronic HF. The main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. Mean age of the patients was 68±12 years and median serum N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide level was 1801 pg/mL (IQR 705-4335). Thirteen per cent of the patients had an LVEF >45%. Vitamin B12 deficiency (serum level <200 pg/mL), folate deficiency (serum level <4.0 ng/mL) and iron deficiency (serum ferritin level <100 µg/L, or 100-299 µg/L with a transferrin saturation <20%) were present in 5%, 4% and 58% of the patients, respectively. No significant correlation between mean corpuscular volume and vitamin B12, folic acid or ferritin levels was observed. Lower folate levels were associated with an impaired health-related quality of life (p=0.029). During a median follow-up of 2.10 years (1.31-3.60 years), 254 subjects died. In multivariable proportional hazard models, vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were not associated with prognosis. Vitamin B12 and folate deficiency are relatively rare in patients with chronic HF. Since no significant association was observed between mean corpuscular volume and neither vitamin B12 nor folic acid levels, this cellular index should be used with caution in the differential diagnosis of anaemia in patients with chronic HF. In contrast to iron deficiency, vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were not related to prognosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. The prevalence of malnutrition and fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Sinead N; Smyth, Niamh D; O'Sullivan, Maria; Feehan, Sinead; Ridgway, Paul F; Conlon, Kevin C

    2014-06-01

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis are at risk of malnutrition and nutrient deficiency due to malabsorption, pain, and poor diet. We sought to examine fat-soluble vitamin levels and malnutrition parameters in patients with chronic pancreatitis. In a prospective controlled cohort study, 128 subjects (62 chronic pancreatitis patients and 66 age-/sex-matched controls) were recruited. Body mass index (BMI), handgrip strength (measure of functional capacity), fat stores (triceps skin fold), muscle stores (mid-arm muscle circumference), exocrine function, and serum levels of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E) were measured. Half of patients in the chronic pancreatitis group were overweight or obese, although the mean BMI was lower in patients than in controls (P = .007). Handgrip strength (P = .048), fat stores (P = .000), and muscle stores (P = .001) were lower in patients than in controls. Of the patients, 14.5% and 24.2% were deficient in vitamins A and E, respectively. Nineteen percent of patients had excess serum vitamin A levels. Despite the prevalence of overweight and obesity, patients had lower muscle stores, strength, and abnormal vitamin levels. Detailed nutrition assessment including anthropometry and vitamin status is warranted in chronic pancreatitis.

  12. Nutritional status of older patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia in a chronic versus an acute clinical situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Silvia; Roca, Maria; Costa, Alicia; Arreola, Viridiana; Ortega, Omar; Palomera, Elisabet; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Cabré, Mateu; Clavé, Pere

    2017-08-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a prevalent risk factor for malnutrition (MN) in older patients and both conditions are related to poor outcome. To explore the nutritional status in older patients with OD in a chronic and an acute clinical situation. We examined 95 older (≥70 years) patients with OD associated to chronic neurological diseases or aging, and 23 older patients with OD and acute community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with videofluoroscopy; and 15 older people without OD. We collected nutritional status, measured with the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA ® ), anthropometric measurements, and biochemistry and bioimpedance for body composition. Functional status was assessed with the Barthel index. 1) Taking into consideration patients with OD with chronic conditions, 51.1% presented a MNA ® ≤23.5; 16.7%, sarcopenia and a) reduced visceral and muscular protein compartments and fat compartment; b) muscular weakness c) intracellular water depletion, and d) reduced body weight. Patients with OD and MNA ® ≤23 needed higher levels of nectar viscosity for a safe swallow and had increased oropharyngeal residue at spoon-thick viscosity. 2) Patients with OD and CAP, 69.5%, presented an MNA ® ≤23.5 and 29.4% sarcopenia, the inflammatory response of the pneumonia adding to the more severe depletion in visceral protein and muscular mass. Prevalence of impaired nutritional status (malnutrition risk, and sarcopenia) among older patients with OD associated with either chronic or acute conditions is very high. In patients with OD and chronic diseases, poor nutritional status further impairs OD with an increase in oropharyngeal residue at spoon-thick viscosity. In the acute setting there is inflammation and an additional protein deficiency. These findings will help develop specific products both for OD and nutritional status in each specific clinical situation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights

  13. [Novel technologies for the correction of aftereffects of deficient nutrition in the dietician practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinkova, L N; Efimenko, N V; Topuriia, D I; Dubovoĭ, R M

    2008-01-01

    Deficient nutrition is a common pathological factor encountered in medical practice. We evaluated results of combined intake of Essentuki-Novaya mineral water and Nutridrink artificial food mixture (Nutritia, Holland). Spa and resort therapy based on the use of natural factors and well-balanced nutrition resulted in the marked alleviation of clinical symptoms in patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Simultaneously, the consequences of deficient nutrition in the preceding period were corrected and manifestations of the main pathological syndromes decreased. It is concluded that a short-term course of oral alimentation using food substrate mixtures had beneficial effect on the health state of patients by improving their nutritional status and quality of life.

  14. Assessing nutritional status in children with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Dhawan, Anil

    2005-12-01

    The metabolic changes compounded by anorexia associated with chronic liver disease adversely affect growth in children. In many cases, this requires the administration of artificial nutritional support. It is important in this group of patients that those who are becoming nutritionally depleted are identified quickly and in those receiving artificial nutritional support, the effectiveness is monitored. The current review is an examination of methods available to assess nutritional status. These include anthropometry, methods available in the laboratory and a selection of less commonly used methods undergoing evaluation at research level. A brief discussion accompanies each technique, outlining the limitations of its use in children with chronic liver disease. The review concludes with an outline of how nutritional status should be assessed in this group of children, and suggests further research.

  15. A Deficiency of Nutrition Education and Practice in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Stephen; Agatston, Arthur; Aggarwal, Monica; Aspry, Karen E; Esselstyn, Caldwell B; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Miller, Michael; O'Keefe, James H; Ros, Emilio; Rzeszut, Anne K; White, Beth A; Williams, Kim A; Freeman, Andrew M

    2017-11-01

    Nutrition is one of the foundations of cardiovascular guidelines for risk reduction and treatment. However, little is known about whether cardiologists, cardiology fellows-in-training, and cardiovascular team members have the nutrition education and knowledge necessary to implement these guidelines. The aim of this study was to describe the educational experiences, attitudes, and practices relating to nutrition among cardiovascular professionals. Surveys completed by cardiologists, fellows-in-training, and cardiovascular team members inquired about their personal dietary habits, history of nutrition education, and attitudes regarding nutrition interventions. A total of 930 surveys were completed. Among cardiologists, 90% reported receiving no or minimal nutrition education during fellowship training, 59% reported no nutrition education during internal medicine training, and 31% reported receiving no nutrition education in medical school. Among cardiologists, 8% described themselves as having "expert" nutrition knowledge. Nevertheless, fully 95% of cardiologists believe that their role includes personally providing patients with at least basic nutrition information. The percentage of respondents who ate ≥5 servings of vegetables and fruits per day was: 20% (cardiologists), 21% (fellows-in-training), and 26% (cardiovascular team members). A large proportion of cardiovascular specialists have received minimal medical education and training in nutrition, and current trainees continue to experience significant education and training gaps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of Nutrition Education vs. Non-Nutrition Education Intervention in Improving Awareness Pertaining Iron Deficiency among Anemic Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Hafzan; Wan Daud, Wan Nudri; Ahmad, Zulkifli

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to compare the effect between nutrition education intervention and non-nutrition education intervention on awareness regarding iron deficiency among schooling adolescents in Tanah Merah, one of rural district in Kelantan, Malaysia. This study which was started in year 2010 involved 280 respondents (223 girls, 57 boys, age: 16 yr) from schools in Tanah Merah. The selection criteria were based on hemoglobin level (Hb = 7 - 11.9 g/dL for girls; Hb = 7 - 12.9 g/dL for boys). They were divided into 2 groups. The first group received nutrition education package (Nutrition education, NE), whereas another group was entitled to receive non-nutrition education intervention (Non-Nutrition Education, NNE) (supplement only). Both interventions were implemented for 3 months. The changes in awareness among respondents of both groups were evaluated using multi-choices questionnaire. Nutrition education receiver group (NE) demonstrated improvement in awareness at post-intervention. No substantial improvement was demonstrated by the counterpart group (NNE). Multimedia nutrition education program conducted at school setting was in fact practical and effective in improving awareness on iron deficiency among anemic adolescents.

  17. Effectiveness of Nutrition Education vs. Non-Nutrition Education Intervention in Improving Awareness Pertaining Iron Deficiency among Anemic Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Hafzan Yusoff; Wan Nudri Wan Daud; Zulkifli Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to compare the effect between nutrition education intervention and non-nutrition education intervention on awareness regarding iron deficiency among schooling adolescents in Tanah Merah, one of rural district in Kelantan, Malaysia. Methods: This study which was started in year 2010 involved 280 respondents (223 girls, 57 boys, age: 16 yr) from schools in Tanah Merah. The selection criteria were based on hemoglobin level (Hb = 7 ? 11.9 g/dL for girls; Hb =...

  18. Chronic severe axonal polyneuropathy associated with hyperthyroidism and multivitamin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugie, Kazuma; Umehara, Fujio; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Kumazawa, Aya; Ueno, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is often associated with various neuromuscular disorders, most commonly proximal myopathy. Peripheral nerve involvement in hyperthyroidism is very uncommon and has rarely been reported. We describe a 29-year-old woman with untreated hyperthyroidism who presented with chronic severe axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy. Peripheral nerve involvement developed together with other symptoms of hyperthyroidism 2 years before presentation. She also had anorexia nervosa for the past 6 months, resulting in multivitamin deficiency. Electrophysiological and pathological findings as well as clinical manifestations confirmed the diagnosis of severe axonal polyneuropathy. Anorexia nervosa has been considered a manifestation of untreated hyperthyroidism. We considered hyperthyroidism to be an important causal factor in the polyneuropathy in our patient, although peripheral nerve involvement in hyperthyroidism is rare. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of chronic severe axonal polyneuropathy ascribed to both hyperthyroidism and multivitamin deficiency. Our findings strongly suggest that not only multivitamin deficiency, but also hyperthyroidism can cause axonal polyneuropathy, thus expanding the clinical spectrum of hyperthyroidism.

  19. Androgen deficiency in the aging male and chronic prostatitis: clinical and diagnostic comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spirin Р.V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to study probability, period of development and characteristics of a clinical course of chronic prostatitis against the background of androgen deficiency in the aging male. Materials and methods: The Aging Male Symptoms (AMS rating scale has been applied for androgen deficiency evaluation and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS — for chronic prostatitis evaluation. 57 men with chronic prostatitis in combination with androgen deficiency in the aging male have been examined. Results: It has been concluded that the development of chronic prostatitis against the background of androgen deficiency in the aging male occurs in a shorter time period and about 1.5 times more frequently compared to androgen deficiency in the aging male at the background of chronic prostatitis. The analysis of time periods between the onset of chronic prostatitis symptoms against the background of androgen deficiency in the aging male and androgen deficiency in the aging male symptoms against the background of chronic prostatitis showed that androgen deficiency in the aging male symptoms have been revealed 1-2 years earlier than the onset of chronic prostatitis. The development of androgen deficiency in the aging male against the background of chronic prostatitis has showed a backward tendency. Signs of chronic prostatitis have been more frequently occurred in a period of four-five years earlier the androgen deficiency in the aging male development. Conclusion: The risk of development of chronic prostatitis against the background of androgen deficiency in the aging male during the next two years is actually four times higher in comparison with the development of androgen deficiency in the aging male against the background of chronic prostatitis. According to the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, patients with chronic prostatitis in combination with androgen deficiency in the aging male showed higher degree of severity than

  20. A Program of Nutritional Education in Schools Reduced the Prevalence of Iron Deficiency in Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Nieves García-Casal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to determine the prevalence of iron, folates and retinol deficiencies in school children and to evaluate the changes after an intervention of nutritional education. The project was developed in 17 schools. The sample included 1,301 children (678 males and 623 females. A subsample of 480 individuals, was randomly selected for drawing blood for biochemical determinations before and after the intervention of nutritional education, which included in each school: written pre and post-intervention tests, 6 workshops, 2 participative talks, 5 game activities, 1 cooking course and 1 recipe contest. Anthropometrical and biochemical determinations included weight, height, body-mass index, nutritional status, hematocrit, serum ferritin, retinol and folate concentrations. There was high prevalence of iron (25%, folates (75% and vitamin A (43% deficiencies in school children, with a low consumption of fruit and vegetables, high consumption of soft drinks and snacks and almost no physical activity. The nutritional education intervention produced a significant reduction in iron deficiency prevalence (25 to 14%, and showed no effect on vitamin A and folates deficiencies. There was a slight improvement in nutritional status. This study shows, through biochemical determinations, that nutritional education initiatives and programs have an impact improving nutritional health in school children.

  1. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND IRON-DEFICIENT ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Melnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available 62 chronic heart failure (CHF patients with iron-deficient anemia (IDA were studied. Standard CHF therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, diuretics, cardiac glycosides was accompanied with the correction of iron deficiency by intravenous injection of Venofer and subsequent Ferro-Folgamma prescription (average daily dose of iron 137,75±5mg. After treatment serum iron level increased by 95,5% and hemoglobin level – by 9,8%. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 32,2% and physical activity tolerance – by 47,6%. Before treatment 32 CHF patients with IDA (51,6% had III functional class (FC of CHF according to NYHA and 16 patients (25,8% – IV FC. After treatment I FC was observed in 18 CHF patients (29%, II FC – in 26 patients and only 18 patients demonstrated III FC of CHF.

  2. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND IRON-DEFICIENT ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Melnik

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available 62 chronic heart failure (CHF patients with iron-deficient anemia (IDA were studied. Standard CHF therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, diuretics, cardiac glycosides was accompanied with the correction of iron deficiency by intravenous injection of Venofer and subsequent Ferro-Folgamma prescription (average daily dose of iron 137,75±5mg. After treatment serum iron level increased by 95,5% and hemoglobin level – by 9,8%. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 32,2% and physical activity tolerance – by 47,6%. Before treatment 32 CHF patients with IDA (51,6% had III functional class (FC of CHF according to NYHA and 16 patients (25,8% – IV FC. After treatment I FC was observed in 18 CHF patients (29%, II FC – in 26 patients and only 18 patients demonstrated III FC of CHF.

  3. Evaluation of dose response effects related to nutritional diseases (mineral deficiencies) in ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goksoy, K.; Gucus, A.I.; Morcol, T.

    1986-01-01

    Nutritional diseases (mineral deficiencies) of farm animals are one of the limiting factors in animal production in Turkey. Present knowledge of mineral deficiencies of farm animals is derived from the study of severe deficiency conditions. Examples in sheep are deficiencies of copper in the central area of the Black Sea region and of selenium in the interior of Anatolia. Phosphorus deficiency is becoming the most serious problem in cattle. Outbreaks of wool shedding in sheep in central Anatolia are also becoming more severe. It is also likely that moderate (borderline) mineral deficiencies exist on a large scale. A general overview of trace mineral deficiencies and recent studies carried out to diagnose and correct them with the aid of biochemical and radioisotopic parameters is presented and discussed. (author)

  4. The Status of Iodine Nutrition and Iodine Deficiency Disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Iodine deficiency disorders are serious public health problems in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence and severity of iodine deficiency disorders among school children in Metekel Zone. Methods: A cross-sectional school based descriptive study was conducted between February 2011 ...

  5. The Importance of Assessing Nutritional Status to Ensure Optimal Recovery during the Chronic Phase of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica C. Serra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite evidence that many of the consequences of stroke that hinder recovery (i.e., obesity, muscle atrophy, and functional declines have nutritionally modifiable behavior components, little attention has been focused on the significance of nutrition beyond the acute phase of stroke. Objective. This literature review summarizes the evidence for and against the influence of nutrition on optimal recovery and rehabilitation in chronic (>6 months stroke. Results. The literature, which is mainly limited to cross-sectional studies, suggests that a suboptimal nutritional status, including an excess caloric intake, reduced protein intake, and micronutrient deficiencies, particularly the B-vitamins, vitamin D, and omega 3 fatty acids, may have deleterious effects on metabolic, physical, and psychological functioning in chronic stroke survivors. Conclusions. Careful evaluation of dietary intake, especially among those with eating disabilities and preexisting malnutrition, may aid in the identification of individuals at increased nutritional risk through which early intervention may benefit recovery and rehabilitation and prevent further complications after stroke.

  6. Refractory cytopenias secondary to copper deficiency in children receiving exclusive jejunal nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Amanda E; Kahwash, Samir B; Chawla, Anjulika

    2017-11-01

    Copper deficiency is a known cause of anemia and neutropenia that is easily remedied with copper supplementation. Copper is primarily absorbed in the stomach and proximal duodenum, so patients receiving enteral nutrition via methods that bypass this critical region may be at increased risk for copper deficiency. In pediatrics, postpyloric enteral feeding is increasingly utilized to overcome problems related to aspiration, severe reflux, poor gastric motility, and gastric outlet obstruction. However, little is known about the prevalence of copper deficiency in this population. We describe three pediatric patients receiving exclusive jejunal feeds who developed cytopenias secondary to copper deficiency. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Enteral nutrition in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBellis, Heather F; Fetterman, James W

    2012-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, chronic disease, in which malnutrition can have an undesirable effect. Therefore, the patient's nutritional status is critical for optimizing outcomes in COPD. The initial nutrition assessment is focused on identifying calorically compromised COPD patients in order to provide them with appropriate nutrition. Nutritional intervention consists of oral supplementation and enteral nutrition to prevent weight loss and muscle mass depletion. Evaluation of nutritional status should include past medical history (medications, lung function, and exercise tolerance) and dietary history (patient's dietary habits, food choices, meal patterns, food allergy information, and malabsorption issues), in addition to physiological stress, visceral proteins, weight, fat-free mass, and body mass index. The current medical literature conflicts regarding the appropriate type of formulation to select for nutritional intervention, especially regarding the amount of calories from fat to provide COPD patients. This review article focuses on the enteral product formulations currently available, and how they are most appropriately utilized in patients with COPD.

  8. Nutrition and prevention of chronic diseases: a unifying eco-nutritional strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, M L

    2004-02-01

    Increasing efforts are being made to address, in public health policy (PHP), both the persistence of nutritional deprivation in economically disadvantaged communities, and the increase in so-called "chronic disease" (abdominal obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, osteoporosis, arthritides, and inflammatory disease) in communities at all stages of economic development. The problems in the "chronic disease" descriptor are that its origins may be as early as conception, rather than during the postnatal lifespan, or even in previous generations; it may appear abruptly or slowly; and it may be amenable to environmental and behavioural intervention well into its course and in older age groups. It is also not necessarily "non-communicable", a qualifier often used for "chronic disease" (chronic non-communicable disease or CNCD) and often has inflammatory features, for example the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein is a predictor of macrovascular disease and ischaemic events can, in part, be prevented in the affected by influenzal vaccination. The nexus between immunodeficiency, inflammatory processes and nutritional status which is characteristic of "infective" and food-borne illness, is also more and more evident in "chronic disease". It may be more helpful to consider "chronic disease" as "eco-disease" with its environmental and behavioural contributors, and to regard that which is clearly nutritionally dependent as "eco-nutritional disease".

  9. Nutritional status and nutritional support before and after pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagianni, Vasiliki Th; Papalois, Apostolos E; Triantafillidis, John K

    2012-12-01

    Cachexia, malnutrition, significant weight loss, and reduction in food intake due to anorexia represent the most important pathophysiological consequences of pancreatic cancer. Pathophysiological consequences result also from pancreatectomy, the type and severity of which differ significantly and depend on the type of the operation performed. Nutritional intervention, either parenteral or enteral, needs to be seen as a method of support in pancreatic cancer patients aiming at the maintenance of the nutritional and functional status and the prevention or attenuation of cachexia. Oral nutrition could reduce complications while restoring quality of life. Enteral nutrition in the post-operative period could also reduce infective complications. The evidence for immune-enhanced feed in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer is supported by the available clinical data. Nutritional support during the post-operative period on a cyclical basis is preferred because it is associated with low incidence of gastric stasis. Postoperative total parenteral nutrition is indicated only to those patients who are unable to be fed orally or enterally. Thus nutritional deficiency is a relatively widesoread and constant finding suggesting that we must optimise the nutritional status both before and after surgery.

  10. The story of iodine deficiency: An international challenge in nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetzel, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a risk factor for the growth and development of up to 800 million people living in iodine deficient environments throughout the world. The effects on growth and development, called the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD), comprise goiter, stillbirths and miscarriages, neonatal and juvenile thyroid deficiency, dwarfism, mental defects, deaf mutism, and spastic weakness and paralysis, as well as lesser degrees of loss of physical and mental function. All these effects are due to inadequate thyroid hormone production because iodine is an essential constituent of the thyroid hormone. In the West, IDD has been largely eliminated by the addition of iodine to the diet through iodized salt or through changes in food distribution and technology. IDD still persists in certain areas of Europe where these dietary changes have not occurred. In the Third World, IDD is a major problem in many countries with large populations, such as China, India, Indonesia, Nigeria, and Zaire. In these and other Third World countries, IDD is a significant barrier to social and economic progress which can be removed by correction of the deficiency. This book shows that elimination of iodine deficiency is feasible within the next decade, only requiring a modest financial and technical effort from the West. Part 1 reviews IDD in man and animals. Part 2 discusses the control of iodine deficiency disorders through iodine supplementation, and considers action at the national and international level. Part 3 presents a global review of the status of IDD control. There is a brief conclusion on the way forward to successful control programs.

  11. The story of iodine deficiency: An international challenge in nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetzel, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a risk factor for the growth and development of up to 800 million people living in iodine deficient environments throughout the world. The effects on growth and development, called the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD), comprise goiter, stillbirths and miscarriages, neonatal and juvenile thyroid deficiency, dwarfism, mental defects, deaf mutism, and spastic weakness and paralysis, as well as lesser degrees of loss of physical and mental function. All these effects are due to inadequate thyroid hormone production because iodine is an essential constituent of the thyroid hormone. In the West, IDD has been largely eliminated by the addition of iodine to the diet through iodized salt or through changes in food distribution and technology. IDD still persists in certain areas of Europe where these dietary changes have not occurred. In the Third World, IDD is a major problem in many countries with large populations, such as China, India, Indonesia, Nigeria, and Zaire. In these and other Third World countries, IDD is a significant barrier to social and economic progress which can be removed by correction of the deficiency. This book shows that elimination of iodine deficiency is feasible within the next decade, only requiring a modest financial and technical effort from the West. Part 1 reviews IDD in man and animals. Part 2 discusses the control of iodine deficiency disorders through iodine supplementation, and considers action at the national and international level. Part 3 presents a global review of the status of IDD control. There is a brief conclusion on the way forward to successful control programs

  12. Disaccharidase Deficiencies in Children With Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Chammas, Khalil; Williams, Sara E; Miranda, Adrian

    2017-03-01

    Carbohydrate intolerance or malabsorption has been suggested as a cause of chronic abdominal pain (CAP) in a subset of patients. We aimed to evaluate disaccharidase deficiencies in children with functional CAP and to correlate deficiencies with clinical features. Patients presenting to the gastroenterology clinic at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin with abdominal pain prospectively completed a detailed demographic, history, and symptom questionnaire. The CAP cohort included those with at least 1 month of symptoms. Data on disaccharidase activity and histology of endoscopic biopsies were collected retrospectively. Only patients with normal histology were included in the study. The association between groups with low disaccharidases and clinical features was examined. A total of 203 pediatric patients with CAP were included. The mean (SD) age was 11.5 (3.1) years, and 32.5% were male. The percentages of abnormally low disaccharidase levels using the standard laboratory cutoffs were lactase, 37%; sucrase, 21%; glucoamylase, 25%; and palatinase, 8%. Thirty-nine percent of the patients with low lactase also had low sucrase, and 67% of the patients with low sucrase had low lactase. There was no significant difference in the activities of any of the disaccharidases or sucrase/lactase ratio in relation to age. Also, no association was found between stool consistency, stool frequency, or location of pain and low disaccharidase activity. A large proportion of patients with CAP have deficiencies in disaccharidases. Bowel frequency, vomiting, or location of pain was no different between groups, suggesting that these clinical features cannot be used to predict disaccharidase deficiencies.

  13. Partnership research on nutrition transition and chronic diseases in West Africa - trends, outcomes and impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, Hélène; Agueh, Victoire; Fayomi, Benjamin

    2011-11-08

    Nutrition-related chronic diseases (NRCD) are rising quickly in developing countries, and the nutrition transition is a major contributor. Low-income countries have not been spared. Health issues related to nutritional deficiencies also persist, creating a double burden of malnutrition (DBM). There is still a major shortage of data on NRCD and DBM in Sub-Saharan Africa. A research program has been designed and conducted in partnership with West African institutions since 2003 to determine how the nutrition transition relates to NRCD and the DBM in order to support prevention efforts. In Benin, cross-sectional studies among apparently healthy adults (n=540) from urban, semi-urban and rural areas have examined cardiometabolic risk (hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance) in relation to diet and lifestyle, also factoring in socio-economic status (SES). Those studies were followed by a longitudinal study on how risk evolves, opening the way for mutual aid groups to develop a prevention strategy within an action research framework. In Burkina Faso, a cross-sectional study on the nutritional status and dietary patterns of urban school-age children (n=650) represented the initial stages of an action research project to prevent DBM in schools. A cross-sectional study among adults (n=330) from the capital of Burkina Faso explored the coexistence, within these individuals, of cardiometabolic risk factors and nutritional deficiencies (anemia, vitamin A deficiency, chronic energy deficiency), as they relate to diet, lifestyle and SES. The studies have shown that the prevalence of NRCD is high among the poor, thereby exacerbating social inequalities. The hypothesis of a positive socio-economic (and rural-urban) gradient was confirmed only for obesity, whereas the prevalence of hypertension, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia did not prove to be higher among affluent city dwellers. Women were particularly affected by abdominal obesity, at 48% compared to 6% of

  14. Partnership research on nutrition transition and chronic diseases in West Africa – trends, outcomes and impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayomi Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nutrition-related chronic diseases (NRCD are rising quickly in developing countries, and the nutrition transition is a major contributor. Low-income countries have not been spared. Health issues related to nutritional deficiencies also persist, creating a double burden of malnutrition (DBM. There is still a major shortage of data on NRCD and DBM in Sub-Saharan Africa. A research program has been designed and conducted in partnership with West African institutions since 2003 to determine how the nutrition transition relates to NRCD and the DBM in order to support prevention efforts. Methods In Benin, cross-sectional studies among apparently healthy adults (n=540 from urban, semi-urban and rural areas have examined cardiometabolic risk (hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance in relation to diet and lifestyle, also factoring in socio-economic status (SES. Those studies were followed by a longitudinal study on how risk evolves, opening the way for mutual aid groups to develop a prevention strategy within an action research framework. In Burkina Faso, a cross-sectional study on the nutritional status and dietary patterns of urban school-age children (n=650 represented the initial stages of an action research project to prevent DBM in schools. A cross-sectional study among adults (n=330 from the capital of Burkina Faso explored the coexistence, within these individuals, of cardiometabolic risk factors and nutritional deficiencies (anemia, vitamin A deficiency, chronic energy deficiency, as they relate to diet, lifestyle and SES. Results The studies have shown that the prevalence of NRCD is high among the poor, thereby exacerbating social inequalities. The hypothesis of a positive socio-economic (and rural–urban gradient was confirmed only for obesity, whereas the prevalence of hypertension, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia did not prove to be higher among affluent city dwellers. Women were particularly

  15. Nutritional management of breastfeeding infants for the prevention of common nutrient deficiencies and excesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Soo Moon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding is the best source of nutrition for every infant, and exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months is usually optimal in the common clinical situation. However, inappropriate complementary feeding could lead to a nutrient-deficient status, such as iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, and growth faltering. The recent epidemic outbreak of obesity in Korean children emphasizes the need for us to control children’s daily sedentary life style and their intakes of high caloric foods in order to prevent obesity. Recent assessment of breastfeeding in Korea has shown that the rate is between 63% and 89%; thus, up-to-dated evidence-based nutritional management of breastfeeding infants to prevent common nutrient deficiencies or excesses should be taught to all clinicians and health care providers.

  16. Rural nutrition interventions with indigenous plant foods - a case study of vitamin A deficiency in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu S.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification, propagation, and introduction of a nutritionally rich, indigenous plant species in the existing cropping system are presented in this paper as a method of rural nutrition intervention. A case study of Moringa (Moringa oleifera Lam., Moringaceae, which is a common tree in Malawi and one of the richest sources of vitamin A and vitamin C compared to the commonly consumed vegetables is presented to address the problem of vitamin A deficiency. After a brief review of the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency and the efforts to reduce its incidence in Malawi, Moringa is suggested as a potential solution to the problem. A framework for designing nutrition intervention with Moringa is described for actual implementation. It is argued that attempts to identify, document, and encourage the utilization of nutrient-rich indigenous plants could be cost-effective, and a sustainable method of improving the nutritional status of local populations.

  17. A Program of Nutritional Education in Schools Reduced the Prevalence of Iron Deficiency in Students

    OpenAIRE

    García-Casal, María Nieves; Landaeta-Jiménez, Maritza; Puche, Rafael; Leets, Irene; Carvajal, Zoila; Patiño, Elijú; Ibarra, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of iron, folates and retinol deficiencies in school children and to evaluate the changes after an intervention of nutritional education. The project was developed in 17 schools. The sample included 1,301 children (678 males and 623 females). A subsample of 480 individuals, was randomly selected for drawing blood for biochemical determinations before and after the intervention of nutritional education, which included in each school: written pre and...

  18. Role of calcium deficiency in development of nutritional rickets in Indian children: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Varun; Seth, Anju; Aneja, Satinder; Sharma, Bhawna; Sonkar, Pitamber; Singh, Satveer; Marwaha, Raman K

    2012-10-01

    Nutritional rickets is usually attributed to vitamin D deficiency. Studies from some tropical countries have postulated low dietary intake of calcium as the cause of nutritional rickets. Both vitamin D and dietary calcium deficiency are highly prevalent in India. Information on their relative contribution in the development of rickets in Indian children is limited. The aim was to study the role of calcium and vitamin D deficiency in causation of nutritional rickets in young Indian children. In a case-control study, 67 children with nutritional rickets and 68 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were compared for demographic factors, nutritional status, sun exposure (UV score), dietary calcium and phytate intake (for subjects not breast-fed at presentation), and biochemical parameters [serum calcium, inorganic phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and PTH]. Mean intake of calcium (204±129 vs. 453±234 mg/d; Prickets, significant negative correlations were seen between dietary calcium intake and radiological score (r=-0.28; P=0.03) and PTH (r=-0.26; P=0.02). No correlation was found between serum 25OHD level and radiological score or biochemical parameters of rickets. Rickets develops when low dietary calcium intake coexists with a low or borderline vitamin D nutrition status.

  19. Nutritional management and growth in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Lesley; Jones, Helen

    2013-04-01

    Despite continuing improvements in our understanding of the causes of poor growth in chronic kidney disease, many unanswered questions remain: why do some patients maintain a good appetite whereas others have profound anorexia at a similar level of renal function? Why do some, but not all, patients respond to increased nutritional intake? Is feed delivery by gastrostomy superior to oral and nasogastric routes? Do children who are no longer in the 'infancy' stage of growth benefit from enteral feeding? Do patients with protein energy wasting benefit from increased nutritional input? How do we prevent obesity, which is becoming so prevalent in the developed world? This review will address these issues.

  20. Nutritional deficiencies and overweight prevalence among children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmaya, Yael; Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Leitner, Yael; Reif, Shimon; Gabis, Lidia

    2015-03-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk of developing nutritional deviations. Three to six year old children with ASD were compared to their typically developing siblings and to a typically developing age and gender matched control group, in order to evaluate their intake and body mass index. Nutrient intake was compared to the Dietary Reference Intake using three-day diet diaries completed by the parents. The sum percentage of nutritional deficiencies in the ASD group compared to the typical development group was 342.5% (±122.9%) vs. 275.9% (±106.8%), respectively (P=0.026). A trend toward higher deficiency in the ASD group was observed as compared to the sibling group 363% (±122.9%) vs. 283.2% (±94.7%) (P=0.071). A higher body mass index was found in the ASD group compared to their counterparts, despite their nutritional deficiencies. In conclusion, children with ASD are more likely to suffer from nutritional deficiencies despite higher body mass index. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phosphorus and Nutrition in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio González-Parra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with renal impairment progressively lose the ability to excrete phosphorus. Decreased glomerular filtration of phosphorus is initially compensated by decreased tubular reabsorption, regulated by PTH and FGF23, maintaining normal serum phosphorus concentrations. There is a close relationship between protein and phosphorus intake. In chronic renal disease, a low dietary protein content slows the progression of kidney disease, especially in patients with proteinuria and decreases the supply of phosphorus, which has been directly related with progression of kidney disease and with patient survival. However, not all animal proteins and vegetables have the same proportion of phosphorus in their composition. Adequate labeling of food requires showing the phosphorus-to-protein ratio. The diet in patients with advanced-stage CKD has been controversial, because a diet with too low protein content can favor malnutrition and increase morbidity and mortality. Phosphorus binders lower serum phosphorus and also FGF23 levels, without decreasing diet protein content. But the interaction between intestinal dysbacteriosis in dialysis patients, phosphate binder efficacy, and patient tolerance to the binder could reduce their efficiency.

  2. Nutritional iron deficiency in women of child bearing age - what to do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, T.; Ali, L.; Aziz, T.; Ara, J.; Liaquat, N.; Tahir, H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Iron deficiency is the most common aetiology of anaemia worldwide and has several risk factors. Although iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) can occur at any age, women from reproductive age group are particularly vulnerable to develop IDA due to increased nutritional demand during pregnancy. Objective was to determine the frequency and nutritional risk factor of iron deficiency anaemia in women of child bearing age. This descriptive, cross sectional study was conducted from October 2005 to March 2006 at the Department of Medicine, Ward-5, and out-patients department of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi. Method: Two hundred non-pregnant females of child bearing age were included in the study; 100 with no previous pregnancy and remaining 100 with at least one prior history of pregnancy. All the relevant information, i.e., demographic and socioeconomic was collected through a questionnaire. Results: Two hundred patients with signs and symptoms of anaemia were recruited. Out of them 89 patients were found to be having iron deficiency anaemia in various age groups. Results also showed that dietary habit of patients was one of the causative factors leading to iron deficiency anaemia. Conclusion: To overcome iron deficiency anaemia a thorough and comprehensive strategy is required, i.e., educating the subjects to consume food rich in iron, community based program, monitoring severely anaemic cases and their treatment. (author)

  3. Pharmacological and nutritive support of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and chronic prostatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Bat'ko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The articles presents a view of the pharmacological and nutritive therapy of the most frequent diseases of males, which are benign prostatic hyperplasia and chronic prostatitis. A modern man is in constant deficiency of various biologically active substances, with the lack of them in food and without generating of sufficient quantity of coenzymes and enzymes. In the author,s opinion, complex drugs that contain highquality biological extracts may provide the substances required for prevention and slowing down the progress of benign prostatic hyperplasia and chronic prostatitis to the male organism. Study of biological activity of food supplement Andro-PRO (Russia that contain the elements required for normalization of the functional state of the prostate was performed. Application of the drug favors positive dynamics of clinical symptoms of the studied nosological entities and has restorative effect on the function of the glandular tissue of the prostate. Analysis of modern references, primary results of clinical studies show the necessity of pharmacological and nutritive support of patients with asymptomatic progress of benign prostatic hyperplasia and chronic prostatitis with the drug. Application of drug studied is efficient and safe, which is confirmed with improvement of indicators and life quality assessment, positive clinical dynamics, and absence of side effects. 

  4. Multiple nutritional deficiencies in cerebral palsy compounding physical and functional impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Hariprasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral palsy (CP refers to a spectrum of disorders causing physical and intellectual morbidity. Macro and micro nutrient deficiencies often contribute to the subnormal physical and mental capabilities of them. Objectives: To assess the growth, nutritional status, physical and functional ability and quality of life in cerebral palsy children and to determine any relation with their gross motor and functional capabilities. Method: The study was conducted at a Tertiary Care Centre, with the participants in the age group 1-16 years. A pretested evaluation tool was prepared which included Anthropometric measurements, tests for hemoglobin and Vitamin D estimation, evidence of micronutrient deficiencies, Dietary patterns, Epidemiological factors, Functional assessment using GMFM (Gross Motor Function Measure and FIM (Functional Independent Measurement scales and Quality of life (QOL assessment. The data was statistically analyzed. Results: Out of the 41 children, 30 had quadriplegia, 3 had hemiplegia and 8 had spastic diplegia. 34 (82.9% were severely underweight, 35 (85.4% had severe stunting and 38 (92.7% had severe wasting. Micronutrient deficiencies were noted like vitamin B complex deficiency in 37 (90.2%, vitamin A deficiency in 31 (75.6%, low vitamin D levels in 27 (65.9% and insufficient levels in 9 (22%, severe anemia in 5 (12.2% and moderate anemia in 26 (63.4%.The gross motor and functional scores were suboptimum in the majority of patients and the care givers had significant impairment in the quality of life. Conclusion: Majority of children with cerebral palsy had multiple nutritional deficiencies, gross motor and functional disabilities. QOL of the children and their care givers were suboptimum. A comprehensive package that address dietary intake, correction of micronutrient deficiencies especially anemia and vitamin D deficiency, physical and emotional support is recommended for the wellbeing of the affected children.

  5. Iron deficiency across chronic inflammatory conditions: International expert opinion on definition, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Comin-Colet, Josep; de Francisco, Angel; Dignass, Axel; Doehner, Wolfram; Lam, Carolyn S; Macdougall, Iain C; Rogler, Gerhard; Camaschella, Clara; Kadir, Rezan; Kassebaum, Nicholas J; Spahn, Donat R; Taher, Ali T; Musallam, Khaled M

    2017-10-01

    Iron deficiency, even in the absence of anemia, can be debilitating, and exacerbate any underlying chronic disease, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is frequently concomitant with chronic inflammatory disease; however, iron deficiency treatment is often overlooked, partially due to the heterogeneity among clinical practice guidelines. In the absence of consistent guidance across chronic heart failure, chronic kidney disease and inflammatory bowel disease, we provide practical recommendations for iron deficiency to treating physicians: definition, diagnosis, and disease-specific diagnostic algorithms. These recommendations should facilitate appropriate diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency to improve quality of life and clinical outcomes. © 2017 The Authors American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Iron deficiency anemia in sports and preventive dietetic and nutrition interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritz Urdampilleta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia in athletes is a very common condition that leads to reduced physical performance. Athletes are susceptible of falling iron deposits, mainly by an increase in its use, by its loss, or by insufficient intake. The present review aims to establish the basis of current knowledge environment: sports-athletes who have increased risk of anemia, etiology of iron deficiency anemia in the sporting group, providing dietary and nutritional guidelines for its prevention. The databases searched were Pubmed, Scirus and Scielo, as well as the official pages of prestigious organizations, recovering items by keywords: “iron-deficiency anemia”, “sports”, “athletic performance”, “iron intake “or Spanish counterparts. Iron deficiency anemia affects mainly endurance athletes (especially women and marathon and the members of team sports with high impact (volleyball and handball. Usually secondary anemias from hemolysis and oxidative stress resulting from the practice of sport, but it cases have also been documented by increased iron losses associated with exercise. Dietary and nutritional practices to prevent iron deficiency anemia in athletes should aim to ensure: carbohydrate intake between 60-65% of total energy daily minimum intake of 1.4 g of protein per day and a consumption of 20-40 mg iron daily, separating the intake of the main absorption inhibitors (phytate, tanetos and calcium. You need assessed by analytical iron status of the athlete every 2-3 months.

  7. Lessons to be learned: a case study approach. Vitamin B12 deficiency of nutritional origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, D

    1997-10-01

    The case is presented of a 14 year old boy who developed severe anaemia at the onset of puberty caused by nutritional deficiency of vitamin B12 of about 10 years duration. The dietary intake comprised mainly chips, ice-cream, fruit and Coca-Cola--with small amounts of vitamin B12 from occasional slices of chicken meat. His denial of abnormal nutritional intake, supported by his mother, delayed confirmation of the correct diagnosis. However, the true situation was eventually confessed--and following implementation of a normal diet he rapidly improved clinically, the haemoglobin value rose to normal and he subsequently remained well.

  8. Prevalence of Nutritional Deficiencies in Hair Loss among Indian Participants: Results of a Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Dinesh; Premalatha, V; Imtiyaz, D B

    2017-01-01

    Nutritional deficiencies are known to be associated with hair loss; however, the exact prevalence is not known. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of nutritional deficiencies in participants with hair loss. In this cross-sectional study, 100 enrolled participants were divided into telogen effluvium (TE), male-pattern hair loss (MPHL), and female-pattern hair loss (FPHL) based on the type of hair loss. All participants underwent laboratory estimation for micronutrients and amino acid levels. Participants with hair loss showed varied amino acid and micronutrient deficiencies across all types of hair loss. Nutritional status did not vary much between the types of hair loss. Among the essential amino acids, histidine deficiency was seen in >90% of participants with androgenic alopecia and 77.78% of participants with TE while leucine deficiency was seen 98.15% of participants with TE and 100% with FPHL. Valine deficiency was also very common across alopecia subtypes. Among the nonessential amino acids, alanine deficiency was observed in 91.67% FPHL, 91.18% MPHL, and 90.74% TE. Cysteine deficiency was present in 55.58% and 50% of participants with MPHL and TE, respectively. A relatively higher proportion of participants with TE had iron deficiency compared to androgenic alopecia ( P = 0.069). Zinc deficiency was seen in 11.76% of participants with MPHL while copper deficiency was seen in 29.41% and 31.48% of participants with MPHL and TE, respectively. Nutritional deficiency is a common problem in participants with hair loss irrespective of the type of alopecia. The findings of our study suggest need for identification and correction of nutritional deficiencies in patients with hair loss.

  9. Strictly NO3- Nutrition Alleviates Iron Deficiency Chlorosis in Arabidopsis thaliana Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najoua Msilini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of NO3- nutrition on iron deficiency responses were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants were grown with or without 5 µM Fe, and with NO3- alone or a mixture of NO3- and NH4+. The results indicated that, NO3- nutrition induced higher dry matter production, regardless the Fe concentration. Fe deficiency reduced growth activity, photosynthetic pigment concentration and Fe content of plants, whatever the N forms. This decrease was more pronounced in plants grown with mixed N source; those plants presented the highest EL and MDA and anthocyanin contents compared to plants grown under Fe sufficient conditions. In iron free-solutions, with NO3- as the sole nitrogen source, enhanced FC-R activity in the roots was observed. However, in the presence of NH4+, plants displayed some decrease in in FC-R and PEPC activities. The presence of NH4+ modified typical Fe stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

  10. Neurological and Epigenetic Implications of Nutritional Deficiencies on Psychopathology: Conceptualization and Review of Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianghong; Zhao, Sophie R.; Reyes, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a role for epigenetic modifications in the pathophysiology of disease has received significant attention. Many studies are now beginning to explore the gene–environment interactions, which may mediate early-life exposure to risk factors, such as nutritional deficiencies and later development of behavioral problems in children and adults. In this paper, we review the current literature on the role of epigenetics in the development of psychopathology, with a specific focus on the potential for epigenetic modifications to link nutrition and brain development. We propose a conceptual framework whereby epigenetic modifications (e.g., DNA methylation) mediate the link between micro- and macro-nutrient deficiency early in life and brain dysfunction (e.g., structural aberration, neurotransmitter perturbation), which has been linked to development of behavior problems later on in life. PMID:26251900

  11. Neurological and Epigenetic Implications of Nutritional Deficiencies on Psychopathology: Conceptualization and Review of Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a role for epigenetic modifications in the pathophysiology of disease has received significant attention. Many studies are now beginning to explore the gene–environment interactions, which may mediate early-life exposure to risk factors, such as nutritional deficiencies and later development of behavioral problems in children and adults. In this paper, we review the current literature on the role of epigenetics in the development of psychopathology, with a specific focus on the potential for epigenetic modifications to link nutrition and brain development. We propose a conceptual framework whereby epigenetic modifications (e.g., DNA methylation mediate the link between micro- and macro-nutrient deficiency early in life and brain dysfunction (e.g., structural aberration, neurotransmitter perturbation, which has been linked to development of behavior problems later on in life.

  12. Dietary Intake of Vitamins in Different Options of Treatment in Chronic Kidney Disease: Is There a Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, M; Szupryczyńska, N; Dębska-Ślizień, A; Borek, P; Kaczkan, M; Rutkowski, B; Małgorzewicz, S

    2016-06-01

    The importance of diet in the management of kidney transplantation (KT), as well as other treatment options of chronic kidney disease (CKD), is generally acknowledged. However, data regarding vitamin intake are very limited. Vitamins are essential in maintaining good nutritional status and preventing many chronic complications. It is still not clear which treatment modality imposes the highest risk of dietary vitamin deficiency and whether successful KT reverses such a threat. We performed this observational study to assess dietary intake of vitamins in CKD patients: after successful KT, not yet dialyzed (ND), treated with hemodialysis (HD), and with peritoneal dialysis (PD). A total of 202 patients were recruited (45 KT, 50 ND, 45 HD, and 62 PD). Vitamin intakes were evaluated through the use of a 24-hour dietary recall and processed with the use of a computerized database. Each record was evaluated by a skilled dietitian. In general, vitamin intakes in all study groups were comparable, with KT and ND groups manifesting lower risk of deficiency than HD and PD groups. The content of fat-soluble vitamins in diet was insufficient, with remarkably high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. Mean intakes of water-soluble vitamins were close to recommended, with the exception of folic acid, which was profoundly deficient in all groups. CKD patients are at risk of inadequate vitamin intake. Vitamin D and folic acid are universally deficient in diet. KT patients have the most satisfactory content of vitamins in their diet, whereas HD individuals are at highest risk of deficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mercury exposure, nutritional deficiencies and metabolic disruptions may affect learning in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Lyn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among dietary factors, learning and behavior are influenced not only by nutrients, but also by exposure to toxic food contaminants such as mercury that can disrupt metabolic processes and alter neuronal plasticity. Neurons lacking in plasticity are a factor in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and mental retardation. Essential nutrients help maintain normal neuronal plasticity. Nutritional deficiencies, including deficiencies in the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, the amino acid methionine, and the trace minerals zinc and selenium, have been shown to influence neuronal function and produce defects in neuronal plasticity, as well as impact behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Nutritional deficiencies and mercury exposure have been shown to alter neuronal function and increase oxidative stress among children with autism. These dietary factors may be directly related to the development of behavior disorders and learning disabilities. Mercury, either individually or in concert with other factors, may be harmful if ingested in above average amounts or by sensitive individuals. High fructose corn syrup has been shown to contain trace amounts of mercury as a result of some manufacturing processes, and its consumption can also lead to zinc loss. Consumption of certain artificial food color additives has also been shown to lead to zinc deficiency. Dietary zinc is essential for maintaining the metabolic processes required for mercury elimination. Since high fructose corn syrup and artificial food color additives are common ingredients in many foodstuffs, their consumption should be considered in those individuals with nutritional deficits such as zinc deficiency or who are allergic or sensitive to the effects of mercury or unable to effectively metabolize and eliminate it from the body.

  14. Iron isomaltoside 1000: a new intravenous iron for treating iron deficiency in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikström, Björn; Bhandari, Sunil; Barany, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often suffer from iron deficiency anemia necessitating treatment with intravenous iron. This study was designed to assess the safety of iron isomaltoside 1000 (Monofer) in CKD patients. The secondary objective was to assess its effect on iron deficiency...... anemia....

  15. Chronic zinc deficiency alters chick gut microbiota composition and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a prevalent micronutrient insufficiency. Although the gut is a vital organ for Zn utilization, and Zn deficiency is associated with impaired intestinal permeability and a global decrease in gastrointestinal health, alterations in the gut microbial ecology of the host under co...

  16. Alterações eletrencefalográficas relacionadas a deficiências nutritivas Electroencephalographic changes related to nutritional deficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriana Moura Ribeiro

    1970-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudadas as alterações eletrencefalográficas em 20 crianças desnutridas. Foi assinalada diferença significativa entre o EEG dos pacientes com desnutrição global e daqueles com desnutrição protêica. Essas alterações foram caracterizadas pela presença de anormalidades encefálicas difusas e/ou descargas focais de tipo epiléptico. A incidência relativamente alta de descargas focais pode ser explicada pelo limiar convulsiógeno muito baixo do cérebro de crianças com desnutrição.The EEG changes in a group of 20 children with nutritional disorders are reported. The results suggest a significant difference in the EEG of patients with undernutrition and those with protein-caloric deficiency. These alterations correspond to the incidence of diffuse cerebral involvement and or discharges of an epileptic focal activity. The relatively high incidence of focal discharges may be explained on the basis of a very low epileptiform threshold of the cerebral cortex in children with nutritional disease.

  17. Early animal models of rickets and proof of a nutritional deficiency hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesney, Russell W

    2012-03-01

    In the period between 1880 and 1930, the role of nutrition and nutritional deficiency as a cause of rickets was established based upon the results from 6 animal models of rickets. This greatly prevalent condition (60%-90% in some locales) in children of the industrialized world was an important clinical research topic. What had to be reconciled was that rickets was associated with infections, crowding, and living in northern latitudes, and cod liver oil was observed to prevent or cure the disease. Several brilliant insights opened up a new pathway to discovery using animal models of rickets. Studies in lion cubs, dogs, and rats showed the importance of cod liver oil and an antirachitic substance later termed vitamin D. They showed that fats in the diet were required, that vitamin D had a secosteroid structure and was different from vitamin A, and that ultraviolet irradiation could prevent or cure rickets. Several of these experiments had elements of serendipity in that certain dietary components and the presence or absence of sunshine or ultraviolet irradiation could critically change the course of rickets. Nonetheless, at the end of these studies, a nutritional deficiency of vitamin D resulting from a poor diet or lack of adequate sunshine was firmly established as a cause of rickets.

  18. Symptoms of nutritional deficiencies in neem plants cultivated in nutrient solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnky Chaell Braga da Silva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The planting of forest species is an activity that, besides introducing new exotic types of plants, can lessen the environmental impacts resulting from extractivism. Nevertheless, such success depends, upon other factors, on the knowledge of the nutritional needs of the species to be used. This study intended to check the typical symptoms of nutritional deficiency of macronutrients in the culture of Neem, through the visual observation of the plants. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse at the College of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine (FAMEV of the Federal University of Mato Grosso (UFMT in Cuiabá/MT, and it was set up in randomized blocks, with seven treatments and three repetitions. Each experimental unit was represented by a plastic vase, two liters capacity. The treatments used were: complete nutritive solution and solution with the omission of the following nutrients: -N, -P, -K, -Ca, -Mg and -S. It was ascertained that the visual symptoms of nutrient deficiency were, as a general rule, of easy characterization except for the treatment with omission of sulphur. Therefore, the omission of macronutrients decreases the production of total dry matter of the Neem plants, except for the omission of the S nutrient.

  19. Nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Marília Gomes Dantas Lopes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zinc is an essential nutrient that is required for numerous metabolic functions, and zinc deficiency results in growth retardation, cell-mediated immune dysfunction, and cognitive impairment. Objective: This study evaluated nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children. Design: We performed a randomised, controlled, triple-blind study. The children were divided into a control group (10% sorbitol, n=31 and an experimental group (10 mg Zn/day, n=31 for 3 months. Anthropometric and dietary assessments as well as bioelectrical measurements were performed in all children. Results: Our study showed (1 an increased body mass index for age and an increased phase angle in the experimental group; (2 a positive correlation between nutritional assessment parameters in both groups; (3 increased soft tissue, and mainly fat-free mass, in the body composition of the experimental group, as determined using bioelectrical impedance vector analysis; (4 increased consumption of all nutrients, including zinc, in the experimental group; and (5 an increased serum zinc concentration in both groups (p<0.0001. Conclusions: Given that a reference for body composition analysis does not exist for intervention studies, longitudinal studies are needed to investigate vector migration during zinc supplementation. These results reinforce the importance of employing multiple techniques to assess the nutritional status of populations.

  20. Effect of a nutrition education program and diet modification in Beninese adolescent girls suffering from mild iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaofé, Halimatou; Zee, John; Dossa, Romain; O'Brien, Huguette Turgeon

    2009-01-01

    A 26-week nutrition intervention, including 4 weeks of nutrition education, combined with an increase in the content and bioavailability of dietary iron for 22 weeks was carried out in 34 intervention and 34 control adolescent girls suffering from mild iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In post-intervention, hemoglobin and serum ferritin were significantly higher in the intervention group, whereas the incidence of IDA was significantly lower in the intervention group compared to the control group. Nutrition knowledge scores were significantly higher in intervention girls compared to control girls. Dietary changes to improve available dietary iron can reduce iron deficiency anemia.

  1. Soluble transferrin receptor: a differentiating marker between iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboor, M.; Moinuddin, A.; Naureen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders are the two major causes of microcytic and hypochromic anaemia. Many times the diagnosis of these conditions becomes difficult through conventional laboratory tests. Determination of soluble transferrin receptors is a helpful laboratory test for the differential diagnosis of these conditions. The study was conducted to evaluate the role of soluble transferrin receptors in the differential diagnosis between iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders. Methods: A total of 80 blood samples were evaluated, i.e., 20 samples from normal adult male, 20 samples from normal adult female, 20 samples from iron deficiency anaemia group and 20 samples from patients with anaemia of chronic disorders. Soluble transferrin receptors were determined by ELISA technique using Quantikine IVD kit (R and D Systems). Results: There was significant difference in the levels of sTfR in iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders. Statistically non-significant difference was observed between the levels of sTfR in patients with anaemia of chronic disorders as compared to normal control group. Conclusion: The sTfR determination can be used as a reliable differentiating marker in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders. (author)

  2. Processes underlying the nutritional programming of embryonic development by iron deficiency in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Swali

    Full Text Available Poor iron status is a global health issue, affecting two thirds of the world population to some degree. It is a particular problem among pregnant women, in both developed and developing countries. Feeding pregnant rats a diet deficient in iron is associated with both hypertension and reduced nephron endowment in adult male offspring. However, the mechanistic pathway leading from iron deficiency to fetal kidney development remains elusive. This study aimed to establish the underlying processes associated with iron deficiency by assessing gene and protein expression changes in the rat embryo, focussing on the responses occurring at the time of the nutritional insult. Analysis of microarray data showed that iron deficiency in utero resulted in the significant up-regulation of 979 genes and down-regulation of 1545 genes in male rat embryos (d13. Affected processes associated with these genes included the initiation of mitosis, BAD-mediated apoptosis, the assembly of RNA polymerase II preinitiation complexes and WNT signalling. Proteomic analyses highlighted 7 proteins demonstrating significant up-regulation with iron deficiency and the down-regulation of 11 proteins. The main functions of these key proteins included cell proliferation, protein transport and folding, cytoskeletal remodelling and the proteasome complex. In line with our recent work, which identified the perturbation of the proteasome complex as a generalised response to in utero malnutrition, we propose that iron deficiency alone leads to a more specific failure in correct protein folding and transport. Such an imbalance in this delicate quality-control system can lead to cellular dysfunction and apoptosis. Therefore these findings offer an insight into the underlying mechanisms associated with the development of the embryo during conditions of poor iron status, and its health in adult life.

  3. Nutritional Deficiencies and Food Insecurity Among HIV-infected Children in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea E. Modlin, BA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor nutrition has been associated with impaired immunity and accelerated disease progression in HIV- infected children. The aim of this study was to quantify the levels of nutrient intake in HIV-infected children and compare these to standard recommendations. Methods: We surveyed HIV-infected Tanzanian children enrolled in a pediatric care program that provided routine nutritional counseling and vitamin supplementation. We obtained anthropometric measurements and determined 24-hour macronutrient and micronutrient intakes and food insecurity. Values were compared to recommended nutrient intakes based on age and gender. Results: We interviewed 48 pairs of children and their caregiver(s. The age of the child ranged from 2-14 years; median age 6 and 60% female. The median weight-for-height z-score for children ≤ 5 years was 0.69 and BMI-for-age z-scores for children >5 was -0.84. Macronutrient evaluation showed that 29 (60% children were deficient in dietary intake of energy; deficiency was more common in older children (p=0.004. Micronutrient evaluation shows that over half of study subjects were deficient in dietary intake of vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, folate, vitamin B12, and calcium. Food insecurity was reported by 20 (58% caregivers. Conclusions and Public Health Implications: The diets of many HIV-infected children at a specialized treatment center in Tanzania do not meet recommended levels of macro- and micro-nutrients. Food insecurity was a contributory factor. Enhanced dietary counseling and provision of macro- and micro-nutrient supplements will be necessary to achieve optimal nutrition for most HIV-infected children in resource-poor regions.

  4. IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN SUNLIGHT EXPOSURE AND 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D DEFICIENCY IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE PATIENTS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Yee-Moon Wang

    2012-06-01

    In conclusion, our study confirmed an extremely high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and an important association between outdoor sunlight exposure and 25(OHD deficiency in Chinese stage 3-5 CKD patients. Further study is needed to determine whether increasing daily outdoor sunlight exposure may represent a cost-free treatment for correcting nutritional 25(OHD deficiency in the CKD population.

  5. Nutritional status of Vietnamese outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, D; Lan, L T T; Diep, D T N; Gallegos, D; Collins, P F

    2017-02-01

    Nutritional screening and assessment is not currently part of routine clinical practice in Vietnam. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the utility of the commonly used methods for identifying malnutrition in outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A cross-sectional pilot study and a larger retrospective study were carried out in outpatients with COPD who were attending a respiratory clinic in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Routine clinical data were collected [body mass index (BMI), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 )]. Nutritional screening and assessment were performed using the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST) and Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) as the gold standard to diagnose malnutrition. In total, 393 outpatients had documented BMI and 29 were prospectively assessed using SGA: males, n = 25; females, n = 4; mean (SD) age 69.7 (9.6) years; mean (SD) BMI 21.0 (3.4) kg m -2 ; mean (SD) FEV 1 percentage predicted 57.0% (19.7%). Malnutrition risk was identified in 20.7% (n = 6) of patients using the MST (38% sensitivity; 94% specificity). However, 45% (n = 13) were diagnosed as malnourished using the SGA (31% mild/moderate; 14% severe). All malnourished patients not identified by the MST had evidence of muscle wasting. BMI had a strong negative correlation with muscle wasting as assessed using the SGA (r = -0.857, n = 28; P Vietnamese outpatients with COPD. A BMI threshold of <21 kg m -2 appears to represent a useful and pragmatic cut-off point for identifying outpatients requiring comprehensive nutritional assessment and support. © 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  6. Associations between Zinc Deficiency and Metabolic Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Himoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn is an essential trace element which has favorable antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and apoptotic effects. The liver mainly plays a crucial role in maintaining systemic Zn homeostasis. Therefore, the occurrence of chronic liver diseases, such as chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or fatty liver, results in the impairment of Zn metabolism, and subsequently Zn deficiency. Zn deficiency causes plenty of metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and hepatic encephalopathy. Inversely, metabolic abnormalities like hypoalbuminemia in patients with liver cirrhosis often result in Zn deficiency. Recent studies have revealed the putative mechanisms by which Zn deficiency evokes a variety of metabolic abnormalities in chronic liver disease. Zn supplementation has shown beneficial effects on such metabolic abnormalities in experimental models and actual patients with chronic liver disease. This review summarizes the pathogenesis of metabolic abnormalities deriving from Zn deficiency and the favorable effects of Zn administration in patients with chronic liver disease. In addition, we also highlight the interactions between Zn and other trace elements, vitamins, amino acids, or hormones in such patients.

  7. Evidence Synthesis and Translation for Nutrition Interventions to Combat Micronutrient Deficiencies with Particular Focus on Food Fortification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Lawrence

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over two billion people suffer from micronutrient deficiencies. Food fortification is a prominent nutrition intervention to combat such deficiencies; however, its effectiveness, risks, and ethical implications vary depending on the contexts associated with the deficiency it is addressing and the circumstances with its implementation. The aim of this research was to analyse the profile of nutrition interventions for combating micronutrient deficiency with particular focus on food fortification reported in existing systematic reviews (SRs, guidelines and policy statements, and implementation actions for nutrition. A review of secondary data available from online databases of SRs, guidelines and policy statements, and implementation actions, categorised as either “nutrition-specific interventions” (NSpI or “nutrition-sensitive interventions” (NSeI, was conducted. Currently, there is evidence available for a diversity of food fortification topics, and there has been much translation into action. Indeed, food fortification and micronutrient supplementation interventions and NSpI more broadly dominate the profile of interventions for which there were SRs, guidelines, and policy statements available. The findings demonstrate that, although there is a rational linear relationship between evidence synthesis and translation in formulating policy and actions to combat micronutrient deficiencies, the various nutrition interventions available to help combat micronutrient deficiencies are not equally represented in the evidence synthesis and translation processes. Effective and safe policies and actions to combat micronutrient deficiencies require decisions to be informed from a body of evidence that consists of evidence from a variety of interventions. Into the future, investment in making available a higher number of SRs, guidelines and policy statements, and actions of NSeI is indicated.

  8. Factors Associated with Vitamin D Testing, Deficiency, Intake, and Supplementation in Patients with Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Manasi; Vanlint, Simon; Moseley, G Lorimer; Mittinty, Murthy N; Stocks, Nigel

    2017-11-02

    Vitamin D deficiency is a public health issue, with reports of six- to twenty-five-fold rise in vitamin D testing. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to many chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, depression, and chronic pain. Identifying factors associated with risk of deficiency in individuals with chronic pain will help minimize time and cost. This study aims to examine the factors associated with vitamin D testing, intake, and physician-advised supplementation in individuals with chronic pain. Using a cross-sectional design, data were collected from 465 individuals with chronic pain. These data were analyzed using penalized logistic regression with the LASSO technique. Fifty-seven percent reported being tested for vitamin D, about 40% reported being diagnosed with vitamin D deficiency, and of those who had been tested, 60% reported taking vitamin D supplementation. The findings suggest older age (OR 3.12, CI [1.02, 9.50]) and higher mean pain intensity score (OR 2.02, CI [1.13, 3.59]) increased an individual's chance of being vitamin D deficient. Unemployment or on leave due to pain (OR 1.79, [CI 1.03, 3.11]), part-time employment (OR 1.86, CI [1.02, 3.39]), and being a resident of Australia (OR 2.32, CI [1.13, 4.72]) increased chances of being tested for vitamin D. Being diagnosed with vitamin D deficiency (OR 6.67, CI [2.75, 16.19]), unemployed or on leave due to pain (OR 3.71, CI [1.25, 11.00]), and in part-time employment (OR 2.69, CI [0.86, 8.38]) were associated with physician-advised vitamin D supplementation. Our results may have practical implications, as identifying pretest risk factors may assist in identifying who is at risk of vitamin D deficiency, whom to test, and when to treat.

  9. [Nutritional assessment of gluten-free diet. Is gluten-free diet deficient in some nutrient?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Quero, J C; Espín Jaime, B; Rodríguez Martínez, A; Argüelles Martín, F; García Jiménez, R; Rubio Murillo, M; Pizarro Martín, A

    2015-07-01

    The gluten-free diet has traditionally been accepted as a healthy diet, but there are articles advocating that it may have some nutritional deficiencies. The current study assesses whether there was any change in the contributions of calories, essential elements, proportion of fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and fiber in children who were diagnosed with celiac diseases, comparing the diet with gluten prior one year after diagnosis with the diet without gluten to the year of diagnosis. The level of clinical or analytical impact that nutritional deficits could have was also assessed. A prospective,descriptive, observational study in which information was collected from a dietary survey, anthropometric and analytical data at pre-diagnosis of celiac disease and following a gluten diet and one year after celiac disease diagnosis, under gluten-free diet. A total of 37 patients meet the study criteria. A decrease in the intake of saturated fatty acids was found, with an increase of monounsaturated fatty acids and an increase in the intake of phosphorus in the diet without gluten. A deficient intake of vitamin D was found in both diets. Clinically, at year of gluten-free diet there was an improvement in weight and size. Analytically, there was an improvement in hemoglobin, ferritin, vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone in plasma. The gluten-free diet has minimal deficiencies, similar to those present in the diet with gluten, with an improvement in the lipid profile by increasing the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids to the detriment of saturated fatty acids. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Nutritional deficiency in citrus with symptoms of citrus variegated chlorosis disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ME. Silva-Stenico

    Full Text Available It is well known that citrus plants that have been infected by Xylella fastidiosa display nutritional deficiencies, probably caused by production of extracellular polymers by the bacteria that block normal nutrient flow through the xylem. The aim of this work was to study the mineral composition of specific foliar areas in different stages of infection in citrus. Thus, the concentrations of macro and micronutrients in leaves of citrus infected by X. fastidiosa were measured. Samples from four infected citrus orchards in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were respectively collected from Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, Neves Paulista, Gavião Peixoto and Paraíso counties. The presence of X. fastidiosa in leaves was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using specific PCR primers. To understand the variation in leaf-nutrient content in citrus plants, we used foliar nutrient values from control (non-symptomatic plants as a reference. Chemometric analysis showed that the deficiency of P and K in symptomatic trees for all orchards and high concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn were observed in chlorotic areas, although other studies revealed deficiency of zinc in leaves. This is the first report showing that a correlation between chlorotic citrus leaf and higher concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn are observed when infected and healthy plants were compared.

  11. [Severe nutritional deficiencies in young infants with inappropriate plant milk consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Louer, B; Lemale, J; Garcette, K; Orzechowski, C; Chalvon, A; Girardet, J-P; Tounian, P

    2014-05-01

    Over the past few years, we have observed increasing consumption of inappropriate plant milks as an alternative to infant milk formula. Some families believe that foods labeled as natural are the most healthy and an appropriate nutritional choice. However, their composition does not respect European recommendations. They are always hypocaloric and protein, vitamin, and mineral concentrations are inadequate. The aim of this study was to report severe nutritional complications after inappropriate plant milk consumption. Between 2008 and 2011, we studied severe nutritional deficiencies caused by consumption of plant milks bought in health food stores or online shops. Infants were identified in our centers and examined through medical history, physical examination, and laboratory testing. Nine cases of infants aged from 4 to 14 months were observed. In all cases, these milks were used as an alternative to milk formulas for supposed cow's milk allergy. At diagnosis, four patients were aged 6 months or less. They had received plant milk exclusively for 1-3 months. The beverages consumed were rice, soya, almond and sweet chestnut milks. In three cases, infants presented severe protein-calorie malnutrition with substantial hypoalbuminemia (slow down the progress of this social trend. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The Nutrition Literacy Assessment Instrument is a Valid and Reliable Measure of Nutrition Literacy in Adults with Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Heather D; Ellerbeck, Edward F; Gajewski, Byron; Zhang, Chuanwu; Sullivan, Debra K

    2018-03-01

    To test the reliability and validity of the Nutrition Literacy Assessment Instrument (NLit) in adult primary care and identify the relationship between nutrition literacy and diet quality. This instrument validation study included a cross-sectional sample participating in up to 2 visits 1 month apart. A total of 429 adults with nutrition-related chronic disease were recruited from clinics and a patient registry affiliated with a Midwestern university medical center. Nutrition literacy was measured by the NLit, which was composed of 6 subscales: nutrition and health, energy sources in food, food label and numeracy, household food measurement, food groups, and consumer skills. Diet quality was measured by Healthy Eating Index-2010 with nutrient data from Diet History Questionnaire II surveys. The researchers measured factor validity and reliability by using binary confirmatory factor analysis; test-retest reliability was measured by Pearson r and the intraclass correlation coefficient, and relationships between nutrition literacy and diet quality were analyzed by linear regression. The NLit demonstrated substantial factor validity and reliability (0.97; confidence interval, 0.96-0.98) and test-retest reliability (0.88; confidence interval, 0.85-0.90). Nutrition literacy was the most significant predictor of diet quality (β = .17; multivariate coefficient = 0.10; P measuring nutrition literacy in adult primary care patients. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dietary imbalances in a large breed puppy, leading to compression fractures, vitamin D deficiency, and suspected nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Moran; Parr, Jacqueline M; MacKenzie, Shawn; Verbrugghe, Adronie

    2018-01-01

    A 6-month-old intact female giant schnauzer dog fed a nutritionally unbalanced homemade diet was evaluated because of a 1-month history of lameness and difficulty walking. Abnormalities identified on ancillary tests, in conjunction with the dog's clinical improvement following diet change, suggested a diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency and nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism. This report underlines the importance of appropriate feeding management, especially during the vulnerable growth phase.

  14. Pathogens, nutritional deficiency, and climate influences on a declining moose population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D.L.; Cox, E.W.; Ballard, W.B.; Whitlaw, Heather A.; Lenarz, M.S.; Custer, T.W.; Barnett, T.; Fuller, T.K.

    2006-01-01

    Several potential proximate causes may be implicated in a recent (post-1984) decline in moose (Alces alces andersoni) numbers at their southern range periphery in northwest Minnesota, USA. These causes include deleterious effects of infectious pathogens, some of which are associated with white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), negative effects of climate change, increased food competition with deer or moose, legal or illegal hunting, and increased predation by gray wolves (Canis lupus) and black bears (Ursus americanus). Long-standing factors that may have contributed to the moose decline include those typically associated with marginal habitat such as nutritional deficiencies. We examined survival and productivity among radiocollared (n = 152) adult female and juvenile moose in northwest Minnesota during 1995–2000, and assessed cause of death and pathology through carcass necropsy of radiocollared and non-radiocollared animals.Aerial moose surveys suggested that hunting was an unlikely source of the numerical decline because the level of harvest was relatively low (i.e., approx. 15% / 2 yr) and the population usually grew in years following a hunt. The majority of moose mortalities (up to 87% of radiocollared moose [n = 76] and up to 65% of non-radiocollared moose [n = 84]) were proximally related to pathology associated with parasites and infectious disease. Liver fluke (Fascioloides magna) infections apparently constituted the greatest single source of mortality and caused significant pathology in the liver, thoracic and peritoneal cavities, pericardial sac, and lungs. Mortality due to meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) was less prevalent and was manifested through characteristic neurological disease. Several mortalities apparently were associated with unidentified infectious disease, probably acting in close association with malnutrition. Bone-marrow fat was lower for moose dying of natural causes than those dying of anthropogenic factors or

  15. Prevalence of childhood Riboflavin deficiency and nutritional status; a study in rural area in Kerman province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabai Sh

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of riboflavin deficiency is high in women and children in developing countries and the deficiency almost invariably occurs in combination with deficiencies of other water soluble vitamins. The objective of this study was the assessment of riboflavin status of rural school children in Kerman province and its relationship with riboflavin, protein and energy intake. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 327 primary school children were randomly selected by the stratified multistage cluster sampling method. Variables for classifications were sex and socio-economic status (according to the educational level. This study was conducted by the Department of Nutrition and Biochemistry of School of Public Health in Tehran University in the winter of 2001. A twenty-four hour recall questionnaire was completed by and 5 cc of venous blood was taken from each student. Riboflavin status was assessed by measuring the glutathione reductase activity coefficient (EGR – AC of the red blood cells. Chi-Square and Pearson’s correlation coefficient tests were used to determine correlations. Student’s t–test was used to show the differences in the mean of EGR – AC between the classifications of independent factors. Results: The relationship between riboflavin status and its independent variables including the status of riboflavin, protein and calorie intake were assessed. Outputs of the study indicated that 39.7% of the boys and 43.6% of the girls (41.8% together were marginally riboflavin deficient. Furthermore, 37.7% of the boys, 33.4% of the girls (35.4% together were frankly riboflavin deficient. An average of 67.2% of the children (70.1% boys, 63.7% girls had enough intake of riboflavin, and 76.2% of the children (79.9%, boys, 72.5% girls had adequate intake of protein. However, only 22% of the children (24.5% boys, 19.3% girls had sufficient caloric intake. Outputs of this dietary evaluation reveal that there is a relationship

  16. Medical nutrition therapy in chronic kidney disease; from dialysis to transplant: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Leal-Escobar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease has direct implications in nutritional status, causing anorexia and muscular catabolism. These situations are frequent in kidney renal replacement therapy in which nutritional disorders and inflammatory mechanisms associated with therapy often lead to the development of protein-energy wasting. Nutrition therapy has shown an adequate therapeutic strategy to prevent and treat metabolic alterations, reducing surgical and nutritional complication risks in kidney transplantation patients. The current case reports nutritional intervention on a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient who was subsequently prescribed to automatic peritoneal dialysis and, finally, kidney transplant from a living donor.

  17. What Characterises Women Vulnerable to Chronic Energy Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavi Kumar, K. S.; Ramachandran, Maithili; Viswanathan, Brinda

    2009-01-01

    Weight-for-squared height or body mass index (BMI) is often considered as an effective predictor of morbidity and mortality rates. This study uses BMI data from a sample of ever-married women in the age group of 15-49 years in the North Indian state of Uttar Pradesh for the year 1998-1999, to analyse the determinants of chronic energy deficiency…

  18. Hematological Disorders following Gastric Bypass Surgery: Emerging Concepts of the Interplay between Nutritional Deficiency and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the associated metabolic syndrome are among the most common and detrimental metabolic diseases of the modern era, affecting over 50% of the adult population in the United States. Surgeries designed to promote weight loss, known as bariatric surgery, typically involve a gastric bypass procedure and have shown high success rates for treating morbid obesity. However, following gastric bypass surgery, many patients develop chronic anemia, most commonly due to iron deficiency. Deficiencies of vitamins B1, B12, folate, A, K, D, and E and copper have also been reported after surgery. Copper deficiency can cause hematological abnormalities with or without neurological complications. Despite oral supplementation and normal serum concentrations of iron, copper, folate, and vitamin B12, some patients present with persistent anemia after surgery. The evaluation of hematologic disorders after gastric bypass surgery must take into account issues unique to the postsurgery setting that influence the development of anemia and other cytopenias. In this paper, the clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis of the hematological disorders associated with gastric bypass surgery are reviewed, and the underlying molecular mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Validation of the qi blood yin yang deficiency questionnaire on chronic fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Ku, Boncho; Kim, Keun Ho

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue (CF) reflects an imbalance of inter-organ functions or of the four essential physiological components qi, blood (xue), yin, and yang. CF can be subdivided into different patterns. However, there are no diagnostic methods for CF. This study aimed to clinically validate a pattern identification method by identifying correlations between CF and responses to the qi blood yin yang deficiency questionnaire (QBYY-Q). Participants were recruited between May and June 2014 through the Kyung Hee University Korean Medicine hospital website and via posters and comprised 129 CF patients diagnosed with the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (1994) criteria. Participants who had organic diseases that explained the CF were excluded. A total of 159 participants were asked to complete the QBYY-Q, the fatigue severity scale, and the Chalder fatigue scale. The latter two questionnaires were used to assess convergent validity with the QBYY-Q. Among the 129 CF participants, 70 and 59 had chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic chronic fatigue, respectively. Two Korean medical doctors independently assessed participants' qi, blood, yin, and yang deficiency patterns using QBYY deficiency pattern identification guidelines. Based on the results of a preliminary study of the QBYY-Q, we selected 32 reliable items for symptoms corresponding to each deficiency pattern. The items were used to estimate internal consistency and construct validity. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed for scores on each deficiency pattern. The data were means and standard deviations or numbers of participants and proportions for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. A statistical significance level of P yin, and yang deficiency were 45.1, 58.0, 52.2, and 63.4 %, respectively. Each QBYY-Q deficiency score was positively associated with each corresponding deficiency pattern. Qi deficiency was used as a reference category. Odds ratios of blood, yin

  20. Antibody deficiency in patients with frequent exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, Brian N; Comellas, Alejandro P; Ballas, Zuhair K; Newell, John D; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Azar, Antoine E

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is the third leading cause of death in the US, and is associated with periodic exacerbations, which account for the largest proportion of health care utilization, and lead to significant morbidity, mortality, and worsening lung function. A subset of patients with COPD have frequent exacerbations, occurring 2 or more times per year. Despite many interventions to reduce COPD exacerbations, there is a significant lack of knowledge in regards to their mechanisms and predisposing factors. We describe here an important observation that defines antibody deficiency as a potential risk factor for frequent COPD exacerbations. We report a case series of patients who have frequent COPD exacerbations, and who were found to have an underlying primary antibody deficiency syndrome. We also report on the outcome of COPD exacerbations following treatment in a subset with of these patients with antibody deficiency. We identified patients with COPD who had 2 or more moderate to severe exacerbations per year; immune evaluation including serum immunoglobulin levels and pneumococcal IgG titers was performed. Patients diagnosed with an antibody deficiency syndrome were treated with either immunoglobulin replacement therapy or prophylactic antibiotics, and their COPD exacerbations were monitored over time. A total of 42 patients were identified who had 2 or more moderate to severe COPD exacerbations per year. Twenty-nine patients had an underlying antibody deficiency syndrome: common variable immunodeficiency (8), specific antibody deficiency (20), and selective IgA deficiency (1). Twenty-two patients had a follow-up for at least 1 year after treatment of their antibody deficiency, which resulted in a significant reduction of COPD exacerbations, courses of oral corticosteroid use and cumulative annual dose of oral corticosteroid use, rescue antibiotic use, and hospitalizations for COPD exacerbations. This case series identifies antibody deficiency as a

  1. Nutritional status and long-term mortality in hospitalised patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Runa; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often have difficulties with keeping their weight. The aim of this investigation was to study nutritional status in hospitalised Nordic COPD patients and to investigate the association between nutritional status and long-term mortality in...

  2. Current iodine nutrition status and progress toward elimination of iodine deficiency disorders in Jazan, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsanosy Rashad Mohammed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The term iodine deficiency disorders (IDD refers to all the effects of iodine deficiency on growth and development in human and animal populations that can be prevented by correction of the iodine deficiency. The objective of this paper was to determine the iodine nutrition status among schoolchildren in the Jazan Region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, by measuring urinary iodine concentrations and by clinical assessments of goiter rate. Methods A school-based cross-sectional survey was conducted in the Jazan region of southwestern KSA from May to November 2010. A total of 311 children, aged 6–13 years, drawn from 12 schools, were selected by a three-stage cluster random sampling method. Data on sociodemographic characteristics were collected using a structured questionnaire. Urine samples were collected and physical examinations were conducted to determine the presence or absence of goiter. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17.0. Chi square and independent t-tests were used for proportions and mean comparisons between groups. Results Out of 360 selected children, 311 were examined. There were 131 males (42% and 180 females (58%. The median urinary iodine concentration (UIC of the study group was 421 μg/L. The study population proportion with UIC > 300 μg/L was 74% with a higher proportion among males and urban populations. The proportion of children with UIC of 100–300 μg/L was only 21% and was significantly higher among females compared with males (p Conclusions The present study demonstrates a remarkable achievement in Universal Salt Iodization (USI and IDD elimination goals in the Jazan area. However, UIC levels reflect excessive iodine intake and may put the population at risk of adverse health consequences like iodine-induced hyperthyroidism and autoimmune thyroid diseases.

  3. Presentation of an infant with nutritional deficiency dermatitis as the initial manifestation of cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojković Anđelka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystemic autosomal recessive disease most frequently recognized by characteristic respiratory and/or digestive manifestations. Exceptionally rare, as is the case with the infant we are presenting, the initial sign of the disease can be nutritional deficiency dermatitis (NDD. Case Outline. A three-month-old male infant of young and healthy non-consanguineous parents, born at term after the first uneventful pregnancy, was hospitalized due to atopic dermatitis (AD-like skin changes, failure to thrive and normochromic anemia (Hb 60 g/L. As exclusively breast-fed, failure to thrive was attributed to hypogalactia and skin changes to nutritional allergy, so that, besides exclusion of cow’s milk protein and other highly allergenic foods in mother’s diet, hypoallergenic milk formula was added to the child’s diet. However, dietetic measures were without effect, and the child was re-hospitalized at age 4.5 months, this time in the condition of severe malnutrition with hypoproteinemic edemas, extensive dermatitis, moderate hepatosplenomegaly and recurrent normochromic anemia (Hb 57 g/L. After plasma-free erythrocyte transfusion, correction of hypoalbuminemia and two-week parenteral and semi-elementary nutrition resulted in gradual recovery of the child, also including the resolution of skin changes. Having in mind the clinical course of the disease, as well as the response to applied therapeutic measures, CF was suspected as the cause of the child’s problems, which was also confirmed by a high level of sweat chlorine (92 mmol/L and DNA analysis (∆F508/∆F508. Conclusion. Our experience indicates that NDD, as the initial manifestation of CF, should be also kept in mind in differential diagnosis of the infant’s AD-like changes.

  4. Effects of a Self-Directed Nutrition Intervention among Adults with Chronic Health Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruth, Meghan; Wilcox, Sara; Jake-Schoffman, Danielle E.; Schlaff, Rebecca A.; Goldufsky, Tatum M.

    2018-01-01

    Chronic diseases are common among adults. A healthy diet may be beneficial for managing the consequences of such conditions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a self-directed nutrition program on dietary behaviors among adults with chronic health conditions. As part of a larger trial examining the effects of a self-directed…

  5. Nutritional Needs of the Child with a Handicap or Chronic Illness. Manual II: Clinical Nutrition. Presentations from a National Interdisciplinary Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekvall, Shirley M.; Wheby, Elizabeth A.

    The following papers were presented at a symposium on clinical nutrition for the child who is chronically ill or handicapped: (1) "Food Allergy"; (2) "Anemia and the Chronically Ill or Handicapped Child"; (3) "Nutrition and Neurotransmitters--Clinical Implications"; (4) "The Importance of Lipid Type in the Diet after Burn Injury"; (5) "Advances of…

  6. [Wasting in chronic kidney disease: Refeeding techniques and artificial nutrition practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasian, Céline; Azar, Raymond; Fouque, Denis

    2016-12-01

    Protein energy wasting (PEW) is an independent factor associated with morbi-mortality in chronic kidney disease. Wasting is particularly common in chronic diseases of organs such as kidney disease with a major impact at the stage of dialysis. It covers 20 to 70% of patients diagnosed with chronic kidney disease according to the degree of evolution of the disease and the diagnostic method used patients. Mechanisms of PEW are based mainly on anorexia and metabolic abnormalities caused by kidney disease. Nutritional treatment differs depending on the stage of the kidney disease acute or chronic treated whether or not by dialysis. Nutritional monitoring should be regular, individualized and collaborative to detect a risk of PEW or treat installed PEW. Refeeding techniques should allow all the nutritional needs. Their indications depend on the clinic, biochemical assessment and nutrient intake. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Energy expenditures & physical activity in rats with chronic suboptimal nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Russell; Lifshitz, Fima

    2006-01-31

    Sub-optimally nourished rats show reduced growth, biochemical and physiological changes. However, no one has assessed metabolic rate adaptations in rats subjected to chronic suboptimal nutrition (CSN). In this study energy expenditure (EE; kcal/100 g body weight) and physical activity (PA; oscillations in weight/min/kg body weight) were assessed in rats subjected to three levels of CSN. Body weight gain was diminished (76.7 +/- 12.0 and 61.6 +/- 11.0 g) in rats fed 70 and 60% of the ad-libitum fed controls which gained more weight (148.5 +/- 32.3 g). The rats fed 80% gained weight similarly to controls (136.3 +/- 10.5 g). Percent Fat-free body mass was reduced (143.8 +/- 8.7 and 142.0 +/- 7.6 g) in rats fed 70 and 60% of ad-libitum, but not in those fed 80% (200.8 +/- 17.5 g) as compared with controls (201.6 +/- 33.4 g). Body fat (g) decreased in rats fed 80% (19.7 +/- 5.3), 70% (15.3 +/- 3.5) and 60% (9.6 +/- 2.7) of ad-libitum in comparison to controls (26.0 +/- 6.7). EE and PA were also altered by CSN. The control rats increased their EE and PA during the dark periods by 1.4 +/- 0.8 and 1.7 +/- 1.1 respectively, as compared with light the period; whereas CSN rats fed 80 and 70% of ad-libitum energy intake had reduced EE and PA during the dark periods as compared with the light period EE(7.5 +/- 1.4 and 7.8 +/- 0.6 vs. 9.0 +/- 1.2 and 9.7 +/- 0.8; p vs. 4.1 +/- 0.9 and 2.4 +/- 0.4; p vs. 0.95 +/- 0.03 and 0.91 +/- 0.05 p light (7.1 +/- 1.4) and dark period (6.2 +/- 1.0) EE and PA (3.4 +/- 0.9 and 2.5 +/- 0.5 respectively) were reduced in rats fed 60% of ad-libitum energy intake. CSN rats adapt to mild energy restriction by reducing body fat, EE and PA mainly during the dark period while growth proceeds and lean body mass is preserved. At higher levels of energy restrictions there is decreased growth, body fat and lean mass. Moreover EE and PA are also reduced during both light and dark periods.

  8. Energy expenditures & physical activity in rats with chronic suboptimal nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifshitz Fima

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-optimally nourished rats show reduced growth, biochemical and physiological changes. However, no one has assessed metabolic rate adaptations in rats subjected to chronic suboptimal nutrition (CSN. In this study energy expenditure (EE; kcal/100 g body weight and physical activity (PA; oscillations in weight/min/kg body weight were assessed in rats subjected to three levels of CSN. Results Body weight gain was diminished (76.7 ± 12.0 and 61.6 ± 11.0 g in rats fed 70 and 60% of the ad-libitum fed controls which gained more weight (148.5 ± 32.3 g. The rats fed 80% gained weight similarly to controls (136.3 ± 10.5 g. Percent Fat-free body mass was reduced (143.8 ± 8.7 and 142.0 ± 7.6 g in rats fed 70 and 60% of ad-libitum, but not in those fed 80% (200.8 ± 17.5 g as compared with controls (201.6 ± 33.4 g. Body fat (g decreased in rats fed 80% (19.7 ± 5.3, 70% (15.3 ± 3.5 and 60% (9.6 ± 2.7 of ad-libitum in comparison to controls (26.0 ± 6.7. EE and PA were also altered by CSN. The control rats increased their EE and PA during the dark periods by 1.4 ± 0.8 and 1.7 ± 1.1 respectively, as compared with light the period; whereas CSN rats fed 80 and 70% of ad-libitum energy intake had reduced EE and PA during the dark periods as compared with the light period EE(7.5 ± 1.4 and 7.8 ± 0.6 vs. 9.0 ± 1.2 and 9.7 ± 0.8; p Conclusion CSN rats adapt to mild energy restriction by reducing body fat, EE and PA mainly during the dark period while growth proceeds and lean body mass is preserved. At higher levels of energy restrictions there is decreased growth, body fat and lean mass. Moreover EE and PA are also reduced during both light and dark periods.

  9. Chronic vitamin C deficiency does not accelerate oxidative stress in ageing brains of guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Andersen, Stine Hasselholt; Miyashita, Namiyo

    2012-01-01

      Increased oxidative stress in the brain has consistently been implied in ageing and in several degenerative brain disorders. Acting as a pivotal antioxidant in the brain, vitamin C is preferentially retained during deficiency and may play an essential role in neuroprotection during ageing. Thus......, a lack of vitamin C could be associated with an increase in redox imbalance in the ageing brain. The present study compared oxidative stress of ageing to that of a long-term non-scorbutic vitamin C deficiency in guinea pigs. Adults (3-9 months old) were compared to old (36-42 months old) animals during...... a six-month dietary intervention by assessing vitamin C transport and redox homeostasis in the brain. In contrast to our hypothesis, chronic vitamin C deficiency did not affect the measured markers of oxidative stress in the brains of adult and aged animals. However, aged animals generally showed...

  10. Effect of a nutrition education programme on nutritional status of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Globally, the prevalence of chronic and acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiency is high in young children, especially in developing countries. Nutrition education is an important intervention to address these challenges. Objective. To determine the nutritional (anthropometric and micronutrient) status of ...

  11. Iron deficiency anemia in an athlete associated with Campylobacter pylori-negative chronic gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, D.; Sherman, P.

    1989-01-01

    A 14-year-old athletic boy with a 1-year history of decreased exercise tolerance presented with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. Panendoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium contrast studies of the gastrointestinal tract were normal. However, persistent uptake of radionuclide using a 99m technetium-sucralfate scan suggested inflammation localized to the stomach. Mucosal biopsies demonstrated acute and chronic gastritis that was not associated with the presence of Campylobacter pylori

  12. The effects of acute and chronic estrogen deficiency on glucose and lipid profile in ovariectomized rats

    OpenAIRE

    Rabie P; Namjoo AR

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Ovariectomy is a standard experimental model of menopause in rodent to investigate postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects acute and chronic estrogen deficiency on lipid profile and glucose serum in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Methods: In this experimental study, Twenty-four adult female Wistar rats were divided into three groups of eight rats. The first group: sham-control, Second group: ovariectomized rats (for five weeks), Third group: Ova...

  13. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rosa Luz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL, a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32. Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003. Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23, compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07. Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031. These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy.

  14. Prevention and treatment of protein energy wasting in chronic kidney disease patients: a consensus statement by the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikizler, T Alp; Cano, Noel J; Franch, Harold; Fouque, Denis; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kuhlmann, Martin K; Stenvinkel, Peter; TerWee, Pieter; Teta, Daniel; Wang, Angela Yee-Moon; Wanner, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Protein energy wasting (PEW) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, especially in individuals receiving maintenance dialysis therapy. A multitude of factors can affect the nutritional and metabolic status of CKD patients requiring a combination of therapeutic maneuvers to prevent or reverse protein and energy depletion. These include optimizing dietary nutrient intake, appropriate treatment of metabolic disturbances such as metabolic acidosis, systemic inflammation, and hormonal deficiencies, and prescribing optimized dialytic regimens. In patients where oral dietary intake from regular meals cannot maintain adequate nutritional status, nutritional supplementation, administered orally, enterally, or parenterally, is shown to be effective in replenishing protein and energy stores. In clinical practice, the advantages of oral nutritional supplements include proven efficacy, safety, and compliance. Anabolic strategies such as anabolic steroids, growth hormone, and exercise, in combination with nutritional supplementation or alone, have been shown to improve protein stores and represent potential additional approaches for the treatment of PEW. Appetite stimulants, anti-inflammatory interventions, and newer anabolic agents are emerging as novel therapies. While numerous epidemiological data suggest that an improvement in biomarkers of nutritional status is associated with improved survival, there are no large randomized clinical trials that have tested the effectiveness of nutritional interventions on mortality and morbidity.

  15. Chronic Latent Magnesium Deficiency in Obesity Decreases Positive Effects of Vitamin D on Cardiometabolic Risk Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokic, Edita; Romani, Andrea; Ilincic, Branislava; Kupusinac, Aleksandar; Stosic, Zoran; Isenovic, Esma R

    2017-08-21

    Obesity and micronutrient deficiencies contribute to the risk of cardiometabolic diseases such are type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease (CVD). We examined the frequency of concomitant deficit of magnesium (Mg) and vitamin D in obese patients and evaluated the connection of these combined deficiencies with indicators of cardiometabolic risk in non-diabetic subjects. Non-diabetic middle aged adults (n = 80; mean age 36 ± 4 years, 52% women) were recruited based on weight/adiposity parameters [i.e. body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage (FAT%)]. Cardiometabolic risk indicators [insulin resistance (Homeostatic Model Assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)) and CVD risk (Framingham risk score for predicting 10-year CVD)], Mg status [i.e. total serum Mg concentration (TMg), chronic latent Mg deficiency (CLMD) - 0.75-0.85 mmol/L], vitamin D status [i.e. serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), vitamin D deficiency <50 nmol/l] were assessed. Among obese subjects 36% presented a combination of vitamin D deficiency and CLMD. In all studied patients, 25(OH)D and TMg levels both, individually and combined, showed a negative linear correlation with HOMA-IR and CVD risk. In subjects with CLMD (TMg ˂0.85 mmol/L), a negative linear coefficient was found between 25(OH)D and, HOMA-IR and CVD risk, compared with subjects with normal TMg status (TMg ≥0.85 mmol/L). CLMD and vitamin D deficiency may commonly be present in obese non-diabetic subjects. Individually and combined, both deficiencies predispose non-diabetic patients to increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases. Maintaining normal Mg status may improve the beneficial effects of vitamin D on cardiometabolic risk indicators. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Nutritional Considerations for Healthy Aging and Reduction in Age-Related Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlisky, Julie; Bloom, David E; Beaudreault, Amy R; Tucker, Katherine L; Keller, Heather H; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Fielding, Roger A; Cheng, Feon W; Jensen, Gordon L; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin N

    2017-01-01

    A projected doubling in the global population of people aged ≥60 y by the year 2050 has major health and economic implications, especially in developing regions. Burdens of unhealthy aging associated with chronic noncommunicable and other age-related diseases may be largely preventable with lifestyle modification, including diet. However, as adults age they become at risk of "nutritional frailty," which can compromise their ability to meet nutritional requirements at a time when specific nutrient needs may be high. This review highlights the role of nutrition science in promoting healthy aging and in improving the prognosis in cases of age-related diseases. It serves to identify key knowledge gaps and implementation challenges to support adequate nutrition for healthy aging, including applicability of metrics used in body-composition and diet adequacy for older adults and mechanisms to reduce nutritional frailty and to promote diet resilience. This review also discusses management recommendations for several leading chronic conditions common in aging populations, including cognitive decline and dementia, sarcopenia, and compromised immunity to infectious disease. The role of health systems in incorporating nutrition care routinely for those aged ≥60 y and living independently and current actions to address nutritional status before hospitalization and the development of disease are discussed. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. Nutritional status and long-term mortality in hospitalised patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Runa; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often have difficulties with keeping their weight. The aim of this investigation was to study nutritional status in hospitalised Nordic COPD patients and to investigate the association between nutritional status and long-term mortality in...... years. Further studies are needed in order to show whether identifying and treating weight loss and depletion of fat-free mass (FFM) is a way forward in improving the prognosis for hospitalised COPD patients. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep...

  18. Nutritional Considerations for Healthy Aging and Reduction in Age-Related Chronic Disease12

    OpenAIRE

    Shlisky, Julie; Bloom, David E; Beaudreault, Amy R; Tucker, Katherine L; Keller, Heather H; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Fielding, Roger A; Cheng, Feon W; Jensen, Gordon L; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin N

    2017-01-01

    A projected doubling in the global population of people aged ≥60 y by the year 2050 has major health and economic implications, especially in developing regions. Burdens of unhealthy aging associated with chronic noncommunicable and other age-related diseases may be largely preventable with lifestyle modification, including diet. However, as adults age they become at risk of “nutritional frailty,” which can compromise their ability to meet nutritional requirements at a time when specific nutr...

  19. Anemia and iron, zinc, copper and magnesium deficiency in Mexican adolescents: National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; Gaona, Berenice; Villalpando, Salvador; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Robledo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    To describe the frequency of anemia and iron, zinc, copper and magnesium deficiencies among Mexican adolescents in the probabilistic survey ENSANUT 2006. The sample included 2447 adolescents aged 12 to 19 y. Capillary hemoglobin and venous blood samples were collected to measure the concentrations of ferritin, sTFR, CRP, zinc, iron, copper and magnesium. Logistic regression models were constructed to assess the risk for mineral deficiencies. The overall prevalence of anemia was 11.8 and 4.6%, body iron deficiency 18.2 and 7.9% for females and males, respectively. Overall prevalence of tissue iron deficiency was 6.9%, low serum copper were 14.4 and 12.25%; zinc 28.4 and 24.5%, magnesium 40 and 35.3%; for females and males, respectively. There is a high prevalence of mineral deficiency in Mexican adolescents; females were more prone to have more mineral deficiencies. Nutritional interventions are necessaries in order to reduce and control them.

  20. Nutritional Deficiencies, the Absence of Information and Caregiver Shortcomings: A Qualitative Analysis of Infant Feeding Practices in Rural China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Yue

    Full Text Available Development during the first two years of life is critical and has a lasting impact on a child's health. Poor infant and child nutrition can lead to deficiencies in essential micronutrients, which may cause a weakened immune system and lasting effects on children's growth and development. Recent studies in rural Shaanxi Province found an anemia prevalence of 54.3% among rural children aged six to twelve months. While new large-scale, quantitative research has begun to catalogue the extent of child malnutrition and anemia, no effort has yet been made to look more closely at the potential reasons for rural children's nutritional deficiencies through qualitative analysis. This study aims to elucidate some of the fundamental causes of poor complementary feeding practices that may lead to anemia among children in rural Shaanxi Province, China.We interviewed sixty caregivers participating in a large survey on child health and nutrition. We conducted three waves of interviews with children's primary caregivers in seventeen rural villages within four nationally-designated poverty counties in the southern part of Shaanxi Province.The qualitative analysis reveals that poor complementary feeding practices are common across our sample. Information gathered from our interviews suggests that complementary feeding practices are impeded by two constraints: absence of understanding topics related to infant health and nutrition under caregivers, as well as inadequate sources of information on these topics. Poverty does not appear to constrain child feeding practices.Our results uncover lack of proper knowledge on infant and child nutrition among rural caregivers in China. This situation causes them to fail incorporating micronutrient rich foods in their children's diet. Age-appropriate complementary feeding can stimulate children's physical and cognitive development, but in its absence it leads to iron-deficiency anemia. We suggest that steps be taken to educate

  1. Caregiver perceptions of iron deficiency anemia and iron replacement therapies in young children with nutritional iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S., approximately 3% of young children develop iron deficiency anemia (IDA), with Hispanic/Latino children disproportionately affected. IDA is associated with inferior neurodevelopmental outcomes. Treatment with oral iron mitigates its consequences yet non-adherence often results in treatme...

  2. Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Patients with Chronic Intestinal Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Hvistendahl, Mark; Naimi, Rahim M.

    2017-01-01

    in treating IF with home parenteral nutrition (HPN), this study documents the HPN evolution and describes the demographics and outcome in one of the world's largest single-center cohorts. Methods: We included patients with IF discharged with HPN from 1970-2010. Data were extracted according to European...... Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism classifications from the Copenhagen IF database. Results: Over the decades, we observed an exponential increase in the number of HPN patients. The 508 patients with IF collectively received HPN for 1751 years. While receiving HPN, 211 patients with IF (42...

  3. Polypharmacy, chronic diseases and nutritional markers in community-dwelling older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Aparecida Silveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polypharmacy is a common practice among the elderly, but few studies have evaluated its association with nutritional markers. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of polypharmacy and its association with nutritional markers, chronic diseases, sociodemographic and health variables. This research is part of the Study Elderly/Goiânia, which evaluated 418 elderly community in a cross-sectional design. Polypharmacy was defined as the use of five or more concomitant medications. The following nutritional markers were investigated: BMI, waist circumference, percentage body fat, weight gain and loss, use of diet, daily consumption of fruits, vegetables, skimmed and whole milk. Multivariate analysis was performed using hierarchical Poisson regression, with significance level set at 5%. The prevalence of polypharmacy was 28% (95%CI 23.1 - 32.5, with a significant association with feminine gender, age range 75 - 79 years, eutrophic nutritional status and obesity, use of diet, poor self-rated health and presence of two, three or more chronic diseases. The high prevalence of polypharmacy and its association with nutritional markers and chronic diseases call the attention for the need of nutritional surveillance and monitoring in the elderly.

  4. Nutritional support in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Peter F; Stratton, Rebecca J; Elia, Marinos

    2012-06-01

    The efficacy of nutritional support in the management of malnutrition in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is controversial. Previous meta-analyses, based on only cross-sectional analysis at the end of intervention trials, found no evidence of improved outcomes. The objective was to conduct a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to clarify the efficacy of nutritional support in improving intake, anthropometric measures, and grip strength in stable COPD. Literature databases were searched to identify RCTs comparing nutritional support with controls in stable COPD. Thirteen RCTs (n = 439) of nutritional support [dietary advice (1 RCT), oral nutritional supplements (ONS; 11 RCTs), and enteral tube feeding (1 RCT)] with a control comparison were identified. An analysis of the changes induced by nutritional support and those obtained only at the end of the intervention showed significantly greater increases in mean total protein and energy intakes with nutritional support of 14.8 g and 236 kcal daily. Meta-analyses also showed greater mean (±SE) improvements in favor of nutritional support for body weight (1.94 ± 0.26 kg, P groups. This systematic review and meta-analysis showed that nutritional support, mainly in the form of ONS, improves total intake, anthropometric measures, and grip strength in COPD. These results contrast with the results of previous analyses that were based on only cross-sectional measures at the end of intervention trials.

  5. Relationship between nutritional risk and exercise capacity in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in male patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xizheng; Liu, Jinming; Luo, Yanrong; Xu, Xiaowen; Han, Zhiqing; Li, Hailing

    2015-01-01

    Objective The nutritional status of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is associated with their exercise capacity. In the present study, we have explored the relationship between nutritional risk and exercise capacity in severe male COPD patients. Methods A total of 58 severe COPD male patients were enrolled in this study. The patients were assigned to no nutritional risk group (n=33) and nutritional risk group (n=25) according to the Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS, 2002) criteria. Blood gas analysis, conventional pulmonary function testing, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing were performed on all the patients. Results Results showed that the weight and BMI of the patients in the nutritional risk group were significantly lower than in the no nutritional risk group (Pnutritional risk group was significantly higher than that of the nutritional risk group (Pnutritional risk group were significantly lower than those of the no nutritional risk group (Pnutritional risk based on NRS 2002 in severe COPD male patients is supported by these results of this study. PMID:26150712

  6. Mannose-binding lectin deficiency and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodruff PG

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Richard K Albert,1 John Connett,2 Jeffrey L Curtis,3,4 Fernando J Martinez,3 MeiLan K Han,3 Stephen C Lazarus,5 Prescott G Woodruff51Medicine Service, Denver Health and Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, 2Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 3Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 4Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, VA Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI, 5Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, and Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USABackground: Mannose-binding lectin is a collectin involved in host defense against infection. Whether mannose-binding lectin deficiency is associated with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is debated.Methods: Participants in a study designed to determine if azithromycin taken daily for one year decreased acute exacerbations had serum mannose-binding lectin concentrations measured at the time of enrollment.Results: Samples were obtained from 1037 subjects (91% in the trial. The prevalence of mannose-binding lectin deficiency ranged from 0.5% to 52.2%, depending on how deficiency was defined. No differences in the prevalence of deficiency were observed with respect to any demographic variable assessed, and no differences were observed in time to first exacerbation, rate of exacerbations, or percentage of subjects requiring hospitalization for exacerbations in those with deficiency versus those without, regardless of how deficiency was defined.Conclusion: In a large sample of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease selected for having an increased risk of experiencing an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, only 1.9% had mannose-binding lectin concentrations below the normal range and we found no association between mannose-binding lectin

  7. Nutrition Prescription to Achieve Positive Outcomes in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Ash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD, management of diet is important in prevention of disease progression and symptom management, however evidence on nutrition prescription is limited. Recent international CKD guidelines and literature was reviewed to address the following question “What is the appropriate nutrition prescription to achieve positive outcomes in adult patients with chronic kidney disease?” Databases included in the search were Medline and CINAHL using EBSCOhost search engine, Embase and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews published from 2000 to 2009. International guidelines pertaining to nutrition prescription in CKD were also reviewed from 2000 to 2013. Three hundred and eleven papers and eight guidelines were reviewed by three reviewers. Evidence was graded as per the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia criteria. The evidence from thirty six papers was tabulated under the following headings: protein, weight loss, enteral support, vitamin D, sodium, fat, fibre, oral nutrition supplements, nutrition counselling, including protein and phosphate, nutrients in peritoneal dialysis solution and intradialytic parenteral nutrition, and was compared to international guidelines. While more evidence based studies are warranted, the customary nutrition prescription remains satisfactory with the exception of Vitamin D and phosphate. In these two areas, additional research is urgently needed given the potential of adverse outcomes for the CKD patient.

  8. Nutritional Considerations for Healthy Aging and Reduction in Age-Related Chronic Disease12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlisky, Julie; Bloom, David E; Beaudreault, Amy R; Tucker, Katherine L; Keller, Heather H; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Fielding, Roger A; Cheng, Feon W; Jensen, Gordon L; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin N

    2017-01-01

    A projected doubling in the global population of people aged ≥60 y by the year 2050 has major health and economic implications, especially in developing regions. Burdens of unhealthy aging associated with chronic noncommunicable and other age-related diseases may be largely preventable with lifestyle modification, including diet. However, as adults age they become at risk of “nutritional frailty,” which can compromise their ability to meet nutritional requirements at a time when specific nutrient needs may be high. This review highlights the role of nutrition science in promoting healthy aging and in improving the prognosis in cases of age-related diseases. It serves to identify key knowledge gaps and implementation challenges to support adequate nutrition for healthy aging, including applicability of metrics used in body-composition and diet adequacy for older adults and mechanisms to reduce nutritional frailty and to promote diet resilience. This review also discusses management recommendations for several leading chronic conditions common in aging populations, including cognitive decline and dementia, sarcopenia, and compromised immunity to infectious disease. The role of health systems in incorporating nutrition care routinely for those aged ≥60 y and living independently and current actions to address nutritional status before hospitalization and the development of disease are discussed. PMID:28096124

  9. [Nutritional Assessment and Management for Patients with Chronic Liver Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Hee

    2018-04-25

    When liver disease is severe, the prognosis can be worse if the patient is malnourished. Adequate nutritional support for patients with liver diseases can improve the patient's condition and prognosis. In the case of liver cirrhosis, malnutrition can occur due to a variety of causes, including poor oral intake, maldigestion, malabsorption, associated renal disease, and metabolic abnormalities. For a nutritional assessment, it is important to check the dietary intake, change in body composition, including anthropometry, and a functional assessment of muscle. Counselling and oral or enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition as in other diseases. If esophageal varices are present, care should be taken when installing a feeding tube, but if there are ascites, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is contraindicated because of the risk of complications. Calories of 30-35 kcal/kg/day and protein from 1.2 to 1.5 g/kg/day are appropriate. Protein restriction is unnecessary unless the hepatic encephalopathy is severe. A late evening snack and branched chain amino acids can be helpful. In the case of cholestasis, the supply of manganese and copper should be restricted. Sarcopenia in patients with liver cirrhosis is also prevalent and associated with the prognosis.

  10. Copper and Zinc Deficiency in a Patient Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition During a Shortage of Parenteral Trace Element Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Eric; Dotson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Drug shortages in the United States, including parenteral nutrition (PN) components, have been common in recent years and can adversely affect patient care. Here we report a case of copper and zinc deficiency in a patient receiving PN during a shortage of parenteral trace element products. The management of the patient's deficiencies, including the use of an imported parenteral multi-trace element product, is described. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease (CKD) Eating Right Related Topics English English French Español Section Navigation Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) What ... foods, instead of deep frying. Cook with nonstick cooking spray or a small amount of olive oil ...

  12. [Nutritional care of elderly people with chronic alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugerolles, Héléna; Mathy, Fabrice; Emery, Sophie; Hervé, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The management of elderly people with chronic alcoholism involves several players, including dieticians.Without stigmatisingthe person or apportioning blame, the challenge is to enable them to become a player in their treatment. Long-term support is required.

  13. Differences of Excess and Deficiency Zheng in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B by Urinary Metabonomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujun Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM physicians stratify patients with the same disease into different subtypes in order to guide the appropriate treatment, which is called Zheng (TCM syndrome classification. Excess and deficiency ZHENG is a couple of basic ZHENGs of maladjusted body nature, reflecting the struggling state of human body and pathogenic factor and is important and prevalently exists in the ZHENG classification of many diseases. The present work using chronic hepatitis B (CHB as an entry point explored the substance connotation of excess and deficiency ZHENG with the metabonomic technology based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The different substantial basis of two ZHENGs suggested that CHB patients could be categorized into two groups with diverse pathogenesis. The differential metabolites and disturbed pathways compared to not-obvious ZHENG characters patients (without ZHENG group/WZ were selected in both of the two ZHENGs. The ROC analysis demonstrated that five metabolites had a greater potential to be the clinic biomarkers of EZ or DZ. And excess ZHENG revealed a higher level of immune function than deficiency ZHENG. We are eager to transform the concept of traditional excess and deficiency ZHENGs to modern therapeutic approaches, with the prospect to help to promote personalized medicine.

  14. Autophagy deficiency in macrophages enhances NLRP3 inflammasome activity and chronic lung disease following silica exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessop, Forrest; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Rhoderick, Joseph F.; Shaw, Pamela K.; Holian, Andrij

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an important metabolic mechanism that can promote cellular survival following injury. The specific contribution of autophagy to silica-induced inflammation and disease is not known. The objective of these studies was to determine the effects of silica exposure on the autophagic pathway in macrophages, as well as the general contribution of autophagy in macrophages to inflammation and disease. Silica exposure enhanced autophagic activity in vitro in Bone Marrow derived Macrophages and in vivo in Alveolar Macrophages isolated from silica-exposed mice. Impairment of autophagy in myeloid cells in vivo using Atg5 fl/fl LysM-Cre + mice resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity and inflammation after silica exposure compared to littermate controls, including elevated IL-18 and the alarmin HMGB1 in the whole lavage fluid. Autophagy deficiency caused some spontaneous inflammation and disease. Greater silica-induced acute inflammation in Atg5 fl/fl LysM-Cre + mice correlated with increased fibrosis and chronic lung disease. These studies demonstrate a critical role for autophagy in suppressing silica-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation in disease development. Furthermore, this data highlights the importance of basal autophagy in macrophages and other myeloid cells in maintaining lung homeostasis. - Highlights: • Silica exposure increases autophagy in macrophages. • Autophagy deficient mice have enhanced inflammation and silicosis. • Autophagy deficiency in macrophages results in greater silica-induced cytotoxicity. • Autophagy deficiency in macrophages increases extracellular IL-18 and HMGB1.

  15. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den G.J.; de Goeij, J.J.M.; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (<1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver,

  16. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, G.J. van den; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendruiks, H.F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (< 1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver,

  17. Impaired Latent Inhibition in GDNF-Deficient Mice Exposed to Chronic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Buhusi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Increased reactivity to stress is maladaptive and linked to abnormal behaviors and psychopathology. Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS alters catecholaminergic neurotransmission and remodels neuronal circuits involved in learning, attention and decision making. Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF is essential for the physiology and survival of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra and of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. Up-regulation of GDNF expression during stress is linked to resilience; on the other hand, the inability to up-regulate GDNF in response to stress, as a result of either genetic or epigenetic modifications, induces behavioral alterations. For example, GDNF-deficient mice exposed to chronic stress exhibit alterations of executive function, such as increased temporal discounting. Here we investigated the effects of CUS on latent inhibition (LI, a measure of selective attention and learning, in GDNF-heterozygous (HET mice and their wild-type (WT littermate controls. No differences in LI were found between GDNF HET and WT mice under baseline experimental conditions. However, following CUS, GDNF-deficient mice failed to express LI. Moreover, stressed GDNF-HET mice, but not their WT controls, showed decreased neuronal activation (number of c-Fos positive neurons in the nucleus accumbens shell and increased activation in the nucleus accumbens core, both key regions in the expression of LI. Our results add LI to the list of behaviors affected by chronic stress and support a role for GDNF deficits in stress-induced pathological behaviors relevant to schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders.

  18. Treatment of chronic portal-systemic encephalopathy with lactose in lactase-deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, M; Márquez, M A; García-Ramos, G; Escobedo, V; Murillo, H; Guevara, L; Lisker, R

    1980-12-01

    A controlled cross-over clinical comparison of lactose (50 g twice a day) versus neomycin (3 g/day) plus milk of magnesia, was carried out in ten cirrhotic patients with chronic portal-systemic encephalopathy and documented lactase deficiency. Serial semiquantitative assessments were done including: mental state, asterixis, number connection test, electroencephalogram, and blood ammonia levels. No patient developed deep coma while ingesting either lactose or neomycin plus milk of magnesia. However, a significant improvement of mental state, asterixis, number connection tests, and electroencephalograms was evident during lactose therapy. apart from mild diarrhea and bloating, no severe side effects were noticeable during lactose treatment. Based on these results, we propose lactose as a valuable alternate treatment of portal-systemic encephalopathy in lactase-deficient populations.

  19. Retarding chronic kidney disease (CKD progression: a practical nutritional approach for non-dialysis CKD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bellizzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report on a patient with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD in whom several nutritional issues are briefly discussed from a practical point of view. The article is accompanied by an editorial published in this Journal in relation to the 2nd International Conference of the European Renal Nutrition working group at ERA-EDTA—“Retarding CKD progression: readily available through comprehensive nutritional management?”—and focuses on several practical topics associated with the nutritional approach for the conservative treatment of non-dialysis CKD. The article is divided into 3 sections—basic nutritional assessment, nutritional targets, and nutritional follow-up in non-dialysis CKD—linked to 3 consecutive steps of the clinical follow-up of the patient and the related nutritional concerns and intervention. First visit: Baseline nutritional assessment and basic nutritional considerations in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD • What nutritional assessment/monitoring for protein-energy wasting (PEW should be employed? • Is a body mass index (BMI of 21 kg/m2 adequate? • What phosphate target should be pursued? • What are the nutritional habits in patients with incident CKD? • What protein needs and amount of dietary protein should be pursued? • Does the quality of protein matter? • What amount of dietary salt should be employed? How should this be obtained? • How should normal serum phosphate be achieved? • What diet should be recommended? Is a vegetarian diet an option? Second visit: Major nutritional targets in non-dialysis CKD • Consequences of unintentional weight loss • What is the role of the renal dietitian in helping the patient adhere to a renal diet? Intermediate visits: Nutritional follow-up in non-dialysis CKD • What treatment for calcium/parathyroid hormone (PTH will affect CKD progression? Final visits: • Would a dietary recall/intensive dietary education improve adherence with

  20. Selenium toxicity but not deficient or super-nutritional selenium status vastly alters the transcriptome in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunde Roger A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein and mRNA levels for several selenoproteins, such as glutathione peroxidase-1 (Gpx1, are down-regulated dramatically by selenium (Se deficiency. These levels in rats increase sigmoidally with increasing dietary Se and reach defined plateaus at the Se requirement, making them sensitive biomarkers for Se deficiency. These levels, however, do not further increase with super-nutritional or toxic Se status, making them ineffective for detection of high Se status. Biomarkers for high Se status are needed as super-nutritional Se intakes are associated with beneficial as well as adverse health outcomes. To characterize Se regulation of the transcriptome, we conducted 3 microarray experiments in weanling mice and rats fed Se-deficient diets supplemented with up to 5 μg Se/g diet. Results There was no effect of Se status on growth of mice fed 0 to 0.2 μg Se/g diet or rats fed 0 to 2 μg Se/g diet, but rats fed 5 μg Se/g diet showed a 23% decrease in growth and elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, indicating Se toxicity. Rats fed 5 μg Se/g diet had significantly altered expression of 1193 liver transcripts, whereas mice or rats fed ≤ 2 μg Se/g diet had Conclusion This study shows that Se toxicity (5 μg Se/g diet in rats vastly alters the liver transcriptome whereas Se-deficiency or high but non-toxic Se intake elicits relatively few changes. This is the first evidence that a vastly expanded number of transcriptional changes itself can be a biomarker of Se toxicity, and that identified transcripts can be used to develop molecular biomarker panels that accurately predict super-nutritional and toxic Se status.

  1. Association between nutritional status and subjective health status in chronically ill children attending special schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Koen; van der Velde, Kelly; Joosten, Pieter; Rutten, Hans; Hulst, Jessie; Dulfer, Karolijn

    2016-04-01

    In hospitalized children with a chronic disease, malnutrition was associated with a lower subjective health status. In outpatient children with a chronic disease attending special schools, this association has never been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the association between nutritional status and subjective health status in chronically ill children attending special schools. Overall, 642 children, median age 9.8 years (IQR 7.7-11.5), 60 % male, 72 % Caucasian, were included in this prospective study in nine special schools for chronically ill children in the Netherlands. Overall malnutrition was assessed as: acute malnutrition (nutritional risk-screening tool STRONGkids. Subjective health status was assessed with EQ-5D. Overall, 16 % of the children had overall malnutrition: 3 % acute and 13 % chronic malnutrition. Nurses reported 'some/severe problems' on the health status dimensions mobility (15 %), self-care (17 %), usual activities (19 %), pain/discomfort (22 %), and anxiety/depression (22 %) in chronically ill children. Their mean visual analogue scale score (VAS) was 73.0 (SD 11.1). Malnutrition, medication usage, and younger age explained 38 % of the variance of the VAS score. The presence of overall malnutrition in chronically ill children attending special schools was associated with lower subjective health status, especially in younger children and in those with chronic medication usage. Therefore, it is important to develop and use profile-screening tools to identify these children.

  2. Effects of peridialytic oral supplements on nutritional status and quality of life in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Meri Kay; Shah, Niyati A; Vilay, A Mary; Thomas, Joseph; Kraus, Michael A; Mueller, Bruce A

    2009-03-01

    Our objective was to determine the effects of peridialytic oral supplements on nutritional markers and quality of life (QOL) in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. This trial was open, prospective, nonrandomized, and comparative. This study was performed at an outpatient hemodialysis unit in a teaching hospital. This study included 88 adults with chronic kidney disease at stage 5. This study involved directly observed nutrition therapy with >or=1 can of enteral nutrition (Nepro) with each hemodialysis session thrice weekly for 3 months, or standard care. Changes in biochemical markers of nutritional status and QOL, as measured by the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form, were determined. Peridialytic oral nutrition resulted in a significant difference between the nutrition and comparison groups in serum albumin change over time (P = .03; repeated-measures analysis of variance with covariates). Mean (+/-SD) serum albumin concentration did not differ between baseline and month 3 in the nutrition group (3.68 +/- 0.33 g/dL vs. 3.75 +/- 0.40 g/dL; P = .12), but in the comparison group, serum albumin levels declined significantly (3.93 +/- 0.34 g/dL at baseline versus 3.81 +/- 0.37 g/dL at month 3; P = .04). The "role-physical" domain score of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form significantly changed over time in the nutrition group versus the comparison group (P = .02; repeated-measures analysis of variance with covariates). Nepro was well-tolerated, and greater than 80% of the prescribed therapy was consumed. Oral nutrition, as part of structured, directly observed peridialytic therapy in chronic hemodialysis patients, was well-accepted, and resulted in the maintenance of serum albumin levels and QOL with respect to impact of physical health on daily activities. These findings need to be confirmed in a randomized, controlled trial.

  3. Nutritional zinc deficiency, immune capacity and malaria : a study on mediators of immunity to malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum in African children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mbugi, E.V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis aimed at investigating the role of genetic and nutritional factors that affect the immune response to malaria in Tanzanian children. The introductory chapter (Chapter 1) reviews the importance of nutritional deficiencies, particularly of zinc, and presents the hypothesis that such

  4. Nutritional Status and Risk Factors for Chronic Disease in Urban-Dwelling Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunschweig, Carol L.; Gomez, Sandra; Sheean, Patricia; Tomey, Kristin M.; Rimmer, James; Heller, Tamar

    2004-01-01

    Nutritional status and biochemical risk factors for chronic disease were assessed in 48 community-dwelling adults with Down syndrome in the Chicago area. Dietary intake was measured using a food frequency questionnaire completed by the participant's primary caregiver; anthropometric measures included height and weight and waist circumference.…

  5. [Severe vitamin D deficiency in children from Punta Arenas, Chile: Influence of nutritional status on the response to supplementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Karin; Le Roy, Catalina; Iñiguez, Germán; Borzutzky, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    There is a high risk of vitamin D (VD) deficiency in the population of southern Chile that can be treated with VD supplements. Weight excess (WE) can influence the response to supplements. To study the prevalence of VD deficiency and the effect of cholecalciferol (VD3) supplements in healthy children from Punta Arenas, Chile, and evaluate a possible association with nutritional status. Demographic and anthropometric data, as well as laboratory assessment of serum 25-hidroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and other bone metabolism parameters were evaluated. After baseline evaluation, children were supplemented with VD3 1600 IU/day for one month, after which 25OHD was retested. Of the 108 children studied, 50% were boys, and had a mean age of 9.6±0.5 years. Nutritional assessment showed that 39% had normal weight, 46% were overweight, and 15% were obese. Median 25OHD was 10.9ng/ml: 96.3% had deficiency (30ng/ml). Children with WE had a significantly lower increase in 25OHD than children with normal weight (5±5.5 vs. 7.7±4.9, p=03). Children with WE may require 32% higher VD dose than normal weight children to attain the same 25OHD concentration. Chilean schoolchildren from Punta Arenas have high prevalence of WE and VD deficiency, with a majority in the range of severe VD deficiency. WE interferes in the response to VD supplementation, leading to a lower increase in 25OHD. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. RISK FACTORS AND PECULIARITIES OF NUTRITION OF INFANTS WITH CHRONIC DIARRHEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Lazareva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of observation of children from 2,5 months to 4 years old, treated in hospital with diagnosis chronic diarrhea are analyzed in this article. Diarrhea debuted in first year of living in most cases. The reason of onset of diarrhea often was alimentary factor. Hereditary predisposition, pathologic pregnancy, and diseases in women at the time of pregnancy played an important role in development of disease. Nutrition of children in early age was characterized by low duration of breast feeding and early conversion of children to the mixed and artificial feeding. Main food stuffs in children's nutrition on mixed and artificial feeding was adapted milk formulas, and rarely non adapted milk food (cow's and goat's milk, kefir. Only 30% of mothers had a definite knowledge of proper child's feeding and advantages of breast feeding. This fact indicates necessity of more active educational work by medical staff.Key words: children, chronic diarrhea, nutrition.

  7. Cooking and Nutrition Basics. An Instructors Guide for Teaching Cooking Skills and Basic Nutrition to the Chronically Mentally Ill Who Are Being Trained for Independent Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barngrover, Lavone

    Designed for those with teaching skills as well as those without and for those with backgrounds in nutrition and those without, this handbook provides information on how to organize and conduct nutrition education and cooking training for the chronically mentally ill. The first section describes the pilot program which developed the handbook,…

  8. Unique dietary patterns and chronic disease risk profiles of adult men: the Framingham nutrition studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, Barbara E; Quatromoni, Paula A; Pencina, Michael; Kimokoti, Ruth; Nam, Byung-H O; Cobain, Sonia; Kozak, Waldemar; Appugliese, Danielle P; Ordovas, Jose; D'Agostino, Ralph B

    2005-11-01

    To identify the dietary patterns of adult men and examine their relationships with nutrient intake and chronic disease risk over long-term follow-up. Baseline 145-item food frequency questionnaires from 1,666 Framingham Offspring-Spouse cohort men were used to identify comprehensive dietary patterns. Independent 3-day dietary records at baseline and 8 years later provided estimates of subjects' nutrient intake by dietary pattern. Chronic disease risk factor status was compared at baseline and 16-year follow-up across all male dietary patterns. Cluster analysis was applied to food frequency data to identify non-overlapping male dietary patterns. Analysis of covariance and logistic regression were used to compare nutrient intake, summary nutritional risk scores, and chronic disease risk status at baseline and follow-up by male dietary pattern. Five distinct and comprehensive dietary patterns of Framingham Offspring-Spouse men were identified and ordered according to overall nutritional risk: Transition to Heart Healthy, Higher Starch, Average Male, Lower Variety, and Empty Calories. Nutritional risk was high and varied by dietary pattern; key nutrient contrasts were stable over 8-year follow-up. Chronic disease risk also varied by dietary pattern and specific subgroup differences persisted over 16 years, notably rates of overweight/obesity and smoking. Quantitative cluster analysis applied to food frequency questionnaire data identified five distinct, comprehensive, and stable dietary patterns of adult Framingham Offspring-Spouse cohort men. The close associations between the dietary patterns, nutritional risk, and chronic disease profiles of men emphasize the importance of targeted preventive nutrition interventions to promote health in the male population.

  9. Impact of nutritional status on body functioning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and how to intervene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniwidyaningsih, Wahju; Varraso, Raphaëlle; Cano, Noel; Pison, Christophe

    2008-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is the fifth leading cause of mortality in the world. This study reviews diet as a risk or protective factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mechanisms of malnutrition, undernutrition consequences on body functioning and how to modulate nutritional status of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Different dietary factors (dietary pattern, foods, nutrients) have been associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the course of the disease. Mechanical disadvantage, energy imbalance, disuse muscle atrophy, hypoxemia, systemic inflammation and oxidative stress have been reported to cause systemic consequences such as cachexia and compromise whole body functioning. Nutritional intervention makes it possible to modify the natural course of the disease provided that it is included in respiratory rehabilitation combining bronchodilators optimization, infection control, exercise and, in some patients, correction of hypogonadism. Diet, as a modifiable risk factor, appears more as an option to prevent and modify the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Reduction of mechanical disadvantage, physical training and anabolic agents should be used conjointly with oral nutrition supplements to overcome undernutrition and might change the prognosis of the disease in some cases. Major research challenges address the role of systemic inflammation and the best interventions for controlling it besides smoking cessation.

  10. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  11. The High Prevalence of Anemia in Cambodian Children and Women Cannot Be Satisfactorily Explained by Nutritional Deficiencies or Hemoglobin Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Frank Tammo; Dahl, Miriam; Chamnan, Chhoun; Poirot, Etienne; Kuong, Khov; Sophonneary, Prak; Sinuon, Muth; Greuffeille, Valerie; Hong, Rathavuth; Berger, Jacques; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine Amma; Laillou, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anemia is highly prevalent in Cambodian women and children, but data on causes of anemia are scarce. We performed a national micronutrient survey in children and women that was linked to the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey 2014 (CDHS-2014) to assess the prevalence of micronutrient deficiency, hemoglobin disorders and intestinal parasite infection. Methods: One-sixth of households from the CDHS-2014 were selected for a follow-up visit for the micronutrient survey. Households were visited from two weeks to two months after the CDHS-2014 visit. Data on micronutrient status were available for 1512 subjects (792 children and 720 women). Results: Anemia was found in 43% of the women and 53% of the children. Hemoglobin disorders affected >50% of the population, with Hemoglobin-E the most prevalent disorder. Deficiencies of iron (ferritin children, the prevalence of iron, vitamin A, vitamin B12 or folic acid deficiency was anemia in children, whereas in the women none of the factors was significantly associated with anemia. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was more prevalent in children children and women, the prevalence of IDA was anemia were hookworm infection and zinc and folic acid deficiency. Over 40% of the anemia was not caused by nutritional factors. Conclusion: The very high prevalence of anemia in Cambodian women and children cannot be explained solely by micronutrient deficiencies and hemoglobin disorders. Micronutrient interventions to improve anemia prevalence are likely to have limited impact in the Cambodian setting. The focus of current interventions to reduce the high prevalence of anemia in children and women should be broadened to include zinc and folic acid as well as effective anti-hookworm measures. PMID:27338454

  12. Functional Significance of Iron Deficiency. Annual Nutrition Workshop Series, Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwonwu, Cyril O., Ed.

    Iron deficiency anemia impairs cognitive performance, physical capacity, and thermoregulation. Recent evidence suggests that these functional impairments are also evident in subclinical nonanemic iron deficiency. Very little is known about the relevance of the latter to the health of blacks, who have been shown to have the highest prevalence of…

  13. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein deficiency promotes early onset and the chronic development of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Carlsen, Stefan; Nandakumar, Kutty

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a homopentameric protein in cartilage. The development of arthritis, like collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), involves cartilage as a target tissue. We have investigated the development of CIA in COMP-deficient mice. METHODS: COMP......-deficient mice in the 129/Sv background were backcrossed for 10 generations against B10.Q mice, which are susceptible to chronic CIA. COMP-deficient and wild-type mice were tested for onset, incidence, and severity of arthritis in both the collagen and collagen antibody-induced arthritis models. Serum anti......-collagen II and anti-COMP antibodies as well as serum COMP levels in arthritic and wild-type mice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: COMP-deficient mice showed a significant early onset and increase in the severity of CIA in the chronic phase, whereas collagen II-antibody titers were...

  14. NUTRITIONAL DISORDERS BY DEFICIENCY IN SUNFLOWER var. CATISSOL-01 DESORDENS NUTRICIONAIS POR DEFICIÊNCIA EM GIRASSOL var. CATISSOL-01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato de Mello Prado

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    This study was carried out in aerated nutritive solution to evaluate the effect of macronutrients, boron, and zinc omission on plant growth, dry matter production, visual symptoms and nutritional status of sunflower. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with two replications and nine treatments corresponding to the complete solution (macro and micronutrients and individual omission of N, P, K, Ca, S, Mg, B and Zn. We measured plant height, number of leaves, stem diameter, leaf area and dry matter, and leaf content of macro and micronutrients. The individual omissions of N, P, K, and Ca were the most limiting to plant dry matter production, and resulted in morphological alterations represented by characteristical visual symptoms of the nutritional deficiency of each element.

    KEY-WORDS: Helianthus annuus; deficiency; nutritional disorder; nutrients; visual symptom.

    Objetivando-se avaliar o efeito da omissão de macronutrientes, de boro e de zinco no crescimento, na produção de matéria seca, nos sintomas visuais e no estado nutricional de plantas de girassol. Conduziu-se um experimento em solução nutritiva aerada. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, com nove tratamentos, que corresponderam à solução completa (macro e micronutrientes e à omissão individual de N, P, K, Ca, S, Mg, B e Zn, em duas repetições. Avaliou-se a altura das plantas, o número de folhas, o diâmetro do caule, a área foliar e a matéria seca, além do teor foliar de macro e micronutrientes. As omissões individuais de N, P, K e Ca foram as mais limitantes para o crescimento vegetativo do girassol, avaliado sobre a produção de matéria seca das plantas. Isso resultou em alterações morfológicas que se traduziram em sintomas visuais característicos da defici

  15. Nutritional status in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: role of hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguso, Comasia A; Luthy, Christophe

    2011-02-01

    In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), malnutrition and limited physical activity are very common and contribute to disease prognosis, whereas a balance between caloric intake and exercise allows body weight stability and muscle mass preservation. The goal of this review is to analyze the implications of chronic hypoxia on three key elements involved in energy homeostasis and its role in COPD cachexia. The first one is energy intake. Body weight loss, often observed in patients with COPD, is related to lack of appetite. Inflammatory cytokines are known to be involved in anorexia and to be correlated to arterial partial pressure of oxygen. Recent studies in animals have investigated the role of hypoxia in peptides involved in food consumption such as leptin, ghrelin, and adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase. The second element is muscle function, which is strongly related to energy use. In COPD, muscle atrophy and muscle fiber shift to the glycolytic type might be an adaptation to chronic hypoxia to preserve the muscle from oxidative stress. Muscle atrophy could be the result of a marked activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as found in muscle of patients with COPD. Hypoxia, via hypoxia inducible factor-1, is implicated in mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy. Third, hormonal control of energy balance seems to be affected in patients with COPD. Insulin resistance has been described in this group of patients as well as a sort of "growth hormone resistance." Hypoxia, by hypoxia inducible factor-1, accelerates the degradation of tri-iodothyronine and thyroxine, decreasing cellular oxygen consumption, suggesting an adaptive mechanism rather than a primary cause of COPD cachexia. COPD rehabilitation aimed at maintaining function and quality of life needs to address body weight stabilization and, in particular, muscle mass preservation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates chronic kidney disease progression after ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Garcia Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Despite a significant improvement in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD, its incidence and prevalence has been increasing over the years. Progressive renal fibrosis is present in CKD and involves the participation of several cytokines, including Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Besides cardiovascular diseases and infections, several studies show that Vitamin D status has been considered as a non-traditional risk factor for the progression of CKD. Given the importance of vitamin D in the maintenance of essential physiological functions, we studied the events involved in the chronic kidney disease progression in rats submitted to ischemia/reperfusion injury under vitamin D deficiency (VDD.Rats were randomized into four groups: Control; VDD; ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI; and VDD+IRI. At the 62 day after sham or IRI surgery, we measured inulin clearance, biochemical variables and hemodynamic parameters. In kidney tissue, we performed immunoblotting to quantify expression of Klotho, TGF-β, and vitamin D receptor (VDR; gene expression to evaluate renin, angiotensinogen, and angiotensin-converting enzyme; and immunohistochemical staining for ED1 (macrophages, type IV collagen, fibronectin, vimentin, and α-smooth mucle actin. Histomorphometric studies were performed to evaluate fractional interstitial area.IRI animals presented renal hypertrophy, increased levels of mean blood pressure and plasma PTH. Furthermore, expansion of the interstitial area, increased infiltration of ED1 cells, increased expression of collagen IV, fibronectin, vimentin and α-actin, and reduced expression of Klotho protein were observed. VDD deficiency contributed to increased levels of plasma PTH as well as for important chronic tubulointerstitial changes (fibrosis, inflammatory infiltration, tubular dilation and atrophy, increased expression of TGF-β1 and decreased expression of VDR and Klotho protein observed in VDD+IRI animals.Through inflammatory

  17. Clinical use of enteral immune nutrition in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-cheng ZHANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the use of enteral immune nutrition preparation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD, regard its efficacy in improving nutritional status, and its influence on immunity and the status of acute inflammatory reaction of the patients. Methods Sixty-two AECOPD patients requiring mechanical ventilation in ICU of our hospital were randomly divided into two groups: immune nutrition group [study group, n=32, receiving Ruineng (a product of Huarui Pharmaceutical Ltd., which contained essential fatty acids, Omega-3 fatty acids, and energy 1.3 kcal/ml] and conventional nutrition group (control group, n=30, receiving the hospital self-made homogenized diet with 1.2 kal/ml. Patients in the two groups took enteral nutrition of equal calorie, and it was given by nasointestinal tube. On the day of admission and the 14th and 18th after admission, venous blood was obtained for the determination of serum albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, C reactive protein (CRP, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6. At the same time upper arm muscle circumference (MAMC was measured at the bed side. The 14-day off-respirator rate and mechanical ventilation time within 28 days were compared between the two groups. Results The 14-day off-respirator rate was higher in study group than in control group (P0.05. Conclusions Compared with homogenized diet, immune enteral nutrition could better improve the nutritional status and immune function, lower the acute inflammatory response level, increase the success rate of early off-respirator in AECOPD patients, therefore, enteral immune nutrition preparation is a better nutrition support solution for AECOPD. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.05.17

  18. Deficiências de macronutrientes no estado nutricional da mamoneira cultivar Iris Deficiencies of macronutrients on nutritional status of castor bean cultivar Iris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Lavres Junior

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste trabalho foram avaliar o efeito da deficiência dos macronutrientes no crescimento e estado nutricional da mamoneira (Ricinus communis L. e a obtenção do quadro sintomatológico das deficiências de N, P, K, Ca, Mg e S. Cultivou-se Ricinus communis L. cultivar Iris em solução nutritiva, tendo como tratamentos soluções completa e deficientes em N, P, K, Ca, Mg e S. Foram determinadas a concentração indireta de clorofila, a atividade da redutase do nitrato, os teores solúveis de N (NO3-, P (H2PO4- e K+ e realizados testes rápidos para N, P e K. As deficiências de N, Ca, S e Mg foram as que mais restringiram a produção de massa de matéria seca, na ordem decrescente: N>Ca>S>Mg>K>P. Os maiores acúmulos de macronutrientes, no tratamento completo, foram observados nas raízes e no limbo das folhas inferiores. As concentrações críticas para N e Ca, ambas no limbo das folhas superiores e, Mg, no pecíolo das inferiores foram, respectivamente, 46,7, 13,8 e 6,5 g kg-1. As deficiências influenciaram as leituras do clorofilômetro. A atividade da redutase do nitrato guardou relação direta com a determinação da clorofila. Os teores de N (NO3-, P (H2PO4- e K+ foram menores nas folhas deficientes em N, P e K, respectivamente, o mesmo acontecendo quando avaliadas pela análise de toque.The objectives of this work were to evaluate the effect of macronutrient deficiencies on growth and on nutritional status of castor beans (Ricinus communis L., and to obtain the symptoms of the lack of N, P, K, Ca, Mg and S. Nutrient solutions containing all macronutrients and those from which one of these elements was omitted were the treatments used. The following determinations were made: chlorophyll (indirectly, nitrate reductase activity, NO3--N, H2PO4--P and K+, both on soluble fractions, and by spot tests. Deficiencies of N, Ca, S and Mg were the most limiting for dry matter production, followed in decreasing order by those of K and

  19. Rethinking Iron Regulation and Assessment in Iron Deficiency, Anemia of Chronic Disease, and Obesity: Introducing Hepcidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Pustacioglu, Cenk; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Braunschweig, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Adequate iron availability is essential to human development and overall health. Iron is a key component of oxygen-carrying proteins, has a pivotal role in cellular metabolism, and is essential to cell growth and differentiation. Inadequate dietary iron intake, chronic and acute inflammatory conditions, and obesity are each associated with alterations in iron homeostasis. Tight regulation of iron is necessary because iron is highly toxic and human beings can only excrete small amounts through sweat, skin and enterocyte sloughing, and fecal and menstrual blood loss. Hepcidin, a small peptide hormone produced mainly by the liver, acts as the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin controls movement of iron into plasma by regulating the activity of the sole known iron exporter ferroportin-1. Downregulation of the ferroportin-1 exporter results in sequestration of iron within intestinal enterocytes, hepatocytes, and iron-storing macrophages reducing iron bioavailability. Hepcidin expression is increased by higher body iron levels and inflammation and decreased by anemia and hypoxia. Importantly, existing data illustrate that hepcidin may play a significant role in the development of several iron-related disorders, including the anemia of chronic disease and the iron dysregulation observed in obesity. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to discuss iron regulation, with specific emphasis on systemic regulation by hepcidin, and examine the role of hepcidin within several disease states, including iron deficiency, anemia of chronic disease, and obesity. The relationship between obesity and iron depletion and the clinical assessment of iron status will also be reviewed. PMID:22717199

  20. Food Versus Pharmacy: Assessment of Nutritional and Pharmacological Strategies to Improve Bone Health in Energy-Deficient Exercising Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southmayd, Emily A; Hellmers, Adelaide C; De Souza, Mary Jane

    2017-10-01

    The review aims to summarize our current knowledge surrounding treatment strategies aimed at recovery of bone mass in energy-deficient women suffering from the Female Athlete Triad. The independent and interactive contributions of energy status versus estrogen status on bone density, geometry, and strength have recently been reported, highlighting the importance of addressing both energy and estrogen in treatment strategies for bone health. This is supported by reports that have identified energy-related features (low body weight and BMI) and estrogen-related features (late age of menarche, oligo/amenorrhea) to be significant risk factors for low bone mineral density and bone stress injury in female athletes and exercising women. Nutritional therapy is the recommended first line of treatment to recover bone mass in energy-deficient female athletes and exercising women. If nutritional therapy fails after 12 months or if fractures or significant worsening in BMD occurs, pharmacological therapy may be considered in the form of transdermal estradiol with cyclic oral progestin (not COC).

  1. State of cognitive development in children 5-6 years of age with nutritional iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chechel V.V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Features of the development of cognitive functions in children 5-6 years of age with iron deficiency (ID were studied and the relationship of the revealed features of iron deficiency degree was established. After clinical and laboratory examination 205 children aged 5-6 years, pupils of pre-school institutions were included in the study. The core group consisted of 155 children, including 105 children with latent iron deficiency (LID and 50 children with iron deficiency anemia (IDA I degree. The control group consisted of 50 healthy children. To study cognitive function, "Approximate comprehensive program of study of children's readiness for school" was used. A significant decrease of average data of all mental functions (perception, memory, language, thinking, ima¬gination in children 5-6 years old with ID, most pronounced in children with IDA was revealed. Indicators of cognitive functions correspond predominantly to a mild and moderate level of development in children with IDA, the average - in children with LID, good and high - in healthy children. There was a significant direct correlation between the level of cognitive functioning and the level of hemoglobin, serum iron and ferritin. The effect of iron deficiency on the development of indicators of cognitive function toward their reduce in preschool children was established. The level of cognitive functioning depends on the degree of iron deficiency.

  2. Phase angle as a nutritional evaluation tool in all stages of chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, W A F; Lento, D F; Baluz, K; Ramalho, A

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition is commonly and frequently under-diagnosed in clinical settings in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) due to the limitations of nutritional evaluation methods in this population. We hypothesized that the bioelectrical impedance analysis derived phase angle (BIA-derived PhA) might be considered as a nutritional indicator in CLD since it represents either cell death or malnutrition characterized by changes in cellular membrane integrity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the BIA-derived PhA as a nutritional evaluation tool in all stages of CLD, including chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Liver-related death and survival were evaluated. A total of 66 patients were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. For the nutritional diagnosis, mid-arm circumference (MAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC) and Subject Global Assessment (SGA) were evaluated. Biochemical and clinical evaluations were performed. Our results showed that PhA was higher in well-nourished patients, according to SGA and in the patients without hepatic encephalopathy. PhA correlated significantly with MAMC, MAC and albumin and was inversely correlated with age. No correlation was found between PhA values and the Child-Pugh score and ascites. PhA was strongly associated with survival and PhA ≤ 5.18º with relative risk increase of 2.5 for death. We conclude that the BIA-derived PhA is a relevant nutritional evaluation tool in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and HCC and the role of PhA in the prediction of survival in CLD should be examined further in a controlled study.

  3. Prognostic value of nutritional status in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landbo, C; Prescott, E; Lange, P

    1999-01-01

    The association between low body mass index (BMI) and poor prognosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common clinical observation. We prospectively examined whether BMI is an independent predictor of mortality in subjects with COPD from the Copenhagen City Heart...... Study. In total, 1,218 men and 914 women, aged 21 to 89 yr, with airway obstruction defined as an FEV(1)-to-FVC ratio of less than 0.7, were included in the analyses. Spirometric values, BMI, smoking habits, and respiratory symptoms were assessed at the time of study enrollment, and mortality from COPD...... with that in subjects of normal weight of 1.64 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.20 to 2.23) in men and 1.42 (95% CI: 1.07 to 1.89) in women. However, the association between BMI and survival differed significantly with stage of COPD. In mild and moderate COPD there was a nonsignificant U-shaped relationship...

  4. Chest radiographs in acquired antibody deficiency syndrome with chronic granulomatous inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaiyumi, S.A.A.; Peest, D.; Galanski, M.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1990-01-01

    Ten cases of acquired antibody deficiency syndrome with chronic granulomatous infection were diagnosed in our hospital during the past 10 years. We were able to perform a retrospective analysis of the initial and follow-up chest radiographs in 8 of these patients. The following pathological findings could be demonstrated: 1. increased bronchovascular markings in the basal lung fields, 2. reticular densities in the middle and basal lung fields, 3. confluent nodular densities of varying size in the periphery of the basal and middle fields, 4. pulmonary infiltrates in the middle and lower lobes, 5. hilar node enlargement of moderate extent. Findings 2, 3 and 5 completely disappeared under steroid therapy whereas 1 showed only partial recovery. If both the radiologic and serologic findings are considered, it is possible to differentiate this disease from sarcoidosis. (orig.) [de

  5. A Case Study Of Dietary Deficiency On Peripheral Nerve Functions In Chronic Alcoholic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbind Kumar Choudhary

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alcoholic neuropathy is most likely result of dietary deficiency rather than direct neurotoxic effect of alcohol. A male alcoholic patient aged 34- years old with clear clinical sign of peripheral neuropathy was examined after his habit of six years chronic alcoholic drinking. Conduction velocities latencies and nerve action potential amplitudes was measured from median radial common peroneal and sural nerves on respective upper and lower limb and the results showed that there was decrease in conduction velocity of common peroneal and posterior tibial in lower limbs. However sensory nerve conduction SNCV of sural nerve right and left was normal in lower limb. Based on the results observed in our study we conclude that the combination of vitamin B12 uridine and cytidine can be safe and effective in the treatment of patients presenting alcoholic polyneuropathy. So the prognosis of alcoholic peripheral neuropathy is good and independent of age provided that intake of alcohol is withdrawn completely.

  6. Sensitivity to Chronic Methamphetamine Administration and Withdrawal in Mice with Relaxin-3/RXFP3 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Mouna; Lam, Monica; Chua, Berenice E; Smith, Craig M; Gundlach, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant, and cessation of use is associated with reduced monoamine signalling, and increased anxiety/depressive states. Neurons expressing the neuropeptide, relaxin-3 (RLN3), and its cognate receptor, RXFP3, constitute a putative 'ascending arousal system', which shares neuroanatomical and functional similarities with serotonin (5-HT)/dorsal raphe and noradrenaline (NA)/locus coeruleus monoamine systems. In light of possible synergistic roles of RLN3 and 5-HT/NA, endogenous RLN3/RXFP3 signalling may compensate for the temporary reduction in monoamine signalling associated with chronic METH withdrawal, which could alter the profile of 'behavioural despair', bodyweight reductions, and increases in anhedonia and anxiety-like behaviours observed following chronic METH administration. In studies to test this theory, Rln3 and Rxfp3 knockout (KO) mice and their wildtype (WT) littermates were injected once daily with saline or escalating doses of METH (2 mg/kg, i.p. on day 1, 4 mg/kg, i.p. on day 2 and 6 mg/kg, i.p. on day 3-10). WT and Rln3 and Rxfp3 KO mice displayed an equivalent sensitivity to behavioural despair (Porsolt swim) during the 2-day METH withdrawal and similar bodyweight reductions on day 3 of METH treatment. Furthermore, during a 3-week period after the cessation of chronic METH exposure, Rln3 KO, Rxfp3 KO and corresponding WT mice displayed similar behavioural responses in paradigms that measured anxiety (light/dark box, elevated plus maze), anhedonia (saccharin preference), and social interaction. These findings indicate that a whole-of-life deficiency in endogenous RLN3/RXFP3 signalling does not markedly alter behavioural sensitivity to chronic METH treatment or withdrawal, but leave open the possibility of a more significant interaction with global or localised manipulations of this peptide system in the adult brain.

  7. Nutritional and taste characteristics of low-potassium lettuce developed for patients with chronic kidney diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Takuya; Sakuma, Kozue; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Dietary potassium restriction is recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with hyperkalemia. Boiling or soaking vegetables in water is known to decrease their potassium content. However, these methods can also reduce the quantity of other nutrients. Recently, low-potassium (LK) lettuce has been developed for CKD patients with hyperkalemia. This study compared the potassium content, other nutritional values, and taste characteristics of LK lettuce with those of normal lettuce. The...

  8. CMKLR1 deficiency maintains ovarian steroid production in mice treated chronically with dihydrotestosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mi; Huang, Chen; Wang, Yu-Fei; Ren, Pei-Gen; Chen, Li; Xiao, Tian-Xia; Wang, Bao-Bei; Pan, Yan-Fei; Tsang, Benjamin K; Zabel, Brian A; Ma, Bao-Hua; Zhao, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Jian V

    2016-02-19

    Elevated serum chemerin levels correlate with increased severity of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, the role of CMKLR1 signaling in ovarian biology under conditions of excess DHT remains unclear. In this study we compared the effects of continuous 90-day high dose DHT exposure (83.3 □g/day) on wild type and CMKLR1-deficient mice. DHT induced PCOS-like clinical signs in wild type mice as well as significant changes in the expression of hormone receptors, steroid synthesis enzymes, and BMPs and their receptors. In contrast, CMKLR1-deficient mice significantly attenuated DHT-induced clinical signs of PCOS and alterations in ovarian gene expression. To determine whether the BMP4 signaling pathway was involved in the pathogenic effects of CMKLR1 signaling in DHT-induced ovarian steroidogenesis, antral follicles were isolated from wild type and CMKLR1 knockout (KO) mice and treated in vitro with combinations of hCG, DHT, and BMP4 inhibitors. BMP4 inhibition attenuated the induction effects of hCG and DHT on estrogen and progesterone secretion in CMKLR1 KO mice, but not in WT mice, implicating the BMP4 signaling pathway in the CMKLR1-dependent response to DHT. In conclusion, CMKLR1 gene deletion attenuates the effects of chronic DHT treatment on ovarian function in experimental PCOS, likely via BMP4 signaling.

  9. Chronic low-dose ultraviolet-induced mutagenesis in nucleotide excision repair-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Nami; Kubota, Yoshino; Hishida, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    UV radiation induces two major types of DNA lesions, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 pyrimidine-pyrimidine photoproducts, which are both primarily repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER). Here, we investigated how chronic low-dose UV (CLUV)-induced mutagenesis occurs in rad14Δ NER-deficient yeast cells, which lack the yeast orthologue of human xeroderma pigmentosum A (XPA). The results show that rad14Δ cells have a marked increase in CLUV-induced mutations, most of which are C→T transitions in the template strand for transcription. Unexpectedly, many of the CLUV-induced C→T mutations in rad14Δ cells are dependent on translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase η, encoded by RAD30, despite its previously established role in error-free TLS. Furthermore, we demonstrate that deamination of cytosine-containing CPDs contributes to CLUV-induced mutagenesis. Taken together, these results uncover a novel role for Polη in the induction of C→T transitions through deamination of cytosine-containing CPDs in CLUV-exposed NER deficient cells. More generally, our data suggest that Polη can act as both an error-free and a mutagenic DNA polymerase, depending on whether the NER pathway is available to efficiently repair damaged templates.

  10. [Study on the iodine nutrition and iodine deficiency disorders status in pasturing areas of Tibet-a non-epidemic area of iodine deficiency disorders in serious iodine deficiency district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Dan; Li, Su-Mei; Li, Xiu-Wei; Wang, Hai-Yan; Li, Shu-Hua; Nima, Cangjue; Danzeng, Sangbu; Zhuang, Guang-Xiu

    2010-08-01

    To explore the status of iodine nutrition and iodine deficiency disorders in the pasturing areas and agricultural regions in Tibet. 30 families were selected respectively in pastoral Dangxiong county and agricultural Qushui county of Lasa. Drinking water and edible salt were collected for testing the iodine contents. In each type of the following populations including children aged 8 - 10, women of child-bearing age and male adults, 50 subjects were randomly sampled to examine their urinary iodine contents. Among them, 50 children and 50 women were randomly selected for goiter examination by palpation. Water iodine content was less than 2 µg/L, both in pasturing area and in agricultural areas. There was no iodized salt used in the families of pasturing areas, while 90% people consumed iodized salt in agricultural areas. The median of urinary iodine in pasturing area was 50.2 µg/L, significantly lower than that of agricultural area (193.2 µg/L). However, the goiter rate of children and women in pasturing area was significantly lower than that in agricultural area. Although iodine intake of populations in pasturing area of Tibet was severely deficient, there was no epidemic of Iodine Deficiency Disorders. This phenomenon noticed by the researchers deserved further investigation.

  11. Prognostic importance of objective nutritional indexes in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, Taro; Arimoto, Takanori; Funayama, Akira; Kadowaki, Shinpei; Otaki, Yoichiro; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Shishido, Tetsuro; Miyashita, Takehiko; Miyamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kubota, Isao

    2013-11-01

    Although malnutrition indicates an unfavorable prognosis in some clinical settings, the association between nutritional indexes and outcomes for patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) is unclear. All the previously established objective nutritional indexes were evaluated. The controlling nutritional status score (CONUT), prognostic nutritional index (PNI), and geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) were determined for 388 consecutive patients with CHF (mean age 69.6±12.3 years). The prevalence of malnutrition in this cohort was 60-69%. Patients were followed prospectively, with the endpoints being death due to a cardiovascular event or re-hospitalization. There were 130 events, including 33 deaths and 97 re-hospitalizations, during a mean follow-up period of 28.4 months. Patients experiencing cardiovascular events showed impaired nutritional status, higher CONUT scores, lower PNI scores, and lower GNRI scores, compared with those who did not experience cardiovascular events. CONUT score [hazard ratio 40.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 10.8-154.8], PNI score (hazard ratio 6.4, 95% CI 5.4-25.1), and GNRI score (hazard ratio 11.6, 95% CI 3.7-10.0) were independently associated with cardiovascular events. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that there was a significantly higher incidence of cardiovascular events in patients who were malnourished than in those who were not. Malnutrition was common in patients with CHF. Evaluation of nutritional status may provide additional prognostic information in patients with CHF. Copyright © 2013 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reproduction of muscular dystrophy in broiler chickens through early nutrition with deficient feed supplemented with oxidised fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Stoyanchev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was the experimental reproduction of muscular dystrophy in broiler chickens through early nutrition with a diet deficient in vitamin E, selenium and sulfur-containing amino acids, supplemented with oxidised fat in order to throw light on the etiopathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, course, treatment and prognosis of the disorder. The experiments were conducted with 1 day-old Cobb 500 broiler chickens. By the 3rd day of life, they were divided into 60 experimental and 20 control birds; the latter were fed a standard compound feed whereas the former group received a diet deficient in sulfur-containing amino acids methionine and cysteine (reduced up to 50%, vitamin E, and Se (from 0.2 mg/kg in standard feed to 0.01 mg/kg, further supplemented with 4% oxidized fat containing peroxides and aldehydes with peroxide number of the food 8.0 meq O2/kg. Peroxide number (meq O2/kg was determined in pork lard oxidised through UV irradiation as per BSS 11374:1986. The clinical signs of experimental muscle dystrophy in broiler chickens appeared first by the 19th day of feeding, when the severe clinical form was established and by the 21st and 25th day in the severe and the mild clinical form. The proportion of diseased chickens during the clinical period was the highest (93.3% mild and 46.6% severe clinical form, and gradually decreased after the treatment with Seled®. The 7-day treatment with Seled® at a dose of 0.06 mg/kg per os for compensation of Se deficiency and replacement of the deficient compound feed with a regular one contributed to recovery of birds by the 31st day after the therapy of mild experimental muscular dystrophy while birds affected by the severe clinical form could not recovery.

  13. Essential fatty acid deficiency in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition 1,2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, P. B.; Høy, Carl-Erik; Mortensen, Per B

    1998-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN), initiated in patients with severe malabsorption or decreased oral intake, may exhaust stores of essential fatty acids and cause clinical manifestations, mainly dermatitis. Plasma fatty acid profiles were measured by gas-liquid chromatography in 37 healthy control...

  14. Hemodialysis duration impairs food intake and nutritional parameters in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekki, Khedidja; Remaoun, Mustapha; Belleville, Jacques; Bouchenak, Malika

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hemodialysis (HD) duration on food intake and nutritional markers in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Twenty CKD patients received maintenance HD over a 9-year period. At the beginning of the study (T0) and at 3-year intervals (T1, T2, and T3) during the 9-year follow-up, a nutritional survey using the 24-h recall and record method was repeated for 4 days, and the blood samples were drawn. The results from T0 were used as references. Nutritional status was assessed through food intake, nutritional markers (urea, uric acid, creatinine, cholesterol, total protein, and albumin), and anthropometric measurements (height, dry weight, and body mass index). HD duration was correlated with energy intake (r = -0.89, P protein intake (r = -0.50, P intakes were noted in patients at T1 (-8%), T2 (-38%), and T3 (-59%) with decreased fiber intakes. Lipid intake was diminished by 11, 17, and 25% in patients, respectively, at T1, T2, and T3. The consumption of milk and dairy products, meats, fish, eggs, fruits, vegetables, and fat was reduced at T1, T2, and T3. In conclusion, long-term HD fails to correct undernutrition caused by CKD. Long-term dialysis complications could be reduced with preventive measures, including the use of biocompatible membranes and high-dose dialysis. Consequently, patients could experience a decreased prevalence of protein-energy malnutrition.

  15. Chronicity of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency, Part 2: Radiographic Predictors of Early Graft Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshinari; Kita, Keisuke; Takao, Rikio; Amano, Hiroshi; Uchida, Ryohei; Shiozaki, Yoshiki; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Kinugasa, Kazutaka; Mae, Tatsuo; Horibe, Shuji

    2018-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that long-term anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency can give rise to an abnormal tibiofemoral relationship and subsequent intra-articular lesions. However, the effects of chronic ACL deficiency (ACLD) on early graft failure after anatomic reconstruction remain unclear. We hypothesized that patients with long-term ACLD lasting more than 5 years would have a greater rate of early graft failure due to insufficient intraoperative reduction of the tibia and that the preoperative and immediately postoperative abnormal tibiofemoral relationship in the sagittal plane, such as anterior tibial subluxation (ATS), would correlate with the graft status on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 358 patients who had undergone anatomic ACL reconstruction with hamstring grafts were divided into 5 groups based on chronicity of ACLD: (1) 0 to 6 months, (2) 6 months to 1 year, (3) 1 to 2 years, (4) 2 to 5 years, and (5) longer than 5 years. Preoperatively and immediately postoperatively, lateral radiographs in full extension were taken in all patients to evaluate the tibiofemoral relationship, specifically with regard to ATS, space for the ACL (sACL), and extension angle. All patients underwent MRI at 6 months to reveal graft status. Groups with a high rate of graft failure were further analyzed to compare demographic and radiographic factors between the intact and failure subgroups, followed by multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify predisposing factors. Graft failure without trauma was observed in 4 (1.8%), 0 (0%), 1 (3.7%), 3 (9.7%), and 8 patients (17.7%) in groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Of the 76 patients in groups 4 and 5, significant differences were noted between the failure and intact subgroups in preoperative ATS (4.9 vs 2.4 mm, respectively; P failure (odds ratio, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.37-7.46). Early graft failure at 6 months increased in patients with ACLD

  16. [Nutritional evaluation, micronutrient deficiencies and anemia among female adolescents in an urban and a rural zone from Zulia state, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Pablo; Leal, Jorymar; Amaya, Daysi; Chávez, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Female adolescents in reproductive age are a susceptible group to anemia and micronutrient deficiencies. The objective of this study was to know the nutritional, anthropometric and dietetic status, the prevalence of anemia, depletion of iron deposits (FeD) and Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) in female adolescents. Seventy-eight not pregnant female adolescents (15.9 +/- 1.1 years old), from an urban and a periurban zone of Maracaibo, and a rural zone near this city, without infectious and inflammatory processes, were analyzed. Anemia in adolescents was considered when Hb zone showed significant lower values of weight (p = 0.0024), height (p = 0.0027), body mass index BMI (p = 0.0487), fatty area (p = 0.0183), MCV (p = 0.0241), MCH (p = 0.0488), MHCC (p = 0.0228), and the highest prevalence of anemia (66.67%), anemia+FeD (33.33%), and anemia+FeD+RVAD (5.56%), with respect to adolescents from the urban zone. Although, anemic adolescents from the rural zone showed a non significant decrease of the iron percentage adjustment. Iron requirements are increased during adolescence, reaching a maximum at the peak of growth and remaining almost as high in girls after menarche, to replace menstrual losses. The low iron status among adolescents from the rural zone determine that this is a high risk group to anemia and FeD and they require prevention, control and suplementation strategies.

  17. Relationship between household wealth inequality and chronic childhood under-nutrition in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Rathavuth; Banta, James E; Betancourt, Jose A

    2006-12-05

    Household food insecurity and under-nutrition remain critically important in developing countries struggling to emerge from the scourge of poverty, where historically, improvements in economic conditions have benefited only certain privileged groups, causing growing inequality in health and healthcare among the population. Utilizing information from 5,977 children aged 0-59 months included in the 2004 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey , this study examined the relationship between household wealth inequality and chronic childhood under-nutrition. A child is defined as being chronically undernourished or whose growth rate is adversely stunted, if his or her z-score of height-for-age is more than two standard deviations below the median of international reference. Household wealth status is measured by an established index based on household ownership of durable assets. This study utilized multivariate logistic regressions to estimate the effect of household wealth status on adverse childhood growth rate. The results indicate that children in the poorest 20% of households are more than three time as likely to suffer from adverse growth rate stunting as children from the wealthiest 20% of households (OR=3.6; 95% CI: 3.0, 4.3). The effect of household wealth status remain significantly large when the analysis was adjusted for a child's multiple birth status, age, gender, antenatal care, delivery assistance, birth order, and duration that the child was breastfed; mother's age at childbirth, nutritional status, education; household access to safe drinking water, arsenic in drinking water, access to a hygienic toilet facility, cooking fuel cleanliness, residence, and geographic location (OR=2.4; 95% CI: 1.8, 3.2). This study concludes that household wealth inequality is strongly associated with childhood adverse growth rate stunting. Reducing poverty and making services more available and accessible to the poor are essential to improving overall childhood health

  18. Relationship between household wealth inequality and chronic childhood under-nutrition in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betancourt Jose A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Household food insecurity and under-nutrition remain critically important in developing countries struggling to emerge from the scourge of poverty, where historically, improvements in economic conditions have benefited only certain privileged groups, causing growing inequality in health and healthcare among the population. Methods Utilizing information from 5,977 children aged 0-59 months included in the 2004 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey , this study examined the relationship between household wealth inequality and chronic childhood under-nutrition. A child is defined as being chronically undernourished or whose growth rate is adversely stunted, if his or her z-score of height-for-age is more than two standard deviations below the median of international reference. Household wealth status is measured by an established index based on household ownership of durable assets. This study utilized multivariate logistic regressions to estimate the effect of household wealth status on adverse childhood growth rate. Results The results indicate that children in the poorest 20% of households are more than three time as likely to suffer from adverse growth rate stunting as children from the wealthiest 20% of households (OR=3.6; 95% CI: 3.0, 4.3. The effect of household wealth status remain significantly large when the analysis was adjusted for a child's multiple birth status, age, gender, antenatal care, delivery assistance, birth order, and duration that the child was breastfed; mother's age at childbirth, nutritional status, education; household access to safe drinking water, arsenic in drinking water, access to a hygienic toilet facility, cooking fuel cleanliness, residence, and geographic location (OR=2.4; 95% CI: 1.8, 3.2. Conclusion This study concludes that household wealth inequality is strongly associated with childhood adverse growth rate stunting. Reducing poverty and making services more available and accessible

  19. Comparison between Total Parenteral Nutrition Vs. Partial Parenteral Nutrition on Serum Lipids Among Chronic Ventilator Dependent Patients; A Multi Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radpay, Rojan; Poor Zamany Nejat Kermany, Mahtab; Radpay, Badiozaman

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is very common among chronically hospitalized patients, especially those in the intensive care unit (ICU). Identifying the patients at risk and providing suitable nutritional support can prevent and/or overcome malnutrition in them. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and partial parenteral nutrition (PPN) are two common routes to deliver nutrition to hospitalized patients. We conducted a multicenter, prospective double blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and compare their adverse effects of each method. 97 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the inclusion criteria. Serum protein, serum albumin, serum transferrin, and total lymphocyte count were measured on days 7 and 14. We did not find any statistically significant differences in clinical status or laboratory values between the two groups but there were significant improvements in measured lab values between days 7 and 14 (pnutritional status in each groups. This study shows that both TPN and PPN can be used safely in chronic ICU patients to provide nutritional support and prevent catabolic state among chronic critically ill patients. We need to develop precise selection criteria in order to choose the patients who would benefit the most from TPN and PPN. In addition, appropriate laboratory markers are needed to monitor the metabolic requirements of the patients and assess their progress.

  20. Decay-accelerating factor 1 deficiency exacerbates Trypanosoma cruzi-induced murine chronic myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, María E; Ferrer, María F; Novoa, María Mercedes; Song, Wen-Chao; Gómez, Ricardo M

    2012-10-01

    Murine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) has been used to study the role of T-cells in the pathogenesis of human inflammatory idiopathic myositis. Absence of decay-accelerating factor 1 (Daf1) has been shown to enhance murine T-cell responses and autoimmunity. To determine whether Daf1 deficiency can exacerbate Tc-induced myositis, C57BL/6 DAF(+/+) and DAF(-/-) mice were inoculated with 5 × 10(4) trypomastigotes, and their morbidity, parasitemia, parasite burden, histopathology, and T-cell expansion were studied in the acute and chronic stages. DAF(-/-) mice had lower parasitemia and parasite burden but higher morbidity, muscle histopathology, and increased number of CD44(+) (activated/memory phenotype) splenic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells. An enhanced CD8(+) T-cell immune-specific response may explain the lower parasitemia and parasite burden levels and the increase in histopathological lesions. We propose that Tc-inoculated DAF(-/-) mice are a useful model to study T-cell mediated immunity in skeletal muscle tissues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Nutrition and Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thai HbH:Vietnamese Relevant links Living with Thalassemia NUTRITION AND EXERCISE ▶ Nutrition and Diet ▶ Diet for the ... Thalassemia (for providers) Exercise for Patients with Thalassemia Nutrition and Diet Nutritional deficiencies are common in thalassemia, ...

  2. Nutritional deficiencies in the developing world: current status and opportunities for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yasir; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2010-12-01

    Several contributory factors such as poverty, lack of purchasing power, household food insecurity, and limited general knowledge about appropriate nutritional practices increase the risk of undernutrition in developing countries. The synergistic interaction between inadequate dietary intake and disease burden leads to a vicious cycle that accounts for much of the high morbidity and mortality in these countries. Three groups of underlying factors contribute to inadequate dietary intake and infectious disease: inadequate maternal and child care, household food insecurity, and poor health services in an unhealthy environment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of chronic complications, metabolic control and nutritional intake in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toeller, M; Buyken, A E; Heitkamp, G

    1999-01-01

    and proliferative retinopathy were more common. Persons from the eastern European and the German centres consumed undesirably high amounts of cholesterol, total and saturated fat. Overall, improvements in the prevention, detection and management of diabetes complications in persons with type 1 diabetes......) and chronic diabetes complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiovascular disease) were all considerably more frequent in the eastern European centres. HbA1c was lower in the German centres than in the total EURODIAB cohort or in the north-western European centres, but severe hypoglycaemia......This study compares the prevalence of chronic complications, the quality of metabolic control and the nutritional intake in people with type 1 diabetes in different European regions. The EURODIAB Complications Study included a sample of 3250 European patients with type 1 diabetes stratified...

  4. Loss of synaptic zinc transport in progranulin deficient mice may contribute to progranulin-associated psychopathology and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Stefanie; Heidler, Juliana; Albuquerque, Boris; Valek, Lucie; Altmann, Christine; Wilken-Schmitz, Annett; Schäfer, Michael K E; Wittig, Ilka; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2017-11-01

    Affective and cognitive processing of nociception contributes to the development of chronic pain and vice versa, pain may precipitate psychopathologic symptoms. We hypothesized a higher risk for the latter with immanent neurologic diseases and studied this potential interrelationship in progranulin-deficient mice, which are a model for frontotemporal dementia, a disease dominated by behavioral abnormalities in humans. Young naïve progranulin deficient mice behaved normal in tests of short-term memory, anxiety, depression and nociception, but after peripheral nerve injury, they showed attention-deficit and depression-like behavior, over-activity, loss of shelter-seeking, reduced impulse control and compulsive feeding behavior, which did not occur in equally injured controls. Hence, only the interaction of 'pain x progranulin deficiency' resulted in the complex phenotype at young age, but neither pain nor progranulin deficiency alone. A deep proteome analysis of the prefrontal cortex and olfactory bulb revealed progranulin-dependent alterations of proteins involved in synaptic transport, including neurotransmitter transporters of the solute carrier superfamily. In particular, progranulin deficiency was associated with a deficiency of nuclear and synaptic zinc transporters (ZnT9/Slc30a9; ZnT3/Slc30a3) with low plasma zinc. Dietary zinc supplementation partly normalized the attention deficit of progranulin-deficient mice, which was in part reminiscent of autism-like and compulsive behavior of synaptic zinc transporter Znt3-knockout mice. Hence, the molecular studies point to defective zinc transport possibly contributing to progranulin-deficiency-associated psychopathology. Translated to humans, our data suggest that neuropathic pain may precipitate cognitive and psychopathological symptoms of an inherent, still silent neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Multiple vitamin deficiencies in a patient with a history of chronic alcohol excess and self-neglect in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Jon Mark; Naylor, Greg; Colver, Graham; Powers, Hilary J; Masters, Paul

    2014-09-22

    We report a case of inadequate diet (caused by extreme self-neglect and alcohol excess) which led to chronic severe deficiencies of vitamins A, D and E. At presentation the patient had widespread follicular hyperkeratosis of the skin, keratomalacia of both eyes and a severe cognitive impairment. He responded well to treatment including high dose parenteral vitamins, but lasting impairments in his vision and cognition have caused permanent disability. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Multiple vitamin deficiencies in a patient with a history of chronic alcohol excess and self-neglect in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, Jon Mark; Naylor, Greg; Colver, Graham; J Powers, Hilary; Masters, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of inadequate diet (caused by extreme self-neglect and alcohol excess) which led to chronic severe deficiencies of vitamins A, D and E. At presentation the patient had widespread follicular hyperkeratosis of the skin, keratomalacia of both eyes and a severe cognitive impairment. He responded well to treatment including high dose parenteral vitamins, but lasting impairments in his vision and cognition have caused permanent disability.

  7. Sexual orientation measurement and chronic disease disparities: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Joanne G; Jabson, Jennifer M

    2018-02-01

    To examine chronic disease disparities by sexual orientation measurement among sexual minorities. We pooled data from the 2009-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to examine differences in chronic disease prevalence between heterosexual and sexual minority people as defined by sexual identity, lifetime sexual behavior, 12-month sexual behavior, and concordance of lifetime sexual behavior and sexual identity. Self-identified lesbian women reported greater odds of asthma (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.19; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.37-7.47) and chronic bronchitis (aOR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.21-5.72) than self-identified heterosexual women. Self-identified sexual minority women with a history of same-sex sexual behavior reported greater odds of arthritis (aOR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.02-2.74). Compared with heterosexual men, gay men reported greater odds of chronic bronchitis when sexual orientation was defined by sexual identity (aOR, 4.68; 95% CI, 1.90-11.56) or 12-month sexual behavior (aOR, 3.22; 95% CI, 1.27-8.20), as did bisexual men defined by lifetime sexual behavior (aOR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.14-4.89). Bisexual men reported greater odds of asthma when measured by lifetime sexual behavior (aOR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.12-3.19), as did self-identified heterosexual men with a history of same-sex sexual behavior (aOR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.10-4.46). How we define sexual orientation influences our understanding of chronic disease prevalence. Capturing subgroups of sexual minority people in health surveillance is essential for identifying groups most at risk and developing targeted interventions to reduce chronic disease disparities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nutritional and Acquired Deficiencies in Inositol Bioavailability. Correlations with Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Dinicola

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Communities eating a western-like diet, rich in fat, sugar and significantly deprived of fibers, share a relevant increased risk of both metabolic and cancerous diseases. Even more remarkable is that a low-fiber diet lacks some key components—as phytates and inositols—for which a mechanistic link has been clearly established in the pathogenesis of both cancer and metabolic illness. Reduced bioavailability of inositol in living organisms could arise from reduced food supply or from metabolism deregulation. Inositol deregulation has been found in a number of conditions mechanistically and epidemiologically associated to high-glucose diets or altered glucose metabolism. Indeed, high glucose levels hinder inositol availability by increasing its degradation and by inhibiting both myo-Ins biosynthesis and absorption. These underappreciated mechanisms may likely account for acquired, metabolic deficiency in inositol bioavailability.

  9. [Nutritional components and sub-chronic toxicity of genetically modified rice expressing human lactoferrin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yichun; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2012-01-01

    To compare the nutritional components of genetically modified rice expressing human lactoferrin (hLf) with its parental rice, and to observe the sub-chronic toxicity of hLf rice. The nutritional components of hLf rice and its parental rice were determined by the National Standard Methods. Eighty weanling Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups based on their gender and body weight: group A (hLf rice high-dose group with 71.45% rice), group B (hLf rice medium-dose group with 35. 725% rice), group C (parental rice group with 71.01% rice) and group D (AIN-93G diet group), and the latter two groups were used as the control. Body weight, dietary intake, blood routine test, blood biochemical examination, organ coefficient, bone density and the pathology of organs were investigated at the end of a 90-day feeding experiment. Except for human lactoferrin and Fe, there was no difference of main nutritional components, minerals and vitamins between groups. The differences of some indicators of blood routine (WBC, HGB, RBC and MCH), blood biochemistry (AST and GLU), organ coefficient and bone density between group A and B (hLf rice) with group C (parental rice) or group D (AIN-93G) were significant, while no difference of other indicators. Although some differences were observed, all indicators were still in the normal reference range. Therefore, there was no sign of toxic and adverse effects for hLf rice on rats.

  10. Chronic transgenerational vitamin B12 deficiency of severe and moderate magnitudes modulates adiposity-probable underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Muralikrishna, Bojanapalli; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Raghunath, Manchala

    2017-05-06

    We have demonstrated previously that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 deficiency altered body composition and induced adiposity in female C57BL/6 mice. This study aims to elucidate the effects of chronic transgenerational dietary vitamin B12 restriction on body composition and various biochemical parameters in the F1 generation offspring of our mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiency established earlier. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice received, ad libitum, for 4 weeks a (i) control diet, (ii) vitamin B12-restricted diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severely deficient diet), or (iii) vitamin B12-restricted diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderately deficient diet) and then mated with control males. The offspring of control and severely deficient dams continued on the respective diets of their mothers. Few moderately deficient dams were rehabilitated to control diet from parturition and their pups were weaned to control diet. Also, some offspring born to moderately B12 deficient dams were weaned to control diet, while others continued on the same diet as their mothers. Various parameters were determined in the F1 offspring after 12 and 36 weeks of feeding. The results indicate that both severe and moderate maternal vitamin B12 restrictions were associated with accelerated catch-up growth, increased body fat percentage, visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia, fasting hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in the F1 offspring. Inflammation, increased glucocorticoid and oxidative stress and poor antioxidant defence probably underlie these adverse effects. Rehabilitation from parturition but not weaning was beneficial in delaying the onset of the adverse outcomes in the offspring. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(3):400-414, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of States, Districts, and Schools That Required Teaching Nutrition and Dietary Behavior, by School Level 100 80 60 40 20 0 72. ... no comparable variable existed in both survey years. Nutrition Services • 68.6% of schools offered breakfast to students and 63.0% participated ...

  12. The Clinical Significance of Specific Antibody Deficiency (SAD) Severity in Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Anjeni; Dunn, Neha M; Manzur, Angelica; Kashani, Sara; Bossuyt, Xavier; Grammer, Leslie C; Conley, David B; Tan, Bruce K; Kern, Robert C; Schleimer, Robert P; Peters, Anju T

    Despite the increased identification of specific antibody deficiency (SAD) in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), little is known about the relationship between SAD severity and the severity and comorbidities of CRS. The prevalence of an impaired antibody response in the general population is also unknown. The objective of this study was to determine if the SAD severity stratification applies to real-life data of patients with CRS. An electronic health record database was used to identify patients with CRS evaluated for humoral immunodeficiency with quantitative immunoglobulins and Streptococcus pneumoniae antibody titers before and after pneumococcal vaccine. SAD severity was defined, according to the guidelines, based on the numbers of titers ≥1.3 μg/dL after vaccination: severe (≤2 serotypes), moderate (3-6 serotypes), and mild (7-10 serotypes). Comorbidities and therapeutic response were assessed. The prevalence of an impaired antibody response in a normal population was assessed. Twenty-four percent of the patients with CRS evaluated for immunodeficiency had SAD, whereas 11% of a normal population had an impaired immune response to polysaccharide vaccination (P SAD. Twenty-four (10%) had severe SAD, 120 (50%) had moderate SAD, and 95 (40%) had mild SAD. Patients with moderate-to-severe SAD had worse asthma, a greater likelihood of pneumonia, and more antibiotic courses in the 2 years after vaccination than patients with mild SAD. This study provides real world data supporting stratification of SAD by severity, demonstrating a significant increase in the comorbid severity of asthma and infections in CRS patients with moderate-to-severe SAD compared with those with mild SAD and those without SAD. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Association between farming and chronic energy deficiency in rural South India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asvini K Subasinghe

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine factors associated with chronic energy deficiency (CED and anaemia in disadvantaged Indian adults who are mostly involved in subsistence farming. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study in which we collected information on socio-demographic factors, physical activity, anthropometry, blood haemoglobin concentration, and daily household food intake. These data were used to calculate body mass index (BMI, basal metabolic rate (BMR, daily energy expenditure, and energy and nutrient intake. Multivariable backward stepwise logistic regression was used to assess socioeconomic and lifestyle factors associated with CED (defined as BMI<18 kg/m² and anaemia. SETTING: The study was conducted in 12 villages, in the Rishi Valley, Andhra Pradesh, India. SUBJECTS: Individuals aged 18 years and above, residing in the 12 villages, were eligible to participate. RESULTS: Data were available for 1178 individuals (45% male, median age 36 years (inter quartile range (IQR 27-50. The prevalence of CED (38% and anaemia (25% was high. Farming was associated with CED in women (2.20, 95% CI: 1.39-3.49 and men (1.71, 95% CI: (1.06-2.74. Low income was also significantly associated with CED, while not completing high school was positively associated with anaemia. Median iron intake was high: 35.7 mg/day (IQR 26-46 in women and 43.4 mg/day (IQR 34-55 in men. CONCLUSIONS: Farming is an important risk factor associated with CED in this rural Indian population and low dietary iron is not the main cause of anaemia. Better farming practice may help to reduce CED in this population.

  14. Clinical global assessment of nutritional status as predictor of mortality in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lu; Mukai, Hideyuki; Lindholm, Bengt; Heimbürger, Olof; Barany, Peter; Stenvinkel, Peter; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2017-01-01

    The value of subjective global assessment (SGA) as nutritional assessor of protein-energy wasting (PEWSGA) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients depends on its mortality predictive capacity. We investigated associations of PEWSGA with markers of nutritional status and all-cause mortality in CKD patients. In 1031 (732 CKD1-5 non-dialysis and 299 dialysis) patients, SGA and body (BMI), lean (LBMI) and fat (FBMI) body mass indices, % handgrip strength (% HGS), serum albumin, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were examined at baseline. The five-year all-cause mortality predictive strength of baseline PEWSGA and during follow-up were investigated. PEWSGA was present in 2% of CKD1-2, 16% of CKD3-4, 31% of CKD5 non-dialysis and 44% of dialysis patients. Patients with PEWSGA (n = 320; 31%) had higher hsCRP and lower BMI, LBMI, FBMI, %HGS and serum albumin. But, using receiver operating characteristics-derived cutoffs, these markers could not classify (by kappa statistic) or explain variations of (by multinomial logistic regression analysis) presence of PEWSGA. In generalized linear models, SGA independently predicted mortality after adjustments of multiple confounders (RR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.11-1.23). Among 323 CKD5 patients who were re-assessed after median 12.6 months, 222 (69%) remained well-nourished, 37 (11%) developed PEWSGA de novo, 40 (12%) improved while 24 (8%) remained with PEWSGA. The latter independently predicted mortality (RR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.13-1.46). SGA, a valid assessor of nutritional status, is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality both in CKD non-dialysis and dialysis patients that outperforms non-composite nutritional markers as prognosticator.

  15. Adaptation to Chronic Nutritional Stress Leads to Reduced Dependence on Microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkosar, Berra; Kolly, Sylvain; van der Meer, Jan R; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2017-10-24

    Numerous studies have shown that animal nutrition is tightly linked to gut microbiota, especially under nutritional stress. In Drosophila melanogaster , microbiota are known to promote juvenile growth, development, and survival on poor diets, mainly through enhanced digestion leading to changes in hormonal signaling. Here, we show that this reliance on microbiota is greatly reduced in replicated Drosophila populations that became genetically adapted to a poor larval diet in the course of over 170 generations of experimental evolution. Protein and polysaccharide digestion in these poor-diet-adapted populations became much less dependent on colonization with microbiota. This was accompanied by changes in expression levels of dFOXO transcription factor, a key regulator of cell growth and survival, and many of its targets. These evolutionary changes in the expression of dFOXO targets to a large degree mimic the response of the same genes to microbiota, suggesting that the evolutionary adaptation to poor diet acted on mechanisms that normally mediate the response to microbiota. Our study suggests that some metazoans have retained the evolutionary potential to adapt their physiology such that association with microbiota may become optional rather than essential. IMPORTANCE Animals depend on gut microbiota for various metabolic tasks, particularly under conditions of nutritional stress, a relationship usually regarded as an inherent aspect of animal physiology. Here, we use experimental evolution in fly populations to show that the degree of host dependence on microbiota can substantially and rapidly change as the host population evolves in response to poor diet. Our results suggest that, although microbiota may initially greatly facilitate coping with suboptimal diets, chronic nutritional stress experienced over multiple generations leads to evolutionary adaptation in physiology and gut digestive properties that reduces dependence on the microbiota for growth and

  16. PROPOSAL OF A REVISIONAL SURGERY TO TREAT SEVERE NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCY POST-GASTRIC BYPASS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio-Neto, José; Branco-Filho, Alcides José; Nassif, Luis Sérgio; Nassif, André Thá; Masi, Flávia David João De; Gasperin, Graciany

    The gastric bypass has nutritional and electrolyte disturbances rate of approximately 17%. The most common deficits are protein malnutrition, ferric and zinc, in addition to the vitamin. Although rare, some malnutrition stages reach such severity that ends up being necessary hospitalization and sometimes revisional or reversal surgical procedures. To present a proposal of surgical revision for treatment of severe malnutrition after bariatric surgery. The procedure is to reconstitute the food transit through the duodenum and proximal jejunum, keeping the gastric bypass restrictive component. As an additional strategy, the gastric fundus resection is performed, aiming to intensify the suppression of the greline and avoiding excessive weight regain. After initial stabilization, nutritional and electrolytic support, the procedure was performed in two patients as definitive treatment of malnutrition status. Good results were observed at one year follow up. As improvement option and/or resolution of the nutritional alterations, surgical therapy is one of the alternatives. There is still no consensus on the surgical technique to be performed. This procedure is based on pathophysiological factors for the treatment of this condition, with good initial results, without significant clinical alterations. Longer follow-up will determine its effectiveness. O bypass gástrico consta com taxa de distúrbios nutricionais e eletrolíticos de aproximadamente 17%. Os déficits mais frequentes são a desnutrição proteica, férrica e de zinco, além das vitamínicas. Apesar de raros, alguns quadros de desnutrição atingem tal gravidade que acaba sendo indicada internação e, por vezes, procedimentos cirúrgicos revisionais ou de reversão. Apresentar proposta de cirurgia revisional para tratamento de desnutrição severa após bypass gástrico. O procedimento consiste em reconstituir o trânsito alimentar pelo duodeno e jejuno proximal, mantendo o componente restritivo do bypass g

  17. NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE : A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Changes in nutritional status, such as weight loss and malnutrition, are a very common complication in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.These changes primarily affect the patients' quality of life and functional capacity and they are also independent prognostic indicators of both morbidity and mortality. The above information inspired us to evaluate the nutritional status in these patients by measuring daily oral intake and anthropom etric measures. METHOD : This cross - sectional study was conducted during the period October 2008 to April 2009. Seventy two COPD patients in the age group of 40 - 65 years, with an FEV (1 < 65% of predicted and an FEV (1/FVC ratio < 70% were included in the study. All the patients were assessed for anthropometric parameters such as height, body weight (BW, Body Mass Index (BMI, Hip Circumference, waist circumference and mid upper arm circumference (MUAC. Daily dietary intakes were calculated by 24 hour re call method with the help of cups, spoons, and glasses which were standardized with commonly consumed recipes. Standardized models of chapatti, rice, fruits, and snacks items were used for accurate data. Energy and nutrient intakes were derived using the N utritive value of Indian foods. RESULTS : The prevalence of under nutrition were (30/72 41.6% based on body mass index (<18.5 kg/m(2 and (46/72 63.8% based on mid - upper arm circumference (<24 cm.More number of patients was above 60 years of age in the income grouping 3000 - 5000 INR / month living with family members of more than 3 per house. The daily intake of food as compared to reference RDA is as follows energy 54.51%, carbohydrates 84.85%, protein60.52% and Fats 71.2%. CONCLUSION : The prevalence of u nder nutrition were (30/72 41.6% based on body mass index (<18.5 kg/m2 and (46/72 63.8% based on mid - upper arm circumference (<24 cm . Nutritional assessment should be made mandatory in order to recognize

  18. Data on IL-10R neutralization-induced chronic colitis in Lipocalin 2 deficient mice on BALB/c background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Singh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The data herein is related to the research article entitled “Microbiota-inducible Innate Immune, Siderophore Binding Protein Lipocalin 2 is Critical for Intestinal Homeostasis” (Singh et al., 2016 [1] where we have demonstrated that C57BL/6 Lipocalin 2 deficient mice (Lcn2KO developed chronic colitis upon anti-interleukin-10 receptor (αIL-10R monoclonal antibody administration. In the present article, we evaluated the susceptibility of BALB/c Lcn2KO mice and their WT littermates to the αIL-10R neutralization-induced chronic colitis. Our data showed that αIL-10R mAb-treated BALB/c Lcn2KO mice exhibited severe chronic colitis (i.e., splenomegaly, colomegaly, colonic pathology, and incidence of rectal prolapse when compared to WT mice.

  19. Management of chronic lateral instability due to lateral collateral ligament deficiency after total knee arthroplasty: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersilge William J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lateral instability following total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a rare condition with limited report of treatment options. The objective of this case presentation is to demonstrate the outcomes of different surgical procedures performed in a single patient with lateral collateral ligament (LCL deficiency. Case presentation We present a case of chronic lateral instability due to LCL deficiency after primary TKA in a 47-year-old Caucasian woman with an obesity problem. Multiple treatment options have been performed in order to manage this problem, including the following: ligament reconstruction; combined ligament reconstruction and constrained implant; and rotating-hinge knee prosthesis that was the most recent surgery. All ligament reconstruction procedures failed within one year. The varus-valgus constrained prosthesis provided stability for six years. Conclusions Ligament reconstruction alone cannot provide enough stability for the treatment of chronic lateral instability in patients with obesity problems and LCL deficiency. When the reconstruction fails, a salvage procedure with rotating-hinge knee is still available.

  20. Effect and mechanism of micronutrient compound on swimming endurance in mice with nutritional deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-quan WU

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the anti-fatigue effect and possible mechanisms of micronutrient compound. Methods One hundred and twenty-five male Kunming mice (SPF were fed following different feeding stuffs: sufficient feed, i.e. AIN-93M feed (corn starch 46.6%, casein 14%, dextrinized corn starch 15.5%, sucrose 10%, soybean oil 4%, fiber 5%, mineral mix 3.5%, vitamin mix 1%, L-cystine 0.18%, choline chloride 0.138% and tert-butylhydroquinone 8 ppm; insufficient feed (composed the same ingredients as the AIN-93M diet, replacing 30%, 50% or 70% of the content of mineral and vitamin mix with corn starch; compound micronutrient-added feed (CMAF, replacing 30% of the content of mineral and vitamin mix of AIN-93M diet with micronutrient compound composed of (g/kg Vit A 0.25, Vit B1 0.3, Vit B2 0.3, Vit B6 0.35, nicotinic acid 1.5, Vit D 0.05, Vit C 50, Vit E 10, calcium carbonate 180, ferrous glycine 1, zinc lactate 1 and corn starch 755.25. The mice were fed for 14 or 28 d, and then subjected to forced swim test with a load on their tails to exhaustion. The maximal swimming time was recorded. In another experiment, the Kunming mice were fed with corresponding feed for 28 d, and then subjected to forced swim test for 60 min, thereafter the samples of blood and liver were collected immediately. The serum contents of glucose, lactate, nonprotein nitrogen, nonesterified fatty acids and hepatic glycogen were measured. Results The dietary intake of 30% nutritional insufficient group (30% group was significantly decreased compared with normal control group (fed with AIN-93M diet, (P 0.05. The serum glucose and hepatic glycogen decreased and serum lactate, nonprotein nitrogen and nonesterified fatty acids increased in the control group, which were aggravated in nutrient insufficient group and reversed in micronutrient supplementation group. Conclusions Insufficient intake of micronutrients has significant influence on swimming endurance in mice and compound

  1. Systematic review and meta-analysis on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, S A; Lekkerkerker, S J; Fockens, P; Boermeester, M A; van Hooft, J E

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) are at risk of malnutrition due to malabsorption, pain and/or alcohol consumption. This can cause vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency, which is associated with osteoporosis and increased risks of fractures. We aimed to perform a meta-analysis to determine the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in CP patients. Furthermore, we compared these results with healthy controls. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on the literature by searching PubMed and EMBASE (January 2000-December 2015) on CP and vitamin D. Primary outcome was prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency ( 0.05). There is a high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in CP patients. Nevertheless, there is no significant difference in prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency compared to healthy controls. Further research should indicate the clinical relevance and consequences of these findings for clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Vitamin D deficiency is common among adults in Wallonia (Belgium, 51°30' North): findings from the Nutrition, Environment and Cardio-Vascular Health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Axelle; Donneau, Anne-Françoise; Streel, Sylvie; Kolh, Philippe; Chapelle, Jean-Paul; Albert, Adelin; Cavalier, Etienne; Guillaume, Michèle

    2015-08-01

    Data on the vitamin D status of the population of Wallonia (Belgium, 51°30' North) are scarce. This study was carried out to estimate vitamin D deficiency, identify potential determinants, and analyze their relationship with vitamin D supplementation. We tested the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency is common in the general population, particularly among subjects without supplementation. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as a serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration less than 50nmol/L. Data were analyzed from 915 participants of the Nutrition, Environment and Cardio-Vascular Health cross-sectional survey. The median (interquartile range) 25(OH)D level was 53.1 (37.8-69.9) nmol/L, and 44.7% of the subjects were vitamin D deficient. Subjects without vitamin D supplementation were more concerned by vitamin D deficiency than those with supplementation (odds ratio [OR], 3.35; P work evidenced the high prevalence of 25(OH)D deficiency in the general population, especially among nonsupplemented subjects with obesity, low household income, and/or lack of light. Vitamin D supplementation looks effective in our population, especially via a stabilization of vitamin D coverage throughout the seasons. The best dietary strategy to achieve optimal 25(OH)D concentrations all year round in the general population requires more research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Delphi consensus panel on nutritional therapy in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Bianchi, Stefano; Bolasco, Piergiorgio; Brunori, Giuliano; Cupisti, Adamasco; Gambaro, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto; Polito, Pasquale; Santoro, Domenico; Santoro, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The conservative management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) includes nutritional therapy (NT) with the aim to reduce the intake of proteins, phosphorus, organic acids, sodium, and potassium, while ensuring adequate caloric intake. While there is evidence that NT may help to prevent and control metabolic alterations in CKD, the criteria for implementing a low-protein regimen in CKD are still debated. There is no final consensus on the composition of the diet, nor indications for specific patient settings or different stages of CKD. Also when and how to start dietary manipulation of different nutrients in CKD is not well defined. A group of Italian nephrologists participated, under the auspices of the Italian Society of Nephrology, in a Delphi exercise to explore the consensus on some open questions regarding the nutritional treatment in CKD in Italy, generating a consensus opinion for 23 statements on: (1) general principles of NT; (2) indications for and initiation of NT; (3) role of protein-free products; (4) NT safety; (5) integrated management of NT. This Delphi exercise shows that there is broad consensus regarding NT in CKD across a wide range of management areas. These clinician-led consensus statements provide a framework for appropriate guidance on NT in patients with CKD, and are intended as a guide in decision-making whenever possible.

  4. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases: report of a Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2003-01-01

    ..., nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases through the life course 4.2.1 Fetal development and the maternal environment 4.2.2 Infancy 4.2.3 Childhood and adolescence 4.2.4 Adulthood 4.2....

  5. Increased Plasmodium chabaudi malaria mortality in mice with nutritional iron deficiency can be reduced by short-term adjunctive iron supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castberg, Filip C; Maretty, Lasse; Staalsoe, Trine

    2018-01-01

    infected mice had extramedullary splenic haematopoiesis, and iron-supplemented mice had visually detectable intracellular iron stores. CONCLUSIONS: Blood transfusions are the only currently available means to correct severe anaemia in children with malaria. The potential of carefully timed, short...... parts of the world. This has rendered interventions against iron deficiency in malaria-endemic areas controversial. METHODS: The effect of nutritional iron deficiency on the clinical outcome of Plasmodium chabaudi AS infection in A/J mice and the impact of intravenous iron supplementation with ferric...... deficiency was associated with increased mortality from P. chabaudi malaria. This increased mortality could be partially offset by carefully timed, short-duration adjunctive iron supplementation. Moribund animals were characterized by low levels of hepcidin and high levels of fibroblast growth factor 23. All...

  6. There is chronic latent magnesium deficiency in apparently healthy university students

    OpenAIRE

    Hermes Sales, Cristiane; Azevedo Nascimento, Débora; Queiroz Medeiros, Anna Cecília; Costa Lima, Kênio; Campos Pedrosa, Lucia Fátima; Colli, Célia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Magnesium is an essential micronutrient for human body, and its deficiency has been associated with risk of non-communicable diseases. Objective: Assessment of magnesium status, and evaluation of the frequency of magnesium deficiency in a group of healthy adults. Methods: Plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels, and magnesium intake were determined in 115 students (55 women and 60 men), from a public university in Brazil. Results: The medians of magnesium concentration in plasma...

  7. Zinc-deficiency acrodermatitis in a patient with chronic alcoholism and gastric bypass: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Shahsavari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acquired adult-onset zinc deficiency is occasionally reported in patients with malnutrition states, such as alcoholism, or malabsorptive states, such as post-bariatric surgery. The defining symptoms of hypozincemia include a classic triad of necrolytic dermatitis, diffuse alopecia, and diarrhea. We report a case of zinc deficiency in a 39-year-old man with history of gastric bypass surgery and alcoholism. For this patient, severe hypozincemia confirmed acrodermatitis, and zinc supplementation was met with gradual improvement.

  8. A Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Ferric Carboxymaltose in Patients With Iron Deficiency and Chronic Heart Failure in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comín-Colet, Josep; Rubio-Rodríguez, Darío; Rubio-Terrés, Carlos; Enjuanes-Grau, Cristina; Gutzwiller, Florian S; Anker, Stefan D; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    Treatment with ferric carboxymaltose improves symptoms, functional capacity, and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure and iron deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of ferric carboxymaltose treatment vs no treatment in these patients. We used an economic model based on the Spanish National Health System, with a time horizon of 24 weeks. Patient characteristics and ferric carboxymaltose effectiveness (quality-adjusted life years) were taken from the Ferinject® Assessment in patients with IRon deficiency and chronic Heart Failure trial. Health care resource use and unit costs were taken either from Spanish sources, or from the above mentioned trial. In the base case analysis, patients treated with and without ferric carboxymaltose treatment acquired 0.335 and 0.298 quality-adjusted life years, respectively, representing a gain of 0.037 quality-adjusted life years for each treated patient. The cost per patient was €824.17 and €597.59, respectively, resulting in an additional cost of €226.58 for each treated patient. The cost of gaining 1 quality adjusted life year with ferric carboxymaltose was €6123.78. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the model. The probability of ferric carboxymaltose being cost-effective (< €30 000 per quality-adjusted life year) and dominant (more effective and lower cost than no treatment) was 93.0% and 6.6%, respectively. Treatment with ferric carboxymaltose in patients with chronic heart failure and iron deficiency, with or without anemia, is cost-effective in Spain. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Living Without Creatine: Unchanged Exercise Capacity and Response to Chronic Myocardial Infarction in Creatine-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygate, Craig A.; Aksentijevic, Dunja; Dawson, Dana; Hove, Michiel ten; Phillips, Darci; de Bono, Joseph P.; Medway, Debra J.; Sebag-Montefiore, Liam; Hunyor, Imre; Channon, Keith M.; Clarke, Kieran; Zervou, Sevasti; Watkins, Hugh; Balaban, Robert S.; Neubauer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Creatine is thought to be involved in the spatial and temporal buffering of ATP in energetic organs such as heart and skeletal muscle. Creatine depletion affects force generation during maximal stimulation, while reduced levels of myocardial creatine are a hallmark of the failing heart, leading to the widely held view that creatine is important at high workloads and under conditions of pathological stress. Objective We therefore hypothesised that the consequences of creatine-deficiency in mice would be impaired running capacity, and exacerbation of heart failure following myocardial infarction. Methods and Results Surprisingly, mice with whole-body creatine deficiency due to knockout of the biosynthetic enzyme (guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase – GAMT) voluntarily ran just as fast and as far as controls (>10km/night) and performed the same level of work when tested to exhaustion on a treadmill. Furthermore, survival following myocardial infarction was not altered, nor was subsequent LV remodelling and development of chronic heart failure exacerbated, as measured by 3D-echocardiography and invasive hemodynamics. These findings could not be accounted for by compensatory adaptations, with no differences detected between WT and GAMT−/− proteomes. Alternative phosphotransfer mechanisms were explored; adenylate kinase activity was unaltered, and although GAMT−/− hearts accumulated the creatine pre-cursor guanidinoacetate, this had negligible energy-transfer activity, while mitochondria retained near normal function. Conclusions Creatine-deficient mice show unaltered maximal exercise capacity and response to chronic myocardial infarction, and no obvious metabolic adaptations. Our results question the paradigm that creatine is essential for high workload and chronic stress responses in heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:23325497

  10. Dietary mobile apps and their effect on nutritional indicators in chronic renal disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Janice; Porter, Judi

    2015-05-10

    Dietary apps for mobile technology are becoming increasingly available and can assist in recording food and fluid intake for nutrition assessment or monitoring. Patients with chronic renal disease, particularly those on dialysis, are required to make significant dietary changes. This study systematically reviews the current literature to assess whether dietary mobile apps improve dietary intake and clinical outcomes in the renal population, specifically those with Chronic Kidney Disease levels 3-5, including dialysis. A systematic search of Medline Complete, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library was performed and supplemented by manual searches of citation and reference lists. Of the 712 studies considered, five were eligible for inclusion in this review. The quality of each included study was assessed using a Quality Criteria Checklist for Primary Research. Among five studies (two RCTs and three case studies/reports), none found significant changes in nutrient intake, biochemical markers or intradialytic weight gain, through the use of dietary mobile apps. The included studies show potential for clinical benefits of mobile app interventions in a renal population. However there is a need for additional rigorous trials to demonstrate if there is a clinical benefit to mobile phone app interventions in this population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of vitamin C deficiency and chronic ultraviolet-B exposure on corneal ultrastructure: a preliminary investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sally; Cafaro, Thamara A.; Boguslawska, Patrycja J.; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.; Boote, Craig; Harris, Jonathan; Young, Robert; Hiller, Jennifer; Terrill, Nicholas; Meek, Keith M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In the visually debilitating condition of climatic droplet keratopathy, corneal transparency is progressively lost. Although the precise cause of the disease and the mechanism by which it progresses are not known, a lifetime exposure to high solar radiation and a vitamin C–deficient diet may be involved in its development. This study examines the effect of dietary ascorbate levels and ultraviolet (UV)-B exposure on corneal stromal structure. Methods Eight guinea pigs were divided into four treatment groups (A, B, C, and D). For 15 weeks, Groups A and C were fed an ascorbate-rich diet (2 mg/100 g bodyweight/day), while Groups B and D received an ascorbate-deficient diet (0.07 mg/100 g bodyweight/day). For the last 12 weeks of the study, Groups C and D also experienced chronic UVB exposure (0.12 J/cm2 for 40 min/day). Following euthanasia, the corneas were enucleated and their stromal ultrastructure examined using X-ray scattering and electron microscopy. Results UVB exposure resulted in an increased corneal thickness (p<0.001), but this was not accompanied by a widespread expansion of the collagen fibrillar array, and in the case of ascorbate-deficient animals, stromal thickening was associated with the compaction of collagen fibrils (p<0.01). Neither UVB exposure nor ascorbic acid deficiency caused any change in the average diameter or D-periodicity of the stromal collagen fibrils. Conclusions UVB-induced changes in the corneal ultrastructure were most pronounced in animals fed an ascorbic acid–deficient diet. This suggests that ascorbic acid may play a vital role in protecting the corneal stroma from the harmful effects of UVB. PMID:22171156

  12. Interrelationships between chronic tension-type headache, musculoskeletal pain, and vitamin D deficiency: Is osteomalacia responsible for both headache and musculoskeletal pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Headache, musculoskeletal symptoms, and vitamin D deficiency are common in the general population. However, the interrelations between these three have not been delineated in the literature. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively studied a consecutive series of patients who were diagnosed as having chronic tension-type headache (CTTH and were subjected to the estimation of serum vitamin D levels. The subjects were divided into two groups according to serum 25(OH D levels as normal (>20 ng/ml or vitamin D deficient (<20 ng/ml. Results: We identified 71 such patients. Fifty-two patients (73% had low serum 25(OH D (<20 ng/dl. Eighty-three percent patients reported musculoskeletal pain. Fifty-two percent patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for chronic widespread pain. About 50% patients fulfilled the criteria for biochemical osteomalacia. Low serum 25(OH D level (<20 ng/dl was significantly associated with headache, musculoskeletal pain, and osteomalacia. Discussion: These suggest that both chronic musculoskeletal pain and chronic headache may be related to vitamin D deficiency. Musculoskeletal pain associated with vitamin D deficiency is usually explained by osteomalacia of bones. Therefore, we speculate a possibility of osteomalacia of the skull for the generation of headache (osteomalacic cephalalgia?. It further suggests that both musculoskeletal pain and headaches may be the part of the same disease spectrum in a subset of patients with vitamin D deficiency (or osteomalacia, and vitamin D deficiency may be an important cause of secondary CTTH.

  13. [Vitamin D deficiency in chronic liver disease, clinical-epidemiological analysis and report after vitamin d supplementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Fernández, Nereida; Linares Torres, Pedro; Joáo Matias, Diana; Jorquera Plaza, Francisco; Olcoz Goñi, Jose Luis

    2016-05-01

    Vitamin D (VD) is known to have multiple extra-skeletal health functions. There is emerging interest in exploring the relationship between vitamin D and chronic liver disease (CLD). To determine the prevalence of VD deficiency in patients with CLD in our setting and to assess whether VD supplementation influences plasma levels and is associated with improved liver function. We conducted a study in 2 phases. First, we analysed clinical and epidemiological characteristics in 94 patients with CLD; second, different doses of calcifediol (25-OH-VD) were administered to patients with VD deficiency (C (7.75ng/mL). After VD supplementation, optimal serum levels were achieved in 94% of patients and significant improvements were observed in platelet count, albumin levels (P<.05) and functional status assessed by the Child-Pugh scale (P<.05). Given the high prevalence of VD deficiency or insufficiency, the need for screening should be considered in the population with CLD. VD supplementation could be safe and effective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  14. A practical approach to the nutritional management of chronic kidney disease patients in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, Oluwatoyin I; Cilliers, Lynette; Okpechi, Ikechi G

    2016-07-08

    The multi-racial and multi-ethnic population of South Africa has significant variation in their nutritional habits with many black South Africans undergoing a nutritional transition to Western type diets. In this review, we describe our practical approaches to the dietary and nutritional management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in Cape Town, South Africa. Due to poverty and socio-economic constraints, significant challenges still exist with regard to achieving the nutritional needs and adequate dietary counselling of many CKD patients (pre-dialysis and dialysis) in South Africa. Inadequate workforce to meet the educational and counselling needs of patients, inability of many patients to effectively come to terms with changing body and metabolic needs due to ongoing kidney disease, issues of adherence to fluid and food restrictions as well as adherence to medications and in some cases the inability to obtain adequate daily food supplies make up some of these challenges. A multi-disciplinary approach (dietitians, nurses and nephrologists) of regularly reminding and educating patients on dietary (especially low protein diets) and nutritional needs is practiced. The South African Renal exchange list consisting of groups of food items with the same nutritional content has been developed as a practical tool to be used by dietitians to convert individualized nutritional prescriptions into meal plan to meet the nutritional needs of patients in South Africa. The list is currently utilized in counselling CKD patients and provides varied options for food items within the same group (exchangeable) as well as offering ease for the description of suitable meal portions (sizes) to our patients. Regular and continuous education of CKD patients by a multi-disciplinary team in South Africa enables our patients to meet their nutritional goals and retard CKD progression. The South African renal exchange list has proved to be a very useful tool in meeting this need.

  15. [NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND BIOCHEMICAL MARKERS OF DEFICIENCY OR EXCESS OF MICRONUTRIENTS IN 4 TO 14 YEAR-OLD CHILEAN CHILDREN: A CRITICAL REVIEW].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozowski Narkunska, Jaime; Castillo Valenzuela, Oscar; Figari Jullian, Nicole; García-Díaz, Diego F; Cruchet Muñoz, Sylvia; Weisstaub Nuta, Gerardo; Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Gotteland Russel, Martín

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of obesity in Chilean children has been increasing steadily for the last two decades. The first study to determine nutritional status and food intake in a representative sample of this population was carried out in 1960. Recently the National Food Consumption Survey (ENCA) carried out in 2012 was released by the Ministry of Health. However, this study did not include biochemical determinations of micronutrients which would allow a better diagnosis of nutritional status in children. to review the literature available from 2004 to 2014 in food intake and nutritional status in Chilean children aged 4 to 14 years. a total of 362 references published between 2004 and 2014 were obtained through searches in the databases PubMed, Lilacs, Embase and Scielo. From these, 40 articles were selected for a thorough review. food intake by children is characterized by a high-energy intake, a low consumption of fruits and vegetables and a high consumption of bread. The ENCA showed that 95% of the Chilean population has a deficient diet. A high prevalence of obesity is observed from very early in life. There is a dearth of data available on plasma indicators of vitamin and mineral status since 1960, which would provide more reliable information on nutritional assessment. It is imperative to implement a representative nutrition survey of children in Chile that includes biochemical indicators to get reliable information in order to develop strategies aimed to correct micronutrient malnutrition from excess or deficiency. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Vitamin D deficiency: What does it mean for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)? a compherensive review for pulmonologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokturk, Nurdan; Baha, Ayse; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Young Ju, Jung; Jones, Paul W

    2018-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are both under-recognized health problems, world-wide. Although Vitamin D has long been known for calcemic effects it also has less known noncalcemic effects. Recent data have shown that Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with COPD and correlates with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 ) and FEV 1 decline. The objective of this work was to review the current literature on vitamin D deficiency in relation with COPD. A literature search, using the words "vitamin D" and "COPD", was undertaken in Pubmed database. The noncalcemic effects of vitamin D relating with COPD may be summarised as increasing antimicrobial peptide production, regulation of inflammatory response and airway remodelling. Vitamin D inhibits the production of several proinflammatory cytokines and leads to suppression Th1 and Th17 responses which may be involved in the pathogenesis of COPD. Vitamin D insufficiency may also contribute to chronic respiratory infections and airway colonization so returning vitamin D concentrations to an optimal range in patients with COPD might reduce bacterial load and concomitant exacerbations.Vitamin D is also important for COPD-related comorbodities such as osteoporosis, muscle weakness and cardiovascular diseases. Data about the effect of Vitamin D supplementation on those comorbidities in relation with COPD are been scarce. Improving the blood level of Vitamin D into the desired range may have a beneficial effect bones and muscles, but more studies are needed to test to test that hypothesis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Comparison of vitamin D deficiency and magnitude of severity of vitamin D deficiency in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients with chronic hepatitis C in a tertiary care hospital Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, S.; Faheem, M.; Ambreen, S.; Tirmizi, A.; Umar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine Vitamin D deficiency in both cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Methodology: We conducted a cross-sectional study at Centre for Liver and Digestive Diseases (CLD), Holy Family Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan from August 2015 to February 2016 and included 120 Patients with CHC with or without cirrhosis. Two groups were formed and vitamin D levels were measured and level of severity was assessed. Results: Out of 120 patients, 94(78.3%) patients had Vitamin D deficiency. 63(100%) cirrhotic patients and 31 54.4%) non cirrhotic patients had Vitamin D deficiency. In cirrhotic patients, 26(41.3%) had mild and 36(58.7%) had moderate Vitamin D deficiency while in non-cirrhotic patients 25(43.9%) had mild and 6(10.5%) had moderate deficiency. No patient with severe Vitamin D deficiency was observed. Conclusion: Most of the patients infected with CHC suffer from vitamin D deficiency. This was observed more in cirrhotic patients than non-cirrhotic patients. Moreover, positive correlation was observed among vitamin D deficiency and stage of fibrosis. (author)

  18. Protein energy wasting in chronic kidney disease: An update with focus on nutritional interventions to improve outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashpal P Jadeja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy wasting (PEW is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. PEW is one of the strongest predictors of mortality in patients with CKD. The International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM expert panel has defined PEW as a, "state of decreased body stores of protein and energy fuels (body protein and fat masses". The ISRNM panel has also proposed diagnostic criteria of PEW with four categories. Cachexia is a severe form of PEW. The proposed causes of PEW are multi-factorial and include nutritional and non-nutritional mechanisms. The literature indicates that PEW can be mitigated or corrected with an appropriate diet and enteral nutritional support that targets dietary protein intake. Dietary requirements and enteral nutritional support must also be considered in patients with CKD and diabetes mellitus and in children with CKD, in addition to dialysis patients. Features of ideal dietary supplement have also been discussed. Dietary interventions such as enteral feeding with high-protein meals or supplements might improve the nutritional status and outcomes in dialysis patients.

  19. Changes on metabolic parameters induced by acute cannabinoid administration (CBD, THC) in a rat experimental model of nutritional vitamin A deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    El Amrani, Loubna; Porres, Jesus M.; Merzouki, Abderrahmane; Louktibi, Abdelaziz; Aranda, Pilar; Lopez-Jurado, María; Urbano, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Vitamin A deficiency can result from malnutrition, malabsorption of vitamin A, impaired vitamin metabolism associated with liver disease, or chronic debilitating diseases like HIV infection or cancer. Background & aims: Cannabis administration has been described as a palliative symptom management therapy in such pathological stages. Therefore, this research aimed to study the effects of acute administration of cannabidiol (CBD) or thetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the levels of ret...

  20. The self-perceived knowledge, skills and attitudes of Australian practice nurses in providing nutrition care to patients with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Louise; Leveritt, Michael D; Desbrow, Ben; Ball, Lauren E

    2014-04-01

    Nutrition is important for the management of chronic diseases. While practice nurses have numerous roles in primary care, the expectations on practice nurses to provide nutrition care for chronic disease management are increasing. The self-perceived knowledge, skills and attitudes of practice nurses in providing nutrition care has not been widely investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the perceptions of Australian practice nurses on the provision of nutrition care for chronic disease management, including specific nutrition-related activities. A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 181 Australian practice nurses in 2013. Descriptive analyses were conducted on each survey item. The survey sample was tested for representation of the Australian practice nurse workforce, and associations between respondents' demographic characteristics and responses to survey items were explored. Almost all practice nurses (89%) felt it was important to address diet whenever they cared for a patient. Over half of practice nurses (61%) were unsure if their practices were effective in increasing patients' compliance with nutritional recommendations. Nearly all practice nurses (98%) perceived further education on nutrition would assist them in their role. Practice nurses perceive they have an important role and favourable attitudes towards providing nutrition care; however, further training and education to enhance their self-perceived effectiveness is warranted. Future research should clarify whether an increase in nutrition-focused training results in improved effectiveness of nutrition care provided by practice nurses in terms of patient health outcomes.

  1. The Nicotianamine Synthase Gene Is a Useful Candidate for Improving the Nutritional Qualities and Fe-Deficiency Tolerance of Various Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nozoye

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25% by the year 2050, the sustainable production of nutritious foods will be necessary for human health and the environment. Iron (Fe is an essential nutrient for both plants and humans. Fe is poorly soluble, especially at high pH levels, at which it is difficult for living organisms to accumulate sufficient Fe. In plants, Fe deficiency leads to low yield and poor nutritional quality, as it significantly affects chlorophyll synthesis. Fe deficiency is a worldwide agricultural problem that is especially serious in soils with a high pH, such as calcareous soils, which comprise approximately 30% of cultivated soils worldwide. Genetic improvements in crops that can tolerate Fe deficiency will be required to meet the demands for crop production and could ultimately contribute to the amelioration of global warming. Nicotianamine (NA is an Fe chelator in plants that is involved in metal translocation in the plant body. In mammals, NA inhibits angiotensin I-converting enzyme, which plays a key role in blood pressure control. It was recently shown that the enhancement of NA production using nicotianamine synthase is useful for increasing not only NA but also Fe and Zn levels in crops such as rice, soybean, and sweet potato. Additionally, these plants showed Fe-deficiency tolerance in calcareous soil. These results suggested that NAS overexpression simultaneously improves food quality and increases plant production. This review summarizes progress in generating crops overexpressing NAS.

  2. Quadruple burden of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, chronic intestinal parasitoses, and multiple micronutrient deficiency in ethiopia: a summary of available findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amare, Bemnet; Moges, Beyene; Mulu, Andargachew; Yifru, Sisay; Kassu, Afework

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis (TB), and helminthic infections are among the commonest public health problems in the sub-Saharan African countries like Ethiopia. Multiple micronutrient deficiencies also known as the "hidden hunger" are common in people living in these countries either playing a role in their pathogenesis or as consequences. This results in a vicious cycle of multiple micronutrient deficiencies and infection/disease progression. As infection is profoundly associated with nutritional status resulting from decreased nutrient intake, decreased nutrient absorption, and nutrient losses, micronutrient deficiencies affect immune system and impact infection and diseases progression. As a result, micronutrients, immunity, and infection are interrelated. The goal of this review is therefore to provide a summary of available findings regarding the "quadruple burden trouble" of HIV, TB, intestinal parasitic infections, and multiple micronutrient deficiencies to describe immune-modulating effects related to disorders.

  3. Inflammatory Markers: C-Reactive Protein, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate, and Leukocyte Count in Vitamin D Deficient Patients with and without Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Yildirim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although some studies revealed a positive relationship between vitamin D3 deficiency and inflammatory markers, there have been also many studies that failed to find this relationship. The aim of this large scaled study is to determine the association between the level of plasma 25 hydroxy vitamin D3 [25-(OH D3] and inflammatory markers in the general population without chronic kidney disease (CKD and in patients with CKD. Participants with simultaneously measured inflammatory markers and 25-(OH D3 levels were retrospectively analyzed (n=1897. The incidence of all-cause inflammation infection, hospitalization, chronic renal failure, and vitamin B12 deficiency was evaluated. The medians of serum creatinine levels in subjects without renal failure were lower in 25-(OH D3 deficient group. Patients with CKD were more likely to have vitamin D3 deficiency compared with normal GFR. 25-(OH D3 levels were associated with a greater incidence of all-cause hospitalization, hypoalbuminemia, and vitamin B12 deficiency. However, there was no relationship between inflammatory markers and vitamin D3 levels. In 25-(OH D3 deficient patients, inflammatory markers can be related to other inflammatory and infectious status such as malnutrition and cachexia. We believed that there must be a relationship between vitamin deficiency and inflammatory markers due to other causes than low 25-(OH D3 status.

  4. Strategies to promote adherence to nutritional advice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a narrative review and commentary

    OpenAIRE

    Beto, Judith A.; Schury,Katherine; Bansal,Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Judith A Beto, Katherine A Schury, Vinod K Bansal Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Loyola University Healthcare System, Loyola University of Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) requires extensive changes to food and lifestyle. Poor adherence to diet, medications, and treatments has been estimated to vary between 20% and 70%, which in turn can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity. Delivering effective nutritional advice in patients with CKD coor...

  5. Production of nutritionally-deficient mutants of the axenic blue-green alga Anabaena flos-aquae NRC-44-1 by ultraviolet irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, H D; Gorham, P R

    1975-01-01

    Anabaena flos-aquae NRC-44-1 is a freshwater nitrogen fixing blue-green alga of some ecological significance because of its toxicity. In axenic culture and possibly also in nature, the alga is highly susceptible to lysis at certain stages of its growth. Nothing is known about genetic phenomena governing toxin production, nitrogen fixation or other characteristics of this organism, mainly because of unavailability of mutant strains that could be utilized in genetic experiments. With the object of overcoming this obstacle to the eventual study of genetics of Anabaena flos-aquae, attempts were made to produce and isolate nutritionally-deficient mutants of this species.

  6. Influence of recombinant interferon alpha on nutritional status and growth pattern in children with chronic viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottrand, F; Michaud, L; Guimber, D; Ategbo, S; Dubar, G; Turck, D; Farriaux, J P

    1996-12-01

    Anorexia and weight loss are frequently reported as adverse effects during recombinant interferon alpha (rIFN-alpha) treatment. The aim of the present study was to assess both nutritional status and growth of children and adolescents treated with rIFN-alpha for chronic viral hepatitis. Eleven patients aged 4-16 years with histologically proven chronic active hepatitis (hepatitis B, n = 9; hepatitis C, n = 2) receiving rIFN-alpha subcutaneously thrice a week for 6 months were studied. Weight and height increments were assessed during the 6 months before starting rIFN-alpha. Weight and height were measured every 3 months (M0, M3, M6) during the 6 months of rIFN-alpha treatment, then every 6 months during the follow up period (6-36 months). Weight decreased in every child during rIFN-alpha treatment (weight loss varies from 0.5 to 2.6 kg after 3 months of treatment). Weight/age Z-score decreased from 0.12 at M0 to -0.69 at M3 (P Nutritional status was significantly impaired during treatment (Z-score for weight/height decreased from 0.18 at M0 to -0.74 at M3, P nutritional status are encountered constantly at the beginning of rIFN-alpha therapy without any deleterious effect on growth. Information of the families and nutritional intervention during treatment should be required, in order to limit the importance of weight loss.

  7. Effects of chronic administration of tamsulosin and tadalafil, alone or in combination, in rats with bladder outlet obstruction induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regadas, Rommel Prata; Reges, Ricardo; Cerqueira, João Batista Gadelha; Sucupira, Daniel Gabrielle; Jamacaru, Francisco Vagnaldo F; Moraes, Manoel Odorico de; Gonzaga-Silva, Lúcio Flávio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define if tadalafil causes detrusor muscle impairment and to observe the effect of combination of tadalafil with tamsulosin on the lower urinary tract of rats with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency. Thirty-one male rats were randomized to following groups: 1 - control; 2 - L-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME); 3 - Tamsulosin + L-NAME, 4 Tadalafil+L-NAME; and 5 - Tamsulosin + Tadalafil + L-NAME. At the end of the treatment period (30 days), all animals were submitted to urodynamic study. The administration of L-NAME increased the number of non-voiding contractions (NVC) (1.04 ± 0.22), volume threshold (VT) (1.86 ± 0.35), and micturition cycle (MC) (1.34 ± 0.11) compared with control (0.52 ± 0.06, 0.62 ± 0.06, and 0.67 ± 0.30), respectively. The administration of tamsulosin reduced the number of NVC (0.57 ± 0.42) and VT (0.76 ± 0.24 ) compared with L-NAME group. Co-treatment with tadalafil decreased the number of VT (0.85 ± 0.53) and MC (0.76 ± 0.22) compared with L-NAME group. The combination of tamsulosin with tadalafil improved the number of NVC (0.56 ± 0.18), VT (0.97 ± 0.52) and MC (0.68 ± 0.30) compared with L-NAME group. In rats with BOO induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency, tadalafil did not cause impairment in detrusor muscle and seems to have an addictive effect to tamsulosin because the combination decreased non voiding contractions as well the number of micturition cycles.

  8. Effects of chronic administration of tamsulosin and tadalafil, alone or in combination, in rats with bladder outlet obstruction induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Prata Regadas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of this study was to define if tadalafil causes detrusor muscle impairment and to observe the effect of combination of tadalafil with tamsulosin on the lower urinary tract of rats with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency. Materials and Methods Thirty-one male rats were randomized to following groups: 1 - control; 2 - L-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 3 - Tamsulosin + L-NAME, 4 Tadalafil+L-NAME; and 5 - Tamsulosin + Tadalafil + L-NAME. At the end of the treatment period (30 days, all animals were submitted to urodynamic study. Results The administration of L-NAME increased the number of non-voiding contractions (NVC (1.04 ± 0.22, volume threshold (VT (1.86 ± 0.35, and micturition cycle (MC (1.34 ± 0.11 compared with control (0.52 ± 0.06, 0.62 ± 0.06, and 0.67 ± 0.30, respectively. The administration of tamsulosin reduced the number of NVC (0.57 ± 0.42 and VT (0.76 ± 0.24 compared with L-NAME group. Co-treatment with tadalafil decreased the number of VT (0.85 ± 0.53 and MC (0.76 ± 0.22 compared with L-NAME group. The combination of tamsulosin with tadalafil improved the number of NVC (0.56 ± 0.18, VT (0.97 ± 0.52 and MC (0.68 ± 0.30 compared with L-NAME group. Conclusion In rats with BOO induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency, tadalafil did not cause impairment in detrusor muscle and seems to have an addictive effect to tamsulosin because the combination decreased non voiding contractions as well the number of micturition cycles.

  9. Platelets of patients with chronic kidney disease demonstrate deficient platelet reactivity in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bladel Esther R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with chronic kidney disease studies focusing on platelet function and properties often are non-conclusive whereas only few studies use functional platelet tests. In this study we evaluated a recently developed functional flow cytometry based assay for the analysis of platelet function in chronic kidney disease. Methods Platelet reactivity was measured using flow cytometric analysis. Platelets in whole blood were triggered with different concentrations of agonists (TRAP, ADP, CRP. Platelet activation was quantified with staining for P-selectin, measuring the mean fluorescence intensity. Area under the curve and the concentration of half-maximal response were determined. Results We studied 23 patients with chronic kidney disease (9 patients with cardiorenal failure and 14 patients with end stage renal disease and 19 healthy controls. Expression of P-selectin on the platelet surface measured as mean fluorescence intensity was significantly less in chronic kidney disease patients compared to controls after maximal stimulation with TRAP (9.7 (7.9-10.8 vs. 11.4 (9.2-12.2, P = 0.032, ADP (1.6 (1.2-2.1 vs. 2.6 (1.9-3.5, P = 0.002 and CRP (9.2 (8.5-10.8 vs. 11.5 (9.5-12.9, P = 0.004. Also the area under the curve was significantly different. There was no significant difference in half-maximal response between both groups. Conclusion In this study we found that patients with chronic kidney disease show reduced platelet reactivity in response of ADP, TRAP and CRP compared to controls. These results contribute to our understanding of the aberrant platelet function observed in patients with chronic kidney disease and emphasize the significance of using functional whole blood platelet activation assays.

  10. Five-year survival and causes of death in patients on home parenteral nutrition for severe chronic and benign intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joly, Francisca; Baxter, Janet; Staun, Michael

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIM: Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is the primary treatment for chronic intestinal failure (IF). Intestinal transplantation (ITx) is indicated when there is an increased risk of death due to HPN complications or to the underlying disease. Age, pathophysiologic conditions and underl......BACKGROUND & AIM: Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is the primary treatment for chronic intestinal failure (IF). Intestinal transplantation (ITx) is indicated when there is an increased risk of death due to HPN complications or to the underlying disease. Age, pathophysiologic conditions...

  11. Dietary and nutrition interventions for the therapeutic treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnolo, N; Johnston, S; Collatz, A; Staines, D; Marshall-Gradisnik, S

    2017-06-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is characterised by unexplained fatigue for at least 6 months accompanied by a diverse but consistent set of symptoms. Diet modification and nutritional supplements could be used to improve patient outcomes, such fatigue and quality of life. We reviewed and discussed the evidence for nutritional interventions that may assist in alleviating symptoms of CFS/ME. Medline, Cinahl and Scopus were systematically searched from 1994 to May 2016. All studies on nutrition intervention were included where CFS/ME patients modified their diet or supplemented their habitual diet on patient-centred outcomes (fatigue, quality of life, physical activity and/or psychological wellbeing). Seventeen studies were included that meet the inclusion criteria. Of these, 14 different interventions were investigated on study outcomes. Many studies did not show therapeutic benefit on CFS/ME. Improvements in fatigue were observed for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydride (NADH), probiotics, high cocoa polyphenol rich chocolate, and a combination of NADH and coenzyme Q10. This review identified insufficient evidence for the use of nutritional supplements and elimination or modified diets to relieve CFS/ME symptoms. Studies were limited by the number of studies investigating the interventions, small sample sizes, study duration, variety of instruments used, and studies not reporting dietary intake method. Further research is warranted in homogeneous CFS/ME populations. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Dietetic Association.

  12. Strategies to promote adherence to nutritional advice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a narrative review and commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beto JA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Judith A Beto, Katherine A Schury, Vinod K Bansal Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Loyola University Healthcare System, Loyola University of Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD requires extensive changes to food and lifestyle. Poor adherence to diet, medications, and treatments has been estimated to vary between 20% and 70%, which in turn can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity. Delivering effective nutritional advice in patients with CKD coordinates multiple diet components including calories, protein, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and fluid. Dietary intake studies have shown difficulty in adhering to the scope and complexity of the CKD diet parameters. No single educational or clinical strategy has been shown to be consistently effective across CKD populations. Highest adherence has been observed when both diet and education efforts are individualized to each patient and adapted over time to changing lifestyle and CKD variables. This narrative review and commentary summarizes nutrition education literature and published strategies for providing nutritional advice in CKD. A cohort of practical and effective strategies for increasing dietary adherence to nutritional advice are provided that include communicating with "talking control" principles, integrating patient-owned technology, acknowledging the typical food pattern may be snacking rather than formal meals, focusing on a single goal rather than multiple goals, creating active learning and coping strategies (frozen sandwiches, visual hands-on activities, planting herb gardens, and involving the total patient food environment. Keywords: talking control, technology-enhanced learning, hemodialysis, nutrition education, education strategies

  13. Oral Tocofersolan Corrects or Prevents Vitamin E Deficiency in Children With Chronic Cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thébaut, Alice; Nemeth, Antal; Le Mouhaër, Jeannie; Scheenstra, René; Baumann, Ulrich; Koot, Bart; Gottrand, Fredéric; Houwen, Roderick; Monard, Laure; de Micheaux, Sylvie Lafaye; Habes, Dalila; Jacquemin, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: D-Alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (Tocofersolan, Vedrop), has been developed in Europe to provide an orally bioavailable source of vitamin E in children with cholestasis. The aim was to analyze the safety/efficacy of Vedrop in a large group of children with chronic

  14. Oral Tocofersolan Corrects or Prevents Vitamin E Deficiency in Children With Chronic Cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thébaut, Alice; Nemeth, Antal; Le Mouhaër, Jeannie; Scheenstra, René; Baumann, Ulrich; Koot, Bart; Gottrand, Fredéric; Houwen, Roderick; Monard, Laure; de Micheaux, Sylvie Lafaye; Habes, Dalila; Jacquemin, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    D-Alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (Tocofersolan, Vedrop), has been developed in Europe to provide an orally bioavailable source of vitamin E in children with cholestasis. The aim was to analyze the safety/efficacy of Vedrop in a large group of children with chronic cholestasis.

  15. Oral Tocofersolan Corrects or Prevents Vitamin E Deficiency in Children With Chronic Cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thebaut, Alice; Nemeth, Antal; Le Mouhaer, Jeannie; Scheenstra, Rene; Baumann, Ulrich; Koot, Bart; Gottrand, Frederic; Houwen, Roderick; Monard, Laure; de Micheaux, Sylvie Lafaye; Habes, Dalila; Jacquemin, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives:d-Alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (Tocofersolan, Vedrop), has been developed in Europe to provide an orally bioavailable source of vitamin E in children with cholestasis. The aim was to analyze the safety/efficacy of Vedrop in a large group of children with chronic

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of ferric carboxymaltose in iron-deficient patients with chronic heart failure in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmarcher, Thomas; Borg, Sixten

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a common but treatable comorbidity in chronic heart failure (CHF) that is associated with impaired health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL). This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness of the intravenous iron preparation ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) for the treatment of iron deficiency in CHF from a Swedish healthcare perspective. A cost-effectiveness analysis with a time horizon of 24 weeks was performed to compare FCM treatment with placebo. Data on health outcomes and medical resource use were mainly taken from the FAIR-HF trial and combined with Swedish cost data. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated as well as the change in per-patient costs for primary care and hospital care. In the FCM group compared with placebo, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) are higher (difference = 0.037 QALYs), but so are per-patient costs [(difference = SEK 2789 (€303)]. Primary care and hospital care equally share the additional costs, but within hospitals there is a major shift of costs from inpatient care to outpatient care. The ICER is SEK 75,389 (€8194) per QALY. The robustness of the result is supported by sensitivity analyses. Treatment of iron deficiency in CHF with FCM compared with placebo is estimated to be cost-effective. The ICER in the base case scenario is twice as high as previously thought, but noticeably below SEK 500,000 (€54,300) per QALY, an informal average reference value used by the Swedish Dental and Pharmaceutical Benefits Agency. Increased HRQoL and fewer hospitalizations are the key drivers of this result.

  17. Evaluation of skeletal and cardiac muscle function after chronic administration of thymosin beta-4 in the dystrophin deficient mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Spurney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tbeta4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. We studied the effects of chronic administration of Tbeta4 on the skeletal and cardiac muscle of dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Female wild type (C57BL10/ScSnJ and mdx mice, 8-10 weeks old, were treated with 150 microg of Tbeta4 twice a week for 6 months. To promote muscle pathology, mice were exercised for 30 minutes twice a week. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function were assessed via grip strength and high frequency echocardiography. Localization of Tbeta4 and amount of fibrosis were quantified using immunohistochemistry and Gomori's tri-chrome staining, respectively. Mdx mice treated with Tbeta4 showed a significant increase in skeletal muscle regenerating fibers compared to untreated mdx mice. Tbeta4 stained exclusively in the regenerating fibers of mdx mice. Although untreated mdx mice had significantly decreased skeletal muscle strength compared to untreated wild type, there were no significant improvements in mdx mice after treatment. Systolic cardiac function, measured as percent shortening fraction, was decreased in untreated mdx mice compared to untreated wild type and there was no significant difference after treatment in mdx mice. Skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis were also significantly increased in untreated mdx mice compared to wild type, but there was no significant improvement in treated mdx mice. In exercised dystrophin deficient mice, chronic administration of Tbeta4 increased the number of regenerating fibers in skeletal muscle and could have a potential role in treatment of skeletal muscle disease in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  18. Influence of chronic alcoholism and oestrogen deficiency on the variation of stoichiometry of hydroxyapatite within alveolar bone crest of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchini, Adriana M P S; Deco, Camila P; Lodi, Karina B; Marchini, Leonardo; Santo, Ana M E; Rocha, Rosilene F

    2012-10-01

    Previous findings suggest that chronic alcoholism and oestrogenic deficiency may affect bones in general (including alveolar bone) and increase individuals' susceptibility to the development of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to assess possible alterations in the chemical composition of alveolar bone in rats subjected to chronic alcoholism, oestrogen deficiency or both. Fifty-four rats were initially divided into two groups: ovariectomized (Ovx), and Sham operated (Sham). A month after surgery, the groups were sub-divided and received the following dietary intervention for eight weeks: 20% alcohol, isocaloric diet and ad libitum diet. Samples of the mandible, in the alveolar bone crest region, were analyzed to verify possible changes in the stoichiometric composition of bone hydroxyapatite, by measuring the relationship between the concentration of calcium and phosphorus (Ca/P ratios), using micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The ad libitum groups presented the highest average values of Ca/P ratios, while the groups with dietary restrictions presented the smallest average values. The Ovx ad libitum group presented the highest values of Ca/P ratios (2.03 ± 0.04). However, these values were not considered statistically different (p>0.05) from the Sham ad libitum group (2.01 ± 0.01). The Ovx alcohol group presented lower values for Ca/P ratios (1.92 ± 0.06), being the only group statistically different (palcohol consumption at 20% significantly changed the stoichiometry composition of hydroxyapatite in the alveolar bone crest, leading to a reduction in Ca/P ratios. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Commensal microbiota contributes to chronic endocarditis in TAX1BP1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Nakano

    Full Text Available Tax1-binding protein 1 (Tax1bp1 negatively regulates NF-κB by editing the ubiquitylation of target molecules by its catalytic partner A20. Genetically engineered TAX1BP1-deficient (KO mice develop age-dependent inflammatory constitutions in multiple organs manifested as valvulitis or dermatitis and succumb to premature death. Laser capture dissection and gene expression microarray analysis on the mitral valves of TAX1BP1-KO mice (8 and 16 week old revealed 588 gene transcription alterations from the wild type. SAA3 (serum amyloid A3, CHI3L1, HP, IL1B and SPP1/OPN were induced 1,180-, 361-, 187-, 122- and 101-fold respectively. WIF1 (Wnt inhibitory factor 1 exhibited 11-fold reduction. Intense Saa3 staining and significant I-κBα reduction were reconfirmed and massive infiltration of inflammatory lymphocytes and edema formation were seen in the area. Antibiotics-induced 'germ free' status or the additional MyD88 deficiency significantly ameliorated TAX1BP1-KO mice's inflammatory lesions. These pathological conditions, as we named 'pseudo-infective endocarditis' were boosted by the commensal microbiota who are usually harmless by their nature. This experimental outcome raises a novel mechanistic linkage between endothelial inflammation caused by the ubiquitin remodeling immune regulators and fatal cardiac dysfunction.

  20. Refeeding syndrome in a young woman with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuy, M; Chen, G-F; Masonek, J M; Scharschmidt, B F

    2015-09-01

    A severely chronically protein and calorie restricted young woman with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency developed transient refeeding syndrome (RFS) and hyperammonemia after modest diet liberalization following initiation of glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB). The patient required IV supportive care and supplementation with potassium, magnesium and calcium. She is now doing well on GPB and an appropriate maintenance diet. Susceptibility to RFS should be considered in chronically nutritionally restricted patients with metabolic disorders after liberalization of diet.

  1. Refeeding syndrome in a young woman with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stuy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A severely chronically protein and calorie restricted young woman with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency developed transient refeeding syndrome (RFS and hyperammonemia after modest diet liberalization following initiation of glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB. The patient required IV supportive care and supplementation with potassium, magnesium and calcium. She is now doing well on GPB and an appropriate maintenance diet. Susceptibility to RFS should be considered in chronically nutritionally restricted patients with metabolic disorders after liberalization of diet.

  2. Sintomas de deficiência nutricional em mudas de Acacia holosericea em resposta à omissão de macronutrientes Symptoms of nutritional deficiency in seedlings of Acacia holosericea submitted to absence of macronutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathiane Santi Sarcinelli

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A Acacia holosericea é uma espécie leguminosa arbórea bastante utilizada na recuperação de áreas degradadas. O conhecimento dos sintomas de deficiência nutricional apresentados por esta espécie possibilita a identificação e a correção de deficiências em exemplares plantados em substratos degradados. Os objetivos deste trabalho foram caracterizar a sintomatologia visual de carências de macronutrientes e avaliar a produção de biomassa e o acúmulo de nutrientes nas raízes e na parte aérea de mudas de Acacia holosericea, submetidas a diferentes soluções nutritivas com exclusão de macronutrientes. Os tratamentos constituíram-se de sete soluções nutritivas: 1 solução completa (SC; 2 SC -N; 3 SC -P; 4 SC -K; 5 SC -Ca; 6 SC -Mg; e 7 SC -S. Os tratamentos -N e Mg foram os que mais afetaram a produção total de biomassa. O decréscimo de produção manifestou-se na seguinte ordem: -N = -Mg > -K > -S > -Ca > SC > -P. As plantas do tratamento -N formaram nódulos no sistema radicular, exibindo teores foliares de N maiores que as plantas do tratamento SC. Com exceção dos tratamentos SC e -P, todos os outros apresentaram sintomas de deficiência. A ausência de S alterou a disposição natural dos filódios novos da A. holosericea.Acacia holosericea is a leguminous species that has been extensively used in land reclamation programs. The knowledge of its nutritional symptoms allows the identification and correction of deficiencies in individuals planted in degraded substrates. The aim of this work was to characterize the behavior of seedlings of A. holosericea submitted to different nutritional solutions with absence of macronutrients. The treatments consisted of seven nutritional solutions: 1 Complete solution (SC; 2 SC - N; 3 SC -P; 4 SC -K; 5 SC -Ca; 6 SC -Mg; 7 SC -S. Treatments -N and -Mg were the ones that most affected biomass production. Decrease in biomass production occurred in the following order: -N = -Mg > -K > -S

  3. Effect of two different sublingual dosages of vitamin B12 on cobalamin nutritional status in vegans and vegetarians with a marginal deficiency: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bo', Cristian; Riso, Patrizia; Gardana, Claudio; Brusamolino, Antonella; Battezzati, Alberto; Ciappellano, Salvatore

    2018-02-15

    Vegetarians and vegans are more vulnerable to vitamin B 12 deficiency with severe risks of megaloblastic anemia, cognitive decline, neuropathy, and depression. An easy and simple method of supplementation consists of taking one weekly dosage of 2000 μg. However, single large oral doses of vitamin B 12 are poorly absorbed. The present research evaluates the ability of two different sublingual dosages of vitamin B 12 (350 μg/week vs 2000 μg/week) in improving cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12 ) nutritional status in vegans and vegetarians with a marginal deficiency. A 12-week randomized, double-blind, controlled, parallel intervention trial was performed. Forty subjects with marginal vitamin B 12 deficiency were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups: test group Ld (low dose, 350 μg/week) and control group Hd (high dose, 2000 μg/week) vitamin B 12 supplementation. Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 15, 30, 60, and 90 days from the intervention for the determination of vitamin B 12 , related metabolic markers, and blood cell counts. Two-way analysis of variance showed a significant effect of time (P < 0.0001) and of time × treatment interaction (P = 0.012) on serum concentration of vitamin B 12 that increased after 90-day supplementation (Ld and Hd) compared to baseline. Both the supplements increased (P < 0.0001, time effect) the levels of holotranscobalamin, succinic acid, methionine and wellness parameter, while decreased (P < 0.0001, time effect) the levels of methylmalonic acid, homocysteine and folate compared to baseline. No difference was observed between groups (LdvsHd). No effect was detected for vitamin B 6 and blood cell count. In our experimental conditions, both supplements were able to restore adequate serum concentrations of vitamin B 12 and to improve the levels of related metabolic blood markers in subjects with a marginal deficiency. The results support the use of a sublingual dosage of 50 μg/day (350

  4. Complement C3 deficiency attenuates chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M Bauer

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests a role of both innate and adaptive immunity in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The complement system is a key sentry of the innate immune system and bridges innate and adaptive immunity. To date there are no studies addressing a role for the complement system in pulmonary arterial hypertension.Immunofluorescent staining revealed significant C3d deposition in lung sections from IPAH patients and C57Bl6/J wild-type mice exposed to three weeks of chronic hypoxia to induce pulmonary hypertension. Right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy were increased in hypoxic vs. normoxic wild-type mice, which were attenuated in C3-/- hypoxic mice. Likewise, pulmonary vascular remodeling was attenuated in the C3-/- mice compared to wild-type mice as determined by the number of muscularized peripheral arterioles and morphometric analysis of vessel wall thickness. The loss of C3 attenuated the increase in interleukin-6 and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in response to chronic hypoxia, but not endothelin-1 levels. In wild-type mice, but not C3-/- mice, chronic hypoxia led to platelet activation as assessed by bleeding time, and flow cytometry of platelets to determine cell surface P-selectin expression. In addition, tissue factor expression and fibrin deposition were increased in the lungs of WT mice in response to chronic hypoxia. These pro-thrombotic effects of hypoxia were abrogated in C3-/- mice.Herein, we provide compelling genetic evidence that the complement system plays a pathophysiologic role in the development of PAH in mice, promoting pulmonary vascular remodeling and a pro-thrombotic phenotype. In addition we demonstrate C3d deposition in IPAH patients suggesting that complement activation plays a role in the development of PAH in humans.

  5. Vitamin D deficiency in children with chronic illnesses: Predisposing and protecting factors

    OpenAIRE

    Koskivirta, Panu

    2011-01-01

    This thesis assesses clinical differences in patients with low and high vitamin D levels. The factors analyzed included the underlying disease, body size, age, ethnic background, use of vitamin D supplements and the season when the blood sample was taken. Fifty patients with the lowest and 50 patients with the highest vitamin D concentrations were selected from a cohort of 1351 chronically ill children and adolescents who had had their vitamin D status assessed at Children's Hospital. Protect...

  6. The Harbin Cohort Study on Diet, Nutrition and Chronic Non-communicable Diseases: study design and baseline characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Na

    Full Text Available Diet and nutrition have been reported to be associated with many common chronic diseases and blood-based assessment would be vital to investigate the association and mechanism, however, blood-based prospective studies are limited. The Harbin Cohort Study on Diet, Nutrition and Chronic Non-communicable Diseases was set up in 2010. From 2010 to 2012, 9,734 participants completed the baseline survey, including demographic characteristics, dietary intake, lifestyles and physical condition, and anthropometrics. A re-survey on 490 randomly selected participants was done by using the same methods which were employed in the baseline survey. For all participants, the mean age was 50 years and 36% of them were men. Approximately 99.4 % of cohort members donated blood samples. The mean total energy intake was 2671.7 kcal/day in men and 2245.9 kcal/day in women, the mean body mass index was 25.7 kg/m2 in men and 24.6 kg/m2 in women, with 18.4% being obese (≥ 28 kg/m2, 12.7% being diabetic, and 29.5% being hypertensive. A good agreement was obtained for the physical measurements between the baseline survey and re-survey. The resources from the cohort and its fasting and postprandial blood samples collected both at baseline and in each follow-up will be valuable and powerful in investigating relationship between diet, nutrition and chronic diseases and discovering novel blood biomarkers and the metabolism of these biomarkers related to chronic diseases.

  7. Endothelial surface layer degradation by chronic hyaluronidase infusion induces proteinuria in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn C Meuwese

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Functional studies show that disruption of endothelial surface layer (ESL is accompanied by enhanced sensitivity of the vasculature towards atherogenic stimuli. However, relevance of ESL disruption as causal mechanism for vascular dysfunction remains to be demonstrated. We examined if loss of ESL through enzymatic degradation would affect vascular barrier properties in an atherogenic model. METHODS: Eight week old male apolipoprotein E deficient mice on Western-type diet for 10 weeks received continuous active or heat-inactivated hyaluronidase (10 U/hr, i.v. through an osmotic minipump during 4 weeks. Blood chemistry and anatomic changes in both macrovasculature and kidneys were examined. RESULTS: Infusion with active hyaluronidase resulted in decreased ESL (0.32±0.22 mL and plasma volume (1.03±0.18 mL compared to inactivated hyaluronidase (0.52±0.29 mL and 1.28±0.08 mL, p<0.05 respectively.Active hyaluronidase increased proteinuria compared to inactive hyaluronidase (0.27±0.02 vs. 0.15±0.01 µg/µg protein/creatinin, p<0.05 without changes in glomerular morphology or development of tubulo-interstitial inflammation. Atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic branches showed increased matrix production (collagen, 32±5 vs. 18±3%; glycosaminoglycans, 11±5 vs. 0.1±0.01%, active vs. inactive hyaluronidase, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: ESL degradation in apoE deficient mice contributes to reduced increased urinary protein excretion without significant changes in renal morphology. Second, the induction of compositional changes in atherogenic plaques by hyaluronidase point towards increased plaque vulnerability. These findings support further efforts to evaluate whether ESL restoration is a valuable target to prevent (micro vascular disease progression.

  8. Duodenum inclusion in alimentary transit for preventing or correcting nutritional deficiencies resulting from Roux-en-y gastric bypass in obesity treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceneviva, Reginaldo

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional and metabolic complications can develop after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) when there is an exaggerated response to the anatomical and functional changes or when there is inadequate nutritional supplementation. Severe malnutrition is rare, but deficiencies of vitamin B12, iron, calcium and thiamin, metabolic bone disease and gallstones are common after RYGB. Shortage of vitamin B12, iron, calcium and also cholelithiasis are caused at least partially by excluding the duodenum and proximal jejunum from food transit. We designed a new procedure, with the maintenance of the duodenum and proximal jejunum in the gastrointestinal transit through interposition of jejunal loop, as a primary operation to prevent such deficiencies or as corrective surgery for severe malnutrition after RYGB with failure in responding to conservative treatment. Complicações nutricionais e metabólicas podem se desenvolver após a derivação gástrica em Y de Roux (DGYR) quando há uma resposta exagerada às mudanças anatômicas e funcionais ou quando há suplementação nutricional inadequada. A desnutrição grave é rara, mas deficiências de vitamina B12, ferro, cálcio e tiamina, doença óssea metabólica e cálculos biliares são comuns após a DGYR. Dessas deficiências mencionadas, a de vitamina B12, de ferro, de cálcio e também a colelitíase, são causadas, ao menos parcialmente, pela exclusão do duodeno e jejuno proximal. Um novo procedimento com a manutenção do duodeno e do jejuno proximal no trânsito gastrointestinal, mediante interposição de alça jejunal, foi idealizado como operação primária para prevenir essas deficiências ou como cirurgia corretiva de desnutrição grave após DGYR com falha na resposta a exaustivas tentativas de tratamento conservador.

  9. Iron deficiency is associated with increased levels of blood cadmium in the Korean general population: Analysis of 2008–2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung-Kook; Kim, Yangho

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: We present data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008–2009 on the distribution of blood cadmium levels and their association with iron deficiency in a representative sample of the adult Korean population. Methods: Serum ferritin was categorized into three levels: low (serum ferritin <15.0 μg/L), low normal (15.0–30.0 μg/L for women and 15.0–50.0 for men), and normal (≥30.0 μg/L for women and ≥50.0 for men), and its association with blood cadmium level was assessed after adjustment for various demographic and lifestyle factors. Results: Geometric means of blood cadmium in the low serum ferritin group in women, men, and all participants were significantly higher than in the normal group. Additionally, multiple regression analysis after adjusting for various covariates showed that blood cadmium was significantly higher in the low-ferritin group in women, men, and all participants compared with the normal group. We also found an association between serum ferritin and blood cadmium among never-smoking participants. Discussion: We found, similar to other recent population-based studies, an association between iron deficiency and increased blood cadmium in men and women, independent of smoking status. The results of the present study show that iron deficiency is associated with increased levels of blood cadmium in the general population.

  10. Effects of protein-deficient nutrition during rat pregnancy and development on developmental hindlimb crossing due to methylmercury intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, S.K.; Bai, Chengjiang [Montreal Univ., Quebec (Canada). Dept. de Medecine du Travail et Hygiene du Milieu

    2000-07-01

    Pregnant rats were fed either a control (20% protein) or low (3.5%) protein diet during gestation and lactation. The pups were separated from their mothers on postnatal day 21, and were given the same dient as their corresponding mothers. The groups of pups from each diet group were treated on either postnatal day 21 or postnatal day 60 with 7.5 mg methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) per kg b.w. once daily by gavage for 10 consecutive days, and the development of ataxia (hind-limb corossing) was monitored. The offspring from mothers on the protein-deficient diet were found to be more sensitive to MeHg-induced ataxia than those on the protein-sufficient diet. The former accumulated more mercury in different brain regions than the latter. The rates of protein synthesis in different brain regions of the offspring fed the protein-deficient diet were significantly reduced compared with the rates in those fed the protein-sufficient diet. However, MeHg treatment did not significantly modify the rates of such protein synthesis further in protein-deficient rats. Thus, a significantly much higher inhibition of the intrinsic rates of protein synthesis in different brain regions due to severe protein deficiency, as observed in this study, may be partly responsible for the increased susceptibility of developing rats fed a protein-deficient diet to MeHg-induced ataxia, or hindlimb crossing, although other factor(s) might also be involved. (orig.)

  11. Impact of PACAP and PAC1 receptor deficiency on the neurochemical and behavioral effects of acute and chronic restraint stress in male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Tomris; Jiang, Sunny Zhihong; Eiden, Adrian M; Weihe, Eberhard; Thistlethwaite, Ian; Eiden, Lee E

    2015-01-01

    Acute restraint stress (ARS) for 3 h causes corticosterone (CORT) elevation in venous blood, which is accompanied by Fos up-regulation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of male C57BL/6 mice. CORT elevation by ARS is attenuated in PACAP-deficient mice, but unaffected in PAC1-deficient mice. Correspondingly, Fos up-regulation by ARS is greatly attenuated in PACAP-deficient mice, but much less so in PAC1-deficient animals. We noted that both PACAP- and PAC1-deficiency greatly attenuate CORT elevation after ARS when CORT measurements are performed on trunk blood following euthanasia by abrupt cervical separation: this latter observation is of critical importance in assessing the role of PACAP neurotransmission in ARS, based on previous reports in which serum CORT was sampled from trunk blood. Seven days of chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces non-habituating CORT elevation, and weight loss consequent to hypophagia, in wild-type male C57BL/6 mice. Both CORT elevation and weight loss following 7-day CRS are severely blunted in PACAP-deficient mice, but only slightly in PAC1-deficient mice. However, longer periods of daily restraint (14-21 days) resulted in sustained weight loss and elevated CORT in wild-type mice, and these effects of long-term chronic stress were attenuated or abolished in both PACAP- and PAC1-deficient mice. We conclude that while a PACAP receptor in addition to PAC1 may mediate some of the PACAP-dependent central effects of ARS and short-term (7 days) CRS.

  12. Chronic parenteral nutrition induces hepatic inflammation, steatosis and insulin resistance in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prematurity and overfeeding in infants are associated with insulin resistance in childhood and may increase the risk of adult disease. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a major source of infant nutrition support and may influence neonatal metabolic function. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that...

  13. BDNF-Deficient Mice Show Reduced Psychosis-Related Behaviors Following Chronic Methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Elizabeth E; Halberstadt, Adam L; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    One of the most devastating consequences of methamphetamine abuse is increased risk of psychosis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor has been implicated in both psychosis and neuronal responses to methamphetamine. We therefore examined persistent psychosis-like behavioral effects of methamphetamine in brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice. Mice were chronically treated with methamphetamine from 6 to 9 weeks of age, and locomotor hyperactivity to an acute D-amphetamine challenge was tested in photocell cages after a 2-week withdrawal period. Methamphetamine-treated wild-type mice, but not brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice, showed locomotor sensitization to acute 3mg/kg D-amphetamine. Qualitative analysis of exploration revealed tolerance to D-amphetamine effects on entropy in methamphetamine-treated brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice, but not wild-type mice. Chronic methamphetamine exposure induces contrasting profiles of behavioral changes in wild-type and brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice, with attenuation of behaviors relevant to psychosis in methamphetamine-treated brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice. This suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor signalling changes may contribute to development of psychosis in methamphetamine users. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  14. Deficiências nutricionais: ações específicas do setor saúde para o seu controle Nutritional deficiencies: specific control measures by the health sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaquias Batista Filho

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem e analisam o papel do setor saúde nos programas de controle das principaiss endemias carenciais, revisando os fundamentos teóricos e estabelecendo possíveis estimativas de reversão para os diversos problemas nutricionais considerados. O artigo representa uma contribuição para a análise das alternativas setoriais elaboradas em função das metas da Organização das Nações Unidas (Unicef - OMS - FAO para o ano 2000, entre as quais figuram a redução do baixo peso ao nascer (abaixo de 2.500 gramas para menos de 10%, a diminuição em 1/3 das anemias, o decréscimo de 50 na prevalência de desnutrições moderada e grave em crianças, e o controle virtual da hipovitaminose A e do bócio iodoprivo.The authors describe and analyze the health sector's role in relation to ways of controlling major endemic nutritional deficiencies by reviewing the theoretical groundwork and establishing possible regression estimates for the various nutritional problems under study. The article is a contribution to the analysis of sectorial alternatives elaborated according to United Nations goals (UNICEF - WHO - FAO for the year 2000. Among these goals, we stress reduction of the proportion of low birth weight (less than 2500 grams to less than 10%; reduction of anemia cases to one-third of present cases; a reduction of 50% in prevalence of moderate and severe cases of malnutrition and the virtual control of vitamine A and iodine deficiencies.

  15. Effects of soy protein and nutrition education on patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze-Wah Kao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of soy protein and nutrition education on patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Patients who were regularly followed up at the nephrology clinics of National Taiwan University Hospital, aged between 18 to 75 years, daily activities-independent, had normal liver function, and had stage III, IV or V CKD were invited to join this study. The enrolled patients were then divided into two groups by simple randomization. Group 1 patients were asked to eat meat while Group 2 patients eat soy bean as their major sources of protein intake for a period of 6 months. Diet education for CKD was given at the start, the 3rd month, and the end of study. Demographic, clinical as well as laboratory data including serum biochemistry, lipid profile, interleukin-6, serum adiponectin, indirect calorimetry, and body composition were compared between the two groups both at the beginning and at the end of study. There were 26 CKD patients who had finished the study, but only 23 of them had complete laboratory data. There was no statistical difference in the baseline demographic, clinical and laboratory data between Group 1 and Group 2 patients except for serum albumin level (4.7±0.2 versus 4.4±0.2 g/dL, P=0.0013 (Table 1. There was neither any statistical difference in the baseline indirect calorimetry and body composition data between the two groups except for body fat percentage (23.1±6.2 versus 28.9±6.5%, P=0.0380. After 6 months of intervention, Group 2 patients were noted to have significantly higher adiponectin level than Group 1 patients (−3776.0±9118.3 versus 9073.5±9748.1 pg/mL, P=0.0049 (Table 2. There was no statistical difference in indirect calorimetry change or body composition change between the 2 groups though Group 2 patients were on average lighter at the end of study (P=0.0532.

  16. Decay-accelerating factor 1 deficiency exacerbates leptospiral-induced murine chronic nephritis and renal fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F Ferrer

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a global zoonosis caused by pathogenic Leptospira, which can colonize the proximal renal tubules and persist for long periods in the kidneys of infected hosts. Here, we characterized the infection of C57BL/6J wild-type and Daf1-/- mice, which have an enhanced host response, with a virulent Leptospira interrogans strain at 14 days post-infection, its persistence in the kidney, and its link to kidney fibrosis at 90 days post-infection. We found that Leptospira interrogans can induce acute moderate nephritis in wild-type mice and is able to persist in some animals, inducing fibrosis in the absence of mortality. In contrast, Daf1-/- mice showed acute mortality, with a higher bacterial burden. At the chronic stage, Daf1-/- mice showed greater inflammation and fibrosis than at 14 days post-infection and higher levels at all times than the wild-type counterpart. Compared with uninfected mice, infected wild-type mice showed higher levels of IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13, with similar levels of α-smooth muscle actin, galectin-3, TGF-β1, IL-17, IFN-γ, and lower IL-12 levels at 90 days post-infection. In contrast, fibrosis in Daf1-/- mice was accompanied by high expression of α-smooth muscle actin, galectin-3, IL-10, IL-13, and IFN-γ, similar levels of TGF-β1, IL-12, and IL-17 and lower IL-4 levels. This study demonstrates the link between Leptospira-induced murine chronic nephritis with renal fibrosis and shows a protective role of Daf1.

  17. Osteomalacia as a result of vitamin D deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, Arti; Rao, Ajay D; Rao, D Sudhaker

    2010-06-01

    Osteomalacia is an end-stage bone disease of chronic and severe vitamin D or phosphate depletion of any cause. Its importance has increased because of the rising incidence of vitamin D deficiency. Yet, not all cases of osteomalacia are cured by vitamin D replacement, and furthermore, not all individuals with vitamin D deficiency develop osteomalacia. Although in the past osteomalacia was commonly caused by malabsorption, nutritional deficiency now is more common. In addition, recent literature suggests that nutritional vitamin D deficiency osteomalacia follows various bariatric surgeries for morbid obesity. Bone pain, tenderness, muscle weakness, and difficulty walking are all common clinical manifestations of osteomalacia. Diagnostic work-up involves biochemical assessment of vitamin D status and may also include a transiliac bone biopsy. Treatment is based on aggressive vitamin D repletion in most cases with follow-up biopsies if patients are started on antiresorptive or anabolic agents. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevention of Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding in Newborn Infants: A Position Paper by the ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihatsch, Walter A.; Braegger, Christian; Bronsky, Jiri; Campoy, Cristina; Domellöf, Magnus; Fewtrell, Mary; Mis, Nataša F.; Hojsak, Iva; Hulst, Jessie; Indrio, Flavia; Lapillonne, Alexandre; Mlgaard, Christian; Embleton, Nicholas; van Goudoever, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) due to physiologically low vitamin K plasma concentrations is a serious risk for newborn and young infants and can be largely prevented by adequate vitamin K supplementation. The aim of this position paper is to define the condition, describe the prevalence,

  19. Association of sleep duration with chronic diseases in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Potsdam study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne von Ruesten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In view of the reduced number of hours devoted to sleep in modern western societies the question arises what effects might result from sleep duration on occurrence of chronic diseases. METHODS: Data from 23 620 middle-aged participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Potsdam study, that were recruited between 1994-1998, were analyzed by using Cox proportional hazard regression to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration at baseline and incidence of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, myocardial infarction, stroke, and cancer. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up period of 7.8 years 841 incident cases of type 2 diabetes, 197 cases of myocardial infarction, 169 incident strokes, and 846 tumor cases were observed. Compared to persons sleeping 7-<8 h/day, participants with sleep duration of <6 h had a significantly increased risk of stroke (Hazard Ratio (HR = 2.06, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.18-3.59, cancer (HR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.09-1.87, and overall chronic diseases (HR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.10-1.55 in multivariable adjusted models. Self-reported daytime sleep at baseline was not associated with incident chronic diseases in the overall study sample. However, there had been an effect modification of daytime sleep by hypertension showing that daytime sleep was inversely related to chronic disease risk among non-hypertensive participants but directly related to chronic diseases among hypertensives. CONCLUSION: Sleep duration of less than 6 h is a risky behavior for the development of chronic diseases, particularly stroke and cancer, and should be therefore addressed in public health campaigns.

  20. Association of sleep duration with chronic diseases in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ruesten, Anne; Weikert, Cornelia; Fietze, Ingo; Boeing, Heiner

    2012-01-01

    In view of the reduced number of hours devoted to sleep in modern western societies the question arises what effects might result from sleep duration on occurrence of chronic diseases. Data from 23 620 middle-aged participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam study, that were recruited between 1994-1998, were analyzed by using Cox proportional hazard regression to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration at baseline and incidence of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, myocardial infarction, stroke, and cancer. During a mean follow-up period of 7.8 years 841 incident cases of type 2 diabetes, 197 cases of myocardial infarction, 169 incident strokes, and 846 tumor cases were observed. Compared to persons sleeping 7-day, participants with sleep duration of <6 h had a significantly increased risk of stroke (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 2.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18-3.59), cancer (HR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.09-1.87), and overall chronic diseases (HR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.10-1.55) in multivariable adjusted models. Self-reported daytime sleep at baseline was not associated with incident chronic diseases in the overall study sample. However, there had been an effect modification of daytime sleep by hypertension showing that daytime sleep was inversely related to chronic disease risk among non-hypertensive participants but directly related to chronic diseases among hypertensives. Sleep duration of less than 6 h is a risky behavior for the development of chronic diseases, particularly stroke and cancer, and should be therefore addressed in public health campaigns.

  1. [Deficient lactose digestion and intolerance in a group of patients with chronic nonspecific ulcerative colitis: a controlled, double-blind, cross-over clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Acosta, G A; Milke-García, M P; Ramírez-Iglesias, M T; Uscanga, L

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that the frequency of hypolactasia and lactose intolerance is similar in both chronic idiopathic ulcerative colitis patients and the general population, the elimination of dairy products from the patient's diet is a habitual recommendation. Hypolactasia is common in Mexico, but its relation to chronic idiopathic ulcerative colitis has not been established. To evaluate lactose digestion and lactose intolerance in persons with chronic idiopathic ulcerative colitis. Thirty-nine patients with confirmed chronic idiopathic ulcerative colitis diagnosis were included in the study (mean: 31 years, range: 15 to 38). Twenty-two patients presented with rectosigmoid involvement and the remaining patients with pancolitis. No patient showed inflammatory activity according to the Truelove-Witts criteria and all consumed dairy products before diagnosis. A prospective, controlled, double-blind, cross-over study was designed. Patients randomly received 12.5 g of lactose or maltose in 250 cc water- each test 72 hours apart - and ydrogen was measured in exhaled air before disaccharide ingestion and then every 30 minutes for 3 hours. Digestion was considered deficient when there was an increase in hydrogen of at least 20 ppm. Symptom intensities were evaluated by Visual Analog Scales before, during, and after the hydrogen test. Differences between the groups were contrasted with the Mann-Whitney U and the Wilcoxon tests. Eighteen patients (46%) presented with deficient lactose digestion. No significant differences were found in the symptoms, extension, or progression of chronic idiopathic ulcerative colitis between patients that could digest and those that could not digest lactose. No patient had symptom exacerbation with the disaccharides used. Lactose digestion deficiency frequency is similar in subjects with chronic idiopathic ulcerative colitis and in healthy individuals in Mexico. We do not know whether higher doses could have some effect, but symptoms in patients

  2. Association of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and X-linked chronic granulomatous disease in a child with anemia and recurrent infections

    OpenAIRE

    Agudelo-Florez, P.; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares [UNIFESP; Lopez, J. A.; Redher, J.; Newburger, P. E.; Alla-Saad, S. T.; Condino-Neto, A.

    2004-01-01

    Patients with severe leukocyte G6PD deficiency may present with impairment of NADPH oxidase activity and a history of recurrent infections, mimicking the phenotype of chronic granulomatous disease. We report herein a child with recurrent infections who initially received the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency. His erythrocyte G6PD activity was reduced: 1.8 U/g Hb (normal: 12.1 +/- 2.1 U/g Hb). Further studies revealed that G6PD activity in neutrophils, mononuclear leukocytes, and Epstein-Barr virus...

  3. Bone mineral density and nutritional status in children with chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Boot (Annemieke); J. Bouquet (Jan); E.P. Krenning (Eric); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Osteoporosis has been reported in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease. AIMS: To evaluate bone mineral density (BMD), nutritional status, and determinants of BMD in children with inflammatory bowel disease. PATIENTS: Fifty five patients

  4. Gait deficiencies associated with peripheral artery disease are different than chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCamley, John D; Pisciotta, Eric J; Yentes, Jennifer M; Wurdeman, Shane R; Rennard, Stephen I; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Johanning, Jason M; Myers, Sara A

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), display significant differences in their kinetic and kinematic gait characteristics when compared to healthy, aged-matched controls. The ability of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to ambulate is also limited. These limitations are likely due to pathology-driven muscle morphology and physiology alterations establish in PAD and COP, respectively. Gait changes in PAD were compared to gait changes due to COPD to further understand how altered limb muscle due to disease can alter walking patterns. Both groups were independently compared to healthy controls. It was hypothesized that both patients with PAD and COPD would demonstrate similar differences in gait when compared to healthy controls. Patients with PAD (n=25), patients with COPD (n=16), and healthy older control subjects (n=25) performed five walking trials at self-selected speeds. Sagittal plane joint kinematic and kinetic group means were compared. Peak values for hip flexion angle, braking impulse, and propulsive impulse were significantly reduced in patients with symptomatic PAD compared to patients with COPD. After adjusting for walking velocity, significant reductions (pgait patterns are impaired for patients with PAD, this is not apparent for patients with COPD (without PAD). PAD (without COPD) causes changes to the muscle function of the lower limbs that affects gait even when subjects walk from a fully rested state. Altered muscle function in patients with COPD does not have a similar effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The high prevalence of anemia in Cambodian children and women cannot be satisfactorily explained by nutritional deficiencies or hemoglobin disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieringa, Frank Tammo; Dahl, Miriam; Chamnan, Chhoun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anemia is highly prevalent in Cambodian women and children, but data on causes of anemia are scarce. We performed a national micronutrient survey in children and women that was linked to the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey 2014 (CDHS-2014) to assess the prevalence of micronutrient...... for 1512 subjects (792 children and 720 women). RESULTS: Anemia was found in 43% of the women and 53% of the children. Hemoglobin disorders affected >50% of the population, with Hemoglobin-E the most prevalent disorder. Deficiencies of iron (ferritin ... and hemoglobinopathy were significantly associated with anemia in children, whereas in the women none of the factors was significantly associated with anemia. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was more prevalent in children

  6. Nutritional Deficiencies in Children of the First 3 Years of Life, According to a Multicenter Study in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Nyankovsky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the fact that in Ukraine today there is not enough researches that summarize the data on the nutritional status of young children, the prevalence of eating disorders and lack of basic macro- and micronutrients in children, the multicenter study on nutrition of children from 9 months to 3 years of life has been carried out. It was found that the present dietary intake of infants is unbalanced, contains excess energy and proteins, lack of zinc, iron, calcium, and vitamins A, D, E, B6, B12, B1. Due to unbalanced diet, the use of special infant formula instead of unmodified bovine milk in feeding young child can increase consumption of important nutrients (calcium, iron, iodine, vitamin E, D and folates.

  7. Nutritional Deficiencies in Children of the First 3 Years of Life, According to a Multicenter Study in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Nyankovsky

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the fact that in Ukraine today there is not enough researches that summarize the data on the nutritional status of young children, the prevalence of eating disorders and lack of basic macro- and micronutrients in children, the multicenter study on nutrition of children from 9 months to 3 years of life has been carried out. It was found that the present dietary intake of infants is unbalanced, contains excess energy and proteins, lack of zinc, iron, calcium, and vitamins A, D, E, B6, B12, B1. Due to unbalanced diet, the use of special infant formula instead of unmodified bovine milk in feeding young child can increase consumption of important nutrients (calcium, iron, iodine, vitamin E, D and folates.

  8. Nutritional deficiencies in German middle-class male alcohol consumers: relation to dietary intake and severity of liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergheim, I.; Parlesak, Alexandr; Dierks, C.

    2003-01-01

    . SETTING: Southern Germany. SUBJECTS: Seventy-six hospitalized German middle-class alcohol consumers with different stages of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and 22 healthy control subjects. METHODS: Subjects and controls were nutritionally assessed and mineral and vitamin content was measured in blood...... increase in carbohydrates (Pvitamin E, micronutrient intake of alcoholics was equal to that of controls; however, blood vitamin (vitamin C, retinol, lycopene, alpha- and gamma-carotene) and trace element (selenium, zinc) concentrations of alcohol-drinking patients were lower...

  9. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  10. [Chronic Malnutrition among Children under Five in Peru: A Spatial Analysis of Nutritional Data, 2010-2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vásquez, Akram; Tapia-López, Elena

    2017-05-19

    Peru has implemented various strategies seeking to improve nutritional indicators in children under five years old. However, high prevalence of malnutrition in some regions still remains. The aim of this study was to assess changes in regional prevalence and to determine the presence of district conglomerates with a high prevalence of chronic childhood malnutrition (CCM) in 2010 and 2016. A comparative descriptive analysis by regions and a district-level spatial analysis were conducted employing indicators reported by the Nutritional Status Information System. 23.9% (561.090/2.343.806) children under five years evaluated in Peru during 2010 and 18.0% (394.049/2.193.268) evaluated during 2016 were chronic malnutrition (reduction of 5.9 percentage points). We identified a decline of 7.6 percent points in rural areas and the persistence of prevalence above 30% in only one region (Huancavelica). The spatial analysis identified clusters of districts with high prevalence in 20% (379/1834) of Peruvian districts in 2010, and 17.2% (316/1834) of those in 2016, which are mainly spread across the sierra and jungle regions. . Peru has made significant progress in reducing stunting in children. Nevertheless, it still represents a health problem due to high prevalence in the sierra region, as well as expansion to jungle districts in 2016. Licencia Creative Commons Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 Unported Licencia Creative Commons

  11. [Food intake, nutritional status and physical activity between elderly with and without chronic constipation. A comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-García, Elisa Joan; Vargas-Salado, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Constipation is one of the most frequently found gastrointestinal problems in the elderly as aging modifies their food intake, nutritional status and physical activity, which are associated factors in the development of constipation. To compare food intake, nutritional status and physical activity between elderly subjects with or without chronic constipation. The study included a total of 140 subjects who were divided in two groups according to the presence or absence of constipation using the Rome III criteria. Diet intake was obtained through a 3-day dietary record (2 days during the week and one on Saturday or Sunday). Height, weight, arm circumference, and triceps skinfold thickness were measured and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was applied to all participants. Fiber and water intake were not statistically different between both groups. Constipated participants showed significantly less variety and less inclusion of all food groups in their diets compared to their non-constipated counterparts (p < 0.02; p < 0.03). Mean nutritional status was overweight and it didn't differ from each studied group (p= 0.49). Higher levels of physical activity were found in non-constipated subjects (1664 vs 1049 MET, p= 0.004). This study indicates that lower physical activity levels as well as an incomplete and less varied diet are associated to constipation in the elderly. Water and fibre intake do not seem to be contributing to constipation.

  12. Chronic vitamin C deficiency promotes redox imbalance in the brain but does not alter sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paidi, Maya Devi; Schjoldager, Janne Gram; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C (VitC) has several roles in the brain acting both as a specific and non-specific antioxidant. The brain upholds a very high VitC concentration and is able to preferentially retain VitC even during deficiency. The accumulation of brain VitC levels much higher than in blood is primarily...... achieved by the sodium dependent VitC transporter (SVCT2). This study investigated the effects of chronic pre-and postnatal VitC deficiency as well as the effects of postnatal VitC repletion, on brain SVCT2 expression and markers of oxidative stress in young guinea pigs. Biochemical analyses demonstrated...... significantly decreased total VitC and an increased percentage of dehydroascorbic acid, as well as increased lipid oxidation (malondialdehyde), in the brains of VitC deficient animals (p C repleted animals were not significantly different from controls. No significant changes...

  13. Iron deficiency is associated with food insecurity in pregnant females in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Clara Y; Eicher-Miller, Heather A

    2014-12-01

    Food-insecure pregnant females may be at greater risk of iron deficiency (ID) because nutrition needs increase and more resources are needed to secure food during pregnancy. This may result in a higher risk of infant low birth weight and possibly cognitive impairment in the neonate. The relationships of food insecurity and poverty income ratio (PIR) with iron intake and ID among pregnant females in the United States were investigated using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010 data (n=1,045). Food security status was classified using the US Food Security Survey Module. One 24-hour dietary recall and a 30-day supplement recall were used to assess iron intake. Ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, or total body iron classified ID. Difference of supplement intake prevalence, difference in mean iron intake, and association of ID and food security status or PIR were assessed using χ(2) analysis, Student t test, and logistic regression analysis (adjusted for age, race, survey year, PIR/food security status, education, parity, trimester, smoking, C-reactive protein level, and health insurance coverage), respectively. Mean dietary iron intake was similar among groups. Mean supplemental and total iron intake were lower, whereas odds of ID, classified by ferritin status, were 2.90 times higher for food-insecure pregnant females compared with food-secure pregnant females. Other indicators of ID were not associated with food security status. PIR was not associated with iron intake or ID. Food insecurity status may be a better indicator compared with income status to identify populations at whom to direct interventions aimed at improving access and education regarding iron-rich foods and supplements. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Association between Low Dietary Protein Intake and Geriatric Nutrition Risk Index in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Retrospective Single-Center Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Aki Kiuchi; Yasushi Ohashi; Reibin Tai; Toshiyuki Aoki; Sonoo Mizuiri; Toyoko Ogura; Atsushi Aikawa; Ken Sakai

    2016-01-01

    Reduced dietary protein intake in malnourished patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be associated with adverse clinical outcomes, which may mask any efficacy of a low-protein diet. The study included 126 patients with CKD who attended a dedicated dietary counseling clinic in 2005–2009 and were systematically followed until January 2015. Of these patients, 20 (15.9%) had moderate or severe nutrition-related risk of geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) < 92; these patients were ...

  15. Association between nutritional status and subjective health status in chronically ill children attending special schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.F.M. Joosten (Koen); K. van der Velde (Kelly); P. Joosten (Pieter); H. Rutten (Hans); J.M. Hulst (Jessie); K. Dulfer (Karolijn)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: In hospitalized children with a chronic disease, malnutrition was associated with a lower subjective health status. In outpatient children with a chronic disease attending special schools, this association has never been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the

  16. Thiamine Deficiency Induced Neurochemical, Neuroanatomical, and Neuropsychological Alterations: A Reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Nardone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional deficiency can cause, mainly in chronic alcoholic subjects, the Wernicke encephalopathy and its chronic neurological sequela, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS. Long-term chronic ethanol abuse results in hippocampal and cortical cell loss. Thiamine deficiency also alters principally hippocampal- and frontal cortical-dependent neurochemistry; moreover in WKS patients, important pathological damage to the diencephalon can occur. In fact, the amnesic syndrome typical for WKS is mainly due to the damage in the diencephalic-hippocampal circuitry, including thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies. The loss of cholinergic cells in the basal forebrain region results in decreased cholinergic input to the hippocampus and the cortex and reduced choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities and function, as well as in acetylcholine receptor downregulation within these brain regions. In this narrative review, we will focus on the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological studies shedding light on the effects of thiamine deficiency in experimental models and in humans.

  17. Chronic mild stress impairs latent inhibition and induces region-specific neural activation in CHL1-deficient mice, a mouse model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhusi, Mona; Obray, Daniel; Guercio, Bret; Bartlett, Mitchell J; Buhusi, Catalin V

    2017-08-30

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal processing of information and attentional deficits. Schizophrenia has a high genetic component but is precipitated by environmental factors, as proposed by the 'two-hit' theory of schizophrenia. Here we compared latent inhibition as a measure of learning and attention, in CHL1-deficient mice, an animal model of schizophrenia, and their wild-type littermates, under no-stress and chronic mild stress conditions. All unstressed mice as well as the stressed wild-type mice showed latent inhibition. In contrast, CHL1-deficient mice did not show latent inhibition after exposure to chronic stress. Differences in neuronal activation (c-Fos-positive cell counts) were noted in brain regions associated with latent inhibition: Neuronal activation in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortices and the nucleus accumbens shell was affected solely by stress. Neuronal activation in basolateral amygdala and ventral hippocampus was affected independently by stress and genotype. Most importantly, neural activation in nucleus accumbens core was affected by the interaction between stress and genotype. These results provide strong support for a 'two-hit' (genes x environment) effect on latent inhibition in CHL1-deficient mice, and identify CHL1-deficient mice as a model of schizophrenia-like learning and attention impairments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of personalized dietary intervention on nutritional, metabolic and vascular indices in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S; Molfino, A; Coppola, B; De Leo, S; Tommasi, V; Galani, A; Migliaccio, S; Greco, E A; Gnerre Musto, T; Muscaritoli, M

    2015-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) present a markedly increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality since the early stages of the disease and a high prevalence of malnutrition, inflammation, and accelerated atherosclerosis. Personalized nutritional intervention, with of a low-protein diet (LPD), since the early stages of CKD should be able to achieve significant metabolic improvements. In our study we have verified the effects of a personalized dietary intervention in patients in the CKD stages 3/4 KDOQI on nutritional, metabolic and vascular indices. We have evaluated renal function, lipid profile, mineral metabolism, inflammatory indices, and acid-base balance of 16 patients with CKD (stages 3/4 KDOQI). Assessment of nutritional status, body composition, bone mineral density and muscle mass, using body mass index (BMI), handgrip strength, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was performed. Vascular indices and endothelial dysfunction such as carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and the brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (baFMD) were also analyzed. After dietary interventions, we observed a significant increase in plasma bicarbonate (p = 0.004) and vitamin D levels (p = 0.03) and a concomitant significant reduction of phosphorus concentration (p = 0.001) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.01). Nutritional intervention potentially plays a major role in reducing the progression of CKD and systemic complications of predialysis patients. A low-protein diet (LPD) ensuring vegetable protein intake and a reduced amount of specific micronutrients should be recommended to stage 3/4 CKD patients in order to ameliorate metabolic profile, renal outcome, and reduce cardiovascular risk factors.

  19. Deficiência nutricional em plântulas de feijão-de-corda decorrente da omissão de macro e micronutrientes Nutritional deficiency in cowpea seedlings due to omission of macro and micronutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Souza Miranda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O feijão-de-corda [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp] cv. Pitiúba é uma importante cultura nos âmbitos econômico e social do Nordeste do Brasil, especialmente no Estado do Ceará, que é considerado o maior produtor desta região. Com a finalidade de caracterizar os sintomas de deficiências nutricionais em plântulas de feijão-de-corda, as sementes foram semeadas em areia exaustivamente lavada e, após um período de cinco dias, as plântulas foram transferidas para uma solução nutritiva completa para o período de aclimatação. Após três dias, as plântulas foram submetidas aos diferentes tratamentos. O experimento teve os seguintes tratamentos: solução nutritiva completa (N; P; K; Ca; Mg; S e micronutrientes e omissão individual de cada elemento -N; -P; -K; -Ca; -Mg; -S; -B; -Fe, bem como ausência de aeração. Os sintomas das deficiências foram observados, caracterizados e registrados por fotografias. No final do experimento, as medidas de comprimento e os teores de matérias fresca e seca das raízes e parte aérea das plântulas foram analisados. Todos os macros e micronutrientes causaram sintomas de deficiência e afetaram o desenvolvimento das plântulas. Os sintomas foram desenvolvidos primeiramente em plântulas com carência em Fe, Ca e N. A matéria seca total foi reduzida em todos os tratamentos com ausência de nutrientes. A ausência de Ca, N e Fe foi responsável por uma maior redução da biomassa. A ordem decrescente de redução foi a seguinte: Ca > N > Fe > P > K > Mg > S > Aeração > B > Completo.The Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp] cv. Pitiúba is an important crop in the economic and social contexts in the Northeast of Brazil, especially in the state of Ceará, which is considered the largest producer of this region. With the purpose of characterizing the symptoms of nutritional deficiencies in Cowpea seedlings, the seeds were sowed in washed sand and, after a period of five days, the seedlings were

  20. Nutrition in the management of cirrhosis and its neurological complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes.

  1. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic gait deviations in individuals with chronic anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Shiek Abdullah; Button, Kate; Simic, Milena; Van Deursen, Robert; Pappas, Evangelos

    2016-06-01

    Altered joint motion that occurs in people with an anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee is proposed to play a role in the initiation of knee osteoarthritis, however, the exact mechanism is poorly understood. Although several studies have investigated gait deviations in individuals with chronic anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee in the frontal and transverse planes, no systematic review has summarized the kinematic and kinetic deviations in these two planes. We searched five electronic databases from inception to 14th October 2013, with key words related to anterior cruciate ligament, biomechanics and gait, and limited to human studies only. Two independent reviewers assessed eligibility based on predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria and methodological quality was evaluated using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology statement checklist. We identified 16 studies, totaling 183 subjects with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee and 211 healthy subjects. Due to the variability in reported outcomes, we could only perform meta-analysis for 13 sagittal plane outcomes. The only significant finding from our meta-analysis showed that individuals with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee demonstrated a significantly greater external hip flexor angular impulse compared to control (P=0.03). No consensus about what constitutes a typical walking pattern in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee can be made, nor can conclusions be derived to explain if gait deviations in the frontal and transverse plane contributed to the development of the knee osteoarthritis among this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this ...

  3. Towards prevention of vitamin D deficiency and beyond: knowledge gaps and research needs in vitamin D nutrition and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Kevin D; Kiely, Mairead

    2011-12-01

    The North American Institute of Medicine (IOM) recently published their report on dietary reference intakes (DRI) for Ca and vitamin D. The DRI committee's deliberations underpinning this most comprehensive report on vitamin D nutrition to date benefited hugely from a much expanded knowledge base in vitamin D over the last decade or more. However, since their release, the vitamin D DRI have been the subject of intense controversy, which is largely due to the persistence of fundamental knowledge gaps in vitamin D. These can be identified at the levels of exposure, metabolism, storage, status, dose-response, function and beneficial or adverse health effects, as well as safe and effective application of intake recommendations at the population level through sustainable food-based approaches. The present review provides a brief overview of the approach used by the IOM committee to revise the DRI for vitamin D and to collate from a number of authoritative sources key knowledge gaps in vitamin D nutrition from the public health perspective. A number of research topics are outlined and data requirements within these are identified and mapped to the risk assessment framework used by the DRI committee. While not intended as an exhaustive list, it provides a basis for organising and prioritising research efforts in the area of vitamin D, which may offer a perspective on the major areas in need of attention. It is intended to be of use to researchers, national policy makers, the public health community, industry groups and other relevant stakeholders including funding institutions.

  4. Nutritional iron deficiency anemia: magnitude and its predictors among school age children, southwest Ethiopia: a community based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalegn, Amare; Mossie, Andualem; Gedefaw, Lealem

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a global public health problem among school age children, which retards psychomotor development and impairs cognitive performance. There is limited data on prevalence and risk factors for IDA. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, severity, and predictors of nutritional IDA in school age children in Southwest Ethiopia. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Jimma Town, Southwest Ethiopia from April to July 2013. A total of 616 school children aged 6 to 12 years were included in the study using multistage sampling technique. A structured questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic data. Five milliliter venous blood was collected from each child for hematological examinations. Anemia was defined as a hemoglobin level lower than 11.5 g/dl and 12 g/dl for age group of 5-11 years and 12-15 years, respectively. Iron deficiency anemia was defined when serum iron and ferritin levels are below 10 µmol/l and 15 µg/dl, respectively. Moreover, fresh stool specimen was collected for diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infection. Stained thick and thin blood films were examined for detection of Plasmodium infection and study of red blood cell morphology. Dietary patterns of the study subjects were assessed using food frequency questionnaire and anthropometric measurements were done. Data were analyzed using SPSS V-20.0 for windows. Overall, prevalence of anemia was 43.7%, and that of IDA was 37.4%. Not-consuming protein source foods [AOR = 2.30, 95%CI(1.04,5.14)], not-consuming dairy products [AOR = 1.83, 95%CI(1.14,5.14)], not-consuming discretionary calories [AOR = 2.77, 95%CI(1.42,5.40)], low family income [AOR = 6.14, 95%CI(2.90,12.9)] and intestinal parasitic infections [AOR = 1.45, 95%CI(1.23, 5. 27)] were predictors of IDA. Iron deficiency anemia is a moderate public health problem in the study site. Dietary deficiencies and intestinal parasitic infections were predictors of IDA

  5. Nutritional iron deficiency anemia: magnitude and its predictors among school age children, southwest Ethiopia: a community based cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amare Desalegn

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is a global public health problem among school age children, which retards psychomotor development and impairs cognitive performance. There is limited data on prevalence and risk factors for IDA.The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, severity, and predictors of nutritional IDA in school age children in Southwest Ethiopia.A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Jimma Town, Southwest Ethiopia from April to July 2013. A total of 616 school children aged 6 to 12 years were included in the study using multistage sampling technique. A structured questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic data. Five milliliter venous blood was collected from each child for hematological examinations. Anemia was defined as a hemoglobin level lower than 11.5 g/dl and 12 g/dl for age group of 5-11 years and 12-15 years, respectively. Iron deficiency anemia was defined when serum iron and ferritin levels are below 10 µmol/l and 15 µg/dl, respectively. Moreover, fresh stool specimen was collected for diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infection. Stained thick and thin blood films were examined for detection of Plasmodium infection and study of red blood cell morphology. Dietary patterns of the study subjects were assessed using food frequency questionnaire and anthropometric measurements were done. Data were analyzed using SPSS V-20.0 for windows.Overall, prevalence of anemia was 43.7%, and that of IDA was 37.4%. Not-consuming protein source foods [AOR = 2.30, 95%CI(1.04,5.14], not-consuming dairy products [AOR = 1.83, 95%CI(1.14,5.14], not-consuming discretionary calories [AOR = 2.77, 95%CI(1.42,5.40], low family income [AOR = 6.14, 95%CI(2.90,12.9] and intestinal parasitic infections [AOR = 1.45, 95%CI(1.23, 5. 27] were predictors of IDA.Iron deficiency anemia is a moderate public health problem in the study site. Dietary deficiencies and intestinal parasitic infections were

  6. Physical Activity Level of Korean Adults with Chronic Diseases: The Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey, 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ho-Seong; An, Ah-Reum; Choi, Ho-Chun; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Shin, Dong-Heon; Oh, Seung-Min; Seo, Young-Gyun; Cho, Be-Long

    2015-11-01

    Proper physical activities are known to be helpful in the prevention and management of chronic diseases. However, the physical activity level of patients with chronic diseases is low. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the physical activity compliance of patients with hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia in Korea. This study analyzed the 2010-2012 Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. We included 13,873 individuals in the analysis. The level of physical activity compliance was measured by performing multivariate logistic regression analyses. In the univariate analysis, the subjects with hypertension or diabetes tended to comply with the physical activity guidelines less faithfully than their healthy counterparts. The proportion of subjects with hypertension who were insufficiently physically active was 65.4% among the men and 75.8% among the women. For diabetes, the proportions were 66.7% and 76.8%, respectively. No significant difference was found between the subjects with dyslipidemia and their healthy counterparts. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, no significant difference in physical activity compliance was observed between the subjects with hypertension, diabetes, or dyslipidemia and their healthy counterparts for both sexes. The patients with hypertension or diabetes tended to have lower physical activity prevlaence than their healthy counterparts. However, for dyslipidemia, no significant difference was found between the two groups. Given the significance of physical activities in the management of chronic diseases, the physical activities of these patients need to be improved.

  7. Oral sodium bicarbonate on the nutritional status of patients on chronic dialysis program: A randomized placebo controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Enríquez-Zarama

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of oral sodium bicarbonate in improving the nutritional status of patients with chronic renal failure on chronic dialysis therapy (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Design: Randomized double blind placebo clinical trial. Setting: RTS Renal Units of Popayan, Colombia. Patients and Methods: 162 patients on chronic dialysis (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis were randomized to either placebo or bicarbonate. Patients received oral sodium bicarbonate, 1.0 g three times daily or placebo. Both groups received treatment for a 4-month period. Results: The study groups were comparable at the beginning of the study (study baseline and no significant differences were observed in any baseline parameters. At 4 months, the levels of albumin and Subjective Global Assessment (SGA improved with bicarbonate (p = 0.000, the malnutrition inflammation score and the score of malnutrition in dialysis with bicarbonate decreased significantly (p = 0.000. The PCR remained unchanged in both groups (p = 0,306. An increase of 20% or more from baseline serum albumin was observed in 6 (7.41% patients who received bicarbonate and 1 (1.23% of those receiving placebo (p = 0.02. At baseline albumin levels

  8. [Effect of transderrmal testosterone on the quality of life of men with androgen deficiency and chronic prostatitis in routine clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinarov, A Z; Rozhivanov, R V

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of Androgel on the quality of life of patients with androgen deficiency (hypogonadism) and chronic prostatitis in everyday practice. This open multicenter observational non-interventional study comprised 401 men with testosterone deficiency and chronic prostatitis who were treated with topical applications of 1% testosterone gel of (Androgel) at a dose of 50 or 100 mg in routine clinical practice for three months. The primary endpoint was the health related quality of life. Also, the patients filled out AMS, I-PSS, NIH-CPSI questionnaires to assess the quality of life related to chronic prostatitis, lower urinary tract symptoms, and aging. Secondary endpoints included changes in the overall score of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5), changes in body weight and waist circumference, the reasons for treatment discontinuation and any adverse events that occurred during treatment. Mean total testosterone levels at baseline and three months were 9.5 (95% CI 9.2-9.7) nmol/L and 16.5 (95% CI 16.1-16.9) nmol/l (pprostatitis and hypogonadism results in an improvement in low urinary tract symptoms, symptoms of chronic prostatitis, alleviates pelvic pain and thus leads to significant improvements in the quality of life.

  9. The impact of Folate Pathway Polymorphisms Combined to Nutritional Deficiency As a Maternal Predisposition Factor for Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Santos-Rebouças

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in genes encoding folate metabolizing enzymes have been linked to an increased risk of maternal chromosomal nondisjunction in several populations. With the purpose of evaluating this relationship, we compared the frequencies of 677C>T and 1298A>C polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR and 66A>G in the methionine synthase reductase gene (MTRR between 103 young mothers of Down syndrome (DS individuals and 108 control mothers, whose offspring was karyotypically normal, correlating it with an estimative of folate and – related micronutrients levels intake. Maternal and paternal transmission frequencies of MTHFR 677T allele were also examined to access potential parent-of-origin effects. PCR-RFLP for genomic DNA was accomplished and allele/genotype frequencies differences were determined using the x2 test, whereas pattern of transmission of the MTHFR 677 allele was analyzed by transmission disequilibrium test. None of the polymorphisms seemed to be more frequent in case mothers than in controls, either individually or combined. The estimative of nutritional intake revealed that folate consumption median was inadequate in both groups, whereas methionine and zinc consumption medians were significantly greater in control mothers. It suggests that such interaction between genetic profile and environment could predispose this sub group of women to have a DS child. Additional studies focusing the interaction between nutritional intakes, biochemical data and folate pathway polymorphisms are needed to confirm the present results. The possibility of neutralize the biochemical negative effects of folate-related polymorphisms through oral supplementation could provide new targets for DS prevention.

  10. Relationship between household wealth inequality and chronic childhood under-nutrition in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Rathavuth; Banta, James E; Betancourt, Jose A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Household food insecurity and under-nutrition remain critically important in developing countries struggling to emerge from the scourge of poverty, where historically, improvements in economic conditions have benefited only certain privileged groups, causing growing inequality in health and healthcare among the population. Methods Utilizing information from 5,977 children aged 0-59 months included in the 2004 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey , this study examined t...

  11. [A longitudinal study regarding the gestational changes in iodine nutrition and thyroid function among pregnant women in the iodine deficient areas of Henan province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Zheng, Heming; Li, Xiaofeng; Ying, Huili

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the gestational changes of iodine nutrition and thyroid function and to explore the factors associated with the thyroid function in pregnant women. A longitudinal survey was conducted in 130 pregnant women in Luohe city of Henan province from October 2012 to May 2013. Samples of fasting blood and urine were collected in each trimester to test on thyroid function and urinary iodine. Data regarding social demography and lifestyle behavior were collected through questionnaire in the first trimester. The medians of urinary iodine (MUI) for pregnant women were 238.9, 150.8 and 306.4 µg/L in the first, second and third trimesters, respectively (P 0.05) but the level of free thyroxine (FT4) decreased (P iodine nutrition and thyroid function. With the increase of iodine level, the level of TSH first increased and then decreased while the levels of FT3 and FT4 showed the opposite trend. The level of TSH was influenced by factors as education level, history of chronic diseases, history of CT and X-ray examination, and intake of pickled food etc. The level of FT4 was associated with residence (urban or rural), stressful events in the previous year, daily means of transportation, and the hours of sedentariness, working and sleeping. Significant differences were noticed in iodine nutrition and thyroid function of pregnant women during the three trimesters. It was essential to establish specific reference ranges for different trimesters. Thyroid functions of pregnant women seemed to be associated with iodine level and lifestyle.

  12. Coffee consumption and risk of chronic disease in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Germany study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floegel, Anna; Pischon, Tobias; Bergmann, Manuela M; Teucher, Birgit; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner

    2012-04-01

    Early studies suggested that coffee consumption may increase the risk of chronic disease. We investigated prospectively the association between coffee consumption and the risk of chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes (T2D), myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and cancer. We used data from 42,659 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Germany study. Coffee consumption was assessed by self-administered food-frequency questionnaire at baseline, and data on medically verified incident chronic diseases were collected by active and passive follow-up procedures. HRs and 95% CIs were calculated with multivariate Cox regression models and compared by competing risk analysis. During 8.9 y of follow-up, we observed 1432 cases of T2D, 394 of MI, 310 of stroke, and 1801 of cancer as first qualifying events. Caffeinated (HR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.84, 1.05) or decaffeinated (HR: 1.05; 95% CI: 0.84, 1.31) coffee consumption (≥4 cups/d compared with disease. A lower risk of T2D was associated with caffeinated (HR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.94; P-trend 0.009) and decaffeinated (HR: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.46, 1.06; P-trend: 0.043) coffee consumption (≥4 cups/d compared with disease and cancer risk were not. The competing risk analysis showed no significant differences between the risk associations of individual diseases. Our findings suggest that coffee consumption does not increase the risk of chronic disease, but it may be linked to a lower risk of T2D.

  13. Dietary Calcium Intake May Contribute to the HOMA-IR Score in Korean Females with Vitamin D Deficiency (2008–2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ho Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background : Vitamin D and calcium are important factors involved in the regulation of blood glucose and insulin secretion. The Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR score is a useful variable for evaluating insulin resistance, and therefore we cross-sectionally compared HOMA-IR scores according to serum vitamin D levels and dietary calcium intake. Methods : We selected data from healthy males (n=5,163 and females (n=7,506 analyzed over 5 years (2008–2012 via the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES. We calculated HOMA-IR scores and compared them according to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD concentration classification (30 ng/mL and dietary calcium quintile after adjustment for relevant variables using complex sample analysis. Comparisons were done after data weighting. Results : The mean dietary calcium intake in males and females was 558.1 mg/day and 445.9 mg/day, respectively. The mean serum 25(OHD concentration in males and females was 19.4 ng/mL and 16.8 ng/mL, respectively. After adjustment for relevant variables, HOMA-IR score was significantly correlated with serum 25(OHD concentration and dietary calcium intake in females, whereas it was only correlated with serum 25(OHD concentration in males. HOMA-IR was significantly lower in the top quintile of dietary calcium intake (mean, 866 mg/day within females with vitamin D deficiency (P=0.047. Conclusion : Adequate dietary calcium intake may be important for normal HOMA-IR in females with vitamin D deficiency.

  14. Magnesium deficiency and increased inflammation: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen FH

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Forrest H Nielsen Research Nutritionist Consultant, Grand Forks, ND, USA Abstract: Animal studies have shown that magnesium deficiency induces an inflammatory response that results in leukocyte and macrophage activation, release of inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins, and excessive production of free radicals. Animal and in vitro studies indicate that the primary mechanism through which magnesium deficiency has this effect is through increasing cellular Ca2+, which is the signal that results in the priming of cells to give the inflammatory response. Primary pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL-1; the messenger cytokine IL-6; cytokine responders E-selectin, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1; and acute-phase reactants C-reactive protein and fibrinogen have been determined to associate magnesium deficiency with chronic low-grade inflammation (inflammatory stress. When magnesium dietary intake, supplementation, and/or serum concentration suggest/s the presence of magnesium deficiency, it often is associated with low-grade inflammation and/or with pathological conditions for which inflammatory stress is considered a risk factor. When magnesium intake, supplementation, and/or serum concentration suggest/s an adequate status, magnesium generally has not been found to significantly affect markers of chronic low-grade inflammation or chronic disease. The consistency of these findings can be modified by other nutritional and metabolic factors that affect inflammatory and oxidative stress. In spite of this, findings to date provide convincing evidence that magnesium deficiency is a significant contributor to chronic low-grade inflammation that is a risk factor for a variety of pathological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Because magnesium deficiency commonly occurs in countries where foods rich in magnesium are not consumed in

  15. Chronic deficiency of nitric oxide affects hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α stability and migration in human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Cattaneo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial dysfunction in widely diffuse disorders, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes and senescence, is associated with nitric oxide (NO deficiency. Here, the behavioural and molecular consequences deriving from NO deficiency in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were investigated. RESULTS: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS was chronically inhibited either by N(G-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME treatment or its expression was down-regulated by RNA interference. After long-term L-NAME treatment, HUVECs displayed a higher migratory capability accompanied by an increased Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 (kinase insert domain receptor, KDR expression. Moreover, both pharmacological and genetic inhibition of eNOS induced a state of pseudohypoxia, revealed by the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α. Furthermore, NO loss induced a significant decrease in mitochondrial mass and energy production accompanied by a lower O(2 consumption. Notably, very low doses of chronically administered DETA/NO reverted the HIF-1α accumulation, the increased VEGF expression and the stimulated migratory behaviour detected in NO deficient cells. CONCLUSION: Based on our results, we propose that basal release of NO may act as a negative controller of HIF-1α levels with important consequences for endothelial cell physiology. Moreover, we suggest that our experimental model where eNOS activity was impaired by pharmacological and genetic inhibition may represent a good in vitro system to study endothelial dysfunction.

  16. Nutritional support in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; Puig, Celia; Soldevillla, Cristina; Barata, Anna; Cuquet, Jordi; Recasens, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease which involves the gastrointestinal tract in about 90% of cases. It may contribute to nutritional deterioration. To assess whether the application of a nutritional support protocol to these patients could improve their nutritional status and quality of life. Single center prospective study, performed on an outpatient basis, in a county hospital. The Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) was used to screen risk for malnutrition. Health questionnaire SF-36 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used to assess quality of life and psychopathology respectively. Weight, height, energy and protein requirements, macronutrient intake and nutritional biochemical parameters were evaluated. Nutritional intervention was performed in patients at risk for malnutrition. Of the 72 patients, 12.5% were at risk for malnutrition. Iron deficiency anemia (18.35%) and vitamin D deficiency (54%) were the most frequently observed nutritional deficits. The questionnaires on psychopathology and quality of life showed a high prevalence of anxiety and depression, and lower level poor quality of life in the physical and mental component. No significant improvements were observed in the weight, food intake, nutritional biochemical parameters, psychopathology and quality of life follow-up. Dietary intervention was able to maintain body weight and food intake. Iron deficiency anemia and vitamin D deficiency improved with iron and vitamine D supplements. No deterioration was observed in psychological assessment or quality of life. Studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to assess the efficacy of this intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of dialysis adequacy with nutritional and inflammatory status in patients with chronic kidney failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Hemayati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with dialysis-dependent renal failure has increased in the past years worldwide. Several parameters have been introduced for the quantitative assessment of dialysis adequacy. The National Cooperative Dialysis Study results indicated that Kt/V and time-averaged concentration of urea (TAC are predictors of mortality in patients who receive maintenance hemodialysis (HD. Also, the protein catabolic ratio (PCR, which is an indicator of nutritional status, can predict patients′ mortality. Our aim was to assess the impact of parameters that show dialysis adequacy on indices of nutrition or inflammation. A total of 46 patients were included in the study; eight patients were excluded during the course of the study and 38 patients were enrolled in the final analysis. All patients were receiving HD for at least for three months. HD was administered three times per week and the study lasted for two months. Kt/V, TAC and PCR were assessed at the beginning of the study based on patients′ urea and blood urea nitrogen in the first week of our study; these calculations were repeated at the end of the first and second months using the mean of the mentioned values in the month. Both adequacy indices significantly and positively correlated with changes in PCR (P <0.001. However, no significant correlation was detectable between Kt/V and TAC with either body mass index and albumin or C-reactive protein. Based on the Kt/V values, patients with adequate dialysis had slower decrease in the PCR (P <0.001. Our results indicate that adequacy of dialysis is correlated with patients′ nutritional status. No correlation was observed between dialysis adequacy and inflammatory status.

  18. Study of the effects of the nutritional and socio-economic factors on the prevalance of iron deficiency anaemia among pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elobeid, Tahra Eltayeb

    1998-12-01

    This Study was conducted with the following objectives: 1.determine the prevalance of iron deficiency anaemia among pregnant women. 2. Determine the factors that affect the iron status of pregnant women (nutritional, social etc...). For the assessment of iron status during pregnancy, 30 healthy pregnant women were included in a longitudinal study from the first to the third trimester. One blood sample was taken in the first trimester and a second blood sample was taken in the third trimester. All subjects were given ten iron supplement tablets at the beginning of the study by the researcher. However, they did not receive any other iron supplements throughout their pregnancy. Ten healthy non-pregnant women were included in the study to serve as controls. The iron status was assessed using the following parameters: haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels which was measured using ImmunoRadiometric Assay (IRMA). The nutritional status was assessed from a nutritional/socio-economic questionnaire that was answered by the study and control groups. Both the study and the control groups had haemoglobin level below the WHO cut-off points ( 0.05) between the level of haemoglobin of control and the study groups in the first and third trimester. There was significant difference (p<0.01) in the level of serum ferritin between the study and control group. The study group had a higher level of serum ferritin than the control. there was also high significant difference (p<0.01) in the level of serum ferritin between the first and third trimester in which a large decrease in the level of serum ferritin was apparent. The results of this study also showed that 16.5% had IDA (Iron Defeciency Anaemia) in the first trimester whereas 27.6% had depleted iron stores without frank defeciency. The prevalance of IDA increased to 26.4% in the third trimester while those who had depleted iron stores increased to 46.6%. Almost 50% of pregnant women started their pregnancy with adequate iron stores

  19. Study of the effects of the nutritional and socio-economic factors on the prevalance of iron deficiency anaemia among pregnant women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elobeid, Tahra Eltayeb [Department of Food Science and technology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1998-12-01

    This Study was conducted with the following objectives: 1.determine the prevalance of iron deficiency anaemia among pregnant women. 2. Determine the factors that affect the iron status of pregnant women (nutritional, social etc...). For the assessment of iron status during pregnancy, 30 healthy pregnant women were included in a longitudinal study from the first to the third trimester. One blood sample was taken in the first trimester and a second blood sample was taken in the third trimester. All subjects were given ten iron supplement tablets at the beginning of the study by the researcher. However, they did not receive any other iron supplements throughout their pregnancy. Ten healthy non-pregnant women were included in the study to serve as controls. The iron status was assessed using the following parameters: haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels which was measured using ImmunoRadiometric Assay (IRMA). The nutritional status was assessed from a nutritional/socio-economic questionnaire that was answered by the study and control groups. Both the study and the control groups had haemoglobin level below the WHO cut-off points (<12g/di for non-pregnant women and <11g/di for pregnant women). However, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the level of haemoglobin of control and the study groups in the first and third trimester. There was significant difference (p<0.01) in the level of serum ferritin between the study and control group. The study group had a higher level of serum ferritin than the control. there was also high significant difference (p<0.01) in the level of serum ferritin between the first and third trimester in which a large decrease in the level of serum ferritin was apparent. The results of this study also showed that 16.5% had IDA (Iron Defeciency Anaemia) in the first trimester whereas 27.6% had depleted iron stores without frank defeciency. The prevalance of IDA increased to 26.4% in the third trimester while those who had depleted

  20. Perioperative Alanyl-Glutamine-Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition in Chronic Radiation Enteritis Patients With Surgical Intestinal Obstruction: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Danhua; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Jian; Guo, Mingxiao; Yin, Jianyi; Li, Yousheng

    2016-04-01

    A prospective, randomized, controlled study was performed to evaluate the effects of perioperative alanyl-glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition (PN) support on the immunologic function, intestinal permeability, and nutrition status of surgical patients with chronic radiation enteritis (CRE)-induced intestinal obstruction. Patients who received 0.4 g/kg/d alanyl-glutamine and isonitrogenous PN were assigned to an alanyl-glutamine-supplemented PN (Gln-PN) group and a control group, respectively. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and glutamine, body fat mass (FM), immunologic function, and intestinal permeability were measured before and after surgery. Serum glutamine levels of the Gln-PN group significantly exceeded that of the control group (P nutrition state and intestinal motility of surgical patients with CRE-induced intestinal obstruction. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. [Overweight, obesity and chronic mal nutrition in 6 to 9 year-old children in Peru, 2009-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajuelo-Ramírez, Jaime; Sánchez-Abanto, José; Alvarez-Dongo, Doris; Tarqui-Mamani, Carolina; Agüero-Zamora, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of overweight, obesity and chronic malnutrition in 6- to 9-year-old children in Peru. A cross-cutting study based on the 2009-2010 National Household Survey. The size/age ratio was analyzed with references of the National Center for Health Statistic (NCSH) and the World Health Organization (WHO), considering less than two standard deviations for chronic malnutrition (CM); and the Must and WHO reference tables to measure the body mass index with 85 to 95 percentile values for overweight and above 95 for obesity. With Must as reference, overweight was 12.1% and obesity 9.4%, and according to WHO overweight and obesity were 10.2 and 11.3% respectively. The prevalence of CM according to NCSH and WHO is 15.4 and 17.8% respectively. The highest prevalence of CM is in the north (25.2%), center (22.9%) and south of (19%) the Highland, while obesity is more present in the south coast (28%), Metropolitan Lima (22.8%) and the central Coast (22.5%). Of all the children with CM, 6.5% has overweight and 1.2% obesity. CM is decreasing because size averages have improved, however obesity has doubled. The presence of CM and obesity in children aged 6 to 9 years old in different regions of Peru poses a challenge in the planning of food and nutrition policies.

  2. Evaluation of malnutrition detected with the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS-2002) and the quality of life in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, M; Soylu, M; Kaner, G; İnanç, N; Başmısırlı, E

    2016-01-01

    Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have impaired quality of life, but the relationship between their nutritional status and quality of life has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quality of life and nutritional status in hospitalized COPD patients. Demographic data, quality of life and nutritional status of 90 inpatients with a mean age of 68.76 ± 10.85 years were enrolled in the study. The Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS-2002) tool was used to evaluate their nutritional status. The quality of life was assessed using the Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire. The correlation analysis was used for the relationship between SF-36 subscales and nutritional status variables. Of the 90 COPD patients included in the study, 54.4 % were men, and 45.6 % were women. Moderate, severe, and very severe COPD were detected in 37.8 %, 38.9 %, and 23.3 % of the patients, respectively. At risk of malnutrition were 55.6 % of the 90 COPD patients, whereas 44.4 % were not. The scores for physical function, physical role functioning, pain, general health, emotional role functioning, vitality, social function, and mental function subscales were lower in the patients at risk of malnutrition (p evaluation of the nutritional status of COPD patients should be an integral part of their clinical treatment plans aiming towards improving their quality of life. Hippokratia 2016, 20(2):147-152.

  3. Nutrition and brain development in early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Elizabeth L; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2014-04-01

    Presented here is an overview of the pathway from early nutrient deficiency to long-term brain function, cognition, and productivity, focusing on research from low- and middle-income countries. Animal models have demonstrated the importance of adequate nutrition for the neurodevelopmental processes that occur rapidly during pregnancy and infancy, such as neuron proliferation and myelination. However, several factors influence whether nutrient deficiencies during this period cause permanent cognitive deficits in human populations, including the child's interaction with the environment, the timing and degree of nutrient deficiency, and the possibility of recovery. These factors should be taken into account in the design and interpretation of future research. Certain types of nutritional deficiency clearly impair brain development, including severe acute malnutrition, chronic undernutrition, iron deficiency, and iodine deficiency. While strategies such as salt iodization and micronutrient powders have been shown to improve these conditions, direct evidence of their impact on brain development is scarce. Other strategies also require further research, including supplementation with iron and other micronutrients, essential fatty acids, and fortified food supplements during pregnancy and infancy. © 2014 International Life Sciences Institute.

  4. Nutrition transition and its relationship to the development of obesity and related chronic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Arne; Dyerberg, Jørn; Selleck, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity has also increased substantially in the nutritional transition countries, and the health burden of obesity-related complications is growing. The introduction of fast-food chains and Westernized dietary habits providing meals with fast-food characteristics...... seems to be a marker of the increasing prevalence of obesity. The mechanisms involved are probably that the supply of foods is characterized by large portion sizes with a high energy density, and sugar-rich soft drinks. The high energy density of foods is partly brought about by a high dietary fat...... content, and it has been shown that even in a Chinese population the increase from about 15% to 20% in the proportion of calories from fat is sufficient to explain some weight gain in the population. In addition, fast food from major chains in most countries still contains unacceptably high levels...

  5. Association between Chronic Laryngitis and Particulate Matter Based on the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Hoon Joo

    Full Text Available Chronic laryngitis (CL has been described as chronic inflammation of the larynx. CL have various causes such as long-term smoking, acid reflux, voice overuse, bronchitis, allergies, pneumonia, excessive exposure to toxic chemicals and complications from the flu or a chronic cold. However, the prevalence of CL and role of air pollution in the etiology is uncertain.The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between CL and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10 in South Korea using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES during 2008-2012.KNHANES is a cross-sectional survey of the civilian, non-institutionalized population of South Korea (n = 21,116. A field survey team that included an otolaryngologist moved with a mobile examination unit and performed interviews and physical examinations. The mean annual concentrations of ambient PM10, SO2, O3, NO2, and CO levels in Korea were determined from monitoring station data. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine the relationship of air pollution to CL.Among the population ≥ 19 years of age, the weighted prevalence of CL was 3.37 ± 0.30% (95% confidence interval, 2.79-3.95%. CL was more prevalent in men, current smokers, and those with lower household income and prevalence increased with age. A significant decrease over time was observed in the prevalence of CL (P for trend = 0.0049 and the annual average concentrations of PM10 (P for trend < 0.0001 from 2008 to 2012. In a multivariate model, the factors associated with CL included PM10 (odds ratio [OR], 1.378, p = 0.0457, age (OR, 1.020, p<0.0001, sex (OR, 0.734, p = 0.0179, and smoking status (OR, 1.438, p = 0.0054.Elevated PM10 exposures could be associated with increased risk of CL in South Koreans. Further epidemiological and experimental studies are necessary to clarify the impact of chronic PM10 exposure on CL.

  6. Nutrition and Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good nutrition is important for everyone. This is especially true when you have a chronic disorder like myasthenia gravis ( ... difficulty with chewing and swallowing may interfere with nutrition and create safety issues. Diet modifications may be ...

  7. Nutritional support for chronic myelogenous and other leukemias: a review of the scientific literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steriti, Ronald

    2002-10-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a slowly progressive disease characterized by the overproduction of granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils). A blood smear shows moderate elevations in white blood cell counts that may persist for years and be benign. Platelets are increased in number, although their function is impaired, resulting in symptoms of easy bleeding (purpura, swollen gums). Conventional medical treatment is a marrow transplant and alkylating agents, which are usually prescribed only during crisis. Several nutrients and botanicals have been studied for use in CML, including vitamin A and all-trans retinoic acid (Retin-A), vitamin D3, vitamin E, vitamin B12, indirubin (found in herbs including Indigofera tinctoria and Isatis tinctoria), and Curcuma longa. This article briefly reviews the scientific literature on the therapeutic use of these nutrients for CML.

  8. Role of heteroplasmic mutations in the mitochondrial genome and the ID4 gene promoter methylation region in the pathogenesis of chronic aplastic anemia in patients suffering from Kidney yin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xing; Wang, Jing-Yi; Liu, Kui; Cui, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Ya-Qin; Wang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    To analyze changes in gene amplification in the mitochondrial genome and in the ID4 gene promoter methylation region in patients with chronic aplastic anemia (CAA) suffering from Kidney (Shen) yin deficiency or Kidney yang deficiency. Bone marrow and oral epithelium samples were collected from CAA patients with Kidney yin deficiency or Kidney yang deficiency (20 cases). Bone marrow samples were collected from 20 healthy volunteers. The mitochondrial genome was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products were used for sequencing and analysis. Higher mutational rates were observed in the ND1-2, ND4-6, and CYTB genes in CAA patients suffering from Kidney yin deficiency. Moreover, the ID4 gene was unmethylated in bone marrow samples from healthy individuals, but was methylated in some CAA patients suffering from Kidney yin deficiency (positive rate, 60%) and Kidney yang deficiency (positive rate, 55%). These data supported that gene mutations can alter the expression of respiratory chain enzyme complexes in CAA patients, resulting in energy metabolism impairment and promoting the physiological and pathological processes of hematopoietic failure. Functional impairment of the mitochondrial respiration chain induced by gene mutation may be an important reason for hematopoietic failure in patients with CAA. This change is closely related to maternal inheritance and Kidney yin deficiency. Finally, these data supported the assertion that it is easy to treat disease in patients suffering from yang deficiency and difficult to treat disease in patients suffering from yin deficiency.

  9. The nutritional status and factors contributing to malnutrition in children with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczyk, E; Wejnarska, K; Dadalski, M; Kierkus, J; Ryzko, J; Oracz, G

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of malnutrition among children with chronic pancreatitis (CP). Furthermore, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between etiological factors of CP, its clinical characteristics, and the severity of malnutrition. The study included 208 children with CP (113 girls and 95 boys; mean age: 10.8 years, range: 1.6-18 years), hospitalized at our center between 1988 and 2012. The severity of malnutrition was graded on the basis of Cole's ratios, and its prevalence was analyzed according to the etiological factors of pancreatitis. Moreover, the analysis of discrimination was performed to identify the factors contributing to malnutrition among the following variables: age at CP onset, duration of CP, number of CP exacerbations, the number of ERCPs performed, the grade of pancreatic damage documented on imaging, co-occurrence of diabetes, and the results of 72-h fecal fat quantification. We documented features of malnutrition in 52 (25%) children with CP, including 36 (17.3%) patients with moderate malnutrition, and 2 (0.96%) with severe malnutrition. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of malnutrition between groups of patients with various etiological factors of chronic pancreatitis. The age at CP onset showed the best discrimination ability of malnourished patients: the mean age at disease onset in a subgroup of malnourished children was significantly higher than in children with Cole's index >85%. A considerable percentage of children with CP can suffer from clinically significant malnutrition. Later age at CP onset predisposes to development of malnutrition. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Survey of health status, nutrition and geography of food selection of chronic liver disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Timothy; Pawloski, Lisa; Kallman-Price, Jillian; Escheik, Carey; Hossain, Noreen; Fang, Yun; Gerber, Lynn H; Younossi, Zobair M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, a complex disease determined both by genetic and environmental factors, is strongly associated with NAFLD, and has been demonstrated to have a negative impact on HCV and other chronic liver diseases (CLD). This study assessed the association between type and location of food sources and chronic liver disease (CLD) using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). CLD patients completed surveys [267 subjects, 56.5% female, age 55.8 ± 12.0, type of CLD: 36.5% hepatitis C (HCV), 19.9% hepatitis B (HBV), 19.9% non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); primary food source (PFS): 80.8% grocery store, secondary: 26.2% bulk food store, tertiary: 20.5% restaurants; fresh food (FF): 83%, pre-packaged (PP) 8.7%, already prepared (AP) 8.3%]. FF consumers had significantly fewer UEH servings/month (p = 0.030) and lived further away from convenience stores (1.69 vs. 0.95 km, p = 0.0001). Stepwise regression reveals the lowest FF consumers were NAFLD patients, subjects with UEH or restaurants and ethnic food stores as their PFS (R = 0.557, p = 0.0001). Eating already-packaged foods and utilizing restaurants or ethnic food stores as the PFS positively correlated with NAFLD (R = 0.546, p = 0.0001). Environmental food source measures, including type and density, should be included when examining areas hyper-saturated with a variety of food options. In hyper-saturated food environments, NAFLD patients consume more prepared food and less FF. CLD patients with UEH also eat significantly more prepared food and frequent restaurants and ethnic food stores as their PFS.

  11. Inflammatory bowel diseases: principles of nutritional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos Fábio Guilherme

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and to prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission in adults and promoting growth in children. Due to its low complication rate and lower costs, enteral nutrition should be preferred over total parenteral nutrition whenever possible. Both present equal effectiveness in primary therapy for remission of active Crohn's disease. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted, especially in patients presumed to need total parenteral nutrition. Recent research has focused on the use of nutrients as primary treatment agents. Immunonutrition is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, modulating the inflammation and changing the eicosanoid synthesis profile. However, beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these and other nutrients (glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  12. Refractory Abdominal Pain in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Be Wary of Acquired Angioedema due to C1 Esterase Inhibitor Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullateef Abdulkareem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1INH-AAE is a rare and potentially fatal syndrome of bradykinin-mediated angioedema characterized by episodes of angioedema without urticaria. It typically manifests with nonpitting edema of the skin and edema in the gastrointestinal (GI tract mucosa or upper airway. Edema of the upper airway and tongue may lead to life-threatening asphyxiation. C1INH-AAE is typically under-diagnosed because of its rarity and its propensity to mimic more common abdominal conditions and allergic reactions. In this article, we present the case of a 62-year-old male with a history of recently diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL who presented to our hospital with recurrent abdominal pain, initially suspected to have Clostridium difficile colitis and diverticulitis. He received a final diagnosis of acquired angioedema due to C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency due to concomitant symptoms of lip swelling, cutaneous nonpitting edema of his lower extremities, and complement level deficiencies. He received acute treatment with C1 esterase replacement and icatibant and was maintained on C1 esterase infusions. He also underwent chemotherapy for his underlying CLL and did not experience further recurrence of his angioedema.

  13. Regular moderate or intense exercise prevents depression-like behavior without change of hippocampal tryptophan content in chronically tryptophan-deficient and stressed mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosung Lee

    Full Text Available Regular exercise has an antidepressant effect in human subjects. Studies using animals have suggested that the antidepressant effect of exercise is attributable to an increase of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; however, the precise mechanism underlying the antidepressant action via exercise is unclear. In contrast, the effect of 5-HT on antidepressant activity has not been clarified, in part because the therapeutic response to antidepressant drugs has a time lag in spite of the rapid increase of brain 5-HT upon administration of these drugs. This study was designed to investigate the contribution of brain 5-HT to the antidepressant effect of exercise. Mice were fed a tryptophan-deficient diet and stressed using chronic unpredictable stress (CUS for 4 weeks with or without the performance of either moderate or intense exercise on a treadmill 3 days per week. The findings demonstrated that the onset of depression-like behavior is attributable not to chronic reduction of 5-HT but to chronic stress. Regular exercise, whether moderate or intense, prevents depression-like behavior with an improvement of adult hippocampal cell proliferation and survival and without the recovery of 5-HT. Concomitantly, the mice that exercised showed increased hippocampal noradrenaline. Regular exercise prevents the impairment of not long-term memory but short-term memory in a 5-HT-reduced state. Together, these findings suggest that: (1 chronic reduction of brain 5-HT may not contribute to the onset of depression-like behavior; (2 regular exercise, whether moderate or intense, prevents the onset of chronic stress-induced depression-like behavior independent of brain 5-HT and dependent on brain adrenaline; and (3 regular exercise prevents chronic tryptophan reduction-induced impairment of not long-term but short-term memory.

  14. Combined effect of the environmental factors as ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency on the thyroid gland and the immune condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danyarova, L. [Department of Endocrynology, Research Institute of Cardiology and Internal Medicine, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2012-07-01

    The Semipalatinsk Test Site was the primary testing venue for the Soviet Union's nuclear weapons. It is located on the steppe in northeast Kazakhstan. The tragic situation of the Semipalatinsk region is an acute and chronic radiation, repeated in big and small doses and a total absence of territorial decontamination, created unique conditions for study of the long term influence of the radiation doses on the health of the population. The Semipalatinsk region of the Republic of Kazakhstan belongs also to an area of moderate and pronounced iodine deficiency. The purpose of the research is to study the prevalence of a thyroid gland pathology and the condition of a cytokine immune link that is likely to be influenced by a combine effect of ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency. 1100 people passed through the investigation and it appears that 56, 75% of them had a thyroid pathology. Thyroid gland functional condition analysis (TSH, FT3, FT4 a-TG, a-TPO) has shown the prevalence of a subclinical hypothyroidism (33%). 28, 8% resulted in the presence of antibodies to thyroglobulin and the thyroid peroxides, whereas in the areas located further to the nuclear range, the percentage was only 13, 0%

  15. Deficiency of insulin-like growth factor 1 reduces vulnerability to chronic alcohol intake-induced cardiomyocyte mechanical dysfunction: role of AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wei; Li, Qun; Turdi, Subat; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) levels are closely associated with cardiac performance although the role of IGF-1 in alcoholic cardiac dysfunction is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of severe liver IGF-1 deficiency (LID) on chronic alcohol-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) dysfunction. Adult male C57 and LID mice were placed on a 4% alcohol diet for 15 weeks. Cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties were evaluated including peak shortening (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (±dL/dt), time-to-relengthening (TR(90) ), change in fura-fluorescence intensity (ΔFFI) and intracellular Ca(2+) decay. Levels of apoptotic regulators caspase-3, Bcl-2 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), the ethanol metabolizing enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), as well as the cellular fuel gauge AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were evaluated. Chronic alcohol intake enlarged myocyte cross-sectional area, reduced PS, ± dL/dt and ΔFFI as well as prolonged TR(90) and intracellular Ca(2+) decay, the effect of which was greatly attenuated by IGF-1 deficiency. The beneficial effect of LID against alcoholic cardiac mechanical defect was ablated by IGF-1 replenishment. Alcohol intake increased caspase-3 activity/expression although it down-regulated Bcl-2, ALDH2 and pAMPK without affecting JNK and AMPK. IGF-1 deficiency attenuated alcoholism-induced responses in all these proteins with the exception of Bcl-2. In addition, the AMPK agonist 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside abrogated short-term ethanol incubation-elicited cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Taken together, these data suggested that IGF-1 deficiency may reduce the sensitivity to ethanol-induced myocardial mechanical dysfunction. Our data further depicted a likely role of Caspase-3, ALDH2 and AMPK activation in IGF-1 deficiency induced 'desensitization' of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. © 2011 The

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as ... tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as ...

  18. Imbalanced insulin action in chronic over nutrition: Clinical harm, molecular mechanisms, and a way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kevin Jon; Wu, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    The growing worldwide prevalence of overnutrition and underexertion threatens the gains that we have made against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and other maladies. Chronic overnutrition causes the atherometabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of seemingly unrelated health problems characterized by increased abdominal girth and body-mass index, high fasting and postprandial concentrations of cholesterol- and triglyceride-rich apoB-lipoproteins (C-TRLs), low plasma HDL levels, impaired regulation of plasma glucose concentrations, hypertension, and a significant risk of developing overt type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition, individuals with this syndrome exhibit fatty liver, hypercoagulability, sympathetic overactivity, a gradually rising set-point for body adiposity, a substantially increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and--crucially--hyperinsulinemia. Many lines of evidence indicate that each component of the atherometabolic syndrome arises, or is worsened by, pathway-selective insulin resistance and responsiveness (SEIRR). Individuals with SEIRR require compensatory hyperinsulinemia to control plasma glucose levels. The result is overdrive of those pathways that remain insulin-responsive, particularly ERK activation and hepatic de-novo lipogenesis (DNL), while carbohydrate regulation deteriorates. The effects are easily summarized: if hyperinsulinemia does something bad in a tissue or organ, that effect remains responsive in the atherometabolic syndrome and T2DM; and if hyperinsulinemia might do something good, that effect becomes resistant. It is a deadly imbalance in insulin action. From the standpoint of human health, it is the worst possible combination of effects. In this review, we discuss the origins of the atherometabolic syndrome in our historically unprecedented environment that only recently has become full of poorly satiating calories and incessant enticements to sit. Data are examined that indicate

  19. Punch grafting of chronic ulcers in patients with laminin-332-deficient, non-Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuen, Wing Yan; Huizinga, Janneke; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    Background: Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a genetic, heterogeneous, trauma-induced blistering disease. Patients with laminin-332-deficient non-Herlitz junctional EB (JEB-nH) can have impaired wound healing witnessed by persistent, small, deep ulcers on the hands and feet that adversely affect the

  20. Associations Between Periodontitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The 2010 to 2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae Ho; Hwang, Hee-Jin; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to examine whether oral hygiene and self-care, particularly in periodontal health, are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the Korean population. Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2010 to 2012 were used to assess the community periodontal index (CPI) of 5,878 participants (normal lung function: n = 5,181; obstructive spirometric pattern: n = 697) aged ≥40 years, who underwent spirometry. Participants with COPD brushed their teeth less frequently and used the following less frequently: 1) dental floss and/or interdental brush; 2) mouthwash; and 3) electric toothbrush (P periodontitis in patients with COPD (58.1%) was significantly higher than in those without COPD (34.0%, P periodontal severity. Periodontitis (CPI 3 and 4) was associated in males with COPD after adjustment for: 1) age; 2) income; 3) education; 4) smoking; 5) alcohol consumption; 6) exercise; 7) body mass index; 8) toothbrushing frequency; 9) diabetes mellitus; and 10) number of teeth (CPI 3: relative risk [RR] = 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.12 to 2.05; CPI 4: RR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.56). Findings of this cross-sectional study suggest that COPD in males may be associated with severe periodontitis and indicates the importance of promoting dental care in patients with COPD.

  1. Storage Pool Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  3. Diet Quality of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients and the Impact of Nutritional Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Andréia Silva; Ramos, Christiane Ishikawa; Nerbass, Fabiana Baggio; Cuppari, Lilian

    2017-12-06

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the quality of the diet of nondialysis-dependent patients with chronic kidney disease and to investigate the impact of dietary counseling in the quality of the diet of these patients. In the cross-sectional analysis, 3-day food records of 100 nondialysis-dependent patients with chronic kidney disease patients, in the first visit to the renal dietitians, were evaluated using the Diet Quality Index (DQI). Under-reporters were excluded. DQI is comprised by 10 components: 6 are food groups (fruits, vegetables, cereals, milk and dairy, meats and eggs, and legumes); 3 are nutrients (total fat, sodium, and cholesterol), and the last one is the diet variety. Each component is scored from 0 to 10, according to the adequacy of the Brazilian dietary guideline, and an overall score ranging from 0 (poor) to 100 (good) is obtained. In a subsample of 44 patients, a prospective analysis was performed to compare the DQI and its components before and after dietary counseling. The median DQI score was 68.6 (62.3-75.6; interquartile range), which means that most of the patients (92%) had a diet that "needs improvement" (DQI between 50 and 80 points). The DQI components with the lowest scores (lower adequacy) were sodium (0.0 [0.0-0.9]), dairy (3.9 [2.1-6.0]), and vegetables (6.0 [2.8-9.5]), whereas meat/egg, legumes, and cholesterol had the highest scores. Vegetables, legumes, and diet variety components were significantly lower in the lower tertiles of DQI. After a median follow-up of 25.0 (17.0-35.8) months comprising 6 (5-10) visits to the dietitian, energy, protein, and micronutrients intake were significantly reduced. The dietary counseling did not improve the overall DQI (after: 69.0 [69.0-74.8]; P = .95) and, a significant reduction in the score of legumes (from 10.0 [2.7-10.0] to 7.8 [4.7-10.0], P = .00) and diet variety (from 7.0 [5.3-10.0] to 6.0 [4.0-9.0], P = .02) components were observed. The diet of this cohort of patients

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Iron-Deficiency Anemia What's in ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  6. Parenteral Nutrition and Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawska, Barbara; Allard, Johane P

    2017-05-06

    Severe short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a major cause of chronic (Type 3) intestinal failure (IF) where structural and functional changes contribute to malabsorption and risk of micronutrient deficiencies. Chronic IF may be reversible, depending on anatomy and intestinal adaptation, but most patients require long-term nutritional support, generally in the form of parenteral nutrition (PN). SBS management begins with dietary changes and pharmacologic therapies taking into account individual anatomy and physiology, but these are rarely sufficient to avoid PN. New hormonal therapies targeting intestinal adaptation hold promise. Surgical options for SBS including intestinal transplant are available, but have significant limitations. Home PN (HPN) is therefore the mainstay of treatment for severe SBS. HPN involves chronic administration of macronutrients, micronutrients, fluid, and electrolytes via central venous access in the patient's home. HPN requires careful clinical and biochemical monitoring. Main complications of HPN are related to venous access (infection, thrombosis) and metabolic complications including intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD). Although HPN significantly impacts quality of life, outcomes are generally good and survival is mostly determined by the underlying disease. As chronic intestinal failure is a rare disease, registries are a promising strategy for studying HPN patients to improve outcomes.

  7. Current food classifications in epidemiological studies do not enable solid nutritional recommendations for preventing diet-related chronic diseases: the impact of food processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardet, Anthony; Rock, Edmond; Bassama, Joseph; Bohuon, Philippe; Prabhasankar, Pichan; Monteiro, Carlos; Moubarac, Jean-Claude; Achir, Nawel

    2015-11-01

    To date, observational studies in nutrition have categorized foods into groups such as dairy, cereals, fruits, and vegetables. However, the strength of the association between food groups and chronic diseases is far from convincing. In most international expert surveys, risks are most commonly scored as probable, limited, or insufficient rather than convincing. In this position paper, we hypothesize that current food classifications based on botanical or animal origins can be improved to yield solid recommendations. We propose using a food classification that employs food processes to rank foods in epidemiological studies. Indeed, food health potential results from both nutrient density and food structure (i.e., the matrix effect), both of which can potentially be positively or negatively modified by processing. For example, cereal-based foods may be more or less refined, fractionated, and recombined with added salt, sugars, and fats, yielding a panoply of products with very different nutritional values. The same is true for other food groups. Finally, we propose that from a nutritional perspective, food processing will be an important issue to consider in the coming years, particularly in terms of strengthening the links between food and health and for proposing improved nutritional recommendations or actions. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Reprint of: Nutrition in the Management of Cirrhosis and its Neurological Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F

    2015-03-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes.

  9. Vitamin Excess and Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Liliane; Krebs, Nancy F

    2018-04-01

    The published literature supports the high prevalence of supplement use in children and adolescents in the United States. Pediatricians today are faced with questions from parents and patients about the benefits, safety, efficacy, and correct dose of vitamins and minerals. In this article, we review 7 vitamins with the most clinical relevance as judged by abundance in food, risks and symptoms of deficiency, and potential for toxicity. Specifically, we focus on possible clinical scenarios that can be indicative of nutritional deficiency. We synthesize and summarize guidelines from nutrition experts, various medical societies, the World Health Organization, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2018. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Chronic Otitis Media: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mina; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Jun Ho; Oh, Seung Ha; Park, Moo Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Background The performance of nationwide studies of chronic otitis media (COM) in adults has been insufficient in Korea. We evaluated the prevalence and risk factors of COM in Korea. Methods This study was conducted using data from the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 23,621). After excluding the subjects under 20 year old and suffered from cancers, 16,063 patients were evaluated for COM. Participants underwent a medical interview, physical examination, endoscopic examination, and blood and urine test. COM was diagnosed by trained residents in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology using an ear, nose, and throat questionnaire and otoendoscopy findings. Data on the presence and absence of COM were collected. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify its risk factors. Results Of the 16,063 participants aged above 20 year old, the weighted prevalence of COM was 3.8%. In the multivariate analyses, the following factors showed high odds ratios (ORs) for COM: pulmonary tuberculosis (adjusted OR, 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-3.01), chronic rhinosinusitis (adjusted OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.17-2.98), mild hearing impairment (adjusted OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.34-2.85), moderate hearing impairment (adjusted OR, 4.00; 95% CI, 2.21-7.22), tinnitus (adjusted OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.34-2.49), increased hearing thresholds in pure tone audiometry in the right ear (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.03), and left ear (adjusted OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.02-1.04). The following factors showed low odds ratios for COM: hepatitis B (adjusted OR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.08-0.94) and rhinitis (adjusted OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.42-0.88). In addition, high levels of vitamin D, lead, and cadmium, EQ-5D index; and low red blood cell counts were associated with development of COM (Student’s t-test, P < 0.01). Conclusions Our population-based study showed that COM is not rare in Korea, and its development may be associated with various host and

  11. Nutritional Ketosis Affects Metabolism and Behavior in Sprague-Dawley Rats in Both Control and Chronic Stress Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene L. Brownlow

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional ketosis may enhance cerebral energy metabolism and has received increased interest as a way to improve or preserve performance and resilience. Most studies to date have focused on metabolic or neurological disorders while anecdotal evidence suggests that ketosis may enhance performance in the absence of underlying dysfunction. Moreover, decreased availability of glucose in the brain following stressful events is associated with impaired cognition, suggesting the need for more efficient energy sources. We tested the hypotheses that ketosis induced by endogenous or exogenous ketones could: (a augment cognitive outcomes in healthy subjects; and (b prevent stress-induced detriments in cognitive parameters. Adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were used to investigate metabolic and behavioral outcomes in 3 dietary conditions: ketogenic (KD, ketone supplemented (KS, or NIH-31 control diet in both control or chronic stress conditions. Acute administration of exogenous ketones resulted in reduction in blood glucose and sustained ketosis. Chronic experiments showed that in control conditions, only KD resulted in pronounced metabolic alterations and improved performance in the novel object recognition test. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis response revealed that KD-fed rats maintained peripheral ketosis despite increases in glucose whereas no diet effects were observed in ACTH or CORT levels. Both KD and KS-fed rats decreased escape latencies on the third day of water maze, whereas only KD prevented stress-induced deficits on the last testing day and improved probe test performance. Stress-induced decrease in hippocampal levels of β-hydroxybutyrate was attenuated in KD group while both KD and KS prevented stress effects on BDNF levels. Mitochondrial enzymes associated with ketogenesis were increased in both KD and KS hippocampal samples and both endothelial and neuronal glucose transporters were affected by stress but only in the

  12. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    From a global perspective and in spite of decades of nutrition programmes, micronutrients deficiency is at alarming proportions in many developing societies today. It affects millions of people worldwide, and includes consequences that potentially compromise morbidity, mortality, cognitive development, and growth, reproductive and work capacity. Recent estimates by the WHO are that deficiencies of iron (Fe), iodine (I), and vitamin A continue to influence the health of 2000 million, 740 million, and 250 million persons respectively. In addition to these three micronutrients, the possible negative consequences of deficiencies of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) are now also being increasingly recognized as important health concerns. As a result of the increasing recognition of the co-existence of multiple micronutrient deficiencies in developing countries, United Nations Agencies have urged that supplementation, fortification and dietary modification/diversification programmes are designed to combat multiple micronutrient deficiencies simultaneously. Fortificant levels for fortification, like supplementation, must be carefully selected to minimize risk of antagonistic nutrient interactions and to take into account the toxic threshold level for normal individuals. Possible antagonistic interactions that may interfere with the utilisation of trace elements in the supplements or fortificants per se, and/or with the utilization of elements intrinsic to the food or the meal include those between Cu-Zn, Cu-Fe, Fe-Zn, Mn-Fe, Ca-Zn. Stable isotope techniques play an important role in quantifying the optimal levels and the bioavailability of micronutrient supplements and fortificants for a range of indigenous meals consumed in developing countries, especially those containing potent absorption inhibitors. This Capacity building CRP or Thermatic CRP (T-CRP) addresses the need to develop effective strategies to combat micro-nutrient malnutrition in developing countries

  13. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    From a global perspective and in spite of decades of nutrition programmes, micronutrients deficiency is at alarming proportions in many developing societies today. It affects millions of people worldwide, and includes consequences that potentially compromise morbidity, mortality, cognitive development, and growth, reproductive and work capacity. Recent estimates by the WHO are that deficiencies of iron (Fe), iodine (I), and vitamin A continue to influence the health of 2000 million, 740 million, and 250 million persons respectively. In addition to these three micronutrients, the possible negative consequences of deficiencies of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) are now also being increasingly recognized as important health concerns. As a result of the increasing recognition of the co-existence of multiple micronutrient deficiencies in developing countries, United Nations Agencies have urged that supplementation, fortification and dietary modification/diversification programmes are designed to combat multiple micronutrient deficiencies simultaneously. Fortificant levels for fortification, like supplementation, must be carefully selected to minimize risk of antagonistic nutrient interactions and to take into account the toxic threshold level for normal individuals. Possible antagonistic interactions that may interfere with the utilisation of trace elements in the supplements or fortificants per se, and/or with the utilization of elements intrinsic to the food or the meal include those between Cu-Zn, Cu-Fe, Fe-Zn, Mn-Fe, Ca-Zn. Stable isotope techniques play an important role in quantifying the optimal levels and the bioavailability of micronutrient supplements and fortificants for a range of indigenous meals consumed in developing countries, especially those containing potent absorption inhibitors. This Capacity building CRP or Thermatic CRP (T-CRP) addresses the need to develop effective strategies to combat micro-nutrient malnutrition in developing countries

  14. Moderator's view: Low-protein diet in chronic kidney disease: effectiveness, efficacy and precision nutritional treatments in nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccali, Carmine; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2018-03-01

    Intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses provide complementary information about the usefulness of therapies. While intention-to-treat analyses of trials that tested low-protein diets remain debated, per-protocol analyses of the same trials show that low protein intake actually reduces the risk of kidney failure. Per-protocol analyses are notoriously open to bias but intention-to-treat analyses are less immaculate than commonly realized because they critically depend on adherence to the treatment being tested and therefore may not be directly relevant for informing clinical decisions when different degrees of adherence to therapy occur. Over the last 20 years new statistical techniques censoring patients at the time when they become uncompliant and that adjust for confounding attributable to incomplete adherence, i.e. for prognostic factors that predict adherence to treatment, have been developed. These techniques can be usefully applied to reanalyse the Modification Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and other trials. Intensive surveillance of patients on a low-protein diet is fundamental for early detection of malnutrition. However, the resources demanded by such surveillance are likely superior to the actual dietitians workforce dedicated to follow-up of the chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. Surveillance efforts may perhaps be preferentially devoted to preselected patients, i.e. patients that maintain good compliance and an adequate metabolic and nutritional status, while patients who are resistant to educational efforts and show persisting uncompliance may be reallocated to a diet with a higher protein content, which poses a lower risk of malnutrition and other adverse health outcomes.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  16. The role of subcutaneous adipose tissue in supporting the copper balance in rats with a chronic deficiency in holo-ceruloplasmin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Y Ilyechova

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that (1 an acute deficiency in blood serum holo-ceruloplasmin (Cp developed in rats that were fed fodder containing silver ions (Ag-fodder for one month and (2 the deficiency in holo-Cp was compensated by non-hepatic holo-Cp synthesis in rats that were chronically fed Ag-fodder for 6 months (Ag-rats. The purpose of the present study is to identify the organ(s that compensate for the hepatic holo-Cp deficiency in the circulation. This study was performed on rats that were fed Ag-fodder (40 mg Ag·kg-1 body mass daily for 6 months. The relative expression levels of the genes responsible for copper status were measured by RT-PCR. The in vitro synthesis and secretion of [14C]Cp were analyzed using a metabolic labeling approach. Oxidase activity was determined using a gel assay with o-dianisidine. Copper status and some hematological indexes were measured. Differential centrifugation, immunoblotting, immunoelectrophoresis, and atomic absorption spectrometry were included in the investigation. In the Ag-rats, silver accumulation was tissue-specific. Skeletal muscles and internal (IAT and subcutaneous (SAT adipose tissues did not accumulate silver significantly. In SAT, the mRNAs for the soluble and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ceruloplasmin isoforms were expressed, and their relative levels were increased two-fold in the Ag-rats. In parallel, the levels of the genes responsible for Cp metallation (Ctr1 and Atp7a/b increased correspondingly. In the SAT of the Ag-rats, Cp oxidase activity was observed in the Golgi complex and plasma membrane. Moreover, full-length [14C]Cp polypeptides were released into the medium by slices of SAT. The possibilities that SAT is part of a system that controls the copper balance in mammals, and it plays a significant role in supporting copper homeostasis throughout the body are discussed.

  17. [Community Nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranceta, Javier

    2004-06-01

    In the last 20 years, Public Health Nutrition focused mainly on the qualitative aspects which may influence the onset of chronic diseases, quality of life, physical and mental performance and life expectancy. This applied knowledge organised as part of preventive and health promotion programs led to the development of Community Nutrition. The aim of Community Nutrition actions is to adequate lifestyles related to food consumption patterns in order to improve the quality of life and contribute to health promotion of the population in the community where programs and services are delivered. Key functions to develop in a Community Nutrition Unit consist in the identification and assessment of nutrition problems in the community as well as the design, implementation and evaluation of intervention programs by means of appropriate strategies. These should aim at different populations groups and settings, such as work places, schools, high risk groups or the general public. Nowadays, Community Nutrition work efforts should focus on three main aspects: nutrition education in schools and in the community; food safety and food security and the development and reinforcement of food preparation skills across all age groups. Social catering services, either in schools, the work place or at the community level, need to ensure adequate nutritional supply, provide foods contributing to healthy eating practices as well as to enhance culinary traditions and social learning. Food safety and food security have become a top priority in Public Health. The concepts referes to the availability of food safe and adequate as well as in sufficient amount in order to satisfy nutrition requirements of all individuals in the community. Social changes along new scientific developments will introduce new demands in Community Nutrition work and individual dietary counselling will become a key strategy. In order to face new challenges, community nutrition pactitioners require a high quality

  18. The changing nutrition scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, C

    2013-09-01

    The past seven decades have seen remarkable shifts in the nutritional scenario in India. Even up to the 1950s severe forms of malnutrition such as kwashiorkar and pellagra were endemic. As nutritionists were finding home-grown and common-sense solutions for these widespread problems, the population was burgeoning and food was scarce. The threat of widespread household food insecurity and chronic undernutrition was very real. Then came the Green Revolution. Shortages of food grains disappeared within less than a decade and India became self-sufficient in food grain production. But more insidious problems arising from this revolution were looming, and cropping patterns giving low priority to coarse grains and pulses, and monocropping led to depletion of soil nutrients and 'Green Revolution fatigue'. With improved household food security and better access to health care, clinical manifestations of severe malnutrition virtually disappeared. But the decline in chronic undernutrition and "hidden hunger" from micronutrient deficiencies was slow. On the cusp of the new century, an added factor appeared on the nutritional scene in India. With steady urban migration, upward mobility out of poverty, and an increasingly sedentary lifestyle because of improvements in technology and transport, obesity rates began to increase, resulting in a dual burden. Measured in terms of its performance in meeting its Millennium Development Goals, India has fallen short. Despite its continuing high levels of poverty and illiteracy, India has a huge demographic potential in the form of a young population. This advantage must be leveraged by investing in nutrition education, household access to nutritious diets, sanitary environment and a health-promoting lifestyle. This requires co-operation from all the stakeholders, including governments, non government organizations, scientists and the people at large.

  19. The changing nutrition scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Gopalan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The past seven decades have seen remarkable shifts in the nutritional scenario in India. Even up to the 1950s severe forms of malnutrition such as kwashiorkar and pellagra were endemic. As nutritionists were finding home-grown and common-sense solutions for these widespread problems, the population was burgeoning and food was scarce. The threat of widespread household food insecurity and chronic undernutrition was very real. Then came the Green Revolution. Shortages of food grains disappeared within less than a decade and India became self-sufficient in food grain production. But more insidious problems arising from this revolution were looming, and cropping patterns giving low priority to coarse grains and pulses, and monocropping led to depletion of soil nutrients and ′Green Revolution fatigue′. With improved household food security and better access to health care, clinical manifestations of severe malnutrition virtually disappeared. But the decline in chronic undernutrition and "hidden hunger" from micronutrient deficiencies was slow. On the cusp of the new century, an added factor appeared on the nutritional scene in India. With steady urban migration, upward mobility out of poverty, and an increasingly sedentary lifestyle because of improvements in technology and transport, obesity rates began to increase, resulting in a dual burden. Measured in terms of its performance in meeting its Millennium Development Goals, India has fallen short. Despite its continuing high levels of poverty and illiteracy, India has a huge demographic potential in the form of a young population. This advantage must be leveraged by investing in nutrition education, household access to nutritious diets, sanitary environment and a health-promoting lifestyle. This requires co-operation from all the stakeholders, including governments, non government organizations, scientists and the people at large.

  20. Expression of a xanthine permease and phosphate transporter in cultures and field populations of the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens: tracking nutritional deficiency during brown tides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurch, Louie L; Gobler, Christopher J; Dyhrman, Sonya T

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene expression using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was employed to track patterns in the expression of genes indicative of nitrogen or phosphorus deficiency in the brown tide-forming alga Aureococcus anophagefferens. During culture experiments, a xanthine/uracil/vitamin C permease (XUV) was upregulated ∼20-fold under nitrogen-deficient conditions relative to a nitrogen-replete control and rapidly returned to nitrogen-replete levels after nitrogen-deficient cells were resupplied with nitrate or ammonium. It was not responsive to phosphorus deficiency. Expression of an inorganic phosphate transporter (PTA3) was enriched ∼10-fold under phosphorus-deficient conditions relative to a phosphorus-replete control, and this signal was rapidly lost upon phosphate resupply. PTA3 was not upregulated by nitrogen deficiency. Natural A. anophagefferens populations from a dense brown tide that occurred in Long Island, NY, in 2009 were assayed for XUV and PTA3 expression and compared with nutrient concentrations over the peak of a bloom. Patterns in XUV expression were consistent with nitrogen-replete growth, never reaching the values observed in N-deficient cultures. PTA3 expression was highest prior to peak bloom stages, reaching expression levels within the range of P-deficient cultures. These data highlight the value of molecular-level assessments of nutrient deficiency and suggest that phosphorus deficiency could play a role in the dynamics of destructive A. anophagefferens blooms. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Consensus definition of sarcopenia, cachexia and pre-cachexia: joint document elaborated by Special Interest Groups (SIG) "cachexia-anorexia in chronic wasting diseases" and "nutrition in geriatrics".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscaritoli, M; Anker, S D; Argilés, J; Aversa, Z; Bauer, J M; Biolo, G; Boirie, Y; Bosaeus, I; Cederholm, T; Costelli, P; Fearon, K C; Laviano, A; Maggio, M; Rossi Fanelli, F; Schneider, S M; Schols, A; Sieber, C C

    2010-04-01

    Chronic diseases as well as aging are frequently associated with deterioration of nutritional status, loss muscle mass and function (i.e. sarcopenia), impaired quality of life and increased risk for morbidity and mortality. Although simple and effective tools for the accurate screening, diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition have been developed during the recent years, its prevalence still remains disappointingly high and its impact on morbidity, mortality and quality of life clinically significant. Based on these premises, the Special Interest Group (SIG) on cachexia-anorexia in chronic wasting diseases was created within ESPEN with the aim of developing and spreading the knowledge on the basic and clinical aspects of cachexia and anorexia as well as of increasing the awareness of cachexia among health professionals and care givers. The definition, the assessment and the staging of cachexia, were identified as a priority by the SIG. This consensus paper reports the definition of cachexia, pre-cachexia and sarcopenia as well as the criteria for the differentiation between cachexia and other conditions associated with sarcopenia, which have been developed in cooperation with the ESPEN SIG on nutrition in geriatrics. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. [Cytokine dysregulation in children with chronic catarrhal gingivitis living in polluted areas with fluoride and iodine deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezvushko, E V; Malko, N V

    The aim of the research was to study the state of oral liquid immunity in children with chronic catarrhal gingivitis living in unfavorable environmental conditions. The study included 190 children with chronic catarrhal gingivitis (CCG): 110 children aged 7, 12 and 15 years and residing in ecologically unfavorable areas of Lviv region and 80 children living in 'conditionally clean' region which constituted comparison group. Children with CCG from polluted areas had increased content of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reduction of anti-inflammatory cytokines compared to controls. The level of pro-inflammatory cytokines was age-depended in both groups but in children from ecologically unfavorable region this tendency was more pronounced. Thus, changes of indicators of interleukin spectrum in children with CCG depend not only on age and degree of severity of periodontium pathology but also on ecological living conditions.

  3. Current Food Classifications in Epidemiological Studies Do Not Enable Solid Nutritional Recommendations for Preventing Diet-Related Chronic Diseases: The Impact of Food Processing12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardet, Anthony; Rock, Edmond; Bassama, Joseph; Bohuon, Philippe; Prabhasankar, Pichan; Monteiro, Carlos; Moubarac, Jean-Claude; Achir, Nawel

    2015-01-01

    To date, observational studies in nutrition have categorized foods into groups such as dairy, cereals, fruits, and vegetables. However, the strength of the association between food groups and chronic diseases is far from convincing. In most international expert surveys, risks are most commonly scored as probable, limited, or insufficient rather than convincing. In this position paper, we hypothesize that current food classifications based on botanical or animal origins can be improved to yield solid recommendations. We propose using a food classification that employs food processes to rank foods in epidemiological studies. Indeed, food health potential results from both nutrient density and food structure (i.e., the matrix effect), both of which can potentially be positively or negatively modified by processing. For example, cereal-based foods may be more or less refined, fractionated, and recombined with added salt, sugars, and fats, yielding a panoply of products with very different nutritional values. The same is true for other food groups. Finally, we propose that from a nutritional perspective, food processing will be an important issue to consider in the coming years, particularly in terms of strengthening the links between food and health and for proposing improved nutritional recommendations or actions. PMID:26567188

  4. Association between Low Dietary Protein Intake and Geriatric Nutrition Risk Index in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Retrospective Single-Center Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Aki; Ohashi, Yasushi; Tai, Reibin; Aoki, Toshiyuki; Mizuiri, Sonoo; Ogura, Toyoko; Aikawa, Atsushi; Sakai, Ken

    2016-10-23

    Reduced dietary protein intake in malnourished patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be associated with adverse clinical outcomes, which may mask any efficacy of a low-protein diet. The study included 126 patients with CKD who attended a dedicated dietary counseling clinic in 2005-2009 and were systematically followed until January 2015. Of these patients, 20 (15.9%) had moderate or severe nutrition-related risk of geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) patients were more likely to be older, have a greater proteinuria, and have lower body mass index and serum albumin concentration. Dietary protein intake was significantly lower in older patients ( r = -0.33, p protein to nitrogen calorie ratio was independently associated with GNRI. Reduced GNRI was significantly associated with mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 4.94; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.61-15.42, p = 0.012) and cardiovascular events (HR = 9.37; 95% CI = 2.49-37.34, p = 0.006), but not with adverse renal outcomes. Restricting protein intake may be harmful to patients with any nutrition-related risk, suggesting that improvement of nutritional status should be a high priority.

  5. Association between Low Dietary Protein Intake and Geriatric Nutrition Risk Index in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Retrospective Single-Center Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Kiuchi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Reduced dietary protein intake in malnourished patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD may be associated with adverse clinical outcomes, which may mask any efficacy of a low-protein diet. The study included 126 patients with CKD who attended a dedicated dietary counseling clinic in 2005–2009 and were systematically followed until January 2015. Of these patients, 20 (15.9% had moderate or severe nutrition-related risk of geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI < 92; these patients were more likely to be older, have a greater proteinuria, and have lower body mass index and serum albumin concentration. Dietary protein intake was significantly lower in older patients (r = −0.33, p < 0.001 and those with lower glomerular filtration rate (r = 0.47, p < 0.001. The non-protein to nitrogen calorie ratio was independently associated with GNRI. Reduced GNRI was significantly associated with mortality (hazard ratio (HR = 4.94; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.61–15.42, p = 0.012 and cardiovascular events (HR = 9.37; 95% CI = 2.49–37.34, p = 0.006, but not with adverse renal outcomes. Restricting protein intake may be harmful to patients with any nutrition-related risk, suggesting that improvement of nutritional status should be a high priority.

  6. Effects of nutrition on oral health

    OpenAIRE

    G A Agbelusi

    2010-01-01

    Nutrition represents a summation of intake, absorption, storage and utilization of foods by the tissues. Oral tissues are one of the most sensitive indicators of nutritional state of the body. Nutritional deficiencies are associated with changes in the integrity (health and appearance) of the oral structures/ tissues and these changes are frequently the first clinical signs of deficiency. Nutrition affects oral health and oral health affects nutrition. The effects of malnutrition can be s...

  7. Seminal quality and sperm production in beef bulls with chronic dietary vitamin A deficiency and subsequent re-alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, L M; Coulter, G H; Kastelic, J P; Bailey, D R

    1995-05-01

    Sixteen Hereford bulls (16 mo of age, 462 kg average body weight) were used in each of 2 yr to evaluate the effects of hypovitaminosis A on seminal quality and sperm production. Bulls were fed a high-concentrate diet with (+VIT) or without (-VIT) supplemental Vitamin A until the apparent onset of hypovitaminosis A (28 and 32 wk in Year 1 and 2, respectively). Half of the bulls on each treatment were then slaughtered and those remaining were re-alimented with Vitamin A. Plasma retinol concentration in -VIT bulls reached a nadir at approximately 25 wk. In Year 1, the proportion of progressively motile spermatozoa was lower in -VIT bulls after 17 wk but returned to that of the +VIT group after re-alimentation. The proportion of spermatozoa with primary morphological defects appeared to be greater in -VIT bulls compared to +VIT bulls by 26 and 24 wk in Year 1 and 2, respectively. The incidence of these defects declined in -VIT bulls upon re-alimentation, and approached the incidence observed in +VIT bulls by 8 to 12 wk of re-alimentation. Hypovitaminosis A decreased paired testes weight, daily sperm production, and epididymal sperm reserves but did not affect daily gain. Prolonged dietary Vitamin A deficiency impaired semen quality and sperm production in the absence of other clinical symptoms. However, under practical feeding conditions, diets that result in long-term, marginal Vitamin A deficiency or a relatively short-term absence of Vitamin A intake probably would have minimal effects on spermatogenesis.

  8. Etiology of the protein-energy wasting syndrome in chronic kidney disease: a consensus statement from the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Stenvinkel, Peter; Cuppari, Lilian; Ikizler, T Alp; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kaysen, George; Mitch, William E; Price, S Russ; Wanner, Christoph; Wang, Angela Y M; ter Wee, Pieter; Franch, Harold A

    2013-03-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), a term proposed by the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM), refers to the multiple nutritional and catabolic alterations that occur in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associate with morbidity and mortality. To increase awareness, identify research needs, and provide the basis for future work to understand therapies and consequences of PEW, ISRNM provides this consensus statement of current knowledge on the etiology of PEW syndrome in CKD. Although insufficient food intake (true undernutrition) due to poor appetite and dietary restrictions contribute, other highly prevalent factors are required for the full syndrome to develop. These include uremia-induced alterations such as increased energy expenditure, persistent inflammation, acidosis, and multiple endocrine disorders that render a state of hypermetabolism leading to excess catabolism of muscle and fat. In addition, comorbid conditions associated with CKD, poor physical activity, frailty, and the dialysis procedure per se further contribute to PEW. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Chronic administration of recombinant IL-6 upregulates lipogenic enzyme expression and aggravates high-fat-diet-induced steatosis in IL-6-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Vida

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 has emerged as an important mediator of fatty acid metabolism with paradoxical effects in the liver. Administration of IL-6 has been reported to confer protection against steatosis, but plasma and tissue IL-6 concentrations are elevated in chronic liver diseases, including fatty liver diseases associated with obesity and alcoholic ingestion. In this study, we further investigated the role of IL-6 on steatosis induced through a high-fat diet (HFD in wild-type (WT and IL-6-deficient (IL-6−/− mice. Additionally, HFD-fed IL-6−/− mice were also chronically treated with recombinant IL-6 (rIL-6. Obesity in WT mice fed a HFD associated with elevated serum IL-6 levels, fatty liver, upregulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3, increased AMP kinase phosphorylation (p-AMPK, and downregulation of the hepatic lipogenic enzymes fatty acid synthase (FAS and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1. The HFD-fed IL-6−/− mice showed severe steatosis, no changes in CPT1 levels or AMPK activity, no increase in STAT3 amounts, inactivated STAT3, and marked downregulation of the expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCα/β, FAS and SCD1. The IL-6 chronic replacement in HFD-fed IL-6−/− mice restored hepatic STAT3 and AMPK activation but also increased the expression of the lipogenic enzymes ACCα/β, FAS and SCD1. Furthermore, rIL-6 administration was associated with aggravated steatosis and elevated fat content in the liver. We conclude that, in the context of HFD-induced obesity, the administration of rIL-6 might contribute to the aggravation of fatty liver disease through increasing lipogenesis.

  10. Nutritional disorders in chrysanthemums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda van Eysinga, J.P.N.L.; Smilde, K.W.

    1980-01-01

    This book is a guide to diagnosing nutritional disorders in chrysanthemums. Deficiencies and toxicities are included, fifteen in all. Colour plates and descriptions are given for nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, calcium, sulphur, boron, copper, manganese, iron and zinc deficiency and for

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  12. Global burden of maternal and child undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Hossain, Muttaquina; Sanin, Kazi Istiaque

    2012-01-01

    Maternal and child undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies affect approximately half of the world's population. These conditions include intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), low birth weight, protein-energy malnutrition, chronic energy deficit of women, and micronutrient deficiencies. Although the rates of stunting or chronic protein-energy malnutrition are increasing in Africa, the absolute numbers of stunted children are much higher in Asia. The four common micronutrient deficiencies include those of iron, iodine, vitamin A, and zinc. All these conditions are responsible directly or indirectly for more than 50% of all under-5 deaths globally. According to more recent estimates, IUGR, stunting and severe wasting are responsible for one third of under-5 mortality. About 12% of deaths among under-5 children are attributed to the deficiency of the four common micronutrients. Despite tremendous progress in different disciplines and unprecedented improvement with many health indicators, persistently high undernutrition rates are a shame to the society. Human development is not possible without taking care to control undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Poverty, food insecurity, ignorance, lack of appropriate infant and young child feeding practices, heavy burden of infectious illnesses, and poor hygiene and sanitation are factors responsible for the high levels of maternal and child undernutrition in developing countries. These factors can be controlled or removed by scaling up direct nutrition interventions and eliminating the root conditions including female illiteracy, lack of livelihoods, lack of women's empowerment, and poor hygiene and sanitation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in High-School Girl Students of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Noori Shadkam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is generally assumed that 50% of the cases of anemia are due to iron deficiency. The most severe consequence of iron depletion is iron deficiency anemia (IDA, and it is still considered the most common nutrition deficiency worldwide. The main risk factors for IDA include: inadequate iron intake, impaired absorption or transport, physiologic losses associated with chronological or reproductive age, or acute or chronic blood loss, parasite infections such as hookworms, acute and chronic infections, including malaria, cancer, tuberculosis, HIV and other micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins A and B12, folate, riboflavin, and copper deficiency. Methods: This work as a cross-sectional study was done in 2007-2008 in Yazd. Two hundred girls who participated in the study were selected randomly from eight girl high schools. Five ml venous blood was collected for determination of serum ferritin and cell blood count (CBC. Serum ferritin was determined by using ECLIA method and CBC by cell counter SYSMEX KX21N. Iron deficiency was defined as having serum ferritin values below 12 μ/l. Anemia was defined as having Hemoglobin levels below12 g/dl. Iron-deficiency anemia was considered to be the combination of both. Results: The3 mean ageyears and body mass index (kg/m2 were 15.19±0.7years and 21.5±4.2, respectively. Distribution in the 14, 15 and 16 years and more age groups were 13, 58.5 and 28.5 percent, respectively. Mean of Hemoglobin(g/dl, Hematocrit(%, MCV (fl, MCH (pg, MCHC (g/dl and ferritin(μ/l were 12.8±0.9, 38.9±3.0, 80.7±4.3, 26.6±1.8, 33.2±3.6 and 23±18.2, respectively. Of the total, 13.5% were anemic, 68% of which had Iron Deficiency Anemia (9.3% of the total. Iron deficiency was present in 34.7% of the population under study. Conclusion: According to world health organization criteria, anemia is a mild public health problem in this region, but iron deficiency is a significant problem and suitable measures for

  14. Association of chronic widespread pain with objectively measured physical activity in adults: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansie, Elizabeth J; Turk, Dennis C; Martin, Kathryn R; Van Domelen, Dane R; Patel, Kushang V

    2014-05-01

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a common and potentially debilitating disorder. Patterns of physical activity (PA) in adults with CWP have primarily been investigated using subjective, self-report measures. The current study sought to characterize PA among community-dwelling individuals with CWP, chronic regional pain, or no chronic pain using objective measurements obtained via accelerometry in the 2003 to 2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Data from 3,952 participants ages 20 and older were analyzed to assess relationships between pain status and objective measurements of PA. Prevalence of CWP was 3.3% and 5.4% in men and women, respectively. In men and women, the average activity counts per minute and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA were significantly lower for the CWP group than for the no chronic pain group. Interestingly, time spent in sedentary, light, and lifestyle activities was not associated with pain status. Statistical interaction tests indicated that the effects of chronic pain on counts per minute were stronger in men than in women. Despite recommendations for increased moderate-to-vigorous PA as a pain management strategy for CWP, results from this nationally representative study indicate that adults with CWP participate in less moderate-to-vigorous PA than individuals without chronic pain. Using objective measurement of PA in a nationally representative sample, this study demonstrates that adults with CWP participate in reduced daily and moderate-to-vigorous PA in comparison to people with no chronic pain. Findings indicate that clinicians should emphasize the importance of increasing PA in patients with CWP. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Altered brain concentrations of citalopram and escitalopram in P-glycoprotein deficient mice after acute and chronic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Louise; Carlsson, Björn; Hiemke, Christoph; Ahlner, Johan; Bengtsson, Finn; Schmitt, Ulrich; Kugelberg, Fredrik C

    2013-11-01

    According to both in vitro and in vivo data P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may restrict the uptake of several antidepressants into the brain, thus contributing to the poor success rate of current antidepressant therapies. The therapeutic activity of citalopram resides in the S-enantiomer, whereas the R-enantiomer is practically devoid of serotonin reuptake potency. To date, no in vivo data are available that address whether the enantiomers of citalopram and its metabolites are substrates of P-gp. P-gp knockout (abcb1ab (-/-)) and wild-type (abcb1ab (+/+)) mice underwent acute (single-dose) and chronic (two daily doses for 10 days) treatment with citalopram (10mg/kg) or escitalopram (5mg/kg) Serum and brain samples were collected 1-6h after the first or last i.p. injection for subsequent drug analysis by an enantioselective HPLC method. In brain, 3-fold higher concentrations of S- and R-citalopram, and its metabolites, were found in abcb1ab (-/-) mice than in abcb1ab (+/+) mice after both acute and chronic citalopram treatments. After escitalopram treatment, the S-citalopram brain concentration was 3-5 times higher in the knockout mice than in controls. The results provide novel evidence that the enantiomers of citalopram are substrates of P-gp. Possible clinical and toxicological implications of this finding need to be further elucidated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic exposure to sublethal doses of radiation mimetic ZeocinTM selects for clones deficient in homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delacote, Fabien; Deriano, Ludovic; Lambert, Sarah; Bertrand, Pascale; Saintigny, Yannick; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2007-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly toxic lesions leading to genome variability/instability. The balance between homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), two alternative DSB repair systems, is essential to ensure genome maintenance in mammalian cells. Here, we transfected CHO hamster cells with the pcDNA TM 3.1/Zeo plasmid, and selected transfectants with Zeocin TM , a bleomycin analog which produces DSBs. Despite the presence of a Zeocin TM resistance gene in pcDNA TM 3.1/Zeo, Zeocin TM induced 8-10 γ-H2AX foci per cell. This shows that the Zeocin TM resistance gene failed to fully detoxify cells treated with Zeocin TM , and that during selection cells were submitted to a chronic sublethal DSB stress. Selected clones show decreases in both spontaneous and induced intrachromosomal HR. In contrast, in an in vitro assay, these clones show an increase in NHEJ products specific to the KU86 pathway. We selected cells, in the absence of pcDNA TM 3.1/Zeo, with low and sublethal doses of Zeocin TM , producing a mean 8-10 γ-H2AX foci per cell. Newly selected clones exhibited similar phenotypes: HR decrease accompanied by an increase in KU86-dependent NHEJ efficiency. Thus chronic exposure to sublethal numbers of DSBs selects cells whose HR versus NHEJ balance is altered. This may well have implications for radio- and chemotherapy, and for management of environmental hazards

  17. Assessing nutritional diversity of cropping systems in African villages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseline Remans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Sub-Saharan Africa, 40% of children under five years in age are chronically undernourished. As new investments and attention galvanize action on African agriculture to reduce hunger, there is an urgent need for metrics that monitor agricultural progress beyond calories produced per capita and address nutritional diversity essential for human health. In this study we demonstrate how an ecological tool, functional diversity (FD, has potential to address this need and provide new insights on nutritional diversity of cropping systems in rural Africa. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Data on edible plant species diversity, food security and diet diversity were collected for 170 farms in three rural settings in Sub-Saharan Africa. Nutritional FD metrics were calculated based on farm species composition and species nutritional composition. Iron and vitamin A deficiency were determined from blood samples of 90 adult women. Nutritional FD metrics summarized the diversity of nutrients provided by the farm and showed variability between farms and villages. Regression of nutritional FD against species richness and expected FD enabled identification of key species that add nutrient diversity to the system and assessed the degree of redundancy for nutrient traits. Nutritional FD analysis demonstrated that depending on the original composition of species on farm or village, adding or removing individual species can have radically different outcomes for nutritional diversity. While correlations between nutritional FD, food and nutrition indicators were not significant at household level, associations between these variables were observed at village level. CONCLUSION: This study provides novel metrics to address nutritional diversity in farming systems and examples of how these metrics can help guide agricultural interventions towards adequate nutrient diversity. New hypotheses on the link between agro-diversity, food security and human nutrition are

  18. Contamination by Helicobacter pylori measured by the 13C-urea-breast-test and nutritional status of children with chronic diarrhoea syndrome in Havana city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, A.; Hernandez-Triana, M.; Sanchez, M.; Herrera, X.; Pawong, M.; Moreno, R.; Reyes, D.; Serrano, G.; Diaz, M.E.; Valencia, M.

    2000-01-01

    Diarrhoea morbidity shows a slow increasing tendency during the last 10 years in Cuba. In young children the compromise of the gastric acid barrier after a chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori is discussed in pathogenic relation to gastritis, duodenal ulcer chronic diarrhoea, short stature, malabsorption of the B-complex vitamins and malnutrition. The Hp contamination level of the population of the developing world is estimated to be considerably high. Endoscopic studies carried out in Cuban subjects with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of 60 to 100%. The current treatment of chronic diarrhoea does not include the elimination of Hp. Cuban children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of more than 60%. There are not available data on the contamination level in apparently healthy Cuban children or those with chronic diarrhoea. In March-April 2000 the prevalence of Hp infection measured in serum by chromatographic immunoassay for detection of Hp IgG antibodies was found to be 94% in 20 infants and young children with persistent chronic diarrhoea and 100% in 11 apparently healthy children in Havana City. Children with diarrhoea showed a more evident affection of their nutritional status and a higher percentage of positive personal or familiar history of parasitism, giardiasis, gastritis, ulcer stomatitis and glositis. The validity of the immunological tests in infants is discussed from the point of view of the antibody transference with breast milk. In a sample of 16 different children studied by the 13 C-Urea-Breath-Test the contamination level was 50% of the children not affected by diarrhoea and only one of the 6 children with diarrhoea showed positive values. This research contract proposes the study of contamination with Hp in Cuban children older than 2 years of age affected by chronic diarrhoea using the 13 C-Urea Breath Test and serological tests for detection of anti-Hp IgG antibodies. Their nutritional

  19. Contamination by Helicobacter pylori measured by the {sup 13}C-urea-breast-test and nutritional status of children with chronic diarrhoea syndrome in Havana city

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, A; Hernandez-Triana, M; Sanchez, M; Herrera, X; Pawong, M; Moreno, R; Reyes, D; Serrano, G; Diaz, M E [Institute of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Department of Biochemistry and Physiology, Havana (Cuba); Valencia, M [Centro de Investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo, Department of Human Nutrition, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Diarrhoea morbidity shows a slow increasing tendency during the last 10 years in Cuba. In young children the compromise of the gastric acid barrier after a chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori is discussed in pathogenic relation to gastritis, duodenal ulcer chronic diarrhoea, short stature, malabsorption of the B-complex vitamins and malnutrition. The Hp contamination level of the population of the developing world is estimated to be considerably high. Endoscopic studies carried out in Cuban subjects with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of 60 to 100%. The current treatment of chronic diarrhoea does not include the elimination of Hp. Cuban children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of more than 60%. There are not available data on the contamination level in apparently healthy Cuban children or those with chronic diarrhoea. In March-April 2000 the prevalence of Hp infection measured in serum by chromatographic immunoassay for detection of Hp IgG antibodies was found to be 94% in 20 infants and young children with persistent chronic diarrhoea and 100% in 11 apparently healthy children in Havana City. Children with diarrhoea showed a more evident affection of their nutritional status and a higher percentage of positive personal or familiar history of parasitism, giardiasis, gastritis, ulcer stomatitis and glositis. The validity of the immunological tests in infants is discussed from the point of view of the antibody transference with breast milk. In a sample of 16 different children studied by the {sup 13}C-Urea-Breath-Test the contamination level was 50% of the children not affected by diarrhoea and only one of the 6 children with diarrhoea showed positive values. This research contract proposes the study of contamination with Hp in Cuban children older than 2 years of age affected by chronic diarrhoea using the {sup 13}C-Urea Breath Test and serological tests for detection of anti-Hp IgG antibodies. Their

  20. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaphalia, Lata [Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Boroumand, Nahal [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Hyunsu, Ju [Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Kaphalia, Bhupendra S., E-mail: bkaphali@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Calhoun, William J. [Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to < 1.0% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 was observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease. - Highlights: • Chronic

  1. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Hyunsu, Ju; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Calhoun, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to < 1.0% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 was observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease. - Highlights: • Chronic

  2. Budget Impact Analysis of Oral Fisiogen Ferro Forte® versus Intravenous Iron for the Management of Iron Deficiency in Chronic Kidney Disease in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbà, Josep; Ascanio, Meritxell

    2018-06-22

    Iron deficiency is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that is associated with a decrease in the quality of life of patients and an increase in the risk of other clinical complications. Iron therapy represents one of the fundamentals of patients with CKD. Sucrosomial ® oral iron allows Fisiogen Ferro Forte ® to be used in all patients who are intolerant to treatment by the oral route of administration, or who present with malabsorption of conventional oral iron preparations. The main objective of this study was to assess the economic impact of the oral iron Fisiogen Ferro Forte ® for the management of iron deficiency in CKD patients in Spain. A 4-year budget impact model was developed for the period 2017-2020 for CKD patients with iron deficiency who were candidates for intravenous iron due to a lack of response to oral iron, from the perspective of the Spanish healthcare system. Three subgroups of CKD patients were included in the analysis: predialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and post-transplant. The intravenous iron formulations Ferinject ® , Venofer ® , and Feriv ® were considered appropriate comparators to be used in the model. National data on the prevalence of CKD for the three subgroups of patients were obtained from the literature, and input data on drug utilization and outpatient hospitalizations associated with iron administration were obtained by consulting nephrologists. Nephrology experts were also asked about resources used during medical visits and monitoring tests. Based on the unit costs for each iron therapy and the resources used, the total treatment cost per patient associated with each product was obtained to estimate the global budget impact of increasing the use of Fisiogen Ferro Forte ® . The average annual budget savings due to an increase in Fisiogen Ferro Forte ® and a decrease in intravenous iron have been estimated at €398,685, €180,937, and €195,842 over 4 years for the predialysis, peritoneal dialysis

  3. FIND-CKD: a randomized trial of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose versus oral iron in patients with chronic kidney disease and iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdougall, Iain C; Bock, Andreas H; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Van Wyck, David; Roubert, Bernard; Nolen, Jacqueline G; Roger, Simon D

    2014-11-01

    The optimal iron therapy regimen in patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unknown. Ferinject® assessment in patients with Iron deficiency anaemia and Non-Dialysis-dependent Chronic Kidney Disease (FIND-CKD) was a 56-week, open-label, multicentre, prospective and randomized study of 626 patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, anaemia and iron deficiency not receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Patients were randomized (1:1:2) to intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting a higher (400-600 µg/L) or lower (100-200 µg/L) ferritin or oral iron therapy. The primary end point was time to initiation of other anaemia management (ESA, other iron therapy or blood transfusion) or haemoglobin (Hb) trigger of two consecutive values <10 g/dL during Weeks 8-52. The primary end point occurred in 36 patients (23.5%), 49 patients (32.2%) and 98 patients (31.8%) in the high-ferritin FCM, low-ferritin FCM and oral iron groups, respectively [hazard ratio (HR): 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44-0.95; P = 0.026 for high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron]. The increase in Hb was greater with high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron (P = 0.014) and a greater proportion of patients achieved an Hb increase ≥1 g/dL with high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron (HR: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.52-2.72; P < 0.001). Rates of adverse events and serious adverse events were similar in all groups. Compared with oral iron, IV FCM targeting a ferritin of 400-600 µg/L quickly reached and maintained Hb level, and delayed and/or reduced the need for other anaemia management including ESAs. Within the limitations of this trial, no renal toxicity was observed, with no difference in cardiovascular or infectious events. NCT00994318. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  4. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficient Male Rats Exhibit Abnormal Behavioral Activation in the Forced Swim Test Following Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment: Association with Altered 5-HT1A and Alpha2A Adrenergic Receptor Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Able, Jessica A.; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n=34) or without (DEF, n=30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n=14) and DEF (n=12) rats were ...

  5. 5-HT2A receptor deficiency alters the metabolic and transcriptional, but not the behavioral, consequences of chronic unpredictable stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Jaggar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress enhances risk for psychiatric disorders, and in animal models is known to evoke depression-like behavior accompanied by perturbed neurohormonal, metabolic, neuroarchitectural and transcriptional changes. Serotonergic neurotransmission, including serotonin2A (5-HT2A receptors, have been implicated in mediating specific aspects of stress-induced responses. Here we investigated the influence of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS on depression-like behavior, serum metabolic measures, and gene expression in stress-associated neurocircuitry of the prefrontal cortex (PFC and hippocampus in 5-HT2A receptor knockout (5-HT2A−/− and wild-type mice of both sexes. While 5-HT2A−/− male and female mice exhibited a baseline reduced anxiety-like state, this did not alter the onset or severity of behavioral despair during and at the cessation of CUS, indicating that these mice can develop stress-evoked depressive behavior. Analysis of metabolic parameters in serum revealed a CUS-evoked dyslipidemia, which was abrogated in 5-HT2A−/− female mice with a hyperlipidemic baseline phenotype. 5-HT2A−/− male mice in contrast did not exhibit such a baseline shift in their serum lipid profile. Specific stress-responsive genes (Crh, Crhr1, Nr3c1, and Nr3c2, trophic factors (Bdnf, Igf1 and immediate early genes (IEGs (Arc, Fos, Fosb, Egr1-4 in the PFC and hippocampus were altered in 5-HT2A−/− mice both under baseline and CUS conditions. Our results support a role for the 5-HT2A receptor in specific metabolic and transcriptional, but not behavioral, consequences of CUS, and highlight that the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to stress-evoked changes is sexually dimorphic. Keywords: 5-HT2A−/− mice, Prefrontal cortex, Hippocampus, Gene expression, Sexual dimorphism, Despair

  6. Pediatric Chronic Intestinal Failure in Italy: Report from the 2016 Survey on Behalf of Italian Society for Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (SIGENP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Diamanti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal failure (IF is the reduction in functioning gut mass below the minimal level necessary for adequate digestion and absorption of nutrients and fluids for weight maintenance in adults or for growth in children. There is a paucity of epidemiologic data on pediatric IF. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, incidence, regional distribution and underlying diagnosis of pediatric chronic IF (CIF requiring home parenteral nutrition (HPN in Italy. Methods: Local investigators were selected in 19 Italian centers either of reference for pediatric HPN or having pediatric gastroenterologists or surgeons on staff and already collaborating with the Italian Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition with regard to IF. Data requested in this survey for children at home on Parenteral Nutrition (PN on 1 December 2016 included patient initials, year of birth, gender, family’s place of residence and underlying diagnosis determining IF. Results: We recorded 145 CIF patients on HPN aged ≤19 years. The overall prevalence was 14.12/million inhabitants (95% CI: 9.20–18.93; the overall incidence was 1.41/million inhabitant years (95% CI: 0.53–2.20. Conclusion: Our survey provides new epidemiological data on pediatric CIF in Italy; these data may be quantitatively useful in developing IF care strategy plans in all developed countries.

  7. Dietary fiber intake is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and cardiovascular risk, but not protein nutritional status, in adults with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Huang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Ming-Qing; Chen, De-Xiu; Wan, Heng; Wei, Lian-Bo; Xiao, Wei

    Evidence suggests that dietary fiber benefits patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, this conclusion requires further validation. In this study, we examined the effects of dietary fiber on kidney function, inflammation, indoxyl sulfate, nutritional status, and cardiovascular risk in patients with advanced CKD. We performed linear regressions to assess the association between dietary fiber intake and CKD parameters. The aforementioned parameters were compared over an 18-month follow- up period. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to investigate the association between fiber intake and Cardiac vascular disease (CVD). In total, 157 patients were included in this study. Dietary fiber and inflammatory indices were associated (interleukin [IL]-6: β=-0.024, p=0.035). The differential estimated glomerular filtration rate (ΔeGFR) as well as levels of C-reactive protein, IL-6, indoxyl sulfate, and serum cholesterol in the higher fiber intake (>=25 g/day) group were lower than those in the lower fiber intake (patients in the higher protein intake group (pintake may be a protective factor associated with CVD (hazard ratio=0.537 and 0.305- 0.947). The protein nutritional status was not different between the two groups (p>0.05). Our results suggest that increasing fiber intake can retard the decrease in the eGFR; can reduce the levels of proinflammatory factors, indoxyl sulfate, and serum cholesterol; and is negatively associated with cardiovascular risk, but does not disrupt the nutritional status of patients with CKD.

  8. Diet and enteral nutrition in patients with chronic kidney disease not on dialysis: a review focusing on fat, fiber and protein intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Alice; Regolisti, Giuseppe; Gandolfini, Ilaria; Delsante, Marco; Fani, Filippo; Gregorini, Maria Cristina; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2017-12-01

    The clinical data available on dietary requirements of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) not on dialysis are limited and largely inconclusive in terms of the renal, cardiovascular and nutritional outcomes achievable through dietary modifications. Restriction of protein intake during the early stages of CKD may in fact slow its progression, but at the same time this approach may also lead to protein-energy wasting, if energy intake is not adequate and properly monitored. Unfortunately, compliance to dietary recommendations is traditionally low in this patient population. A switch from saturated to mono- and polyunsaturated fats is generally recognized as advantageous for cardiac health; however, the benefits in term of renal function are largely unknown. Similarly, the association between dietary fiber intake and kidney disease is largely unknown. In fact, while there is evidence on the positive health effects of dietary fibers in the general population, nutritional guidelines for CKD lack formal recommendations concerning fiber intake. This paper reviews data and evidence from clinical trials and meta-analyses on renal and cardiovascular outcomes related to modifications in protein, fat and fiber intake. Suggestions for maintaining nutritional status through patient-oriented dietary patterns and enteral supplementation in CKD patients on conservative therapy are also presented.

  9. Mantakassa: an epidemic of spastic paraparesis associated with chronic cyanide intoxication in a cassava staple area of Mozambique. 2. Nutritional factors and hydrocyanic acid content of cassava products*

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    An outbreak of spastic paraparesis which mostly affected women and children occurred in a northern province of Mozambique in 1981. The epidemic was related to chronic cyanide intoxication associated with a diet consisting almost exclusively of cassava. A prolonged drought in the area had exhausted all food resources except cassava, especially the bitter varieties. A nutritional, toxicological and botanical investigation was carried out in two of the five districts affected. The main findings were that cyanide levels were unusually high in the cassava plant as a consequence of the drought with daily intakes estimated at 15-31.5 mg HCN. Detoxification of the bitter varieties by sun-drying was inadequate because of the general food shortage, and metabolic detoxification was probably reduced owing to the absence of sulfur-containing amino acids in the diet. The raw and dried uncooked cassava was eaten mostly by women and children. The nutritional status of the population, however, was not very poor and symptoms of advanced under-nutrition were rarely seen. PMID:6088100

  10. Nutritional challenges for children in societies in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wei

    2014-05-01

    This review is to explore the childhood nutrition and health in relation to socioeconomic changes in transitional countries, and to describe the good experiences and policies in these countries to combat childhood nutritional challenges. Double burden of malnutrition - the coexistence of under-nutrition and over-nutrition in the same population - is a prominent public health concern in transitional countries. With rapid industrialization, these countries are facing a growing epidemic of overweight/obesity in children and adolescents. The increasing prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity is a likely consequence of behavioral changes, and accompanied with an increasing incidence of noncommunicable chronic diseases. Although remarkable improvement of childhood nutrition was achieved, the stunting growth and micronutrient deficiency remain to be child health issues in transitional countries. The social transition caused a broad range of nutrition-associated problems. Previous successful experiences indicated that if appropriate action is undertaken, the child nutritional problems accompanied with economic transition could be controlled to some extent. However, greater efforts are needed to improve the status of childhood nutrition in transitional countries.

  11. Strategies for nutritional improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, K S

    1991-01-01

    India has achieved self-sufficiency in the production of food grains, yet the production of milk, legumes, vegetables, oils and fats, eggs, and meat is far short of the needs of the population. The Indian diet predominantly comprises cereals, and the diets of expectant and nursing mothers as well as children are grossly deficient in protective foods. Serious nutritional inadequacies have resulted in low birth weight, retarded growth, and nutritional deficiencies (protein energy malnutrition in preschool children, vitamin A deficiency, iron deficiency in women of reproductive age, and iodine deficiency disorders among neonates and schoolchildren). General malnutrition is prevalent in 25% of the rural and 20% of the urban population. Deficiency symptoms of vitamin B complex and vitamin C are also not uncommon. 37% of the population of India lives below the poverty limit, the literacy rate is only 52.1% (39.4% for women), safe drinking water is scarce, nutritional ignorance is rampant, there is a lack of personal hygiene, and poor sanitation all account for malnutrition. A number of government and nongovernmental organizations' programs have attempted to raise the level of nutrition and the standard of living of the people. Some of them include the integrated child development services, special nutritional program, national vitamin A deficiency prophylaxis program, national anemia prophylaxis program, national goiter control program, midday meal program, special class feeding programs, universal immunization program, nutritional and health education through the mass media as well as the observance of world food day and world health day. The national health policy gives high priority to the promotion of family planning, the provision of primary health care, and the acceleration of welfare programs for women and children. As a result of policies and programs of health and nutrition, the infant, child, and maternal mortality rates have declined and life expectancy at

  12. The triad of Iron deficiency anemia, hepatosplenomegaly and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-04

    Dec 4, 2014 ... In conclusion, iron deficiency anemia occurring in the triad without zinc deficiency as .... a negative zinc balance and mask existing zinc deficiency.[10] ... erythropoiesis‑stimulating agents in men with chronic kidney disease.

  13. Association of urinary phenolic compounds, inflammatory bowel disease and chronic diarrheal symptoms: Evidence from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Punyanganie S. de; Yang, Xuan; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Goldman, Rose H.; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Caban-Martinez, Alberto J.

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors such as phenolic compounds and parabens may be involved in chronic non-infective disease. While products incorporating these compounds are extensively utilized in consumer and personal products, little is known about their effect on bowel health. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) - consisting of the diseases ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease - and irritable bowel syndrome are common chronic non-infectious diarrheal diseases. Despite limited knowledge on the etiology of IBD, these diseases have increased prevalence in industrialized countries and cause significant impairment to quality of life. In the present study we examine relationships between urinary environmental phenolic compounds, chronic diarrhea and inflammatory bowel disease. Data was obtained from the 2005–2010 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) including demographics, lifestyle factors, self-reported health conditions, inflammatory markers and urinary phenolic chemical concentrations. Only participants with complete environmental phenols & parabens component were included in our analysis. Chronic diarrheal symptoms were determined by using the 2009–2010 NHANES questionnaire which included questions pertaining to bowel health. We utilized chronic bowel leakage symptoms as a surrogate marker for chronic diarrhea. The presence of IBD was also analyzed from 2009 to 2010 NHANES data, as a sub-analysis for arthropathy directly querying the presence or absence of IBD. Among the subset of 5218 American adults aged 20–80 years in the NHANES study period who completed environmental phenols & parabens component, 25.5% reported chronic diarrheal symptoms. Abnormal markers of inflammation were present in 2200 (42.2%) of respondents. For IBD, 19 individuals with arthropathy confirmed a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis, and 1 person confirmed a Crohn's diagnosis. After adjustment for demographics, inflammatory and subsample weighing; lower paraben

  14. Learner-Directed Nutrition Content for Medical Schools to Meet LCME Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Hark

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in medical school nutrition education have been noted since the 1960s. Nutrition-related non-communicable diseases, including heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, and obesity, are now the most common, costly, and preventable health problems in the US. Training medical students to assess diet and nutritional status and advise patients about a healthy diet, exercise, body weight, smoking, and alcohol consumption are critical to reducing chronic disease risk. Barriers to improving medical school nutrition content include lack of faculty preparation, limited curricular time, and the absence of funding. Several new LCME standards provide important impetus for incorporating nutrition into existing medical school curriculum as self-directed material. Fortunately, with advances in technology, electronic learning platforms, and web-based modules, nutrition can be integrated and assessed across all four years of medical school at minimal costs to medical schools. Medical educators have access to a self-study nutrition textbook, Medical Nutrition and Disease, Nutrition in Medicine© online modules, and the NHLBI Nutrition Curriculum Guide for Training Physicians. This paper outlines how learner-directed nutrition content can be used to meet several US and Canadian LCME accreditation standards. The health of the nation depends upon future physicians’ ability to help their patients make diet and lifestyle changes.

  15. Development of a validated questionnaire to measure the self-perceived competence of primary health professionals in providing nutrition care to patients with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lauren E; Leveritt, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    Nutrition is an important aspect of chronic disease prevention and management by primary health professionals, including GPs, dietitians, practice nurses, diabetes educators and exercise professionals. In order to better understand how to improve the delivery of nutrition care, it is important to have valid and reliable tools to measure self-perceived competence. This study aimed to develop a valid, structured, questionnaire that measures the self-perceived competence of primary health professionals to provide nutrition care to patients with chronic disease. The development of the questionnaire was carried out in four stages (1): preparation of scope and structure, through a literature review and consultation with an expert reference group (2); development of questionnaire items, which were refined through feedback from the reference group and 18 primary health professionals (3); investigation of internal consistency and concurrent validity through a pilot study on 118 primary health professionals (4) and investigation of test-retest reliability through a pilot study on 33 primary health professionals who completed the questionnaire twice, 2-3 weeks apart. Stages 1 and 2 resulted in four constructs and 35 questions in the questionnaire. Stage 3 confirmed internal consistency, with Cronbach's α ranging from 0.88 to 0.98 for each construct and 0.98 for all items combined. Dietitians scored significantly higher than speech pathologists (P COMPetence (NUTCOMP) questionnaire is a valid, reliable and suitable tool that can be used to directly inform professional development and identify opportunities to support safe and effective practice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Anemia and iron, zinc, copper and magnesium deficiency in Mexican adolescents: National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 Anemia y deficiencia de hierro, zinc, cobre y magnesio en adolescentes mexicanos: resultados de la ENSANUT 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa De la Cruz-Góngora

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE: To describe the frequency of anemia and iron, zinc, copper and magnesium deficiencies among Mexican adolescents in the probabilistic survey ENSANUT 2006. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample included 2447 adolescents aged 12 to 19 y. Capillary hemoglobin and venous blood samples were collected to measure the concentrations of ferritin, sTFR, CRP, zinc, iron, copper and magnesium. Logistic regression models were constructed to assess the risk for mineral deficiencies. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of anemia was 11.8 and 4.6%, body iron deficiency 18.2 and 7.9% for females and males, respectively. Overall prevalence of tissue iron deficiency was 6.9%, low serum copper were14.4 and 12.25%; zinc 28.4 and 24.5%, magnesium 40 and 35.3%; for females and males, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: There is a high prevalence of mineral deficiency in Mexican adolescents; females were more prone to have more mineral deficiencies. Nutritional interventions are necessaries in order to reduce and control them.OBJETIVO: Describir la prevalencia de anemia y deficiencia de hierro, zinc, cobre y magnesio en adolescentes mexicanos en la encuesta probabilística ENSANUT 2006. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: La muestra incluyó 2447 adolescentes de 12 a 19 años de edad. Se tomó hemoglobina capilar y muestras de sangre venosa para medir las concentraciones séricas de ferritina, sTFR, CRP, zinc, hierro, cobre y magnesio. Se construyeron modelos de regresión logística para evaluar el riesgo de deficiencia de minerales. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia de anemia fue de 11.8% en mujeres y 4.6% en hombres. Las deficiencias de hierro fueron de 18.2 y 7.9% La deficiencia tisular de hierro fue 6.9%; la baja concentración de cobre fue de 14.4 y 12.25% la de zinc de 28.4 y 24.5%, la de magnesio fue 40 y 35.3% en mujeres y hombres, respectivamente. CONCLUSIONES: Existe una alta prevalencia de deficiencia de minerales en los adolescentes; las mujeres tuvieron mayor riesgo. Son necesarias

  17. Social isolation stress and chronic glutathione deficiency have a common effect on the glutamine-to-glutamate ratio and myo-inositol concentration in the mouse frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoba, Alberto; Gruetter, Rolf; Do, Kim Q; Duarte, João M N

    2017-09-01

    Environmental stress can interact with genetic predisposition to increase the risk of developing psychopathology. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that social isolation stress interacts with impaired glutathione synthesis and have cumulative effects on the neurochemical profile of the frontal cortex. A mouse model with chronic glutathione deficit induced by knockout (-/-) of the glutamate-cysteine ligase modulatory subunit (Gclm) was exposed to social isolation stress from weaning to post-natal day 65. Using magnetic resonance methods at high-field (14.1 T), we analysed the neurochemical profile in the frontal cortex, brain size and ventricular volume of adult animals. Glutathione deficit was accompanied by elevated concentrations of N-acetylaspartate, alanine, and glutamine, as well as the ratio of glutamine-to-glutamate (Gln/Glu), and by a reduction in levels of myo-inositol and choline-containing compounds in the frontal cortex of -/- animals with respect to wild-type littermates. Although there was no significant interaction between social isolation stress and glutathione deficiency, mice reared in isolation displayed lower myo-inositol concentration (-8.4%, p social isolation had no effect on these parameters. We conclude that social isolation caused neurochemical alterations that may add to those associated to impaired glutathione synthesis. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  18. Modulation of leptin, insulin, and growth hormone in obese pony mares under chronic nutritional restriction and supplementation with ractopamine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buff, Preston R; Johnson, Philip J; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Ganjam, Venkataseshu K; Messer Iv, Nat T; Keisler, Duane H

    2006-01-01

    Horses fed beyond their nutritional requirement and that are physically inactive will develop obesity, which is often accompanied by insulin resistance and heightened risk of laminitis. The use of pharmacologic agents in combination with nutritional restriction may promote weight loss in obese horses unable to exercise because of laminitic pain. This study shows that reducing feed intake of brome grass hay to 75% of ad libitum intake in obese pony mares reduces body weight without induced exercise. Additional supplementation of ractopamine hydrochloride for 6 weeks resulted in a tendency for increased weight loss. Subsequent modulation of obesity-associated hormones, leptin and insulin, as a result of caloric restriction was observed.

  19. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency does not alter the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on central serotonin turnover or behavior in the forced swim test in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Robert K; Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Lipton, Jack W

    2013-12-01

    While translational evidence suggests that long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status is positively associated with the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, the neurochemical mechanisms mediating this interaction are not known. Here, we investigated the effects of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid insufficiency on the neurochemical and behavioral effects of chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Female rats were fed diets with (CON, n=56) or without (DEF, n=40) the n-3 fatty acids during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90), and one half of each group was administered FLX (10mg/kg/day) for 30days (P60-P90) prior to testing. In adulthood (P90), regional brain serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic (5-HIAA) concentrations, presynaptic markers of 5-HT neurotransmission, behavioral responses in the forced swim test (FST), and plasma FLX and norfluoxetine (NFLX) concentrations were investigated. Peri-adolescent n-3 insufficiency led to significant reductions in cortical docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-25%, p≤0.0001) and DEF+FLX (-28%, p≤0.0001) rats. Untreated DEF rats exhibited significantly lower regional 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios compared with untreated CON rats, but exhibited similar behavioral responses in the FST. In both CON and DEF rats, chronic FLX treatment similarly and significantly decreased 5-HIAA concentrations and the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens, brainstem tryptophan hydroxylase-2 mRNA expression, and immobility in the FST. While the FLX-induced reduction in 5-HIAA concentrations in the prefrontal cortex was significantly blunted in DEF rats, the reduction in the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio was similar to CON rats. Although plasma FLX and NFLX levels were not significantly different in DEF and CON rats, the NFLX/FLX ratio was significantly lower in DEF+FLX rats. These preclinical data demonstrate that n-3 fatty acid deficiency does not significantly reduce the effects of chronic

  20. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in blood does not decrease in proportion of the Zn deficiency. Adverse effects of Zn deficiency vary with age: low weight gain, diarrhoea, aneroxia and neurobehavioral disturbances are observed in infants, while skin changes and dwarfism are frequent in toddlers and adolescents. Common manifestations of Zn deficiency among elderly include hypogeusia, chronic non-healing ulcers and recurrent infections.Ameliorative measures of Zn deficiency in humans can be classified in two groups, namely, nutraceutical and biofortification of food grains. Nutraceutical interventions include pharmaceutical supplements, dietary supplements and dietary diversification, while biofortification of food grains can be achieved by genetic modification (GM of crops or by agronomic techniques that include soil or/and foliar fertilization of crops.The major disadvantage of nutraceutical approaches is that the major beneficiaries are urban people and the poor rural masses that need adequate Zn nutrition most are left out. Genetic biofortification of food grains requires large amounts of funds and a fairly long-period of time. Further, a large number of countries have not yet accepted genetically modified (GM foods. On the other hand agronomic biofortification of food grains yields immediate effects and rural and urban people are equally benefitted. Our studies have shown that Zn concentration in cereals (rice, wheat etc and pulses can be considerably increased by soil or/and foliar

  1. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in blood does not decrease in proportion of the Zn deficiency. Adverse effects of Zn deficiency vary with age: low weight gain, diarrhoea, aneroxia and neurobehavioral disturbances are observed in infants, while skin changes and dwarfism are frequent in toddlers and adolescents. Common manifestations of Zn deficiency among elderly include hypogeusia, chronic non-healing ulcers and recurrent infections. Ameliorative measures of Zn deficiency in humans can be classified in two groups, namely, nutraceutical and biofortification of food grains. Nutraceutical interventions include pharmaceutical supplements, dietary supplements and dietary diversification, while biofortification of food grains can be achieved by genetic modification (GM of crops or by agronomic techniques that include soil or/and foliar fertilization of crops. The major disadvantage of nutraceutical approaches is that the major beneficiaries are urban people and the poor rural masses that need adequate Zn nutrition most are left out. Genetic biofortification of food grains requires large amounts of funds and a fairly long-period of time. Further, a large number of countries have not yet accepted genetically modified (GM foods. On the other hand agronomic biofortification of food grains yields immediate effects and rural and urban people are equally benefitted. Our studies have shown that Zn concentration in cereals (rice, wheat etc and pulses can be considerably increased by soil or/and foliar

  2. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fax/Phone Home » Iodine Deficiency Leer en Español Iodine Deficiency Iodine is an element that is needed ... world’s population remains at risk for iodine deficiency. Iodine Deficiency FAQs WHAT IS THE THYROID GLAND? The ...

  3. Vitamin and mineral status in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia syndrome : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, Monica L; Minovic, Isidor; Janssens, Karin A M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Rosmalen, Judith G M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients (35-68%) use nutritional supplements, while it is unclear whether deficiencies in vitamins and minerals contribute to symptoms in these patients. Objectives were (1) to determine vitamin and mineral status in

  4. Contamination by Helicobacter pylori measured by the 13C-Urea-Breath-Test and nutritional status of children with chronic diarrhoea syndrome in Havana City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Triana, M.H.; Cabrera, A.; Sanchez, M. A.; Herrera, X.; Pawong, M.; Moreno, R.; Reyes, D.; Serrano, G.; Diaz, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Diarrhoea morbidity shows a slow increasing tendency during the last 10 years in Cuba. In young children the compromise of the gastric acid barrier after a chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is discussed in pathogenic relation to gastritis, duodenal ulcer, chronic diarrhoea, short stature, malabsorption of the B-complex vitamins and malnutrition. The Hp contamination level of the population of the developing world is estimated to be considerably high. Endoscopic studies carried out in Cuban subjects with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of 60 to 100%. The current treatment of chronic diarrhoea does not include the elimination of Hp. Cuban children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of more than 60%. There are not available data on the contamination level in apparently healthy Cuban children or those with chronic diarrhoea. In March-April 2000 the prevalence of Hp infection measured in serum by chromatographic immunoassay for detection of Hp IgG antibodies was found to be 94 % in 20 infants and young children with persistent chronic diarrhoea and 100% in 11 apparently healthy children in Havana City. Children with diarrhoea showed a more evident affection of their nutritional status and a higher percentage of positive personal or familiar history of parasitism, giardiasis, gastritis, ulcer, stomatitis and glositis. The validity of the immunological tests in infants is discussed from the point of view of the antibody transference with breast milk. In a sample of 16 different children studied by the 13C-Urea-Breath-Test the contamination level was 50% of the children not affected by diarrhoea and only one of the 6 children with diarrhoea showed positive values

  5. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  6. Nutrition transition and food sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belahsen, Rekia

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present paper is to review nutrition transition (NT) ongoing in low and middle income countries and the associated dietary changes. NT is accompanied by demographic and epidemiological transition associated with economic development and urbanisation. In these countries, while the problems of hunger and undernourishment persist, there is an escalation of diet-related non-communicable diseases; making them face both problems of malnutrition, under and overnutrition. Indeed, in addition to protein energy malnutrition underweight and micronutrient deficiencies affect a high proportion of children and women. Conversely, changes in dietary habits and physical activity patterns have led to emergence of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, hyperlipidaemia, CHD and cancer. One possible explanation of weight gain and its associated health consequences is the trend of the consumption of already prepared meals and the restaurants that are in continuous development leading to high consumption of foods rich in sugar and fat. The health problems associated with NT have not spared populations in the Mediterranean area where the type of diet is reported to be healthy and to protect against cardiovascular risks. This is seen in North Africa that belongs also to the Mediterranean basin, where the nutritional situation raises the problem of traditional foods sustainability. Accurate nutritional policy and education are needed to redress the effects of malnutrition related to NT on health.

  7. Nutrition transition in South Asia: the emergence of non-communicable chronic diseases [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghose Bishwajit

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Overview: South Asian countries have experienced a remarkable economic growth during last two decades along with subsequent transformation in social, economic and food systems. Rising disposable income levels continue to drive the nutrition transition characterized by a shift from a traditional high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets towards diets with a lower carbohydrate and higher proportion of saturated fat, sugar and salt. Steered by various transitions in demographic, economic and nutritional terms, South Asian population are experiencing a rapidly changing disease profile. While the healthcare systems have long been striving to disentangle from the vicious cycle of poverty and undernutrition, South Asian countries are now confronted with an emerging epidemic of obesity and a constellation of other non-communicable diseases (NCDs. This dual burden is bringing about a serious health and economic conundrum and is generating enormous pressure on the already overstretched healthcare system of South Asian countries.   Objectives: The Nutrition transition has been a very popular topic in the field of human nutrition during last few decades and many countries and broad geographic regions have been studied. However there is no review on this topic in the context of South Asia  as yet. The main purpose of this review is to highlight the factors accounting for the onset of nutrition transition and its subsequent impact on epidemiological transition in five major South Asian countries including Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Special emphasis was given on India and Bangladesh as they together account for 94% of the regional population and about half world’s malnourished population. Methods: This study is literature based. Main data sources were published research articles obtained through an electronic medical databases search.

  8. Successful term pregnancy in an intestine-pancreas transplant recipient with chronic graft dysfunction and parenteral nutrition dependence: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, E A; Wozniak, L J; Venick, R S; Ponthieux, S M; Cheng, E Y; Farmer, D G

    2015-04-01

    Pregnancy after solid organ transplantation is becoming more common, with the largest recorded numbers in renal and liver transplant recipients. Intestinal transplantation is relatively new compared to other solid organs, and reports of successful pregnancy are far less frequent. All pregnancies reported to date in intestinal transplant recipients have been in women with stable graft function. The case reported here involves the first reported successful term pregnancy in an intestine-pancreas transplant recipient with chronic graft dysfunction and dependence on both transplant immunosuppression and parenteral nutrition (PN) at the time of conception. Pregnancy was unplanned and unexpected in the setting of chronic illness and menstrual irregularities, discovered incidentally on abdominal ultrasound at approximately 18 weeks' gestation. Rapamune was held, tacrolimus continued, and PN adjusted to maintain consistent weight gain. A healthy female infant was delivered vaginally at term. Medical complications during pregnancy included anemia and need for tunneled catheter replacements. Ascites and edema were improved from baseline, with recurrence of large volume ascites shortly after delivery. Successful pregnancy is possible in the setting of transplant immunosuppression, chronic intestinal graft dysfunction, and long-term PN requirement, but close monitoring is required to ensure the health of mother and child. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Veterinary clinical nutrition: success stories: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Mike

    2016-08-01

    In this overview of success stories in veterinary clinical nutrition topics in cats and dogs reviewed include the dietary management of chronic kidney disease, dissolution of urinary tract uroliths by dietary modification, the recognition that taurine and L-carnitine deficiencies can cause dilated cardiomyopathy; that clinical signs associated with feline hyperthyroidism (caused by a benign adenoma) can be controlled by a low-iodine diet alone; that dietary management of canine osteoarthritis can also reduce non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug doses; and that disease-free intervals and survival times can be statistically longer in dogs with Stage III lymphoma managed with diet. As we discover more about nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics, and as we expand our basic understanding of idiopathic diseases we are bound to identify more nutritionally related causes, and be able to develop novel dietary strategies to manage disease processes, including the formulation of diets designed to alter gene expression to obtain beneficial clinical outcomes.

  10. Micronutrient malnutrition, obesity, and chronic disease in countries undergoing the nutrition transition: potential links and program/policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    Eckhardt, Cara L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential long-term effects of micronutrient malnutrition in early childhood on obesity and related disease outcomes. The links between early micronutrient malnutrition, stunting, and subsequent short adult stature — emerging risk factors for obesity and associated chronic diseases—are reviewed. This paper also explores recent literature linking micronutrient malnutrition in adults to increased risk and severity of chronic disease. Finally, this paper discusses the pr...

  11. Estado nutricional e carência de ferro em crianças freqüentadoras de creche antes e 15 meses após intervenção nutricional Nutritional status and iron deficiency among children enrolled in a day care center before and after 15 months of nutritional management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha Soares Biscegli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o estado nutricional e a prevalência de carência de ferro em crianças freqüentadoras de creche antes e 15 meses após orientação nutricional e intervenção terapêutica. MÉTODOS: Estudo coorte com 52 crianças de 32 a 78 meses de idade, freqüentadoras de uma creche em Catanduva, São Paulo, avaliadas em dois períodos: antes e 15 meses após receberem tratamento para anemia e correção das alterações no estado nutricional. O estado nutricional das crianças foi avaliado por meio da curva da Organização Mundial de Saúde (2006. O diagnóstico de carência de ferro foi realizado por dosagem de hemoglobina e nível de ferritina sérica. Dados adicionais das crianças não eutróficas foram obtidos por meio de entrevistas com suas mães. RESULTADOS: Observou-se 2% de desnutrição aguda e 8% de obesidade, não havendo diferença significante entre os dois períodos. 12% das crianças apresentaram anemia, havendo diminuição do número de crianças com anemia após o tratamento. Dois novos casos de obesidade e cinco de carência de ferro surgiram durante o período de intervenção nutricional. Das oito crianças com alterações nutricionais no período inicial, 63% das mães procuraram atendimento médico para tratamento. CONCLUSÕES: O tratamento dos distúrbios nutricionais e da carência de ferro diminuiu o número de crianças afetadas. O aparecimento de novos casos de obesidade e anemia serve de alerta para a necessidade de outras medidas preventivas tanto na creche como no âmbito familiar.OBJECTIVE: To compare the nutritional status and the prevalence of iron deficiency among children enrolled in a day care center before and after 15 months of nutritional management. METHODS: Cohort study of 52 children, aged 32 to 78 months, evaluated before and after treatment of anemia and nutritional disturbs in a no-profit day care center in Catanduva, São Paulo, Brazil. The nutritional status was classified according

  12. Can renal nutrition education improve adherence to a low-protein diet in patients with stages 3 to 5 chronic kidney disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes-Barreto, Juliana Giglio; Silva, Maria Inês Barreto; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Bregman, Rachel; Cervante, Vicente Faria; Carrero, Juan Jesús; Avesani, Carla Maria

    2013-05-01

    Low adherence is frequently observed in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who are following a low-protein diet. We have evaluated whether a specific nutrition education program motivates patients with CKD who do not yet receive dialysis to reduce their protein intake and whether such a program improves adherence to a low-protein diet over and above standard dietary counseling. This was a randomized controlled clinical trial conducted at the CKD outpatient clinic at Pedro Ernesto University Hospital, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This study included adult patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) Patients were randomized to a normal counseling group (individualized dietary program: 0.6 to 0.75 g protein/kg/day or 0.6 to 0.8 g/kg/day for patients with diabetes and 25 to 35 kcal/kg/day with sodium restriction) or an intense counseling group (same dietary program plus nutrition education materials). The nutrition education material included 4 different actions to improve patient knowledge and understanding of the low-protein and low-sodium diet. Both groups were followed by means of individual monthly visits to the outpatient clinic for 4 months. We looked for a change in protein intake from baseline values as well as the adherence rate, assessed as a 20% decrease of the initial protein intake (by 24-hour food recall). Eighty-nine patients completed the study (normal counseling n = 46; intense counseling n = 43). The number of patients who adhered to a low-protein diet was high but did not differ between groups (in the last visit 69% vs. 48%; P = .48; intense vs. normal counseling, respectively). The reduction in protein intake from baseline values was greater for the intense counseling group compared with the normal counseling group (at the last visit, -20.7 g/day [-30.9%] vs. -10.5 g/day [-15.1%], intense vs. normal counseling, respectively; P = .04). An intense nutrition education program contributed to reducing protein intake in patients with

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the body. When your heart has to work harder, this can lead to several conditions: irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias , a heart murmur , an ... chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result in treatments not working as well. Look for Diagnosis will discuss any ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  16. [A retrospective study on nutritional status and growth and development of 37 children with chronic kidney disease stage 3 to 5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, R; Chen, C Y

    2016-09-01

    To retrospectively analyze the nutritional status and growth and development situation of the children with chronic kidney disease stage 3 to 5 when they were diagnosed at the first visit. After searching for the data of all the hospitalized cases during January 2007 to September 2015 in the Department of Nephrology of Children's Hospital Affiliated to the Capital Institute of Pediatrics from the medical record system, data of 37 cases with complete clinical data were collected; all these cases were diagnosed as chronic kidney disease stage 3 to 5 according to the diagnostic criteria.We recorded these children's age, height, weight, body mass index, albumin, blood lipids and acidosis situation when they were first diagnosed, and then, analyzed and summarized their nutritional status and growth and development situation. In these 37 cases, 24 cases were boys and 13 cases were girls; 23 cases (62%) were shorter than the third percentile of age-sex-specific height; 18 cases (49%) exhibited lower weight than the third percentile of age-sex-specific weight; 5 cases (13.5%) showed lower BMI than the third percentile of height-age BMI, and 5 cases (13.5%) had obesity. The level of albumin was (37.0±8.7) g/L, and no statistically significant difference was observed within each stage. In all of these cases, 10 cases were hypoalbuminemia (27%), and the difference of its frequency between stage 3-4 and stage 5 was not statistically significant. Triglyceride was (2.2±1.1) mmol/L. The mean level was higher than the normal range, but with no statistically significant difference within each stage; 21 cases (62%) were diagnosed as hypertriglyceridemia, which were more frequent compared with the occurrence of the hypercholesterolemia (32%), the high low density lipoprotein (26%) and the low high density lipoprotein(12%). And the occurrence of decompensated metabolic acidosis in stage 5 (69%) was significantly higher than that in stage 3-4 (38%) (P=0.036 6, children with chronic

  17. Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity in Leptin-Receptor Deficient and Diet-Induced Obese Mice Through Suppression of ER Stress and Chronic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huansheng; Huang, Hu; Yun, Xinxu; Kim, Do-sung; Yue, Yinan; Wu, Hongju; Sutter, Alton; Chavin, Kenneth D.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Adams, David B.; Kim, Young-Bum

    2014-01-01

    Obesity-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress causes chronic inflammation in adipose tissue and steatosis in the liver, and eventually leads to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The goal of this study was to understand the mechanisms by which administration of bilirubin, a powerful antioxidant, reduces hyperglycemia and ameliorates obesity in leptin-receptor-deficient (db/db) and diet-induced obese (DIO) mouse models. db/db or DIO mice were injected with bilirubin or vehicle ip. Blood glucose and body weight were measured. Activation of insulin-signaling pathways, expression of inflammatory cytokines, and ER stress markers were measured in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver of mice. Bilirubin administration significantly reduced hyperglycemia and increased insulin sensitivity in db/db mice. Bilirubin treatment increased protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and suppressed expression of ER stress markers, including the 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein, X box binding protein (XBP-1), and activating transcription factor 4 in db/db mice. In DIO mice, bilirubin treatment significantly reduced body weight and increased insulin sensitivity. Moreover, bilirubin suppressed macrophage infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression, including TNF-α, IL-1β, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, in adipose tissue. In liver and adipose tissue of DIO mice, bilirubin ameliorated hepatic steatosis and reduced expression of GRP78 and C/EBP homologous protein. These results demonstrate that bilirubin administration improves hyperglycemia and obesity by increasing insulin sensitivity in both genetically engineered and DIO mice models. Bilirubin or bilirubin-increasing drugs might be useful as an insulin sensitizer for the treatment of obesity-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes based on its profound anti-ER stress and antiinflammatory properties. PMID

  18. Chronic Giardia muris infection in anti-IgM-treated mice. I. Analysis of immunoglobulin and parasite-specific antibody in normal and immunoglobulin-deficient animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, D P; Gordon, J; McDermott, M R; Underdown, B J

    1985-06-01

    To investigate the role of B cells and antibody in the immune response of mice to the murine intestinal parasite Giardia muris, we used mice treated from birth with rabbit anti-IgM antisera (aIgM). Such mice developed in serum and in gut secretions extreme Ig deficiency (IgM, IgA, and IgG) relative to control animals. The aIgM-treated mice showed no anti-G. muris antibody in serum or in gut wash material. Infections of G. muris in these mice were chronic, with a high load of parasite present in the small bowel, as reflected by prolonged cyst excretion (greater than 11 wk) and high trophozoite counts. In contrast, normal, untreated mice or NRS-treated animals developed anti-parasite IgA and IgG antibody in serum, demonstrated IgA antibody against the parasite in gut washings, and expelled the parasite within 9 wk. These effects of aIgM treatment on the murine response to primary infection with G. muris were demonstrated in two strains of mice: BALB/c and (C57BL/6 X C3H/He) F1. It was also observed that the response to G. muris infection in untreated animals was characterized by higher than normal total secretion of IgA into the gut and a concomitant increase in the serum polymeric IgA level. Mice treated with aIgM had a marked decrease of both monomeric and polymeric IgA in serum, and little detectable IgA in the intestinal lumen. These experiments provide the first demonstration that anti-IgM treatment suppresses a specific intestinal antibody response to antigen, and provide evidence that B cells and antibody play a role in the development of an effective response to a primary infection with G. muris in mice.

  19. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diet Poor diet in infants Poor nutrition during pregnancy Certain health conditions can make it difficult for your body to absorb enough vitamin B12. They include: Chronic alcoholism Crohn disease, celiac disease, infection with the fish ...

  20. Iron deficiency anaemia among apparently healthy pre-school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Iron deficiency, and specifically iron deficiency anaemia, remains one of the most severe and important nutritional deficiencies in the world today. Objective: To estimate the prevalence and associated factors for iron deficiency anaemia among pre-school children in Lagos. Methodology: The study was ...

  1. Nutritional Supplementation with Chlorella pyrenoidosa Lowers Serum Methylmalonic Acid in Vegans and Vegetarians with a Suspected Vitamin B₁₂ Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Randall Edward; Phillips, Todd W; Udani, Jay

    2015-12-01

    Since vitamin B12 occurs in substantial amounts only in foods derived from animals, vegetarians and particularly vegans are at risk of developing deficiencies of this essential vitamin. The chlorella used for this study is a commercially available whole-food supplement, which is believed to contain the physiologically active form of the vitamin. This exploratory open-label study was performed to determine if adding 9 g of Chlorella pyrenoidosa daily could help mitigate a vitamin B12 deficiency in vegetarians and vegans. Seventeen vegan or vegetarian adults (26-57 years of age) with a known vitamin B12 deficiency, as evidenced by a baseline serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) level above 270 nmol/L at screening, but who otherwise appeared healthy were enrolled in the study. Each participant added 9 g of C. pyrenoidosa to their daily diet for 60 ± 5 days and their serum MMA, vitamin B12, homocysteine (Hcy) levels as well as mean corpuscular volume (MCV), hemoglobin (Hgb), and hematocrit (Hct) were measured at 30 and 60 days from baseline. After 30 and 60 days, the serum MMA level fell significantly (P < .05) by an average ∼34%. Fifteen of the 17 (88%) subjects showed at least a 10% drop in MMA. At the same time, Hcy trended downward and serum vitamin B12 trended upward, while MCV, Hgb, and Hct appeared unchanged. The results of this work suggest that the vitamin B12 in chlorella is bioavailable and such dietary supplementation is a natural way for vegetarians and vegans to get the vitamin B12 they need.

  2. Management of protein-energy wasting in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease: reconciling low protein intake with nutritional therapy1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kopple, Joel D; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), characterized by a decline in body protein mass and energy reserves, including muscle and fat wasting and visceral protein pool contraction, is an underappreciated condition in early to moderate stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a strong predictor of adverse outcomes. The prevalence of PEW in early to moderate CKD is ≥20–25% and increases as CKD progresses, in part because of activation of proinflammatory cytokines combined with superimposed hypercatabolic states and declines in appetite. This anorexia leads to inadequate protein and energy intake, which may be reinforced by prescribed dietary restrictions and inadequate monitoring of the patient's nutritional status. Worsening uremia also renders CKD patients vulnerable to potentially deleterious effects of uncontrolled diets, including higher phosphorus and potassium burden. Uremic metabolites, some of which are anorexigenic and many of which are products of protein metabolism, can exert harmful effects, ranging from oxidative stress to endothelial dysfunction, nitric oxide disarrays, renal interstitial fibrosis, sarcopenia, and worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Given such complex pathways, nutritional interventions in CKD, when applied in concert with nonnutritional therapeutic approaches, encompass an array of strategies (such as dietary restrictions and supplementations) aimed at optimizing both patients’ biochemical variables and their clinical outcomes. The applicability of many nutritional interventions and their effects on outcomes in patients with CKD with PEW has not been well studied. This article reviews the definitions and pathophysiology of PEW in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, examines the current indications for various dietary modification strategies in patients with CKD (eg, manufactured protein-based supplements, amino acids and their keto acid or hydroxyacid analogues), discusses the rationale behind their potential use in

  3. Management of protein-energy wasting in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease: reconciling low protein intake with nutritional therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kopple, Joel D; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-06-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), characterized by a decline in body protein mass and energy reserves, including muscle and fat wasting and visceral protein pool contraction, is an underappreciated condition in early to moderate stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a strong predictor of adverse outcomes. The prevalence of PEW in early to moderate CKD is ≥20-25% and increases as CKD progresses, in part because of activation of proinflammatory cytokines combined with superimposed hypercatabolic states and declines in appetite. This anorexia leads to inadequate protein and energy intake, which may be reinforced by prescribed dietary restrictions and inadequate monitoring of the patient's nutritional status. Worsening uremia also renders CKD patients vulnerable to potentially deleterious effects of uncontrolled diets, including higher phosphorus and potassium burden. Uremic metabolites, some of which are anorexigenic and many of which are products of protein metabolism, can exert harmful effects, ranging from oxidative stress to endothelial dysfunction, nitric oxide disarrays, renal interstitial fibrosis, sarcopenia, and worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Given such complex pathways, nutritional interventions in CKD, when applied in concert with nonnutritional therapeutic approaches, encompass an array of strategies (such as dietary restrictions and supplementations) aimed at optimizing both patients' biochemical variables and their clinical outcomes. The applicability of many nutritional interventions and their effects on outcomes in patients with CKD with PEW has not been well studied. This article reviews the definitions and pathophysiology of PEW in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, examines the current indications for various dietary modification strategies in patients with CKD (eg, manufactured protein-based supplements, amino acids and their keto acid or hydroxyacid analogues), discusses the rationale behind their potential use in patients

  4. Health Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all health deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  5. Storing empty calories and chronic disease risk: snack-food products, nutritive content, and manufacturers in Philadelphia corner stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucan, Sean C; Karpyn, Allison; Sherman, Sandy

    2010-05-01

    Corner stores are part of the urban food environment that may contribute to obesity and diet-related diseases, particularly for low-income and minority children. The snack foods available in corner stores may be a particularly important aspect of an urban child's food environment. Unfortunately, there is little data on exactly what snack foods corner stores stock, or where these foods come from. We evaluated snack foods in 17 Philadelphia corner stores, located in three ethnically distinct, low-income school neighborhoods. We recorded the manufacturer, calories, fat, sugar, and sodium for all snack items, excluding candy and prepared foods. We then compared the nutritive content of assessed snack items to established dietary recommendations and a school nutrition standard. In total, stores stocked 452 kinds of snacks, with only 15% of items common between all three neighborhoods. Total and unique snacks and snack food manufacturers varied by neighborhood, but distributions in snack type varied negligibly: overall, there were no fruit snacks, no vegetable snacks, and only 3.6% of all snacks (by liberal definition) were whole grain. The remainder (96.4% of snacks) was highly processed foods. Five of 65 manufacturers supplied 73.4% of all kinds of snack foods. Depending on serving size definition, 80.0-91.5% of snack foods were "unhealthy" (by the school nutrition standard), including seven of 11 wholegrain products. A single snack item could supply 6-14% of a day's recommended calories, fat, sugar, and sodium on average (or 56-169% at the extreme) for a "typical" child. We conclude that corner store snack food inventories are almost entirely unhealthful, and we discuss possible implications and next steps for research and intervention.

  6. Elevating optimal human nutrition to a central goal of plant breeding and production of plant-based foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, David C; Morris, Cindy E; Dratz, Edward A; Pilgeram, Alice

    2009-11-01

    High-yielding cereals and other staples have produced adequate calories to ward off starvation for much of the world over several decades. However, deficiencies in certain amino acids, minerals, vitamins and fatty acids in staple crops, and animal diets derived from them, have aggravated the problem of malnutrition and the increasing incidence of certain chronic diseases in nominally well-nourished people (the so-called diseases of civilization). Enhanced global nutrition has great potential to reduce acute and chronic disease, the need for health care, the cost of health care, and to increase educational attainment, economic productivity and the quality of life. However, nutrition is currently not an important driver of most plant breeding efforts, and there are only a few well-known efforts to breed crops that are adapted to the needs of optimal human nutrition. Technological tools are available to greatly enhance the nutritional value of our staple crops. However, enhanced nutrition in major crops might only be achieved if nutritional traits are introduced in tandem with important agronomic yield drivers, such as resistance to emerging pests or diseases, to drought and salinity, to herbicides, parasitic plants, frost or heat. In this way we might circumvent a natural tendency for high yield and low production cost to effectively select against the best human nutrition. Here we discuss the need and means for agriculture, food processing, food transport, sociology, nutrition and medicine to be integrated into new approaches to food production with optimal human nutrition as a principle goal.

  7. A putative low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet elicits mild nutritional ketosis but does not impair the acute or chronic hypertrophic responses to resistance exercise in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael D; Holland, A Maleah; Kephart, Wesley C; Mobley, C Brooks; Mumford, Petey W; Lowery, Ryan P; Fox, Carlton D; McCloskey, Anna E; Shake, Joshua J; Mesquita, Paulo; Patel, Romil K; Martin, Jeffrey S; Young, Kaelin C; Kavazis, Andreas N; Wilson, Jacob M

    2016-05-15

    We examined whether acute and/or chronic skeletal muscle anabolism is impaired with a low-carbohydrate diet formulated to elicit ketosis (LCKD) vs. a mixed macronutrient Western diet (WD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (9-10 wk of age, 300-325 g) were provided isoenergetic amounts of a LCKD or a WD for 6 wk. In AIM 1, basal serum and gastrocnemius assessments were performed. In AIM 2, rats were resistance exercised for one bout and were euthanized 90-270 min following exercise for gastrocnemius analyses. In AIM 3, rats voluntarily exercised daily with resistance-loaded running wheels, and hind limb muscles were analyzed for hypertrophy markers at the end of the 6-wk protocol. In AIM 1, basal levels of gastrocnemius phosphorylated (p)-rps6, p-4EBP1, and p-AMPKα were similar between diets, although serum insulin (P ketosis, as the LCKD-fed rats in AIM 2 exhibited ∼1.5-fold greater serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels relative to WD-fed rats (diet effect P = 0.003). This study demonstrates that the tested LCKD in rodents, while only eliciting mild nutritional ketosis, does not impair the acute or chronic skeletal muscle hypertrophic responses to resistance exercise. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Myeloperoxidase-Related Chlorination Activity Is Positively Associated with Circulating Ceruloplasmin in Chronic Heart Failure Patients: Relationship with Neurohormonal, Inflammatory, and Nutritional Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aderville Cabassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Heart failure (HF is accompanied by the development of an imbalance between oxygen- and nitric oxide-derived free radical production leading to protein nitration. Both chlorinating and peroxidase cycle of Myeloperoxidase (MPO contribute to oxidative and nitrosative stress and are involved in tyrosine nitration of protein. Ceruloplasmin (Cp has antioxidant function through its ferroxidase I (FeOxI activity and has recently been proposed as a physiological defense mechanism against MPO inappropriate actions. Objective. We investigated the relationship between plasma MPO-related chlorinating activity, Cp and FeOxI, and nitrosative stress, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nutritional biomarkers in HF patients. Methods and Results. In chronic HF patients (n=81, 76 ± 9 years, NYHA Class II (26; Class III (29; Class IV (26 and age-matched controls (n=17, 75 ± 11 years, CTR, plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, FeOxI, nitrated protein, free Malondialdehyde, BNP, norepinephrine, hsCRP, albumin, and prealbumin were measured. Plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, BNP, norepinephrine, and hsCRP were increased in HF versus CTR. FeOxI, albumin, and prealbumin were decreased in HF. MPO-related chlorinating activity was positively related to Cp (r= 0.363, P<0.001, nitrated protein, hsCRP, and BNP and inversely to albumin. Conclusions. Plasma MPO chlorinated activity is increased in elderly chronic HF patients and positively associated with Cp, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nitrosative parameters suggesting a role in HF progression.

  9. Analysis of nutrition and nutritional status of haemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacka, Anna; Sobczak-Czynsz, Anna; Kucharska, Elżbieta; Madaj, Małgorzata; Stucka, Katarzyna

    2018-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common disease of civilization where nutrition is part of the treatment. Diet therapy is difficult as it is necessary to control the intake of: energy, protein and minerals – Na, K, Ca and P in the daily food rations (DFR). The aim of the study was to assess the nutritional status and diets of haemodialysis (HD) patients. The study involved 141 haemodialysis patients, at the average age of 65.9. The patients were divided into groups taking into consideration their sex and diagnosis for diabetes. The information on the diets were collected using a 7-day dietary recall. In the DFRs the amount of energy and 22 nutrients were calculated. Obtained results were compared with requirements for HD patients. Appropriate nutritional status (measured with BMI) was reported for majority of women (70.6%) and almost half of men, however, excessive weight was recognized in every third female patient and more than half male patients, and type I obesity was noted in 7.8% of men. The analysis of the results showed that diets of all examined patients were deficient in energy and protein (except women with diabetes), whereas the consumption of fat was appropriate in both groups of women. The recommendations with respect to the amount of cholesterol were met but dietary fibre was too low. Intake of vitamins B1, D, C, folates and Ca and Mg was lower and intake of vitamin B12 was higher than recommended. Assessment of the coverage of the demand on nutrients in HD patients should not be based on the analysis of their nutritional status (BMI) only but also on the analysis of diets, especially in case of diabetes.

  10. Uneven dietary development: linking the policies and processes of globalization with the nutrition transition, obesity and diet-related chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkes Corinna

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a "nutrition transition", the consumption of foods high in fats and sweeteners is increasing throughout the developing world. The transition, implicated in the rapid rise of obesity and diet-related chronic diseases worldwide, is rooted in the processes of globalization. Globalization affects the nature of agri-food systems, thereby altering the quantity, type, cost and desirability of foods available for consumption. Understanding the links between globalization and the nutrition transition is therefore necessary to help policy makers develop policies, including food policies, for addressing the global burden of chronic disease. While the subject has been much discussed, tracing the specific pathways between globalization and dietary change remains a challenge. To help address this challenge, this paper explores how one of the central mechanisms of globalization, the integration of the global marketplace, is affecting the specific diet patterns. Focusing on middle-income countries, it highlights the importance of three major processes of market integration: (I production and trade of agricultural goods; (II foreign direct investment in food processing and retailing; and (III global food advertising and promotion. The paper reveals how specific policies implemented to advance the globalization agenda account in part for some recent trends in the global diet. Agricultural production and trade policies have enabled more vegetable oil consumption; policies on foreign direct investment have facilitated higher consumption of highly-processed foods, as has global food marketing. These dietary outcomes also reflect the socioeconomic and cultural context in which these policies are operating. An important finding is that the dynamic, competitive forces unleashed as a result of global market integration facilitates not only convergence in consumption habits (as is commonly assumed in the "Coca-Colonization" hypothesis, but adaptation to

  11. Uneven dietary development: linking the policies and processes of globalization with the nutrition transition, obesity and diet-related chronic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Corinna

    2006-01-01

    In a "nutrition transition", the consumption of foods high in fats and sweeteners is increasing throughout the developing world. The transition, implicated in the rapid rise of obesity and diet-related chronic diseases worldwide, is rooted in the processes of globalization. Globalization affects the nature of agri-food systems, thereby altering the quantity, type, cost and desirability of foods available for consumption. Understanding the links between globalization and the nutrition transition is therefore necessary to help policy makers develop policies, including food policies, for addressing the global burden of chronic disease. While the subject has been much discussed, tracing the specific pathways between globalization and dietary change remains a challenge. To help address this challenge, this paper explores how one of the central mechanisms of globalization, the integration of the global marketplace, is affecting the specific diet patterns. Focusing on middle-income countries, it highlights the importance of three major processes of market integration: (I) production and trade of agricultural goods; (II) foreign direct investment in food processing and retailing; and (III) global food advertising and promotion. The paper reveals how specific policies implemented to advance the globalization agenda account in part for some recent trends in the global diet. Agricultural production and trade policies have enabled more vegetable oil consumption; policies on foreign direct investment have facilitated higher consumption of highly-processed foods, as has global food marketing. These dietary outcomes also reflect the socioeconomic and cultural context in which these policies are operating. An important finding is that the dynamic, competitive forces unleashed as a result of global market integration facilitates not only convergence in consumption habits (as is commonly assumed in the "Coca-Colonization" hypothesis), but adaptation to products targeted at different

  12. Nutritional status is related to fat-free mass, exercise capacity and inspiratory strength in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollyane Galinari Sabino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Being overweight or obese is associated with a higher rate of survival in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. This paradoxical relationship indicates that the influence of nutritional status on functional parameters should be further investigated. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of nutritional status on body composition, exercise capacity and respiratory muscle strength in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. METHODS: Thirty-two patients (nine women were divided into three groups according to their body mass indices (BMI: overweight/obese (25 < BMI < 34.9 kg/m², n=8, normal weight (18.5 < BMI < 24.9 kg/m², n=17 and underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m², n=7. Spirometry, bioelectrical impedance, a six-minute walking distance test and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures were assessed. RESULTS: Airway obstruction was similar among the groups (p=0.30; however, overweight/obese patients had a higher fat-free mass (FFM index [FFMI=FFM/body weight² (mean±SEM: 17±0.3 vs. 15±0.3 vs. 14±0.5 m/kg², p<0.01], exercise capacity (90±8 vs. 79±6 vs. 57±8 m, p=0.02 and maximal inspiratory pressure (63±7 vs. 57±5 vs. 35±8 % predicted, p=0.03 in comparison to normal weight and underweight patients, respectively. In addition, on backward multiple regression analysis, FFMI was the unique independent predictor of exercise capacity (partial r=0.52, p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients who were overweight or obese had a greater FFM, exercise capacity and inspiratory muscle strength than patients with the same degree of airflow obstruction who were of normal weight or underweight, and higher FFM was independently associated with higher exercise capacity. These characteristics of overweight or obese patients might counteract the drawbacks of excess weight and lead to an improved prognosis in COPD.

  13. Personalised nutrition: Status and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joost, H.G.; Gibney, M.J.; Cashman, K.D.; Görman, U.; Hesketh, J.E.; Mueller, M.; Ommen, B. van; Williams, C.M.; Mathers, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Personalised, genotype-based nutrition is a concept that links genotyping with specific nutritional advice in order to improve the prevention of nutrition-associated, chronic diseases. This review describes the current scientific basis of the concept and discusses its problems. There is convincing

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection, chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: A nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiaqi; Zagai, Ulrika; Hallmans, Göran; Nyrén, Olof; Engstrand, Lars; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Duell, Eric J; Overvad, Kim; Katzke, Verena A; Kaaks, Rudolf; Jenab, Mazda; Park, Jin Young; Murillo, Raul; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Riboli, Elio; Aune, Dagfinn; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Capellá, Gabriel; Agudo, Antonio; Krogh, Vittorio; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Martínez, Begoña; Redondo-Sanchez, Daniel; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Hm Peeters, Petra; Regnér, Sara; Lindkvist, Björn; Naccarati, Alessio; Ardanaz, Eva; Larrañaga, Nerea; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Rebours, Vinciane; Barré, Amélie; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Ye, Weimin

    2017-04-15

    The association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk remains controversial. We conducted a nested case-control study with 448 pancreatic cancer cases and their individually matched control subjects, based on the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, to determine whether there was an altered pancreatic cancer risk associated with H. pylori infection and chronic corpus atrophic gastritis. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for matching factors and other potential confounders. Our results showed that pancreatic cancer risk was neither associated with H. pylori seropositivity (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.31) nor CagA seropositivity (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.48). We also did not find any excess risk among individuals seropositive for H. pylori but seronegative for CagA, compared with the group seronegative for both antibodies (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.38). However, we found that chronic corpus atrophic gastritis was non-significantly associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.77, 2.37), and although based on small numbers, the excess risk was particularly marked among individuals seronegative for both H. pylori and CagA (OR = 5.66; 95% CI: 1.59, 20.19, p value for interaction cancer risk in western European populations. However, the suggested association between chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk warrants independent verification in future studies, and, if confirmed, further studies on the underlying mechanisms. © 2016 UICC.

  15. Nutritional catch-up growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat-Yablonski, Galia; Pando, Rakefet; Phillip, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition, marked by variant nutrient deficiencies, is considered a leading cause of stunted growth worldwide. In developing countries, malnutrition is caused mainly by food shortage and infectious diseases. Malnutrition may also be found in the developed world, where it is due mostly to prematurity, chronic diseases, and anorexia nervosa. In most cases, when food consumption is corrected, spontaneous catch-up (CU) growth occurs. However, CU growth is not always complete, leading to growth deficits. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms that govern this process. Using a rat model of food restriction followed by refeeding, we established a nutrition-induced CU growth model. Levels of leptin and insulin-like growth factor-1 were found to significantly decrease when food was restricted and to increase already 1 day after refeeding. Gene expression analysis of the growth plate revealed that food restriction specifically affects transcription factors such as the hypoxia inducible factor-1 and its downstream targets on the one hand, and global gene expression, indicating epigenetic regulation, on the other. Food restriction also reduced the level of several microRNAs, including the chondrocyte-specific miR-140, which led to an increase in its target, SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase. These findings may explain the global changes in gene expression observed under nutritional manipulation. We suggest that multiple levels of regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic mechanisms, and microRNAs respond to nutritional cues and offer a possible explanation for some of the effects of food restriction on epiphyseal growth plate growth. The means whereby these components sense changes in nutritional status are still unknown. Deciphering the role of epigenetic regulation in growth may pave the way for the development of new treatments for children with growth disorders. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Differences in gorilla nettle-feeding between captivity and the wild: local traditions, species typical behaviors or merely the result of nutritional deficiencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Shelly

    2011-11-01

    Behavioral and cognitive studies on captive apes often pay little attention to the specific environmental conditions of their study subjects. A recent report form Byrne et al. (Anim Cogn doi: 10.1007/s10071-011-0403-8, 2011), comparing nettle-feeding techniques between captive and wild gorillas, claimed to document "the strongest evidence yet to come from any great ape that observational learning of a skilled conspecific" can allow social learning and culture in gorillas. An earlier study with similar findings placed emphasis instead on the many similarities and claims for species typical behavior, thus a genetic hypothesis instead of a cultural hypothesis. This commentary aims at formulating a third environmental hypothesis based on path-dependent behavioral differences owing to different diet and availability of nutritional resources of wild and captive gorillas. Captive diet provides gorillas with a much lower concentration of fibers. Gorillas are hindgut fermenters, and this deficit of natural fermentation of fibers may impact their health and their behavior in zoos. Results of Byrne et al.'s study will be discussed comparing feeding choice and availability of nutritional resources of wild and captive gorillas, showing that in captivity gorilla, motivation to consume certain food or certain plant parts may differ drastically from that of wild gorillas. This view does not intend to deny that social learning and culture may exist in gorillas, but to guide and encourage future works investigating social learning in great apes to take more accurately into account the living conditions and, when comparing populations, the possible environmental differences. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  17. Performance of the Androgen Deficiency in Aging Male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    failure, chronic liver disease, chronic renal failure, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and malignancy. Relevant socio- demographic and diabetes-related information were documented. Clinical evaluation of androgen deficiency. Participants completed the original ...

  18. CALCIUM DEFICIENCY AND CAUSATION OF RICKETS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2005-03-03

    Mar 3, 2005 ... communication about the benefits of exposing children to sunlight is very important in preventing the ... of rickets was nutritional deficiency of vitamin D due either to ..... resulting from less time being spent outdoors is the cause.

  19. [Improvement in zinc nutrition due to zinc transporter-targeting strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, Taiho

    2016-07-01

    Adequate intake of zinc from the daily diet is indispensable to maintain health. However, the dietary zinc content often fails to fulfill the recommended daily intake, leading to zinc deficiency and also increases the risk of developing chronic diseases, particularly in elderly individuals. Therefore, increased attention is required to overcome zinc deficiency and it is important to improve zinc nutrition in daily life. In the small intestine, the zinc transporter, ZIP4, functions as a component that is essential for zinc absorption. In this manuscript, we present a brief overview regarding zinc deficiency. Moreover, we review a novel strategy, called "ZIP4-targeting", which has the potential to enable efficient zinc absorption from the diet. ZIP4-targeting strategy is possibly a major step in preventing zinc deficiency and improving human health.

  20. [Study on gene differential expressions of substance and energy metabolism in chronic superficial gastritis patients of Pi deficiency syndrome and of pi-wei hygropyrexia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ze-Min; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wang, Ying-Fang

    2012-09-01

    To analyze the metabolic levels of energy and substance in chronic superficial gastritis (CSG) patients of Pi deficiency syndrome (PDS) and of Pi-Wei hygropyrexia syndrome (PWHS), including lipid, protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrate, trace element, and energy metabolism, and to study the pathogenesis mechanism of PDS from substance and energy metabolisms. Recruited were 8 CSG patients who visited at First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine from June 2004 to March 2005, including 4 patients of PDS and 4 of PWHS. Their gastric mucosae were used for experiments of DNA microarray. The dual-channel DNA microarray data were bioinformatically analyzed by BRB ArrayTools and IPA Software. Obtained were fifty-six differentially expressed genes involved in substance and energy metabolisms with the expression fold more than 2, including 11 genes up-regulated and 45 genes down-regulated. Of them, genes correlated to lipid metabolism included CRLS1, LRP11, FUT9, GPCPD1, PIGL, SULT1A4, B3GNT1, ST8SIA4, and ACADVL, mainly involved in the metabolic processes of fatty acid, cholesterol, phospholipids, and glycolipid. Genes correlated to protein metabolism included ASRGL1, AARSD1, EBNA1BP2, PUM2, MRPL52, C120RF65, PSMB8, PSME2, UBA7, RNF11, FBXO44, ZFYVE26, CHMP2A, SSR4, SNX4, RAB3B, RABL2A, GOLGA2, KDELR1, PHPT1, ACPP, PTPRF, CRKL, HDAC7, ADPRHL2, B3GNT1, ST8SIA4, DDOST, and FUT9, mainly involved in the biosynthesis processes of protein, ubiquitination, targeted transport and post-translation modification. Genes correlated to nucleic acid metabolism included DFFB, FLJ35220, TOP2A, SF3A3, CREB3, CRTC2, NR1D2, MED6, GTF2IRD1, C1ORF83, ZNF773, and ZMYND11, mainly involved in DNA replication and repair, transcription regulation. Genes correlated to carbohydrate metabolism included AGL, B3GNT1, FUT9, ST8SIA4, SULT1A4, DDOST, and PIGL, mainly involved in glucogen degradation and

  1. Inflammation and nutritional status assessment by malnutrition inflammation score and its outcome in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeswaran, D; Indhumathi, E; Hemamalini, A J; Sivakumar, V; Soundararajan, P; Jayakumar, M

    2018-01-09

    Malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome (MICS), hyperhomocysteinemia, calcium and phosphate levels derangement have been predicted as important contributing factors for the progression of cardiovascular burden. Among patients with earlier stage of CKD, hypoalbuminaemia and inflammation deliberated as non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors, which add more burden to circulatory disease, mortality and rapid advancement to CKD stage 5. The aim of the study is to evaluate inflammation and nutritional status of CKD patients not on dialysis using Malnutrition inflammation score (MIS) and to verify the association with mortality in the follow-up period. In this prospective cohort study 129 (66 males, 63 females) pre-dialysis CKD patients enrolled between June 2013 to August 2014 and censored until March 2017. Malnutrition and Inflammation assessed using Malnutrition inflammation score. Blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, albumin, Interleukin - 6, highly sensitive C reactive protein (hsCRP), total cholesterol and anthropometric data were analyzed. The Malnutrition inflammation score in pre-dialysis CKD patients ranged from 0 to 18 with the median score of two. During 36 or more months of follow-up, there were 30 (23.2%) deaths, 35 (27%) patients initiated on hemodialysis, one (0.7%) patient was initiated on peritoneal dialysis, two (1.4%) patients underwent renal transplantation and two (1.4%) patients were lost for follow-up. In this study, 33% had varying degree of malnutrition and inflammation. Patients who had MIS ≥7 had significant increase in IL-6 (p = 0.003) and HsCRP levels (p < 0.001) when compared with other tertiles of MIS. ROC curve analysis of MIS showed 56.5% sensitivity and 81% specificity in predicting death rate (AUC 0.709; 95% CI 0.604-0.815, p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed MIS ≥7 had a strong association (log rank test, p < 0.001) with mortality during 36 and more months of follow-up time. In unadjusted analyses

  2. Iron deficiency - a global problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Iron deficiency is an important nutritional global problem. This paper contains summery of information gathered from a dietary survey as iron deficiency anaemia is major public health problem in many developing countries including Pakistan. Comparison of anaemia in different age group and sex versus various regions in the world are given. In Pakistan also anaemia is widespread. According to the report of Micro-Nutrient survey of Pakistan 40% of the population are found to have low level of haemoglobin, more than half of pregnant women suffered from marginal or deficient haemoglobin. (A.B.)

  3. Iron deficiency - a global problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S M [Pakistan Council for Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    1994-12-31

    Iron deficiency is an important nutritional global problem. This paper contains summery of information gathered from a dietary survey as iron deficiency anaemia is major public health problem in many developing countries including Pakistan. Comparison of anaemia in different age group and sex versus various regions in the world are given. In Pakistan also anaemia is widespread. According to the report of Micro-Nutrient survey of Pakistan 40% of the population are found to have low level of haemoglobin, more than half of pregnant women suffered from marginal or deficient haemoglobin. (A.B.).

  4. Interaction of nutrition and infections globally: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawinkel, M B

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of nutrition and infections is known by experience by generations of medical doctors. Before the era of antibiotics, diet was an integral part of the management of infections. Now, it is necessary to take a fresh look at this interaction as the understanding of immune response has expanded considerably. Comparatively little research has addressed the impact of nutrition interventions on the management of infectious diseases. Most observations of the interaction between nutrition and infections are epidemiological in character. This holds especially true for measles as well as for tuberculosis. In AIDS, the deterioration of the nutritional status is an indicator of disease progression. Infections in undernourished children are a common cause of death, and taking this finding into account helps to reduce the case fatality rate in severely malnourished patients. Regarding the immune response, cellular as well as soluble components are affected by deficiencies of single nutrients or general undernutrition. The immunosuppressive effect of undernutrition starts during intrauterine life already: maternal nutrition status has been shown to impact on immune function in adult animals. Recent research suggests that not only undernutrition but also caloric overnutrition impacts on immune response to infections and immunization. This is partly due to the chronic inflammatory activity of the adipose tissue and partly due to neuroendocrine alterations. Infectious diseases also impact on the nutritional status, either specifically or through unspecific mechanisms, such as anorexia, tachypnea, and vomiting. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Mineral Requirements in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rezaeian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Decreased oral intake or impaired function / structure in the gut, such as hypertension port associated with atrophic changes in the protein nutrition - calories can lead to micronutrient deficiencies.This paper examines the status of micronutrients in chronic liver disease in children.   Materials and Methods: In this review study databases including proquest, pubmedcentral, scincedirect, ovid, medlineplus were been searched with keyword words such as” chronic liver disease"” minerals””children” between 1999 to 2014. Finally, 3 related articles have been found.   Results: In chronic liver disease changes in micronutrient metabolism lead to changes in the daily requirements, such that in certain circumstances intake increasing or decreasing  is needed. Low serum calcium and phosphate concentrations are often the reflection of malabsorption-induced bone disease that is unresponsive to vitamin D store normalization. Iron is usually deficient in children with CLD and supplementation frequently needed. The origin of iron deficiency is multifactorial and includes ongoing losses, inadequate intakes, serial blood draws and malabsorption secondary to hypertensive enteropathy. Zinc plays an important role in cognitive function, appetite and taste, immune function, wound healing, and protein metabolism. Low plasma zinc levels are frequent in children with chronic cholestasis, but unfortunately plasma concentrations are not reflective of total body zinc status. Copper and manganese, unlike other minerals, are increased in CLD, because they are normally excreted through bile. Parenteral nutrition in cholestatic patients can induce manganese intoxication and accumulation in basal ganglia.   Conclusion:  In fants with CLD are prone to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Mineral state should be evaluated, treated and reevaluated, until sufficient daily requirement achieved. Poster  Presentation, N 33  

  6. Adropin and irisin levels in relation to nutrition, body composition, and insulin resistance in patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałużna, Małgorzata; Hoppe, Krzysztof; Schwermer, Krzysztof; Ibrahim, Aisha Y; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna

    2016-07-25

    INTRODUCTION    Newly discovered myokines, adropin, and irisin, are regulators of energy homeostasis and metabolism in humans. In end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the significance and role of irisin and adropin as metabolism regulators are still unclear. OBJECTIVES    The aim of this study was to evaluate serum adropin and irisin levels and establish their relation to insulin resistance, nutritional status, and hydration status in patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) and on peritoneal dialysis (PD). PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study consisted of 71 subjects, including 48 patients (18 women, 30 men; median age, 56.5 years; range, 26-84 years) either on HD (n = 41) or PD (n = 7) and 36 healthy controls matched for age and sex. We measured the serum levels of adropin, irisin, creatinine, albumin, glucose, and insulin, as well as the plasma levels of lipids. The bioimpedance method was used to evaluate the body composition and overhydration in patients with ESRD. RESULTS    Irisin levels were significantly lower in patients with ESRD compared with controls, but there were no differences in adropin levels between both study groups. Adropin levels were inversely correlated with body mass, lean tissue mass, total, intracellular, and extracellular water, and albumin concentrations in patients with ESRD. Irisin levels were positively correlated with glucose levels and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. No significant correlations were observed between adropin and irisin concentrations and overhydration. CONCLUSIONS    Adropin may be considered as a new marker of nutritional status in patients with ESRD. The significance and cause of low irisin levels characteristic for these patients are still unclear. Adropin and irisin should be further investigated as possible markers of cachexia and insulin resistance in patients with ESRD.

  7. Conflicting Role of Sarcopenia and Obesity in Male Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyeon-Kyoung; Park, Joo-Hyun; Park, Hye Kyeong; Jung, Hoon; Lee, Sung-Soon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of sarcopenia and obesity on pulmonary function and quality of life (QOL) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Research Design and Methods Data were obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, including data from health interviews, health examinations, nutritional questionnaires, and laboratory findings. Laboratory data included pulmonary function assessment and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry results. Sarcopenia was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and obesity was defined by body mass index. Male COPD patients were then classified into 4 groups according to the presence of sarcopenia and obesity. Results In male patients with COPD, the prevalence of sarcopenia was found to be 29.3%, and that of sarcopenic obesity was 14.2%. Furthermore, 22.5% of the patients observed in this study had impaired QOL. Following multivariable statistical analysis, both sarcopenia and obesity were independent risk factors for worsening lung function. Adjusted values of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were the lowest in the sarcopenic obesity group. Sarcopenia was also associated with more subjective activity limitation and poorer QOL; however obesity was related to less subjective limitation and better QOL after multivariable analysis. Adjusted value of QOL was the lowest in sarcopenic subjects without obesity, and the highest in obese subject without sarcopenia. Conclusions Both sarcopenia and obesity were found to be associated with worsening lung function in male COPD patients. However, obesity was positively correlated with improved QOL while sarcopenia was negatively correlated with QQL. PMID:25353344

  8. Very Low-Protein Diet (VLPD) Reduces Metabolic Acidosis in Subjects with Chronic Kidney Disease: The "Nutritional Light Signal" of the Renal Acid Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Di Micco, Lucia; Marzocco, Stefania; De Simone, Emanuele; De Blasio, Antonietta; Sirico, Maria Luisa; Nardone, Luca

    2017-01-17

    Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease; current guidelines recommend treatment with alkali if bicarbonate levels are lower than 22 mMol/L. In fact, recent studies have shown that an early administration of alkali reduces progression of CKD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of fruit and vegetables to reduce the acid load in CKD. We conducted a case-control study in 146 patients who received sodium bicarbonate. Of these, 54 patients assumed very low-protein diet (VLPD) and 92 were controls (ratio 1:2). We calculated every three months the potential renal acid load (PRAL) and the net endogenous acid production (NEAP), inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate levels and representing the non-volatile acid load derived from nutrition. Un-paired T -test and Chi-square test were used to assess differences between study groups at baseline and study completion. Two-tailed probability values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), protein and phosphate intake, urinary sodium, potassium, phosphate and urea nitrogen, NEAP, and PRAL. VLPD patients showed at 6 and 12 months a significant reduction of SBP ( p protein intake ( p intake ( p intake of acids; nutritional therapy of CKD, that has always taken into consideration a lower protein, salt, and phosphate intake, should be adopted to correct metabolic acidosis, an important target in the treatment of CKD patients. We provide useful indications regarding acid load of food and drinks-the "acid load dietary traffic light".

  9. Effect of branched-chain amino acid-enriched nutritional supplementation on interferon therapy in Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagao Yumiko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of nutritional supplementation with branched-chain amino acids (BCAA with zinc component (Aminofeel® on adherence to and outcome of therapy in patients treated with interferon (IFN for chronic hepatitis C and cirrhosis and to determine whether to recommend the supplement. Methods In this retrospective study, 51 patients who received IFN therapy were investigated among 203 consecutive patients who visited our hospital and were advised regarding the potential benefit of taking Aminofeel®. Each patient was free to choose whether to purchase and take Aminofeel®. Results Twenty four patients (group 1-A took Aminofeel® during standard IFN therapy and 13 (group 1-B did not. Low-dose, long-term IFN (maintenance therapy, mainly peglated (Peg-IFN alpha 2a, was administered to 14 patients who were difficult to treat, because of no effect or harmful side effects with standard IFN therapy, and who had advanced liver fibrosis. Among the 14, 11 patients (group 2-A took Aminofeel® and 3 (group 2-B did not. The prevalence of obesity was significantly higher (P=0.04 in group 1-A than in group 1-B. The rate of adherence to IFN therapy was higher in group 1-A (83.3% than in group 1-B (53.8%, P=0.05. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the rates of sustained virological response (SVR to IFN therapy. According to multivariate analysis, two factors, SVR and intake of Aminofeel®, were associated with successful adherence to IFN therapy. The adjusted odds ratios for these two factors were 13.25 and 12.59, respectively, and each was statistically significant. The SVR rate of maintenance IFN therapy was in 18.2% group 2-A and 0% in group 2-B. Conclusion Our data show that BCAA intake is useful for adherence to and effect of IFN therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis C. Nutritional supplementation with BCAA seems to be useful for HCV-infected patients receiving

  10. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake toge...

  11. Antepartum Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakajima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left.

  12. Attitudes towards nutritional supplement use amongst adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nutritional supplements refer to a product ingested to increase the nutritional content of a normal diet, to fill a dietary need and/or presumed deficiency. The usage and popularity of nutritional supplements, however, raises concerns from a health benefit and risk perspective. In South Africa, there is currently no ...

  13. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  14. Acute nutritional axonal neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Johanna; Logigian, Eric L

    2018-01-01

    This study describes clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features of a severe acute axonal polyneuropathy common to patients with acute nutritional deficiency in the setting of alcoholism, bariatric surgery (BS), or anorexia. Retrospective analysis of clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory data of patients with acute axonal neuropathy. Thirteen patients were identified with a severe, painful, sensory or sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy that developed over 2-12 weeks with sensory ataxia, areflexia, variable muscle weakness, poor nutritional status, and weight loss, often with prolonged vomiting and normal cerebrospinal fluid protein. Vitamin B6 was low in half and thiamine was low in all patients when obtained before supplementation. Patients improved with weight gain and vitamin supplementation, with motor greater than sensory recovery. We suggest that acute or subacute axonal neuropathy in patients with weight loss or vomiting associated with alcohol abuse, BS, or dietary deficiency is one syndrome, caused by micronutrient deficiencies. Muscle Nerve 57: 33-39, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Nutrition and the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, N G; West, K P

    1999-12-01

    The topic "nutrition and the eye" cannot adequately be covered in a single review article; indeed, dozens of books and hundreds of articles have been written on the subject. This review concentrates on three areas in which specific nutrients are known or theorized to have a major impact on vision and the visual system: vitamin A deficiency; antioxidants and their proposed role in the prevention of age-related cataract and macular degeneration; and nutritional optic neuropathies, including those of the recent Cuban epidemic. In addition, this article touches on nutritional treatments that have been suggested for several less common eye diseases and, finally, considers several less prevalent conditions in which deficiency of or excess exposure to a particular nutrient has been associated with ocular pathology.

  16. Sodium and phosphorus-based food additives: persistent but surmountable hurdles in the management of nutrition in chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and phosphorus-based food additives are among the most commonly consumed nutrients in the world. This is because both have diverse applications in processed food manufacturing, leading to their widespread utilization by the food industry. Since most foods are naturally low in salt, sodium additives almost completely account for the excessive consumption of sodium throughout the world. Similarly, phosphorus additives represent a major and “hidden” phosphorus load in modern diets. These factors pose a major barrier to successfully lowering sodium or phosphorus intake in patients with chronic kidney disease. As such, any serious effort to reduce sodium or phosphorus consumption will require reductions in the use of these additives by the food industry. The current regulatory environment governing the use of food additives does not favor this goal, however, in large part because these additives have historically been classified as generally safe for public consumption. To overcome these barriers, coordinated efforts will be needed to demonstrate that high intakes of these additives are not safe for public consumption and as such, should be subject to greater regulatory scrutiny. PMID:23439374

  17. [Treatment of chronic refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura. 10 years experience at the Salvador Zubiran National Institute of Nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita-Ramírez, L; Hurtado-Monroy, R; Labardini-Méndez, J

    1992-01-01

    A total of 126 patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura were diagnosed from January 1980 to January 1990 in our institute. In this group of patients, 21 were refractory to prednisone therapy, splenectomy or both, or had had a relapse after a good response with these treatments. They were given other therapies. There was enough information for evaluation in 16 of the 21 patients. The treatment responses were classified according to the post-therapy platelet counts: complete response (CR) = > 150 x 10(9)/L for more than three months; partial response (PR) = 50-150 x 10(9)/L for more than three months; any response (AR) = CR + PR; no response (NR) = < 50 x 10(9)/L. There were 15 women and one male. The median age was 41 years (range 11 to 65). 6-mercaptopurine was given in all patients with CR = 31.2%, PR = 18.8%, AR = 50% and NR = 50%. Seven patients received cyclophosphamide with CR = 28.6%, PR = 14.3%, AR = 42.9% and NR = 57%. Vincristine was given in four patients with only one PR. Interferon alpha 2B was given in four patients with two transitory PR. One patient received colchicine and vitamin C without response. It is concluded that 6-mercaptopurine and cyclophosphamide are useful drugs in refractory thrombocytopenic purpura.

  18. Efeito da omissão de macronutrientes e boro no crescimento, nos sintomas de deficiências nutricionais e na composição mineral de plantas de camucamuzeiro Effect of omission of macronutrient and boron on growth, on symptoms of nutritional deficiency and mineral composition in camucamuzeiro plants (Myrciaria dubia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael de Jesus Matos Viégas

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito da omissão de macronutrientes e do micronutriente boro no crescimento, nos sintomas de deficiências nutricionais e na composição mineral em plantas de camucamuzeiro, conduziu-se experimento em casa de vegetação, mediante a técnica do elemento faltante. O delineamento experimental foi o inteiramente casualizado, com quatro repetições e oito tratamentos, sendo completo (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S e micronutrientes e omissão individual de N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S e B. Os sintomas visuais de deficiências foram, de modo geral, de fácil caracterização para todos os nutrientes. Com exceção do fósforo, as omissões dos demais nutrientes afetaram a produção de matéria seca, quando comparados ao tratamento completo. Com base nos teores em g kg-1, dos macronutrientes, e em mg kg-1, do micronutriente boro nas folhas, infere-se em uma primeira aproximação dos valores adequados (completo, ou seja: 16,9 a 18,2 de N ; 1,2 a 1,9 de P; 5,2 a 6,0 de K; 9,9 a 11,7 de Ca; 1,4 a 3,6 de Mg; 2,4 a 2,8 de S ; 8,4 a 9,5 de B e do deficiente (omissão , 6,5 a 7,9 de N ; =0,9 de P; =1,7 de K ; 5,4 a 6,5 de Ca; =0,7 de Mg; 0,7 a 1,2 de S e 1,1 a 1,9 de BThe effects of omission of macronutrient and boron on growth, on symptoms of nutritional deficiency and mineral composition of plants of "camucamuzeiro" were evaluated. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse, by means of the missing element technique. The experimental design was completely randomized, with eight treatments and four repetitions, including complete (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S and micronutrients and individual omission of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S and B. The visual symptoms of deficiency were easily characterized for all the nutrients. Excepting for P, dry mass was affected by the omission of all the other nutrients, when compared with the complete treatment. Based on the macronutrient (g kg-1 and on the micronutrient boron (mg kg-1 on leaves contents, a first approach of the

  19. Very Low-Protein Diet (VLPD Reduces Metabolic Acidosis in Subjects with Chronic Kidney Disease: The “Nutritional Light Signal” of the Renal Acid Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagio Raffaele Di Iorio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease; current guidelines recommend treatment with alkali if bicarbonate levels are lower than 22 mMol/L. In fact, recent studies have shown that an early administration of alkali reduces progression of CKD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of fruit and vegetables to reduce the acid load in CKD. Methods: We conducted a case-control study in 146 patients who received sodium bicarbonate. Of these, 54 patients assumed very low-protein diet (VLPD and 92 were controls (ratio 1:2. We calculated every three months the potential renal acid load (PRAL and the net endogenous acid production (NEAP, inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate levels and representing the non-volatile acid load derived from nutrition. Un-paired T-test and Chi-square test were used to assess differences between study groups at baseline and study completion. Two-tailed probability values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, protein and phosphate intake, urinary sodium, potassium, phosphate and urea nitrogen, NEAP, and PRAL. VLPD patients showed at 6 and 12 months a significant reduction of SBP (p < 0.0001, DBP (p < 0.001, plasma urea (p < 0.0001 protein intake (p < 0.0001, calcemia (p < 0.0001, phosphatemia (p < 0.0001, phosphate intake (p < 0.0001, urinary sodium (p < 0.0001, urinary potassium (p < 0.002, and urinary phosphate (p < 0.0001. NEAP and PRAL were significantly reduced in VLPD during follow-up. Conclusion: VLPD reduces intake of acids; nutritional therapy of CKD, that has always taken into consideration a lower protein, salt, and phosphate intake, should be adopted to correct metabolic acidosis, an important target in the treatment of CKD patients. We provide useful indications regarding acid load of food and

  20. How Much Nutrition for How Much Growth?
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanussen, Michael; Wit, Jan M

    2017-01-01

    Increasing agreement exists about the use of length-for-age as the indicator of choice in monitoring the long-term impact of chronic nutritional deficiency. Yet, already shortly after World War I, a causal link between nutrition and growth was questioned. Also, modern meta-analyses of controlled nutrition intervention studies show that the net effect of nutrition on body height is small. Broad evidence obtained from historic observations on human starvation made since the 19th century questions an obligatory association between nutrition and growth. Many additional explanations for the apparent shortness of people from developing countries have been published since, focusing on genetic factors, environment, economy, epigenetics, and, recently, psychosocial factors, such as strategic growth adjustments suggesting stature to be a social signal. The marked variability in average population height of up to 20 cm within a few generations complicates the use of normative growth charts, even though they have been widely propagated. We support the concept of local growth references, for example using the "Synthetic Growth References" methodology. These references combine local growth information obtained from a given population of interest and common features of human population growth, with LMS values for height, weight, and BMI from birth to maturity.
. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Anemia, Iron Deficiency and Iodine Deficiency among Nepalese School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatiwada, Saroj; Lamsal, Madhab; Gelal, Basanta; Gautam, Sharad; Nepal, Ashwini Kumar; Brodie, David; Baral, Nirmal

    2016-07-01

    To assess iodine and iron nutritional status among Nepalese school children. A cross-sectional, community based study was conducted in the two districts, Ilam (hilly region) and Udayapur (plain region) of eastern Nepal. A total of 759 school children aged 6-13 y from different schools within the study areas were randomly enrolled. A total of 759 urine samples and 316 blood samples were collected. Blood hemoglobin level, serum iron, total iron binding capacity and urinary iodine concentration was measured. Percentage of transferrin saturation was calculated using serum iron and total iron binding capacity values. The mean level of hemoglobin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation and median urinary iodine excretion were 12.29 ± 1.85 g/dl, 70.45 ± 34.46 μg/dl, 386.48 ± 62.48 μg/dl, 19.94 ± 12.07 % and 274.67 μg/L respectively. Anemia, iron deficiency and iodine deficiency (urinary iodine excretion iron deficient children. Iron deficiency and anemia are common in Nepalese children, whereas, iodine nutrition is more than adequate. Low urinary iodine excretion was common in iron deficiency and anemia.

  2. Nutritional Problems and Policy in Tanzania. Cornell International Nutrition Monograph Series, Number 7 (1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgaza, Olyvia

    This monograph discusses policies designed to deal with food and nutrition problems in Tanzania. Available information on food supplies and nutritional conditions in Tanzania clearly shows that the country faces nutritional problems; protein energy malnutrition is the most serious and requires priority action. Iron deficiency anemia, goiter, and…

  3. Estado nutricional e absorção intestinal de ferro em crianças com doença hepática crônica com e sem colestase Nutritional status and intestinal iron absorption in children with chronic hepatic disease with and without cholestasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Helena Guedes da Motta Mattar

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a ingestão alimentar, a ocorrência de desnutrição energético-protéica e de anemia e a absorção intestinal de ferro em crianças com doença hepática crônica. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 25 pacientes com doença hepática crônica, sendo 15 com colestase e 11 sem colestase. A idade variou entre 6,5 meses e 12,1 anos. A absorção intestinal de ferro foi avaliada pela elevação do ferro sérico uma hora após a ingestão de 1 mg/kg de ferro elementar e pela resposta à ferroterapia oral. A absorção intestinal de ferro foi comparada com um grupo de crianças com anemia ferropriva. RESULTADOS: A ingestão média de energia e proteínas nos pacientes com doença hepática com colestase foi maior do que nos pacientes sem colestase. O déficit nutricional foi mais grave nos pacientes com colestase, predominando os déficits de estatura-idade e peso-idade. A anemia foi freqüente tanto nas crianças com doença hepática com colestase (11/14; 78,6% como nas sem colestase (7/11; 63,6%. Na doença hepática com colestase, observou-se menor (p OBJECTIVES: to evaluate food intake, occurrence of energy-protein malnutrition and anemia, and intestinal iron absorption in children with chronic liver disease. METHODS: The study included 25 children with chronic liver disease, 15 with cholestasis and 11 without cholestasis. The age varied between 6.5 months and 12.1 years. Intestinal iron absorption was evaluated by the increment of serum iron one hour after the ingestion of 1 mg/kg of elemental iron and by the response to oral iron therapy. Iron intestinal absorption was compared to a group with iron deficiency anemia (without liver disease. RESULTS: The mean intake of energy and protein in the cholestatic group was higher than in patients without cholestasis. The nutritional deficit was more severe in cholestatic patients, especially with regard to height-for-age and weight-for-age indices. Anemia was found in both

  4. Iron deficiency and hematinic deficiencies in atrial fibrillation: A new insight into comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Muhammed; Ural, Dilek; Altay, Servet; Argan, Onur; Börklü, Edibe Betül; Kozan, Ömer

    2018-03-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common nutritional deficiency, and iron metabolism becomes further deteriorated in the presence of certain conditions, such as heart failure (HF). Atrial fibrillation (AF) has many similarities to HF, including a chronic inflammatory pathophysiology; however, the prevalence of ID and other hematinic deficiencies in AF patients have not been determined. In this study, the prevalence of iron (serum ferritin <100 µg/L or ferritin 100-299 µg/L with transferrin saturation <20%), vitamin B12 (<200 pg/mL), and folate deficiency (<4.0 ng/mL) was evaluated in 101 patients with non-valvular AF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction and no signs of HF, and the results were compared with 35 age- and gender-matched controls. Anemia was detected in 26% of the patients. A total of 48 (47.6%) patients had ID, 10 (9.9%) had a vitamin B12 deficiency, and 13 (12.9%) had a folate deficiency. The prevalence of ID was similar in the controls and the paroxysmal AF patients, but increased gradually in persistent and permanent AF. Univariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that permanent vs. paroxysmal AF [Odds ratio (OR): 2.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82-5.69; p=0.011], high sensitive C-reactive protein (OR: 1.47; 95% CI: 0.93-2.36; p=0.019), N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (OR: 1.24; 95% CI: 0.96-1.71; p=0.034), and white blood cell count (OR: 1.21; 95% CI: 0.95-1.58; p=0.041) were associated with ID. In multivariable analysis, permanent AF remained as an independent clinical associate of ID (OR: 4.30; 95% CI: 0.83-12.07; p=0.039). ID is common in permanent AF, as in HF. Inflammation and neurohormonal activation seem to contribute to its development.

  5. The physiology of functional hypothalamic amenorrhea associated with energy deficiency in exercising women and in women with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaway, Heather C M; Southmayd, Emily A; De Souza, Mary Jane

    2016-02-01

    An energy deficiency is the result of inadequate energy intake relative to high energy expenditure. Often observed with the development of an energy deficiency is a high drive for thinness, dietary restraint, and weight and shape concerns in association with eating behaviors. At a basic physiologic level, a chronic energy deficiency promotes compensatory mechanisms to conserve fuel for vital physiologic function. Alterations have been documented in resting energy expenditure (REE) and metabolic hormones. Observed metabolic alterations include nutritionally acquired growth hormone resistance and reduced insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) concentrations; hypercortisolemia; increased ghrelin, peptide YY, and adiponectin; and decreased leptin, triiodothyronine, and kisspeptin. The cumulative effect of the energetic and metabolic alterations is a suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion is decreased with consequent suppression of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone release. Alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary secretion alters the production of estrogen and progesterone resulting in subclinical or clinical menstrual dysfunction.

  6. Early-Life Nutritional Programming of Health and Disease in The Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sophie E

    2017-01-01

    Exposures during early life are increasingly being recognised as factors that play an important role in the aetiology of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The "Developmental Origins of Health and Disease" (DOHaD) hypothesis asserts that adverse early-life exposures - most notably unbalanced nutrition - leads to an increased risk for a range of NCDs and that disease risk is highest when there is a "mismatch" between the early- and later-life environments. Thus, the DOHaD hypothesis would predict highest risk in settings undergoing a rapid nutrition transition. We investigated the link between early-life nutritional exposures and long-term health in rural Gambia, West Africa. Using demographic data dating back to the 1940s, the follow-up of randomised controlled trials of nutritional supplementation in pregnancy, and the "experiment of nature" that seasonality in this region provides, we investigated the DOHaD hypothesis in a population with high rates of maternal and infant under-nutrition, a high burden from infectious disease, and an emerging risk of NCDs. Key Messages: Our work in rural Gambia suggests that in populations with high rates of under-nutrition in early life, the immune system may be sensitive to nutritional deficiencies early in life, resulting in a greater susceptibility to infection-related morbidity and mortality. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Perioperative Parenteral Nutrition in Adults With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Emily

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory condition with numerous nutrition implications, including an increased risk of malnutrition and various nutrient deficiencies. Surgical interventions are often necessary in the treatment of IBD, and patients with IBD presenting for surgery often have multiple issues, including acute inflammatory processes, malnutrition, anemia, and infections, which may increase the likelihood of poor surgical outcomes. Thus, determining adjunctive treatments that may decrease postoperative complications is paramount. Although enteral nutrition (EN) is considered the preferred nutrition support modality when the gastrointestinal tract is accessible and functional, parenteral nutrition (PN) may provide a suitable alternative when the use of EN is not feasible. The aim of this review is to evaluate the currently available literature on the impact of perioperative PN on postoperative complications, disease severity, and nutrition status in adults with IBD. Six studies within the past 10 years investigated this topic and are analyzed here. Results indicate general trends toward improvements in postoperative outcomes, disease severity, and nutrition status associated with perioperative PN use. Although results appear promising, additional, larger studies with an emphasis on PN composition will improve our understanding of the benefits of perioperative PN in adults with IBD. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  8. The role of vitamin A in nutritional anaemia : a study in pregnant women in West Java, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suharno, D.

    1994-01-01

    Nutritional anaemia affects 50-70% of pregnant women in the developing world where vitamin A deficiency is also a problem. Since previous studies have indicated that vitamin A deficiency can be involved in the aetiology of nutritional anaemia, the role of vitamin A deficiency in nutritional

  9. Nutrition and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Olsen, Mette Frahm; Filteau, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    , which is mainly synergistic and operating at different levels. HIV infection increases energy and nutrient requirements, yet it reduces food security. The result is nutritional deficiencies, which increase progression of HIV infection. Both undernutrition and food insecurity may also lead to increased...... risk of transmission. Nutritional intake and status may affect metabolism of antiretroviral drugs, some of which may affect body composition, and increase risk of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, HIV is transmitted through breastfeeding, causing a serious infant feeding dilemma for which...

  10. Diet & Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Diet & Nutrition Eating healthy to take charge of your health. Shelly Diagnosed in 2006 Diet & Nutrition Take Control of Your Weight Portion Control Low ...

  11. Review of randomized controlled trials of nutritional supplementation in people living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneij A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alicia Sneij, Adriana Campa, Marianna K Baum Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work, Florida International University, Modesto Maidique Campus, Miami, FL, USA Background: Nutritional deficiencies are widespread in people living with HIV (PLWH, prior to the antiretroviral treatment (ART. Nutrient deficiencies and other nutrition-related conditions, however, have been identified in patients receiving ART. Trials of nutritional supplementation have been conducted to alleviate these nutritional conditions and improve or reverse nutrition-related outcomes. This review aims to evaluate the benefits of supplementation, its unintended adverse effects, and the difference in approach and focus, research design, formulations, and outcomes between those randomized clinical trials (RCTs conducted before and after the initiation of ART. Methods: An evidence-based systematic review of the literature was conducted using electronic databases and the resources of the Florida International University Research Library. Forty-two RCTs were selected for review, and their design and outcomes were compared and contrasted conceptually and in the form of tables. Results: Most of the RCTs (n=31 were conducted before the advent of ART, and their aims were delaying disease progression, reversing malnutrition, and improving pregnancy outcomes in women and infants infected with HIV. The RCTs conducted with coadministration of ART were fewer (n=11, with relative smaller sample size, of shorter duration, and mainly focused on preventing or ameliorating the nutrition-related conditions generated by the chronic infection, its treatment, and the aging of PLWH. Conclusion: As ART is becoming more accessible worldwide, and people are living longer with the disease, more longitudinal trials of nutritional interventions with larger sample sizes are needed to study the nutritional consequences and potential treatments for PLWH. Keywords: HIV, antiretroviral therapy

  12. Health & nutritional status of HIV infected children in Hyderabad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetha, G Krishna; Hemalatha, R; Prasad, U V; Murali, Vasudev; Damayanti, K; Bhaskar, V

    2015-01-01

    Information on nutritional status of HIV infected children from India is lacking and is required before taking up nutritional supplementation trials. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess the growth and morbidity status of HIV infected children over a period of one year in a city in southern India. This was an observational study carried out between July 2009 and February 2011, at two orphanages in Hyderabad, India. Seventy seven HIV-positive children aged between 1 and half and 15 years, both on and not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) were included. Nutritional status was assessed longitudinally for one year by weight gain, linear growth and body composition. Serum samples were analyzed for haemoglobin, micronutrients, CD4 and CD8 counts. Dietary intakes were assessed by institutional diet survey and morbidity data were recorded every day for 12 months. Mean energy intakes were less than recommended dietary allowance (RDA) in all age groups. Iron and folate intakes were less than 50 per cent of RDA; 46 (59.7%) children were stunted, 36 (46.8%) were underweight and 15 (19.5%) had low BMI for age. Anaemia was observed in 35 (45.5%) children. Micronutrient deficiencies such as vitamin D (40/77; 51.9%), vitamin A (11/77; 14.3%), folate (37/77; 48.1%), iron (38/77; 49.3%) were widely prevalent. HIV viral load was higher in children not on ART and those with morbidity. Respiratory (36.6%) and dermatological illnesses (18.8%) were the commonest presentations. Acute, chronic malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies were common in HIV infected children, especially in those not on ART and having morbidity. With severe malnutrition being an alarming consequence of HIV, prophylactic nutritive care should be considered for integration into HIV care strategies besides initiation of ART to improve the nutritional status and quality of life of these children.

  13. What Are Rare Clotting Factor Deficiencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  14. Impact of chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption on blood lipid and heart energy profile in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fan; Cao, Quan; Wang, Cong; Ma, Xin; Shen, Cheng; Liu, Xiang-wei; Bu, Li-ping; Zou, Yun-zeng; Hu, Kai; Sun, Ai-jun; Ge, Jun-bo

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the roles of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), the key enzyme of ethanol metabolism, in chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption-induced heart protective effects in mice. Twenty-one male wild-type (WT) or ALDH2-knockout (KO) mice were used in this study. In each genotype, 14 animals received alcohol (2.5%, 5% and 10% in week 1-3, respectively, and 18% in week 4-7), and 7 received water for 7 weeks. After the treatments, survival rate and general characteristics of the animals were evaluated. Serum ethanol and acetaldehyde levels and blood lipids were measured. Metabolomics was used to characterize the heart and serum metabolism profiles. Chronic alcohol intake decreased the survival rate of KO mice by 50%, and significantly decreased their body weight, but did not affect those of WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum ethanol levels in both WT and KO mice, but KO mice had significantly higher serum acetaldehyde levels than WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum HDL cholesterol levels in WT mice, and did not change the serum HDL cholesterol levels in KO mice. After chronic alcohol intake, WT and KO mice showed differential heart and serum metabolism profiles, including the 3 main energy substrate types (lipids, glucose and amino acids) and three carboxylic acid cycles. Low to moderate alcohol consumption increases HDL cholesterol levels and improves heart energy metabolism profile in WT mice but not in ALDH2-KO mice. Thus, preserved ALDH2 function is essential for the protective effect of low to moderate alcohol on the cardiovascular system.

  15. Deficiency symptoms of nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium and sulphur in pepper (Capsicum spp) cv malagueta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruca, F.A.; Gouveia, P.R.; Teixeira, N.T.

    1989-01-01

    The pepper (Capsium spp) was cultivated in sand and nutritive solution to describe the deficiency symptoms of N, P, Ca and S. The deficiency symptoms and the first lack signals were clear to P and N nutrient. (author) [pt

  16. Child nutrition in Senegal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Efforts to reduce malnutrition, particularly in densely populated, peri-urban areas, is considered a priority among governments around the world. The problem is especially acute in Africa due to the high prevalence of malnutrition and micronutrient deficiency. The International Atomic Energy Agency is providing technical support to a community nutrition programme in Senegal where nuclear techniques help to monitor the programme's effectiveness in order to ensure that it produces maximum benefits on vulnerable groups (women and children). (IAEA)

  17. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency Does Not Alter the Effects of Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment on Central Serotonin Turnover or Behavior in the Forced Swim Test in Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    McNamara, Robert K.; Able, Jessica A.; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Lipton, Jack W.

    2013-01-01

    While translational evidence suggests that long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status is positively associated with the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, the neurochemical mechanisms mediating this interaction are not known. Here we investigated the effects of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid insufficiency on the neurochemical and behavioral effects of chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Female rats were fed diets with (CON, n=56) or without (DEF, n=40) the n-3 fatty acids d...

  18. Annual Research Review: Improved Nutrition--A Pathway to Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Aisha K.; Rasheed, Muneera A.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Early child nutritional deficiencies are prevalent in low- and middle-countries with consequences linked not only to poor survival and growth, but also to poor development outcomes. Children in disadvantaged communities face multiple risks for nutritional deficiencies, yet some children may be less susceptible or may recover more…

  19. Rickets–vitamin D deficiency and dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Rickets is an important problem even in countries with adequate sun exposure. The causes of rickets/osteomalacia are varied and include nutritional deficiency, especially poor dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium. Non-nutritional causes include hypophosphatemic rickets primarily due to renal phosphate losses and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis. In addition, some varieties are due to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism and are called vitamin D dependent rickets. This chapter highlights rickets/osteomalacia related to vitamin D deficiency or to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism. Hypophosphatemic rickets and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis are discussed in other sections of the journal. PMID:22470851

  20. Rickets-vitamin D deficiency and dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Sahay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rickets is an important problem even in countries with adequate sun exposure. The causes of rickets/osteomalacia are varied and include nutritional deficiency, especially poor dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium. Non-nutritional causes include hypophosphatemic rickets primarily due to renal phosphate losses and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis. In addition, some varieties are due to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism and are called vitamin D dependent rickets. This chapter highlights rickets/osteomalacia related to vitamin D deficiency or to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism. Hypophosphatemic rickets and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis are discussed in other sections of the journal.

  1. No Clinical or Biochemical Evidence for Essential Fatty Acid Deficiency in Home Patients Who Depend on Long-Term Mixed Olive Oil- and Soybean Oil-Based Parenteral Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, E.D.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Fisk, H.L.; Calder, P.C.; Wanten, G.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) patients depend on lipid emulsions as part of their parenteral nutrition regimen to provide essential fatty acids (EFAs). Mixed-oil sources are used in modern lipid emulsions to decrease the amount of proinflammatory EFAs, mainly linoleic acid, which is

  2. Maternal and child nutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa: challenges and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartey, Anna

    2008-02-01

    Women of child-bearing age (especially pregnant and lactating women), infants and young children are in the most nutritionally-vulnerable stages of the life cycle. Maternal malnutrition is a major predisposing factor for morbidity and mortality among African women. The causes include inadequate food intake, poor nutritional quality of diets, frequent infections and short inter-pregnancy intervals. Evidence for maternal malnutrition is provided by the fact that between 5 and 20% of African women have a low BMI as a result of chronic hunger. Across the continent the prevalence of anaemia ranges from 21 to 80%, with similarly high values for both vitamin A and Zn deficiency levels. Another challenge is the high rates of HIV infection, which compromise maternal nutritional status. The consequences of poor maternal nutritional status are reflected in low pregnancy weight gain and high infant and maternal morbidity and mortality. Suboptimal infant feeding practices, poor quality of complementary foods, frequent infections and micronutrient deficiencies have largely contributed to the high mortality among infants and young children in the region. Feeding children whose mothers are infected with HIV continues to remain an issue requiring urgent attention. There are successful interventions to improve the nutrition of mothers, infants and young children, which will be addressed. Interventions to improve the nutrition of infants and young children, particularly in relation to the improvement of micronutrient intakes of young children, will be discussed. The recent release by WHO of new international growth standards for assessing the growth and nutritional status of children provides the tool for early detection of growth faltering and for appropriate intervention.

  3. Nutritional evaluation of cereal mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    An advisory group of experts, comprising nutritionists, analysts and plant breeders, discussed the desirability of nutritional goals for plant breeding and attempted to specify the deficiencies of various cereal crops in essential nutrients. It considered the plant factors influencing the value for human and animal nutrition and the feasibility of improving these by genetic and plant breeding methods. Methods of assaying nutritional quality were discussed, particularly in relation to the need for rapid, inexpensive methods capable of being used as screening procedures in plant breeding programmes. The proceedings contain 9 scientific papers and a conclusion and recommendations, including a review of the chemical cuzymatic, microbiological and animal assay techniques that are available

  4. The role of 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency in promoting insulin resistance and inflammation in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson David W

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 50% of patients with stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease are 25-hydroxyvitamin D insufficient, and this prevalence increases with falling glomerular filtration rate. Vitamin D is now recognised as having pleiotropic roles beyond bone and mineral homeostasis, with the vitamin D receptor and metabolising machinery identified in multiple tissues. Worryingly, recent observational data has highlighted an association between hypovitaminosis D and increased cardiovascular mortality, possibly mediated via vitamin D effects on insulin resistance and inflammation. The main hypothesis of this study is that oral Vitamin D supplementation will ameliorate insulin resistance in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease stage 3 when compared to placebo. Secondary hypotheses will test whether this is associated with decreased inflammation and bone/adipocyte-endocrine dysregulation. Methods/Design This study is a single-centre, double-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Inclusion criteria include; estimated glomerular filtration rate 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m2; aged ≥18 on entry to study; and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels Discussion To date, no randomised controlled trial has been performed in pre-dialysis CKD patients to study the correlation between vitamin D status with supplementation, insulin resistance and markers of adverse cardiovascular risk. We remain hopeful that cholecalciferol may be a safe intervention, with health benefits beyond those related to bone-mineral homeostasis. Trial registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000246280.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  6. Chronic fatigue in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-Hypermobile type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Alan; De Wandele, Inge; O'Callaghan, Chris; Pocinki, Alan; Rowe, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Chronic fatigue is an important contributor to impaired health-related quality of life in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. There is overlap in the symptoms and findings of EDS and chronic fatigue syndrome. A proportion of those with CFS likely have EDS that has not been identified. The evaluation of chronic fatigue in EDS needs to include a careful clinical examination and laboratory testing to exclude common causes of fatigue including anemia, hypothyroidisim, and chronic infection, as well as dysfunction of major physiological or organ systems. Other problems that commonly contribute to fatigue in EDS include sleep disorders, chronic pain, deconditioning, cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, bowel and bladder dysfunction, psychological issues, and nutritional deficiencies. While there is no specific pharmacological treatment for fatigue, many medications are effective for specific symptoms (such as headache, menstrual dysfunction, or myalgia) and for co-morbid conditions that result in fatigue, including orthostatic intolerance and insomnia. Comprehensive treatment of fatigue needs to also evaluate for biomechanical problems that are common in EDS, and usually involves skilled physical therapy and attention to methods to prevent deconditioning. In addition to managing specific symptoms, treatment of fatigue in EDS also needs to focus on maintaining function and providing social, physical, and nutritional support, as well as providing on-going medical evaluation of new problems and review of new evidence about proposed treatments. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effect of Iron Deficiency Anemia on Intellectual Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Seventy six of these children had iron deficiency anemia based on their .... Anorexia. 09. Nil. Pica. 07. 03. Dizziness. 04. Nil. Headache. 03. Nil. Table 4: Laboratory investigation ... environment on intelligence, the effect of nutrition.

  8. Hepatic fibrosis and carcinogenesis in α1-antitrypsin deficiency: a prototype for chronic tissue damage in gain-of-function disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, David H; Silverman, Gary A

    2011-03-01

    In α1-antitrypsin (AT) deficiency, a point mutation renders a hepatic secretory glycoprotein prone to misfolding and polymerization. The mutant protein accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and causes hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma by a gain-of-function mechanism. Genetic and/or environmental modifiers determine whether an affected homozygote is susceptible to hepatic fibrosis/carcinoma. Two types of proteostasis mechanisms for such modifiers have been postulated: variation in the function of intracellular degradative mechanisms and/or variation in the signal transduction pathways that are activated to protect the cell from protein mislocalization and/or aggregation. In recent studies we found that carbamazepine, a drug that has been used safely as an anticonvulsant and mood stabilizer, reduces the hepatic load of mutant AT and hepatic fibrosis in a mouse model by enhancing autophagic disposal of this mutant protein. These results provide evidence that pharmacological manipulation of endogenous proteostasis mechanisms is an appealing strategy for chemoprophylaxis in disorders involving gain-of-function mechanisms.

  9. Mantakassa: an epidemic of spastic paraparesis associated with chronic cyanide intoxication in a cassava staple area of Mozambique. 2. Nutritional factors and hydrocyanic acid content of cassava products. Ministry of Health, Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    An outbreak of spastic paraparesis which mostly affected women and children occurred in a northern province of Mozambique in 1981. The epidemic was related to chronic cyanide intoxication associated with a diet consisting almost exclusively of cassava. A prolonged drought in the area had exhausted all food resources except cassava, especially the bitter varieties. A nutritional, toxicological and botanical investigation was carried out in two of the five districts affected. The main findings were that cyanide levels were unusually high in the cassava plant as a consequence of the drought with daily intakes estimated at 15-31.5 mg HCN. Detoxification of the bitter varieties by sun-drying was inadequate because of the general food shortage, and metabolic detoxification was probably reduced owing to the absence of sulfur-containing amino acids in the diet. The raw and dried uncooked cassava was eaten mostly by women and children. The nutritional status of the population, however, was not very poor and symptoms of advanced under-nutrition were rarely seen.

  10. Can nutrition be promoted through agriculture-led food price policies? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangour, Alan D; Hawkesworth, Sophie; Shankar, Bhavani; Watson, Louise; Srinivasan, C S; Morgan, Emily H; Haddad, Lawrence; Waage, Jeff

    2013-06-25

    To systematically review the available evidence on whether national or international agricultural policies that directly affect the price of food influence the prevalence rates of undernutrition or nutrition-related chronic disease in children and adults. Systematic review. Global. We systematically searched five databases for published literature (MEDLINE, EconLit, Agricola, AgEcon Search, Scopus) and systematically browsed other databases and relevant organisational websites for unpublished literature. Reference lists of included publications were hand-searched for additional relevant studies. We included studies that evaluated or simulated the effects of national or international food-price-related agricultural policies on nutrition outcomes reporting data collected after 1990 and published in English. Prevalence rates of undernutrition (measured with anthropometry or clinical deficiencies) and overnutrition (obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases including cancer, heart disease and diabetes). We identified a total of four relevant reports; two ex post evaluations and two ex ante simulations. A study from India reported on the undernutrition rates in children, and the other three studies from Egypt, the Netherlands and the USA reported on the nutrition-related chronic disease outcomes in adults. Two of the studies assessed the impact of policies that subsidised the price of agricultural outputs and two focused on public food distribution policies. The limited evidence base provided some support for the notion that agricultural policies that change the prices of foods at a national level can have an effect on population-level nutrition and health outcomes. A systematic review of the available literature suggests that there is a paucity of robust direct evidence on the impact of agricultural price policies on nutrition and health.

  11. Improving nutrition through nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    Good nutrition is essential to health and quality of life. As a United Nations agency dedicated to helping Member States achieve their social and economic goals, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recognizes the importance of good nutrition and is working to address the problems underlying poor nutrition. In fact, many Agency activities serve basic human needs, by applying nuclear science to increase food production, improve health care, improve management of water resources, and assess sources of environmental pollution. Global progress in reducing malnutrition throughout the human life cycle has been slow and patchy. In its 2000 Report on the World Nutrition Situation, the United Nations Sub Committee on Nutrition estimated that in developing countries 182 million children under five years of age are chronically undernourished and 150 million are underweight. An estimated 30 million infants are born each year with impaired growth due to poor nutrition during pregnancy. Worldwide, renewed international commitments have been made to address this situation, and the IAEA is a vital partner in these efforts. Nuclear science provides valuable tools for monitoring factors that influence nutrition, such as micronutrients, body composition, and breast milk uptake. Through its sub-programme on nutrition, the Agency is helping countries to use isotope applications and other nuclear techniques to their nutritional problems and is supporting leading-edge research on the interaction between nutrition and environmental pollution and infection with the ultimate goal of improving human nutrition

  12. Improved differential diagnosis of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia: a prospective multicenter evaluation of soluble transferrin receptor and the sTfR/log ferritin index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skikne, Barry S; Punnonen, Kari; Caldron, Paul H; Bennett, Michael T; Rehu, Mari; Gasior, Gail H; Chamberlin, Janna S; Sullivan, Linda A; Bray, Kurtis R; Southwick, Paula C

    2011-11-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are the most prevalent forms of anemia and often occur concurrently. Standard tests of iron status used in differential diagnosis are affected by inflammation, hindering clinical interpretation. In contrast, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) indicates iron deficiency and is unaffected by inflammation. Objectives of this prospective multicenter clinical trial were to evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of sTfR and the sTfR/log ferritin index (sTfR Index) for differential diagnosis using the automated Access(®) sTfR assay (Beckman Coulter) and sTfR Index. We consecutively enrolled 145 anemic patients with common disorders associated with IDA and ACD. Subjects with IDA or ACD + IDA had significantly higher sTfR and sTfR Index values than subjects with ACD (P < 0.0001). ROC curves produced the following cutoffs for sTfR: 21 nmol/L (or 1.55 mg/L), and the sTfR Index: 14 (using nmol/L) (or 1.03 using mg/L). The sTfR Index was superior to sTfR (AUC 0.87 vs. 0.74, P < 0.0001). Use of all three par